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Tofu vegetarian recipes

Vegan Potato Soup

yesterday 13:30 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Potato SoupThis thick, hearty Vegan Potato Soup is quick and easy to make using simple ingredients and very budget-friendly too. Enjoy it chunky as is, puree it until smooth and/­­ or get all fancy with toppings. Who’s up for a bowl of comforting vegan potato soup packed with veggie goodness? Warming, satisfying and soothing – that is what all fall-centric and especially potato-centric comfort food should be like. Whether it’s cold where you live or life has brought some downs that make you crave all the comfort food. This vegan potato soup is medicine for the soul. Super easy, hugely delicious and so filling you can have it as a main course. It’s amazing fresh but its even better the next day. So when you make this make lots and know you have some good eating ahead. It’s a great feeling. I like to finish mine off with some crumbled vegan coconut, tofu, or tempeh bacon and a sprinkle of chives for a pop of colour! MORE VEGAN SOUP RECIPES FOR THE SOUL - Lentil Chili. GF - Mushroom Chickpea Veggie Soup. GF - IP Mushroom Wild Rice Soup. GF - Japanese Veggie Curry. GF - Instant Pot Lasagna Soup with Red lentils.  - So Easy - IP Potato Chickpea Soup. GF - Tomato Soup with Tofu Croutons. - Tortilla soup with red lentils. GF Continue reading: Vegan Potato SoupThe post Vegan Potato Soup appeared first on Vegan Richa.

10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet

November 19 2020 Vegetarian Times 

With the new year just weeks away, the media is honing in on the top nutrition trends we can expect to see in 2021, and to no surprise increasing plant-protein remains at the top. Whether youre eating more plant-based for sustainability, health, or just because, rest assured there are a variety of whole food options you can choose from to meet your protein needs. But, before you head straight into the freezer department at your local grocer to pick up the latest faux meat product, lets take a look at 10 whole food sources of plant-based protein you may just want to toss into your cart instead! Reader beware, you may end up saving a few bucks once you realize how convenient and affordable many of these options are. Lentils Just one cup of cooked lentils provides nearly 18 grams of plant-protein and 16 grams of fiber for just 225 calories. Lentils also contain many important nutrients, like iron, potassium, zinc and choline (a nutrient that 90% of Americans arent getting enough of!) Plus, theyre budget-friendly with a 16-ounce bag of dried lentils coming in at just $2.99.  Registered Dietitian Kim Rose of www.kimrosedietitian.com recommends making a pot of seasoned lentils on the weekends. Divide them into individual 1 cup servings, and then add them to different meals throughout the week!  Youll find me turning lentils into meatballs, or for a really quick fix, adding a little bar-b-que sauce to them to make tasty, vegan sloppy joes. Hummus This plant-based spread can be made from a variety of beans and legumes, not just the traditional garbanzo bean you may think! Depending on the bean used, the protein content will vary slightly, but a standard 1/­­4 cup serving (or about 70 grams by weight) has roughly 6 grams of protein for just 180 calories. Plus, it often packs heart-healthy unsaturated fatty acids that help keep you fuller for longer too! Brynn McDowell, Registered Dietitian and cookbook author of The Mediterranean Diet Made Easy recommends using hummus in place of mayo on sandwiches or spreading it on bagels or toast! She suggests thinning it out and using it as a creamy salad dressing to add more plant-based protein to meals. Pistachios Pistachios are a good source of plant-based protein with a 1-ounce serving of the nut (shelled) providing 6 grams of it! Plus, they pack dietary fiber, potassium, and antioxidants that help keep your body in tip-top shape. While the shelled variety tends to be a tad pricier, you can still pick up a 10-ounce in-shell bag for about $5.49 at most markets. Lauren Manaker, Registered Dietitian, and author of Fueling Male Fertility, recommends to use shelled pistachios as a salad topped in place of grilled chicken or shrimp. The plant-based protein boost that also gives you fiber and healthy fats for staying power. You can also toss pistachios in trail mixes and in oatmeal as a topping for added nutrition and crunch! Related: Healthy Late-Night Snacks Chickpeas One of the most common forms of plant-based protein on the market is the good ole chickpea (aka, the garbanzo bean!) With nearly 7.5 grams of protein, 6.5 grams of fiber, and 3.7 mg of iron in just 1/­­2 cup serving of cooked chickpeas, its a great way to increase the total nutrient density of your diet. The best part: a pound of chickpeas (dried) often comes in at less than $3.00! NYC-based Registered Dietitian, Natalie Rizzo, MS, RD, is a big fan of adding chickpeas to both meals and snacks! From grain bowls to veggie burgers, or roasted as a protein-filled snack, chickpeas offer a convenient and affordable plant-based protein to nearly every diet. Edamame (Soybeans) Edamame is the immature form of the soybean that is often eaten from the shell (or shelled) alongside traditional Asian dishes. Regardless of the form of soybean you eat, they can easily be incorporated into a balanced diet with two servings being a reasonable goal for adults. A half-cup of shelled edamame packs nearly 9.5 grams of plant-based protein and 4 grams of fiber, as well as iron, potassium, folate, and choline! Sarah Koszyk, Sports Nutritionist and author of 25 Anti-Aging Smoothies for Revitalizing, Glowing Skin, recommends pureeing edamame in a hummus, dip, or pesto. Spread the edamame purees on a sandwich or wrap, add it to a burrito, or toss it with a salad, pasta, or rice dish. If youre looking to venture into the other forms of soybeans (like tofu), Registered Dietitian Sylvia Klinger of Hispanic Food Communications suggests blending silken tofu with oil, spices and herbs makes for a delicious high protein dressing, or adding a soy-based curd to pancakes to boost the protein there as well! Tempeh Tempeh is a fermented product made from soybeans in addition to some whole grains, seasonings and other flavorings. A 4-ounce serving of this soy-based protein packs nearly 20 grams of protein, in addition to a host of nutrition benefits. For starters, tempeh is filled with nutrients like manganese, magnesium, phosphorus and B vitamins in addition to its role as a probiotic. Jenna Braddock, Florida based at MakeHealthyEasy.com recommends spending a little bit of time prepping it to make the perfect dish! Braddock suggests crumbling the tempeh, then marinating it and finishing with a sear in a hot pan to add instant protein to salads, wraps, bowls and tacos. Pill Nuts Pronounced peel-y, this nut is native to the pili tree often found in Northern Australia and the Philippines. While lower in protein comparatively speaking per serving size (a 1/­­4 cup serving provides 3 grams in comparison to some of the other nuts), it packs a nutritional punch in that it contains essential amino acids the human body needs. This nut is harder to find at local markets, and you will need to likely shop online and be willing to spend about $16.99 for a one-pound bag. Maya Feller, nationally recognized nutrition expert and author of The Southern Comfort Food Diabetes Cookbook, recommends enjoying this mildly flavored nut in yogurt form (yes, brands are now popping up incorporating this nut into their yogurts!) smothered over a stack of pancakes or in their raw form as a crunchy snack. Hemp Seeds Three tablespoons of hulled hemp seeds provide nearly 10 grams of plant-based protein to your meal for just 170 calories. Plus, theyre full of iron and unsaturated fats while offering a great nut-free alternative for crunch. While a bit more pricey than other seeds (a 12-ounce bag is roughly $12.99), theyre an easy addition to boost plant-protein on simple foods. Plant-based sports dietitian, Kelly Jones of kellyjonesnutrition.com recommends adding them to oatmeal, sprinkling them onto pancakes, using as a topper for soups and salads, and incorporating into homemade energy bites! Lupini Beans Lupini beans are a staple of the Mediterranean diet and making a name for themselves in the US due to their high protein content. In just a 1/­­2 cup cooked serving of the bean it packs nearly 13 grams of plant-based protein. But, where it packs in protein it lacks in fiber, with that same 1/­­2 cup serving providing only 2 grams. Found traditionally in the jarred food section of the market, there are a few ways you can cook with them! Amy Gorin, a plant-based registered dietitian and owner of Plant-Based Eats recommends draining and rinsing the beans as you would do with any other canned beans. Then, use them in your favorite dishes, like her delicious plant-based lupini salad! Quinoa One of the only whole grains that is a complete source of protein (containing all 9 essential amino acids), this is an excellent (and affordable) gluten-free, plant-based protein addition to nearly any diet! One cup of cooked quinoa contains nearly 8 grams of protein for just 220 calories (plus nearly 5 grams of fiber.) Quinoa also contains many important B vitamins as well as potassium and antioxidants. Registered Dietitian Tamara Hoffman of Unbeetable Nutrition and Wellness recommends adding quinoa to your taco Tuesday menus with a spicy Mexican seasoning or sauteing it into your stir-fry dishes with a soy sauce. The post 10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Vegan Butternut Squash Carbonara

November 7 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Butternut Squash CarbonaraThis Vegan Butternut Squash Carbonara is a dairy-free spin on the traditional Italian Carbonara recipe with a creamy cashew cheese butternut squash carbonara sauce! Serve with crispy roasted smoky bacon-ish tofu.Jump to Recipe This easy vegan Butternut Squash Carbonara is the perfect fall and winter dinner. It’s a creamy spin on my popular Pumpkin Sage pasta and trust me, it will likely become a staple you will make again and again. Traditional Italian Carbonara Sauce is made from parmesan cheese and egg yolks.  This vegan version is just as deliciously rich and creamy (even without egg or dairy), thanks to cashew cream, and even quite cheesy thanks to nutritional yeast, and a hearty thanks to miso paste and fresh sage! While traditional Carbonara is often topped with bacon or pancetta, I wanted that smoky “chew” on top and went with oven-roasted tofu. Before roasting the tofu, we coat it in a whole bunch of spices to bring on the smoky-sweet notes. Let me tell you this dish has a perfect balance and blend of cozy fall flavors (butternut squash + sage = fall central)! A simple plant-based pasta dinner or plant-based lunch your whole family will love. Even your kids will give this a big thumbs up! Let’s make this gorgeous fall meal.Continue reading: Vegan Butternut Squash CarbonaraThe post Vegan Butternut Squash Carbonara appeared first on Vegan Richa.

7 Tips for Shaking Sugar

November 7 2020 Vegetarian Times 

1. Rethink breakfast and afternoon treats Many people who decide to eat less sugar face two immediate challenges: what to eat for breakfast and finding a non-sweet afternoon treat, says Amy Chaplin, author of Whole Food Cooking Every Day (2020, Artisan/­­Workman Publishing Co., Inc.) which includes many sugar-free recipes. For breakfast, Chaplin suggests making your own muesli or granola using yakon syrup, a natural sweetener that is low on the glycemic index (GI) scale (meaning it doesnt bombard your body with sugar because it is digested slowly). Other options: tofu scrambles and steel-cut oatmeal. For snacks, go for apple slices with peanut butter, plain yogurt with blueberries or carrots and hummus. Instead of soda or fruit juices, drink chilled sparkling water with a slice of lemon or herbal teas. 2. Know what you are eating There are at least 200 other names for sugar on food labels, says Uma Naidoo, MD, director of Nutritional and Lifestyle Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital and author of This Is Your Brain on Food (2020 Little Brown Spark/­­Hachette). Fructose, dextrose and maltose are just a few. And look for added sugars Dr. Naidoo advises. Foods like ketchup, pasta sauces and salad dressings often have more added sugars than sweet foods where you expect sugar. 3. Mind your carbs Choose to eat complex carbs that are low on the GI scale such as apples, oranges, bran cereals and black beans, which are slowly digested, and skip simple carbs such as potatoes, French fries, white rice, white pasta and refined breakfast cereals which are high on the scale. 4. Try new ingredients When cooking, use naturally sweet ingredients in place of sugar. I like using freshly squeezed orange juice, berries and berry powders, beet juice powder, vanilla, coconut butter or dried coconut flakes, says Chaplin. Medjool dates are another good choice, and spices such as cinnamon add extra flavor. Related: 8 Way to Improve Your Gut Health & Mood 5. Be fruit-wise Because fruit contains fiber and nutrients, it is digested slowly and its sugar is absorbed slowly too. Still, its wise to limit fruit. I prefer lower glycemic fruit such as blueberries, blackberries, strawberries and Bing cherries. These options contain less fructose, the natural sugar in fruit, says Dr. Naidoo. Two to three servings of fruit eaten throughout the day should be OK for most people, she adds, unless you are diabetic or have fructose intolerance in which case you should consult with your doctor. 6. Remember why its important Sweet cravings are hard to resist. Sugar-laden foods increase serotonin in the brain and make you feel good, explains Dr. Naidoo. The calming effect of serotonin may often be felt shortly after eating a candy bar, cake, or other foods high in simple carbs--this is a reason why these foods can be so addictive. Remind yourself that consuming too much sugar can raise the risk of life-threatening illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease when overwhelmed with a craving for a sugary sweet, 7. Enjoy dessert! Dont deprive yourself of luscious desserts. Start to replace those sugary treats with healthier options that still taste good, says Dr. Naidoo. Another option is to switch to baking with erythritol--sold as Swerve--in recipes, says Dr. Naidoo. Even when using artificial sweeteners, however, moderation is key. She also suggests making your own fruit-based ice cream. Amy Chaplins new cookbook features fruit-based desserts such as Berry Chia Pudding--A crowd pleaser for sure! Chaplin says. Click here for the recipe. The post 7 Tips for Shaking Sugar appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Alternative Meats: A Convenience or a Curse?

November 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Have you started swinging through the drive-thru more frequently since fast-food chains decided to hop on board with plant-based burger options? Sure, Burger Kings Impossible Whopper and Carls Jr.s meatless Beyond Meat burger may seem like enticing options after a long day -- heck, even Ikea is rumored to be working on a meatless version of its famous Swedish meatballs. And of course, its an encouraging sign that a plant-based lifestyle is becoming more mainstream, especially when its accepted in restaurants known for their beefy offerings. But could racking up too many fast-food visits mean youre sacrificing some of the positive health benefits associated with a plant-based diet for the sake of convenience? Meat alternatives are taking center stage because more and more people are recognizing that taking meat off our menus is an imperative if we are to preserve the planets life support systems for future generations, says Brenda Davis, R.D., a world-renowned expert in plant-based nutrition and coauthor of Nourish: The Definitive Plant-Based Nutrition Guide for Families. Aside from being better for the planet, her coauthor, Reshma Shah, M.D., a plant-based pediatrician, notes the many health attributes with this lifestyle. Plant-based diets have been associated with longevity, a decreased risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, certain cancers, and a healthy gut, she explains. Studies suggest the people eating a plant-based diet have a lower risk of being overweight or obese. Additionally, plant-based diets have been shown to be an effective strategy for treating many of the chronic diseases that make up the leading causes of death in the United States and throughout the world. 5 Pros of Alternative Meats First, lets explore the benefits of adding alternative meats to your diet: - Easy protein source. Some people may benefit from these concentrated, and very bioavailable protein sources. For athletes who struggle meeting protein needs, these foods can rapidly boost protein intake, says Davis. Also, for seniors who have higher protein needs, and lower calorie intakes, it can be tough to meet recommended intakes. Meat alternatives can help boost protein intakes in a way that is simple and palatable for seniors. - A non-threatening way to transition to eating less meat. New to the world of plant-based eating? Or simply trying to replace a few meat-based dishes each week? Plant-based meat alternatives can offer convenience for busy families, provide an alternative in social situations, and make the transition to a plant-based diet more enjoyable and sustainable in the long run, says Dr. Shah. You may find that you rely on these foods more at the beginning of your plant-based journey. As many people become more comfortable cooking and enjoying a variety of whole, plant foods, they may end up eating these foods less often. - Cleaner fuel. Plant-based meats are lower in persistent organic pollutants that are most concentrated in products at the top of the food chain, such as meat, fish and dairy products, says Davis. Also, plant-based meats cannot form heterocyclic amines, which are carcinogenic compounds formed when meat, poultry or fish are cooked at high temperatures. - Lesser inflammatory response. Plant-based meats are much lower in endotoxins (also known as lipopolysaccharides) than ground meats, which Davis says are associated with chronic inflammation and several disease states. - Reduced risk of food poisoning. Plant-based meat alternatives don’t carry the risk of foodborne disease from bacterial contamination in the same way that animal-based foods do, says Dr. Shah. Related: Tofu: The Unsung Hero of Coronavirus-Related Meat Shortages 5 Cons of Alternative Meats There are some downsides to alternative meat consumption, too: - Processed food is still processed food. While it might be tempting to skip purchasing whole ingredients and making your meals from scratch, the tradeoffs may not be worth it. Most plant-based meat alternatives tend to be higher in calories, fat, sodium, and additives compared to whole plant foods -- like beans and rice, says Dr. Shah. While plant-based meat alternatives are higher in fiber -- animal foods contain no fiber-- and are devoid of cholesterol, they certainly would not be considered a health food when compared to a homemade burger made of black beans, quinoa, and veggies. - Budget-buster. Currently, meat alternatives are rather expensive, sometimes even more expensive than meat. As the demand increases, this may change. - Quality depends on the brand. Meat alternatives vary in their quality, but are generally fairly highly processed foods, says Davis. Some are made from extracted plant proteins, fats, seasonings and preservatives, while others are made from black beans and quinoa. Consumers who want minimally processed foods need to read the label. - Allergens abound. Are you sensitive to gluten, soy or nuts? Meat alternatives are often based on ingredients that are associated with common allergens, so be sure to read labels carefully to avoid a reaction. - Nutrient deficient options. Davis says that meat alternatives are not always fortified with vitamin B12 or zinc, both of which are relatively high in meat. Make sure youre getting enough of these nutrients via the rest of your diet or through supplements. Related: 8 Must-Try Alternative Milks How to Shop for Alternative Meats A simple ingredient list with recognizable foods is always a good place to start. Next, Dr. Shah says to consider the amount of fat (especially saturated fat), sodium, and other additives. One particular additive that has gained scrutiny is the addition of heme iron in certain plant-based meat alternatives, she says. Heme-iron is added to enhance the meaty flavor and appearance of these foods -- but its thought to be pro-inflammatory, cause increased body iron stores, and provide an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. How Often Should You Consumer Alternative Meats? As with most things in life, moderation is key. Eating plant-based meat alternatives from time to time can certainly be a part of a healthy diet, but relying on them on a regular basis -- especially if they are taking the place of whole, plant foods -- would not be considered health-promoting, concludes Dr. Shah. Its also important to note that the consumption frequency may depend on your overall state of health. What is safe and appropriate for one individual may be quite different for another, explains Davis. If you struggle with hypertension or cardiovascular disease, you will want to minimize intake of the high sodium, high-fat meat alternatives. The post Alternative Meats: A Convenience or a Curse? appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Holidays

November 1 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Holidays We are so excited to tell you about our new holiday ebook! It’s a collection of our favorite, festive, plant-based recipes, developed with the intention of bringing color and joy to your holiday table. As always, the focus is on flavor-packed, whole food ingredients and inspiring, seasonal produce. This project was so incredibly fun to work on. Dreaming up a celebratory table of vibrant, plant-forward dishes, and bringing it to life is just a really gratifying thing to do. Coming together around a table of good food is one of the undeniable pleasures of life, and we hope that these recipes will become yours as you celebrate with your loved ones. We are also launching the holiday ebook bundle, which includes the holiday ebook along with our desserts ebook for $4 off the total price. You can check out a few sneak peek photos from the ebook, plus the full recipe index below. Buy the Holiday Ebook /­­ Buy the Holiday Ebook Bundle ($4 Off) Recipe Index *all recipes are vegan, all but 4 recipes are gluten-free - Sour Cream and Shallot Dip - Stuffed Mushrooms with Smoky Quinoa and Cashew Parm - Smashed Potato Latke Bites - Beet Caviar - Butternut Squash, Farro and White Bean Salad - Holiday Slaw with Tahini-Orange Dressing - Miso-Roasted Cauliflower and Grapes with Green Caper Sauce - Leek and Potato Soup with Brussels Sprout Chips - Maple-Mustard Brussels Sprouts - Mashed Potatoes with Mushroom White Bean Gravy - Herb and Walnut Stuffing/­­Dressing - Sweet Potato and Caramelized Onion Casserole - Creamy Butternut Squash and Apple Soup with Fried Shallots - Cranberry and Pear Sauce - Leeks in Vinaigrette - Cardamom Rice - Lentil Loaf with Balsamic Glaze - Coconut-Braised Red Cabbage - Orange and Sage Tempeh - Red Onion Tart with Tofu Ricotta - Quinoa and Vegetable Pot Pie with Gluten-Free Crust - Chocolate Fudge - Seeded Pumpkin Bread with Apple Butter - Rosemary Almonds - Gingerbread Banana Granola Buy the Holiday Ebook /­­ Buy the Holiday Ebook Bundle ($4 Off) The post New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Holidays appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

My Thoughts for Air Fryer

October 7 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

After giving it much thought, I finally decided to get an air fryer. I checked out many of them and eventually decided to get the Air Fryer Convection Toaster Oven: it includes a toaster, oven, and air fryer all in one. Another reason I decided to buy this one is to save kitchen countertop space. I replaced the toaster oven with this air fryer. So far, I am enjoying it. As a toaster oven, it does a better job than any toaster or toaster oven I have used. I am very happy with the oven feature: it is big enough to bake a cake, small batches of cookies, and a medium size pizza. I dont do much baking, but I have started baking more because the air fryer is easy to use and needs less time to bake it preheats in 2-3 minutes easily. It is also easy to clean. When using it as an air fryer (the reason I purchased this new gadget), it so far has not produced very satisfactory results except in grilling vegetables, tofu, paneer, and roasting nuts. I also use this to dry roast poha (flat rice) and makhana (fox nuts) half the way and then finish roasting in a frying pan, which saves some time but more importantly because for both things you need constant stirring which becomes too much for my shoulder. I do make both items very often. I have tried making French fries, pakora, samosa, katchori, and salteen crackers. If you eat these items as soon as they come out from the air fryer, they taste just okay, in my opinion. Also, using the air fryer did not save any time and the items lost the flavor. One of my friends suggested she liked heating the frozen snacks like samosas, katchories. I decided to try this; I got frozen samosa and katchories from the grocery store, and yes they came out good when I heated them. The question is why I needed the Air Fryer for that since I could have done the same in the toaster oven or in a conventional oven.  I am looking for help and suggestions. If you have any vegetarian recipe you were happy with, I will try and do the recipe.  I will like you to share your suggestions. Thanks! The post My Thoughts for Air Fryer appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Jalape?o Popper Chickpea Salad Sandwich

August 12 2020 Vegan Richa 

Jalape?o Popper Chickpea Salad SandwichThis Jalapeno Popper Chickpea Salad Sandwich recipe combines two favorites into a new exciting lunch sandwich! Protein-rich chickpeas and veggies tossed with a creamy tofu dip, with a bit of a kick thanks to both pickled and fresh jalapenos!  Jump to Recipe I love Jalape?o Popper anything: Apart from classic Vegan Jalape?o Poppers  I already have Jalape?o Popper Dip, Jalapeno Popper Pizza, and this Tempeh Scramble Wrap recipe with Jalape?o Popper Dip. So yes, I have a thing for Jalape?o Poppers. Here’s my new favorite spin on this crowd-pleasing appetizer! Jalape?o Popper Chickpea Salad – a quick, easy, and flavorful vegan lunch sandwich that you can prep ahead and pack for an epic office lunch all week. The whole flavor of jalape?o popper in a simple sandwich that is healthy and packed with plant-based protein. I like to use both fresh and pickled jalapeno peppers for the chickpea salad recipe for double the jalapeno flavor but you can add a bit less if you cannot handle a lot of heat.Continue reading: Jalape?o Popper Chickpea Salad SandwichThe post Jalape?o Popper Chickpea Salad Sandwich appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Baked Rigatoni with Vegan Meat Sauce

August 2 2020 Vegan Richa 

Baked Rigatoni with Vegan Meat SauceVegan Baked Rigatoni is an easy weeknight meal the whole family will love! This comforting one-dish pasta is made with rigatoni, lentil bolognese, and cheesy tofu mozzarella topping. Gluten-free & soy-free &  Nut-free options.Jump to Recipe Youre going to love this recipe for Vegan Baked Rigatoni! Its basically a lazy lasagna! Absolutely perfect for when company comes over and you want to please everyone, vegans and carnivores alike. super easy to make this as a busy weeknight dinner because its so quick. It can be made gluten-free if needed or whole grain. For that cheesy topping I went with non-dairy tofu mozzarella cheese which is just blended up tofu and is quick and easy and creamy! You make it in the blender and it takes just seconds to make. For the “ragu” I went with a simple vegan lentil bolognese that is basically just marinara, lentils, Italian herbs! DONE. How easy is this?Continue reading: Baked Rigatoni with Vegan Meat SauceThe post Baked Rigatoni with Vegan Meat Sauce appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Potato and Soy Goulash

July 18 2020 seitan is my motor 

Potato and Soy GoulashEasy to make and very flavourful protein-rich potato goulash. No tofu! The post Potato and Soy Goulash appeared first on seitan is my motor.

Tie-Dye Purple Cauliflower Alfredo

July 17 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Tie-Dye Purple Cauliflower Alfredo Serves 6 The world is a nightmare, dinner doesnt have to be. What if pasta could be a fantasy dreamworld where our alfredo was tie-dye purple? But this alfredo is not just pretty, its so, so tasty! Purple cauliflower is braised just until tender, keeping its color somewhat intact and bringing a deep, cruciferous flavor, plus lots of creaminess, to the sauce.  Note, I said it keeps its color somewhat intact. I had to throw in a non-conventional ingredient to make the lavender pop a bit. Dont hate…its frozen blueberries! But you really cant taste them and you know you have some laying around for the apocalypse.  So youll be left with a pretty lavender sauce to coat your noodles in. But it doesnt stop there! Take a lemon and squirt it over the plate, then watch your lavender deepem into fuschia and magenta streaks, splotches and ribbons of color. You are the greatest artist of your generation. Make sure to do this tableside and get a video of it.  OK, now get yourself on an app, order some purple cauli and whip this up! Its good wholesome entertainment for the whole fam (or your cats) and a relaxing escape that will make you think of a better possible future. Right? Recipes Notes ~ Some serving ideas: grilled or breaded tofu, tofu balls (recipes for all of those exist on this site, I’m just too world weary to link to them), toasted pine nuts, springs of fresh basil, your favorite fake chick’n. ~ Bottled lemon juice will work, but fresh will taste better! ~ If you dont have purple cauli this wont work out but it will still be a tasty cauliflower recipe.  ~ For best results, trim the white parts of the cauliflower away as much as possible so that you are left with mostly purple floret. ~ Dont use too dark a veg broth. The lighter you go, the less muted your sauce will be. ~ If you dont have a high speed blender, do not despair. Just soak the cashews for at least 2 hours (preferably overnight) and proceed with your regular old blender. You can also boil them for 20 minutes if you are super short on time and didnt plan ahead. Ingredients 2 tablespoons refined coconut oil 1 cup sliced shallot 6 cloves garlic, minced 3 cups vegetable broth 1 head purple cauliflower in small florets (about 6 cups) 3/­­4 cups whole unroasted cashews 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice (plus extra for squeezing) 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast 10 frozen blueberries 3/­­4 teaspoons salt 1 pound fettuccine, cooked according to package directions in salted water Directions 1 – Boil salted water for pasta and get that whole thing going. By the time youre done making the sauce sauce the pasta should be drained and ready.  2 – Preheat a large pan over medium heat. Sauté shallot in coconut oil with a pinch of salt for 5 to 7 minutes. Add the garlic to the pan and spoon a little dab of oil on it. Mix in with the shallots and cook another 2 minutes.  3 – Add the broth, cover pan and bring to a boil. Place the cauliflower in the pan in as much of a single layer as possible. Cover and steam about 4 minutes. Mix cauliflower in the liquid, cover and steam another 4 minutes. It should be fork tender. Remove a few florets to place on the individual pasta plates later, if you like. 4 – In the meantime, place the cashews, lemon juice, nutritional yeast, blueberries and salt in a high speed blender (see note if you don’t have a highspeed blender). When the cauliflower is done, transfer it to the blender. Let sit for 10 minutes or so just to stop steaming. At that point, blend until smooth, scraping down the sides 5 – When pasta is ready, drain and pour the sauce over it. Reserve a little bit for dolloping over the plates of pasta. Taste pasta for salt. The saltiness with vary depending on your salted water and the saltiness of the broth. 6 – Place pasta in bowls, spoon additional sauce over noodles. Now take a seeded lemon and squirt it all over the pasta. Voila! Tie dye alfedo.

Chocolate-Kissed Peanut Butter Pie

July 14 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Chocolate-Kissed Peanut Butter Pie The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook comes out in just four weeks. Let’s celebrate with something sweet from the book! The Chocolate-Kissed Peanut Butter Pie is everything you could want in a dessert and more.  The “more” being PROTEIN, of course! Each small serving of this decadent confection contains 12 grams of plant protein. This peanut butter pie is complemented by chocolate because: chocolate. The addition of almond flour and tofu (plus the peanuts and peanut butter, of course) provide a wealth of protein to this decadent treat. If you prefer a firm fudgy texture, keep the pie in the freezer; for a softer, creamier texture, keep it in the refrigerator. While the book concentrates mostly on the savory side of plant protein, this recipe shows that there are some sweet treats in store as well.  Best of all, the recipes are all plant foods — no protein powders are called for in any of the recipes. Have you pre-ordered your copy of The Plant-Protein Revolution Cookbook yet? Do it now and get bonus recipes. If you pre-order before August 11, 2020, my publisher will send you additional bonus recipes that you can start using right away! Just send your proof of purchase to the following e-mail address: plantproteinrev@quarto.com and theyll send you the bonus recipes. Now about that pie…. Chocolate-Kissed Peanut Butter Pie This recipe is from The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook by Robin Robertson (c) 2020, The Harvard Common Press. Photo by Jackie Sobon. Crust - 11/­­2 cups (129 g) almond flour - 1/­­4 cup (22 g) unsweetened cocoa powder - 1/­­4 cup (80 g) pure maple syrup - 1 tablespoon (14 g) refined coconut oil, plus more as needed, melted Filling - 1 cup (175 g) vegan semi-sweet chocolate chips, melted - 1 (12-ounce [340 g]) package firm silken tofu, drained - 1 cup (260 g) creamy natural peanut butter - 1/­­3 cup (106 g) pure maple syrup - 1 tablespoon (5 g) unsweetened cocoa powder - 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract Drizzle - 1/­­2 cup (88 g) vegan dark chocolate chips - 1/­­2 teaspoon refined coconut oil - 1/­­4 cup (36 g) crushed unsalted dry-roasted peanuts - Line a 9-inch (23 cm) springform pan with parchment paper. - To make the crust, in a food processor, combine the flour, cocoa powder, maple syrup, and coconut oil. Blend until crumbly and well mixed. If the mixture doesnt hold together when pinched between your fingers, add up to 1 tablespoon (15 ml) additional coconut oil. Use your fingers to press the mixture evenly into the bottom and about halfway up the sides of the pan. Place the pan in the freezer while you make the filling. - To make the filling, combine all the filling ingredients in a food processor and blend until completely smooth. Pour the filling into the prepared crust and refrigerate or freeze for 4 hours, or until firm. - To make the drizzle, in a microwave-safe bowl, combine the chocolate chips and coconut oil. Microwave for 30 seconds, then stir. If not completely melted, microwave again for 10 seconds at a time until melted. Drizzle the melted chocolate over the top of the pie and sprinkle with the crushed peanuts. Store in the refrigerator for up to 3 days or in the freezer for up to 1 month. Variation: Try swapping out the peanut butter and peanuts for almond butter and crushed almonds. The post Chocolate-Kissed Peanut Butter Pie appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Tofu in Creamy Black Pepper Tomato Sauce – Dum Tofu Paneer Kali Mirch

June 17 2020 Vegan Richa 

Tofu in Creamy Black Pepper Tomato Sauce – Dum Tofu Paneer Kali MirchTofu in Creamy Black Pepper Tomato Sauce is a weeknight dinner your whole family will love! This easy Indian tofu recipe treats pan-fried firm tofu pieces to a bath of deliciously aromatic and creamy peppery gravy.  Serve over rice or with naan or roti. Oil-free, soy-free and nut-free options included. Jump to Recipe I know, tofu may not seem like the most exciting food to some of you. But hey, when you wrap it in a blanket of flavors it turns into a thing of beauty! I mean, what’s not to love about crispy fried tofu cubes in a fragrant creamy sauce? While I do already have some pretty amazing tofu curries on the blog, this one is special in so many ways. Dum Tofu Paneer Kali Mirch, you guys! A lip-smacking delicious creamy vegan tofu curry that is packed with vibrant flavors and so easy to make that it could be dinner on any given weeknight. As the name suggests this dish has a good amount of Kali Mirch ( black pepper ) which really livens up the gravy so don’t skimp on it. This one-pot dish is perfect as a warming main course on a rainy day. The signature-orange tomato gravy wraps itself silkily around your the tofu cubes and is sure to wow your tastebuds! This is a chunky sauce,  for smooth sauce, purée tomatoes in a blender and add to the skillet.Continue reading: Tofu in Creamy Black Pepper Tomato Sauce – Dum Tofu Paneer Kali MirchThe post Tofu in Creamy Black Pepper Tomato Sauce – Dum Tofu Paneer Kali Mirch appeared first on Vegan Richa.

The Best Plant-Based Foods to Eat (and Avoid) Before Bed for a Better Sleep

June 1 2020 Meatless Monday 

The Best Plant-Based Foods to Eat (and Avoid) Before Bed for a Better SleepSometimes its just impossible to fall asleep; and, sure, it could be due to excitement or stress, but many restless nights might be a result of the food we had for dinner (or dessert). What we eat plays an important role in how we sleep, because fruits, vegetables, legumes, and even spices contain a complex array of nutrients that all have different effects on our bodies. And while some ingredients can help quell restless nights, others may have the opposite effect, keeping you wired and jittery for hours. So, the next time youre planning your weekly dinner menu, be sure to keep your sleep schedule in mind. Check out our list of plant-based foods to eat (and avoid) before bed for a better sleep. What to Eat:   Almonds A welcomed addition to a strawberry kale salad , trail mix, or Asian noodle bowl , almonds are packed with all the nutrients necessary for healthy eating. But almonds also contain certain minerals that make them useful sleep aids , specifically high amounts of magnesium, which has been found to reduce inflammation and levels of cortisol, a stress-hormone attributed to disrupting sleep.   Bananas Universally beloved for its convenience and mellow flavor, the banana is also a good source of tryptophan, an amino acid associated with sleep. Have breakfast for dinner with a plate of banana buckwheat pancakes or a bowl of banana maple oatmeal , and set yourself up for a sound snooze. Chamomile Tea Its well known, and well documented, that herbal teas can help you relax, but chamomile tea is particularly capable of improving your sleep . Chamomile contains apigenin, an antioxidant that binds to certain receptors in the brain that may promote sleepiness and reduce insomnia.   Kiwi Who wouldve thought this odd, little, green fruit could be the answer to your restless nights? Okay, maybe thats an overstatement, but research does show that kiwis contain high of serotonin, a brain chemical that helps regulate the sleep cycle. Kiwis can be tricky to eat, so we recommend throwing them into the blender for a late-night kiwi-basil smoothie .   Oatmeal Complex carbohydrates, like oats, have the power to induce drowsiness before sleep. Oats -- one of our favorite inexpensive Meatless Monday pantry staples -- contain melatonin, making them a potentially useful sleep aid if consumed before bed.   What to Avoid:   Beans The humble legume is packed with a bounty of nutritional benefits -- protein, fiber, minerals -- but beans may not be the best things to eat right before bed. Eating a bowl of chili or rice and beans before sleep, although delicious, is asking for a night of indigestion and gas pains.   Broccoli Broccoli is a great addition to any diet, but it shouldnt be consumed close to bed time. Fibrous foods, like broccoli, take the body longer to digest, which may keep you awake at night.   Candy An evening full of candy or other sugary treats will have you tossing and turning in bed. Candy is typically composed straight sugar, which can cause wild swings in blood-sugar levels. The initial sugar crash may help you fall asleep, but afterward youll be stuck wide awake.   Cured Meats Preserved meats contain high concentrations of the amino acid tyramine, which signals the brain to release norepinephrine, a neurotransmitter that readies the body for action. Levels of norepinephrine are lowest during sleep and highest during dangerous or stressful situations. Not an ideal combination for night time. Thankfully, there are plenty of plant-based swaps to satisfy your cravings for salty, fatty foods. Spicy Food Finishing off a spicy bowl of curry or cauliflower Buffalo wings will awaken your taste buds, but it will also keep you awake. Chile peppers can be good for you, but eating them before bedtime can lead to indigestion, heart burn, and elevated body temperature -- physical qualities that impair sleep.   Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post The Best Plant-Based Foods to Eat (and Avoid) Before Bed for a Better Sleep appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Label Lingo: Plant-Based Diet vs. Vegan Diet

November 6 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Plant-based products have never been hotter. From grocery store aisles to restaurant menus, the term plant-based is everywhere these days. Meanwhile, vegan has become so mainstream that it seems like every day, you hear about another celebrity or athlete going vegan. So does plant-based mean vegan and vice versa? Its hard enough reading labels on food products let alone figuring out the difference between these terms, especially when you throw whole food in front of plant-based. While they do have things in common, there are differences between these labels. Experts untangle them below. Related: 5 Plant-Based Subscription Meal Kits Guaranteed to Make Your Taste Buds Happy Plant-Based Versus Vegan As the name implies, plant-based dieters are focused on increasing the amount of plant-based food sources in their meals. This means more fruits, vegetables, legumes, tubers, nuts, seeds, legumes and grains. Although a person on a plant-based diet may still consume foods with animal products and/­­or byproducts, the ratio of plant-based sources increases while foods from animal and seafood sources are minimized, says Dan Nguyen, R.D.N., registered dietitian and nutritionist at HelloFresh. Of course, the based part of plant-based can be confusing, namely because it has wide-ranging meanings. For some, it could indicate that theyre eating 51 percent of their diet from plants while others might be closer to 90 or 95 percent. They can both be called plant-based eaters, but only if youre eating 100 percent plants can you say that youre a whole-food, plant-based eater, says Susan Levin, M.S., R.D., C.S.S.D., director of nutrition education for the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. Vegan, on the other hand, means that this person eats zero animal products. That translates into no meat, poultry, dairy, seafood, or any animal byproducts. Yet vegan extends beyond the diet, as it also affects what people wear and what purchases they make. According to the Vegan Society, vegan is defined as a philosophy and way of living which seeks to exclude--as far as is possible and practicable--all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose; and by extension, promotes the development and use of animal-free alternatives for the benefit of animals, humans and the environment. In dietary terms, it denotes the practice of dispensing with all products derived wholly or partly from animals. Related: Tofu: The Unsung Hero of Coronavirus-Related Meat Shortages Why Plant-Based and Vegan Labels Arent a Health Halo Eating more plants is the key to better health and even longer life, according to numerous studies. Plants are a powerhouse of fiber, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and phytonutrients, Nguyen says. By eating more plants and fewer animals, youll get more of these valuable nutrients. As a result, you might experience lower blood sugar, LDL (or bad) cholesterol, and blood pressure, to name a few beneficial side effects. Plus, eating fewer animal foods and seafood will help decrease your carbon footprint, which is a win for the planet. Yet dont get duped into thinking that foods labeled plant-based or vegan are automatically healthy. The surprise? Many of these foods are still highly processed. Foods marketed as plant-based may not necessarily be healthy or contain many whole plant foods, Nguyen says. These foods can be high in fat, sugar and/­­or sodium and could still make you sick, putting you at greater risk for chronic conditions like heart disease and diabetes. Thats true even if youre a junk food vegan who primarily eats processed vegan food. Just taking animal products out of your diet doesnt guarantee that youll be healthier, as you may not be getting the fiber and nutrients you need, Levin says. Related: Less Meat, Less Problems How to eat healthy, no matter whether youre plant-based or vegan While going plant-based, more so vegan because youre eliminating all animal products, is an admirable first step, it shouldnt be your end step if youre prioritizing health, Levin says. Instead, think about moving as close as you can to a 100 percent whole-food diet. To get there, Levin suggests reading food labels and keying in on fiber. Fiber is often a good indicator of how processed the product is, she says. If you dont see much fiber in a food, chances are its on the low end of the healthy food scale. Then check the added sugar and the ingredient list in general. If you see ingredients you dont know how to pronounce, you should probably avoid putting that food in your cart, Levin says. The post Label Lingo: Plant-Based Diet vs. Vegan Diet appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

WORLD 2.0 vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

November 2 2020 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

WORLD 2.0 vegan cookbook on Kickstarter Visit Kickstarter to pre-order: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2TE62bO  My first book has been a bestseller for almost eight years, but ever since the sequels came out, I’ve wanted to go back and massively upgrade the visuals on the original book: to re-do the cover artwork and re-shoot most of the food photos. After publishing 5 other books and spending additional years in the kitchens of the world, I knew I could improve the recipes, add outstanding dishes that didn’t make it into the first versions, and bring more culinary authenticity and cultural awareness to the entire book. The newly updated, re-photographed and freshly illustrated edition of The Lotus and the Artichoke – Vegan Recipes from World Adventures is my classic, first journey in the world of vegan cookbooks reimagined and upgraded. Its my tribute to powerful memories, awesome individuals, and fantastic meals that Ive made, found, and shared with countless others like you. I’ve wanted to re-create my first cookbook for years, but the opportunity didn’t really arise until the surprises and challenges that have been this monster of a year, 2020. Yasai Izakaya Genki, Tokyo 2019 You see, I’d planned to return to Japan and continue my adventures from late 2019. Ultimately, now, Id be wrapping up The Lotus and the Artichoke – JAPAN. But when Corona hit, not only did it cancel nearly all my events and most of my income, like for so many people, lockdowns and border closures meant drastic changes not just daily life but to our travel plans as well. The struggle to return to a form of life that is more predictable and free has been different for all of us. As life has become more routine and restricted, our travels have been more in our minds and through the eyes of others-- through art, music, video and social media. A big part of my own escape these last months has been getting into the kitchen and diving back into my first cookbook - revisiting the intense dishes, unforgettable places and global flavors that shaped my life and projects over the last eight years. Ive cooked for the family, for friends, and for neighbors. Hopefully opportunities for more lunch and dinner parties and big cooking events will shape up soon! updated world map & photo collage for WORLD 2.0 edition NEW in Vegan Recipes from World Adventures 2.0: - brand NEW cover art & illustration! - NEW introduction & kitchen info! - more travel stories! - 8+ totally NEW recipes (not found in earlier editions!)  - 70+ newly photographed dishes!  - 100+ updated & improved recipes!  - better recipe names with respect to cultures & inspirations - 8+ additional pages of adventures & travels! As with all 6 of my cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed and designed this book myself. The Lotus and the Artichoke is the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. - My fully updated and re-envisioned first cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide -  224 pages with 100+ recipes and over 90 full-page color photos  - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by my travels and culinary adventures in over 50 countries.  - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients  - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Palak Paneer – North Indian spinach with tofu paneer Pad Thai – rice noodles with tofu, crushed peanuts & lime Omelette *NEW RECIPE* Mombasa Red Curry – with sweet potatoes & tofu Buka – Nigerian stew & Jollof – Senegalese rice *NEW RECIPES* Koshary – Egyptian pasta, lentils & rice with red sauce & fried onions *NEW RECIPE* Mini Meat Pies – made with lentils & vegetables Lasagna – with smoked tofu, cashew cheese, zucchini & mushrooms Recipes in Vegan Recipes from World Adventures 2.0 AMERICAS -  Salade a la Montréal arugula, pears, walnuts & lemon dressing -  Lower East Side Salad avocado and tomatoes on quinoa & carrot ginger dressing -  Jersey Summer Salad spinach, tomatoes, mushrooms, walnuts & raspberry dressing -  Pancakes American breakfast classic -  Waffles *NEW*  -  French Toast another American breakfast classic -  Tofu Scramble with mixed vegetables -  Omelette *NEW*  -  North End Pasta Spaghetti & Vegan Meatballs with red sauce -  Ithaca Mac & Cheeze baked casserole -  TLT Tempeh Lettuce Tomato sandwich -  Black Bean Burgers 90’s style classic burgers -  Three Bean Chili with assorted vegetables -  Mango Pear Crumble with ginger & cinnamon -  Roasted Walnut Brownies double chocolate delight -  Oatmeal Cranberry Walnut Cookies American classic -  Guacamole Latin American avocado dip -  Salsa Latin American spicy tomato dip ASIA -  Cold Sesame Noodles Chinese dim-sum classic -  Wontons Chinese steamed dumplings with soy ginger dipping sauce -  Congee savory rice porridge *NEW*  -  Horenso Goma-ae Japanese chilled sesame spinach -  Miso Soup Japanese classic with tofu -  Teriyaki Tempeh Japanese stir-fry with vegetables -  General Tsos Chicken Cantonese classic -  Sesame Ginger Tofu Chinese fusion -  Tom Kha Thai coconut soup with tofu & vegetables -  Pad Thai rice noodles with tofu, crushed peanuts & lime -  Pad Horapa Makua Thai stir-fry with eggplant, basil, tofu & cashews -  Bai Cha Cambodian fried rice with smoked tofu & vegetables -  Gói Cuôn Vietnamese fresh spring rolls with ginger peanut sauce -  Pho Vietnamese noodle soup with smoked tofu & vegetables -  Banh Mi Vietnamese seitan sandwich -  Mirza Ghasemi Persian eggplant -  Gajar Masala grated carrots with pineapple, dates & cashews -  Aloo Raita Indian potatoes and cucumbers in yogurt -  Poha Indian flattened rice with potatoes & spices -  Gobi Tikka Indian baked marinated cauliflower -  Pakoras Indian spinach fritters with apple tamarind chutney -  Masoor Dal North Indian red lentils -  Chole Bhature Indian chickpeas with fried flatbread -  Hyderabadi Biryani South Indian rice dish -  Dhokla South Indian savory steamed chickpea cake -  Masala Dosa South Indian cr?pe with spicy potato filling -  Sambar South Indian vegetable & lentil stew -  Coconut Coriander Chutney South Indian condiment -  Paneer Makhani North Indian tomato curry with tofu paneer -  Mutter Paneer North Indian peas with tofu paneer -  Palak Paneer North Indian spinach with tofu paneer -  Navratan Korma North Indian creamy vegetable curry -  Vegetable Jalfrezi North Indian spicy mixed vegetables -  Dal Makhani North Indian creamy bean curry -  Sindhi Bhindi Masala North Indian okra -  Bengan Bhartha North Indian eggplant -  Chilli Paneer Indo-Chinese tofu paneer -  Vegetable Manchurian Indo-Chinese dumplings -  Halva Indian semolina sweet -  Saffron Mango Lassi Indian yogurt shake -  Naan North Indian flatbread -  Nariyal Chaval South Asian coconut rice -  Haldi Chaval North Indian golden rice with turmeric -  Jeera Chaval North Indian rice with cumin seeds AFRICA -  Plasas & Fufu Gambian spinach peanut stew with mashed cassava -  Koshary Egyptian pasta, lentils & rice with red sauce & fried onions *NEW* -  Tanjine Moroccan stew with couscous *NEW* -  Mombasa Red Curry with sweet potatoes & tofu -  Ful Medames North African spicy bean dip *NEW* -  Hummus North African & Middle Eastern chickpea spread -  Buka Nigerian stew mushrooms and soy meats *NEW* -  Jollof Senegalese seasoned rice *NEW* EUROPE -  Endive Sprout Boats with sesame soy dressing -  Field Greens & Seared Apples with chickpea ginger parsley dressing -  Borscht Russian beet soup -  Blintzes Russian-Ukrainian cr?pes -  Gazpacho cold tomato & cucumber soup -  Carrot Ginger Zucchini Soup classic & creamy -  Roasted Root Vegetables with rosemary & spices -  Rotkohl German stewed red cabbage -  Kartoffelpuffer German potato pancakes with homemade applesauce -  Semmelknödel Bavarian bread dumplings -  Auflauf German zucchini & potato casserole -  Zwiebelkuchen German baked flatbread with onions & smoked tofu -  Schnitzel Austrian-style breaded bean cutlets -  Käsespätzle Swiss-German noodles with leeks & cheeze sauce -  Tofu Mushroom Stroganoff with fresh herbs -  Quiche French savory pie -  Cashew Mushroom Risotto with sun-dried tomatoes -  Lasagna with smoked tofu, zucchini & mushrooms -  Tempeh Stuffed Mushrooms with garlic & herbs -  Stuffed Peppers with tomato rice & smoked tofu -  Spinach & White Beans with sun-dried tomatoes & herbs -  Vegan Meat Pies with lentils & vegetables -  Turkish Bulgar Pilaf with Tofu-Feta & fresh herbs -  Grah Balkan bean stew with seitan -  Gibanica Balkan cheese pie -  Bratäpfel baked apples stuffed with dates, figs & walnuts -  Apfelstrudel Austrian-German apple pastry -  Lebkuchen traditional German Christmas cookies -  Tarte au Citron French lemon pie -  Mandeltorte German-Swedish almond pie Dal Makhani – North Indian creamy bean curry Masala Dosa – South Indian cr?pe with spicy potato filling, sambar & coconut chutney Pad Horapa Makua – Thai stir-fry with eggplant, basil, tofu & cashews Borscht – Russian beet soup Blintzes – Russian-Ukrainian tofu cheese cr?pes with jam Beaner Schnitzel – Austrian-style breaded bean cutlets Käsespätzle – Swiss-German noodles with leeks & cashew cheese sauce Pasta Famiglia – Spaghetti & Vegan Meatballs with red sauce Teriyaki Tempeh – Japanese stir-fry with vegetables Hyderabadi Biryani – South Indian rice with vegetables Chilli Paneer – Indo-Chinese spicy stir-fry with tofu paneer Vegetable Manchurian – Indo-Chinese dumplings The Lotus and the Artichoke – World Adventures from World Adventures 2.0, my updated, re-photographed & illustrated original cookbook is only available for pre-order on Kickstarter for 21 days!

Tofu Fresco Cotija

October 23 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Tofu Fresco Cotija Makes about 2 cups photo by Kate Lewis, recipe by llovani This tofu-based cotija is very easy for the beginner vegan cheesemaker. Tangy and crumbly and even a little melty from coconut oil, cotija is the perfect cheese for topping spicy, saucy things like refried beans, fajitas or tucked into tacos. It adds a beautiful splash of brightness to create contrast, and of course, delicious, cheezy flavor. This recipe is from The Modern Love Community Cookzine, which you can download for free! There is also an amazing Chilaquiles recipe in there to crumble this all over. Ingredients 14 oz block extra firm tofu, cubed medium 1/­­3 cup melted refined coconut oil 1/­­4 cup unsweetened plain rice milk 1 1/­­2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast 1 1/­­4 teaspoon fine sea salt 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon onion powder Directions In a medium pot, submerge tofu cubes in water. Bring to a boil for five minutes. Drain and allow them to cool completely.  Once cool, use cheesecloth to squeeze water out and get it as dry as possible.  Place tofu and the remaining ingredients in a food processor fit with a metal blade and pulse until it resembles cottage cheese. Lightly grease a 3 cup bowl or pyrex to use as a mold. Transfer cheese to the bowl and press down firmly to make sure there arent any air pockets. Cover and refrigerate for a minimum of 2 hours. When ready to use, it should crumble nicely in your fingers. 

Indonesian Noodles with Tempeh

August 28 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Indonesian Noodles with Tempeh The answer is: Indonesian Noodles with Tempeh. Here’s the question: What is easy to make, tastes great, features a delicious sauce made with peanut butter and coconut milk, and contains more than 30 grams of plant protein per serving? This is just one of the protein-packed recipes you’ll find in my new book, The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook. Enjoy! Indonesian Noodles with Tempeh Tofu or seitan can be used instead of tempeh, if you prefer. You can also make this dish using cooked rice instead of noodles. - 8 ounces (225 g) rice vermicelli (or use cooked spaghetti) - 2 tablespoons (30 ml) water, or 1 tablespoon (15 ml) avocado oil - 8 ounces (225 g) braised tempeh, cut into 1/­­2-inch [1 cm] dice - 1/­­3 cup (70 ml) tamari - 1/­­2 cup (130 g) creamy natural peanut butter - 2/­­3 cup (140 ml) low-fat unsweetened coconut milk - 2 tablespoons (30 ml) fresh lemon juice - 1 to 2 teaspoons sambal oelek or other Asian chili paste (depending on how spicy you want it) - 1 teaspoon natural sugar - 11/­­4 cups (295 ml) water - 1 red bell pepper, seeded and chopped - 6 cups (420 g) chopped bok choy - 1 large carrot, shredded - 1/­­2 cup (50 g) chopped scallions, white and green parts - 3 garlic cloves - 1 tablespoon (8 g) grated fresh ginger - 1 cup (134 g) frozen peas, thawed - 1/­­4 cup (35 g) chopped unsalted dry-roasted peanuts - 2 tablespoons (8 g) minced fresh cilantro - Soak the rice vermicelli in hot water until softened, about 5 minutes. Drain well, rinse, and set aside. - Heat the water in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the tempeh and 1 tablespoon (15 ml) of the tamari and cook until the tempeh is browned on all sides. Remove the tempeh from the skillet and set aside. - In a food processor, combine the peanut butter, coconut milk, lemon juice, sambal oelek, sugar, and the remaining 4 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon (64 ml) tamari. Add 1 cup (235 ml) of the water and process until smooth, then set aside. - Heat the remaining 1/­­4 cup (60 ml) of water in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the bell pepper, bok choy, carrot, scallions, garlic, and ginger and cook, stirring occasionally until softened, about 10 minutes. - Reduce the heat to low and stir in the peas and the reserved tempeh. Add the reserved noodles, stir in the sauce, and simmer until the noodles are hot and well coated with the sauce. Serve garnished with peanuts and cilantro.      The post Indonesian Noodles with Tempeh appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Grilled Vegan Banh Mi Sandwiches

August 10 2020 Oh My Veggies 

Grilled Vegan Banh Mi Sandwiches Most vegan banh mi sandwich recipes use tofu, but this one is different! It’s a Grilled Veggie Banh Mi, made with marinated summer vegetables. Farmer’s Market Veggies This weekend I went to check on my garden and all the squash plants were limp, brown, and crispy.

Rainbow Salad with Lemon Chia Dressing

July 28 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Rainbow Salad with Lemon Chia Dressing The Rainbow Salad with Lemon Chia Dressing is a refreshing and satisfying main-dish salad that is a great way to use leftover grains you may have on hand. If you roast your sweet potatoes ahead of time, this salad can come together quickly. For even more protein, you can add some diced smoked tofu or cooked chopped tempeh bacon. This recipe is from my new book The Plant-Based Protein Revolution which comes out in just two weeks. If you haven’t pre-ordered yet, do it today and receive bonus recipes. Just email your proof of purchase to my publisher at plantproteinrev@quarto.com. Support for this book has been amazing, and Im especially grateful for the kind words of Dr. Neal D. Barnard, president of Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.  About The Plant-Based Protein Revolution Cookbook, Dr. Barnard wrote: Robin Robertson is the expert when it comes to creating recipes that are delicious, healthful, and easy to prepare. This wonderful protein-packing volume proves that plant-based eating is the most satisfying way to power your day. More coming soon, along with some great tips for getting more protein from plants.  For now, though, let’s eat! Rainbow Salad with Lemon Chia Dressing This recipe is from The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook by Robin Robertson (c) 2020, The Harvard Common Press. Photos by Jackie Sobon. Salad - 4 cups packed (120 g) baby spinach - 11/­­2 cups (338 g) diced roasted sweet potato - 2 cups (390 g) cooked brown rice or quinoa - 11/­­2 cups (246 g) cooked chickpeas, or 1 (15-ounce [425 g]) can, rinsed and drained - 1/­­2 cup (55 g) toasted slivered almonds or walnut pieces - 1 cup (150 g) shredded red cabbage - 1 large Gala or Fuji apple, cored and diced - 1 ripe Hass avocado, peeled, pitted, and diced Dressing - 2 tablespoons (32 g) almond butter - 2 tablespoons (30 ml) fresh lemon juice - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) rice vinegar - 1/­­3 cup (70 ml) water, plus more if needed - 2 teaspoons pure maple syrup - 2 teaspoons ground chia seeds - Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper Salad: In a large bowl, combine the spinach, roasted sweet potatoes, brown rice, chickpeas, almonds, cabbage, apple, and avocado. Dressing: In a blender, combine the almond butter, lemon juice, vinegar, water, maple syrup, and chia seeds. Blend until smooth. Season to taste with salt and black pepper. Set aside for 5 minute before using. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. If the dressing is too thick, add more water, 1 tablespoon at a time. To serve, drizzle the dressing on the salad and toss well to coat. Makes 4 servings The post Rainbow Salad with Lemon Chia Dressing appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Hoisin-Glazed Bok Choy with Tofu and Soba Noodles

July 17 2020 VegKitchen 

Hoisin-Glazed Bok Choy with Tofu and Soba Noodles This Hoisin-Glazed Bok Choy with Tofu and Soba Noodles recipe makes a quick, delicious dish of tofu and greens with a hint of citrus. For a dazzling plate, serve with a beet salad. Recipe from Wild About Greens;* photo by Gail Davis of Hungry Vegan. The post Hoisin-Glazed Bok Choy with Tofu and Soba Noodles appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Tofu Katsu Curry

July 15 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Tofu Katsu CurryCurb your Japanese take-out cravings with this easy homemade vegan tofu katsu curry recipe! Crispy panko breaded tofu in a creamy, mildly spiced curry sauce. Serve with rice and pickled veggies. GF option, Nutfree. Jump to Recipe Meet one of my all-time favorite vegan tofu recipes, – Japanese inspired Tofu Katsu Curry! A vegan spin on a traditional Japanese dish that is fairly straight forward, and loved by everyone. Vegan katsu curry is a bit of a special treat of golden crispy, breaded tofu served with a rich and fragrant curry sauce. The mild sauce is probably my favorite part of this Japanese Curry! In my opinion, you can never have too much sauce, especially when it tastes this good. It is a beautiful mix between sweet & spicy with a bold flavor thanks so garam masala and curry powder. To keep things authentic, you can serve the breaded tofu over sushi rice but really any rice will do. And yes, cauliflower rice would be a great alternative if you want to keep things low cal. Instead of making a separate milk and flour mixture for breading I use the curry sauce itself to coat the tofu which is then breaded and then pan fried or grilled! Shorter and simpler. Continue reading: Vegan Tofu Katsu CurryThe post Vegan Tofu Katsu Curry appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Eggplant and Tofu Outdoor Mixed Grill

July 10 2020 VegKitchen 

Eggplant and Tofu Outdoor Mixed Grill Eggplant and tofu steaks cooked on the grill can be eaten from plate, served on bread, or inserted into buns. The fruit in the recipe, added here as a garnish, is a pleasing accompaniment. Recipe contributed by Nikki and David Goldbeck, from American Wholefoods Cuisine. The post Eggplant and Tofu Outdoor Mixed Grill appeared first on VegKitchen.

Honoring Diversity Through Plant-Based Cooking

June 8 2020 Meatless Monday 

Food is a universal language that we all speak and understand, with many of our favorite dishes, meals, ingredients, and recipes resulting from years of cultural collaboration and shared experiences. And thats why so many of us love food; because cooking and eating together is a way to celebrate diversity -- of tradition, of history, of background, of ingredients, of ritual, of technique. Meatless Monday is an international movement, and we are proud to shine a spotlight on some of the amazing plant-based dishes and recipes being developed by people from all walks of life. Let us honor the diversity and importance of food by paying respect to the diverse group of individuals making plant-based eating accessible and delicious to all. Tex-Mex Tater Tot Casserole One of our favorite culinary mashups, Tex-Mex cooking ties together the best of southwest comfort food with Mexican flavors and ingredients. This recipe for Tex-Mex vegan tater tot casserole by Larisha Campbell from Make it Dairy Free , is completely plant-based, using black beans, walnuts, and a homemade vegan cheese sauce to recreate that taco taste and texture. Source: Make it Dairy Free Chickn and Waffles Comforting soul foods star is definitely chicken n waffles. Thanks to this chickn and waffles recipe by Jenné Claiborne from Sweet Potato Soul , now plant-based eaters can relive the sweet, savory, crispy, crunchy magic of everyones favorite brunch dish. Source: Sweet Potato Soul Risotto Stuffed Sweet Potatoes with Shitake Bacon So many universally loved ingredients and flavors come together in this plant-based dish. Sweet Potato Risotto Stuffed Boats by Haile Thomas brings together rich and creamy risotto, hearty sweet potatoes, and topped with savory, umami-packed bacon. Finished with vegan cashew crema and dried cranberries, this is a Meatless Monday masterpiece. Source: Haile Thomas Spicy Chicken-Fried Cauliflower The name of this dish is enough to make your mouth water. This recipe for spicy chicken-fried cauliflower from I Can You Can Vegan uses a homemade, plant-based buttermilk as well as a seasoned flour mixture to give these nuggets of cauliflower a decadent, crunchy breading. Serve these up as an appetizer or plate them up with a side salad for a main course. Source: I Can You Can Vegan Vegan Crunch Wrap Supreme The original Crunch Wrap Supreme from Taco Bell is a discus of meat, cheese sauce, tortilla, sour cream, lettuce, and tomato; not exactly Meatless Monday fare. But thankfully, this recipe for a homemade vegan crunch wrap supreme from The Geneus Life captures all the grandeur of the original, while using only plant-based ingredients. Spicy tofu sofritas and cashew queso are a welcomed departure from their fast-food animal-based counterparts. Source: The Geneus Life Vegan Cheeze-Its One of the ultimate snack foods, the Cheez-It possess a perfectly toasty, cheesy flavor thats hard to decipher, but easy to recognize. The Ashleys, creators of the blog Eat Figs, Not Pigs , have captured the enigmatic taste of the Cheez-It without using any cheese or dairy at all. Their recipe for vegan Cheeze-Its   uses vegan cheese shreds, nutritional yeast, and a diverse array of spices and seasonings. Source: Eat Figs, Not Pigs Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Honoring Diversity Through Plant-Based Cooking appeared first on Meatless Monday.

New Ebook: Weeknight Magic Vol. 1

May 27 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

New Ebook: Weeknight Magic Vol. 1 Our new ebook is here! It’s a collection of straightforward, plant-based recipes for busy people who love to cook. Each recipe was developed to be weeknight-friendly, with shorter cooking times and easier prep. Whole, plant foods are featured prominently throughout the ebook and make up the bulk of the meals within. We’ve been working on this project since last summer, and it’s so exciting to finally share it with you. We spent a lot of time putting every recipe through a weeknight filter, streamlining the ingredients and techniques and much as possible without sacrificing flavor. We are in love with every recipe, and we hope that they’ll bring some ease and joy to your weeknight dinners and beyond. You can check out a few sneak peek photos from the ebook, plus the full recipe index below. Click Here to Buy Recipe Index *all recipes are vegan and can be gluten-free if needed - Staple Red Lentils with Crispy Coconut and Chili Oil - Creamy Tomato Pasta - Baked Tofu with Crispy Kale - Cauliflower, Tomato and Chickpea Stew - Portobello and Red Lentil Bolognese - Sweet Potato Nachos - Cauliflower Caesar Salad with Chickpea Croutons - Weeknight Chili - Zucchini Mac & Cheese - Zaatar-Roasted Vegetables and Chickpeas with Tahini Sauce - Saag Tofu - Quinoa Pilaf with Lemony Green Beans - Cold Nut Butter Noodles - Maple-Mustard Baked Tempeh and Broccoli Bowls - Brothy Coconut Turmeric Noodles - Ratatouille-ish Summer Stew - Creamy Polenta with Smoky Mushrooms and Chickpeas - The Coziest Rice and Beans - Braised Lentils with Mushrooms, Leeks and Potatoes - Minestrone with Rosemary Walnuts - Coconut Rice - Coconut Bacon - Knife Salsa Verde - Cashew Crema - Cheesy Cashew Dust Click Here to Buy The post New Ebook: Weeknight Magic Vol. 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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