Sushi - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Vegan Omelet with Mung Bean “Egg”

Lisa O’Connor

Joy Bauer’s Tips for Getting Kids to Eat More Vegetables

Heart-y Artichokes, Green Beans, and Leeks










Sushi vegetarian recipes

All-You-Can-Eat Vegan Buffets Around the World

November 26 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

– 7 restaurants in 6 countries where you can fill your plate with vegan dishes. As vegans, it’s a celebration to find entirely vegan restaurants. But entirely vegan buffets? That’s a tricky one!  The truth is: it just takes a little searching - and occasionally traveling – to find one. From east to west around the world, here are some of our favourite vegan buffets. The Poya Day Vegan Buffet - Mount Lavinia, Sri Lanka If you were to plan your Sri Lanka trip around this buffet, you wouldn’t be the first! Located near the pool and beach,  it features both a salad and dessert bar all its own. Considering it’s open only once a month (on Poya Day, a public holiday correlating with the full moon), you’ll definitely want to add this to your must-visit list. SuTao Cafe - Malvern, PA, U.S.A. The Chinese buffet at SuTao Cafe is available for lunch, dinner, and a buffet-to-go. Cold and hot items, soups, and desserts are offered - including home-made vegan sushi. All of their veggie meat and seafood dishes are made with soy protein, seitan, or konjac. With plenty of these faux meats, you’re sure to keep your omnivorous friends […] The post All-You-Can-Eat Vegan Buffets Around the World appeared first on HappyCow.

Restaurant Review: Roots & Rolls, Barcelona

May 13 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

If you can easily find most of your favourite food transformed into a yummy vegan meal, sushi often remains the craving that devoted vegans suffer from. Already conceived as a healthy option, the plant-based chefs seem to focus less on the Japanese delicacies than on the myriad ways to revisit the classics. Burgers, wraps, pizzas are the main attractions of the plant-based culinary scene. Regretfully, vegan restaurants tend to neglect the many cuisines that make our planet such a beautiful place. Luckily, they are entrepreneurs that are innovative enough to challenge the status quo and invest in what hasnt been done yet instead of following the existing trends. May I present you Roots & Rolls, one of the most avant-garde plant-based concepts opened in Barcelona. Their cuisine is a fusion of Japanese/­­Asian heritage with a touch of international inspirations incorporating flavours and spices from all over the world. The environment itself merits attention, its design atmosphere and trendy look attract the fine bouche but also curious foodies in search of the newest concept in town. Its unique minimalistic design is influenced by the Nordic legacy of the owner, Sandra de Jong. The elegant and modern setting is embellished by plenty […] The post Restaurant Review: Roots & Rolls, Barcelona appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Vegan Sushi

April 27 2019 VegKitchen 

Vegan Sushi This type of sushi is called makizushi (sushi roll). It comes in the form of a roll of dried nori seaweed stuffed with various foods, especially raw fish, but in our case its going to be vegetables!     Save Print Vegan Sushi Serves: The post Vegan Sushi appeared first on VegKitchen.

Rice is Nice, for so Many Reasons

April 8 2019 Meatless Monday 

Rice is Nice, for so Many ReasonsWe all love rice, and there are good reasons why! This naturally gluten-free grain is inexpensive, wildly versatile and can contribute to a nutrient-rich, meatless meal. When rice is paired with beans, for example, the dish becomes a complete protein . Pairing complementary foods, like rice and beans, is a great way to meet your plant-based nutritional needs (and, of course, satisfy your taste buds). This Monday, try a meatless meal with rice, whether you choose brown, white, long grain, medium grain, short grain, sushi rice, sweet rice, Arborio, Jasmine or Basmati. A little-known rice fact? About 85% of all rice consumed in the U.S. is grown on American farmland, according to our friends at USA Rice . For you trivia folks out there: Arkansas is the no. 1 rice producing state, followed by California. Buying U.S.-grown rice supports American farmers, which is always a good thing! Black Sesame Coconut Rice Pudding with Matcha Cream Were featuring something sweet for this weeks Meatless Monday recipe. This Black Sesame Coconut Rice Pudding with Matcha Cream uses U.S.-grown black japonica rice, which becomes almost chewy in this Japanese-inspired dessert pudding. Thanks to the FeedFeed and Phoebe Lapine of Feed Me Phoebe for sharing! More Recipes with Rice Rice is truly a jack-of-all-trades. Whether you want something sweet or something savory for breakfast, lunch or dinner this ingredient is an overachiever. Check out some other fantastic recipes from Think Rice below for some Meatless Monday inspiration. Banana Sticky Rice Spicy Vegan Burrito Bowls Japonica Rice Salad   Meatless Brown Rice Jambalaya   Have a favorite meatless recipe that uses rice? Tell us about it by leaving a comment on our Facebook  page or post it using #MeatlessMonday. If youre looking for other meatless recipe inspiration, be sure to check out our recipe gallery . Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Rice is Nice, for so Many Reasons appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook + Free Drinks Ebook

December 1 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook + Free Drinks Ebook It’s been around three years since we started working on this cookbook, so finally telling you about it today feels monumental, exhilarating, and terrifying all at the same time. Our new cookbook is called Simply Vibrant: All-Day Vegetarian Recipes for Colorful Plant-Based Cooking, and it’s available now! It’s written by me, Anya, and photographed by Masha – the same mother/­­daughter team that’s behind this blog. Today, we are sharing some key details about the book, accompanied by a book trailer (above), sneak peak photos and ways to order. We’ll also be talking about the free ebook that we created for anyone who buys the book and leaves a review. SO excited to share all of this with you :) About the Book -- Simply Vibrant comes out on February 6th, 2018. Anyone who orders the book and writes a review will also have access to a free drinks ebook that we made as a little thank you gift. More on that below. -- There are 129 recipes in the book, all of which are vegetarian, 124 of them are vegan, and 109 of them are gluten-free or gluten-free adaptable. My goal was to create healthful, everyday recipes that require accessible, whole food ingredients – mainly vegetables, fruit, herbs, spices, grains, and legumes. The recipes are very much influenced by the seasons, too. Our hope is that you’ll be able to find whatever good-looking produce you picked up at your market or store in the index of the book, and get some ideas on preparing it. -- I used comfort food classics from around the world as inspiration for the recipes in the book, which also influenced the book’s organization. The chapters are as follows: Morning Porridges and Pancakes – this chapter contains breakfast recipes for every season, both savory and sweet. Salads and Bowls – this one has a grain bowl recipe for every season, as well as plenty of vibrant salads for every occasion. Wraps and Rolls – this chapter celebrates the wrapping techniques seen in cuisines all around the world. There are recipes for summer rolls, enchiladas, burritos, maki (sushi), collard green wraps, and more. Soups and Stews – the recipes in this chapter range from hearty winter stews to refreshing and light summer soups. Risotto, Paella and Pilaf – for this chapter, I took the format of well-loved rice dishes from around the world, and reinvented them with the use of different vegetables and grains (there are even a couple of completely grain-free risottos!). Noodles, Pasta and Pizza – this one is all about the coziest foods out there, reimagined to be more vegetable-forward – there are recipes for homemade pasta and dumplings, but also for noodles and pizza crusts made with vegetables. Fritters and Veggie Burgers – this chapter has a veggie burger recipe for every season, as well as plenty of lacy, plant-packed fritters. Just Veggies – this chapter is here to prove that seasonal vegetables only need a simple nudge to taste amazing – there are techniques for marinating, pickling, braising, stewing, and glazing that will take your produce to the next level. Sweets for Every Season – the title of this chapter speaks for itself – there are brownies, galettes, pies, cakes, and pots de creme, made with unrefined sweeteners, fruit, and even some vegetables. Basics and Sauces – a foundational chapter, which will supply you with ammunition for creating vibrant meals quickly – from mind-blowing sauces to broth that will cost you $0 in extra groceries. -- I’ve been thinking a lot about the amount of waste we produce as humans, and I’ve been working on developing techniques for using up all parts of the produce I buy. I present some of these ideas in this book, from the aforementioned veggie scrap broth, to a watermelon rind marmalade, broccoli stem risotto, and more. -- The introduction has a story about my shoemaker grandfather, which has basically become folklore in our family. I was very excited to immortalize it in a book. -- If you have our first cookbook, The Vibrant Table, this book is a follow-up to that. While The Vibrant Table focused on creativity in plant-based cooking, Simply Vibrant is much more focused on the everyday. It’s all about putting breakfast, lunch and dinner on the table. -- The book is 328 pages long, hardcover, and 7.5″ x 10″ in size. Every recipe is accompanied by a beautiful photograph, with the exception of a few sauces. Praise Here are some kind words we’ve heard about the book from people and publications we greatly admire. “Simply Vibrant captures the kind of accidentally-vegetarian food we want to eat right now.” --Bon Appetit Simply Vibrant is intuitively organized and brilliantly executed. It illustrates how many of us are striving to eat these days: crave-able, template-style recipes with seasonal touches, simple techniques, and an underlying nourishing essence that reads as encouraging, rather than prescriptive. Anyas approach starts with a deep-rooted reverence for what nature provides in all of its seasons--and in all of its sometimes neglected or wasted forms. The thoughtful uses for carrot tops, chickpea soaking liquid, and barley cooking water--like the rest of the books delicious plant-based recipes--speak to both virtue and pure enjoyment. This book inspires me to cook (and live!) with a deeper sense of care and appreciation. --Laura Wright, author of The First Mess Cookbook Anyas approach to food and the seasons always stands out as creative, inventive, and colorful. Simply Vibrant contains an abundance of inspiring recipes and clever tricks to add more nourishment and adventure to your everyday meals. --Amy Chaplin, James Beard award-winning author of At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen Anya has the incredible ability to inspire her readers to cook, but more importantly, she helps them tap into their own intuition to create delicious meals in a more relaxed way. I love her emphasis on seasonality, and her creative approach to leaf-to-root cooking, using every ingredient to its fullest potential without wasting a single seed! This recipe collection is bursting with global flavors, unique ingredient combinations, and of course, vibrancy on the highest level. --Sarah Britton, holistic nutritionist and author of My New Roots and Naturally Nourished   We are longtime fans of Golubka Kitchen and Anyas creative and beautiful plant-based recipes. Her new book is jam-packed with healthy, flavorful, and simple recipes and lots of interesting suggestions on how to cook with the odds and ends of produce that usually are discarded--like making marmalade from watermelon rinds and risotto using broccoli stems. So clever! --David Frenkiel and Luise Vindahl, creators of the blog Green Kitchen Stories “Exciting, vegetable led food.” -- Anna Jones, author of A Modern Way to Cook, A Modern Way to Eat and columnist for The Guardian “What made me want to cook from Simply Vibrant is its more relaxed approach to plant-based cooking” --Toronto Star Order Here’s where you can order Simply Vibrant. Many of these outlets are selling the book at a discounted price. Amazon Barnes & Noble Roost Powell’s IndieBound Book Depository (ships worldwide for free) Amazon Canada Indigo Free Ebook: Simply Vibrant Drinks To show our immense gratitude to anyone who orders the book and leaves a review, we made a little thank you gift in the form of a free drinks ebook. It’s sort of like a mini e-cookbook, complete with our favorite, lush drink recipes that won’t be published anywhere else. Click here for instructions on how to claim your ebook and see a preview of the recipes within. Thank You This book only exists because of this blog, and this blog exists because of you – your support, kindness, and curiosity in visiting this space, cooking from our recipes, and reading our stories. Seriously, none of this would be here without YOU. So thank you! Truly, from the bottom of our hearts. – Anya and Masha The post Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook + Free Drinks Ebook appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Best Vegan Restaurants - San Francisco

October 9 2018 VegKitchen 

Best Vegan Restaurants - San Francisco The San Francisco Bay Area is among the most vegan-friendly places in the US. Whether you like Chinese, Japanese, or Thai food, San Franciscos got it. Mexican, classic BBQ, healthy smoothies, and delicious vegan cookies--whatever you think of, youll likely find it here If youre looking for cafes and restaurants with excellent plant-based menus, heres a short list of some of the best vegan restaurants in San Francisco. 1. Golden Era Vegan With an immense reputation and exceptional food and service quality, Golden Era Vegan Restaurant qualifies as one of the best vegan restaurants San Francisco has to offer. The restaurant is located on Golden Gate Avenue and is open daily from 10:30AM to 8:30PM. The substantial menu is completely meat-free and covers breakfast, lunch, and dinner options. Some of the most popular dishes include the Shrimp Delight, the garden vermicelli, the spicy noodle soup, and the curry beef. When it comes to desserts, the mocha cake and the Oreo cake are the crowd favorites. 2. Shizen Vegan Sushi Bar & Izakaya Shizen Vegan Sushi Bar & Izakaya offers a mix of traditional Japanese izakaya foods and modern American restaurant aesthetics. This fancy eatery is located on 14th Street and […] The post Best Vegan Restaurants - San Francisco appeared first on VegKitchen.

One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust

December 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Since this is our last recipe of 2017, we wanted to make sure that it’s a special one. It needed to check all the boxes we usually try to check with our recipes: nourishing, delicious, seasonal, beautiful, convenient, and a little bit unexpected. This veggie and lentil-centered one pan pie is all of those things. It’s very cozy and fun to prepare, too. If I had a choice, most of my savory dishes would be one-pan dishes :) Convenience is hard to beat. That little bit of initial effort you put into assembling all the ingredients for a single-pan dish pays off incredibly well when you end up with a big meal, plus a ton of leftovers for the week, having only used one pan or pot in the process. This one-pan dish is something like a vegetable pot pie, but the crust is made up of thinly mandolined winter roots – potatoes, sweet potatoes, and celery root. The filling is shredded Brussels sprouts, mushrooms, and red lentils (you can add barley, too, for a grain component) that cooks in a mixture of healing spices and coconut milk. The whole thing is packed with a great variety of plants. It’s perfect for those looking to up their intake of vegetables after the holidays, but still wanting to keep their cooking hearty and cozy. The ingredient that takes this dish into the complete meal category are the red lentils. Vegetable dishes are great on their own, but adding any kind of pulses (lentils, beans, chickpeas, dry peas) to your plant-centric meals will up their nutrition and ability to satisfy quite a bit. Pulses are incredibly nutrient-dense, like superfoods, but they are also very affordable, unlike most other superfoods, so it’s a win-win all around. Try adding about a half a cup of pulses to your meals a few times a week – your cooking will greatly benefit from them, and you’ll be on your way to discovering a whole new world of deliciousness (of you haven’t already, of course). Head here for more of our recipes using pulses, and be sure to check out Half Cup Habit. Happy New Year! Thank you so much for visiting GK, trying out our recipes, and reading up on the self-care series. It all means so much to us .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Biggest most influencial #WorldVeganDay #WorldVeganMonth set to Rock the World

October 31 2017 World Vegetarian And Vegan News 

Biggest most influencial #WorldVeganDay #WorldVeganMonth set to Rock the WorldYour help is need to reach over a million new potential vegans during #WorldVeganMonth which is kick-starting on #worldveganday 1st November. Please click on the link below to the one time vegan thunderclap 2017 has been a phenomenal year for the worldwide vegan community, google trends show interest in vegan in the UK has quadrupled since early 2015 Vegan interest quadrupled since Jan 2015 In 2015 there were around 30 Vegan Fairs, this year in 2017 there were 150 vegan fairs and festivals and yet despite this VegfestUK London was bigger than ever before with 280 exhibitors, hoards of caterers and a new vegan trade show tacked on. Vegan fairs and festivals more than quadrupled since 2015 I worked hard last year and the beginning of this year to encourage retailers to make sure they followed Pret's lead and stocked a vegan sandwich. I think everyone now sells a vegan sandwich or wrap apart from Asda who say they are "working on it". Marks and Spencers renowned for putting dairy in everything whether it needed it or not (even the Sushi!) now have a great vegan range. Asda now only supermarket with no vegan sandwich/­­wrap I've now turned my attention to pubs whose accessibility for vegans has been made a lot more accommodating by Guinness taking the fish fining out of their world famous stout (Yes Draught Guinness is now Vegan). Luckily BidFood (formerly Bidvest 3663) one of the biggest wholesale  distributors to the catering trade has introduced some vegan desserts, vegan cheese and some vegan savoury items which has left no excuses for the On trade/­­Pub trade. Brewers Fayre  - No Vegan Christmas OptionOther new vegan products this include new palm oil free vegan margarine by Flora , Ben and Jerrys vegan ice creams, new vegan dairy free cheeses by Tescos, Sainsburys and in Waitrose, a range of new vegan products by Quorn meat alternatives as well as a universal move to remove the egg from supermarket vegetarian products that would otherwise be vegan. Vegan pizzas are not just being sold in Pizza Express, Zizzis and Ask but also beginning to appear in supermarkets too starting with Sainsbury's. Independent vegan cafes and restaurants have had to work hard to keep up with the new level of quality and choice now available on the high street. The coconut craze has meant a whole new generation of ice creams, milks, yogurt and desserts that has left consumers with no excuses but to ditch dairy. Oat products from Oatly such as the new Creme fraiche and the barista milk has further eaten into  dairy sales making the dairy industry less and less viable every week. The advertising standards authority finding that the slogan "There's no such thing as Humane Milk" was indeed legitimate was a massive blow to Dairy Farmers who faced with Brexit and loss of subsidies are literally at the end of their tether. Smart dairy farmers in  Canada and the USA have moved on to Pea Milk which has more protein than other plant milks and more calcium than cow's milk. Look out for new brands in 2018. Omega 3 rich flax milk is also a thing now. Please help keep the momentum going and encourage all your non vegan friends to try going vegan for #WorldVeganMonth. 2-3 clicks is all it takes via facebook or twitter or just cut and paste the link More Vegan and Vegetarian News at Vegan News - Health, Diet and Nutrition News

15 Crave-Worthy Vegetarian Sushi Recipes

September 4 2017 Oh My Veggies 

With fillings like eggplant, tofu, and sweet potatoes, vegetarian sushi is the best sushi! Here are 15 of our favorite recipes to get you rolling.

Cauliflower Rice Sushi Bowls with Tofu

June 26 2017 Oh My Veggies 

Baked tofu, crisp veggies, and avocado slices are served atop a bed of cauliflower rice and drizzled in tamari dressing to make these light and healthy sushi bowls.

20 Turmeric Recipes Vegan Glutenfree options

June 1 2017 Vegan Richa 

20 Turmeric Recipes Vegan Glutenfree options20 Recipes with Turmeric. Turmeric Cauliflower Rice, Turmeric Chocolate Marble Loaf, Golden Iced Tea, Turmeric Miso Soup, Turmeric brussels spouts and more. Vegan Gluten-free Turmeric Recipes. Soy-free options.  Turmeric is one of the common spices used in Indian food. We grew up eating food which had turmeric in most meals. Most Dals, curries, veggie sides have Turmeric added to them in small amounts. Some creamy white sauces, Indo- chinese food or snacks were exceptions.  Fresh turmeric is a bit more bitter than powder and can be an acquired flavor. Dried powdered turmeric root (turmeric powder) is more easily available than fresh turmeric root. Powdered turmeric in larger amounts can also add a bitter profile to the dish. The overall flavor might be pronounced for some, ok or undetectable for many. With the interest in Turmeric recently increasing because of many beneficial properties, I now experiment with Turmeric in other applications other than Indian food as well. Try a few of these to start on your Turmeric adventure. In a Sauce, soup, dals, with cauliflower rice, as Turmeric Lentil Fritters (pic above), in sushi roll, in muffins, cakes, Iced tea and more. Continue reading: 20 Turmeric Recipes Vegan Glutenfree optionsThe post 20 Turmeric Recipes Vegan Glutenfree options appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Crunchy Vegan Sushi

March 23 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

We are huge fans of vegan sushi–avocado rolls, vegetable rolls…so many options! But what if you’re in the mood for something a little…crunchier? Well, East Meets Kitchen has just the […] The post Crunchy Vegan Sushi appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl

March 10 2017 My New Roots 

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Poke seems to be everywhere these days, from fine restaurant menus, to fast-casual and even food trucks. Chefs are coming up with clever combos and creative reinterpretations - even fish-free versions for the veg set. I knew had to take a stab at it. Or at least a poke. Sorry. For those of you hearing about poke for the first time, this fresh and tasty dish (pronounced POH-kay), hails from Hawaii. In its most unadulterated form, poke is raw fish, originally combined with sea salt, candlenut and seaweed. It evolved over the years as ingredient availability increased, and the salt was replaced with soy sauce, the seaweed with spring onion, the candlenut with sesame and so on. Once it hit mainland America a few years ago, poke mania ensued and the dish evolved to become more of a meal - not just a snack. Now it is often served atop rice and garnished with all manner of innovative ingredients. Fully-focused poke restaurants have established themselves in major cities across North America. Many of these eateries allow their patrons to customize their bowls with veggies, sea weed, pickles, beans, nuts, and alt-grains, tapping into the to the fact that fast, fresh, healthy meals are becoming mainstream. Which totally rocks. I had most of the elements for my own poke-inspired version in my head...except for the fish (the most important part?). I racked my brain to come up with something that looked just like tuna or salmon, but didnt want to use fruit, like watermelon or papaya, since I didnt want the dish to be sweet. It wasnt until I was trying to fall asleep one night, that it came to me...chiogga beets! Chiogga, or candy-striped beets are gorgeously two-toned when they are raw. Sliced thin horizontally, they reveal rings of deep pink pigment and creamy white, resembling something that your grandmother keeps on her coffee table in a crystal dish. But for anyone who has ever roasted these stunning creatures will know that the magic doesnt last; the magenta bleeds into the white during cooking, resulting in an almost homogenous pale pink, with slight variegation. WHICH LOOKS EXACTLY LIKE TUNA. I almost couldnt sleep. Too excited. The next day I gathered up all the things Id like in a poke bowl: short grain brown rice (not long grain - an important distinction), spring onion for bite, carrot for crunch, edamame for pop and protein, and avo for creaminess. I took this last one a step farther and blended it with lemon and wasabi for the most boss sauce ever. This alone would be delish on most things...please try it. And for the fishy component, I thought back to the raw vegan tuna I made for my first cookbook, and how effective adding a sprinkle of nori was to boost that fresh-from-the-sea flavour. This is not a deal breaker for the overall dish, but it definitely made it taste complete. If you cant find nori flakes, just crunch up a couple sheets of the stuff that youd use to make sushi. Easy fix! I like to use wasabi powder in the avo cream since the pre-made stuff in a tube is questionable. Have you ever read the ingredient list on one of those packages? It can be scary stuff. In a pinch, use it, but tracking down the powder is worth it from a nutrition standpoint, and also a flavour one. The real stuff tastes infinitely better! What a shocker. Wasabi is Japanese horseradish, and like its western counterpart, it belongs to the Brassica family, like cabbage, broccoli and mustard. The root is dried and then pulverized, which gives us the powder that we can blend with water to create wasabi paste. It is a difficult crop to grow, which explains the high price for the genuine product. Most wasabi powders dont contain any wasabi at all, but are instead a mix of mustard powder and regular horseradish mixed with green food dye. A high-quality wasabi powder should be organic and contain only horseradish and wasabi. The colour should be pale green - not disco neon. Most health food stores carry wasabi powder. This is a good brand. Everything unfolded just as Id hoped it would. The beets came out perfectly pink with those thin white stripes that look just like fat striation. The marinade that I tossed them around in was acidic and ginger-y and just plain yum. Building the meal up with the rice, the beans, the veggies, a dollop of cream, a sprinkle of nori and roasted sesame, was ever so satisfying and fun. This healthy, fresh meal is calling you. No need to poke about, just make it. Again, sorry.     Print recipe     Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Serves 3-4 Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 200g short grain brown rice, soaked overnight if possible 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 2 cups /­­ 250g edamame beans, fresh or frozen 2 tsp. cold-pressed olive oil a couple pinches flaky sea salt Beets & Marinade 3 medium Chiogga (candy striped) beets 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1 tsp. finely grated ginger pinch fine sea salt Avocado Wasabi Cream 2 medium ripe avocados 2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1-2 tsp. wasabi powder, to taste pinch fine sea, to taste 2 spring onions, sliced lengthwise into ribbons 2 medium carrots, julienned 2 Tbsp. sesame seeds 3 Tbsp. nori flakes Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Wrap beets in aluminum foil and place on a baking sheet in the oven. Roast until tender, about 45 minutes (to check doneness, peel back the foil of one beet and insert the tip of a sharp knife. If there is little resistance, its ready). Peel back foil from each beet and let cool slightly. 2. While the beets are roasting, make the rice. Drain and rinse well. Place in a pot with 2 cups /­­ 500ml of fresh water and salt. Cover, bring to a boil and reduce to simmer. Cook until tender (add more during cooking if necessary), about 45 minutes. 3. While the rice is cooking, make the Avocado Wasabi Cream. Scoop out the flesh from both avocados and add to a food processor. Blend on high, then add the lemon juice, wasabi powder and salt. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. 4. In a medium bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil, ginger and salt. Slip the skins off the cooled beets. Cut the beets into cubes and toss in the marinade. Let sit for at least 20 minutes. 5. While the beets are marinating, bring a medium pot of water to the boil. Add a few pinches of salt and the edamame. Simmer for a couple minutes until bright green and tender (do not overcook!). Drain and rinse under cold water to halt cooking. Toss with a little olive oil and sprinkle with flaky salt. 6. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast sesame seeds, stirring often until fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside. 7. Julienne the carrots. 8. To assemble, divide the rice among the bowls. Add the marinated beets, edamame, carrots and a dollop of Avocado Wasabi Cream. Sprinkle with nori flakes, the toasted sesame seeds and top with the spring onions. Enjoy! I’m on my last few days of the North American tour now. Honestly, it’s been just magical and I am so grateful to all of you who came out to show some love and connect with the healthy community around them! I have just one more event left, and if you’re in LA, please come to The Springs tomorrow! I’ll be giving a lecture on Improving Immunity, Digestion and Detoxification, serving a delicious lunch, and launching a recipe collaboration with their chef! Hope to see you there. All love and smiles, Sarah B Show me your bowls on Instagram! #mnrpokebowl The post Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl appeared first on My New Roots.

Mango Sushi Bowls with Quick-Pickled Carrots and Cucumbers

August 9 2016 Oh My Veggies 

Making sushi rolls is a difficult skill to master, but putting all the components of sushi in a bowl? So much easier.

Banana Sticky Rice

April 8 2019 Meatless Monday 

Eating bananas for breakfast isn’t some kind of groundbreaking move, but this banana sticky rice recipe certainly adds a fun new twist to the typical morning meal. The dish is sweet and hearty, making it a stick-to-your-bones-type fuel that’ll help energize you all day long. And while its creaminess may seem incomparable, thanks to the use of coconut milk, the recipe is 100% vegan. This recipe is from our partners at Think Rice . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - 2 cups sweet rice (or short grain sushi rice), uncooked - 3.5 cups coconut milk, unsweetened - 2 teaspoons lime zest - 3/­­4 teaspoon salt - 8 banana leaves, thawed - 8 bananas, cut into thirds   1. Combine rice and 2.5 cups of coconut milk in pot. 2. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer, cover and cook for 20 minutes. 3. Let pot stand covered off heat for an additional 5 minutes. 4. While rice is still hot, fold cooked sushi rice with remaining unsweetened coconut milk, lime zest, and salt in a bowl until rice becomes sticky and has cooled slightly. 5. Using a 2-oz scoop, scoop warm coconut lime rice into each banana leaf square and top with a piece of banana. Top with another 2 oz scoop of rice and then roll the banana leaves into a “burrito-style” roll making sure banana is encased in rice. 6. Steam the packets 4 minutes or until banana leaf becomes fragrant. Can be served warm or cold The post Banana Sticky Rice appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi

November 14 2018 My New Roots 

Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi   You know that game where you give someone a word and they have to make up a story with that word in it? Im like that, except with food. Give me an ingredient, and magically, as if out of nowhere, an entire recipe (or several!) will appear in my head. I could even give you the amount of salt it needs, how the vegetables should be sliced, the oven temp, and what it should be garnished with. Its a tad psycho, but my best party trick hands down. When my friend Christiann Koepke emailed me about coming to visit her in Portland, driving to the Pacific coast, and photographing some recipes together, I was all in. And then when she suggested we put seaweed into something (because ocean) it was like someone had opened the flood gates in my brain and alllll the ideas came rushing to me. Neat! And very convenient. But what do we really want to eat at the beach when its chilly and maybe windy, maybe raining, maybe freezing-raining (it is the Pacific Northwest, after all)? The answer is soup. And I knew it was going to be a creamy, dreamy, sea veggie-kissed broth with all the tasty toppings.     When seaweed is a featured ingredient in a recipe, I tend to channel Asian flavours like miso, ginger, wasabi, toasted sesame, to compliment to the unmistakably briny, salty, ocean-y flavour of seaweed. Eaten as a staple food throughout China and Japan for thousands of years, sea vegetables are rich in essential minerals, trace minerals, chlorophyll, iodine, fiber, and lots of protein. Some sea vegetables even contain vitamin B12 - a rare element for a plant! Sea vegetables are less complex than their land-dwelling relatives. Without intricate root systems or tissues, seaweeds get their nutrients from the waters they grow in. To survive, they form root-like parts to attach themselves to rocks or other stable elements. There are three categories of sea vegetables; brown, red, and green. Brown algae thrive in cool water at depths of around 50 feet. The most commonly known brown seaweed is kelp, which can grow up to 1,500 feet (500 meters) long! Red algae, like dulse, contain elements that can gel foods. Green sea vegetables bridge the gap between land and sea plants, as they can store food as starch, just like vegetation found out of the water. The most popular kind of green algae is nori, which is what your sushi comes wrapped in.      Seaweeds range in flavours from mild to wild. Some are sweet and nutty, while others are pungent, funky, and an acquired taste. If youre a seaweed newb (which most Westerners are), I suggest starting out with a less challenging one, like arame. Arame is in the brown category of sea vegetables, but when you buy it, it will appear closer to jet black. It has a stringy texture, and almost looks like wiry hair, but will soften into tender, noodle-y strands after being soaked. Before it is packaged, arame must be cooked for seven hours, and then dried in the sun. To use, simply re-hydrate by soaking it in room temperature water for 10-15 minutes until it is soft and has doubled in volume. Arame is very high in calcium, rich in iron, potassium, vitamin A and the B vitamins. And like other brown seaweeds, arame contains sodium alginate, a compound that helps to convert heavy metals in the body into harmless salt, which is easily excreted. Besides soup, I like to put arame in stews, stir fries, and salads (heres a great recipe from the archives...check out that incredible food photography!). The flavor of arame is saline and a bit funky, but mostly sweet. The texture is like an al dente pasta, and I think it adds amazing meaty-ness to a dish, with its satisfying chew.     This soup is well balanced, and hits all the notes: sweet and creamy from the butternut, savoury from miso, chewy from the arame, warming from the ginger, spicy from the wasabi, and nutty and crunchy from the toasted sesame. You could theoretically use any kind of winter squash here, like a Hokkaido pumpkin, acorn or delicate squash. Scale back on the ginger and perhaps leave out the wasabi if youre making this for kiddos. And if you dont have arame, or youre simply not into sea vegetables, leave it out, or replace with some coconut bacon. It should be noted that once youve added the miso to the soup base, its important that you dont let it boil if you reheat it. Miso is contains delicate probiotics and enzymes that will be destroyed by high heat. The soup freezes well, but leave the wasabi out until you serve it since the flavour will fade if once its frozen.             Print recipe     Butternut Squash Miso Soup with Wasabi and Arame Serves 4 (Makes 8 cups /­­ 2 liters) Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 10g dried arame 1 large yellow onion 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 4 cloves garlic 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 25g minced fresh ginger approx. 3 lbs. /­­ 1 1/­­2 kg butternut squash 2 Tbsp. expeller-pressed coconut oil 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water, more if needed 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml white miso, or more if desired 3 Tbsp. black sesame seeds 1 tsp. wasabi powder microgreens and wasabi arugula for garnish, if desired Directions: 1. Place the arame in a medium bowl and cover with a few inches of water. Let soak while you cook the soup. 2. Roughly chop the onion, peel and mince the garlic and ginger. Peel and cube the butternut squash. 3. Melt the coconut oil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add the onions and salt, cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic and ginger, stir, and cook for another couple of minutes. When fragrant, add the butternut squash, stir and cook for 4-5 minutes with the lid on. Add the water, replace the lid, bring to a boil, and then reduce to simmer. Cook until the squash is tender, about 15 minutes. 4. While the soup is simmering, toast the sesame seeds by placing them in a small skillet over medium heat. Stir occasionally until they begin to pop. Remove from heat and let cool completely. 5. Carefully transfer the soup to a blender (or simply use an immersion blender), and blend on high until completely smooth. Add more water to thin, if necessary. 6. Place miso and wasabi powder into two small, separate bowls. Add a bit of soup to each bowl, stir well, then add just the miso blend to the blender, and blend once again to incorporate. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. Keep the wasabi to the side until serving. 7. Drain and lightly rinse the arame. 8. To serve, place the piping hot soup into bowls, drizzle with the wasabi and swirl, sprinkle with sesame seeds. Top with a handful of the arame, some microgreens, and enjoy.   Christiann and I had such an incredible time at the ocean, pulling this whole miracle off together. The weather - although abysmal every other day that week - was beyond beautiful from the moment we set foot on the sand, to the second we decided it was time to call it a night (and then it started pouring, ha!). We caught an epic sunset by the fire, exhausted and so grateful for the stars aligning in every way possible, to make this day possible. And it was such an honour to work alongside a photographer that has inspired me for years - if you havent checked out her genius yet, here is a link to her website and Instagram. Thank you, Christiann for making this dream a reality! I had such a blast! We have another post coming up in the New Year I cannot wait to share it with you, dear friends. Big love to all and I hope autumn is treating you well. Happy American Thanksgiving to all my loves stateside! xo, Sarah B photo credits: images 4, 6, 7, 8, 9 Christiann Koepke *   *   *   *   *   * Good news friends! Due to the overwhelming feedback, we’ve extended the period of sign-ups for the Life-Changing Loaf Subscription Box that can be shipped before the holidays. If you’re looking for a great gift for a family member or friend (or need to hand out suggestions for yourself!), this is the perfect thing – it’s the gift that keeps on giving To give the box as a gift, simply click “ship to a different address” when you check out. Thank you for all the support so far! Your loaf is on the way!     The post Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi appeared first on My New Roots.

Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook!

September 18 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook! It’s been around three years since we started working on this cookbook, so finally telling you about it today feels monumental, exhilarating, and terrifying all at the same time. Our new cookbook is called Simply Vibrant: All-Day Vegetarian Recipes for Colorful Plant-Based Cooking, and it’s available for pre-order now! It’s written by me, Anya, and photographed by Masha – the same mother/­­daughter team that’s behind this blog. Today, we are sharing some key details about the book, accompanied by a book trailer (above), sneak peak photos and ways to pre-order. We’ll also be talking about the pre-order bonus recipe bundle, which is a free gift that we created for anyone who pre-orders the book. SO excited to share all of this with you :) About the Book -- Simply Vibrant will be released on February 6th, 2018, but it’s available for pre-order now. Anyone who pre-orders the book will have access to a free bonus recipe bundle, consisting of 10 brand new, plant-based recipes, which won’t be published anywhere else. Just save your receipt! This is our way of thanking you for your support :) More on the bonus below. -- There are 129 recipes in the book, all of which are vegetarian, 124 of them are vegan, and 109 of them are gluten-free or gluten-free adaptable. My goal was to create healthful, everyday recipes that require accessible, whole food ingredients – mainly vegetables, fruit, herbs, spices, grains, and legumes. The recipes are very much influenced by the seasons, too. Our hope is that you’ll be able to find whatever good-looking produce you picked up at your market or store in the index of the book, and get some ideas on preparing it. -- I used comfort food classics from around the world as inspiration for the recipes in the book, which also influenced the book’s organization. The chapters are as follows: Morning Porridges and Pancakes – this chapter contains breakfast recipes for every season, both savory and sweet. Salads and Bowls – this one has a grain bowl recipe for every season, as well as plenty of vibrant salads for every occasion. Wraps and Rolls – this chapter celebrates the wrapping techniques seen in cuisines all around the world. There are recipes for summer rolls, enchiladas, burritos, maki (sushi), collard green wraps, and more. Soups and Stews – the recipes in this chapter range from hearty winter stews to refreshing and light summer soups. Risotto, Paella and Pilaf – for this chapter, I took the format of well-loved rice dishes from around the world, and reinvented them with the use of different vegetables and grains (there are even a couple of completely grain-free risottos!). Noodles, Pasta and Pizza – this one is all about the coziest foods out there, reimagined to be more vegetable-forward – there are recipes for homemade pasta and dumplings, but also for noodles and pizza crusts made with vegetables. Fritters and Veggie Burgers – this chapter has a veggie burger recipe for every season, as well as plenty of lacy, plant-packed fritters. Just Veggies – this chapter is here to prove that seasonal vegetables only need a simple nudge to taste amazing – there are techniques for marinating, pickling, braising, stewing, and glazing that will take your produce to the next level. Sweets for Every Season – the title of this chapter speaks for itself – there are brownies, galettes, pies, cakes, and pots de creme, made with unrefined sweeteners, fruit, and even some vegetables. Basics and Sauces – a foundational chapter, which will supply you with ammunition for creating vibrant meals quickly – from mind-blowing sauces to broth that will cost you $0 in extra groceries. -- I’ve been thinking a lot about the amount of waste we produce as humans, and I’ve been working on developing techniques for using up all parts of the produce I buy. I present some of these ideas in this book, from the aforementioned veggie scrap broth, to a watermelon rind marmalade, broccoli stem risotto, and more. -- The introduction has a story about my shoemaker grandfather, which has basically become folklore in our family. I was very excited to immortalize it in a book. -- If you have our first cookbook, The Vibrant Table, this book is a follow-up to that. While The Vibrant Table focused on creativity in plant-based cooking, Simply Vibrant is much more focused on the everyday. It’s all about putting breakfast, lunch and dinner on the table. -- The book is 328 pages long, hardcover, and 7.5″ x 10″ in size. Every recipe is accompanied by a beautiful photograph, with the exception of a few sauces. Praise Here are some kind words we’ve heard about the book from people and publications we greatly admire. “Simply Vibrant captures the kind of accidentally-vegetarian food we want to eat right now.” --Bon Appetit Simply Vibrant is intuitively organized and brilliantly executed. It illustrates how many of us are striving to eat these days: crave-able, template-style recipes with seasonal touches, simple techniques, and an underlying nourishing essence that reads as encouraging, rather than prescriptive. Anyas approach starts with a deep-rooted reverence for what nature provides in all of its seasons--and in all of its sometimes neglected or wasted forms. The thoughtful uses for carrot tops, chickpea soaking liquid, and barley cooking water--like the rest of the books delicious plant-based recipes--speak to both virtue and pure enjoyment. This book inspires me to cook (and live!) with a deeper sense of care and appreciation. --Laura Wright, author of The First Mess Cookbook Anyas approach to food and the seasons always stands out as creative, inventive, and colorful. Simply Vibrant contains an abundance of inspiring recipes and clever tricks to add more nourishment and adventure to your everyday meals. --Amy Chaplin, James Beard award-winning author of At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen Anya has the incredible ability to inspire her readers to cook, but more importantly, she helps them tap into their own intuition to create delicious meals in a more relaxed way. I love her emphasis on seasonality, and her creative approach to leaf-to-root cooking, using every ingredient to its fullest potential without wasting a single seed! This recipe collection is bursting with global flavors, unique ingredient combinations, and of course, vibrancy on the highest level. --Sarah Britton, holistic nutritionist and author of My New Roots and Naturally Nourished   We are longtime fans of Golubka Kitchen and Anyas creative and beautiful plant-based recipes. Her new book is jam-packed with healthy, flavorful, and simple recipes and lots of interesting suggestions on how to cook with the odds and ends of produce that usually are discarded--like making marmalade from watermelon rinds and risotto using broccoli stems. So clever! --David Frenkiel and Luise Vindahl, creators of the blog Green Kitchen Stories “Exciting, vegetable led food.” -- Anna Jones, author of A Modern Way to Cook, A Modern Way to Eat and columnist for The Guardian “What made me want to cook from Simply Vibrant is its more relaxed approach to plant-based cooking” --Toronto Star Pre-Order Here’s where you can pre-order Simply Vibrant. Many of these outlets are selling the book at a discounted price while it’s still in the pre-order stages. Amazon Barnes & Noble Roost Powell’s IndieBound Book Depository (ships worldwide for free) Amazon Canada Indigo Pre-Order Bonus Recipe Bundle To show our immense gratitude to anyone who pre-orders the book, we made a little thank you gift in the form of a free Bonus Recipe Bundle PDF. It’s sort of like a mini e-cookbook, complete with 10 brand-new, plant-based recipes that won’t be published anywhere else. The style of the recipes is very similar to that of the recipes in the actual book – everyday meals to make your home cooking more delicious and vibrant. Click here for instructions on how to claim your pre-order bonus and see a preview of the recipes within. Thank You This book only exists because of this blog, and this blog exists because of you – your support, kindness, and curiosity in visiting this space, cooking from our recipes, and reading our stories. Seriously, none of this would be here without YOU. So thank you! Truly, from the bottom of our hearts. – Anya and Masha The post Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook! appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Entering Into The World Of Vegan Sushi

November 28 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

What the hell is a maki... Those were my first thoughts when I arrived at El Buda Profano in Arequipa, Peru. I feel a bit bashful admitting it, but I am no sushi connoisseur. Well, I wasnt, at least. Traveling through Peru brought a wide range of experiences. It brought me everything from a serious case of travelers flu to a serious case of spiritual awakening (long story). But maybe most importantly, it brought me awareness about the joys of vegan sushi, something that I think about now more often than most people would consider to be normal. It turns out that maki are basically just small morsels of rice with fresh veggies wrapped up in nori, which was just one piece of insight that I was to learn. The owner, Alan, was kind enough to let me come in twice a day for a whole week, sampling their entire menu and never once asking, You sure you can eat all that? My kinda guy. With every visit, I was further impressed at the wide array of not only sushi, but other traditional and not-so-traditional Japanese flavors that were coming out of their kitchen. One day I was shown the mystical […] The post Entering Into The World Of Vegan Sushi appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

On The Go Vegan Lunch Ideas for School Or Work (Bento Box)

October 3 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Caitlin Shoemaker has created 3 super easy and yummy vegan lunch ideas that are perfect for taking to work or school! Meal 1 is a soba noodle salad and brownies. Meal 2 is a curry chickpea wrap. Meal 3 is sushi burrito and pb&j energy bites. Caitlin shows how all 3 meals can be conveniently packed to take on the go — she used bento boxes, but any container will do! Make as much or as little as you want – these recipes are here to inspire you and get you out of the “same thing every day” rut! So check out the video below to see the recipes in action: Read the full recipes in the video description here. The post On The Go Vegan Lunch Ideas for School Or Work (Bento Box) appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Meatless Monday Restaurant Roundup

July 24 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Restaurant RoundupThis Monday, were putting the spotlight on five restaurants around the United States that are participating in Meatless Monday! Every week, they offer discounts and vegetarian specials to their customers, giving them delicious meat-free options at their favorite places. The list of restaurants that have joined Meatless Monday continues to grow, and here are five to keep an eye on! 1. Harvest Seasonal Grill & Wine Bar, Multiple Locations: With its focus on local, sustainable cuisine, Harvest Seasonal Grill & Wine Bar has a plentiful selection of healthy meal choices including several vegetarian choices. For Meatless Monday, CEO Dave Magrogan has one recommendation in particular: “I love the Spicy Tofu Stir Fry. The sweet flavors of the pineapple and coconut jasmine rice combine with spicy flavors, peppers, baby bok choy, snow peas and eggplant to create a great flavor profile. This dish is satisfying and filling without a high calorie count. The tofu gives a nice protein boost. Overall its a very well-rounded vegetarian dish for someone looking for bold flavors and solid protein content.” 2. Tattooed Mom, Philadelphia, PA: This Philly food joint can bring townies of all stripes together for cocktails and sandwiches. On Meatless Monday, the vegetarian sammies get the spotlight: “Our world famous Vegan Pickle Fried Chickn Sammy is a Meatless Monday favorite at Tattooed Mom. Our house brined vegan chicken is topped with fried pickles, lettuce, tomato, onion and crystal hot sauce mayo, all on a brioche bun. You’ll find it here, along with our full line up of 10 vegetarian and vegan delights, on special for half price EVERY Meatless Monday from noon – 10pm.” 3. Burrito San, Miami, FL: Burrito San has become famous for its sushi burrito, making it a great destination for pescatarians and sushi lovers alike. Their Meatless Monday features $10 lunch specials including vegetarian sushi options. Marketing manager Mitzi Napoles has a favorite: “The Buddhas Belly Burrito roll is the perfect Meatless Monday choice. It has a satisfying heft from the portobello mushrooms and a great contrast of flavors and textures. We also have it available as a Salad or Poke option if Giant Sushi rolls are not your thing!” 4. Forage, Cambridge, MA: Forage works with local farmers, foragers, and fisherman to bring sustainable, healthy cuisine to its Cambridge customers. But on Meatless Monday, seasonal veggies get a starring role. From owner and manager Stan Hilbert: “We love our veggies and the farmers that grow them. Meatless Monday is one way for us to support our farmer friends while highlighting seasonal and local produce and offering something different every week. We feature veggies in savory and sweet courses. We have a $39 four-course vegetarian or vegan tasting menu available every day of the week, but on Mondays we throw in another two courses for the same price!” 5. BeWiched, Minneapolis, MN: A believer in old-world culinary traditions, BeWiched certainly doesnt shy away from meat on their menu of deli sandwiches. However on Mondays, they offer up something different for their Meatless Monday specials. From Ally Dahlberg, Director of Marketing, Catering & Sales: “Every Monday, we offer a new seasonal plant-based sandwich as an ode to #meatlessmonday. This is Farmer Bob (pictured above). He comes in at least once a week and sells us fresh produce picked from his farm. He recently harvested some tomatoes that we used for a Fried Green Tomato sandwich special. It doesn’t get any more farm-to-table than that!” Honorable Mentions: We cant leave out restaurants that go meat-free every day! Here are two vegan food joints that cater to everyone who loves great, sustainable, healthy meals! Choices Café, Florida (multiple locations): Choices goes meat-free every day of the week, in case you forget to stop in on Monday! Their mission statement: “Our mission is to inspire compassionate choices by serving delicious, healthy, and organic plant-based food prepared with love for people, animals and the planet.” VO2 Vegan Café, Cambridge, MA: Another spot with all vegan offerings is VO2 Vegan Café, which welcomes diners of all preferences who just want to treat themselves to something healthy and delicious. From VO2 manager Stephanie Kirkpatrick: All our food is 100% vegan, so everything is meatless and we celebrate Meatless Monday every day! It’s so wonderful when vegans and vegetarians come in and are so excited that they don’t have to ask about ingredients because they already know everything is vegan. Many meat-eaters also love our food and look at it as an awesome and easy way to enjoy delicious food knowing they are eating healthier, for themselves and our planet. Does your favorite restaurant participate in Meatless Monday? Wed love to feature them on our site! If you own a restaurant and are considering taking part in Meatless Monday, let us know! Send us an email: info@meatlessmonday.com. The post Meatless Monday Restaurant Roundup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Meal Plan | Black Bean Noodles, Plantain Tacos & Mango Sushi Bowls

June 2 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegan meal plan includes: black bean noodle bowls with spicy sesame sauce; plantain black bean tacos with chimichurri sauce; mango sushi bowls with quick pickled vegetables; lentil taco bowls; and lentil mushroom burgers.

Vegan Unicorn Sushi Donuts

May 1 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Sushi, donuts, and unicorns – we didn’t think it was possible to combine these 3 epic things. But Sweet Simple Vegan did the impossible! She has created the coolest, most colorful […] The post Vegan Unicorn Sushi Donuts appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Penang Laksa

March 13 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Penang Laksa Incredibly, I’d been in Malaysia for almost two weeks before I got to try Laksa, the legendary noodle soup. Even before the trip, I’d read about the intensely loved, powerful and fiery, somewhat-sour soup in food blogs and food guides to Malaysia. I’d checked out plenty of recipes and seen lots of super tasty photos. Once I got to Malaysia, whenever I asked locals what dishes I had to try, I heard again and again: Laksa! Okay, great, but where? And the answer was: Penang! Penang was hands-down my favorite place to eat on the Malaysia trip. (Singapore was a fairly close second. Penang was just more artsy, soulful, and real). I collected maps with locations of the best street food in Georgetown (Penang) and scoured the web and my travel guides for addresses of must-try vegetarian restaurants. On my second day in town, I had lunch at the vegan restaurant Sushi Kitchen, and met the chef/­­owner, who made a list for me of Must-See places and dishes. That night I went to Luk Yea Yan, a vegetarian Chinese restaurant known for fantastic flavors and inexpensive eats. I ordered up the Laksa soup. Three minutes later my oversized bowl of hot, steaming, bright red soup arrived - with countless ingredients and toppings piled up to the rim. There were at least three kinds of noodles, tofu cubes, soya and seitan chunks, numerous vegetables, about four kinds of fresh herbs - and balanced on top: a soup spoon with a thick, red curry paste on it. I’d read about this… Traditionally Laksa is usually served with a generous spoonful of rempeh - spicy red curry paste for you to stir in to the hot red broth yourself. I knew what to do. I did it. A half dozen flavors immediately exploded in my mouth: tamarind, chili, lime, pineapple, cilantro, mint. This was followed by a second wave of flavors: an army of vegetables, tofu, and seitan slices. I slurped down the noodles and paddled pieces of everything with my chopsticks into my hungry jaws. I had to take a break a few times to catch my breath and cool the spice alarm with generous draws on my lemon iced tea. When I was done, my forehead was light with perspiration and my lips and tongue were tingling and alive. There was never a doubt whatsoever that I would include a vegan recipe for Penang Laksa in my new Malaysia cookbook. Several weeks later (after having tried vegan Laksa soup at least three other times in Malaysia) I was back in my kitchen in Germany and set to work. It took a few attempts to master the recipe, each try better than the last. And then I had it: my own epic Laksa recipe! Since then, I’ve made it probably ten more times, including for several dinner parties large and small, and plenty of times for lunch. It’s best on cold, cloudy days to fire up your mood and open you up! But I’ve also made it lots of other times, even in the summer, well… just because it’s so awesome and is always a dish guests talk about long after the meal. Penang Laksa classic Malaysian noodle soup recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA serves 2 to 3 /­­ time 45 min - 5 oz (150 g) seitan sliced - 3.5 oz (100 g) smoked tofu sliced - 1/­­3 cup (45 g) pineapple chopped - 1 Tbs vegetable oil  - 1 Tbs soy sauce or Vegan Fish Sauce - 7 oz (200 g) udon noodles (cooked) - 2 1/­­2 cups (600 ml) water  - 2/­­3 cup (150 ml) coconut milk  - 1 kefir lime leaf or 1 tsp lime zest  - fresh mint leaves chopped - fresh coriander leaves chopped - fresh thai basil leaves chopped - bean sprouts for garnish laksa spice paste: - 4 candlenuts or 2 Tbs cashews soaked 20 min in hot water, drained - 1 stalk lemongrass chopped - 1/­­2-1 large red chili chopped - 2 cloves garlic chopped - 1 shallot chopped - 3/­­4 in (2 cm) fresh galangal or ginger chopped - 1/­­2 tsp paprika ground (more as desired, for red color) - 1/­­2 tsp fennel seed ground - 1/­­2 tsp coriander ground - 2 tsp coconut sugar or agave syrup  - 3/­­4 tsp sea salt  - 1 tsp tamarind paste (seedless) - 2 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice  - 2 Tbs vegetable oil  - If using dried Udon: Cook, rinse, and drain 3.5 oz (100 g) noodles according to package instructions. - Blend spice paste ingredients in a small food processor until smooth. - Heat 1 Tbs oil a large pot or wok on medium high heat. Add sliced seitan and smoked tofu. Fry, turning regularly until edges are browned and crispy, 3-5 min. - Stir in chopped pineapple. Continue to stir-fry, 2-3 min. Add soy sauce (or Vegan Fish Sauce). Fry 2-3 min. Transfer to a plate or bowl. - Return pot or wok to medium high heat. Fry blended spice paste until it darkens and oil starts to separate, stirring constantly, 3-5 min. - Gradually stir in water, coconut milk and kefir lime leaf (or lime zest). Bring to simmer. Add cooked udon noodles. Return to simmer. Cook until noodles have slightly softened, 3-5 min. - Stir in fried seitan, tofu, and pineapple. Turn off heat. Cover until ready to serve. - Portion soup and noodles into bowls. Garnish with chopped herbs and bean sprouts. Serve. Panang Laksa vegan recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA (available as printed cookbook & ebook - in English & German) The post Penang Laksa appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices

January 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices This post was created in partnership with Amira. This month we are focusing on recipes that will hopefully be helpful to those wanting to hit the reset button after all the holiday eating and drinking. I wanted a very manageable weekday dinner to be the first in the series, because we haven’t had one up in a while, and because I myself have been on the hunt for some new but trustworthy, quick and wholesome meal ideas. Most of my focus right now is on completing the kitchen renovation, a good part of which my husband and I have been doing ourselves. It’s been dragging on much longer than we expected – a common theme when it comes renovations, as I hear. We are finally down to the small finishing touches, but they somehow seem to be the hardest to complete. Cooking up large batches of un-elaborate, nourishing dishes like this stew to have on hand during the week has been one of my strategies for staying sane throughout this whole process. It’s amazing how helpful a home-cooked meal can be during times of stress. When looking for inspiration for balanced winter weeknight meals, I often turn to South Indian cuisine for its array of delicious vegetarian dishes and Ayurveda-approved ingredients. This particular stew is based on a recipe for sambar – a mung dal (yellow split mung beans that are protein-rich and affordable) stew that comes in hundreds of variations. The base for sambar is most commonly made up of mung dal that’s been cooked down to a porridge-like consistency and spiced, after which almost anything goes. You can include one or many stew-friendly vegetables in season, as well as other fun add ins like desiccated coconut. I love the versatility of this dish and usually just add in whatever vegetables or greens I have on hand. For this version, I kept things simple and only added chopped butternut squash and dried coconut – it can be as simple or as involved as you’d like. The ingredient list might seem long, but it’s mostly composed of spices, which play a huge role in building flavor in this otherwise modest stew. Each spice also brings its unique healing properties to the table – fennel helps aid digestion, turmeric is anti-inflammatory, fenugreek helps with blood sugar balance and much, much more. Like many Indian dishes, sambar is traditionally served over rice, and I’ve been truly enjoying serving it over Amira’s fragrant Thai Jasmine Brown Rice. Amira sent me a few of their premium long grain rice varieties to try, and I was consistently impressed with their quality and how distinctly different each kind tasted. Besides the jasmine brown rice, the variety that stood out to me is their Smoked Basmati Rice, which has a very unique smoked flavor and is really good in salads, and as a base for all kinds of veggie bowls. I’m crazy about smoked foods, so that one really hit the spot. If you see Amira rice in your grocery store, give it a try, I think you’ll really enjoy it! Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients 3 cups water ½ cup mung dal ¼ teaspoon turmeric ¼ teaspoon cumin ¼ teaspoon whole fenugreek seeds (optional) 3 sprigs fresh curry leaves (optional) 1 small yellow onion - chopped ½ medium butternut squash - peeled and cubed ¼ cup desiccated coconut sea salt 1 tablespoon red chili powder 2 tablespoons ghee or coconut oil ¼ teaspoon whole black mustard seeds 1 whole dried red chili - torn in half ⅛ teaspoon whole fennel seeds 1 tablespoon fresh lemon or lime juice 1½ cups cooked rice of your choice - for serving cilantro - for garnish (optional) coconut milk or yogurt - for garnish (optional) Instructions Bring 3 cups of water to a boil in a medium pot. Have a tea kettle or another pot with about 1 more cup of hot water ready, in case you need more water later in the process. Once 3 cups of water in the pot are boiling, add mung dal, turmeric, cumin, fenugreek and curry leaves (if using). Lower heat to establish a steady simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Mix periodically to ensure the mung dahl doesnt stick to the pan. Discard curry sprigs, if using. Add onion, squash, desiccated coconut, and salt to the pot. If it seems like there isnt enough liquid in the pot, add a little more hot water from the tea kettle until the vegetables have room to simmer in the water, keeping the dal consistency like a soupy porridge. Continue simmering, covered, for another 20 minutes or until the vegetables are cooked through. Stir in chili powder at half time. Mix periodically to prevent any sticking. Once the vegetables are around 5 minutes away from being done, warm ghee/­­oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add mustard seeds and let toast for about 30 seconds, tossing all the while. Add the chili and fennel seeds and toast for another 30 seconds or until fennel is toasted in color and fragrant. Add the toasted spices along with the ghee/­­oil from the pan into the pot with the stew, mix it in and let simmer, covered, for another 5 minutes. Once stew is done cooking, discard the pepper and mix in the lemon/­­lime juice. Taste and adjust the salt. Serve stew over rice, garnished with cilantro and coconut milk/­­yogurt if desired. Notes 1. You can add any vegetables/­­greens you have on hand in place of the butternut squash here and simmer until done, thats what makes this stew so versatile. 2. Curry leaves are completely optional here, but if you can get your hands on some, add them - their unique flavor works very well in this stew. 3. Traditional sambar calls for hing and tamarind. If you have one or both, add ⅛ teaspoon of hing to the pan with the toasting spices, towards the end and add to the stew with the rest of the toasted spices and ghee/­­oil. Add 2 teaspoons tamarind paste in place of the lemon/­­lime juice and simmer stew for another 5 minutes to let the flavor incorporate. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Penne Pomodoro with Vegan “Tuna”

August 3 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Penne Pomodoro with Vegan “Tuna” I have crawled up in a rusty canopy swing with the computer in my lap, spiderweb from the canopy tangled up in my hair, Mr Bojangles on repeat (I always write with a single song on repeat in my ears) and Elsa balancing on my legs. We are spending a few days at my dad’s summerhouse and while Luise is drawing with Isac, I wanted to tell you about this pasta dish that we cooked and photographed the other day. I’m trying to formulate my thoughts into words. How soaked sunflower seeds almost magically get the texture of canned tuna when mixed in a food processor. But it’s not easy. Elsa is using every muscle in her body to steal my attention from the computer screen. Her mouth is forming words (that I can’t hear because of the earplugs), her head is jumping from side to side while her eyes are actively seeking mine. She is smacking her hands together right in front of my face and she grins when I finally look up from the computer and pull out the earplugs. - Do you know what this means on sign language? She asks me with giggle in her voice while she keeps smacking her hands together and then pointing at herself. - No, tell me. - I want a saaaaandwich! - Are you hungry? - No, I’m just teaching you sign language. - Ok, nice. But I’m working right now. Maybe you can teach me more later? - Ok. Just one more. Do you know what this is? [Taps her forehead with her hand and pulls it away in a half circle.] - Ehm, maybe a unicorn? - Nooo stupid, it means thank you. Actually, I think I want a sandwich. - Maybe you can ask mom to help you? - Okaaaaaaay. She jumps down and runs into the house. Earplugs back in. I’m guessing that I have approx 5 mins to write this. Here we go. It’s not often that we create dishes that mimics meat. In fact, we often do the opposite by letting the vegetables shine in all their glory. I don’t remember eating tuna a lot before I became a vegetarian, but after having seen a few vegan sunflower seed “tuna” recipes on the web (especially this beautiful Tuna Tartine from Faring-Well) I suddenly got this weird craving for it. So we decided to give fake-tuna a try. By pulsing soaked sunflower seeds in a food processor together with salty capers, shallots, oil, apple cider vinegar, lemon and nori sheet, you actually get something that looks weirdly similar to canned tuna with a crumbly, moist texture and a flavour that reminds me of salty seas and umami. Most recipes we’ve seen use this sunflower seed tuna as a spread or as a tuna salad (often with the addition of celery and herbs) but we instead added it to a tomato sauce and served it with penne, creating a classic Italian poor mans dish. The vegan “tuna” adds a nice texture to the sauce and it improves the flavour as well. The kids loved it! It is a simple recipe if you are on a budget and it is a tad more special than your basic pasta pomodoro. So go put your sunflower seeds in water and pretend they are a fish. I can see Elsa eyeballing me from the window now so I better round this up. I have got a class in imaginative sign language up ahead with my favourite teacher. Penne Comodoro with Vegan “Tuna” Serves 4 It’s important to soak the sunflower seeds to achieve the right texture so don’t skip that step. If you’ve got some white wine opened in the fridge, you can add a glug of that for extra depth and flavour. Vegan Tuna 1 cup raw sunflower seeds, soaked in water for 6 hours or overnight 1 small shallot or red onion, minced 3 tbsp capers + brine 1 tbsp lemon juice 1 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil (coconut oil, ghee or butter) 1 tsp apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1/­­2 sheet of nori (the seaweed you use for sushi), cut into tiny pieces (optional) Pomodoro Sauce 1 onion 2 cloves of garlic 2 tbsp olive oil 3 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz cans of chopped tomatoes 1 handful fresh basil or 2 tsp dried sea salt freshly ground black pepper Serve with Pasta of choice (we use wholegrain penne or a gluten free version made from dried beans) 1/­­2 cup large capers fresh parsley, finely chopped ruccola To prepare the “tuna”, simply add all ingredients to a food processor. Pulse a few times until it you have a coarsely textured mixture. Taste and add more salt, lemon juice or vinegar. Pulse again and scoop the mixture into a bowl. Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic. Place a large sauce pan on medium heat and add olive oil. Sauté the onion and garlic for a few minutes until fragrant. Add tomatoes, basil, salt and pepper. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and simmer for about 30 minutes. Taste and adjust the flavours throughout. Add a splash of water or white wine if it starts looking dry. Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to the instructions on the package. When the tomato sauce is ready, stir in 2/­­3 of the “tuna”, saving the rest for serving. Divide the pasta in 4 bowls, top with tomato sauce, capers, fresh parsley and a drizzle of olive oil.


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