Tee - vegetarian recipes

Tee vegetarian recipes

No Bake Chocolate Cookies

June 22 2019 VegKitchen 

No Bake Chocolate Cookies There are only advantages to preparing no-bake cookies. These cookies are ready in minutes and you’re also guaranteed to end up with a perfect batch of cookies--not too cooked or too soft. You will enjoy them even more this summer when you can prepare them without turning on your oven during hot weather. The post No Bake Chocolate Cookies appeared first on VegKitchen.

12 Athletes Who Get Their Fuel From Plants

June 10 2019 Meatless Monday 

12 Athletes Who Get Their Fuel From PlantsProfessional athletes use their bodies in incredible ways. Whether serving as a human bulldozer or striking a ball with colossal force, their bodies require loads of fuel in order to function as powerfully and efficiently as possible. And as the athletes prove below, fuel can come in many forms, and plant-based fuel has helped many achieve great things. Read on to see what this diverse bunch has to say about running on plants.   Lewis Hamilton, Formula 1 Champion I have plenty of protein in my diet and Ive gained muscle, and Im healthier and happier than Ive ever been. Wish I did it sooner. Five-time Formula 1 world champion Lewis Hamilton, via Instagram , discussing the benefits of adopting a plant-based diet. According to Forbes, Hamilton was the world’s 12th highest-paid athlete in 2018 and is the highest-paid Formula 1 driver. Hamilton sites his concerns for the environment around climate change and animal welfare as his motivations for switching to a plant-based diet. He is vocal across his social media platforms about the benefits of plant-based eating and encourages his fans to also reduce meat in their diets.     Venus Williams, professional tennis player “I was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease, and I wanted to maintain my performance on the court. Once I started, I fell in love with the concept of fueling your body in the best way possible [through raw, vegan food], she told Health . “Not only does it help me on the court, but I feel like I’m doing the right thing for me.”       Derrick Morgan, American professional football player “Overcoming the preconceived notions is the biggest part. I was a part of it. I used to believe athletes had to eat meat to maintain play, then I educated myself,” Derrick Morgan, NFL football player to ESPN . Morgan is a 100 percent plant-based athlete who has encouraged many of his Tennessee Titans teammates to join him in eating plant-based. He and many of the Titans players have also attributed improved energy, reduced inflammation and better performance to switching to a meatless diet.     Kyrie Irving, professional basketball player for the NBAs Boston Celtics I’ve been on more of a plant-based diet, getting away from all the animals [products], Irving told ESPNs Chauncey Billups . Irving also credits plant-based eating with giving him more energy and endurance, which helps him sustain a high performance level throughout games. So my energy is up, my body feels amazing.       Hannah Teter, American Olympian snowboarder “I feel stronger than I’ve ever been, mentally, physically, and emotionally, Teter told HuffPost . My plant-based diet has opened up more doors to being an athlete. It’s a whole other level that I’m elevating to. I stopped eating animals about a year ago, and it’s a new life. I feel like a new person, a new athlete.”       Scott Jurek, American Ultramarathoner I grew up hating vegetables, eating meat and potatoes, he told GQ . When I was in college I started reading more about different diets and the vegetarian and vegan diets really came up quite a bit. As I worked in hospitals through physical therapy school it became clear to me that I needed to change my diet to avoid the health problems I was seeing. It was definitely a long-term decision rather than one made for short-term performance gains.       Jermain Defoe, English professional footballer I think Ive managed [to adopt veganism] successfully, he told the Guardian . I dont find anything hard to give up, as such, because I know the feeling scoring goals gives me. So, while getting in an ice bath isnt nice, I just think: You know what? Im going to do this and be rewarded. Its hard but in another way its easy because all I want to do is play well and score goals.       Tia Blanco, Puerto Rican professional surfer “I feel really great eating a plant-based diet and love the way it makes me feel physically and mentally, she said in an interview with Teen Vogue . Many of us know the effects of diet on one’s health, but fail to realize that diet plays a huge role in more than just your personal well-being.”         Austin Aries, American professional wrestler Im usually concerned with keeping my calories up to maintain my size, though I adjust my calories depending on if I need to bulk up or cut weight, he told Mens Journal . I try to limit my intake of things like soy, gluten, and overly processed foods. The easiest way to do this is by making sure Im eating a variety of different foods every day. This also ensures I am consuming all different types of plant-based protein to cover the full amino acid profile as well as my vitamins and nutrients.     JJ Redick, American professional basketball player for the Philadelphia 76ers During the season, my main focus is staying healthy and feeling strong, he said in an interview with Mens Journal .  Ive always had a leaner frame, so balancing my intake of protein, fat, and carbs is an important focus that guides my food choices. Ive found that incorporating plant-based protein items like Beyond Meat into my diet can deliver just as much protein, if not more, than some traditional meat items, while making me feel healthy, fit, and agile.       David Carter, American professional football player Football is a machismo sport, which is great, but everything can’t be machismo. On the field and at practice, yes, you can be machismo, but when it comes to diet, you need to have compassion for your body, he told NFL.com in an interview.         Barny du Plessis, British professional body builder and Mr. Universe winner I am the best Ive ever been. I feel fantastic, no aches, pains or niggles. No delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMs) after heavy sessions, du Plessis said in an interview with the Thinking Vegan . All my workouts are on fire; endurance and energy are awesome, strength and power are as good as I want them to be. I feel really healthy, fit, and buzzing with energy. I feel lighter, and not bloated, but Im still as heavy as I was when eating meat and animal products. Being leaner on more calories - thats always a good thing!     FREE ORGANIC GOYA FOR A YEAR Dont miss your chance to win ONE YEAR of FREE ORGANIC GOYA PRODUCTS! Meatless Monday has teamed up with Goya to promote their Dont Panic, Its Organic giveaway. Check out Goyas organic products and enter to win Goya goodness for a year . Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post 12 Athletes Who Get Their Fuel From Plants appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Potato and Fennel Hash Skillet

June 8 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Potato and Fennel Hash Skillet This potato and fennel hash skillet meal makes for a very special breakfast/­­brunch, but it also works nicely as a wholesome lunch or dinner. And the leftovers taste like a really special potato salad! So it’s pretty versatile. We’re obsessed with the combination of potatoes and fennel. Potato fennel soup is a staple (maybe we should share that recipe too?), and our love for that pairing definitely doesn’t stop there. Fennel is a polarizing vegetable, but I think that mostly has to do with its crunchy, anise-forward raw form. Cooked fennel takes on a completely new life – it’s sweet and silky, with a toned down anise flavor. If you’ve never tried it, you’re in for a serious treat :) We’ll be making this whole dish on our Instagram stories later today, so you can see exactly how it comes together. The main chunk of time is dedicated to getting the fennel and potatoes golden and crispy. From there on out it’s just about topping it with all your favorite things. The caramelized fennel provides a beautiful sweetness, and the bell pepper gives this hash a crucial dose of juiciness. We included beans and spinach to make this a complete meal, but you could also omit them if you’re looking for a hash to accompany other, more filling breakfast dishes. Wishing you a nice weekend and hope you’ll give this a try

Vegan Black Bean Burgers with Guacamole and Charred Romaine Salad

June 3 2019 Meatless Monday 

These vegan gluten-free black bean burgers are perfect for busy weeknights when you need something nutritious and satisfying quickly. Ground oats give the burgers structure and amp up the fiber content. In the flavor department, weve got sweetness from a sautéed onion, smokiness from smoked paprika, and freshness from lime and cilantro. In the summer, you can serve the burgers on a crunchy purple cabbage slaw. You can also plop them on a whole grain bun with all the regular fixins. This recipe comes to us from Alex of The New Baguette. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 For the Burgers: - 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided - 1 small yellow onion, finely diced -  1/­­2 teaspoon sea salt, divided - 2 medium garlic cloves, minced - 1 14-ounce can of black beans, drained and rinsed (1 3/­­4 cups cooked beans) -  3/­­4 cup rolled oats -  3/­­4 teaspoon ground cumin -  3/­­4 teaspoon smoked paprika -  1/­­4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper - 2 handfuls cilantro leaves, roughly chopped - 2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lime juice   For the Guacamole and Salad: - 1 large avocado, peeled, pitted and mashed - 1 tablespoon minced red onion - 1 tablespoon finely chopped cilantro - Freshly squeezed lime juice, to taste - Sea salt, to taste - 2 small heads of Romaine lettuce, cleaned thoroughly, halved lengthwise and patted dry - About 2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil - 1 1/­­2 cups grape tomatoes, halved   Burgers: 1. Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a large skillet over medium-low heat. Add the onion and 1/­­4 teaspoon salt. Stir and cook until softened, about 4 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for another 30 seconds. Set aside. 2. Place 1/­­3 cup of the beans in a medium bowl and mash lightly with a fork. Set aside. Place the oats in a food processor and grind into a fine meal. Add the cumin, smoked paprika, black pepper, cilantro, lime juice, the remaining 1/­­4 teaspoon salt, the onion mixture, and the whole beans. Puree until smooth. Transfer the pureed mixture to the bowl with the mashed beans and stir to combine. 3. If you prefer thicker patties, divide the mixture into 4 pieces; for thinner patties, 5 pieces. Roll each piece between your palms and flatten into a patty. Place on a tray or platter. Wipe out the skillet where you cooked the onion and heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil over medium heat. Cook the burgers about 4 minutes per side, until browned and crisp, flip and cook for another 4 minutes. Serve with charred romaine salad (below) or as desired. Guacamole and Salad: 1. In a small bowl, stir together the avocado, onion, and cilantro. Season to taste with lime juice and salt. Set aside. 2. Heat a large skillet or grill pan over high heat. Lightly drizzle the cut sides of the lettuce with oil and place cut side down in the skillet, gently pressing down. Cook for 1-2 minutes, until nicely browned, then flip and cook for another minute. Transfer to a cutting board and set aside. Reduce the heat to medium and add a bit of oil to the pan. Add the tomatoes and cook for 1 minute, just until softened. Set aside. 3. Slice the lettuce into thin strips and toss in a bowl with the tomatoes, lime juice, and salt to taste. Divide the salad among 4 plates and top with burgers and guacamole. The post Vegan Black Bean Burgers with Guacamole and Charred Romaine Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Restaurant Higlight: Solo Bio Organico, Buenos Aires

May 28 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Solo Bio Organico is not only the first organic vegetarian restaurant in Argentina, but also the whole of Latin America! Claudia Carrara is the pioneer that took the leap of opening her own vegetarian restaurant in Argentina’s charming capital of Buenos Aires. Everything started from the desire to bring her children up with the best possible nutrition. Soon enough, she began to sell natural dishes to her neighbours that she would create from the leftover vegetables she had in her kitchen. The success of her improvised cuisine led a friend to offer her a few tables where her clients could sit and enjoy healthy meals. One thing led to another and the idea of opening a restaurant was born. Originally, the main focuses of Claudias research were health, taste, and environmental sustainability. First with the humble intention to feed her kids in a conscious way, and after in the way she would develop her restaurant to have the best possible impact on her society. The name of her cuisine speaks for itself. At Solo Bio Organico, they only work with fresh, local and organic products and this is guaranteed since they were granted the Organic Certification by Food Safety. The […] The post Restaurant Higlight: Solo Bio Organico, Buenos Aires appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Mexican Baked Polenta with Salsa Beans & Sautéed Veggies

May 17 2019 Oh My Veggies 

This easy dinner uses two of our favorite pantry staples: a tube of prepared polenta and a can of black beans. Add fresh vegetables, salsa, and cheese and youve got yourself a delicious Mexican-inspired meal!

Tomato Tofu Scramble

May 13 2019 Meatless Monday 

Crumbed tofu gets a golden yellow glow thanks to a spoonful of turmeric in this vegan take on scrambled eggs. We pair tofu with tomatoes, but it can be cooked up with almost any vegetable, such as leftover roasted potatoes, sautéed mushrooms, or roasted bell peppers. For a fluffier scramble, we recommend pressing the tofu prior to crumbling it to remove excess water--this takes about 20 minutes of inactive time. If youre in a pinch, you can skip the pressing step for a less defined, slightly softer-textured scramble. This recipe comes to us from the The Complete Vegan Cookbook , by the Natural Gourmet Center with Alexandra Shytsman and Rebecca Ffrench. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 1 pound firm tofu, drained - 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil - 1 small yellow onion, finely chopped - 2 tablespoons pine nuts - 1 garlic clove, minced -  1/­­2 teaspoon ground cumin -  1/­­2 teaspoon ground turmeric -  1/­­4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes - 1 large ripe tomato, seeded and diced - 1 teaspoon fine sea salt, or to taste - 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice (from 1 to 2 limes) - Whole-wheat toast, to serve (optional) Line a plate with paper towels and place the tofu on top. Place another paper towel on the tofu then top with another plate. Weigh it down with cans or pie weights for 20 to 30 minutes to remove excess water, draining off the water periodically. Using a fork or your hands, crumble the tofu into small bits. Heat a medium skillet over medium heat, add the oil, and heat until it just starts to shimmer. Add the onion and cook until just softened, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in the pine nuts, garlic, cumin, turmeric, and red pepper flakes, and continue to cook until fragrant, about another 2 minutes. Stir in the crumbled tofu, tomato, salt, and lime juice. Increase the heat to medium-high and cook until the tofu is heated through, about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Divide among plates and serve. Reprinted from The Complete Vegan Cookbook: Over 150 Whole Foods, Plant-Based Recipes and Techniques by the Natural Gourmet. Copyright (C) 2019 by Natural Gourmet Cookery Corporation. Photographs copyright (C) 2019 by Christina Holmes. Published by Clarkson Potter/­­Publishers, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC. The post Tomato Tofu Scramble appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Legendary Layer Bean Dip - Vegan, Grain-free

April 26 2019 My New Roots 

Legendary Layer Bean Dip - Vegan, Grain-free     Dips are my favourite food group. Yes, food group. If I ever got a tattoo, it would probably say something like: pass the hummus. I was recently hosting a party-for-no-reason, and like most of my get togethers they involve a lot of food. But I didnt feel like making a fallback dip, like tzatziki, or baba ganoush. No. I felt like leveling up and creating something I hadnt tried to before. Something with BIG DIP ENERGY – a chunky, spicy, creamy, and above all impressive layer dip. Id cooked pinto beans the night before, had a little tin of chipotle chilies kicking around the pantry, and I knew that if I cut a couple corners, this thing would come together so Id still have time to tizz myself up before the guests arrived. My childhood memories of layer dip involve many cans and jars of processed food being dumped into a large bowl, but the current-reality-holistic-nutritionist version definitely involves making every single one of those things from scratch. Mama dont have time for that! So I simplified things by cutting out the guacamole (dont yell at me like that - add it if you want to!), and using jarred salsa. Everything else was homemade, but came together quickly and easily.       First, I sautéed the pre-cooked pinto beans with onions, garlic, spices, and the chipotle peppers. While that was on the stove, I whipped up the hemp seed queso (no soaking required!). And the salsa got an upgrade with some fresh, chopped cherry tomatoes. This is such an easy hack btw, since it makes the salsa taste more alive and juicy, while giving it a lot more texture, which I personally dig. All it takes after that is mushing the beans up a bit in the pan, which you can do with a bean masher, or an immersion blender, if you dont want to haul out yet another large piece of equipment. Then layer away! All in all, this took me about 20 minutes, start to finish, and the party people hung around this bowl like it was the last dip on planet earth. The delicious, creamy cheese sauce is a riff off my cashew queso, but in the interest of keeping this allergen-free, I used hemp seeds instead. I love this change-up, since its less expensive, and contains way more omega-3 fats and protein. You can dial up the heat here if you like, but because both the salsa and the bean layer have quite a kick to them, I kept the queso pretty mild. Did I mention that this is delicious on its own next to a platter of veggie sticks?! Or chips. Lets be honest.          Pinto Bean Dreams Just look at those beautiful beans! Dont they look gorgeous in all of their tone-on-tone mottled-ness? Pinto actually means painted in Spanish, and when you take a close look at pinto beans you can clearly see how theyve earned their moniker. Their speckles fade when cooking, and turn a lovely pale pink colour. They also gain a super creamy interior that is perfect in soups and stews, but also dips. Pintos, like all beans, are a mixture of protein and complex carbohydrates, making them incredibly filling, but wont spike blood sugar levels. Pinto beans are low in calories and fat, but contain the highest amount of fiber out of all the legumes (wow!). Key nutrients in pinto beans include potassium to maintain normal blood pressure, calcium for supporting muscle and nerve function, iron to enhance oxygen transport, and zinc for skin health.  Like all beans, pintos can cause an increase in intestinal gas (burps! farts! abdominal discomfort!), due to the oligosaccharides in the beans fermenting in the lower intestine. Because these starchy molecules live in the skin of the beans, a simple soak in water overnight usually does the trick. The soaking process will help leach out many of these fermenting properties, which is why it is so important to discard the soaking water and then boil them in fresh water. Adding a strip of kombu seaweed to the pot will further help to reduce the gas-producing potential of pinto beans (and all legumes), acting like a sponge to absorb those raffinose sugar toot culprits. Try these two tricks to reduce your toilet tunes, and stay social!          I used a clear glass bowl to serve the dip in so that they layers are visible, and it was not until after pouring in two layers did I have the idea to put cilantro stems up on the sides of it. Doh! But knowing it would be #worthit, I painstakingly scooped out the beans and salsa trying to keep everything separate, cleaned the bowl, and started over. I lightly brushed the tiniest amount of olive oil on the leaves to act as glue, then pressed them to the walls of bowl. This is completely unnecessary, but it makes the dip look less monotone and more enticing in my opinion – green always does it! This step takes an extra two minutes and adds a decorative touch, but its your call. Maybe you need those two minutes to tizz yourself up?  If you want to change up the recipe, try using black beans or kidney beans in place of the pintos. If you want to add another layer to this already boss situation, go on and add the guac! I was just trying to keep things a little easier for yall.  And if youd like to make your own salsa, I have a stellar raw recipe right here. Lastly, I want to add that my bowl for this was roughly 1 1/­­2 quarts /­­ litres capacity, and everything it fit perfectly. I would only suggest sizing up if you don’t have this exact container size.         Print recipe     Legendary Layer Bean Dip Serves 8-10 Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil (or ghee) 1 medium yellow onion, diced 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 clove garlic, minced 2 tsp. ground cumin 1 tsp. dried Mexican oregano (substitute with regular oregano) 1/­­2 tsp. ground sweet paprika 3 cups /­­ 500g cooked pinto beans (about 2 cans) 1/­­2 can chipotle peppers in adobo sauce (use more or less to suit your taste) water as needed 1 small bunch cilantro, washed and dried 1 pint /­­ 280g cherry tomatoes, divided 1 green onion, sliced (white and green part) 1 small jar (15.5 oz. /­­ 415ml) store bought salsa, mild medium or hot, depending on your tastes 1 cup /­­ 145g hulled hemp seeds 1 medium red bell pepper, seeds removed and roughly chopped 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 Tbsp. nutritional yeast 2-3 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice, to taste 1/­­2 clove garlic 1 small piece fresh turmeric, chopped (substitute with 1/­­2 tsp. dried) ground cayenne, to taste 3 Tbsp. water, if needed Directions: 1. Melt oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onions, salt, and stir to combine. Cook until lightly caramelized (about 10 minutes), then add the garlic and cook for a couple minutes until fragrant. Stir in cumin, oregano and paprika, cook for 2 minutes, then add the beans and chipotles in adobo (use as much or as little as you like). Cover and cook on low heat while you make the queso. If the pot becomes dry, add a little water and stir. 2. To make the queso, put all ingredients, except water, in a high-speed blender or food processor and blend until smooth and creamy. If needed, add water one tablespoon at a time until the desired consistency is reached. If you want a thick cream, use less water, for a thinner sauce, use more. (You will not achieve a perfectly smooth sauce with a food processor, but it is still delicious!). 3. Slice the cherry tomatoes into quarters. Add half of them to the salsa and stir to combine. Save the other half for later. 4. Smash the beans with a bean masher, potato masher, immersion blender, or put them into your high-speed blender (remove the queso first, but dont worry about cleaning it). The goal is to get the beans creamy, but not perfectly smooth. Add water if necessary, and season to taste.  5. Pick out a few stems of the most attractive cilantro, brush them with a little olive oil and stick them to the inside wall of the bowl (this step is optional). Chop the remaining cilantro and set aside. 6. Combine the remaining cherry tomatoes and combine them with the sliced spring onion. Sprinkle with a little salt, and fold to combine.  7. To assemble the dip, Spread the bean layer in the bottom first, followed by the salsa and finally the hemp queso. Top with the chopped cilantro, and finally the fresh tomato mix. Serve with whatever you like to dip! Party on!      Hope you’re all doing well out there. If you are experiencing any semblance of Spring weather where you are, please send some my way. K thanks. Happy dipping! xo, Sarah B The post Legendary Layer Bean Dip – Vegan, Grain-free appeared first on My New Roots.

Recipe | Deconstructed Breaded Zucchini

April 15 2019 Oh My Veggies 

Clearly I am watching too much Top Chef. Because everything on Top Chef is deconstructed, right? You can’t argue with the fact that breaded zucchini is awesome. So why deconstruct it? Well, because breaded zucchini is a huge hassle to make what with the egg on the hands and the breadcrumbs under the fingernails. And painstakingly dipping each little zucchini round into egg and then breadcrumbs takes a lot of time too. Deconstructed breaded zucchini is breaded zucchini for those of us who are short on time, lazy, or a little bit of both. While the onion might not be included in the original version, I threw it in because I had it on hand and I like sauteed zucchini with onions. So why not? This might not be quite the same as breaded zucchini, but it does take half the time (and effort!), which is a big plus in my book.

Coconut Mango Overnight Oatmeal

April 12 2019 Oh My Veggies 

Having never lived in the tropics, I can’t really tell you when mango season is. But I do know that a few times a year, there’s suddenly an abundance of champagne mangoes at the grocery store. They’ll be strategically positioned at the front of the produce section, boxes stacked precariously on top of each other. And they’re always 5 for $5. While I like regular mangoes just fine, I like the champagne ones even more. They’re a little bit smaller, but I have yet to get one that wasn’t sweet or that was stringy or weird in some other way. So, in summary, I love champagne mangoes and it’s that time of year–cheap champagne mango season. Exclamation point! I’ve been trying out different kinds of overnight oatmeal lately, but I haven’t had success until I came up with this Coconut Mango Overnight Oatmeal recipe. The first time I made overnight oatmeal in a jar, I tried using steel cut oats. I’ve read other people raving about using those in overnight oats, but I have TMJ and chewing on them gave me a jaw ache that stayed with me the rest of the day. Not good! I also tried adding cocoa […]

Dumpling Ramen Bowls

March 29 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Dumpling Ramen Bowls In our house, were crazy about ramen bowls.  Theyre one-dish meals that are healthful, versatile, and easy-to-make. What’s not to love? The cheapest and easiest noodles to use in ramen bowls are the eponymous ramen noodle bricks that you can find in any grocery store for about 20 cents each. (Just be sure to throw away the seasoning packet — nasty stuff in there!) When I have rice noodles on hand, I use them instead of the ramen noodles, and Ive also been known to use leftover linguine or angel hair pasta. For the broth, you can go with adding a regular vegetable soup base (I like Better than Bouillon brand) or even miso paste to water.  Were tom yum soup fanatics, so more often I will season my broth with a great tom yum soup base I found that contains no animal products. The vegetables and other ingredients you add to your bowls are only limited by your imagination (or, more accurately, whats in your fridge).  Usually I add some diced extra-firm tofu (sautéed when I have the time, or just simmered with everything else when Im in a hurry).  Ive also been known to add pieces of vegan sausage (as I did here) as well as meatballs when I have them on hand. I add whatever veggies I have on hand, whether fresh or frozen. These bowls are also a great way to use up small amounts of leftover vegetables. One of my favorite additions to ramen bowls are Asian dumplings.  I live in a rural area, so until recently, if I wanted Asian dumplings, Id have to take a road trip to a city with an Asian market. But the nice people at Nasoya sent me samples of their organic Nasoya Vegan Dumplings to try for this post. I’m also happy to report that my local Food Lion now carries these dumplings (they’re in the fresh produce section next to the tofu), so I can now enjoy organic vegan dumplings anytime!  Click here for coupons to give them a try — they’re available in two flavors - Tofu Vegetable and Thai Basil Vegetable. Below is my recipe for Dumpling Ramen Bowls.   They can be made super-quickly if you use the simmer-everything-together method, or you can take a few extra minutes to saute some of the ingredients separately (such as the dumplings) and add more flavor to the final result. I especially like to use my electric wok when I make these bowls because I find that it makes it easier, whichever method I use.   Heres a recipe using my preferred method in which I saute a few of the components first:  Dumpling Ramen Bowls 2 teaspoons neutral vegetable oil 1 package Nasoya Vegan Dumplings 1 1/­­2 cups sliced shiitake mushrooms 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce 3 cups water 2 teaspoons vegetable soup base or tom yum soup base 2 packages ramen noodles or rice noodles 1/­­2 cup shredded carrots 2 cups fresh baby spinach or baby bok choy 1 cup cooked broccoli florets (or other cooked vegetable, optional 2 diced vegan sausage links or 1 cup diced extra-firm tofu, optional Sriracha, to taste, optional Thai basil leaves or cilantro, optional garnish Black sesame seeds, optional garnish Heat the oil in a wok or large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the dumplings and stir-fry until nicely browned on both sides, about 2 minutes per side.  Add a splash of water, if needed to keep the dumplings from sticking. Remove the dumplings from the wok, and set aside. Reheat the wok or skillet over medium-high heat.  Add the mushrooms and a splash of soy sauce and stir-fry for 1 to 2 minutes to brown nicely and soften.  Remove the mushrooms from the wok and set aside.  Bring the the water to a boil in the wok or medium saucepan. Stir in the soup base until blended. Add the ramen noodles, carrot, and remaining soy sauce and reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook until the noodles are tender, about 2 minutes. Add the spinach and stir gently until the spinach is wilted. Divide the noodle mixture into large soup bowls, arranging the carrots and spinach on top of the noodles.  Return the dumplings and mushrooms to the wok and heat until hot.  Arrange the dumplings and mushrooms on top of the noodles, next to the spinach and carrots.  Add the cooked broccoli and vegan sausage and stir-fry for a minute to heat through.  To serve, drizzle each bowl with sriracha, if using.  Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Garnish with basil or cilantro and a sprinkle of sesame seeds, if using. Makes 2 to 4 servings   NOTE: For the quick, no-oil, Simmer-Everything-Together Method, use the above ingredients (except the oil) and proceed as follows: Heat the water in a large saucepan.  Add the soy sauce and vegetable soup base or tom yum soup base and bring to a boil.  Add the Nasoya Vegan Dumplings and return the water to a boil for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the ramen noodles, mushrooms, and reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook until the noodles and dumplings are tender, about 2 minutes. Add the carrots, and spinach and stir gently until the spinach is wilted. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Stir in any additional cooked veggies, tofu, or other ingredients, as desired. Divide the soup into bowls, arranging a few of the dumplings on top of each serving.  Drizzle with a little sriracha, if desired. Garnish with a few Thai basil or cilantro leaves and a sprinkle of sesame seeds, if using. The post Dumpling Ramen Bowls appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Recipe | Shiitake Panini with Roasted Asparagus Pesto

March 11 2019 Oh My Veggies 

When I make asparagus, nine times out of ten, I roast it. Steamed asparagus is good and sautéed asparagus is better, but neither compare to roasted asparagus. Just like with cauliflower, roasting mellows the flavor of asparagus. It gets caramelized and tender and just perfect in every way. As soon as I saw spring asparagus at the grocery store, I knew I had to buy it, but other than roasting it, I wasn’t sure what to do with it. I played around with different ideas and settled on a sandwich. Roasted asparagus sandwich! You never see asparagus on a sandwich, right?! But then the more I thought about it, I realized there’s probably a reason for that–asparagus would be a little bit unwieldy on a sandwich. So I decided to make an asparagus pesto to spread onto the sandwich and I topped that with roasted shiitake mushrooms and Fontina cheese. Believe it or not, I grilled this on my Griddler, but I can never get nice grill marks on my panini, no matter how long I let it sit on there. Well, the inside still got nice and melty, which is more important than the aesthetics, I think. Served with […]

Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo

March 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo Every year, people around the world celebrate Mardi Gras and Carnival, a festival of parades, music and eating decadent foods leading up to Lent. Millions of people observe Lent by fasting or foregoing treats and meats for 40 days. Fun fact, the term carnival is from carnelevare, or to remove meat. So thats what were doing, removing the meat, but keeping the delicious flavor of the popular Mardi Gras dish gumbo. This Creole stew from Southern Louisiana usually features strong-flavored stock, meat, or shellfish, but, with a few simple swaps, it’s a perfect vegetarian dish. Green Gumbo is a popular plant-based version that includes a variety of greens and herbs that give it an amazing color and rich flavors. Richard McCarthy, Member of the Executive Committee for Slow Food International and a Meatless Monday ambassador , shares his green gumbo recipe and great tips for making this plant-based dish taste authentic. Richards essentials for cooking green gumbo: Cook with what you have. Use collard greens, kale, mustard greens, turnip greens, spinach, and herbs like parsley, dill, etc. Green gumbo appears throughout the Lenten culinary calendar as meatless and on Holy Thursday in famous restaurants (like Dooky Chase) with meat stock. Begin by making a roux. Heat the pan with vegetable or olive oil, add flour, and mix with a wooden spoon until dark brown. The color of the gumbo will be determined by how dark you make the roux. The roux gives butter beans and lima beans a great base of flavor. Or, consider any medley of vegetables. Add Shiitake Bacon to get the traditional umami flavor. Umami is the savory flavor that many eaters say is missing in vegetarian recipes. One way to add umami to green gumbo is to make shiitake bacon, which provides the missing depth of flavor. Dont forget the rice. Rice is a traditional accompaniment to gumbo. While a saucepan is perfectly good for preparing rice, rice cookers are also an easy way to prepare perfect rice every time. Any grain or variety of rice can work, but long-grain rice is best since it provides the gumbo with more surface areas to cover with flavor.  McCarthy recommends a simplified version of the recipe crafted by Richard Stewart, the former chef of Gumbo Shop. Green Gumbo Serves 4 Ingredients: Gumbo: 1/­­4 cup of vegetable or olive oil 1/­­4 cup of flour 1 large onion, minced 4 stalks of celery, minced 1 bell pepper, minced 2 bunches of available greens (collard, mustard, kale, turnip, and/­­or spinach), chopped 1/­­4 cup of chopped parsley 2-4 cups of water (or enough to make a soup) 2 bay leaves Salt and pepper, to taste Cayenne pepper or hot sauce, to taste 1 cup of dried field peas (or Sea Island red peas, on the Slow Food Ark of Taste ) Vegetable stock, to taste (optional) Mushroom Bacon: 1 dozen fresh shiitake or button mushrooms 1 TBS of liquid smoke, smoked salt and/­­or smoked paprika 1/­­4 cup of vegetable or olive oil 1 TBS of salt or soy sauce (to taste) Rice: 1 cup of long-grained rice 2 cups of water Preparation: Field peas: Rinse, then boil field peas in salt water until soft. Drain peas of excess water and either store or immerse immediately into the gumbo. This step can be done in advance in order to cut down on preparation time on the day of serving. You can even prepare and freeze the peas days before, drop them into the hot soupy pot mid-way through the process. Make the gumbo: Heat a soup pot at a medium setting and make a roux (the soup base). Roux: add oil to the pot, once sizzling, add flour and mix with a wooden spoon. When the flour starts to smell delicious, it will then begin to turn a brownish color. Stir fairly vigorously to avoid burning. Once its a dark brown (5-10 minutes), add minced onions, celery and bell pepper. Stir the ingredients well to blend the flavors. Add salt, pepper, and more oil and/­­or water (or wine) to deglaze the pan. The roux will become bubbly and smell almost sweet. At this point, start adding water and turn down the heat a little. Add bay leaves, other seasonings, and the chopped greens and herbs. They will soon turn from bright green to dark green. Add field peas and any additional vegetables, like chopped carrots or turnips, whatever you have in the kitchen. Let simmer for at least 60 minutes. Once the gumbo is hot, tasty and ingredients cooked down into dark greens, and soft field peas, it is ready to serve. Tasting it at the end is important: Is it salty or spicy enough? If not, add more cayenne or hot sauce, black pepper, salt, etc. Mushroom bacon: Slice fresh mushrooms vertically in thirds, depending upon the size of the mushrooms. (Button mushrooms are fine and usually easily available, feel free to select shiitake or other exceptionally tasty varieties.) In a mixing bowl, add 1/­­4 cup of oil, 1 TBS of liquid smoke, salt or soy sauce. Mix the ingredients, and then add the fresh mushrooms and mix until they are coated. Spread sliced mushrooms across a baking sheet and bake for 20-30 minutes at 375 degrees F. Check after 15 minutes and turn over ones that are browned and crisp. Once crispy, turn off the oven and let cool slowly in oven. Rice: If you have a rice cooker, prepare as usual. If not, wash 1 cup of rice under running cold water to remove any excess dust, etc. Boil in 2 cups of water until soft (usually 25-30 min). Final Preparations: Place 1/­­4 cup of rice in the middle of a shallow soup bowl. Pour gumbo around the rice, making sure that there are equal amounts of greens and liquid. Take the dried, crispy mushroom bacon from the cooled oven and add a handful on top of the rice, and serve. Invite your friends and family to celebrate a plant-based Mardi Gras with this Green Gumbo recipe. If youre looking for other meatless recipe inspiration throughout the Lenten season, check out our recipe gallery . Happy Mardi Gras! Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Earl Grey Tea Sandwich Cookies, Vegan and Gluten-Free + Giveaway

February 20 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Earl Grey Tea Sandwich Cookies, Vegan and Gluten-Free + Giveaway This post was created in partnership with Arbor Teas /­­ Giveaway below! We come from a culture, where tea is everything. In Russia, tea is probably the most commonly consumed beverage. It’s like water, but much more popular than water. Everyone drinks it – adults, kids, and even coffee lovers. It’s acceptable to have tea after every meal, as well as as during breaks throughout the day, any time of day. If you attempt to stop by someone’s house for a quick second, you will most likely end up staying for tea. And tea time is sacred. It’s when 90% of conversations happen (or at least it seems that way). Tea time is never just tea, either, there’s always some kind of treat involved. It can really be anything sweet: hard candy, chocolate, cookies, waffles, cake, powdered sugar-dusted cranberries… Dessert is so intertwined with tea for us, that to this day we can’t enjoy anything sweet without a hot beverage. It just doesn’t taste good. We’d rather have no dessert than dessert without tea. This is especially true for cookies. Today we are super excited to be collaborating on a tea time-ready, sandwich cookie recipe with Arbor Teas, a Michigan-based tea company that carries the loveliest selection of organic and fair-trade loose leaf tea. There’s a giveaway, too! When we were dreaming up these cookies, we immediately thought about tea sandwiches – you know, those miniature, crustless sandwiches that usually accompany fancy tea. With that format in mind, we went for a layered ‘sandwich’ cookie. Earl Grey tea is probably our favorite, most nostalgia-inducing black tea, and since the Arbor Teas Earl Grey smelled so incredibly fresh (the best we’ve ever had!), we were very excited to incorporate that flavor in some way. The result: buttery, vegan and gluten-free cookies, layered with a luxurious Earl Grey cream, with a kiss of dark chocolate. They are the perfect cross between virtuous and indulgent. And of course, they are best enjoyed with or dipped in tea. Arbor Teas is one of those dream sponsors that we feel lucky to work with. Not only do they take pride in the quality of their product, but they also put a huge emphasis on sustainability. They source only organic and fair-trade tea, package it in backyard-compostable packaging, and run their facility on solar power. We like to believe that companies like this are the future. Besides their earl grey, we’ve been loving the Chaga Chicory, Makaibari Estate Silver Tips, and Golden Ginger Turmeric teas. G i v e a w a y  :  Today’s giveaway is for one 4 oz Earl Grey tea and a stainless steel infuser from Arbor Teas, as well as one copy of our cookbook, Simply Vibrant. To enter, leave a comment on this post telling us about your favorite kind of tea or a tea that intrigues you from the Arbor Teas shop, until February 28th, 2019. Giveaway is U.S. only. Earl Grey Tea Sandwich Cookies, Vegan and Gluten-Free   Print Serves: about 12 complete cookies Ingredients for the Earl Grey cream heaping ¼ cup cashews - soaked in boiling water for 10 min and drained ½ tablespoon arrowroot powder ⅓ cup very strong Earl Grey tea 1 tablespoon lemon juice 2 tablespoons maple syrup 2 tablespoons coconut oil fat from one 13.5 oz can full fat coconut milk for the cookies 1/­­2 packed cup pitted dates 2 tablespoons flax/­­chia meal (aka ground flax/­­chia) 1 cup old-fashioned gf rolled oats 1/­­2 cup ground walnuts/­­almond meal + 1/­­2 cup ground oats/­­oat flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/­­2 teaspoon baking soda 1 tablespoon loose leaf Earl Grey tea - ground in a mortar and pestle (optional) pinch of sea salt - to taste 1 cup nut butter like almond, cashew, peanut, sunflower or tahini 1/­­4 cup plus 1 tablespoon melted neutral coconut oil, divided 1 cup dairy-free dark chocolate chips Instructions to make the Earl Grey cream Place the cashews, arrowroot, tea, lemon juice, maple syrup, and coconut oil in an upright blender. Blend until smooth. Place the coconut fat in a medium bowl and whisk it with a whisk to make it a little fluffier. Add the blended mixture to the bowl and whisk it in. Place the bowl in the refrigerator for about 1 hour, until the cream is hardened but scoopable. You will likely have some cream left over after making the cookies. You can freeze it and use it as cupcake/­­cake icing, serve on the side of pancakes, waffles, crepes, etc. to make the cookies Place the dates into a small, heat proof bowl and pour hot purified water over them, then leave to soak for 10 minutes. Place the flax/­­chia meal into another small bowl and add 6 tablespoons of purified water. Whisk to combine and let sit to gel for 15 minutes. Preheat oven to 350° F (180° C). Combine the oats, flour or meal, baking powder, baking soda, Earl Grey powder (if using), and salt in a large bowl, mix well. Combine the nut butter, ¼ cup of coconut oil, drained soaked dates and the gelled flax/­­chia in a bowl of a food processor fit with an S blade. Process until smooth. Add the mixture into the bowl with the oats and flours, and stir to combine. The mixture will be stiff and sticky. Prepare a baking sheet by covering it with parchment paper. Use a small ice cream scoop to scoop uniform batter portions onto the baking sheet. If you dont have an ice cream scoop, portion out about 2 tablespoons of batter for each cookie. Leave enough space between each portion for flattening. Using a lightly oiled hand, flatten each cookie into uniform circles, about ¼ in thickness. Bake for 10-12 minutes, or until the outside of the cookies is dry to the touch. Let the cookies cool for about 5-7 minutes on the baking sheet, then transfer to a cooling rack to cool completely. You will probably need to bake the cookies in 2 batches. To make the cookie sandwiches, place a generous amount of the Earl Grey cream into the center of a cookie, then use another cookie to sandwich the cream and let it spread out to the sides, pressing gently. The cookies should be facing bottom side in. Repeat with the rest of the cookies, placing them back on their baking sheet. Place in the refrigerator while you prepare the chocolate, for the Earl Grey cream to harden a little. Prepare a drying rack, lined with parchment paper underneath. Melt the chocolate chips in a small saucepan or bowl on a double boiler, together with the remaining 1 tablespoon of coconut oil. Dip each cookie into the melted chocolate about half way, letting the excess chocolate drip off. Place on the drying rack. Repeat with the rest of the cookies. Transfer the rack to the refrigerator for a few minutes for the chocolate to harden. Keep the cookies in an airtight container in the refrigerator or a cool room. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Restaurant Highlight: Bio Solo Organico, Buenos Aires

May 28 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Bio Solo Organico is not only the first organic vegetarian restaurant in Argentina, but also the whole of Latin America! Claudia Carrara is the pioneer that took the leap of opening her own vegetarian restaurant in Argentina’s charming capital of Buenos Aires. Everything started from the desire to bring her children up with the best possible nutrition. Soon enough, she began to sell natural dishes to her neighbours that she would create from the leftover vegetables she had in her kitchen. The success of her improvised cuisine led a friend to offer her a few tables where her clients could sit and enjoy healthy meals. One thing led to another and the idea of opening a restaurant was born. Originally, the main focuses of Claudias research were health, taste, and environmental sustainability. First with the humble intention to feed her kids in a conscious way, and after in the way she would develop her restaurant to have the best possible impact on her society. The name of her cuisine speaks for itself. At Bio Solo Organico, they only work with fresh, local and organic products and this is guaranteed since they were granted the Organic Certification by Food Safety. The […] The post Restaurant Highlight: Bio Solo Organico, Buenos Aires appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Lauki Vadi Ki Sabji

May 25 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Lauki Vadi Ki Sabji (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Lauki Vadi Ki Sabji Laucki is also known as Bottle gourd. This is a healthy and wholesome lentil and vegetable main dish. I like making Lauki as it is mild in taste and easy to digest. I usually will serve this with plain rice or rotis. - 4 cup laucki (bottle gourd, peeled and cut into byte size cubes) - 1/­­3 cup moong dal vadi (broken into small pieces) - 3/­­4 cup tomato puree - 1 tsp ginger paste - 2 tbsp oil - 1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 1 tbsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­4 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder - 1 tsp salt - 1/­­4 tsp garam masala - 1/­­2 cup water -  I am using instant pot; I am using the instant pot instead of pressure-cooker. Not for saving time but ease of use. -  Heat one tablespoon of oil in instant pot on sautéed mode. Oil should be moderately hot, add moong dal vadi stir-fry till they are light golden brown this should take about 1 minute. take out the vadies from instant pot. -  Add remaining 1 tablespoon of oil, in instant pot keeping on sautéed mode oil should be moderately hot and add cumin seeds. When seeds start to crack, add the asafetida, stir and add tomato puree, ginger, coriander powder, turmeric, salt and chili powder and cook stirring occasional till spice mix start leaving the oil. -  Add bottle gourd, vadies and 1/­­2 cup of water. Change the setting to pressure cook on high mode. Set the time for 6 minutes. (At this time instant pot is working just like pressure cooker, it will take same time building the pressure and after cooking releasing the pressure as pressure cooker, advantage is you can take care other work you have to do or even if you have to go out.) -  Open the instant pot when you are ready. After you open the instant pot adjust the water if you need more, add garam masala. I like to serve this with roti or rice. This makes a very satisfying meal. Enjoy! Thank you The post Lauki Vadi Ki Sabji appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

10 Plant-Based Cookbooks to Inspire Your Next Meatless Monday

May 13 2019 Meatless Monday 

10 Plant-Based Cookbooks to Inspire Your Next Meatless MondayWant to add new tastes and techniques to your Meatless Monday repertoire? Weve compiled some of our favorite, meatless cookbooks to offer a little inspiration. In the list, youll find endless ways to liven up your meals: Whether youre an Instant Pot fanatic or want to finally put your extensive spice collection to use, youre bound to find something that sparks joy below.   The Complete Vegan Cookbook: Over 150 Whole-Foods, Plant-Based Recipes and Techniques The Natural Gourmet Center compiled pages upon pages of satiating recipes that can help you up your plant-based cooking game using whole foods and local ingredients. The book is teeming with techniques that explain how to transform animal-free foods into divine dinners like a pro, along with seasonal-driven recipes thatll have even the most skeptical diner forget about the meat. Find it on Amazon .     Mostly Plants: 101 Delicious Flexitarian Recipes from the Pollan Family The Pollan Family -- Tracy, Dana, Lori, and Corky -- have been producing inspiring recipes for years that follow Michael Pollan’s famous food advice -- Eat food, not too much, mostly plants. In Mostly Plants, their new, flexitarian-focused cookbook, the Pollan Family shows how vegetables can shine when theyre at the center of the meal rather than a side. Most of the recipes in these pages can be cooked up in 35 minutes or less, and many can be easily modified for any dietary need. Find it on Amazon .     Veg: Easy and Delicious Meals for Everyone Chef Jamie Olivers newest cookbook, which will be released on August 22, 2019, celebrates tasty and simple food that, as Oliver puts it, just happens to be meatless. Beyond its very viable recipes, the book shares cooking hacks and tricks thatll help any level chef become more comfortable in the kitchen. Find in on Amazon .       Dinner for Everyone: 100 Iconic Dishes Made 3 Ways -- Easy, Vegan, or Perfect for Company Mark Bittman shares 100 straightforward recipes in his new cookbook that can feed a group filled with all types of dietary needs. Every recipe can be modified to appease the palate of any guest, making this cookbook an essential manual for anyone tasked with the challenge of feeding a vegan and a carnivore at the same time. Find it on Amazon .     Vegan Instant Pot Cookbook: 500 Simple Plant-Based Recipes to Feel Better. Ultimate Pressure Cooker Vegan Cookbook for Beginners and Pros Healthful eating doesnt have to be hard or time-consuming. The Instant Pot has gained a cult following for its quick, dump-and-bake technique. Mary Goodrich proves through her recipes that plant-based food works just as nicely with the convenient cooking gadget. Whether youve been obsessed with your Instant Pot forever or you want to see what all the buzz is about, this extensive recipe book will serve you well. Find it on Amazon .       Food Is the Solution: What to Eat to Save the World--80+ Recipes for a Greener Planet and a Healthier You The easiest thing a person can do to combat climate change is to eat less meat. Matthew Prescott, the senior food policy director of the Humane Society, incorporated this philosophy into his first cookbook, which is equal parts educational and drool-inducing. Let this book guide you in changing the way you feed yourself and the way you think about food. Find it on Amazon .     The Indian Vegetarian Cookbook Indian food is a staple for many plant-based eaters because there are so many flavorful, meatless recipes integral to Indian cooking. Pushpesh Pant makes Indian cooking accessible to western readers while maintaining the integrity of whats so good about Indian food in the first place. Vegetables are anything but boring, but if you needed convincing, this book should do it. Find it on Amazon .       OMD: The Simple, Plant-Based Program to Save Your Health, Save Your Waistline, and Save the Planet Suzy Amis Cameron is a mom of five, so she understands how important it is for meals to be effortless and kid-friendly. The author is the founder of the MUSE School in California, where Meatless Monday is implemented. This book will help any parent make meatless meals that their children will love, and also offers great wisdom around why eating meatless is so crucial in the first place. Find it on Amazon .       Heirloom Kitchen: Heritage Recipes and Family Stories from the Tables of Immigrant Women Without immigrants, thered be nothing good to eat. Anna Francese Gass, who migrated to the U.S. from Italy as a young girl, recognizes the importance of immigrant women cooks through her own experience growing up in the U.S. Her new cookbook serves as a record of history; in it she collects and preserves her Italian mothers recipes so that they can be enjoyed by generations to come. And they are simply timeless. Find it on Amazon .       Masala Mamas: Recipes and Stories from Indian Women Changing Their Communities Through Food and Love This incredible story is peppered with recipes from the Masala Mamas -- 16 women who live in the Kalwa slum in India whove dedicated their lives to cooking up hot and nutritious meals for school children who often cant afford much to eat. All proceeds from this cookbook support the Masala Mamas in their mission. Find it on Amazon .     Have a favorite cookbook that deserves to be on the list? Let us know about it on our Facebook page . And for even more recipe inspiration, check out our recipe gallery . The post 10 Plant-Based Cookbooks to Inspire Your Next Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales

April 28 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales Adriana Ayales is a rainforest herbalist from Costa Rica and the founder of herbal apothecary Anima Mundi. We are in love with Adriana’s world and creations, and so excited to share this interview. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Although I love the grounded power of routine, I’m living in a phase of being open and free. With kids, and a beyond full time devotion to running a business, I just ride the waves as they come. I’ve learned to surrender that not everything has to look the way it should look. Lifes situations and patterning moves around like the seasons. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I love getting up before the kids, and sneaking into the kitchen to make myself a healing cup(s) of medicine. First thing I do is a big ole cup of vitamin C rich goodness, sometimes its mangosteen hibiscus with a lemon squeeze, or fresh picked turmeric from the garden grated with ginger, along with camu camu and lemon water. Then I make a seasonal fruit bowl of sorts, with oatmeal, or homemade granola loaded with mineralizing herbs (like nettle or mesquite powder). Followed by my favorite, and not so healthy friend, Coffee. Ah coffee. I cant tell you how wonderful locally grown heirloom coffee is here, paired with deliciously fresh cacao and medicinal mushrooms and homemade almond. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Massaging the face, forehead and skull with warm oil at night is one of the simplest and most restorative practices we can do to induce deep sleep. I love using a mix I make at home of jojoba oil, with rosehip, infused with clary sage and a fine sandalwood. Another one of my all time favorites for evening relaxation is blue lotus. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Sipping tea mindfully in nature, witnessing time in silence is one of my favorite things. I tap into my feelings, breath, mind, and begin to clear energy. Sustenance -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do love caffeine. Growing up in Costa Rica has woven me into loving a good cup of locally roasted coffee. Depending on the day, I love adding reishi, or a mix of medicinal mushrooms, raw cacao with mucuna, along with a homemade plant based milk. I also love having an aged puerh, or traditional matcha with added herbs for nourishment, like moringa. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? Sometimes I do, especially when I’m tired or running on low energy. When im over-worked, or running on stress I definitely crave more carby and sugary things, and this is usually due to skipping a meal, or needing a quick-fix. Some tips I bare in mind during stressful moments that ignite the sweet tooth (or just in general!) are: always go for fruits before you opt for a sugary dessert, always choose low glycemic sweeteners vs. sugar (some faves are coconut sugar, maple syrup, and real stevia extract -- not the synthetic ones!) For carbs avoid empty carbs and refined flours, and opt for ones that are more easily absorbed, like coconut, almond and cassava flour. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness?  Oh my, so many! I seasonally change my herbal intake, but certainly stick with some favorites. I love having my potent singles (single herb tinctures) on me at all times, like shisandra berries and blue lotus. A Brain tonic while I’m working, usually with herbs like gotu kola, ginkgo, brahmi and lion’s mane mushroom. Two that I dose with very often are the Happiness tonic (st johns wort, mucuna, ashwagandha, etc.) and euphoric/­­mood elevating herbs like catuaba, mucunam muira puama and damiana. I also love our Liver formula for daily cleansing and nourishment, like the moringa, burdock, nettles, chlorella. And of course beauty herbs like He Shou Wu, Mangosteen and more! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Absolutely, I love doing a mix between yoga and pilates. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I love the torture! When I feel a little lazy and not like suffering in an intensive workout, I just remind myself how excellent I feel when I finish it. Not just seeing physical results, but especially the mental peace and happiness after working out. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? A feeling of wholeness. When your mood is high, your gut is vibrant, and you feel confident and beautiful. When there is no sense of lack, imbalance or deficiency. When you feel aligned. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love making my own body and face oils. I usually infuse collagen boosting herbs, and skin strengthening herbs and lather up. I also like to keep things simple, like using cacao butter with coconut oil, or just a fluffy shea butter for deep moisture.  -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Yes! I’m a big fan of eating herbs and supplements that protect the skin, increase our own collagen receptors and help activate our natural glow. The herbs I designed for the vegan collagen formula have been my go-tos for quite sometime. Horsetail, He Shou Wu, Calendula, Nettle seed + leaf, Comfrey, and others like Mangosteen, Camu Camu and Hibiscus are great for the skin too. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? I love making edible masks. Infusing a high potency extract into a raw clay and avocado, along with an activating source like apple cider vinegar, or more protein like flax, and making a smooth paste to lather all over the face, body and even hair is one of my all time favorites. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Visualization is huge for me. Sitting in silence and tuning in is vital, along with the help of nervines and adaptogenic herbs that assist in de-compression like skullcap, blue lotus and ashwagandha. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I like taking a walk or hike in nature, get in the ocean/­­lake/­­river or any kind of body of water. I completely unplug from work, the phone, or computer. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Before the cold kicks in, I take strong echinacea extracts in a soothing tea, mixing turmeric, lemon, grated ginger, apple cider vinegar, garlic and aloe in warm water. It works every time. I make a large batch and dose all day long --  even my kids love it!  -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? This certainly overlaps for me, which can honestly be a bitter sweet reality. I love everything surrounding plants, and its medicinal uses, as well as teaching, and medicine making. I love that my business is all about honoring ancestral ways, plant medicine, the art of herbalism, righteous cultivation, and medicine making. Yet, like any business owner would understand, there are many tasks to the job that are exhausting and certainly not what made you fall in love in the first place. For me personally, Ive learned to reconcile by doing what I love doing the most, medicine making and wildcrafting. I made a commitment to myself in making space for this no matter what, and not disregarding it by prioritizing business with the things that dont really matter in life. Its vital that we take moments in our free time that refine our focus and intention in life, re-align to what inspired the dream, without getting side swept with busy-ness. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Over the last couple years Ive struggled with this because of having babies. Which Im sure a lot of new moms can relate to this! Every time I get a moment between being a mother, wife and business owner, my priority to feel more self loving (and more human!) is yoga. The simple act of getting oxygen, doing conscious breathing, and distracting the monkey mind from its patterning, you become yourself again.  -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Herbs. Integrating plant medicine into everything has significantly changed my body mind and soul. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Off the top of my head I love these: Healing with Whole Foods with Paul Pitchford, Gabriel Cousens’ Spiritual Nutrition, The Body Ecology Diet by Donna Gates, and of course The Medical Medium by Anthony William. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming an herbalist and starting Anima Mundi? Growing up I learned closely with curanderos on plant medicine and rainforest herbalism overall. I then attended herbal schools in California where I learned a lot of native, northern and european herbalism. Life somehow took me to NYC (a place I NEVER thought I would ever go to) after living in California for quite some years, and I started practicing privately as an herbalist. I kept noticing the common trends, symptomology and imbalances folks that came in had, and started developing mother formulas to be able to make large batches. -- How do you approach sourcing herbs for Anima Mundi?  First and foremost we try to create a direct relationship with the people/­­farmers that cultivate. Although we value certification of prime ingredients, there are many ethical wild crafters and farms that do not have special certifications, yet cultivate sustainable practices and have quality products that we also like to support. We are also adamant of supporting local economies as much as possible, particularly with rainforest herbs sourced directly from indigenous people, supporting their craft as well as ethically crafted botanicals. -- What are some of Anima Mundis best sellers? Our plant-based Collagen Booster, Happiness Tonic, Adaptogenic Immortality Tonics, Curam Beauty Elixir, our 100% Coconut Cream Powder, Mushroom Mocha Milk and more...! Fun and Inspiration -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Women Who Run with Wolves Song/­­Album –  Cuatro Vientos /­­ Danit Movie –  Loving the The OA lately! Piece of Art –  Ayahuasca art by Pablo Amaringo Photos by Renee Byrd and from Anima Mundi’s IG /­­ This post contains Amazon Affiliate links. The post Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Asparagus Corn Chowder

April 18 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Asparagus Corn Chowder We sent out this simple asparagus chowder recipe as a little bonus in our newsletter a few years ago. Since then, it’s become a total spring staple for us, and we cook it almost every time there’s good asparagus around. It also turned out to be a crowd pleaser, since we heard back from a lot of people who made and loved it (those are the best emails to get, always). This spring, while making the chowder yet again, we realized that we should probably publish it here and make it readily accessible to everyone at all times :) This delicate chowder is a great dish for showcasing asparagus – there’s few ingredients, so the tender, green qualities of asparagus can really shine. The recipe comes together so quickly, too (you can watch the whole process in our Instagram stories later today)! The key here is not to overcook the asparagus, since it’s at its best when bright green and snappy. Otherwise, it turns into something brown, mushy, and generally unappealing. It’s barely cooked in this recipe – just quickly sautéed with some lemon juice and flash blanched in broth and coconut milk. This recipe definitely allows for all kinds of improvisation with spring produce. You can use any tender spring greens that you can find this time of year, as well as herbs – chives with their pretty blossoms, basil, and mint all work great here. You can swap in peas or fava beans for some of the corn or ramps for some of the onion. Have fun with the toppings, too. An assertive flavored oil like chili oil would be great, but a drizzle of good quality olive oil is always delicious as well. Something crunchy like toasted pumpkin seeds or croutons would be heavenly on top, and lots of herbs, always. Hope you’ll give this one a try :) Asparagus Corn Chowder   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 tablespoon olive oil or other cooking oil of choice 1 teaspoon cumin - freshly ground 1 teaspoon coriander - freshly ground 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt - to taste kernels from 2 ears of sweet corn or about 2 cups frozen and thawed corn freshly ground black pepper 1 bunch asparagus - tough ends cut off, sliced into bite-size pieces 3 cloves garlic - minced juice of 1 lemon 1 13.5 oz can unsweetened canned coconut milk 1½ cups vegetable broth or water 4 cups spring greens, such as spinach, arugula, watercress, etc. handful of fresh basil or mint leaves (optional) chives/­­chive blossoms - for garnish (optional) chili oil, basil oil or olive oil - for garnish (optional) Instructions Heat the oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the cumin, coriander, onion and a few pinches of salt, sauté for 5 minutes. Add the corn, a pinch of salt and black pepper, and cook, stirring, for another 5 minutes. Add the asparagus and garlic and sauté until the asparagus is bright green, for about 2-3 minutes. Add the lemon juice and let it absorb for a minute. Add the coconut milk and vegetable broth/­­water and bring to a boil. Remove the pot from the heat and stir in the greens to wilt them. Transfer about half of the soup to an upright blender along with the basil/­­mint, if using, and blend until creamy. Return the blended mixture back to the soup pot and stir to combine. Taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. Serve garnished with chives and chive blossoms, a drizzle of oil or any other desired toppings. 3.5.3226 The post Asparagus Corn Chowder appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Stadiums Up Their Game with New Meatless Options

April 15 2019 Meatless Monday 

Stadiums Up Their Game with New Meatless OptionsWhether youre in it for the love of the game or the delectable ballpark eats, baseball season is in full swing. In 2019, stadiums are offering more meatless options than ever before: From the Impossible Burger to falafel-packed pitas to meat-free Philly cheesesteaks, theres no shortage of tasty ways to fill up at the concession stands. Find a few notable favorites below. Photo Credit: Beyond Meat Dodger Stadium Burgers and hot dogs are ballpark staples, and now meatless options are, too, at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. Find the Impossible Burger topped with herb mayo, lettuce, tomato and onions at Field Section 47 and Reserve section 29, according to Eater . Beyond Meat is also available, in the form of a Dodger Sausage , at Field 10, Loge 133, and Reserve 4.   Citi Field Mets fans can whet their appetites at the Goya Burrito Bar (Section 414), where they can choose from bean, rice and veggie burritos, bowls, or nachos, Eater reported. In the mood for something else? Youre in the right place, as AM New York highlighted. Score a margarita pizza cupcake (Jim Beam Highball Club on the Promenade),  Shake Shacks Portobello Shroom Burger (Section 140, Field Level Concourse), a veggie taco at El Verano Taqueria (Section 139, Field Level Concourse), or a veggie dog at Hain Celestial Gluten Free & Organic Stand (Section 105).   Globe Life Park Stadium The Texas Rangers provide their fans with a meatless haven at Globe Life Park Stadium . The Ballpark Vegan (near section 16) serves up a variety of meatless eats, including a Beyond Burger topped with vegan cheese, street tacos loaded with Beyond Meat crumbles and vegan chili.   T-Mobile Park If you have tickets to a Seattle Mariners home game, come hungry ! Find the seemingly ubiquitous Impossible Burger at Lil Woodys Burger & Shakes (at the Pen). This version is built the old fashioned way, topped with chopped onion, diced pickle, tomato, lettuce, ketchup and mayo. Hit It Here Café (Right Field Hit It Here Terrace) serves a fully vegan Beyond Burger, which is paired with vegan Just Mayo. At The Natural (Section 105), Beyond Meat is served in the form of a sweet and spicy sausage. Here you can also order avocado toast - not yet a ballgame staple, but whos to judge? At Paseo (Edgars Cantina and Edgars Home Run Porch), you can chow down on the Tofu Delight Sandwich, which features sautéed organic tofu with garlic aioli, caramelized onion, cilantro, pickled jalape?o and romaine lettuce, all served on a toasted baguette.   Yankee Stadium Yankee Stadium boasts tons of meatless dining options. At Bareburger (section 132), choose between the Beyond Sausage sandwich, avocado bites or the Changeup Burger (Impossible Burger, pickled red onions, spinach, guacamole, spicy pico de gallo on a sprout bun). At the Toyota Terrace (in the right field bleachers), try a crispy buffalo cauliflower bun thats served with celery slaw and creamy bleu cheese. If youre craving something sweet, its important to know theres a Ben & Jerrys Scoop Shop located in Sections 125 and 318.   Oracle Park The three-time World Champion San Francisco Giants are winners in more ways than one: Their stadium food options are truly trophy-worthy. The venue hosts a culinary garden behind the centerfield wall, from which two restaurants source fresh produce like kale and avocado. Beyond an assortment of fresh veggies, there are tons of meatless meals available here. The Garden Table offers an Impossible beef-based chili, and the standard Impossible Burger is available at Derby Grill outposts. Guests can go beyond classic ball game fare with the rice bowl (baby bok choy and baked tofu) or the noodle bowl (roasted eggplant, wok-seared bell peppers, crispy tofu) at Fongs , located on the second floor promenade.   Citizens Bank Park Grammy Award-winning musician Questlove has certainly upped the Philadelphia Phillys cool factor. Launched at the end of March 2019, the teams Citizens Bank Park is now serving Questloves Cheesesteak , a meatless riff on the citys iconic dish made with - you guessed it - Impossible Meat (Sections 108 and 120). In addition to the new menu item, plant-based meals can be found at Shake Shack, the first sit-down Shake Shack in a sports venue (near the Third Base Gate) and at Harry the Ks Broadcast Bar and Grille, which is serving up curry cauliflower lettuce (Left Field Gate).   Did we miss one your meatless stadium faves? Tell us about it by leaving a comment on our Facebook  page or post it using #MeatlessMonday. Want to bring Meatless Monday to your local stadium or community? Become a Meatless Monday Ambassador today ! Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Stadiums Up Their Game with New Meatless Options appeared first on Meatless Monday.

5 April Fools’ Recipes that Will Make Them Think They’re Eating the Real Thing

April 1 2019 Meatless Monday 

5 April Fools’ Recipes that Will Make Them Think They’re Eating the Real ThingBacon, wings and meatballs are all on the menu this Meatless Monday, but the recipes all have one very important thing in common: theyre meatless, of course! In honor of April Fools’ Day, consider cooking up a dish that poses as meat. Its up to you whether youll let your diners know theyre eating meatless versions of their dinner favorites. From mushroom-based meat balls to succulent sandwiches that swap in jackfruit for pork, this April Fools’ Day is guaranteed to be a tasty one. Pulled Jackfruit Sandwiches from the Veg Life Cauliflower Buffalo Wing Bites from the Saucy Southerner Potato Salad with Coconut “Bacon” from Migraine Relief Recipes Black Bean Meatless Balls and Zucchini Noodles from the Happy Health Freak Eggplant and Shiitake Meatballs from Sarcastic Cooking Did you fool anyone? Let us know how it all went down by commenting on our Facebook page. If youre looking for other meatless recipe inspiration, check out our recipe gallery. Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post 5 April Fools’ Recipes that Will Make Them Think They’re Eating the Real Thing appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sapiens, A Plant-Based Canteen In The City Of Santiago, Chile

March 12 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Sapiens is a symbol of evolution–a restaurant born from an inspiring story. A few years ago, two young, yet passionate Chileans, Nicolas and Piero left their home to embark on an exciting journey across the great lands of Australia. This experience abroad, working to make a living while roaming freely, slowly merged into an awakening and life-changing adventure. Back in Chile, the two friends feel the urge to change their lifestyle. Those months of cultural challenges and adaptation have changed them in a way that couldnt have been expected. The people they have encountered on the way, the places they have worked at, the wisdom they have gained, lead them to question their place in the world. Incorporating the values they have cultivated on the road into their Chilean culture is now a duty–a purpose. Their mission is to adopt a more sustainable way of living both for their own health and for the good care of the planet they live in. Veganism is a clear step–but they also fight for more than just a plant-based diet. They want to promote their values and educate their community about the whole picture. How can one educate another? Lectures and debates sometimes […] The post Sapiens, A Plant-Based Canteen In The City Of Santiago, Chile appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Walnut “Meat” Stuffed Pepper

March 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Walnuts stand in for ground beef in this Tex-Mex-inspired stuffed pepper. This recipe comes to us from Chef Lisa Sereda, executive chef of Wine Time . Chef Sereda cooked it for the Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge at the 2019 International Restaurant & Foodservice Show of New York. Serves 8 – 10 - 6 quarts of water - 12 medium sized Anaheim peppers - 2 cups diced yellow onion - 2 tbsp minced garlic - 3 cups roasted peppers - 6 cups roasted walnuts - 2 1/­­2 tbsp cumin - 1 tbsp cayenne pepper (plus or minus depending on spice index) - 2 tbsp paprika - 4 tbsp white sugar - 1 tbsp salt -  1/­­4 cup lemon juice - 2 tbsp olive oil - 6 cups shredded white cheddar (more or less depending on cheesy preference) - 2 cups crumbled feta - 1 cup full fat Greek yogurt (to make the pepper vegan, skip the cheese, feta and Greek yogurt) - Non-stick cooking spray - Diced fresh chives for garnish   Directions: Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Bring water to full boil in large saucepan. Cut peppers lengthwise down one side from stem to within 1/­­2 inch of tip. Boil peppers in water for about seven minutes or until pepper turns an olive green color. Remove and place in ice bath and remove seeds and veins from pepper. Drain and pat peppers dry. In separate pan sauté onion and garlic in olive oil until translucent. Pulse roasted walnuts in food processor or chop until the consistency of sautéed ground beef. Add chopped walnuts to onion and garlic and cook until mixed through. Chop roasted bell peppers in food processor until almost a liquid consistency. Add to walnut mixture. Add cayenne, paprika, cumin, sugar, salt and lemon juice. Sauté on medium for about five minutes until the mixture begins to come together and most of the moisture has evaporated. Place peppers onto prepared cooking sheet (spray bottom of pan with nonstick cooking spray before placing peppers on pan). Stuff each pepper with desired amount of walnut meat mixture. Cover each pepper with generous amount of white cheddar (omit for vegan pepper). Cook uncovered for about twenty minutes until cheese is melted and slightly browned. Garnish with crumbled feta, a drizzle or scoop of Greek yogurt and fresh chives.   The post Walnut “Meat” Stuffed Pepper appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Soup (and my gardener's lament: winter poison ivy!)

March 3 2019 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Soup (and my gardener's lament: winter poison ivy!) Dear Soup, Thank you for always reminding me there are better days ahead. Soups are mainstays around here, especially with snow on the ground and temps hovering in low twenties to single digits tonight, plus more cold on the horizon this week. And poison ivy. (Yup.) I've probably made six batches of this already this winter. It involves a food processor and a soup pot. That's it. Comes together in approximately five minutes and is satisfying, warm and delicious. Here's my take on this soup, which was originally inspired by this. Here's how I made my Vegan Pasta e Fagioli: 4 carrots 1 leek 6 cloves garlic 1 celery stalk 1/­­2 onion sliced thin 2 bay leaves 1/­­2 head of cabbage 1 can of cannellini beans (drained, rinsed) 1 can diced tomatoes 1/­­3 cup ditalini pasta (cooked in separate pot, then added to soup just before serving) 2 T. nutritional yeast 1 qt. veggie stock olive oil thyme oregano red pepper flakes salt & pepper to taste Add chopped veggies--carrots, leeks, garlic to food processor, pulse about ten times. Prep the soup pot with the olive oil over medium heat, add chopped veg. Cook till just tender. Add remaining ingredients and broth and seasonings, salt and pepper. Cover and let simmer two hours over low heat. Serve with a side of your best homemade bread. (Mine is Jim Lahey's --I made the ciabatta version). After a visit with the folks at Urgent Care yesterday for a infernal outbreak of poison ivy, I am now awaiting an agonizing three weeks for this painful mess to clear up. Or longer. Why does Mother Earth require such an evil, toxic plant? What purpose does it serve? I've been struck by this havoc on only a handful of times in my life because I am so gawdawful afraid. Sounds impossible. But trust me when I tell you: only to me, the Master Gardener, and in winter no less. And above is the culprit.  Our home is undergoing a transformation of sorts in a few weeks which will finally rid us of these old railroad timbers and be replaced with a more substantial wall of stone. (That will hopefully outlive us and beyond.)  So I found myself outside on a warm-ish day earlier last week in a bit of a snit over the demise of some cherished plants I couldn't bear to loose. I've spent fifteen years tending and planting, so obviously there are plants I want to keep. Out with the shovel and buckets and pots. Everything's dormant, ground was soft, sun was out: perfect. Until later that night when I woke with what I imagined to be some sort of bug bite. Then to the next afternoon when my arm reached up to scratch my wrist (pulling the long sleeve back and discovering to my horror what really had happened). OMG. WTH? Could this be? . . . is this? Noooooo!  And then began the seven stages of grief: shock, denial, guilt, anger and bargaining, depression and loneliness to reconstruction (the UC visit) and finally acceptance. Yes, I accept that I have the rash of the spring and summertime, of gardeners, campers, hikers and landscapers, the poisonous fury of: Leaves of Three Let it Be! Ah, but what about the roots?  I had come in contact with said dormant plant--through the roots. I had oh-so carefully lifted plants and divided, setting each clump aside. Gloves and long sleeves. I have replayed this moment back through my mind a hundred times: as I reached under one of my plants, I must have accidentally, on an exposed part of my wrist, come in contact with the worst plant root on the planet, unbeknownst to me.  I am more allergic than most and so, this lovely little visitor and its prescribed remedy dosed out (the horrid steroid treatment) is, well. It's hell. The rash has traveled from my left wrist, up my right arm, to my abdomen, and leg. There's a perfect dot-to-dot landscape you can follow if you wanted. I can see the entry at every point. It's like an incredibly cruel irony and one I will face with tears, determination, agitation and regret. As for the remainder of the plants. They'll be destined for demolition. 

The Chocolate Chip Cookie I Can't Stop Baking (it's been around awhile, sorta like this blog)

February 17 2019 Vegan Thyme 

The Chocolate Chip Cookie I Can't Stop Baking (it's been around awhile, sorta like this blog) This is the chocolate chip cookie for which no other chocolate chip cookie can be measured. It's Alison Roman's chocolate chip cookie recipe. Yes, this is 'that' cookie--the Instagram darling from ages ago. I'm late to the party again. But I've made over a hundred of these by now. During the holidays, I'd gone off them for a bit--baking the Greatest Hits from the archive which appear every December. Then three weeks ago, during cookie craving mania, the recipe appeared on the top of my pile of recipes and here we are, on our third batch. I halve the recipe (which is very easy to do) because I take great joy in re-making this cookie. Takes five minutes to mix, roll into a log, then chill. I prep in the morning usually because it requires a two hour chill. The halved recipe makes for a perfect 12-16 or so cookie batch. That's enough cookies to last us a week. A shortbread texture, chocolate chunks and a pinch of salt. Before slicing, Alison't recipe indicates a roll of cookie log in egg and then sugar. I brush mine with soy milk and then roll in sugar and bake. Seemed to work fine.  I've spent ten years sharing food and life stuff here. During these last few years, a little less so. I told someone recently I "had" a blog as we discussed recipes. I said it had gone dormant, almost with a sense of shame. But truthfully, I'm not ashamed at all. Life moves on, new voices arise and new stories are told.  I've simplified, pared down. This is a hard thing to do in a that-was-news-five-minutes-ago world. I think it's why I felt compelled to share this cookie even though its five minutes of fame was last year.   If you've read this far, I might as well add a few highlights/­­accomplishments/­­humble-brag moments of life--just so we're all caught up. Things haven't changed much. There's the knitting. My steady companion for over fifteen years now.  Ramblin' Woman by Caitlin Hunter. Here's mine on Ravelry here. The Weekender by Andrea Mowry pullover. Here's mine on Ravelry here.  The 1898 Hat by Kristine Byrnes. Here's mine on Ravelry here. (Btw, DH loves this hat. I was so thrilled!) Us. My steady companion for over twenty-two years. The furbabies. Always. My sister and her Dear Husband: the newlyweds as of last summer! 


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