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North Indian-Inspired Butter Chickpeas

November 18 2021 My New Roots 

North Indian-Inspired Butter Chickpeas Most lovers of North Indian cuisine widely available in North America are familiar with Butter Chicken – the iconic dish that has captured the hearts and bellies of people the world over. In fact butter chicken is likely the most popular and recognizable Indian dish in our neck of the woods, and without a doubt my own personal gateway to the unique flavours of Indian cuisine. This dish was the inspiration for these North Indian-Inspired Butter Chickpeas! When I was 13 or 14, my best friends mother, Annie (who Ive mentioned before in my sushi post – a woman who truly opened my eyes to the world of food beyond hot dogs and hamburgers!), took the three of us to The Host, a famous, Toronto institution that has been running successfully for 24 years. I can still remember the feeling of walking into the space, the air absolutely swollen with mouthwatering scents I had never experienced before. We sat down at the table, covered in a crisp white tablecloth, and a basket of seed-flecked, paper-thin crackers was dropped off along with the menus. Papadam Annie said. I took one bite and the entire thing shattered into my hands, which made us all laugh, and the taste was delicious, even if completely unfamiliar. I had just tried my first cumin seed! This primed my palette for what was to come, and Annie confidently ordered for the table. There were things I recognized, like rice, and flatbread (naan), but most of the dishes were alluringly mysterious, arriving in copper bowls, with colourful sauces and chutneys. Once she explained to put some rice on my plate as a bed for the curries, she handed me a bowl whose scent made my mouth water instantly. Butter chicken she told me. Well, I knew both of those ingredients very well, but not looking like this! Is it spicy? I asked. Not spicy hot, she replied. There are plenty of spices in there, but Id describe it flavourful. I had trusted this woman to guide me through Japanese, Korean, Ethiopian, Greek, Macedonian, and Moroccan restaurant experiences so far, so I took a heaping spoonful of the butter chicken and spread it over the rice.  It was love at first bite. The combinations of flavours, commingling in a sauce that was beguilingly rich and creamy, with huge chunks of perfectly tender chicken throughout was absolutely divine. It was tomato-y, but not overpoweringly so, and deeply aromatic with spices that I had certainly never tasted before. I savoured every bite of that butter chicken, along with chana masala, palak paneer, aloo gobi, and dal makhni. We ate naan, and samosa, and pakora and bhaji. It was a veritable feast that began my love affair with Indian food. Little did I know every corner of the continent, every family, every household brings a diversity and a uniqueness to what we generally label Indian food -- theres so much to explore!     Butter chicken was invented in the 1950s, by a man named Kundan Lal Gurjal, who operated a restaurant called Moti Mahal in Delhi, the capital territory of India. Kundan had settled here in this Northern region of the country and started his business after escaping from political upheaval in another region of India. Moti Mahal was a success, and it served several delicious tandoori dishes, that came from their tandoor oven – a circular clay oven central to Punjabi cuisine.  As the story goes, Kundan didnt want his leftover tandoori chicken to go to waste, but he also didnt want it to dry out, so he mixed leftover marinade juices with tomato and butter, added the chicken to it, and let it all stew – butter chicken was born! Although necessity was the mother of this invention, he likely had no idea that he had created an internationally-loved delicacy that would stand the test of time.  I started eating a vegetarian diet when I was 16, and butter chicken was one of the foods I missed the most. Ive cooked a lot of Indian-inspired food at home over the years, but Id never taken a crack at a plant-based butter chicken until my mom served me a version with chickpeas...brilliant! It was a serious why-didnt-I-think-of-that moment.  One of the things that makes butter chicken so good, is that the chicken is marinated in yogurt and spices before cooking. This step accomplishes two things: one, it tenderizes the meat, and second, it seasons it. Because I was aiming for a weeknight dinner, I decided to skip this step with the chickpeas and just make sure that they were properly cooked and well seasoned before adding to the sauce. I also smashed about half of the legumes. This helped to increase their surface area, break up their tough skins, and allow the flavourful sauce to penetrate to the inner, absorbent centers. I also appreciated having the texture variation in the dish, making it more similar to the OG version. Chickpea Party Tricks We all know that chickpeas are fiber all-stars, providing 50% of your RDI in just one cup, (whoa!) but they have another party trick up their sleeve that I bet you didnt know about. Two-thirds of the fiber in chickpeas is insoluble, meaning that it doesnt break down during digestion, but instead moves through our digestive tract unchanged until it hits the large intestine. The fun starts here, where friendly bacteria (think probiotics!) go to town on said insoluble fiber and actually break it down to create short-chain fatty acids, including acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid. These short-chain fatty acids can then be absorbed by the cells that line the wall of our large intestine and used for energy! How rad is that?! Butyric acid is in fact the preferred source of energy for the cells lining our colon, and with this bonus fuel comes greater potential for optimally active and healthy cells. This translates into a reduced risk of colon problems including colon cancer. So friends, invite chickpeas to your next dinner party - theyll feed you and your colon cells. Can your pot roast do that? Now lets get cooking! For this dish I highly recommend cooking your own chickpeas from dried (I mean, have I ever NOT recommended that?! haha). For one, if you make the entire batch, youre looking at around 4 cans of chickpeas, which is a lot  of waste produced. Second, if you cook the legumes yourself, you can control the amount of salt that you use, as high sodium levels are a concern for some people. Third, they taste way better. Trust me. And fourth, it costs a lot less – I likely dont have to elaborate on that for you If youre not sure how to cook beans from scratch, the full instructions are in this post, and a full video tutorial is up on my membership site, My New Roots Grow. If youre especially interested in this dish, Id love to invite you to the live, online cooking demo on Saturday, December 18th. Part of the Winter Radiance Retreat alongside Mikkala Marilyn Kissi, this recorded, one-day virtual retreat has so many wonderful seasonal goodies planned for you. Check it out and sign up here!  The ingredient list for this recipe may look long, but half of them are spices, and the remaining ones are primarily pantry staples, making this the perfect thing to cook up when you dont have a ton of fresh produce around (Im looking at you, late fall, winter, and early spring!). Cilantro is optional, but such a delicious addition if it’s available to you. And I like to serve the dish with rice or naan, or both. A simple kachumber salad, made with chopped tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, and lemon juice is a great accompaniment to butter chickpeas when those ingredients are in season. Pro tip: measure out two or more portions in separate containers of the spice mix when youre making it the first time so the next time all you have to do is grab the blend instead of all your individual spice jars!   And what about the butter?! Well, there isnt any classic dairy butter here (although there is no shame in adding it!), instead I used cashew butter to achieve that crave-able creaminess. Some recipes for butter chicken call for whole cashews, which may in fact be easier for some of you to find than cashew butter. If that is the case, sub the cashew butter with whole, raw cashews that have been soaked for 4-8 hours, and add them to the pot with the tomatoes and coconut milk in step 3. If you’d like to know more about soaking and activating nuts, check out my article here. Get a load of that 2008 photography! Print North Indian-Inspired Butter Chickpeas  Author Sarah Britton Ingredients2 Tbsp. coconut oil preferably expeller-pressed or ghee 1 Tbsp. ground cumin 1 Tbsp. ground coriander 2 tsp. ground turmeric 2 tsp. ground ginger 1 Tbsp. garam masala 1 tsp. smoked paprika 1 tsp. ground cinnamon 1/­­2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper pinch cayenne to taste 1 large yellow onion diced 2 tsp. fine sea salt 5 cloves garlic minced 28 oz. /­­ 796ml whole or diced tomatoes 1 large can 3 Tbsp. tomato paste 1 cup /­­ 250ml full-fat coconut milk 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml cashew butter 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 6 cups /­­ 900g cooked chickpeas from 2 cups dried /­­ approx. 4 cans cilantro for garnish if desired rice and /­­ or naan for serving if desired InstructionsIn a large stockpot over medium heat, melt the coconut oil. Add the cumin, coriander, turmeric, ginger, garam masala, smoked paprika, cinnamon, black pepper, and cayenne. Stir well to mix with the oil, and stir frequently so it doesnt scorch.   Add the onion and salt, stir well to coat, let cook for 5-10 minutes until the onions have softened slightly. Add the garlic, stir well,  and cook for 2-3 more minutes.  Add the canned tomatoes, tomato paste, and coconut milk, stirring well to incorporate. Bring to a simmer and cook for about 5 minutes.  While the sauce is simmering, take about half of the chickpeas and smash them flat with the bottom of a drinking glass. This step is optional, but it changes the shape and texture of the chickpeas (see headnote). Transfer the sauce to a blender, add the cashew butter and lemon juice, then blend on high until completely smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning as desired (if youd like it spicier for example, add more cayenne).  Add all of the chickpeas to the sauce and fold to combine. Bring a very light simmer, and let cook for 5 minutes, up to an hour, making sure to stir every so often so the bottom doesnt scorch.  Serve the butter chickpeas over rice with lots of fresh cilantro, and naan if desired. Say thank you and enjoy! NotesServes 8-10 I hope you love this recipe as much as I do, and find the same satisfying coziness with each bite you enjoy. As we head into the darker, colder months of the year, I know Ill be turning to these butter chickpeas to keep me warm and grounded, while picturing us at our stoves, connected in spirit over steaming pots and nourishing bowls. All love from me to you, Sarah B  The post North Indian-Inspired Butter Chickpeas appeared first on My New Roots.

A Mezcal Expert Tells Us How to Shop for Sustainable, Artisan Bottles

June 9 2021 Vegetarian Times 

A Mezcal Expert Tells Us How to Shop for Sustainable, Artisan Bottles Mezcals recent surge in popularity could pose a threat to biodiversity and traditional, small-scale production. Heres what you need to know to enjoy responsibly. The post A Mezcal Expert Tells Us How to Shop for Sustainable, Artisan Bottles appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

7 Foods to Heal Your Gut Micobiome

April 26 2021 Vegetarian Times 

7 Foods to Heal Your Gut Micobiome When it comes to maintaining your microbiome at its healthiest level, nothing is more important than what you eat and drink. Add these foods to your gut-friendly grocery list. The post 7 Foods to Heal Your Gut Micobiome appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

What’s the Difference: Prebiotics, Probiotics and Postbiotics

April 14 2021 Vegetarian Times 

What’s the Difference: Prebiotics, Probiotics and Postbiotics First came probiotics, then prebiotics, and now the newest member of the biotics family is postbiotics. What are they, and why are they good for you? Heres what you need to know. The post What’s the Difference: Prebiotics, Probiotics and Postbiotics appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

10 Healthy Portable Vegetarian Snacks

February 2 2021 Vegetarian Times 

10 Healthy Portable Vegetarian Snacks Check out these 10 portable vegetarian snacks that will satisfy and satiate every craving! From prebiotics and probiotics, to single-ingredient whole foods, and protein-packed goodness, weve got something for everyone in this roundup... no assembly required! The post 10 Healthy Portable Vegetarian Snacks appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

The Ultimate Wellness Gift Guide for Everyone on Your List

December 1 2020 Vegetarian Times 

The Ultimate Wellness Gift Guide for Everyone on Your ListTis the season to update your naughty or nice lists and start holiday shopping. With health and wellness remaining center stage amidst a new surge of COVID-19 cases, everyone could use an extra dose of TLC throughout the holidays and into the new year. Weve curated a collection of 25 wellness gifts at a variety of price points that are sure to fill your lucky recipients with the warm fuzzies this season is all about. Broglie Box Curated Wellbeing Kits Help a loved one on your list keep his or her anxiety or stress in check with a BroglieBox. Co-founder Julia Broglie was inspired to create the company after experiencing her own mental health challenges as a young adult and losing her older brother, Justin, to suicide. She offers a wide variety of boxes -- such as Grief Relief, Stress Less and Focus Kit -- but were partial to the Alleviate Anxiety Deluxe Box, which comes with therapy dough, a massage rollerball, mindfulness cards, a workout band, hydration reminder, journal, medication reminders and a magazine full of articles from mental health experts. BroglieBox, $40 Nap Bar Better Sleep Box Good things come to those who nap, including reduced sleep deprivation and increased productivity. Houston residents adore pay-by-the-snooze facility Nap Bar, and you can now give the same luxurious napping experience to anyone on your nice list, no matter where they live. Nap Bars Better Sleep Box features everything you need for the perfect napping environment: an aromatic soy-based candle, a vegan aromatherapy pillow mist, a blackout sleep mask, and a downloadable theta brain wave audio file. Nap Bar Better Sleep Box, $69 Dazzle Dry Mini Kit Its not as easy to get a mani/­­pedi these days, so why not gift a quick-drying, non-toxic, humane, and long-lasting manicure system that brings gorgeous nails right to your recipients house? Developed by bio-organic chemist Dr. Vivian Valenty and backed by over 30 years of research, Dazzle Dry is a unique line of naturally advanced, high-performance nail care. Its award-winning four-step nail system is vegan, never tested on animals, and dries in just five minutes without UV light. DazzleDry, $75 Landia Skincare Mens Care Starter Set No doubt, theres a man in your life who could really use his own skincare products, and the Mens Care Starter Set from Landia Skincare is the perfect choice. The whole vegan skincare line is toxin-free, and made in Oregon from organic local ingredients that are responsibly sourced. This set includes a shave cream, face cream, and beard and hair oil in two scents -- and, best of all, it comes luxuriously packaged in a wooden box complete with a wooden button. Built Marketplace, $20 Lord Jameson Dog Treats Whether your pup celebrates Christmas or Hanukkah, Lord Jamesons got you covered. Choose from Holiday Cobbler (crisp green apples and oats), Gingerbread (peanut butter and oats), or Hanukkah Gelt (blueberries) -- the entire collection is vegan, cruelty-free, plant-based, allergy-friendly, and made without any preservatives, artificial colors, flavors, or GMO ingredients. Lord Jameson, $12.99 The Dry Challenge Book If 2021 is the year someone in your life has vowed to cut back on their alcohol consumption, help support their healthy lifestyle choice with a copy of, The Dry Challenge: How to Lose the Booze for Dry January, Sober October, and Any Other Alcohol-Free Month. The Dry Challenge is ideal for anyone who wants to complete a dry-month challenge, giving up all forms of alcohol for 31 days -- it walks you step-by-step through one drink-free month, from sharing the news with friends and family to getting back on track if you slip up and have a drink (or two). Amazon.com, $14.99 Puritize Home Sanitizing System Sanitize everything was 2020s slogan, and all signs are pointing to 2021 requiring the same vigilance with hygiene. Help protect your loved ones with a Puritize Home system, an ultraviolet light home sanitizing system that kills more than 99.9% of germs, bacteria and viruses -- in just 10 minutes. Put your cell phones, masks, glasses, keys, remote controls, headphones, toothbrushes, and electronic devices in and wait for it to work its magic. Puritize, $199.99 Vellabox Candle Subscription Do you know what really sets the mood this holiday season? Heavenly scented small-batch candles-- especially ones that are made by American artisans, are vegan and cruelty-free, use 100% natural wax with cotton wicks, and are phthalate- and paraben-free. Vellabox ticks all those boxes, with an expertly curated candle subscription box. With three sizes to choose from, your recipient will receive a candle and surprise gift each month all year long. Vellabox; starting at $10/­­month FINEX Cast Iron Skillet Set Theres no more prized culinary tool than a cast iron skillet -- you can pretty much cook anything in it, it lasts literally forever, and it even fortifies food with iron. FINEX is designed by a small team of Portland-based craftspeople who are grounded in the belief that cooking should be genuine. The Holiday Starter Set comes with a 10-inch skillet and lid (the most versatile pan youll ever own) perfect for cooking holiday meals, and a custom three-piece care kit to ensure the cookware is preserved and performs perfectly for generations to come. Finex, $229.00 Blissd Happiness Planner They say it takes 30 days to break a bad habit or create a healthy one. But what if it takes just a bit longer? Blissd will give you 100 days of goal setting, self-reflection and inspirational quotes all wrapped up in its beautiful Happiness Planner. This planner uses the power of positive thinking, mindfulness, gratitude, and self-development to help you discover and create a life in alignment with who you truly are. Bliss’d, $29.00 Saltworks Gourmet Salt Gift Set Dont get salty this season; give salty! Any foodie will love the curated selection of six signature salt fusions from SaltWorks -- including Black Truffle Sea Salt, Wild Porcini Mushroom, Vintage Merlot, Espresso Brava, Lime Fresca and Spanish Rosemary. Its housed in a limited-edition recipe box, along with six different recipes. The bold flavors absolutely come through, since SaltWorks uses a proprietary process to bind natural ingredients to each sea salt crystal. Saltworks, $49.95 Green Chef Meal Delivery Know someone doing keto? Paleo? Living a plant-powered lifestyle? No matter their dietary preference, Green Chef delivers. Literally. All of the premium ingredients you need to cook a delicious meal for two or four comes pre-measured and prepped -- all you have to do is follow the step-by-step instructions to enjoy a gourmet meal. These days, skipping the grocery store is the best gift of all. Green Chef, starting at $11.99 per serving Mala Collective Mala Bead Necklace Long-time meditators and those wishing to start their practice will appreciate receiving mala beads from Mala Collective this holiday season. Whats a mala? A string of 108 beads (an auspicious number in Buddhism) used as a tool to help count mantras. It also acts as a tactile guide as you sit in silence in a meditation practice. Each necklace is made from different gemstones (each steeped in its own symbolism) and Rudraksha seeds (which provide inner calm and peace), and is hand-knotted and blessed in Bali. Mala Collective, $96.00 Mission Farms CBD Goat Milk Soaps Sure, soap can clean, but the right soap can also heal. Thats why Mission Farms crafts soaps made from more than 25% fresh goat milk (goats milk naturally contains specific enzymes to reduce dry skin and psoriasis, such as alpha-hydroxy acid and MCT oils), coconut oil, and olive oil -- and infuses it with full-spectrum CBD and other essential oils. The goats milk comes from a farm outside of Bend, Oregon, and theres a formulation for any need: Deepen Your Sleep (lavender blossom), Ease Your Comfort (spearmint eucalyptus), Cam Your Stress (honey grapefruit) and Enhance Your Well-Being (oatmeal and honey). Mission Farms CBD, $20.00 Dr. PAWPAW Skincare Balms Is it a lip balm? Color for your cheeks? Eyeshadow? The answer is yes! Dr.PAWPAWs Hello Gorgeous Gift Set is whatever you need it to be, including the perfect stocking stuffer. This set of vegan-approved, cruelty-free, ethically sourced multipurpose natural skincare balms jazz up and nourish lips, skin and hair. They harness the power of pawpaw or papaya and contain vitamins A, C, and E, plus iron, potassium and magnesium. Ulta, $12.99 Apollo Neuro Wearable Wellness Device Since stress is at an all-time high, it makes sense to fight it with technology never seen before. A team of physicians and neuroscientists at Apollo Neuro recently developed a wearable wellness device that uses gentle vibrations (low-frequency, inaudible sound waves you can feel but not hear) to help your body recover from stress. Apollos scientifically proven technology improves heart rate variability -- a key biometric of stress -- so you can feel more calm, balanced, and perform at your best. Apollo, $349.00 NAMAR Sustainable Cutlery Set Single-use plastic is ruining the environment, so why not give a gift that will help the future of our planet? This sustainable stocking stuffer is ideal for coworkers who bring their lunch to work, frequent travelers, picnickers, or anyone leery of germs on restaurant silverware. Made from 100% wheat straw, yet gluten-free, NAMAR is biodegradable, reusable and easy to clean -- and it doesnt get soggy in soups or salads. The set includes a fork, spoon and set of chopsticks placed inside a travel-friendly wheat straw case. Namar, $12.00 White Elm Vegan Leather Tote Bag For the woman who always has her hands full, give the perfect vegan carry-all: a White Elm Aquila vegan leather tote bag. Not only does it feel like high-quality leather, but the well-thought-out design is also a favorite among traveling mothers, nurses, teachers and working professionals. It was created by a busy mom who wanted to stay organized and look good, so the super spacious bag features an adjustable shoulder strap, carry handles, three exterior pockets, five interior pockets, and a secure zip closure. White Elm, $129.00 Slumber CBN Sleep Aid Youre probably familiar with CBD, but CBN is another compound found in the cannabis plant thats primarily used as a natural sleep aid. For anyone on your list whos struggling with getting enough shut-eye, CBN may be the most priceless gift of all. This THC-free formula is made in Colorado and derived from organically grown hemp, plus its vegan and GMO-free. Slumber, $44.95 Sanabul Womens Boxing Gloves Theres no such thing as punching like a girl, but that doesnt mean she needs to wear mens boxing gloves while doing so. Sanabuls Womens Easter Egg Boxing Gloves feature a narrower silhouette that contours the female hand for a comfortable fit. And dont let the feminine array of colors (mint, coral, ice blue, and lavender) fool you -- these gloves are made for performance and durability. Amazon, $49.99 AncestryHealth Genetics and Health Kit Wouldnt it be helpful to have a little crystal ball that provides insights into your risk for commonly inherited health conditions? Well, it exists -- but in the form of a DNA kit, not a crystal ball. Simply use the AncestryHealth kit to provide a saliva sample, and your recipient will learn his or her risk for some commonly inherited conditions (such as breast cancer). By knowing this risk, users are able to work with their healthcare provider to get the screenings they need for early detection and chart a healthier path forward. Plus, AncestryHealth also includes all of the features of AncestryDNA, which allows one to discover their origins and connect to living relatives. Amazon, $119.00 OLIKA Hydrating Hand Sanitizer Clip Ons Help your loved ones maintain clean hands on the go with OLIKA hydrating hand sanitizers. These thoughtful vegan and gluten-free stocking stuffers are refillable, recyclable and come in six essential oil-based fragrances (such as mint citrus and cucumber basil). Plus, theres aloe vera in the formula to help keep frequently sanitized hands moisturized. Clip one to your purse and another to your childs backpack. Olika, $29.99 Martha Stewart CBD Holiday Sampler Sick of the CBD gummies that taste like unsophisticated kids candy? Kick things up a notch for the CBD-lover on your list with Martha Stewarts new 15-flavor CBD gummy sampler. With this special gummy sampler gift box, I was inspired by flavors from my garden, said Stewart. So, she included raspberry, rhubarb, passionfruit, Persian lime, black raspberry, strawberry, grapefruit, calamondin, green apple, black currant, blood orange, kumquat, quince, Meyer lemon and huckleberry in this 60-count box with 10mg CBD per gummy. Shop Canopy, $64.99 Moodygirl Chocolate Bars Its easy to rationalize eating dark chocolate -- its full of antioxidants, heart-healthy flavanols, and even a little brain-stimulating caffeine. But what about a chocolate bar that boosts your mood, too? Moodygirl chocolate bars contain vitamins and adaptogens designed to help women through PMS symptoms, low libido and stress relief. Plus, they are organic, vegan, gluten-free and free of refined sugars. These are the most delicious and guilt-free stocking stuffers around. Moodygirl, $9.99 Hurom Easy Clean Slow Juicer Juicing is a great way to pack more fruits and vegetables into each day, but cleaning up can be such a chore. Enter the Hurom Easy Clean Slow Juicer, which eliminates the mess thanks to a larger pulp outlet and elongated strainer grooves that rinse clean -- no scrubbing required. Its slow squeeze technology mimics the motion of squeezing fruit by hand, and youll be left with bone-dry pulp. Bonus: it can also make smoothies, nut milk and ice cream. Hurom, $499.00 The post The Ultimate Wellness Gift Guide for Everyone on Your List appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Alternative Meats: A Convenience or a Curse?

November 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Have you started swinging through the drive-thru more frequently since fast-food chains decided to hop on board with plant-based burger options? Sure, Burger Kings Impossible Whopper and Carls Jr.s meatless Beyond Meat burger may seem like enticing options after a long day -- heck, even Ikea is rumored to be working on a meatless version of its famous Swedish meatballs. And of course, its an encouraging sign that a plant-based lifestyle is becoming more mainstream, especially when its accepted in restaurants known for their beefy offerings. But could racking up too many fast-food visits mean youre sacrificing some of the positive health benefits associated with a plant-based diet for the sake of convenience? Meat alternatives are taking center stage because more and more people are recognizing that taking meat off our menus is an imperative if we are to preserve the planets life support systems for future generations, says Brenda Davis, R.D., a world-renowned expert in plant-based nutrition and coauthor of Nourish: The Definitive Plant-Based Nutrition Guide for Families. Aside from being better for the planet, her coauthor, Reshma Shah, M.D., a plant-based pediatrician, notes the many health attributes with this lifestyle. Plant-based diets have been associated with longevity, a decreased risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, certain cancers, and a healthy gut, she explains. Studies suggest the people eating a plant-based diet have a lower risk of being overweight or obese. Additionally, plant-based diets have been shown to be an effective strategy for treating many of the chronic diseases that make up the leading causes of death in the United States and throughout the world. 5 Pros of Alternative Meats First, lets explore the benefits of adding alternative meats to your diet: - Easy protein source. Some people may benefit from these concentrated, and very bioavailable protein sources. For athletes who struggle meeting protein needs, these foods can rapidly boost protein intake, says Davis. Also, for seniors who have higher protein needs, and lower calorie intakes, it can be tough to meet recommended intakes. Meat alternatives can help boost protein intakes in a way that is simple and palatable for seniors. - A non-threatening way to transition to eating less meat. New to the world of plant-based eating? Or simply trying to replace a few meat-based dishes each week? Plant-based meat alternatives can offer convenience for busy families, provide an alternative in social situations, and make the transition to a plant-based diet more enjoyable and sustainable in the long run, says Dr. Shah. You may find that you rely on these foods more at the beginning of your plant-based journey. As many people become more comfortable cooking and enjoying a variety of whole, plant foods, they may end up eating these foods less often. - Cleaner fuel. Plant-based meats are lower in persistent organic pollutants that are most concentrated in products at the top of the food chain, such as meat, fish and dairy products, says Davis. Also, plant-based meats cannot form heterocyclic amines, which are carcinogenic compounds formed when meat, poultry or fish are cooked at high temperatures. - Lesser inflammatory response. Plant-based meats are much lower in endotoxins (also known as lipopolysaccharides) than ground meats, which Davis says are associated with chronic inflammation and several disease states. - Reduced risk of food poisoning. Plant-based meat alternatives don’t carry the risk of foodborne disease from bacterial contamination in the same way that animal-based foods do, says Dr. Shah. Related: Tofu: The Unsung Hero of Coronavirus-Related Meat Shortages 5 Cons of Alternative Meats There are some downsides to alternative meat consumption, too: - Processed food is still processed food. While it might be tempting to skip purchasing whole ingredients and making your meals from scratch, the tradeoffs may not be worth it. Most plant-based meat alternatives tend to be higher in calories, fat, sodium, and additives compared to whole plant foods -- like beans and rice, says Dr. Shah. While plant-based meat alternatives are higher in fiber -- animal foods contain no fiber-- and are devoid of cholesterol, they certainly would not be considered a health food when compared to a homemade burger made of black beans, quinoa, and veggies. - Budget-buster. Currently, meat alternatives are rather expensive, sometimes even more expensive than meat. As the demand increases, this may change. - Quality depends on the brand. Meat alternatives vary in their quality, but are generally fairly highly processed foods, says Davis. Some are made from extracted plant proteins, fats, seasonings and preservatives, while others are made from black beans and quinoa. Consumers who want minimally processed foods need to read the label. - Allergens abound. Are you sensitive to gluten, soy or nuts? Meat alternatives are often based on ingredients that are associated with common allergens, so be sure to read labels carefully to avoid a reaction. - Nutrient deficient options. Davis says that meat alternatives are not always fortified with vitamin B12 or zinc, both of which are relatively high in meat. Make sure youre getting enough of these nutrients via the rest of your diet or through supplements. Related: 8 Must-Try Alternative Milks How to Shop for Alternative Meats A simple ingredient list with recognizable foods is always a good place to start. Next, Dr. Shah says to consider the amount of fat (especially saturated fat), sodium, and other additives. One particular additive that has gained scrutiny is the addition of heme iron in certain plant-based meat alternatives, she says. Heme-iron is added to enhance the meaty flavor and appearance of these foods -- but its thought to be pro-inflammatory, cause increased body iron stores, and provide an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. How Often Should You Consumer Alternative Meats? As with most things in life, moderation is key. Eating plant-based meat alternatives from time to time can certainly be a part of a healthy diet, but relying on them on a regular basis -- especially if they are taking the place of whole, plant foods -- would not be considered health-promoting, concludes Dr. Shah. Its also important to note that the consumption frequency may depend on your overall state of health. What is safe and appropriate for one individual may be quite different for another, explains Davis. If you struggle with hypertension or cardiovascular disease, you will want to minimize intake of the high sodium, high-fat meat alternatives. The post Alternative Meats: A Convenience or a Curse? appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

The Spring Supper Salad

April 23 2020 My New Roots 

The Spring Supper Salad Greetings, friends! For fun I am resurrecting one of the blog posts I wrote back in 2010 – a warm butter bean salad bowl, garlic-roasted carrots and wild rice. Why I am re-publishing a decade-old recipe? Well, for one I thought that there are a bunch of new followers around here who have never even seen this delight (hello, by the way)! Second, most of you who have been here since the beginning may have forgotten about it. Third, its the ideal pantry staple recipe. And lastly, because its very, very delicious. Creamy butter beans, golden garlic-y carrots coins, chewy wild rice, crisp and bright pickled onions, silky kale, and refreshing dill, all coming together with a lick-your-lips mustardy dressing that is divine on just about everything – this salad and beyond. I’ve also re-named it the Spring Supper Salad because it’s the perfect seasonal transition meal (yea baby, it’s definitely a meal) incorporating both winter and spring produce and flavours, as we make our way into the light of the upswing! Hooray! This recipe brings back so many memories for me. It was around this time that I had been working in restaurants in Copenhagen for about 3 years. I loved my job, and could hardly believe that someone actually paid me to spend all day in a hot, cramped kitchen, cooking a dozen new dishes every day without a menu or recipes – definitely still in the honeymoon phase. I felt confident in the food I was making, applying my deep understanding of nutrition to recipe development, and I used every day to push myself creatively, keenly aware of how fast I was learning and growing. I was certainly in the vortex, and it was a very exciting time of my life.  I started my shift around 8 am, and the majority of my dishes needed to be ready at 12 noon when we opened the doors for lunch. This is a relatively short window of time to pump out 200 servings of anything, but after some years, I developed short cuts that would deliver a lot of flavour in a hurry. One of these short cuts, was garlic oil – the first thing I would make after tying my apron strings, that would act as a marinade, a roasting medium, and a base for soups, stews, dressings and sauces for the entire day. In fact, I dont think that there were many dishes coming off of my station that didnt have garlic in them back then (such an easy way to make things taste good!). This oil sat on my bench and it got tossed into all the things, and all the people kept coming back for more.  One thing I loved using the garlic oil on, was winter veggies. I could toss them in said liquid gold, crank up the oven, and in half an hour, Id have a blistered, glistening pile of roasted rainbow roots to serve, only needing a squeeze of lemon juice and a smattering of fresh herbs to make it presentable. Who wouldnt want to dive into that?! Plus, it was cheap. Like most restaurants, we were always looking at the bottom line and how we could make even the most humble foods taste exquisite. Garlic oil was the ticket.  At the restaurant, my signature move was combining veggies, grains, and beans in exciting ways (which was very novel at the time!) so this dish emerged from a commercial ovens worth of garlic-roasted carrots needing a home. With some tender and creamy butter beans coming off the stove, and some day-old, steamed wild rice calling out to me from the fridge, this combination came together very organically, taking the varied textures, colours, and flavours into consideration.  The secret to this dish is the consistency of the garlic in the oil. Different from mincing garlic and adding it to oil, here you must must must grate it or blend it up together so it becomes almost paste-like. This way, the garlic goes everywhere the oil does, and evenly caramelizes into the most divine, delectable gold, thats mellow and sweet and roast-y. You will not hate it. Stop! Fiber time. Fiber is probably the least sexy and alluring of all the nutrients we hear about. Its all about Protein! Fat! And if you hear about carbohydrates, its probably something ignorant and unfair (I really hate jerks picking on macronutrients, back off!). Fiber seems pretty boring and something only your grandmother cares about, so why do you need to?   One reason that plant-rich diets are so health-sustaining, is not only due to their high fiber content, but their potential for fiber diversity. In the past, fiber has been broken down into two main categories: soluble and insoluble. Whats new and exciting in this field of research, is that we can see that fiber can be broken down into several more categories (viscous, non-viscous, non-starch polysaccharides, resistant starches etc.) each one bringing forth the potential for diversified food sources for our gut bacteria. In short, the greater the diversity of plants we eat, the greater the diversity of our microbiome.  Why does this matter? Because our gut is the foundation for our overall health. If weve got a wide range of troops on the front lines of our immune system, the better our chances are for not just surviving, but thriving. The fiber we eat also feeds our good bacteria, and specific types of fiber feed specific types of bacteria. Enjoy eating the widest variety of plants you can, to ensure that youre supporting the widest variety of good guys in your digestive system. They will repay you in spades Im tellin ya!  The foods with the highest amounts of fiber are beans and lentils, vegetables, fruits, grains, and nuts and seeds (remember that there is no fiber in animal-based foods). Different proportions of soluble, insoluble fiber, as well as viscous /­­ non-viscous fiber, and fermentable fiber can be found in all of these food groups, it is highly recommended that you eat from each of them. And instead of focusing on grams (the minimum daily recommended intake is a measly 25g, not that were talking about that…), we need to focus on diversity. Enjoy as many plant-based foods as you can, and experience the terrain of your body slowly begin to change. Everything comes back to the gut, and not just what you are eating, but what your gut-bacteria are eating too. With this dish, youll be feeding those good guys with fiber from six different plants! Talk about a solid mix. Beans, whole grains, 3 different veggies, plus herbs, add up to serious fiber diversity. Good, good, good fiberations! The fun thing about revisiting this recipe, was seeing if there was anything I would change this time around. I have learned so much and grown incredibly as a cook in the past ten years, so I was surprised that I didnt have many tweaks to make. The only two things I felt this salad needed was a dark leafy green and a pickle – classic Sarah B moves at this point! Since we still dont have any spring greens happening yet, I decided kale was the winner, and obviously it needed to be massaged! I turned the red onions in the original recipe into a quick pickle, as this is another indispensable kitchen technique that Ive learned since posting the first time around. This salad-meal has everything you need and crave from a single bowl: its super flavourful and filling, with all of the textures in the mix to satisfy your noshing desires. The elements can all be made separately, even on separate days, if it seems like too many things to cook at once for a single dish. If you go the rollover route, boil the beans and rice a day or so before (and make extra while youre at it, because meal prep is for winners), and pickle the onions up to a week ahead. The kale can be prepped /­­ massaged a day or so in advance, but the carrots should be roasted right before serving.  If you dont have butter beans, any white bean would work (navy, cannellini, Great Northern, or baby lima beans are some varieties) and if you want to switch up the grain, any kind of rice would work – even millet or quinoa would be delicious! Instead of carrots, use any root veg you have kicking around your crisper: beets, sweet potato, turnip, or winter squash would taste great in the garlic oil. And if dill isnt the herb of your dreams, try substituting it with flat-leaf parsley, cilantro, basil, or tarragon.      Print recipe     Butter Bean, Wild Rice, and Garlic-Roasted Carrot Salad Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup wild rice 1 cup dried butter beans 4-5 medium carrots 4 cloves garlic 2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 bunch fresh dill sea salt freshly ground black pepper a handful of quick-pickled red onion (recipe follows) 1 batch massaged kale (recipe follows) Dressing: 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard 1 Tbsp. maple syrup 2 Tbsp. raw apple cider vinegar 3 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil pinch of sea salt Directions: 1. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight. Drain, rinse well and cover with fresh water. Add a teaspoon of sea salt. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cook until beans are soft - about 45 minutes. 2. While the beans are cooking, rinse the wild rice well, drain, and put in a pot. Cover rice with 1.5 cups fresh water, add a couple pinches of sea salt, bring to a boil, and reduce to simmer. Cook until rice is chewy-tender - about 45 minutes. You will know the rice is done when the grains open up to reveal their purple-gray inner portion. 3. Preheat the oven to 400F. While the rice is cooking, wash the carrots and slice them on the diagonal into coins, place on a baking sheet. Grate the garlic with a microplane and combine it with the oil. Pour over carrots and toss to coat. Sprinkle with salt. Place in the oven and roast, turning them a few times over the course of 15-20 minutes. The carrots should be cooked but not mushy - al dente! 4. Make the dressing by combining all ingredients together, shake well. 5. Now all the elements come together: Drain and rinse beans in cool water to stop the cooking process. Pour dressing over warm beans and toss. Let sit for 5 minutes or so. Drain the rice if any water remains, cool slightly. Mix with beans. Toss in the carrots, scraping the pan to add garlic oil to the remainder of the ingredients. Throw in the massaged kale, as many pickled onions as you fancy, and an explosion of dill. Cracked black pepper too, if it’s calling to you. 6. Serve immediately and enjoy. Quick-Pickled Red Onion Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml raw apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water 2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 medium red onion, thinly sliced Directions: 1. Combine the vinegar, water, salt, and maple syrup in a large jar. Stir to dissolve the salt and syrup. Add the onions to the jar and put them in the fridge. Enjoy after at least 30 minutes, keeps for up to two weeks.  Massaged Kale Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 90g shredded curly or dino kale Juice of 1/­­2 lemon 2 tsp. extra virgin olive oil 2 pinches of fine sea salt, plus more as needed Directions: 1. In a large bowl, combine the shredded kale, lemon juice, olive oil, and salt. Using your hands, rub and squeeze the kale together as if you are giving it a massage, until the kale leaves are dark green and tender, about 2 minutes. Enjoy immediately in the salad, or store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for up to five days.  I really hope you enjoy this delicious and satisfying meal soon. These days are asking so much of us, and I continue to come back to the kitchen for grounding, clarity, and connection. There are no answers, just presence. And in that presence I find myself over a cutting board, being grateful for just what is front of me, slicing a carrot, then another, saying thank you for simple things. Love to you all. Stay well and safe out there. xo, Sarah B The post The Spring Supper Salad appeared first on My New Roots.

Top 10 Healthy Vegan Restaurants in LA

January 29 2020 Happy Cow veggie blog 

January’s nearing an end – with all of the indulgent food over the holidays and into the New Year, you may be seeking some lighter fare. Luckily, the HappyCow app is here to help! Haven’t tried it before? Let’s have a mini-tutorial with one of the world’s most vegan-friendly cities: Los Angeles. Keep reading for a run-down of the top healthy vegan restaurants in LA.  Firstly, if you’re a regular HappyCow user and you don’t have the HappyCow app… what are you waiting for? (Visit this link to learn more about the download.) Second, using the app is easy. Simply open it up, select “Vegan”, “Vegetarian”, or “Veg-Options”, and then click on “Filters”. From here, you can search for a business by name, scan your radius, or sort options by distance, rating, alphabetical, price, or most reviewed. There are even options such as who has outdoor seating, who needs reservations, wheelchair accessibility, who accepts credit cards, and who has WiFi. Among selecting various cuisines and searching for store types (bakeries, hotels, food truck, etc.) you can scroll down to “Categories”. As you can see above, for this search we’ve selected gluten-free, organic, juice bar, macrobiotic, raw food, and salad bar. […] The post Top 10 Healthy Vegan Restaurants in LA appeared first on HappyCow.

Joy Bauer’s Tips for Getting Kids to Eat More Vegetables

December 9 2019 Meatless Monday 

Joy Bauer’s Tips for Getting Kids to Eat More VegetablesEvery parents predicament: How do I get my children to eat more vegetables? Although theres no secret sauce (sorry ketchup), there are tried and true methods to get your kids to eat more adventurously. But what are they? The team at Meatless Monday spoke with Joy Bauer, bestselling author and health and nutrition expert on The Today Show, about her new book, Yummy Yoga: Playful Poses and Tasty Treats , and her creative ways to encourage kids to eat healthier. Yummy Yoga pairs healthy, kid-friendly recipes with fun yoga positions, giving the whole family the opportunity to get in the kitchen and on the yoga mat. But what sets this book apart is the collection of adorable yoga sculptures made out of fruits and vegetables that accompany each recipe (warning: they definitely encourage playing with your food). To celebrate the launch of her book, Joy shared with us some easy-to-apply tips and tricks that will spark a passion for veggies in even the pickiest of eaters. This Monday, follow Joys words of wisdom and help your kids establish a loving relationship with plant-based foods. Tip # 1: Make Healthy Food Fun The key to encouraging kids to eat healthfully is to make food fun and exciting. Thats the whole point of Yummy Yoga. The pages are filled with tasty, kid-friendly recipes -- smoothies, fruit skewers, veggie pizzas, super food ice pops, etc. -- and playful yoga poses to entertain and excite little ones as they discover healthy, new habits.   Tip #2: Eat More Produce Yourself Kiddie see, kiddie do. If your little ones (and big ones) see you eating a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, theyre more likely to do it, too. A study from the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, found that preschool age kids were more likely to eat bell peppers (and prefer them in the future) after being shown a video of people eating the veggie compared to kids who didnt see the veggie video. Encourage your children to eat more fruit and vegetables by enjoying them yourself, and by pointing out other people (grandparents, siblings, cousins, friends, babysitters, and so on) who enjoy them, too!   Tip #3: Think Out of the Box If a picky spouse or child doesnt like steamed broccoli, dont give up. Instead, try another spin. Whip up a batch of Broccomole Dip (I mash steamed broccoli florets into guacamole), Roasted Broccoli , Creamy Broccoli Soup , Broccoli Tots , or top it with cheese sauce or marinara...you get the idea. Be creative and experiment until you find a recipe that your picky eater does like.   Tip #4: Give Them the Power of Choice Give picky eaters the power to choose--a fun recipe, a new fruit or a veggie to prepare as a side dish, or even the theme of the meal. Its a simple equation that will make mealtimes less fraught: more freedom = less fussing. When you involve picky eaters with planning and prep a few nights each week, youll find theyre less likely to argue about finishing their veggies. Good food, good mood...sounds appetizing, right?   Tip #5: When in Doubt, Hide it Sometimes, its easier to just slip veggies into their favorite foods. You can add a handful of kale or spinach into smoothies; add chopped broccoli, diced carrots or yellow bell peppers into mac and cheese (no brainer!); swap out standard noodles for veggie noodles, like spaghetti squash or zucchini linguini (aka zoodles); mix cauliflower rice with traditional rice; blend canned pumpkin puree into marinara sauce and taco meat -- the options are limitless!   Tip #6: Try it on a Monday Monday follows the weekend, which is when most people do their shopping and prep work-the veggies have been purchased, cleaned, peeled and chopped. Plus, its the perfect way to reset and reboot for a healthy and energizing new week ahead. Try Joy’s recipe for Heart-y Artichokes, Green Beans, and Leeks from the book and check out Yummy Yoga for more delicious recipes!   Want some more plant-based cooking tips for you and your picky eaters? Check out The Kids Cook Monday for more recipe inspiration and fun kitchen activities for you and your children to do together. The post Joy Bauer’s Tips for Getting Kids to Eat More Vegetables appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pumpkin Spice Energy Bites

September 30 2019 Oh My Veggies 

Yes, I am jumping on the pumpkin spice bandwagon. I couldn’t resist doing a pumpkin recipe (it is fall after all) and if you do a sweet pumpkin recipe, you have to add pumpkin pie spice, right? This kind of reminds me of the time I accidentally wore the school colors on spirit day when I was in high school and I had to spend the whole day explaining to everyone that no, I didn’t have school spirit, and that the navy blue t-shirt I was wearing was just a coincidence. “Hey Kiersten, do we have a quiz today in biology?” “I DIDN’T MEAN TO WEAR THIS SHIRT TODAY! IT WAS AN ACCIDENT! I HATE THIS SCHOOL!” That was the worst day. Sometimes I throw things together just to eat, not really intending to blog about it; this is one of those recipes. I bought an adorable little pie pumpkin and made puree with it for another recipe and had just a little bit left, so I added a little almond butter and maple syrup, folded in oats and raisins and pepitas, put in a little sprinkle-sprinkle of pumpkin pie spice, and rolled the mixture into balls. Random! But they […]

Restaurant Highlight: Bio Solo Organico, Buenos Aires

May 28 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Bio Solo Organico is not only the first organic vegetarian restaurant in Argentina, but also the whole of Latin America! Claudia Carrara is the pioneer that took the leap of opening her own vegetarian restaurant in Argentina’s charming capital of Buenos Aires. Everything started from the desire to bring her children up with the best possible nutrition. Soon enough, she began to sell natural dishes to her neighbours that she would create from the leftover vegetables she had in her kitchen. The success of her improvised cuisine led a friend to offer her a few tables where her clients could sit and enjoy healthy meals. One thing led to another and the idea of opening a restaurant was born. Originally, the main focuses of Claudias research were health, taste, and environmental sustainability. First with the humble intention to feed her kids in a conscious way, and after in the way she would develop her restaurant to have the best possible impact on her society. The name of her cuisine speaks for itself. At Bio Solo Organico, they only work with fresh, local and organic products and this is guaranteed since they were granted the Organic Certification by Food Safety. The […] The post Restaurant Highlight: Bio Solo Organico, Buenos Aires appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett

May 5 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett Rachelle Robinett is an Herbalist, Holistic Health Practitioner, and founder of Supernatural, a company dedicated to real-world plant-based wellness. Rachelle has been studying the relationship between plants and people her entire life – be that on a farm in the Pacific Northwest (where she grew up) to time with healers, specialists, and shaman in farther-away places. She now provides functional plant-based wellness services, products, and education to empower people to understand their health, and lean into it, naturally. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? This has changed a lot for me since launching my company and having total control of my schedule. I do schedule every thing, but also move through life very intuitively. For example, on a day off Ill plan to ride my bike but once Im on it, it doesnt matter to me where I go. There are things I do routinely (meal preparation, exercise, rituals, sleep) but I never ignore instincts or anything my body is telling me. I love to be surprised but also care so much about how I spend every moment that planning is a big part of my life. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. No more alarm clock! Or, infrequently, which isnt something I would have predicted for my life. Ill wake up to open windows and the sounds of birds on a breeze. A glass of water with a tincture and probiotics. If its a day off, Ill skip caffeine and head out for a run while Im still sleepy. I love waking up while I run. A work day means a small cup of cold-brew with MCT oil and (currently, though it changes as I work with different herbs) mucuna pruriens and L-theanine. I practice intermittent fasting daily so dont typically eat until 11am or later but in the morning Ill make a broth or giant green juice and also a smoothie, which becomes brunch. A meditation ritual with some South American plants Ive come to love and then its off to the races. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Getting away from blue light! If Im near screens, they have physical filters and apps (like flux) installed to reduce the effect. Dimmed lights, incense, my Zen Spa Stuff playlist, and something to drink. There are always herbs at night as my energy tends to run very high, naturally. I cycle between kava kava, skullcap, valerian, poppy, lavender, and more. Also very in love with a relaxing face-washing routine. :) -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Im working diligently at becoming a more regular meditator. Its most days now, but Id like to deepen it. Otherwise, yoga, running and long bike rides silence my mind. I can practice yoga (ashtanga) for hours a day and be thrilled. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – A giant smoothie made with fresh tropical fruits and fats, ideally picked from a jungle farm that morning. Lunch – All the vegetables, fresh and raw and local. Amazing olive oil, avocado, or coconut. Maybe some seeds. Seaweed too. Every color of the rainbow. Snack – 100% cacao. Local. Dinner - See lunch. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Currently I have about 1/­­2 cup of cold-brew coffee that we make at home. Im so high energy naturally that I often dont finish it. Green juice is my favorite energy support. Otherwise I use water, food, sunlight and breath to adjust my energy. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? Dark chocolate – often homemade but if bought its 92 – 100%. Ill eat that for breakfast, honestly. My sugar intake is so low that sweets cravings are rare but if they get aggressive Ill have extra cacao in smoothies or elixirs, or eat more fruit, sweet potatoes/­­yams, etc. Chocolate chip cookies are dear to my heart though. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? This evolves as I learn and grow too but ... – An excellent probiotic – Personalized herbs. For me those are mood-supportive and nervous-system soothing. I use a combination of herbal teas (infused overnight), tinctures (HerbPharm are my favorite!) and well-sourced powders. – Supplements depending on bloodwork, body composition and lifestyle. – Im seeing the greatest overall health changes in my clients who are working on gut health. It just affects so much! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I live to move. Every single day if possible! If I skip more than two days, I get really restless. Running and yoga are my favorite, but I need both. I joke that running is my church; I treasure it and find it extremely cathartic. Yoga keeps everything balanced and I hope to have the practice for life. Weather permitting, Ill ride my bike for hours but that just feels like play. Im also into strength training (aka lifting weights at the gym, which surprises people). Overall, I consider exercise as essential as good food, water, and sleep. My preference for high-intensity exhaustive stuff comes from my high-energy personality but isnt necessary for everyone. Ive seen some of the fastest changes in my body with a daily yoga practice, some walking, and an excellent diet. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? Absolutely heavenly. Excellent playlists are essential! Also, just do it. ;) Beauty -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I think people doubt me when I say greens, and especially green juice, are responsible for the glow but I really mean it. Veggies veggies veggies, healthy fat, tons of water, and sweat! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Aside from food, water, rest, and sweat, I find that a consistent routine of gentle exfoliation and good quality rehydration (topically, that is) work best for me. Continually renewing the surface, allowing skin to breathe, and keeping it nourished with really simple ingredients (I love Egyptian Magic and fruit enzyme or honey-based masks) gives really great face. That said, Im not an esthetician and have increasingly more respect for what I dont know about skincare (thanks to spending more time with the professionals at CAP Beauty, especially) and it will differ for everyone. What wont differ is the value of a right diet to help reduce inflammation, increase circulation, maintain hydration, and provide enough energy for both exercising and rest. :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Exercise and sleep have always been stress-reliefs for me. Ive recently integrated more meditation, and herbs of course (especially nervines). Whats making the greatest difference, though, is - as with most things - addressing the root cause or source of the stress. Rather than just trying to breathe between emails, Im looking at how to reduce email overall. Setting timers, limits on the number of meetings Ill take each day, inbox pausing, and scheduling (and sticking to) more time truly offline. Personal days, screen-free evenings or weekends, etc. If doing this, its important to prepare for there to be more to address when you return to it, so another part of the practice may be letting go of how much we want to engage with and choosing quality over quantity. Much harder said than done. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Heat and spice! I completely eliminate all sugar including fruit and yes, honey too. I put on three extra layers to get warm and stay warm. Garlic, ginger, and all sorts of spice. And rest. Essentially, Im aiming to help my body reach a sort of break-point with the cold/­­flu, or to sweat it out before it even reaches a peak, which Ive had a lot of success with. Medicinal mushrooms can also be great for cold/­­flu season. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? Im working on this. (See above regarding stress avoidance!) My work is my play is my passion is my love so whats not work is sometimes very hard to determine. My hypnotherapist friend suggests that if it makes me happy, perhaps its not important to distinguish. My partner has inspired me to take in information from sources entirely outside of my usual bubble, which is great for play, and avoiding a filtered or algorithmic existence. This is a new practice for me. I grew up in a home that didnt allow for play so its something Im creating space for and learning how to do as an adult. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Ive found that its just impossible to be my best self when Im not taking care. Its really priority number one (and two, and maybe three) at this point. That said, there are times when life when its worth compromising different things. Like, in my twenties when I worked my ass off (and loved it) in order to achieve certain things. Now, I feel freer to play and rest. These bodies are our only homes in this life. I am so grateful to have one; I really think of it like my best friend and partner in existence. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Learning how to eat entirely plant-based, and well. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Thankfully, I dont have these. But, the opposite side of that spectrum is overworking, under-socializing, or burnout. And, existential crises which seem to strike when things are best. Rest and changes of scenery can do wonders. (Lately, I have been exploring procrastination from the perspective of mindfulness, though. This is an enlightening talk on it.) -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Instead Ill choose a couple of people: My mom, who as a Dietician gave me the greatest start in understanding nutrition, but more importantly taught me how to listen to my body. Rather than bandaging symptoms, she showed us how to ask why and follow the clues to root causes. My dad, an Anaesthesiologist who - much the opposite of Mom - taught us about medicine yes, but of more value he gave me the travel bug and experiences with wild nature that started and perpetuate my relationship with earth. And, Wendy Green, who I met at the perfect time in my journey. She helped direct my then multitudinous health practices into a more singular approach, which Ive honed and deepened since we met years ago. She also showed me how much I love ashtanga yoga, which is the gift of a lifetime. Ill be back to her retreat for the third time this summer. Knowledge -- Do you have any recommendations for those thinking of taking their career in a similar direction? Where does one start, where to find the education, how important is certification, etc. This is one of the most common questions I receive! I appreciate Mountain Rose Herbs list of resources for those looking into schools, teachers, or even just books. Its worth knowing which certifications are recognized by The American Herbalists Guild, though many people disregard the value of that and choose to study from great herbalists or schools that exist outside of the system. Id recommend as much exploration and direct experience as possible in the form of classes, workshops, and apprenticeships before then committing to a longer-term study. Find someone whose approach you respect and identify with and learn from them in whatever ways are available. -- Tell us about HRBLS, your beautiful herb infused chew line! Woo, HRBLS! These are my babies! Long story short, I wanted to give people an easy, delicious, beautiful but still very effective form of herbs. The HRBLS are gummies, or chews, that are equivalent to a dose of a tincture, a strong cup of herbal tea, or some capsules. Theyre a marriage between functional food and herbal remedies. A snack medicine or treat with benefits. Nerve Less is the first flavor (honeyed lavender tarragon) and includes my favorite herbs for daytime stress and anxiety relief, which so many folks come to me for help resolving. In the near future, well announce the next flavor – okay flavor s. :) -- And a last, fun one: what are your three favorite plants for the spring season and why? – Nettle! Because its my bff (we grew up together) and the coolest combination of edible green, super-green plant medicine, and a natural antihistamine. – Dandelion: I love the multi-taskers and like nettle, dandelion is an edible flower and bitter green (great for digestion), and medicinal top to root. – Mimosa. The tree of happiness which blooms more in the summer than spring, but close enough. Aside from looking magical, its full of medicine – everything from antioxidants to DMT. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Deep massages – two hours with the strongest hands I can find please! Acupuncture. Running, yoga, riding. TRAVEL. The post Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

7 Meatless Monday Soup Recipes to Keep You Warm Until Spring

February 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

7 Meatless Monday Soup Recipes to Keep You Warm Until SpringSpring is still a month away so theres plenty of time to enjoy hearty winter soups that make this season delicious. To help you celebrate the last few weeks of winter, weve gathered some of our favorite winter soup recipes that include seasonal vegetables, such as root vegetables, squash and parsnips. Enjoy these tasty plant-based recipes from our Meatless Monday recipe gallery as we count down the days until spring arrives. Sweet Potato and White Bean Soup from Healthy with Nedi Oven-Roasted Pea Soup with Mint and Mascarpone Dressing from Fabio Viviani Curried Butternut Velvet Soup from She’s Cooking Mediterranean Vegetable Noodle Soup from Tofu ‘n Sproutz Carrot Soup with Parsnip Chips from MyRecipes.com Red Onion Soup with Shiitake Broth from Jackie Newgent, RDN Hearty White Bean & Millet Soup from Bean A Foodie Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post 7 Meatless Monday Soup Recipes to Keep You Warm Until Spring appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Burn the Best: Beeswax Candles

March 5 2021 My New Roots 

Burn the Best: Beeswax Candles I was at a health food store with a friend the other day, cruising the aisles when he asked: Hey Sarah, why do beeswax candles cost so much more than regular candles? Well, I had to admit that he had me stumped there. I had heard that beeswax candles were better to burn than their paraffin counterparts, but I didnt know why exactly. Oohhh so exciting – I couldnt wait to get to the bottom of this one! With a little research I found some truly shocking information that was certainly blog-worthy… Before I explain why beeswax candles are so superior, first let me give you the low-down on the downsides of the alternatives. Paraffin origins Most candles we buy are made from paraffin wax. Paraffin is a petroleum by-product, left over after producing many of the other common petroleum products such as gas, oils, pavement, etc. This material is then bleached with 100% strength bleach creating toxic dioxins, before being refined into solid paraffin using various carcinogenic, solidifying chemicals. Candle companies purchase paraffin wax and then add various other texturizing chemicals, artificial dyes for colour, and synthetic fragrances. When synthetic fragrances are burned, they produce toxic fluoro-carbons and other polluting by-products. Inhaling these fluoro-carbons damages the receptors in our nasal passages that detect scent, and over an extending period of time diminishes the overall abilities of your olfactory senses by wearing them out. This is one of the reasons many people seem to require increasingly stronger-smelling candles (or synthetic air fresheners), etc., to experience any enjoyable aromas at all! Last, but certainly not least, is the indirect cost of burning a fuel like paraffin in your home, which emits black soot that coats your walls, household furnishings and curtains, and least desirably, your lungs and skin. It is a proven fact that paraffin, with its associated synthetic scents and other additives, causes headaches, allergic reactions and difficulties with sinuses and lungs. Anyone with respiratory problems should not burn paraffin candles, nor should those that want to prevent said problems. I hope this sheds some light (ha!) on the perils of paraffin to your health, home and environment. Now let me introduce you to beeswax and the incredible properties it has to offer. Beloved Beeswax Burning beeswax candles is better for you and the environment for so many reasons. First, burning beeswax produces negative ions, which benefit us and the air we breathe by attracting pollutants, in much the same way that a magnet attracts iron fillings. Negative ions attach to positively charged ions that hold onto dust, dander, molds and other air borne contaminants. Once attached, the positive ions are weighed down and this drops both the ions and the contaminants to the ground to be swept up or vacuumed away. Bottom line: burning beeswax will actually clean your air. Beeswax candles are the best choice for the environment since the material used is 100% renewable, and in its native, raw state does not require bleaching or hydrogenation. The production of paraffin (a non-renewable resource), and even soy and palm waxes, involves chemical intervention to modify the raw material into a wax form and then into a candle. This means that beeswax is a better choice for the environment, since its processing is minimal, does not require chemicals, and the end product is completely biodegradable. You can burn beeswax in an unventilated room without fear of pollution. In fact, many people report that burning a candle in the bedroom for 30 minutes or so before falling asleep produces a more restful sleep. Beeswax is hypo-allergenic, benefits those with environmental allergies, sensitivities, and even asthma. To keep your air as clean as possible, just remember to trim your wicks before each use, and extinguish the candle by submerging the wick in its own wax pool instead of blowing it out, as both these measures prevent smoke. Lastly, the quality of the golden light given off by beeswax candles is unsurpassed by its paraffin counterparts. Because of the high melting point of the wax, beeswax burns stronger and brighter than paraffin, in addition to emitting the same spectrum of light as the sun — how amazing is that! The Overall Cost So to answer my friends question: while the initial cost may seem higher than paraffin candles, beeswax burns for much longer – two to five times the burn time of other candles. Beeswax has a much higher melting point than paraffin – in fact, the highest melting point of any wax, so it burns far more slowly. Costing only pennies an hour to burn, beeswax is much more economical than paraffin over time. You can purchase beeswax candles at farmers markets, health food stores and of course online. The candles in this post are from The Beeswax Co., an American company committed to tradition and quality, they ship internationally, and I highly recommend them. Wherever you choose to purchase your candles, beware of imitations! Look for 100% pure cappings beeswax, which is the wax that comes from the seal around each cell in the honeycomb. Some companies will cut their beeswax with paraffin, palm or soy waxes and still call them beeswax candles, so read the labels. Also, make sure the wick is made of a natural fiber (like cotton or hemp) and that it doesnt contain a metal wire (which can sometimes contain lead), and that there arent any artificial scents or chemical colours added. Pure beeswax should smell like honey, and have a natural, golden hue. Burn, baby. Burn! The post Burn the Best: Beeswax Candles appeared first on My New Roots.

How a Plant-Based Diet Can Affect Your Mood

December 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

When most people hear the phrase, You are what you eat, they think about it in terms of body size or physical medical issues -- such as being overweight or underweight or having Type 2 diabetes. But research shows your food choices also affect your mental health, mood, and temperament. Eating a healthy diet containing fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds --with the addition of fortified foods and supplements when indicated -- can support mental well-being, says Reshma Shah, M.D., a plant-based pediatrician and coauthor of Nourish: The Definitive Plant-Based Nutrition Guide for Families. Phytonutrients, which have a protective effect, and fiber, which is responsible for the health of our gut microbiome, are exclusive to plants and have been associated with improved mental health outcomes. Mental Health Benefits of a Plant-Based Diet Theres no shortage of research being done on the mood-boosting and mental health effects associated with the consumption of fruits, vegetables, and other plant-based fuel. These include: - Anxiety and stress. The arachidonic acid, found only in animal products like eggs and chicken, sets off multiple chemical reactions in the body that eventually lead to an increase in inflammation, says Dr. Kasey Nichols, NMD, licensed physician and member of the Arizona Naturopathic Medical Association (AzNMA). When this inflammation reaches the brain, it subsequently can cause feelings of anxiety and stress, as well as depression. People who avoid foods with arachidonic acid typically report a more positive mood and improved mental health. One survey-based study found decreased rates of stress and anxiety in those eating a vegan vs. omnivorous diet, and that vegetarians had reported better mood than non-vegetarians. - Depression. Research suggests eating more plant-based foods can improve quality of life, mood and reduce symptoms of depression. A study published in the British Journal of Psychiatry analyzed the dietary patterns and risk of depression in 3,486 participants over a five-year period. Individuals eating whole foods reported fewer symptoms of depression compared to those who ate mostly processed foods. - ADHD. Although diet isn’t the driving cause or cure for ADHD, Dr. Nichols says some research has shown that switching to a plant-based diet could help with its symptoms. One study showed that preschoolers who chose processed dietary patterns were significantly and positively correlated with ADHD symptoms, while those who chose vegetarian dietary patterns were negatively correlated with ADHD symptoms. Cognition. Some research has shown that eating more plant foods can prevent a cognitive decline later in life, says Dr. Nichols. One study found that those who consistently ate more plant-based foods were 18-33% less likely to develop cognitive impairment than those who didn’t. - Focus. Looking to improve productivity in the workplace? One study showed that employees who ate plant-based foods reported improved job performance and missed fewer workdays. Related: 8 Ways to Improve Your Gut Health & Mood 2 Things to Watch on a Plant-Based Diet While eschewing animal products is a healthy lifestyle choice, it requires a thorough understanding of how to create balanced and complete meals. There are a couple areas youll need to pay special attention to, to ensure youre reaping all of the healthy benefits: - Nutrient deficiency. If done improperly, a plant-based diet could lack important nutritional needs that can negatively affect mental health. A deficiency in nutrients found in animal products -- like choline, vitamin B-12, folate, omega-3 fatty acids and amino acids -- have been linked to depression, poor mood regulation, poor metabolism, low energy, as well as memory and attention span difficulties. Plant-based eaters in developed countries need to be the most concerned about lacking brain-healthy nutrients like DHA, vitamin B12, vitamin K2, zinc, iron, riboflavin, and vitamin D3, says Dr. Nichols. It is usually common knowledge that vegan diets need to be supplemented with B12, but many people are under the impression that colorful fruits and vegetables are excellent sources of most other vital nutrients. Dietary supplements are a great way counter any deficiency. - Caloric deficiency. Switching to a plant-based diet may end up resulting in a significant reduction in calories. Many find that they lose a few pounds, but if the reduction becomes too extreme and lacks key nutrients and carbohydrates, you may become more irritable, or hangry, and easily distracted, says Dr. Nichols. If youre losing too much weight, add some more healthy fats (such as coconut oil and avocados) into your diet. Related: Plant-Powered Brain Health Boost Your Mood with These Plant-Based Must-Haves Its easy to fall into a rut during meal prep and planning -- many people are creatures of habit who gravitate toward the same menu week after week. But if your go-to meals arent well-rounded, this could leave you lacking in essential nutrients. In order to ensure youre getting the full spectrum of nutrition your body and mind need to thrive, make sure youre including the following: - Omega 3s. Omega 3 fatty acids have been implicated in improved mental health outcomes, says Dr. Shah. Plant-based diets generally limit or exclude fish, which is a major source of omega 3 fatty acids, so they may be low in this key nutrient. Instead, youll find your omega 3s in foods such as chia seeds, hemp seeds, flax seed, and walnuts. - Tryptophan. The brain uses the amino acid tryptophan to produce serotonin, the feel-good neurotransmitter. Its found in chicken, eggs, cheese and fish, but plant-based sources of tryptophan include leafy greens, sunflower seeds, watercress, soybeans, pumpkin seeds, mushrooms, broccoli and peas. - B vitamins. Known to boost mood by increasing such neurotransmitters as serotonin, dopamine, and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), B vitamins may be the key to boosting your spirits, too. Choose from beans, legumes and lentils, fortified cereals and sunflower seeds. The effects of going plant-based vary from person to person, so it’s best to consult your doctor first to make sure it’s the right move for you, says Dr. Nichols.   The post How a Plant-Based Diet Can Affect Your Mood appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet

November 19 2020 Vegetarian Times 

With the new year just weeks away, the media is honing in on the top nutrition trends we can expect to see in 2021, and to no surprise increasing plant-protein remains at the top. Whether youre eating more plant-based for sustainability, health, or just because, rest assured there are a variety of whole food options you can choose from to meet your protein needs. But, before you head straight into the freezer department at your local grocer to pick up the latest faux meat product, lets take a look at 10 whole food sources of plant-based protein you may just want to toss into your cart instead! Reader beware, you may end up saving a few bucks once you realize how convenient and affordable many of these options are. Lentils Just one cup of cooked lentils provides nearly 18 grams of plant-protein and 16 grams of fiber for just 225 calories. Lentils also contain many important nutrients, like iron, potassium, zinc and choline (a nutrient that 90% of Americans arent getting enough of!) Plus, theyre budget-friendly with a 16-ounce bag of dried lentils coming in at just $2.99.  Registered Dietitian Kim Rose of www.kimrosedietitian.com recommends making a pot of seasoned lentils on the weekends. Divide them into individual 1 cup servings, and then add them to different meals throughout the week!  Youll find me turning lentils into meatballs, or for a really quick fix, adding a little bar-b-que sauce to them to make tasty, vegan sloppy joes. Hummus This plant-based spread can be made from a variety of beans and legumes, not just the traditional garbanzo bean you may think! Depending on the bean used, the protein content will vary slightly, but a standard 1/­­4 cup serving (or about 70 grams by weight) has roughly 6 grams of protein for just 180 calories. Plus, it often packs heart-healthy unsaturated fatty acids that help keep you fuller for longer too! Brynn McDowell, Registered Dietitian and cookbook author of The Mediterranean Diet Made Easy recommends using hummus in place of mayo on sandwiches or spreading it on bagels or toast! She suggests thinning it out and using it as a creamy salad dressing to add more plant-based protein to meals. Pistachios Pistachios are a good source of plant-based protein with a 1-ounce serving of the nut (shelled) providing 6 grams of it! Plus, they pack dietary fiber, potassium, and antioxidants that help keep your body in tip-top shape. While the shelled variety tends to be a tad pricier, you can still pick up a 10-ounce in-shell bag for about $5.49 at most markets. Lauren Manaker, Registered Dietitian, and author of Fueling Male Fertility, recommends to use shelled pistachios as a salad topped in place of grilled chicken or shrimp. The plant-based protein boost that also gives you fiber and healthy fats for staying power. You can also toss pistachios in trail mixes and in oatmeal as a topping for added nutrition and crunch! Related: Healthy Late-Night Snacks Chickpeas One of the most common forms of plant-based protein on the market is the good ole chickpea (aka, the garbanzo bean!) With nearly 7.5 grams of protein, 6.5 grams of fiber, and 3.7 mg of iron in just 1/­­2 cup serving of cooked chickpeas, its a great way to increase the total nutrient density of your diet. The best part: a pound of chickpeas (dried) often comes in at less than $3.00! NYC-based Registered Dietitian, Natalie Rizzo, MS, RD, is a big fan of adding chickpeas to both meals and snacks! From grain bowls to veggie burgers, or roasted as a protein-filled snack, chickpeas offer a convenient and affordable plant-based protein to nearly every diet. Edamame (Soybeans) Edamame is the immature form of the soybean that is often eaten from the shell (or shelled) alongside traditional Asian dishes. Regardless of the form of soybean you eat, they can easily be incorporated into a balanced diet with two servings being a reasonable goal for adults. A half-cup of shelled edamame packs nearly 9.5 grams of plant-based protein and 4 grams of fiber, as well as iron, potassium, folate, and choline! Sarah Koszyk, Sports Nutritionist and author of 25 Anti-Aging Smoothies for Revitalizing, Glowing Skin, recommends pureeing edamame in a hummus, dip, or pesto. Spread the edamame purees on a sandwich or wrap, add it to a burrito, or toss it with a salad, pasta, or rice dish. If youre looking to venture into the other forms of soybeans (like tofu), Registered Dietitian Sylvia Klinger of Hispanic Food Communications suggests blending silken tofu with oil, spices and herbs makes for a delicious high protein dressing, or adding a soy-based curd to pancakes to boost the protein there as well! Tempeh Tempeh is a fermented product made from soybeans in addition to some whole grains, seasonings and other flavorings. A 4-ounce serving of this soy-based protein packs nearly 20 grams of protein, in addition to a host of nutrition benefits. For starters, tempeh is filled with nutrients like manganese, magnesium, phosphorus and B vitamins in addition to its role as a probiotic. Jenna Braddock, Florida based at MakeHealthyEasy.com recommends spending a little bit of time prepping it to make the perfect dish! Braddock suggests crumbling the tempeh, then marinating it and finishing with a sear in a hot pan to add instant protein to salads, wraps, bowls and tacos. Pill Nuts Pronounced peel-y, this nut is native to the pili tree often found in Northern Australia and the Philippines. While lower in protein comparatively speaking per serving size (a 1/­­4 cup serving provides 3 grams in comparison to some of the other nuts), it packs a nutritional punch in that it contains essential amino acids the human body needs. This nut is harder to find at local markets, and you will need to likely shop online and be willing to spend about $16.99 for a one-pound bag. Maya Feller, nationally recognized nutrition expert and author of The Southern Comfort Food Diabetes Cookbook, recommends enjoying this mildly flavored nut in yogurt form (yes, brands are now popping up incorporating this nut into their yogurts!) smothered over a stack of pancakes or in their raw form as a crunchy snack. Hemp Seeds Three tablespoons of hulled hemp seeds provide nearly 10 grams of plant-based protein to your meal for just 170 calories. Plus, theyre full of iron and unsaturated fats while offering a great nut-free alternative for crunch. While a bit more pricey than other seeds (a 12-ounce bag is roughly $12.99), theyre an easy addition to boost plant-protein on simple foods. Plant-based sports dietitian, Kelly Jones of kellyjonesnutrition.com recommends adding them to oatmeal, sprinkling them onto pancakes, using as a topper for soups and salads, and incorporating into homemade energy bites! Lupini Beans Lupini beans are a staple of the Mediterranean diet and making a name for themselves in the US due to their high protein content. In just a 1/­­2 cup cooked serving of the bean it packs nearly 13 grams of plant-based protein. But, where it packs in protein it lacks in fiber, with that same 1/­­2 cup serving providing only 2 grams. Found traditionally in the jarred food section of the market, there are a few ways you can cook with them! Amy Gorin, a plant-based registered dietitian and owner of Plant-Based Eats recommends draining and rinsing the beans as you would do with any other canned beans. Then, use them in your favorite dishes, like her delicious plant-based lupini salad! Quinoa One of the only whole grains that is a complete source of protein (containing all 9 essential amino acids), this is an excellent (and affordable) gluten-free, plant-based protein addition to nearly any diet! One cup of cooked quinoa contains nearly 8 grams of protein for just 220 calories (plus nearly 5 grams of fiber.) Quinoa also contains many important B vitamins as well as potassium and antioxidants. Registered Dietitian Tamara Hoffman of Unbeetable Nutrition and Wellness recommends adding quinoa to your taco Tuesday menus with a spicy Mexican seasoning or sauteing it into your stir-fry dishes with a soy sauce. The post 10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

shrikhand recipe | shrikand sweet | how to make kesar shrikhand

May 18 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

shrikhand recipe | shrikand sweet | how to make kesar shrikhandshrikhand recipe | shrikand sweet | how to make kesar shrikhand with step by step photo and video recipe. yoghurt or curd based recipes or dessert recipes are very common across india. yoghurt is typically served after the spicy meal to lower the temperature and also to introduce the probiotics to the immune system. one such hugely popular curd based dessert recipe is shrikhand recipe. The post shrikhand recipe | shrikand sweet | how to make kesar shrikhand appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Protect the Planet by Going Meatless this Monday

April 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

Protect the Planet by Going Meatless this MondayOur daily food choices have a direct impact on the health of the planet. And while its true that all foods need resources to produce, research shows that meat and dairy have the greatest impacts on the environment. This isnt too hard to picture; raising animals to feed billions of people requires huge inputs of land, feed, water, and energy to be processed, stored, and transported. While the environmental impacts of food production can seem daunting, thankfully there are easy and delicious ways to reduce our individual and collective foodprints through eating a more plant-based diet and reducing food waste . But you dont need to go vegan to make a difference; starting small, like going Meatless Monday, is meaningful and can also lead to eating more plant-based foods throughout the week. Meatless Monday Tips for Plant-based Eating Add more fruits and vegetables to your meals Make meals from the Meatless Monday recipe gallery Stock your pantry with plant-based staples for quick and easy meals Enjoy a wide variety of plant-based proteins Load up your spice cabinet for flavorful meatless meals Reduce food waste with inexpensive foods that wont go bad Get the whole family involved with The Kids Cook Monday meatless recipes Just how much of a difference does it make replacing animal products with plant-based foods? To help quantify the power of plant-based eating, weve collaborated with our academic partners at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future to gather the facts and figures behind plant-based foods and the environment. According to calculations from Johns Hopkins, if sixty percent of Americans ate plant-based just one day, it would save the equivalent of 104,000 Olympic swimming pools of water and the land area of the California Redwood Forests. Hungry for more reasons to go Meatless Monday? Check out the facts below to see the impact that livestock production as on the environment, and how you can help minimize those effects by reducing meat and adding more fruits, vegetables, legumes, and grains into your diet. Water Animal agriculture is responsible for about 70 percent of the worlds freshwater use. By 2050, water demand for livestock production is expected to leave half the worlds population living in water-stressed environments. Research shows that eating a more plant-based diet can decrease agricultural water use by 50 percent. Deforestation The meat industry is the most significant driver of deforestation, clearing approximately 50 million square miles of forest for agricultural purposes each year. Combining pasture and land used for feed crops, 80 percent of the worlds farmlands are used for livestock production. Soil Health Animal agriculture damages soil quality and compromises the health of the ecosystem. Industrial livestock production, through its intensive land management practices, reduces soil fertility and leaves previously fertile regions barren and more prone to natural disaster such as wildfires, flooding, and dust storms. Wide-scale shifts toward more plant-based diets would carry tremendous benefits for soil health and biodiversity. Biodiversity Livestock production has led to over 60% decline in species populations since 1970. Animal agriculture disrupts delicate eco-systems, making it one of the greatest human contributors to species decline. Global Emissions Meat and dairy production remain the most significant contributors of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and of these sources, livestock production is the largest, accounting for an estimated 14.5 percent of global GHG emissions from human activities, according to the United Nations. Interested in learning more about the connection between the food system and the health of the environment? Click here for more facts and figures from our academic partners at Johns Hopkins University. The post Protect the Planet by Going Meatless this Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Still Looking For a Reason to Go Meatless on Monday? Here are 19.

December 30 2019 Meatless Monday 

Still Looking For a Reason to Go Meatless on Monday? Here are 19.Youve probably heard of Meatless Monday. Maybe youve even considered giving it a try. Well, weve got your motivation right here -- the 19 reasons to go meatless on Monday in 2020. With the human population set to reach 10 billion by as early as 2050, the current approach to food production is no longer sustainable. Studies show that a reliance on animal products like dairy, beef, pork, and poultry is doing irreversible damage to the environment and is having a negative impact on personal health. Pretty heavy issues, but Meatless Monday can be part of a delicious solution to tackle these global problems. For 2020, we are encouraging everyone to ditch meat one day a week to help preserve the planet and live a healthier life. Improve Your Health Eating animal products has shown to increase instances of a myriad of metabolic and chronic health problems. Cut out meat one day a week to improve your wellbeing:   1. Reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. 2. Lessen the probability of developing type 2 diabetes. 3. Lower chances of having a stroke. 4. Preserve your kidneys. 5. Maintain a healthy weight. Save the Environment  Theres an inextricable link between livestock production and environmental degradation. For a number of reasons (many of which are listed below), a reduction in the consumption of animal products can help stall the destruction of our oceans, forests, and atmosphere. Enjoying plant-based meals instead of meat on Mondays can be help address climate issues including: 6. Forests are cleared for livestock production. 7. Animal feed production requires intensive use of water, fertilizer, pesticides, and fossil fuels. 8. Animal waste is a leading factor in the pollution of land and water resources. 9. Beef, pork, and poultry emit large amounts of carbon dioxide, methane, and other harmful greenhouse gases. 10. Livestock production uses 75% of the earths agricultural land. 11. Industrial livestock production displaces small, rural producers. 12. A quarter-pound of beef requires 425 gallons of water to produce (enough to fill 6,800 glasses of fresh drinking water). 13. Livestock manure can contain a variety of pathogens such as coli, growth hormones, and antibiotics. 14. Livestock waste streams contaminate drinking water and groundwater. Plant-based Goodness   Feel good about the food youre eating while saving money and exploring new ingredients. Thanks to the boom of flexitarian and plant-based eating, its never been easier, more convenient or delicious to go Meatless Monday. 15. Abundance of delicious plant-based meats to satisfy any of your cravings. There are so many high-protein meatless products now available at grocery stores, restaurants and fast food chains - making it easier than ever to enjoy your favorite foods - entirely plant-based. 16. Make Meatless Monday a reason to get the team together. Round up your friends and family to enjoy plant-based meals with on Mondays. 17. Almost all of your favorite restaurants offer a hearty plant-based option. So you can still frequent your favorite local, just explore new parts of the menu on Mondays. 18. Provides an opportunity to explore new ingredients. There are so many fruits, vegetables and grains to choose from, every Meatless Monday meal can be a new culinary adventure. 19. Youll likely save money on your grocery bill!   Interested in learning more about why you should give Meatless Monday a try? Weve got all the information (and plant-based recipes) that youll need to get started. The post Still Looking For a Reason to Go Meatless on Monday? Here are 19. appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Unique Holiday Gift Guide for the Gourmets and Food Lovers on Your List

December 2 2019 Meatless Monday 

Unique Holiday Gift Guide for the Gourmets and Food Lovers on Your ListThe holiday season is here, so the team at Meatless Monday has assembled a snazzy gourmet gift-guide that includes everything you need to make plant-based eating -- or any type of eating for that matter -- easier, healthier, and more tantalizing to the taste buds. Whether youve been naughty or nice, weve got something for everybody: A self-sustaining indoor herb garden for your apartment-bound offspring, a molecular gastronomy starter pack for your Chopped-obsessed sister-in-law, and, of course, a hazard-proof mandoline for mom. But no matter the tool, cooking gadget, or condiment, all of the gifts listed below will make someones Meatless Monday a whole lot more delicious. Indoor Smart Herb Garden Tell us if this sounds familiar: Your recipe calls for 2 tablespoons of fresh basil, but the quantities sold in the grocery store would last you a month. Thankfully your thoughtful friend purchased you this easy-to-use, self-sustaining smart herb garden. It works just like a capsule coffee machine: Insert the biodegradable smart-soil capsule, add water to the tank (good for up to 3 week), and plug it in! Bring on the basil. For the Indoor Smart Herb Garden, click here.   Hot Sauce Flavors from Around the World The ideal gift for any hot-sauce junkie, this set of hot sauce flavors from around the world will add some searing flavor to any plant-based meal. Add some BAM! to your seitan and experiment with some spicy sauces from Costa Rica, New Orleans, Argentina, and 27 other states and countries. For the Hot Sauce Flavors from Around the World, click here. Embossed Rolling Pin Theres nothing more comforting than the aroma of freshly baked cookies. Let your baked goods look as good as they smell with one of these ornately embossed rolling pins; theyll transform any sheet of cookie dough or pie crust into an edible art piece. For the Embossed Rolling Pins, click here.  Food Dehydrator A must-have for any individual looking to easily incorporate more plant-based foods into their diet, a food dehydrator can turn any fresh fruit or vegetable into the perfect plant-based snack. Use it to dry herbs or make your own fruit leather or mushroom jerky. For the Food Dehydrator, click here. Hazard-Proof Mandoline Slicer and Spiralizer Its sharp blade and high potential for kitchen mishaps has earned the mandoline a villainous reputation, but its still a very useful kitchen tool that can quickly transform any number of fruits and vegetables into perfectly bake-able, fry-able, salad-able slices. This hazard proof mandoline is foolproof, safe, and comes with its own handy spiralizer, perfect for turning oblong shaped vegetables into flowing strands of carb-free noodles. For the Hazard Proof Mandoline Slicer and Spiralizer, click here. Super-Cute Kids Cookware Introducing children to the magic of cooking is one of the most valuable lessons you can bestow upon them. An appreciation for gastronomy starts in the kitchen, and theres no easier way to get the young ones cooking than with a set of super-cute kids cookware, which features an adorable set of vegetable-themed spoons, measuring cups, and whisks. For the Super-Cute Kids Cookware, click here. Molecular Gastronomy Starter Pack  Bring out your inner Top Chef with this incredibly cool molecular gastronomy starter pack. Use food-friendly additives to create jells, powders, beads, and caviars that will have your guests marveling at your gastronomic chops. For the Molecular Gastronomy Starter Pack, click here.    Fermentation Kit (Jars Not Included) The list of health benefits associated with fermented vegetables (kimchi, sauerkraut, pickles) is lengthy, but these foods can be a little pricey when purchased from the supermarket. A fun and cost-effective way to bring more fermented foods into your diet is to make them yourself. This fermentation kit comes with all the tools you need to pickle, culture, and preserve all of your favorite veggies. For the Fermentation Kit, click here. DIY Mochi Kit Mochi is the dessert that melts in your mouth, not in your hands. Everyone -- and I mean everyone -- has fallen head-over-heels in love with this Japanese frozen dessert. This DIY mochi kit is perfect for plant-based food lovers because it allows you to swap in any one of your favorite non-dairy ice creams. For the DIY Mochi Kit, click here.   Foodie Baby Gear We know that your baby niece, cousin, or newborn couldnt be any cuter, but what if they were wearing a little dim-sum or tater-tot onesie? This collection of adorable baby gear comes complete with all the food puns that any food-loving parent could ever dream of. For the Foodie Baby Gear, click here. Tofu Press Water is the element that prevents your perfect cubes of tofu from absorbing flavor and crisping up in the sauté pan. So just say no to soggy tofu! Exorcise those dampening demons in 15 minutes with this EZ Tofu Press: Simply set the press on a dish to catch water, place tofu on press base, turn both knobs for resistance, and continue to tighten the knobs every few minutes until your desired texture is achieved. For the Tofu Press, click here.   Meatless Monday Family Cookbook The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook, by Jenn Sebestyen, emphasizes the limitless potential of plant-based cooking. The recipes are nutritious, easy-to-prepare, and mimic the look, taste, and texture of comfort-food favorites (youve got to check out the lentil Bolognese, butternut-squash mac and cheese, and meaty mushroom stew). Its an awesome gift for anyone looking to expand their repertoire of plant-based recipes. For the Meatless Monday Family Cookbook, click here.   For more Meatless Monday inspiration, tips, and recipes, click here The post Unique Holiday Gift Guide for the Gourmets and Food Lovers on Your List appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Behind the Scenes with Facebook HQ’s Plant-Based Chef, Anthony Moraes

September 30 2019 Meatless Monday 

Behind the Scenes with Facebook HQ’s Plant-Based Chef, Anthony MoraesFacebook has always been a pioneer in the world of technology, but thanks to Anthony Moraes, Head Wellness Chef at Facebooks headquarters in New York City, the company is now a shining example of how plant-based eating can be integrated into corporate dining services. Meatless Monday had the opportunity to speak with Chef Moraes about Facebooks fully plant-based café, Ceci et Cela, and how people simply cant stop talking, tweeting, and Instagramming about the innovative meatless meals he and his team are cooking up. What was the motivation behind having an entirely plant-based cafe in Facebooks HQ? Do other cafes at Facebook also serve vegetarian options? The motivation for having an entirely plant-based café came from our desire to provide interesting and innovative plant-based concepts that complement our mainstream cafes.  We always have our finger on the pulse of what is happening in the world of food and drink, and as more people switch to alternative diets, we wanted to accommodate those preferences by creating a place that offers food that is healthy, cutting edge, and suitable for all eating lifestyles. Our daily menus incorporate vegan, vegetarian, Meatless Monday, keto, paleo, juicing, and healthy-living options. How have employees reacted to Ceci et Cela?  Ceci et Cela opened up to rave reviews from our employees, and it continues to receive amazing feedback after nearly two years in operation. How do you entice employees to choose a plant-base option over a meat-centric dish? We post some mouthwatering pictures of the food on our internal Facebook page, and these photos tend to draw in both plant-based diners and meat eaters, but most of the time its word-of-mouth that gets the line started. Whats the most popular dish at Ceci et Cela? Its hard to say, since our menu changes weekly and we try to never repeat a dish. But I guess if we had to pick, there is one salad that I created for our opening menu that is so immensely popular that someone created a Fan Page for it; its called All Hail The Kale.  Lol... It has many followers. So funny... Plant-based has become more popular, what plant-based cuisine trends or insights can you share from your success with Cecis? Have you seen more traffic on Mondays? Running a plant-based café allows us to be creative, but it also enables us to see which types of plant-based foods outshine the others. Currently, theres a trend towards trying different varieties of nut milks. We make all of our own nut milks in-house, and Ive noticed a growing interest in other plant-based milks beyond the common almond and soy. Oat milk has grown in popularity, but we also experiment with walnuts, macadamia nuts, various dried legumes, and seeds.   I also see that more people are concerned with their gut health. We offer kombucha on tap as well as house-made probiotic foods and drinks. As for a traffic boost on Mondays, we do have a healthy Monday service due to our steady flow of plant-based eaters and our committed Meatless Monday diners. Ironically, we see an even bigger spike on Tuesdays, as all of our Monday guests go back and tell their friends and co-workers about their incredible meal at Ceci et Cela. A third trend that started off as more of a feeling is the correlation between clean nutrition and beauty (I believe theyve coined a word for it now, Nutraceuticals). So, I put together a Beauty Bar within our café that is set up like a makeup station complete with a lighted mirror, compact cases, perfume bottles, blush brushes, etc. But instead of makeup, I filled all of these cases and jars with superfood additives like, acai powder, maca, chlorella, camu-camu, pine oil, and matcha so that guests can come up to the bar and add an extra boost of super foods to their food or drink. At the Beauty Bar, Ive also included a nicely-framed legend explaining what additives are good for your hair, your nails, your skin, eyes, etc... It has become immensely popular and is a very Instagram-able station. Have employees started eating more plant-based meals as a result of trying new foods at Cecis? Any stories you can share? There are so many stories of employees coming to us and thanking us for re-introducing them to the delicious potential of vegetables. Our team does such an incredible job at making all of our offerings attractive and appealing to everyone, not just the vegans and vegetarians. I am grateful for the many stories and accolades we receive each week. One employee came to me and said that he has strictly only eaten at Ceci et Cela for the past 6 months and lost 30 pounds. A few employees have brought in their personal trainers and nutritionists to see everything we do. Another employee said that Ceci et Cela was an official part of her wedding plan this summer! Follow the Facebook plant-based food trends via Chef Anthony Moraes on Instagram . Keep us posted on your #MeatlessMonday meals by posting your favorite plant-based dishes and tagging @MeatlessMonday .   Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Behind the Scenes with Facebook HQ’s Plant-Based Chef, Anthony Moraes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Restaurant Higlight: Solo Bio Organico, Buenos Aires

May 28 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Solo Bio Organico is not only the first organic vegetarian restaurant in Argentina, but also the whole of Latin America! Claudia Carrara is the pioneer that took the leap of opening her own vegetarian restaurant in Argentina’s charming capital of Buenos Aires. Everything started from the desire to bring her children up with the best possible nutrition. Soon enough, she began to sell natural dishes to her neighbours that she would create from the leftover vegetables she had in her kitchen. The success of her improvised cuisine led a friend to offer her a few tables where her clients could sit and enjoy healthy meals. One thing led to another and the idea of opening a restaurant was born. Originally, the main focuses of Claudias research were health, taste, and environmental sustainability. First with the humble intention to feed her kids in a conscious way, and after in the way she would develop her restaurant to have the best possible impact on her society. The name of her cuisine speaks for itself. At Solo Bio Organico, they only work with fresh, local and organic products and this is guaranteed since they were granted the Organic Certification by Food Safety. The […] The post Restaurant Higlight: Solo Bio Organico, Buenos Aires appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Meet Chef Heidi Tompkins, Winner of the Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge

March 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Meet Chef Heidi Tompkins, Winner of the Meatless Monday Rapid Fire ChallengeOn Monday, March 4, three finalists competed to be crowned the New York Restaurant Show Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Champion . Finalists were chosen from a pool of chefs who submitted original meatless recipes and videos. For the first time since Rapid Fire challenged chefs in 2016, three female chefs went head-to-head to prove that they had the best Meatless Monday dish. The competition was judged by a panel of experts including Maria Loi , Chef, Cookbook Author and Healthy Lifestyle Expert, Peggy Neu , President, The Monday Campaigns, Gennaro Pecchia , Partner, @aosbysosa /­­ Co-host @rolandsfoodcourt @siriusxm and Fabio Viviani , Chef, Culinary Personality, Restaurateur, Cookbook Author. The three finalists were: o Lisa Sereda, Executive Chef, Wine Time o Heidi Liv Tompkins, Co-Founder, CFO, Product Development Manager, Heidi’s Health Kitchen o Patricia Washuta, Director of Culinary Services, Executive Chef, and Certified Dietary Manager, Gentry Park Orlando . Chefs had 20 minutes to prepare their dishes, discussing the ingredients, flavors, and health benefits. Chef Heidi took home the victory with her Mock Tuna Salad in Lettuce Wrap, drizzled with Yum-Yum Ginger Sauce. This dish, like all dishes at Heidis Health Kitchen is both raw and plant-based. The tuna taste comes from two types of seaweed and a vegan fysh sauce. Remarkably, both the taste and texture resembled tuna so closely that some of the judges couldnt believe it. Chef Heidi Tompkins is the Lead Product Developer, CFO, and Co-Founder of Heidis Health Kitchen . Ivan J. Raj, her Partner and Co-Founder, served as her sous-chef at the competition. Heidi has years of sales and marketing experience, coupled with a personal passion for wellness through the development of healthful foods.  She wrote her first cookbook when she was just eight years old! For the last four and a half years, through Heidis Health Kitchen, Heidi and Ivan have offered free monthly cooking classes in NYC, as well as a monthly pop-up restaurant serving raw plant-based foods. Heidis goal is to incorporate the highest form of nutrition, along with taste and texture for everyone who goes Meatless Monday! Try Heidis Raw Mock Tuna recipe, as well as the other two finalists recipes, below. Chef Heidi’s Raw Mock Tuna Lettuce Wrap Chef Patricia’s Impossible Meatless Kefta with Tamarind Chutney Chef Lisa’s Walnut Meat Stuffed Pepper   Interested in starting a Meatless Monday program? Learn how to bring Meatless Monday to your restaurant here or to your foodservice establishment here . Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post Meet Chef Heidi Tompkins, Winner of the Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder

December 30 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder Erin Lovell Verinder is a herbalist, nutritionist and energetic healer living in the wilds of the Byron Bay hinterland in Australia, working with clients locally in her Sydney clinic and worldwide via Skype. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I honestly love both. I keep certain parts of my day very structured especially around work days and where I can, I claim open space. I follow structure to bring in the foundations of support that are essential for me to thrive and maintain my balance. Like slow mornings, connecting to nature, enjoying a whole nourishing breakfast. But then I open up my days where possible to flow & allow spontaneity. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I keep my mornings slow and sacred, it’s been a very intentional movement towards this over the years. I wake with the sunlight pouring into our bedroom, we live in an old church and the light in here is just next level serene. I always keep the blinds open to allow my body rhythms to harmonize with the sun and moon cycle. This regulates your cortisol and melatonin in such a fundamental way. I allow myself to wake slowly, no rush, no jump out of bed, no alarms, no startle response! I will then take time to do some stretching sequences with conscious breath, and then sit for a 20 minute meditation. Followed by a morning dog walk around our very green country town. Other mornings it’s a swim in the ocean with my husband and a lazy lay on the sand. After this, it’s breakfast time. I brew a tea, or make a tonic and take that out into the garden. I really feel it’s so important to have a whole breakfast, and we really honour that in our household, we sit and chat and connect over a meal before the day unfolds. I do my absolute best to only engage in anything work related after 8am and completely screen free before then is the daily goal. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Yes! I am super ritualistic about the evening wind down. I ensure I am off all screens at least two hours before sleep. I feel this is so greatly important to allow our bodies to align and flow into the yin cycle of the night. I switch off all overhead lights and only use very warm low light lamps as the sun sets. This is another trick to converse with your body to wind down, let go of any tasks and prep for rest. I read, write, listen to music and savour evenings for creative flow and conversation with my husband. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Many. I practice conscious breath and meditation as my main allies. But I also spend A LOT of time with plants, growing, making, conversing and in nature scapes. This is for me the ultimate mindfulness practice of oneness, presence and connection. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Scrambled eggs with turmeric, garlic and greens, avocado and some home fermented veggies on the side.  Lunch – Wild caught Mahi Mahi with tarragon, parsley, lemon and garlic cooked in ghee, on top of a bed of greens with some roasted sweet potato on the side. (Literally one of my favourite dishes ever) Snack – I love smoothies. Often a smoothie, my current fav is Strawberries, cashew nut butter, cashew nut mylk, collagen, hemp seeds, tocos, cinnamon, vanilla powder & ashwaganda powder. Dinner - San choy bow, with a rainbow of veggies & lots of bold ginger flavour in vibrant cos lettuce cups. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I actually do not, I am completely stimulant free. I have not always been, but just find myself so very sensitive to any stimulants these days. I used to love love love a great spicy black chai tea but since going caffeine free I have replaced it with a dandelion chai blend I make myself that is just so warming and grounding I adore it. Plus no crazy energy spikes and lows, so thats a plus! -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? At the same time when I let go of stimulants, I completely let go of sweets- even natural sweeteners. In the past I have been an avid lover of raw chocolate and quite the connoisseur (ha) but these days I make my own carob chocolate that has no sweetener in it at all. I love carob as it’s very sweet naturally so you can get away with no added sweeteners. I pair it with vanilla powder and they work synergistically to give a natural sweetness that I find so comforting. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I do utilize supplement support as needed, this shifts as my body shifts. I love Vitamin C on so many levels but particularly for its adrenally restorative healing elements, so it is absolutely in my daily supplement routine, alongside Magnesium citrate on the daily. With herbs, I will vary what I am taking depending on my needs. I add herbal powders and medicinal mushrooms to my tonics and smoothies. Currently my favourites are Withania (Ashwaganda) and Reishi. I also am a huge lover of infusions (long loose leaf herbal brews) and always have a big jar of an overnight infusion with me to sip throughout my day. My most utilized blend would be Nettle leaf, Oat straw and Hibiscus. Earthy, calming, tangy and nourishing. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Years go I had a heinous back injury, I herniated multiple discs from overexercising. My approach and relationship to body movement completely shifted after this, from rigorous to gentleness. It is still an area of my life I have to encourage myself back to and approach more as an act of self love. Taking care of my temple. I walk my pups daily, I love pilates and swimming, I have begun the be.come project and absolutely LOVE the approach to body movement with body positivity, inclusivity, no need for any equipment and in the comfort of my own home. This all feels really supportive and a mix of gentle yet effective support for me and my body. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I am not a natural athlete by any measure! I have recently connected to how emotional it can be to return to body movement when you have been through a big physical injury/­­body change/­­life change. So for me the way I psyche myself up to do a session is to come from self love, to know this is a loving act of care for my body. That really helps me so much. Also knowing there are no rules to how you must move your body, allow exercise to meet your vibration- yin, yang and all between. Shifting the type of body movement I do with my menstrual cycle/­­hormones is so key. Be your own compass. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Authenticity, when someone is just purely themselves and at ease with it. I find it absolutely stunning. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Oils, oils and more oil. I swear by the dewy hydration of oils. I am pretty low maintenance with skin care, and have noticed I need a lot less intervention since moving to the sea and swimming in the ocean most days. The salt magic is so nourishing for the skin. I also find the sun very healing, contrary to the fear of UV rays we have been indoctrinated with! I use a homemade herbal balm for a lot of applications, hair mask, makeup remover, and moisturizer. It is a power packed plant based mix, and such a heavenly blend. I also use Ritual oil, a moringa and blue lotus oil as a body moisturizer.  I am in my mid 30s and really notice my skin responds so well to the dewy goodness of oils. I practice dry body brushing also, which I feel is so wonderful to aid stagnation and lymphatic flow. I use a jade roller which I keep in the fridge for extra lymphatic cooling, and use on my face every few days with oil. I always end my showers with cold water, to add in a hydrotherapy element. I wear very little makeup, but when I do it is always natural, as clean as can be. I love RMS and Ere Perez. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? The importance of a vibrant whole foods diet and hydration is EVERYTHING! So many compounds in our foods, fruit + veggies are anti aging and collagen boosting anti oxidant heros. I drink 3+ litres of filtered water daily and do my very best to eat a rainbow of seasonal organic fruit/­­veggies daily and honestly I rely on this to support my health, skin and hair primarily. I do add in a marine based collagen daily to either smoothies or tonics. Also I am in a stage of encouraging my hair to grow, and am using nettle, rosemary and horsetail infusions as a hair rinse. I also massage in olive oil and rosemary oil into my scalp, truly it is so simple and aids hair growth. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? A low tox life is key. Keep your stress in check, move your body, eat as clean as possible – mostly plants, organics or pesticide free produce, clean water and clean air. The most incredibly glowy humans I know follow this ethos. This has been my guideline and I am often told I really do not look my age. I am so at ease with ageing but it is always nice to hear you are maintaining a youthful glow! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  I really do. I work for myself and direct all of my offerings at this point. This can be demanding and means work can have a never-ending feel. There are always so many thoughts, needs and energy streams flowing into my work life. I also feel when you work as a space holder and in the healing realms, your energy output can be hefty. Burn out is high in this line of work, as you truly want to assist so deeply to aid others, we can often throw our needs to the side. I have learnt this many times in my years as a clinician/­­healer. I implement a lot of consistency with a structured clinic week~ limiting the amount of clients I see weekly to where I feel my energy is at and how many clients I can truly be present for. I balance myself with time off, away from screens, in nature and welcome in receiving energy to counteract my giving energy. My self care practice is the core of how I seek balance. I am actually freakily good at giving back to myself, which I believe enables me to do what I do! -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? For me, it is much healthier to come at it head on.. (typical Aries answer!) I do my finest to address the stressors, and clear the way. Whether this means a mountain of admin,  which is often a stressor for me as I not a natural lover of admin. I bunker down, switch off all other distractions, play some flute music or chants, burn some incense and get in the zone. When I exit that zone I feel so accomplished and reward myself with an ocean swim, or a nature walk to balance out the mental space I have been in. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? First and foremost I rest. Immunity can be a very strong conversation our bodies communicate to us with the message of needed REST. My go to supplement and herbal approach is to take a high dose of Vitamin C consistently in divided doses throughout my day, I also add in zinc supplements. I always have an immune focused liquid herbal tonic in my first aid support cabinet, so I begin this at a high frequent dose to meet the acute presentation of a cold/­­virus~ generally dosing up to 4 x daily. Usually it will have Echinacea, andrographis, elderberry, manuka, thyme in it. I love medicinal mushrooms to support immunity so I will take a blend of Reishi and Chaga in higher doses. I avoid raw foods and focus on lots of cooked warming nourishing food to feed the cold, congees, broths, soups, stew. I also make fresh oregano, thyme with sliced lemon &  ginger tea. If I really honour the rest that is needed, the cold/­­rundown feelings will shift very swiftly. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? The best thing I ever did was to get a separate work phone. I have a dedicated phone that my clients can contact me on, so in my free time it is left at home or on silent. This has helped me enormously create healthy boundaries. I also do not have my work emails on my phone, so I do not check them at all unless I am sitting down at my computer to work. It is so important to be available to your own process and own life, especially when you are in the field of assisting others. These simple interventions help fortify those boundaries greatly for me. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I return to softness with myself if I lose my way a little. I do my best to not judge or engage in negative self talk. I soften and return to my centre. We all have patterns we are cycling. Although I feel I am quite a master of my own self care practice I definitely can get caught up in my workload a fair bit. One thing I do consciously do is to book a treatment in weekly in some form, usually a bodywork-massage session. I find this tactile healing so restorative. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? I recently moved from the mountains to the sea, although they are both completely beautiful nature rich locations I was very much in need a big environment change for my own health and wellbeing.  Having lived in a very cold environment mountain side for 10 + years I was craving the warmth, the salt and the sun. Being by the ocean and soaking up the sun rays has been so fundamentally healing for me at this point. Total game changer! The power of changing your environment is so potent when you feel the call to do so. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I acknowledge that this too shall pass, it is transient. I do my best to trust my own creative genius. I am quite a forward motion person, so when I am feeling uninspired it absolutely can get me down. I am naturally a procrastinator in many ways, which can be so frustrating but saying that I also have the ability to then smash out the tasks in an uncanny way! I often find when I am not in such a wonderful place with myself I feel that sense of stagnation, so I do my very best to get to the roots of that stagnation. Often it takes me getting into nature to be re inspired, crafting out some quiet space to re energize and tackle the task head on. I try to ask myself what is the block, and unpack the block to free up the energy flow. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. As cheesy at it sounds I LOVED Practical Magic, the witchy plant potions and the apothecary Sandra Bullocks character opened was a total inspiration for me as teenager.. & still is now (lol). Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a herbalist, nutritionist, and energetic healer? How do all of those practices interweave for you? I was always drawn to the esoteric realms and the mystery of nature. As a little girl I loved being outside, I loved the flowers, the trees, the plants, the grasses, the oceans, the mountains. I loved being an observer and always felt so held when I was in nature. As soon as I began to understand that plants could have a positive effect on our health, it just fascinated me. Learning about folklore of plant medicine, applications and remedies drew me into a language I wanted to be fluent in. I believe that much of our call to the plant path is remembering, these plants  have been with us through our ancestral lines for eons. My career began really at the age of 16 with energetic healing, I met a group of wild women up north in Australia and was welcomed into circles, introduced to the concepts of healing, and recognized as a student of these realms. I learnt reiki which led to crystal healing, then to sound healing, colour therapy, kinesiology.. I went to a college for 2 years to learn energetic healing in depth and graduated by the age of 19 holding full in depth sessions on auric healing and clearing energetic blockages. For me it felt too much too soon. So I went and travelled, met my husband in the USA and studied a whole lot more. When I returned to Australia I wanted to anchor my knowledge of healing with more grounded modalities so I began studying Naturopathic medicine. I forked off into a Bachelor of Western Herbal Medicine and Nutritional Medicine. I loved learning about plants and food as medicine, I loved the union of science and grass roots knowledge. Over years of being in practice, I have found that there is no way or no need to seperate these modalities. I weave them all in together to ultimately support the client in a very holistic way. I approach my practice with this lens of perception. I lead with intuition, and merge functional testing, pathology testing, traditional folk medicine, evidence based plant medicine, nutritional medicine, and energetics all to support. I believe there are always energetics involved in a health presentation, along with the demand for nutritional healing as powerful ally, and herbal medicine to assist, shift and support. Aligning these healing modalities is a potent combination. Essentially the basis of Naturopathic Medicine is individualised care, no one case is the same. This ethos rings true to me, there is not one client I have worked with that is the same as any other. How can we approach health in one way, or believe there is one remedy for one presentation? It goes against the nature of our uniqueness! My practice is about honouring the individuals path, story and health goals. -- You put a lot of emphasis on gut health in your practice and believe it to be the root to all balanced health. Can you talk a little bit about why you see this as such an important aspect of wellbeing?  All diseases begin in the gut – Hippocrates had it right! So many issues stem from the gut, it is the root of our health. With the emergence of continued evolving science we are seeing so much more information come to light around the microbiome/­­microbiota, which is truly wonderful. Much of our immunity is linked with gut health, it impacts mental health greatly with our second brain residing in the gut producing neurotransmitters, it is involved in the auto immune expression, it defines our ability to absorb and produce nutrients/­­vitamins/­­minerals, it impacts our metabolism, it is directly connected to our stress response and digestion responds accordingly.. And so much more... I work very closely with digestive healing with each and every one of my clients as I believe this is a key element to balanced health and shifting imbalanced symptoms. Many of my clients present with poor digestion and we dig like detectives to get to the roots, often it is a leaky gut like picture – with parasites, yeast overgrowths or SIBO which we generally detect via functional testing. Once we have a good sense of what is actually happening in the gut, we go in with a supportive treatment plan – lifestyle, supplemental, nutritional and herbal interventions. It always astounds me how health can transform so greatly, from imbalanced to balanced with the right support, intention and dedication. Our bodies are so wise, and so willing to transform. -- What is your favorite way of incorporating herbal medicine into your (or your clients) everyday life? I personally incorporate it in so many ways. I make my own products and use them on my skin and in my home on the daily, I drink herbal teas and infusions daily and use tonic herbs to support my body/­­being. I have a herbal garden that is buzzing right now, so connecting with the plants via gardening is medicine to me. There is something so potent about growing and caring for a plant and utilising her healing, knowing the story of the plants beginnings enhances the healing power I believe. For clients~ it really depends but I do always advise infusions to become a part of their everyday lives. They are so very simple and accessible, basically a long brewed overnight tea! If you are working with me in a session we will touch on many ways to incorporate plant medicine into your life, from the herbs that are suitable for your current process, to cleaning up your skin care with more plant love, to working with herbal tablets/­­liquid tonics for marked support. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? This next year feels so full of creativity, as I expand and launch multiple new offerings. Right now I am in a potent brewing stage, so I look forward to it all coming to fruition! -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Days off at the beach, going into the bush, gardening in my medicinal plant patch, reading a great book, screen free days, massages, hugs with my husband & dogs. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Braiding Sweetgrass – Robin Wall Kimmerer Song –  Stay – Cat Power/­­ Ba Movie –  Call me by your name Piece of Art –  A oil pastel pencil drawing gifted to me by my husband and family by my dear friend and incredible creator Chanel Tobler called Curves like jam -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Emily Lami from Bodha, she is a scent magician. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff Self-Care Interview Series: Lucy Vincent Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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