Rose - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Vegan Malai Kofta Recipe ( Baked or Pan-Fried)

Kakarakaya pulusu recipe | bitter gourd curry | kakarakaya curry

10 Reasons Why You Need To Eat More Plant Proteins

Stacked Vegan Cheese Enchiladas










Rose vegetarian recipes

Modern Love Mac & Shews

June 4 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Modern Love Mac & Shews Modern Love Community Cookzine! Photo by Isa Chandra. Art by Jason Meyer. Click image to buy! It’s our world famous Mac & Shews! With a few caveats. Firstly, this recipe has basically been on the internet for a while now. Also, this isn’t the EXACT recipe Modern Love uses. It’s simplified for home cooks. But it certainly gets the job done when you’re away from Brooklyn or Omaha and need your fix. And finally, this isn’t a regular blog post but, then again, these aren’t regular blog times. Now I don’t want to make this recipe intro too long because I know that twitter HATES that. But! I need to tell you about Modern Love Community Cookzine. Well, what happened was, my restaurant — Modern Love Brooklyn — closed at the beginning of the pandemic. We thought we would be done for good. It was heartbreaking, but I have my health and my cats, so ok. I have a lot to be grateful for. Then, after a few weeks, my business partner and I realized we have this empty restaurant. It’s still not safe enough to open. But, we thought, let’s get people their jobs back in as safe a way as possible, AND help the community on top of that. Let’s cook amazing, free (or dirt cheap) meals. Modern Love Community Meals was born. On top of feeding hundreds of people a week, we also decided, hey, let’s do a Community Cookbook, that seems to be the thing! Easy. No prob. So we started this CookZINE (zine, because I am punk) and gathered together some of the city’s best chefs to give us tips, stories and recipes. So now, here we are, and I’m asking you to please buy it. BUT WHY SHOULD I BUY IT?!!? Because it will help fund our Community Meals project. And it will help get the restaurant back open. And so we kinda need you to! BUT I DON’T WANT TO HELP YOU! Ok we know no one is actually saying that. But in addition to helping us you get all those amazing tips, stories and recipes we mentioned! What a deal. And you can spend anywhere from $5 to $50 to support us. In turn, we will continue to support the community. And be able to open our doors safely for pickup. STILL NOT CONVINCED? OR READY TO BUY NOW? Look at some of the gorgeous art! This is by Erica Rosey, for a section called Menuhoods, where a chef creates menus for the neighborhood they’re from. This is Greenpoint. (Also featured: Crown Heights and Sheepshead Bay.) Greenpoint, by Erica Rose Levine OK. That’s the pitch. Thanks for listening! I hope you enjoy the recipe and the zine and we can’t wait to feed you again! OH PS, here is the link to buy one. Recipes Notes ~ If you don’t have a high speed blender, do not despair. Just soak the cashews for at least 2 hours (preferably overnight) and proceed with your regular old blender. You can also boil them for 20 minutes if you are super short on time and didn’t plan ahead. ~ We use home roasted red pepper at the restaurant, but you can totally use one from a jar. But if you wanna’ try it, homemade is way better. I won’t write the directions here, just google it. Ingredients 1 pound macaroni 1 cup whole unroasted cashews 1 cup vegetable broth 1 roasted red pepper, chopped 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast flakes 1/­­4 teaspoon turmeric 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 1 tablespoon chickpea miso 1 tablespoon onion powder 1/­­4 teaspoon salt Directions 1 – Bring 6 quarts of salted water to a boil in a large pot for the macaroni. 2 – While the water is coming to a boil, make the sauce. Place all sauce ingredients in a high-speed blender (see recipe note if you don’t have one) and blend until completely smooth. This can take anywhere from a minute to 5 minutes depending on your blender. Scrape down the sides of the blender with a rubber spatula from time to time. 3 – Once water is boiling, cook pasta. Drain pasta in a large colander and add immediately back to the pot. It should still be piping hot and wet with pasta water. Do not rinse and do not wait. This part is important because you need the wet, hot pasta to get the sauce creamy and awesome and clinging to the pasta. 4 – Add the sauce to the pasta pot and use the rubber spatula to mix. Turn the heat on low and stir for about 2 minutes to get everything warmed through. Taste for salt and seasoning.

New Ebook: Weeknight Magic Vol. 1

May 27 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

New Ebook: Weeknight Magic Vol. 1 Our new ebook is here! It’s a collection of straightforward, plant-based recipes for busy people who love to cook. Each recipe was developed to be weeknight-friendly, with shorter cooking times and easier prep. Whole, plant foods are featured prominently throughout the ebook and make up the bulk of the meals within. We’ve been working on this project since last summer, and it’s so exciting to finally share it with you. We spent a lot of time putting every recipe through a weeknight filter, streamlining the ingredients and techniques and much as possible without sacrificing flavor. We are in love with every recipe, and we hope that they’ll bring some ease and joy to your weeknight dinners and beyond. You can check out a few sneak peek photos from the ebook, plus the full recipe index below. Click Here to Buy Recipe Index *all recipes are vegan and can be gluten-free if needed - Staple Red Lentils with Crispy Coconut and Chili Oil - Creamy Tomato Pasta - Baked Tofu with Crispy Kale - Cauliflower, Tomato and Chickpea Stew - Portobello and Red Lentil Bolognese - Sweet Potato Nachos - Cauliflower Caesar Salad with Chickpea Croutons - Weeknight Chili - Zucchini Mac & Cheese - Zaatar-Roasted Vegetables and Chickpeas with Tahini Sauce - Saag Tofu - Quinoa Pilaf with Lemony Green Beans - Cold Nut Butter Noodles - Maple-Mustard Baked Tempeh and Broccoli Bowls - Brothy Coconut Turmeric Noodles - Ratatouille-ish Summer Stew - Creamy Polenta with Smoky Mushrooms and Chickpeas - The Coziest Rice and Beans - Braised Lentils with Mushrooms, Leeks and Potatoes - Minestrone with Rosemary Walnuts - Coconut Rice - Coconut Bacon - Knife Salsa Verde - Cashew Crema - Cheesy Cashew Dust Click Here to Buy The post New Ebook: Weeknight Magic Vol. 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

10 Tips, Hacks, and Tricks for Tasty Plant-Based Cooking

May 4 2020 Meatless Monday 

10 Tips, Hacks, and Tricks for Tasty Plant-Based CookingCulinary secrets exist, and they can elevate your cooking from good to give-me-seconds. Dinner may never be the same after you start adding a tablespoon of smooth peanut butter to your chili, a splash of soy sauce to your tomato sauce, or a touch of vinegar to soups and stews. When it comes to improving the taste, texture, and flavor profile of your meatless dishes or recreating plant-based versions of animal-based ingredients, its all about knowing the right techniques. Maybe your tofu Buffalo wings didnt come out crispy because you forgot to press the tofu, or your kale not as tender because you didnt massage the leaves. Sure, these suggestions may seem minor, but they can dramatically affect the outcome of a recipe. As we are all doing more home cooking, take a look at the list below and see how you can incorporate these cooking hacks into your next Meatless Monday meal. Add a Spoonful of Peanut Butter to Chili It might sound crazy, but the secret to many award-winning chili recipes is a heaping amount of smooth, creamy peanut butter. The subtle hint of sweet paired with the peanuts inherent nuttiness is enough to balance out the spice and acid of vegetarian chili.   Press Tofu for Crispy Wings Removing the moisture from tofu allows it to get nice and crispy, an important step if youre baking, pan frying, or cooking up Jamaican jerk tofu tacos . To properly press tofu, line a plate with paper towels or clean kitchen towel and place the block of tofu on top. Place another layer of paper towel on the tofu block and apply something heavy -- book, cutting board, pan -- on top. Let it press for at least 20 minutes, replace the paper towels and let it rest for another 10 minutes for extra an extra chewy meaty texture. Massage Kale for Tender Salads Kale needs some TLC to become, well, tender. To break down the tough fibers, rip the leaves off the rib (or stem), add to a bowl, coat with some olive oil, and knead them (as if you would bread dough) for around four minutes. Add them to a Mediterranean salad for a quick weeknight meal. Blend Cauliflower for an All-Purpose Cream Sauce Add richness, depth, and creaminess to any dish with this magic, all-purpose cauliflower sauce . To make this simple sauce, boil cauliflower spears until tender. While boiling, sauté sliced garlic in olive oil until fragrant. Drain the cauliflower and scrape all of the garlic-infused oil into a blender and blend until smooth. Photo Source: FoodieWithFamily Refrigerate Coconut Milk for Easy Whipped Cream Simple, easy, and decadent, refrigerating a can of coconut milk overnight results in a thick and creamy whipped topping for desserts, waffles, or coffee. Add some vanilla extract and powdered sugar for some extra flavor and sweetness.         Freeze Bananas for Nice Cream The best kept secret that every plant-based eater knows about, frozen banana soft serve will change the way you think about dessert. Simply peel a few bananas, throw them in the freezer, and blend them up with some frozen fruit the next day. Maybe add a splash of lemon juice, nut butter, or a sprinkle of maple syrup if so inclined. Photo Source: Detoxinista   Use Avocado in Place of Butter With a one-to-one ratio, you can use avocado to replace butter in most baked goods and desserts. And while avocado wont impart a noticeable flavor, you can also avoid butter by using a non-dairy butter substitute (also a one-to-one ratio).         Make Your Own Plant Parmesan Cheese Parmesan elevates anything from pastas and risottos to soup and roasted vegetables. Recreate the sharp umami flavor of Parmesan with a combination of nutritional yeast, walnuts (or cashews), salt, and garlic powder. Give the mixture a couple of pulses in the food processor and youre good to go. Photo Source: MinimalistBaker Customize a Creamy Tofu Herb Dip Tofu comes in all different types and textures. Blend soft silken tofu together with salt and fresh herbs -- basil, parsley, chive, cilantro, rosemary -- for a quick and easy dip for crudité. Add some avocado or a splash of citrus to round out the flavor. Photo Source: CrowdedKitchen   Finish Cooking Pasta in Sauce for a Creamier Consistency   Contrary to the instructions on the box, pasta should actually be slightly underdone when you drain it. After draining, immediately toss the pasta into the simmering sauce for another two minutes. This helps the pasta absorb the sauce, but it also releases the starch within the pasta, giving the sauce a creamier consistency.       Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post 10 Tips, Hacks, and Tricks for Tasty Plant-Based Cooking appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Chia Surprise Muffins

April 27 2020 Oh My Veggies 

Oh, I can’t keep a secret. The surprise is jam. Jam! There’s jam in the middle of these muffins. Surprise! I’ve been making these muffins every week or two for the past few months. I love them because they’re not too sweet (the older I get, the less I want super sweet food in the morning) and the jam is baked on the inside, so I don’t even have to get the jar out of the fridge. Convenient! These muffins are actually one of the first recipes I remember making. (Well, not these muffins, because back in the 80s, chia seeds were for sprouting on little ceramic heads, not for eating.) After finding my Aunt Darlene’s old copy of Betty Crocker’s New Boys and Girls Cookbook at my grandparents’ house, I relentlessly begged my Grandma to help me make something from it. Each time I visited, we’d make something different: a pie made with pudding and rainbow marshmallows (remember those?!), roses made from radishes, and Surprise Muffins. And then my Grandma let me keep the book. I’m not sure it was because I loved it so much (and I did) or because she was tired of me wanting to make […]

Sephardic Date Haroset

March 20 2020 VegKitchen 

Sephardic Date Haroset Haroset is an intrinsic component of the Passover plate, a condiment made from fruit, nuts, and wine. It symbolizes the mortar used by the Jewish slaves to build ancient Egyptian cities. Sephardic haroset is made in various ways, but usually contains dates. The post Sephardic Date Haroset appeared first on VegKitchen.

Maple and Balsamic Roasted Brussels Sprouts

December 9 2019 Meatless Monday 

Who doesnt love roasted Brussels sprouts these days? These cruciferous veggies have gone from hated to adored over the past couple of years. And the chief reason is the discovery that these petit choux (small cabbages) roast up so nicely. This easy roasted recipe calls upon maple syrup, balsamic vinegar, cranberries, hazelnuts, red onions, and rosemary to really bring on the flavor. This recipe comes to us from Sharon Palmer, The Plant-Powered Dietitian. Serves 8 - 2 pounds Brussels sprouts  - 1 red onion, sliced  -  1/­­2 cup hazelnuts, halved  - 1 cup whole fresh or frozen cranberries (or 1/­­2 cup dried)  - 2 tablespoons olive oil  - 1 tablespoon pure maple syrup  - 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar  - 1 garlic clove, minced  - 1 teaspoon smoked paprika  - Salt and pepper (if desired, optional)  - 3 twigs fresh rosemary, chopped coarsely (or 1 teaspoon dried)   Preheat oven to 375 F.   Trim ends of Brussels sprouts and slice them in half. Arrange evenly on a baking sheet. Arrange onion slices, hazelnuts, and cranberries over Brussel sprouts and toss together gently. In a small dish, mix together, olive oil, maple syrup, vinegar, garlic, smoked paprika, and salt and pepper (if desired). Drizzle vinaigrette over vegetables, sprinkle with rosemary, and toss with tongs to distribute. Place in top rack of oven and roast until gold brown, about 35-40 minutes. The post Maple and Balsamic Roasted Brussels Sprouts appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Lisa O’Connor

December 8 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Lisa O’Connor Lisa O’Connor is a Toronto-based Holistic Nutritionist, Healing Alchemist, and host of the Glow Deep Podcast. We interviewed Lisa about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, healing and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Both! Im a naturally disciplined soul, so I have no problems at all committing to something. I thrive off of routine, but Ive been learning to be way more in flow these past few years. Especially with creating my own schedule and building my business /­­ practice, and now with the arrival of our puppy. My schedule got shifted around quite a bit, as he needs A LOT of attention and training at this moment! Im learning to find my own rhythm between routine, and free flow. Which I believe is always a dance for us as we transition through different seasons, and times of our lives. -- What do your mornings look like? Now with a puppy things have shifted! -We are morning people – getting up anywhere between 5-6am -A liter of water first thing -A walk in nature with the pup -A little play time with him & then putting him in his crate for a nap, so I can have me time -Kundalini -Meditation -Matcha latte -Reading – I commit to 30-45 min daily reading in the morning -Smoothie or whatever else Im feeling -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? To be honest, I dont have a lot of bedtime rituals, as I dont really have a problem with sleep. Whats important for me is turning my phone on airplane mode a good 45min- 1 hour before sleep, having a shower to shift my energy, magnesium cream, and reading a book in bed with my husband, or sometimes we watch a little something on Netflix to just switch completely off! -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  -Meditation -Walking in nature and being present -Kundalini -Im not a massive journal writer, but when it calls I listen! Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Smoothie & homemade matcha latte (I have the matcha first, and probably wait an hour or so and then have the smoothie!) Lunch – Honestly on client days I often keep it light and just snack – green juice here, smoothie there, some veggies, coconut water! And some days I just have liquids (juices, smoothies, water until dinner) on other days it could be a light salad, or a lunch out with a friend at a local healthy restaurant Snack – Im not too much of a snack person! But I would say nuts /­­ seeds, green juice, maybe a piece of fruit in the summer Dinner - Green salad, roasted veggies, curries, soups, brown rice -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do :) I drink matcha during the week, and on the weekend when I can savour a beautiful organic Americano when Im at a cafe with my husband, its just that much more special. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your cart? We do our big haul on Saturdays at a place here called Organic Garage. Everything is organic, and is so reasonable in price. In the summer I also add in local markets, and farmers markets. That being said, I feel like Im always grocery shopping on the daily, as Im always picking up fresh greens, or picking up supplemental things for dinner that we didnt get during our big shop on Saturday morning. Things that we always include: -Variety of leafy greens -Olives -Bananas -Apples -Mushrooms -Celery -Lemons -Frozen berries -Avocados -Brown Rice -Fresh herbs -Variety of proteins -Cucumbers -ACV -Pumpkin seed butter -Zucchinis -White & Sweet potatoes -Garlic -Ginger -Dates -Variety nuts & seeds -Seasonal vegetables -Hemp seeds +++ More but those are always staples!  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? I know people wont like this answer, but I actually dont! I can eat 95-100% chocolate, and feel super satisfied. If Im sweetening anything I use dates, bananas, and/­­or a touch of raw honey. -- Are there any particular foods that you find to be helpful with your energy levels and general wellness? Greens!!! I am a greens monster, and feel so deeply connected to them. I love to consume their liquid sunshine properties. Potatoes are also a huge staple for me, as they are easily digested, high in fiber, and the natural sugars are burned as energy for me. Berries – I love wild blueberries and raspberries Spices /­­ herbs – Ginger, garlic, cayenne, nettle, turmeric Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I dont have anything particular right now! My favourite form of exercise is walking! Its highly underrated in my opinion. I live in a big city, without a car, so my mode of transport is Me. I find it meditative, calming, and great exercise. I also practice Kundalini yoga, and will sometimes do some resistance work (P.Volve). -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I find it to be an extension of me, and I dont ever have to force it. I trust my body and flow with what it wants and feels in the season of life that Im in. At the moment Ive been the least active Ive ever been, but its what feels best for me, and my body is welcoming it, and responding beautifully to it. In other seasons of my life Ive done intense and hard workouts at least 4 -5 x per week, and other times Ive done daily exercise. If there is anything Ive learnt along the way, is that nothing good comes from force. When we practice, and learn to tune- in, we will always be guided to what our body needs. In 2020 I want to get back into doing Ballet Beautiful though, as I did it for over two years and felt so graceful, feminine, yet toned. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty, both internal and external? My idea of beauty will always be that is stems from within. And not just the foods that we eat, or supplements we take, but the thoughts we think, our mood, mental state, stress levels, how kind we are...etc. I struggled with really bad acne for years, and addressing all of the above, with nutrition + curated herbs /­­ supplements, actually brought my skin back better than before! Beauty in my eyes is always a projection, and energetic force with regards to whats going on inside. When things are aligned within, I feel beauty just radiates regardless of how we *think* we look. This beautiful energetic force truly knows no bounds. I do still enjoy to take care of my external skin, and body, but I would say its only about 10% of my regime. Everything else stems from internal work! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? MINIMAL. People are so surprised how little I do, as I really do practice what I preach. When we focus on the internal, the external will always reflect that. I use all natural products – Face wash, rose spray, and oil (I rotate a few of my favourite brands – including Living Libations, F. Miller & Marie Veronique) In the summer I mask more (May Lindstrom or just the Aztec Clay mask) I find them too harsh for the winter, so I love a good Manuka honey mask during the winter. -- Do you have any beauty tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Less is more. When I was healing my skin I tried EVERYTHING. I used too many products, stripped my skin, and it all just made it worse. I find my skin is the best the less that I do. Sweating is key, so are hot /­­ cold (contrast showers), kundalini (breathwork) and again coming back to nurturing and feeding (Physical & Mental) your Internal Self, which then shows up Externally. The key is to get things moving & flowing. Digestion, lymph, liver, as this ultimately shows up on the skin. No flow, no glow. Stress, Etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress?  -Meditation (nothing fancy, or prescriptive, just sitting with myself) -Dog walks in nature -Kundalini Yoga -Reading -Nutrition -Seeing loved ones -Spending time with my husband, and puppy -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? -REST /­­ SLEEP – seriously the simplest thing one can do, I just believe we feel as a society that we cant just Be, or cant just take a break -Green juicing -Hot /­­ cold showers to stimulate lymph flow and detoxification -Ginger tea -Broths /­­ soups Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Im quite simple, easy-going, yet Ive always been disciplined, and my husband might say stubborn (my Ukrainian genes :) ). I dont find it that difficult to honour my body, mind, and soul. Ive also been on a deep healing journey since 2006 (got diagnosed with Lyme Disease in 2012), so truly these arent even actions or steps I take, they are just Me. I dont force anything, and allow for flow, ease, while still knowing, and honouring when I need to heal something deeper, take a new direction, and take care of my inner child. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Hmmmm I dont think there is just one thing, as I see things very holistically, and connected. I would say mind work. Focusing on mental strength, vitality, and honouring my subconscious mind, as this is where all of our habits, programs, and deep belief systems live. Our mind is everything, as the body is the unconscious mind.  -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Take a break! It could be an afternoon, a day or even a few. I have a tendency to force things, and when I do nothing flows. Ive learned this the hard way many times over, so I create space to go within. On the other hand, I can get inspired easily via images, nature, people, environments, so its always there for me. Its cheesy, but inspiration can hit at any moment, so I stay open. But when Im stuck, I take a step back or I schedule a brainstorming session with my husband. Just so I can talk things through, get a different perspective ( hes very smart, yet practical). In my business its just me, myself, and I, so it can get pretty insular. Although my goal for 2020 is to hire my first employee!  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. To be honest, nothing outside of myself influenced this or my view. It was losing my health, and healing on a deep level that has brought me to where I am with self-care. Its never been anything to do, if anything its how I practice Being. Ive come to see, and know deeply that our relationship to Self – On a body, mind, and soul level is everything. If we dont show up for ourselves, than we cant for others. But if I were to pick anything in terms of external energy, I would say the book Magdalen Manuscript, its a channeled script of Mary Magdalen. It speaks about Ka energy (life force), and the power of energy that courses through all of Us. The only way to channel this energy, is to nourish ourselves from the inside out. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a holistic nutritionist? When I started to become ill in 2006, it set me on my path. At first it started with my own experiments, lifestyle changes, and reading /­­ self-knowledge for close to six years. Then from there, I took it further to get certified, and study formally. While Im a HN, Ive expanded my view of my work, as I go *much* deeper than just food. My story is WILD, so I wont go into all the details, but when you experience something so deep, intense, and beautiful on your own, you want to help others heal via your journey, knowledge, and gifts (which I believe we all have! Its just up to us to cultivate them). I dont believe I chose this profession, as Ive never felt more called to something. Knowing how crazy, and wild it is to lose one’s health, its my mission to help others tap themselves into their own innate healer. -- What is your healing philosophy? How do you approach working with clients? Ive come to see healing as alchemy. As a society weve been taught that we should just focus on one body part, one thing, one pill, and weve become so singular in our view point and scope of healing /­­ practice. I.E. if we are having back pain, focus on the back. Where as I see everything, and I mean everything holistically. I see the alchemy, and connection between it all – Body, Mind, and Spirit. While we might be having physical pain some place (i.e. back), yes we must look and take care of the cellular body (which I do), but we also have to look at our emotions, trauma, history, and deeper work into the soul, and subconscious. While this isnt the easy work, to me its the only way I know! So when taking on a client, this is where we go. I look at each soul as a unique and individual being. No one is alike, so there isnt a pill or protocol that fits just because someone has been diagnosed with X, and so has their friend. Those two people are so different, have been raised uniquely, have most likely experienced trauma in their own way, and are navigating different life pathways, and stressors. We navigate the deeper parts, so we can heal holistically, sustainably, and in connection with our whole Self. We arent just a body, we are so much more. When we focus on just the body, I dont believe we do ourselves any favours. This is whats often missing in chronic care of  humans and why so many people are just living and coping with pain and dis-ease. We are seeking greater depth, purpose, and fulfilment, yet were left confused, hopeless, and overwhelmed. If I can just bring someone to see that they DO have the power to heal, than man oh man, it just means everything to me! Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Our new puppy Rumi! Hes a Rhodesian Ridgeback, so he will grow to be a big boy, but we are soaking up all the puppy cuddles right now. Also ending off a decade, ushering in a new one , and entering into the year 2020. There is a lot of potent energy coming forth, and Im feeling really charged, clear, and ready for it all. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Nothing really special, I love just the simple things in life. A hot shower, getting into my robe or a grey sweat suit, eating a nourishing dinner, and cuddling with my husband & puppy! Sometimes I will treat myself to a facial, and when I can infrared sauna sessions.  -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Anatomy of the Spirit and Course in Miracles Song/­­Album –   Anything by Bon Iver or Ben Howard or White Sun Movie –   Dirty Dancing (forever & always my favourite) Piece of Art –  I adore a lot of art  /­­ creative work, but some of my favourites include: Renaissance art, Matisse, Unconditional Magazine, Picasso, Christiane Spangsberg. This post contains Amazon Affiliate Links Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post Lisa O’Connor appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

A Vegetarian Thanksgiving Menu

November 25 2019 Oh My Veggies 

I hope you’ve enjoyed the week of vegetarian Thanksgiving posts that I put together with Rikki! I’ve gotten so used to working on my own as a blogger that it’s nice to collaborate with someone else once in a while and see my food through another photographer’s eyes (or camera lens). And Rikki isn’t just an amazing photographer, but she’s also a great friend and mentor who totally gets my food, so I can’t imagine working with anyone else. I’m totally thrilled with how all of her photos turned out in these vegetarian recipes for a vegetarian thanksgiving main course! Here’s our complete menu with vegetarian recipes for thanksgiving main course: Quinoa-Stuffed Acorn Squash Rings /­­/­­ Roasted acorn squash rings stuffed with quinoa, apples, cranberries, sage, and cheddar. A main dish for vegetarians that also works as a side dish for everyone else! Whipped Sweet Potatoes /­­/­­ Vanilla-scented sweet potatoes lightly sweetened with maple syrup and topped with candied pecans. The perfect alternative to the typical marshmallow-topped sweet potato casserole. Rosemary Roasted Carrots /­­/­­ Heirloom carrots make this simple Thanksgiving side dish a showstopper. Green Beans & Caramelized Shallots /­­/­­ Tender roasted green beans are topped with caramelized shallots. Wild Mushroom Gravy […]

New York City Passes Historic Citywide Meatless Monday Resolution

November 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

New York City Passes Historic Citywide Meatless Monday ResolutionNew York City has passed a historic resolution supporting the promotion and adoption of Meatless Monday for residents, businesses, and government organizations. The resolution encourages individuals and public and private institutions to try and provide plant-based options for their health and the environment, especially on Mondays. New York City is already a leader in providing its residents with opportunities to enjoy plant-based meals and reduce their meat consumption, with Meatless Monday programs currently available in all public schools and public hospitals. This new resolution builds and strengthens the citys current efforts and is part of a larger push to promote plant-based meals and reduce processed meat consumption in local restaurants, cafeterias and community organizations in all five boroughs. Helen Rosenthal, New York City council member and lead advocate of the resolution, celebrated the victory with a post on her Facebook Page:   Today the City Council passed my resolution which encourages New Yorkers to enjoy Meatless Mondays so that all of us can take part in the long-lasting benefits of a plant-based diet — reduced risk of a wide range of diseases, improved overall health, and longer lives.       The Meatless Monday team joined fellow non-profit partners and city council members in advocating for a citywide resolution in 2015. Recent public environmental concerns and scientific publications have increased momentum around interest and adoption of plant-based eating for health and environmental benefits. Meatless Monday is a global campaign that encourages people to enjoy meat-free meals on Mondays to improve their personal and public health as well as environmental and agricultural sustainability. The resolution brings awareness to the efforts already underway in restaurants, schools, and cafeterias across the city to provide meatless meals on Mondays, and calls on an expansion of those efforts citywide. A coalition of leading health and environmental organizations have endorsed Meatless Monday as one of the easiest actions that mayors and city officials can take to improve their communitys health and achieve their climate goals. Major cities including Los Angeles, Long Beach, San Francisco, Washington D.C., Philadelphia, Indianapolis, Sacramento, Cleveland, and many others have all committed to some iteration of the program. Do you want to keep the Meatless Monday movement growing? Click here for five simple ways to implement Meatless Monday in YOUR community. The post New York City Passes Historic Citywide Meatless Monday Resolution appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Roasted Potatoes and Tomatoes with Rosemary

October 21 2019 VegKitchen 

Roasted Potatoes and Tomatoes with Rosemary Roasted potatoes flavored with tomatoes and rosemary make an appealing side dish for winter and early spring holiday meals or company dinners. Their mellow flavor is always welcome at the table. Photos by Evan Atlas. The post Roasted Potatoes and Tomatoes with Rosemary appeared first on VegKitchen.

Recipe | Brown Sugar Peach French Toast Cups

August 30 2019 Oh My Veggies 

I know I post a lot of recipes with peaches. And I fully intended to make this recipe with blueberries or blackberries. Blueberries and blackberries! Two fruits that I’ve completely neglected on my blog. But a little nagging voice in my head kept saying, “No! Use peaches! Peaches will be better!” Usually the voice in my head is too busy singing Poison songs to get involved in my cooking process, so I figured I better listen. If nagging inner voice can take a break from “Every Rose Has Its Thorn” on endless repeat for hours at a time, this must be important! So I went with peaches. Again. I promise, next summer will be the summer of blueberries. Blueberry everything! All summer! You have my word. And my word? It’s gold. If you’ve been reading Oh My Veggies for a while, maybe you remember my Sweet Potato French Toast Cups recipe. I wanted to do that again, but with fruit. The thing I love most about making little individual French toasts in muffin tins is that they’re portion-controlled and easy to freeze. Bake ’em, freeze ’em, and heat ’em in the microwave for breakfast. It doesn’t get much easier than […]

Vegan Socca Recipe – Chickpea Flatbread Gluten-free

July 5 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Socca Recipe – Chickpea Flatbread Gluten-freeEasy Vegan Socca Recipe – Chickpea Flatbread. Savory Gluten free Vegan Chickpea flour flatbread. 1 Bowl 5 Ingredients. Vegan Grain-free Soyfree Nutfree Recipe. Jump to Recipe What is Socca? Socca is a type of thin unleavened pancake, flatbread or crepe made with chickpea flour. It has other names in various regions of France and Italy (farinata, Panisse) and can be made thin or thick with various flavor additions. It is naturally gluten-free and grain-free and can easily be used as flatbread or pizza base. Similar preparations are also found in other cuisines with variations in methods of cooking and forms. Chickpea flour is an amazingly versatile and worldy ingredient! Socca Bread needs just 2 main ingredients, chickpea flour and water. I add salt, rosemary, pepper flakes for flavor and cook it on a skillet or bake. I prefer the skillet version. It is easier, and quicker and you can adjust the thickness and crispyness as you prefer. Slice up the socca and serve with dips or just olive oil. Or top with pesto or chimichurri and veggies and bake for a pesto pizza. Chickpea flour is generally available in grocery stores.

Rhubarb Milk

May 22 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Rhubarb Milk Stopping by with a different way to celebrate rhubarb season today. Think strawberry milk, but made with beautiful, pink stalks of rhubarb and a few lush aromatics. It comes together quickly and can be enjoyed in a number of delicious ways. You start this recipe out by stewing the rhubarb in maple syrup, which takes no more than 10 minutes and leaves you with a delicious rhubarb ‘jam’. You could stop right there and serve it on top yogurt, porridge, granola, or various desserts (like panna cotta). Or you could go on and blend the stewed rhubarb with some dairy-free milk. You can then enjoy the rhubarb milk multiple ways – on its own with ice, poured over iced matcha for a beautiful, spring matcha latte, or you could blend it with a frozen banana or two for an out-of-this-world rhubarb smoothie. We employ the help of rose water and cardamom to complement the tart flavors of rhubarb in this recipe, but if you don’t have those, you could entirely leave them out or add your own aromatic twist – think cinnamon, cloves, pink peppercorns, orange blossom water, etc. Hope you enjoy this easy little idea! Wishing you a great rest of your week

Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett

May 5 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett Rachelle Robinett is an Herbalist, Holistic Health Practitioner, and founder of Supernatural, a company dedicated to real-world plant-based wellness. Rachelle has been studying the relationship between plants and people her entire life – be that on a farm in the Pacific Northwest (where she grew up) to time with healers, specialists, and shaman in farther-away places. She now provides functional plant-based wellness services, products, and education to empower people to understand their health, and lean into it, naturally. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? This has changed a lot for me since launching my company and having total control of my schedule. I do schedule every thing, but also move through life very intuitively. For example, on a day off Ill plan to ride my bike but once Im on it, it doesnt matter to me where I go. There are things I do routinely (meal preparation, exercise, rituals, sleep) but I never ignore instincts or anything my body is telling me. I love to be surprised but also care so much about how I spend every moment that planning is a big part of my life. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. No more alarm clock! Or, infrequently, which isnt something I would have predicted for my life. Ill wake up to open windows and the sounds of birds on a breeze. A glass of water with a tincture and probiotics. If its a day off, Ill skip caffeine and head out for a run while Im still sleepy. I love waking up while I run. A work day means a small cup of cold-brew with MCT oil and (currently, though it changes as I work with different herbs) mucuna pruriens and L-theanine. I practice intermittent fasting daily so dont typically eat until 11am or later but in the morning Ill make a broth or giant green juice and also a smoothie, which becomes brunch. A meditation ritual with some South American plants Ive come to love and then its off to the races. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Getting away from blue light! If Im near screens, they have physical filters and apps (like flux) installed to reduce the effect. Dimmed lights, incense, my Zen Spa Stuff playlist, and something to drink. There are always herbs at night as my energy tends to run very high, naturally. I cycle between kava kava, skullcap, valerian, poppy, lavender, and more. Also very in love with a relaxing face-washing routine. :) -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Im working diligently at becoming a more regular meditator. Its most days now, but Id like to deepen it. Otherwise, yoga, running and long bike rides silence my mind. I can practice yoga (ashtanga) for hours a day and be thrilled. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – A giant smoothie made with fresh tropical fruits and fats, ideally picked from a jungle farm that morning. Lunch – All the vegetables, fresh and raw and local. Amazing olive oil, avocado, or coconut. Maybe some seeds. Seaweed too. Every color of the rainbow. Snack – 100% cacao. Local. Dinner - See lunch. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Currently I have about 1/­­2 cup of cold-brew coffee that we make at home. Im so high energy naturally that I often dont finish it. Green juice is my favorite energy support. Otherwise I use water, food, sunlight and breath to adjust my energy. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? Dark chocolate – often homemade but if bought its 92 – 100%. Ill eat that for breakfast, honestly. My sugar intake is so low that sweets cravings are rare but if they get aggressive Ill have extra cacao in smoothies or elixirs, or eat more fruit, sweet potatoes/­­yams, etc. Chocolate chip cookies are dear to my heart though. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? This evolves as I learn and grow too but ... – An excellent probiotic – Personalized herbs. For me those are mood-supportive and nervous-system soothing. I use a combination of herbal teas (infused overnight), tinctures (HerbPharm are my favorite!) and well-sourced powders. – Supplements depending on bloodwork, body composition and lifestyle. – Im seeing the greatest overall health changes in my clients who are working on gut health. It just affects so much! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I live to move. Every single day if possible! If I skip more than two days, I get really restless. Running and yoga are my favorite, but I need both. I joke that running is my church; I treasure it and find it extremely cathartic. Yoga keeps everything balanced and I hope to have the practice for life. Weather permitting, Ill ride my bike for hours but that just feels like play. Im also into strength training (aka lifting weights at the gym, which surprises people). Overall, I consider exercise as essential as good food, water, and sleep. My preference for high-intensity exhaustive stuff comes from my high-energy personality but isnt necessary for everyone. Ive seen some of the fastest changes in my body with a daily yoga practice, some walking, and an excellent diet. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? Absolutely heavenly. Excellent playlists are essential! Also, just do it. ;) Beauty -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I think people doubt me when I say greens, and especially green juice, are responsible for the glow but I really mean it. Veggies veggies veggies, healthy fat, tons of water, and sweat! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Aside from food, water, rest, and sweat, I find that a consistent routine of gentle exfoliation and good quality rehydration (topically, that is) work best for me. Continually renewing the surface, allowing skin to breathe, and keeping it nourished with really simple ingredients (I love Egyptian Magic and fruit enzyme or honey-based masks) gives really great face. That said, Im not an esthetician and have increasingly more respect for what I dont know about skincare (thanks to spending more time with the professionals at CAP Beauty, especially) and it will differ for everyone. What wont differ is the value of a right diet to help reduce inflammation, increase circulation, maintain hydration, and provide enough energy for both exercising and rest. :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Exercise and sleep have always been stress-reliefs for me. Ive recently integrated more meditation, and herbs of course (especially nervines). Whats making the greatest difference, though, is - as with most things - addressing the root cause or source of the stress. Rather than just trying to breathe between emails, Im looking at how to reduce email overall. Setting timers, limits on the number of meetings Ill take each day, inbox pausing, and scheduling (and sticking to) more time truly offline. Personal days, screen-free evenings or weekends, etc. If doing this, its important to prepare for there to be more to address when you return to it, so another part of the practice may be letting go of how much we want to engage with and choosing quality over quantity. Much harder said than done. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Heat and spice! I completely eliminate all sugar including fruit and yes, honey too. I put on three extra layers to get warm and stay warm. Garlic, ginger, and all sorts of spice. And rest. Essentially, Im aiming to help my body reach a sort of break-point with the cold/­­flu, or to sweat it out before it even reaches a peak, which Ive had a lot of success with. Medicinal mushrooms can also be great for cold/­­flu season. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? Im working on this. (See above regarding stress avoidance!) My work is my play is my passion is my love so whats not work is sometimes very hard to determine. My hypnotherapist friend suggests that if it makes me happy, perhaps its not important to distinguish. My partner has inspired me to take in information from sources entirely outside of my usual bubble, which is great for play, and avoiding a filtered or algorithmic existence. This is a new practice for me. I grew up in a home that didnt allow for play so its something Im creating space for and learning how to do as an adult. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Ive found that its just impossible to be my best self when Im not taking care. Its really priority number one (and two, and maybe three) at this point. That said, there are times when life when its worth compromising different things. Like, in my twenties when I worked my ass off (and loved it) in order to achieve certain things. Now, I feel freer to play and rest. These bodies are our only homes in this life. I am so grateful to have one; I really think of it like my best friend and partner in existence. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Learning how to eat entirely plant-based, and well. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Thankfully, I dont have these. But, the opposite side of that spectrum is overworking, under-socializing, or burnout. And, existential crises which seem to strike when things are best. Rest and changes of scenery can do wonders. (Lately, I have been exploring procrastination from the perspective of mindfulness, though. This is an enlightening talk on it.) -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Instead Ill choose a couple of people: My mom, who as a Dietician gave me the greatest start in understanding nutrition, but more importantly taught me how to listen to my body. Rather than bandaging symptoms, she showed us how to ask why and follow the clues to root causes. My dad, an Anaesthesiologist who - much the opposite of Mom - taught us about medicine yes, but of more value he gave me the travel bug and experiences with wild nature that started and perpetuate my relationship with earth. And, Wendy Green, who I met at the perfect time in my journey. She helped direct my then multitudinous health practices into a more singular approach, which Ive honed and deepened since we met years ago. She also showed me how much I love ashtanga yoga, which is the gift of a lifetime. Ill be back to her retreat for the third time this summer. Knowledge -- Do you have any recommendations for those thinking of taking their career in a similar direction? Where does one start, where to find the education, how important is certification, etc. This is one of the most common questions I receive! I appreciate Mountain Rose Herbs list of resources for those looking into schools, teachers, or even just books. Its worth knowing which certifications are recognized by The American Herbalists Guild, though many people disregard the value of that and choose to study from great herbalists or schools that exist outside of the system. Id recommend as much exploration and direct experience as possible in the form of classes, workshops, and apprenticeships before then committing to a longer-term study. Find someone whose approach you respect and identify with and learn from them in whatever ways are available. -- Tell us about HRBLS, your beautiful herb infused chew line! Woo, HRBLS! These are my babies! Long story short, I wanted to give people an easy, delicious, beautiful but still very effective form of herbs. The HRBLS are gummies, or chews, that are equivalent to a dose of a tincture, a strong cup of herbal tea, or some capsules. Theyre a marriage between functional food and herbal remedies. A snack medicine or treat with benefits. Nerve Less is the first flavor (honeyed lavender tarragon) and includes my favorite herbs for daytime stress and anxiety relief, which so many folks come to me for help resolving. In the near future, well announce the next flavor – okay flavor s. :) -- And a last, fun one: what are your three favorite plants for the spring season and why? – Nettle! Because its my bff (we grew up together) and the coolest combination of edible green, super-green plant medicine, and a natural antihistamine. – Dandelion: I love the multi-taskers and like nettle, dandelion is an edible flower and bitter green (great for digestion), and medicinal top to root. – Mimosa. The tree of happiness which blooms more in the summer than spring, but close enough. Aside from looking magical, its full of medicine – everything from antioxidants to DMT. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Deep massages – two hours with the strongest hands I can find please! Acupuncture. Running, yoga, riding. TRAVEL. The post Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Sephardic Date Haroset (Passover)

March 20 2020 VegKitchen 

Vegan Sephardic Date Haroset (Passover) Haroset is an intrinsic component of the Passover plate. Traditionally, haroset is a condiment made from fruit, nuts, and wine. It symbolizes the mortar used by the Jewish slaves to build ancient Egyptian cities. The post Vegan Sephardic Date Haroset (Passover) appeared first on VegKitchen.

Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff

January 18 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff I really love January. To me, this month has a bright and sparkling clean feel to it. And even though the start of a new year is purely symbolic, it can be such great time to set some concrete intentions and start making lasting changes or small steps in a new direction. This year, much like the past few years, I’m inspired to simplify, minimize, and really think about the things that I bring into my life, and my impact as a consumer. In the past few years, we’ve tackled food waste and figured out a way to compost food scraps that’s sustainable for us. We’ve also done away with a lot of store-bought household products like paper towels and most single-purpose cleaning products, but there is still a lot of work to do in that area. Of course I find that cooking at home is always a top priority when it comes to simplifying in a sane way. Being prepared, having tried and true recipes and techniques under my sleeve, and having some trusted meal components stocked in the fridge or pantry always leads to less stress, less waste, and more enjoyment throughout the week. This Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff doesn’t have any particular ties to these January musings, beside the fact that it’s a cozy, wintery recipe that I’ll gladly plan to cook on any given week this winter. It’s a nostalgic flavor for us, since our family in Russia cooked it quite a bit, but we think that this plant-based version is even better than the original :) Below I’m sharing some of my plans, projects I’d like to tackle, and resources that I’ve found to be super inspiring when it comes to simplifying, minimizing my impact and beyond. Would love to hear yours! Goals: projects I’d like to tackle and a few (small but impactful) new habits I’d like to form this year – Stop buying single-purpose household cleaning products and make my own, super simple ones (key words: super simple). I already do this by making a 1 part vinegar, 1 part water all-purpose cleaner that I use on pretty much all surfaces. I sometimes infuse the vinegar with citrus peels for a week or add a few drops of essential oils for a more refreshing scent. That cleaner works really well for most things. But I’d like to make a few more site-specific mixes as well, since I sometimes panic and end up buying some shower cleaner I don’t actually need. Simply Living Well is an amazing resource for easy, home-care recipes. I’m going to make this shower spray, this floor cleaner, and this glass/­­window cleaner. All those recipes have really basic, interchangeable ingredients, which keeps them from being overwhelming. Please let me know if you have a favorite homemade laundry detergent recipe – still trying to figure that one out. – Repair things I have before buying new. I’ve always liked doing stuff with my hands, so for me this is an inherently relaxing activity that I’d like to make more time for. Right now, our linen duvet cover has decided to rip in many places at once, and instead of buying a new one, the plan is to mend it properly with tonal patches, which can look really cool. Julie O’Rourke has a super comprehensive darning and mending tutorial here in her IG stories (just flip through the doll-making part). Her whole account is super dreamy as well. – Make a pot of beans every single week. I’ve noticed that every time I make a big batch of beans, I end up thanking myself over and over again for all the easy meals I’ve made possible with that one step. I like to cook the beans with aromatics so that I also end up with a delicious broth that I can either eat with the beans or use later for soups, etc. Different kinds of beans yield such different flavor/­­cooking potential, so it’s easy to switch them up every week without getting bored. For example, I cook chickpeas with aromatics, then have them for dinner in their broth with greens and maybe other veggies wilted in. I freeze some of the broth to use later as veggie stock. I then eat the chickpeas as is in veggie bowls/­­salads, make hummus with them, marinate them, make crispy chickpeas, or make falafel/­­veggie burgers. You can of course do all of this with canned beans, but home-cooked ones are much tastier, more cost effective, less wasteful if you buy them in bulk, and the broth that you get from cooking them is super valuable! If I find that I can’t use up all of the beans, I just freeze them in their broth and again set my future self up for success. We have a lot of meal plans centered around whole pots of beans here. Inspiring Resources: – 75 Ways to Create a Low-Waste Home from Simply Living Well and Zero Waste, Plastic Free Alternatives Master List from Paris to Go are chock-full of ideas to slowly chip away at. – Jessie’s Produce Prep Ebook is such a wonderful guide to reducing food waste and enjoying the abundance of the plant food world. – Mama Eats Plants is the queen of low-waste living, vegan cooking, and a generally mindful lifestyle. – Live Planted is a great, short-format podcast about a practical approach to a low-waste lifestyle and much more. – This One Part Podcast interview with Kathryn Kellogg of Going Zero Waste is so full of positivity and details some actionable steps most of us can implement to decrease waste. Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 8 oz package tempeh - crumbled 2 teaspoons tamari 1 teaspoon maple syrup ½ cup cashews - soaked to soften if no high-speed blender 1 tablespoon white or chickpea miso 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 cup purified water sea salt black pepper avocado oil or other cooking oil of choice 1 yellow onion - diced 4 garlic cloves - minced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary 1 tablespoon tomato paste pinch of red pepper flakes (optional) 6 oz portobello mushroom caps (about 3 medium) - sliced into long strips ½ cup red wine 10-12 oz any pasta of choice fresh parsley - for serving (optional) Instructions Put the crumbled tempeh in a bowl. Pour the tamari and maple syrup over it, mix and let sit while making the cashew sauce. In an upright blender, combine the cashews, miso, mustard, apple cider vinegar, water, and salt and pepper to taste. Blend until very smooth. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Set aside. Heat some oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the tempeh and stir once to coat with the oil, then let sit uninterrupted for 2-3 minutes, until the undersides are browned. Mix and let sit again for another 3-5 minutes, until browned. Push the tempeh to one side of the pan, if your pan is large enough, or transfer back to a bowl and set aside until later. Add more oil to the pan. Add the onions and a pinch of salt, and sauté for 7-8 minutes, until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic, rosemary, tomato paste, and red pepper flakes, if using. Stir until the garlic is fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the mushrooms, along with another pinch of salt. Sauté until the mushrooms are browned and all the liquid that they release has evaporated, about 8-10 min. Mix the tempeh back in. Add the wine, bring it up to a simmer, and let reduce for about 3 minutes. Add the cashew sauce, stirring it and letting it warm through for a few minutes. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Meanwhile, cook the pasta al dente in well-salted water, according to the directions on the package. Reserve about 1 cup of starchy pasta water for thinning out the sauce. Drain the cooked pasta and add it to the pan with the stroganoff. Start mixing the pasta with the sauce, adding splashes of the starchy pasta water to thin out the sauce and to get it to stick to the pasta, as needed. Enjoy right away, garnished with parsley, if using. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

14 Recipes that Will Wow Your Family and Friends this Holiday Season

December 9 2019 Meatless Monday 

14 Recipes that Will Wow Your Family and Friends this Holiday SeasonTis the season to incorporate more meatless dishes into your recipe collection. Weve made a list -- and weve checked it twice -- of some of our favorite holiday appetizers, mains, side, and desserts, almost all of which are plant-based! Craving chestnuts roasting on an open fire? Try our roasted chestnut soup. Jack Frost nipping at your nose? Nothing will keep you more snug than our warming carrot cauliflower stew. Grandma got ran over by a reindeer? Well, um, weve got a great recipe for honey-vanilla poached pears. Check out our Meatless Monday holiday menu below and see how you can wow your guests with some festive and flavorful meatless meals. Appetizers Set the proper tone for the meal with these seasonal holiday appetizers: Roasted Chestnut Soup Warming Carrot Cauliflower Stew Spicy Jalape?o Cashew Cheese Dip Sides On this holiday dinner table, let the side dishes take center stage: Maple Balsamic Roasted Brussels Sprouts Rosemarys Beets with Hazelnuts and Basil Roasted Potatoes with Orange Couscous Baked Polenta Basil Fries Mains Plant-based mains can be just as hardy and comforting as their animal-based counterparts: Meaty Mushroom Stew with Garlic Mashed Potatoes Italian White Beans with Kale Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta Chickpea Burgers with Spicy Harissa  Desserts End with something sweet (but not too sweet): Honey Vanilla Poached Pears Apple Cranberry Oatmeal Bread Baked Apple Donuts   Interested in adding some more plant-based recipes to your repertoire? Click here for more Meatless Monday inspiration. The post 14 Recipes that Will Wow Your Family and Friends this Holiday Season appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving Feast

November 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving FeastThanksgiving is a time for family, giving, and gratitude. But its also the time for stuffing...and starches, and birds, briskets, casseroles, cranberry sauce, gravy, dressings, and desserts! But as we know from Thanksgivings past, the entire family doesnt always agree, especially when it comes to the food on the dining room table.  So, whether your guests prefer dark meat, white meat, or no meat, its important that your Thanksgiving spread accommodates everyone. Fortunately, the classic Thanksgiving fixings can be made completely plant-based without compromising tradition or taste. Weve compiled a collection of simple plant-based Thanksgiving swaps that allow everyone -- from the newly vegan to the traditional omnivore -- to enjoy the holiday feast, together. Mushroom Gravy from Trader Joes Sometimes your secret recipe is store bought. We wont tell. Trader Joes has an impressive Organic Savory Vegan Gravy made with onion, garlic, coconut milk, tamari, mushrooms, and a whole bunch of seasonings and zero work for you. Oh, its also gluten free. Roasted-Garlic Smashed Potatoes from Minimalist Baker The secret to incredibly light and fluffy dairy-free mashed potatoes isnt much of a secret. After boiling and mashing your potatoes (you can use a potato masher or hand mixer; if you use the latter, be careful not to overmix), fold in non-dairy butter and a whole head of roasted garlic to pump up the decadence.  Super Savory Vegan Stuffing from The Cheeky Chickpea A Thanksgiving spread is judged not on its turkey, but rather the quality of its stuffing. We scoured the internet to find the most satisfying stuffing recipe available. Chopped mushrooms, wild rice, bell peppers, vegetable bouillon, plant-based sausage, cubed up bread, and Thanksgiving seasonings -- fennel, garlic, parsley, fresh rosemary -- make this stuffing simply irresistible. Cinnamon Sugar Sweet Potato Casserole from Eat With Clarity Oh, sweet potato casserole; you sit innocently on the Thanksgiving table masquerading as a member of the main meal, but we all know youre our pre-dessert dessert...with your delightful topping of crushed pecans, coconut sugar, oats, and marshmallows. But the sweet and creamy nature of this indulgent side dish is a necessary counterbalance to all the punchy herbs and spices. This recipe adds another dimension to the traditional sweet potato casserole by using non-dairy milk, ground flax seeds, and melted coconut oil. Roasted Root Vegetables with a White Balsamic Glaze from Healthy World Cuisine No bacon necessary for these magical root vegetables. The recipe suggests fennel, carrots, and Cipollini onions, but you can add any of your favorite seasonal vegetables. Curried Green Bean Casserole from Omnivore’s Cookbook A spin on the classic, this curried green bean casserole adds a new dimension to the Thanksgiving table. Traditional green bean casseroles typically rely on a can of condensed cream of mushroom soup and a topping of bread crumbs and fried onion straws. This recipe is just as easy to make, but offers your taste buds so much more! No-Meat Loaf from Nora Cooks Turkey doesnt always have to be the star of the Thanksgiving spread. Meatloaf traditionally plays a supporting role, but this holiday season let it take center stage with this smoky, savory plant-based chickpea loaf. After its covered with a tangy ketchup glaze and baked in the oven, its look and texture become indistinguishable from its meaty counterpart. Cranberry Jam from Delish Theres something extraterrestrial-looking about the maroon cylinder of congealed cranberry sauce that you always find sitting menacingly next to the gravy boat. Its Thanksgiving, you deserve better. Treat your family (and yourself) with this simple-to-make four-ingredient cranberry jam. All you need is fresh cranberries, sugar, water, orange zest, and about twenty minutes. Your dinner rolls, stuffing, and other Thanksgiving starches will thank you. Chipotle Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Caper Vinaigrette from Goya Need an alternative centerpiece for your Thanksgiving meal? Look no further than this elegant whole roasted cauliflower with a smoky chipotle finish. Top your cauliflower steaks with a tart and briny caper vinaigrette for a perfect alternative to the big bird. Chocolate Fudge Brownie Pie from Sweet Vegan Sara Some people eat to live, others eat to get to dessert. Your patience has paid off. This plant-based chocolate fudge brownie pie looks sinful, but it really isnt. The crust uses a combination of almond flour, rolled oats, date sugar, and flax eggs (coagulated flax seeds), while the filling is as healthy as hummus, using chickpeas, nondairy milk, date paste, cocoa powder, rolled oats, and vegan chocolate chips. Creamy Coconut Pumpkin Pie from Loving It Vegan What makes this pumpkin pie filling so much more luxurious than the rest? A rhinestone-studded crust? Nope, this pie gets its extra decadent flare from a can of full-fat coconut milk. Fold in some brown sugar, maple syrup, pumpkin pie spice, and a little bit of cornstarch, and youve got yourself the ultimate Thanksgiving dessert.   Invite your friends and family to try (and share) these plant-based Thanksgiving swaps. If youre looking for more meatless recipe inspiration, check out our recipe gallery. The post Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving Feast appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Rosemary Roasted Carrots

November 4 2019 Oh My Veggies 

Recipes by me, photos by Rikki Snyder. Even though I have a food blog, I have to confess that I get overwhelmed when cooking a few things at once. Does that happen to you too, or am I just especially weak and easily confused? It seems like the more I have going on in the kitchen, the more likely things are to end up charred and inedible. So when developing recipes for a vegetarian Thanksgiving, I wanted a good mix of dishes that were a little more involved and dishes that required very little time, effort, or thought. These Rosemary Roasted Carrots are one of the latter. I also decided to add some simple roasted vegetable recipes to our Thanksgiving line-up because I wanted to have some lighter, healthier options in the midst of the stuffing and dessert and mashed potatoes. And that brings me to the other topic of this post: World Diabetes Day. When Carolyn from All Day I Dream About Food asked me to be involved in her World Diabetes Day event, I didn’t hesitate to say yes. But then I had a moment of doubt--do I even know how to make a recipe that’s diabetic-friendly? Carolyn […]

Vegan Almond Halwa – Instant Pot Badam Halwa (No Oil)

October 23 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Almond Halwa – Instant Pot Badam Halwa (No Oil)Vegan Almond Halwa – Instant Pot Badam Halwa with No Added Refined oil. No ghee or dairy! 5 Mins active time. 6 Ingredients! And Almond Ladoo too! Gluten-free Grain-free Soy-free Recipe. Jump to Recipe Its that time of the year! No not Halloween, Its Diwali this weekend! All festivals and holidays seem to all come close to each other. One day I am planning bowl meals and the next I am thinking pumpkin, Indian sweets, desserts, lentil loafs. This Diwali I bring you 3 variations of Almond Halwa! Indian Halwa can range in texture from a crumble to a set jelly like to soft spoon fudge like. You can make this halwa into any of the textures you like! If you don’t want to use the spoon, roll it up into balls for amazing almond ladoos. Traditional Badam Halwa recipe often requires making a sugar syrup of certain consistency, then adding almonds(soaked and blended or ground) and cooking for a good number of minutes. This recipe has none of that! No standing around in the kitchen stirring stuff and no checking on the sugar to get the right syrup thread consistency. Just mix the sugar of choice in the hot water, Add flavors such as cardamom, saffron, rose water or cinnamon. Add in almond flour (blanched works great) and pressure cook. Done and done. With pressure cooking, the sugar, water mixture thickens and the almond flour rehydrates very quickly.  Did I mention, you don’t need any butter or oil as well! Ok lets make this. If you double the recipe(which you will want to), add a minute to the pressure cooking time.Continue reading: Vegan Almond Halwa – Instant Pot Badam Halwa (No Oil)The post Vegan Almond Halwa – Instant Pot Badam Halwa (No Oil) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Shepherd’s Pie

September 30 2019 Meatless Monday 

Theres nothing more comforting on a cool autumn day than a heaping scoopful of shepherds pie. This recipe is a blessing for those who want to recreate the decadent taste and texture of this classic dish without using any animal products. A layer of creamy mashed potatoes sits atop a rich filling of diced cremini or baby Portobello mushrooms, lentils, and vegetables. This recipe comes from Anne Hernandez, co-founder of Urban Homestead, an online magazine that focuses on holistic remedies and healthy eating, and one of the finalists of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 8 - Mashed Potato Topping - 5 Pounds Russet Potatoes peeled & cut into 1-inch cubes - 1/­­2 Tablespoon Salt - 2-4 Tablespoons Vegan Butter - 1 teaspoon Dry Mustard Powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon Pepper or to taste - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons Salt to taste   - Filling - 2 1/­­2 Tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil - 1 Medium Onion diced - 3 Cloves Garlic minced - 1 Cup Baby Portobello/­­Crimini Mushrooms diced small - 2 Tablespoons Flour - 1 teaspoon Parsley dried - 1 teaspoon Thyme dried - 1/­­2 teaspoon Rosemary dried - 1 Bay Leaf - 1 Cup Red Wine - 2 1/­­2 Tablespoons Tomato Paste - 1 1/­­2 Cups Vegetable Broth or Stock - 1 Pound Lentils cooked - 28 Ounce Frozen Mixed Vegetables - Salt & Pepper to taste   Instructions Mashed Potato Topping Cover the peeled & cubed potatoes with cold water in a large saucepan. Sprinkle with 1/­­2 Tablespoon of salt and turn the heat to high. Once the water starts to boil, partially cover with the lid, reduce the heat to low and simmer for about 10 minutes or until the potatoes are soft. Put a colander over a heat-proof bowl and drain the potatoes, reserving the potato water. Return the potatoes to the saucepan and mash with a potato masher. Stir in the dry mustard, salt, pepper, and vegan butter. Add the potato water 1/­­2 cup at a time, mixing thoroughly with each addition, until the mashed potatoes have a slightly loose consistency (but not runny). Set aside. Filling Preheat oven to 400 F. In a large oven-proof skillet, heat olive oil until shimmering over medium heat. Add the onions and cook for 2 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for a minute longer. Add the mushrooms, season all with salt & pepper, and cook for 2 more minutes. Stir the flour, parsley, thyme, and rosemary into the mushroom mixture until evenly coated for at least a minute to cook the flour. Add the wine and cooked lentils (I used Trader Joes). Cook until most of the wine is reduced and absorbed. Whisk the tomato sauce into the vegetable broth and add with the frozen vegetables and bay leaf, stirring to combine. Simmer for 5 minutes then remove from the heat. Discard the bay leaf. If youre feeding a large crowd, leave the mixture in the skillet. If youd rather split the recipe into 2 pie plates, now is the time to do it. Follow the recipe but only bake one of the pies and freeze the other for another day. Top the filling with the mashed potatoes. You can spoon it on and spread carefully as to not mix in the filling or gravy, or use a piping bag to get fancy. Bake in the pre-heated oven for 15 minutes or until the potatoes are lightly browned. Remove the pie from the oven and let it rest for 15 minutes before serving. The post Vegan Shepherd’s Pie appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Easy Rosé Pasta Sauce

July 24 2019 Oh My Veggies 

This rosé sauce is perfect for pasta. It’s simple to make and extremely tasty!    

Fruit Shrub, The Most Refreshing Summer Drink

June 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Fruit Shrub, The Most Refreshing Summer Drink And just like that, summer is here, and so is the very first heat wave. I’m deeply devoted to having warm and cozy drinks every day, but I’ve definitely been icing my matcha and superfood lattes for the past week or so. It also feels very nice to have something chilled and bubbly in the early evening, when it’s still light outside, and the sky is just beginning to turn pretty sunset colors. It’s those little details that make summer so special. For me, that something bubbly is usually kombucha, but I recently learned about fruit shrubs and fell in love. A shrub is a drinking vinegar syrup, which is delicious served over ice with seltzer or as a cocktail component. Today I’m specifically talking about fruit shrubs, which are so easy to make and last a while in the fridge. The flavor is definitely reminiscent of kombucha – fruity with a vinegary acidity, but the preparation requires much less patience than homemade booch. This is very much a no-recipe recipe, since it can be interpreted so many ways, with so many different fruit and aromatics. There’s a video explaining the whole process as well! Follow the ratio provided in the recipe below, using a combination of any of these ingredients. Experimenting with the flavors is the most fun part. Fruit Berries Blueberries Raspberries Strawberries Blackberries Etc. Stone Fruit Plums Peaches Nectarines Cherries Mangoes Etc. Other Apples Pears Pineapple Rhubarb Etc. Aromatics Spices Cinnamon Cloves Ginger (ideally fresh) Peppercorns (black or pink) Star anise Nutmeg Etc. Herbs Basil Mint Cilantro Rosemary Lemon thyme Lemon verbena Tarragon Etc. Citrus Lemon Lime Orange + their zest Etc. Fruit Shrub, The Most Refreshing Summer Drink   Print Serves: about 10-12 oz shrub syrup Ingredients 1 lb fruit of choice (see above for suggestions) ¾ - 1 cup sugar (I like to use raw cane sugar here) any aromatics of choice (see above for suggestions) - to taste 1 cup apple cider vinegar Instructions In a large bowl, combine the fruit and sugar, mixing well. Use a potato masher to gently mash up the fruit in order to get it to start releasing its juices and to break up the skins if present. Add the aromatics like bruised or chopped herbs, spices, citrus juice/­­zest, etc. Cover and set aside for at least 4 hours, or ideally refrigerate overnight, especially if using tougher fruit like apples, pears, rhubarb. Strain the fruit mixture through a fine mesh strainer, making sure to squeeze all the juices out of the pulp. Add the vinegar and mix well. Transfer to an airtight container and keep refrigerated. Enjoy your shrub by filling a glass with ice, adding a splash of the shrub, and topping it with seltzer and/­­or liquor of choice. Notes Most traditional shrub recipes call for a ratio of 1 cup sugar to 1 lb of fruit, but I find that ¾ cup of sugar is enough for me in most cases. This also largely depends on the initial sugar content of the fruit youre using. Experiment and see what you like! 3.5.3226 The post Fruit Shrub, The Most Refreshing Summer Drink appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie

May 15 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie Spring has been super rainy for us (it’s been raining for almost a full week now!), with only a sprinkling of a few nice days, so cozy food cravings are still in full swing around here. I seriously can’t wait until freezing cold smoothies, raw salads, and huge watermelon mono-meals regain their appeal, but I definitely don’t mind living on this pot pie til then :) It’s got almost all the comforting features of a traditional pot pie, but is made with bright spring produce and a blanket of thinly sliced vegetables instead of the more traditional pastry-based crust. Leeks, asparagus, peas, and spinach all made it into this pot pie in celebration of spring. There’s also quinoa for more substance and a stew-like texture, as well as carrots and zucchini. The crust is made up of thinly sliced potatoes (use new potatoes for the ultimate seasonal points) and zucchini. You could totally sub in your favorite pot pie pastry crust here if you’re looking for something even more substantial, store-bought biscuits would work too. Don’t be afraid to improvise and include other spring goodies that you might find around this time of year. Green garlic, spring onions, and ramps could replace some of the leeks. Quickly blanched fava beans could stand in for part of the peas. Chives can be used for garnish instead of scallions, and chive blossoms will always offer the most beautiful finish. Hope you enjoy this one :) Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie   Print technique adapted from The First Mess cookbook Serves: 6 Ingredients avocado oil or olive oil 2 leeks - white and pale parts only, thinly sliced 2 medium carrots - sliced into half-moons salt - to taste 3 medium zucchini - divided 5 garlic cloves - minced about ½ teaspoon each of dried herbs - such as thyme, rosemary, marjoram (you can use fresh herbs as well, about 1 tablespoon minced total) 1 tablespoon tomato paste ¼ cup uncooked quinoa freshly ground black pepper - to taste ½ cup dry white wine scant ¼ cup ground rolled oats or oat flour (gluten-free if needed) 2½ cups vegetable stock 1 small bunch asparagus - tough ends trimmed, cut into 1-inch pieces 4 cups baby spinach or other tender spring greens 8-10 oz fresh or frozen green peas 2 medium new potatoes or Yukon gold potatoes - thinly sliced into rounds on a mandoline fresh herbs - for garnishing Instructions Preheat the oven to 375° F (190° C). Warm a generous drizzle of oil in a soup pot or very deep pan over medium heat. Add the leeks, carrots, and a pinch of salt, and sauté for about 7 minutes, until the leeks are soft. Meanwhile, dice 2 of the zucchini into medium cubes and mandoline the remaining 1 zucchini into thin rounds, setting it aside together with the mandolined potatoes. Add the garlic, herbs, and tomato paste and stir to incorporate for about 30 seconds, until garlic is fragrant. Add the diced zucchini, quinoa, more salt, and pepper, and stir to incorporate. Pour in the wine and turn up the heat to a medium high. Let the wine cook off and absorb for 1-2 minutes. Add the ground oats/­­oat flour and the vegetable stock to the pot. Bring everything up to a simmer and cook for 3-5 minutes, stirring periodically, until the mixture is slightly thickened. Turn off the heat and let the pot sit off the heat for a few minutes, then stir in the asparagus, spinach, and peas, mixing to lightly wilt the spinach. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Spoon the stew into an oiled 9 x 9 baking dish (or a dish of a similar size), evening it out with a spoon. Arrange the mandolined potato and zucchini on top of the stew, overlapping them and alternating them in a pattern. Brush the vegetables with more oil and season with salt and pepper. Bake for 35-40 minutes, until the potato slices are fully cooked. Turn on your broiler on low and place the pot pie under the broiler for about 5 minutes, or until your crust is crispy, golden and blistered in places. Be careful not to burn the crust. Let the pot pie cool slightly and serve, garnished with fresh herbs. Notes You could divide the pot pie mixture and crust vegetables into small, single serve dishes or ramekins for individual pot pies. Just place the ramekins on a baking sheet and slide into the oven. 3.5.3226 The post Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Fudgy Sweet Potato Brownies

May 1 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Fudgy Sweet Potato Brownies I consider these to be snacking brownies, rather than full-on dessert brownies. They’re vegan, gluten-free, flourless, and pretty lightly sweetened. They depend on steamed sweet potato for much of their fudgyness and even some of their sweetness. In other words, they’re pretty virtuous as far as brownies go. But not too annoyingly so, since they’re still plenty delicious. They’d make for a great lunchbox snack for kids or a midnight bite for students. They freeze well, too, so it’s good to keep a batch in the freezer to satisfy any kind of sweet tooth emergency. We are huge fans of using sweet potatoes as an ingredient for good vegan desserts – see these truffles, this pudding, and this nougat. They do so many things: they bind, contribute moistness, add a bit of sweetness, but also largely act as a blank flavor slate. We are currently obsessed with steamed sweet potatoes and found that that method of cooking works beautifully for these brownies. Sweet potatoes come out incredibly silky when steamed, and the process also hydrates them quite a bit, which is crucial for that fudgyness in the brownies. Steaming generally cooks sweet potatoes faster than roasting them, so that’s another little bonus. Just a note that we used a Japanese, white-fleshed sweet potato for this photoshoot because that’s all they had at the store somehow. You can definitely use a regular, orange sweet potato. Hope you’ll give these a try! Have a great rest of your week :) Fudgy Sweet Potato Brownies   Print inspired by Minimalist Bakers black bean brownies Serves: 12 brownies Ingredients 2 tablespoons ground flax seeds 1 medium sweet potato - steamed until fork-tender and peeled 3 tablespoons olive oil or soft coconut oil, plus more for oiling the tin ½ teaspoon vanilla extract ¾ cup cocoa powder ¼ cup + 3 tablespoons coconut sugar 1½ teaspoons baking powder generous pinch of sea salt dairy-free dark chocolate chips - for topping optional: nuts, and/­­or coconut flakes - for topping (we also used rose petals, which should be added after baking) Instructions Preheat oven to 350°F (175° C). Prepare a 12 hole muffin tin by oiling each hole with olive oil or soft coconut oil. In a small bowl, combine the ground flax with 6 tablespoons of water. Whisk together and let sit while you prepare the rest of the ingredients. In a large bowl, mash the sweet potato until smooth. You should have about 1¾ - 2 cups of sweet potato flesh. Add the oil, vanilla, cocoa, sugar, baking powder, and salt to the bowl. Mix everything together until smooth. Fold in the flax mixture, which should be thickened to a raw egg-like consistency at this point. You can also do all this mashing and mixing in a food processor if you prefer. Distribute the brownie mixture in the oiled muffin tin, patting it down into the muffin holes somewhat evenly. I like to use slightly dampened hands for this, but you can also use a wetted spoon. Top each brownie with some chocolate chips and any other topping of choice, if using. Place in the oven and bake for 28-30 minutes, until the brownies are dry to the touch on the outside but still quite fudgy inside. Let cool for at least 20 minutes before removing the brownies from the pan. Keep refrigerated or frozen in an air-tight container. Notes These brownies are very mildly sweetened. If you prefer a sweeter brownie, I would recommend adjusting the amount of sugar to a full ½ cup. Since this is vegan batter, you can also safely taste it for sweetness before baking and adjust as needed. 3.5.3226 The post Fudgy Sweet Potato Brownies appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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