Rolle - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Palak (Spinach) Puri

Quick and Easy Hummus

Green Monster Smoothie

Carrot beans poriyal recipe | carrot beans thoran | carrot beans stir-fry










Rolle vegetarian recipes

Shortcut Apple Steel Cut Oats + A Day of Eating Video

December 6 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Shortcut Apple Steel Cut Oats + A Day of Eating Video Hi friends! Today we’re sharing a new video as part of a video series we are working on, where well be going through a whole day of plant-based meals, as well as little tricks, ideas, and inspirations around the kitchen. We’ve always been fascinated with peoples everyday routines (which is why we have the self-care interview series), and we love getting a peak at how they sustain themselves throughout the day, so we thought it would be fun to film something similar. Todays video has a shortcut recipe for creamy steel cut oats, as well as ideas for lunch, a pick-me-up hot chocolate, dinner, and an end of day treat. All the recipes mentioned in the video are linked below. Let us know what you think! Ever since I discovered steel cut oats, I haven’t been able to go back to rolled oats for porridge purposes. They just seem so sad and mushy, compared to the al dente, textured goodness that are steel cut oats. The only thing that puts steel cut oats at a disadvantage is that they take a while to cook – 30 or so minutes, which is an amount of time that most busy people don’t have in the mornings. Thankfully, there’s a shortcut! It involves quickly bringing your steel cut oats to a boil the night before and leaving them to sit overnight, and you end up with a pot of creamy, dreamy oats in the morning. In the fall, I like to have them with apples, but the possibilities for flavoring and toppings are endless here. Here are all the other recipes mentioned in the video: Nettle Infusion – full of vitamins and minerals, great for hair, nails, and skin, and I actually like the taste, too. Harissa – a powerful, North African condiment that can really take a meal to the next level. Our Plant-Based Meal Plan – the link is to the most recent meal plan we posted, but you can also see all of our meal plans here. Black Bean Sweet Potato Soup – this is such a cozy, fall soup (that uses harissa!) Tahini Hot Chocolate – I drink a variation of this drink every day that I’m working from home. It’s a great pick-me-up, and full of healthful ingredients, too. Red Lentil Stew – this Ottolenghi recipe is so solid and delicious. We also have a step-by-step, no-recipe red lentil soup recipe saved in our Instagram highlights. Shortcut Apple Steel Cut Oats   Print Serves: 1 Ingredients ¼ cup steel cut oats pinch of sea salt a few shakes of cinnamon, or to taste 1¾ cup water 1 apple lemon juice (optional) 2 teaspoons coconut sugar (optional) plant milk of choice - for reheating (optional) hemp hearts or other nuts or seeds - for sprinkling on top almond butter - for garnish Instructions The night before you want steel cut oats for breakfast, combine the steel cut oats, salt, cinnamon, and water in a pot with a lid. Place the pot over high heat and bring up to a boil. Turn off the heat immediately as the oats start boiling. Leave the pot with the oats to sit on the stove top, covered, until morning. In the morning, the oats will be cooked and creamy. The next morning, cut your apple in half and core. Grate half of the apple and mix it into the pot with the oats. Slice or cube the other half of the apple, for topping the porridge. Optionally, mix the apple slices/­­cubes with a few squeezes of lemon juice and coconut sugar for a more impactful topping. Reheat the oats with the grated apple over medium high heat, mixing regularly. If the oats seem too watery, cook them for about 5 minutes, and theyll thicken up. On the other hand, if youd like the oats to be more creamy, reheat them with a splash of plant milk or water for a creamier consistency. Serve, topped with sliced apple, hemp heart or other nuts/­­seeds, and almond butter. Notes This recipe is highly customizable: use any seasonal fruits or berries you have on hand in place of apples, mix in cacao powder and top with banana for chocolate oats, switch up the toppings...the possibilities are endless! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sprouted Spelt Pancackes Sweet Potato Buckwheat Snack Bars with Cardamom Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Shortcut Apple Steel Cut Oats + A Day of Eating Video appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Christmas Breakfast with Pom & Flora

December 4 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Christmas Breakfast with Pom & Flora Last week we biked over to our friends Anna & Rasmus. They run two super cozy and popular cafes in Stockholm called Pom & Flora. Together we made a Christmas inspired breakfast with Saffron Buns, Lingonberry Smoothie Bowls, Gingerbread Truffles, Xmas Tree Smoothie and their signature Christmas Saffron Porridge. Our Elsa and their son Henry helped out with the food and they also gave the cafe a Christmas decoration touch-up . We recorded this little video from that morning. You can find all the recipes from the video below. We will be back soon with a savory Christmas recipe roundup. xo Lucia Saffron Buns Lussebullar Makes around 24 large buns For a vegan version simply replace butter with coconut oil + almond butter and quark with a vegan soft cheese alternative or yogurt. 50 g fresh active yeast or 1 tbsp dry active yeast 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1 g (2 sachets) saffron powder 120 g organic butter (or 100 g coconut oil + 20 g almond butter) 2 cups milk of choice (oat milk, rice milk, cow’s milk or soy milk) 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup coconut sugar or maple syrup 250 g /­­ 1 cup quark cheese, greek yogurt or vegan yogurt 800 g /­­ 7 cups flour (we use half light and half whole grain) 50 raisins (approx. 1/­­3 cup) Brush with 1 egg yolk, beaten  (use plant milk for vegan alternative) Crumble the yeast in a large mixing bowl. Melt butter in a medium size sauce pan, then add milk, sugar or maple syrup and saffron and heat until 37°C /­­ 98°F. Pour the mixture into the mixing bowl with yeast. Add quark cheese and stir around until dissolved. Add 2/­­3 of the flour. Stir around with a wooden spoon until it is thick enough to knead with your hands. Add more flour until the dough is easy to work with and has formed into a round ball that doesnt stick to your hands. Cover the bowl with a kitchen cloth and leave to rise in a warm place for about an hour, or until double in size and full of air pockets. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface and knead for a minute, form it into the shape of a baguette. Divide it into 24 equal pieces and, using your hands, roll each piece into a long 1/­­2-inch ( about 1 cm) thick string. Then roll both ends tight in opposite direction into an S-shaped bun. Place buns, well spaced apart, on 2 baking sheets, cover with a cloth and set aside in a warm spot to rise for about 30 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 440°F (225°C). Brush the buns with an egg yolk or milk and then place one raisin in each circle. Bake the buns until golden brown on top, about 5-8 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack to let cool slightly. Serve! Xmas Tree Smoothie 2 glasses 2-3 large kale leaves, stems removed 1 banana 2 dates 1 tbsp hazelnut butter 250 ml /­­ 1 cup oat milk or plant milk of choice 1/­­2 lemon, juice 2 tsp freshly grated ginger 1 tsp ground cinnamon To serve 1 tbsp shredded coconut snow 2 spruce sprigs Place all ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth and creamy. Taste and adjust the flavours to your liking. Serve in to glasses and sprinkle with coconut snow and decorate with spruce sprigs. Lingonberry Smoothie Bowl Serves 2 2 frozen bananas (sliced)  250 ml /­­ 1 cup oat milk or milk of choice, more if needed 500 ml /­­ 2 cups frozen lingon berries 1 tsp ground cardamom 2 tbsp tahini (sesame paste) For serving 2 tbsp toasted buckwheat  2 tbsp desiccated coconut Start by blitzing the coconut in a food processor so it looks like tiny snow flakes, then set aside. Add all smoothie bowl ingredients to the food processor and blend until smooth and thick like a soft serve. Spoon into two bowls and serve with toasted buckwheat and the coconut snow flakes. Pom’s Christmas Porridge Serves 4 500 ml /­­ 2 cups oat milk 250 ml /­­ 1 cup water 1 tsp ground cardamom 1 pinch sea salt 100 g /­­ 1 cup steel cut oats 100 g /­­ 1 cup rolled oats 0,5 g ground saffron (1 sachet) 2 tbsp raisins 2 tbsp dried cranberries   For serving  4 tbsp mascarpone 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup foamed oat milk Place oat milk, water, cardamom and salt in a saucepan and bring to the boil. Add the steel cut oats and whisk to combine, bring to the boil, lower the heat and then add the rolled oats, saffran, raisins and cranberries and let simmer for 6-8 minutes. Turn off the heat and let the porridge sit for a couple of minutes before serving. When ready, spoon into two bowls and serve with mascarpone and foamed oat milk. Gingerbread truffles Makes 20 truffles 16 soft dates, pitted 60 g almonds 2 tbsp coconut oil 1/­­2 tsp ground ginger 1/­­2 tsp cinnamon 1/­­2 tsp cardamom 1/­­2 tsp allspice 1 pinch cloves 1/­­4 tsp salt For rolling 50 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup desiccated coconut 50 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup desiccated coconut mixed with 1/­­2 tsp beetroot powder Mix all the ingredients in a food processor for about 1 minute or until it forms up like a ball. If using dried dates, you can soak them in hot water for 30 minutes before adding them to the food processor. Remove the knife blades from the food processor. Place the mixture in the fridge for about 10 minutes, if it is too sticky to form, it depends on how sticky the dates are. Then form 15 - 20 small round truffles with your hands. Roll half of the truffles in shredded coconut and the other half in shredded coconut mixed with beetroot powder for a red colour. If the coconut doesnt stick, you can dip the truffles in cold water before rolling them in the coconut. Serve or store in the fridge. ******* Here is also our last video from when we went out in the forest foraging mushrooms with our friend Niki, cooked over open fire and forgot to bring anything to eat from/­­with :)

oats idli recipe | instant oats idli | steamed oatmeal idli

November 15 2018 hebbar's kitchen 

oats idli recipe | instant oats idli | steamed oatmeal idlioats idli recipe | instant oats idli | steamed oatmeal idli with step by step photo and video recipe. idli recipes are very common across india and especially in southern india. due to its popularity, there has been a lot of variations and types of idli recipe which can be cherished for breakfast. one such fusion recipe is oats idli recipe made with powdered quick rolled oats, which can easily served with chutney and sambar. The post oats idli recipe | instant oats idli | steamed oatmeal idli appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Crispy Shakarpara (Almond Biscuit) Recipe

November 11 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Crispy Shakarpara (Almond Biscuit) Recipe (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Crispy Shakarpara A traditional tea-time biscuit-like snack often made during festive occasions, shakarpara is the perfect sweet for any gathering. They are deep-fried sugar crisps with almonds and hint of cardamom, which adds to their unique flavor. This is one of those snacks that you wont be able to stop munching on.  - 1 cup all-purpose flour (maida, plain flour) - 2 Tbsp fine sooji (semolina) - 1/­­8 tsp salt - 1/­­8 tsp baking soda - 2 Tbsp oil - 1/­­4 tsp cardamom powder (ilachi) - 3 Tbsp sliced almonds - 4 Tbsp sugar - 1/­­4 cup water (use as needed) -  Mix flour, sooji, sugar, salt, baking soda, cardamom powder, almonds and oil in a bowl and make a stiff dough adding water slowly as needed. Knead it well. Cover the dough and set aside for 15 minutes or more. - Take the dough and make a flat ball shape. Rolling into about 9-inch square, then with fingers try to give a square shape. Fold in fours, roll it again and fold, do this three times. Use dry four as needed to help rolling. - Cut the rolled dough into about inch square. Note: you can cut them in your desire shape. - Heat the oil in a frying pan on low medium heat. - The frying pan should have at least 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put a small piece of dough in the oil. The dough should make the oil sizzle and come up slowly. Dont over crowed the frying pan, you should be able to turn them easily. -  Keep stirring occasionally, fry the shakkar paras until both sides are golden-brown. Frying time should be about 6-8 minutes. -  Let the shakkar paras comes to the room temperature,  they should be crisp. Notes: don’t fry shakerparas on high heat otherwise they will be soft.  Shakarpara are a perfect gifting idea for the holiday season since they have a long shelf life. The post Crispy Shakarpara (Almond Biscuit) Recipe appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

oat cookies recipe | oatmeal cookie recipe | oatmeal raisin cookies

October 31 2018 hebbar's kitchen 

oat cookies recipe | oatmeal cookie recipe | oatmeal raisin cookiesoat cookies recipe | oatmeal cookie recipe | oatmeal raisin cookies with step by step photo and video recipe. cookies or biscuits have become an integral part of many indian households. it is generally consumed as a snack or perhaps dipped in a cup of tea or coffee before consuming it. one such healthy and tasty cookies recipes are oat cookie made with rolled oats with raisin and choco chips. The post oat cookies recipe | oatmeal cookie recipe | oatmeal raisin cookies appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri

October 20 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri Sana on the left Sana Javeri Kadri is the founder of Diaspora Co., a radically different spice collective dedicated to equity, sustainable agriculture, and decolonization. We’ve been fortunate to try Diaspora’s heirloom, organic, single-origin turmeric powder, and let’s just say it’s going to be very hard to go back to enjoying any other powdered turmeric ever again. Sana lives between Mumbai and Oakland, California. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I crave routine and am most productive when Im following a routine. However, Im unable to do deep thinking work or larger creative work in the middle of a hectic routine, so I like to keep at least one day of the week wide open for creative projects and giving myself the time and space I need to create something important. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I have been trying really hard to wake up, spend as little time on my phone as possible and then make myself a nourishing drink and most importantly, make myself some breakfast. One of my worst habits is to wake up, get on my phone, start responding to emails and then quickly get changed for work and dive straight into a full workday without taking any time to nourish myself or check in with my body. It means that by 1pm Im starving, cranky and already tired for the day. The life changing power of breakfast is something Im still learning… -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My girlfriend and I try not to spend too much time on our phones before bed, or looking at a screen. She recently introduced a 20 mins of reading before bed practice that were trying to stick to, its my favorite way to wind down and Im committing to not responding to work emails at 10:45pm, even if its 11:15am in Mumbai and my team there is just getting fired up. Work in progress. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  My therapist guides me into mindfulness during our sessions every week because I often come in feeling stressed, frantic and a bit fragile. Shes always able to help me get back in touch with my body and begin to feel grounded again. At her urging, I handle all my stressful work calls or emails sitting outside in the sunshine, ideally with my bare feet in the ground. This practice of grounding has been particularly helpful to me in the past few months of managing a stressful season. I also recently downloaded the Headspace app, and just the five minutes everyday of meditation has made a huge difference to me. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – In Oakland – Bread srsly gluten free sourdough, crispy fried egg cooked in ghee topped with smoked paprika, turmeric and salt, sliced avocado or smoky pinto beans or sliced tomatoes or any veggie leftovers I can wrangle from the fridge, maybe a slice of bacon if Im wanting some extra fat. In Mumbai – a loaded crispy veggie dosa. Either way, I love hot and savory breakfast. The cold and sweet breakfast tradition isnt common in India so, cereal and granola with milk culture is something I find very odd about the United States. Lunch – Leftovers express. My girlfriend and I both work long hours, so our saving grace is prepping large meals a couple times a week and then subsisting on leftovers. Gluten-free pasta with canned early girls (I can 80 lb every summer so that we never have to buy store bought tomato sauce) with every vegetable in the fridge/­­our imperfect produce box and ground beef is a family classic. Rosie is always joking that my stomach doubles when it comes to pasta and shrinks for everything else. Shes not wrong. Snack – My favorite snack is stovetop popcorn. Growing up in Mumbai we never had a microwave, it was my parents most loathed kitchen appliance. So now Im following that tradition of never owning a microwave. My favorite stovetop popcorn is popped in ghee and then topped with nutritional yeast, turmeric, and salt. Its perfect. Dinner - My perfect dinner is khichdi (spiced rice and lentils cooked in ghee and heavy on the ginger, turmeric and cumin), thick full fat yogurt, masala okra, a little bit of pickle (Brooklyn Delhi achaars are divine) and a side of spicy amaranth battered fish. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I used to do caffeine, in a delicious ghee, turmeric, cardamom and coconut sugar concoction, but over time Ive stopped being able to handle it. It started to make my stomach hurt and made me anxious. So I now drink either matcha with rice milk and date syrup, or hot chocolate with hemp oil, coconut sugar and adaptogens if Im needing the extra nourishment. Some days, if Ive slept enough and rested enough, I do better on just water and breakfast, no extra boost needed. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? I had a notorious sweet tooth all the way until my early twenties – I couldnt be trusted with bars of chocolate and was known to sneak spoonfuls of cake first thing in the morning. However the older Ive gotten (Im still technically in the early twenties), sweets just give me a sugar crash and make me feel sluggish. As an avid lover of food, Id rather eat plenty of things that make me feel fantastic, than the things that make me feel terrible. Both Rosie and I have been surprised and how quickly our respective sweet tooths have disappeared since we started living together, and how easily weve been able to cut out sugar from our life once we could verbalize how terrible it made us feel. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I swear by cannabis tinctures. Im not big on cannabis in other ways, but I find cannabis to be the only way to really deal with chronic pain. Ive also started using Super Good Hemps Turmeric Full Spectrum Hemp Oil in my morning drinks, and I find that it has similar effects. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I used to weight lift and do Crossfit pretty intensely, but had a really awful injury in 2016. Since then, Ive really had to reframe my definition of exercise. Now, I consider it an extension of my healing process. Intense exercise just isnt possible for me in the same way, so I stick to swimming as often as I can (usually a couple times a week), doing Nike Training body weight workouts at home, and talking our dog for a long walk every evening. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I love exercise and do best when Im outside and moving my body. Rosie and I try to take our pup Lilly out for a hike at least once a week, and we notice how much more present are with each other and our work when weve exercised.  That being said, Im also an incredibly competitive person, so reframing exercise to no longer be an intensely competitive thing has been very hard for me. I find it difficult to work up the enthusiasm to go on a leisurely swim, without a team to train with, or a competition to work towards. Switching off my producing strategy is my biggest challenge. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Both! It took me a long time to love my face, acknowledge that it was beautiful despite not looking like everything I saw on magazines and on billboards. But that acceptance and love for my external beauty definitely came from tending to, and growing confidence in my inner beauty. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I grew up using raw honey as a face cleanser, handmade ayurvedic soaps for my body, and a mom who never used makeup. So that has informed a lot of my skincare today. My skincare guru is 300% Abena, the founder of Hanahana Beauty, I use her shea butter exfoliating body bar and swear by it, and I use Abenas recipe for a rose water, tea tree oil and jojoba oil soaked cotton pad as a cleanser morning and night, and it has been a complete game changer for getting my glow back. Ive also been using Curology, which is a custom dermatologist service, that is super affordable and came highly recommended by friends. They prescribed me their night cream, which has really taken care of my breakouts and blackheads. Im not usually big on using chemicals on my skin but have found Curology to be a minimalist option that really works. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Cutting out sugar and gluten entirely is the most obvious one – I break out as soon as I am eating sugar, so its first to go. I also use a turmeric, honey, hemp oil and cornmeal face mask every couple weeks that always makes me feel radiant. My dentist has noticed and commented on the huge difference in my teeth that shes seen since I stopped drinking coffee – theyre whiter than ever before and need much less cleaning, which for me is reason enough to skip the coffee. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Abenas DIY rose water, jojoba oil and tea tree oil cotton pads! I used to be a ardent fan of Thayers Rose Witch Hazel Toner but in my experience with skincare – once you go DIY, its impossible to go back :) That being said – I will admit to being a Glossier believer, I didnt use makeup until I discovered Glossier concealer and highlighter. Its so easy and lazy but it works so wonderfully. Stress, Etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Taking our pup out for a long walk by the water is a really grounding activity for me. I have no idea how I managed my stress before she moved in with us. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Honestly Im a spokesperson for not really managing my stress well. My partner often comes home to a fuming, off the hook Sana and it takes significant chatting, massaging and cuddling to work me out of the state that I can get into if Im very stressed.  Im an extrovert and a peoples person so being around people that I love is my best coping mechanism. That being said – I have to be careful not to emotionally dump onto my loved ones, just because theyre willing to be there for me. Ive definitely been guilty of that in the past. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? The first one is to make sure I get a really good nights sleep, and make sure Im not drinking alcohol, eating dairy or any processed food. Usually, managing my sleep and diet is the easiest way to kick a cold before it hits. If the cold cant be stopped, I usually start by accepting that my bodys way of asking for rest is by getting sick, and its important to just honor that and completely rest. Then – turmeric, ginger, honey tea all day long.  -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Ive been trying really hard to take weekends off, and any weekend that I succeed at that- the balance feels so much better. Honestly, as a young business owner, the hustle is so glamorized and romanticized. Youre told that now is your time to grind, and to get further in your career. Whilst this is true, Id also argue that now is the time to establish healthy boundaries and habits in your life so you learn how to maximize your productivity and your potential. Any day that I work a 16 hour day (which is too often), I know that I am not focusing on the bigger picture, and am actually sacrificing my long term goals as a business owner. Remembering that, and focusing on working more effectively, rather than working more, has been a huge step towards achieving healthier work life balance. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Therapy. Every week, no matter what. That perspective and process is something Im deeply committed to. Therapy rarely feels easy, but it is always in service of myself and my larger goals, so its the easiest way to feel on track. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Eating based on how it makes me feel, not how it sounds or tastes. As soon as I focused on how it made me feel, my taste buds changed, I lost weight, my skin issues cleared and I became a very healthy person, with remarkable ease. I know how obnoxious that sounds, Im sorry. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I fly home to India. I know this is incredibly privileged, and a bit excessive, but shuffling back and forth between two continents constantly gives me a broader perspective, and somehow – the psychology of taking an international flight is an incredibly cathartic and productive experience for me. I almost always come back from my trips to India with fresh eyes, new vision and a bigger picture. Thats true for all travel, in my opinion. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. The fundamental line of Crossfit – eat meat and vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch and no sugar. has influenced my self nourishment beyond any book or movie. I may not be a competitive Crossfit athlete any more but eating to nourish my body is so much more fulfilling than eating to nourish my cravings. Knowledge --  What was your path to starting Diaspora Co.? You can read a lot more about that here, but long story short – Ive been working in the food industry since I moved to the United States in 2012 and I quickly noticed that whilst the farm to table movement felt at its zenith in the Bay Area, it only applied to certain things. Spices and imported foods were somehow excluded from those quality standards. The idea for a new kind of import export company formed in November 2016, and in February 2017 I quit my job and embarked on seven months of research visiting farms, research institutions and markets across India. Diaspora Co. was formally launched as a direct trade sustainable food company with our first offering of turmeric in August 2017. Its been a total rollercoaster since then. --  Can you tell us about the kind of turmeric you sell and how it differs from most turmeric one can buy at a store today? Im biased, but Im also overly honest so I dont think it would be an exaggeration to say that we sell the worlds best turmeric. Historically, there hasnt ever been a quality standard for how to define the highest quality, beyond arguments and branding largely based in exoticism and the colonizer/­­savior mindset. It is the freshest, as in it was harvested in 2018 and is milled every 3 months, versus powders that can be up to five years old and still on a grocery store shelf, stale as ever. It is the most potent variety of turmeric out there, with a tested 4.7% curcumin content. It is a fragrant and exceptional heirloom rhizome variety that compares to other turmeric powders out there as an heirloom summer tomato would to a grocery store store tomato grown for storage not flavor. Finally, it is organically farmed in a spice agriculture landscape where pesticide overuse and residue is notorious. Phew! --  Can you tell us about your decision to pay your turmeric producer really well and about owning the fact that your product costs more because of this? I think part of our work is that what the industry considers paying our producer really well, we consider basic human dignity of paying a living wage and for the price of sustainability, flavor and honest work. If we didnt pay our partner farmers the prices that we do, they wouldnt have the power or the incentive to produce at the standard that they do. To me, this big word decolonizing really just means how are you going to empower the people around you who have historically been stripped of their power? Paying our farmers well is actually the easiest embodiment of our decolonizing mission. As for owning our higher prices – we simply couldnt exist without charging what we do. And ultimately, were dedicating to riding the fine line between being affordable to the home cook and being a leader of sustainability and supply chains and therefore being regarded as a luxury product. I have to believe that we can do both. Turmeric latte blends or turmeric centered businesses that dont want to pay our prices or wholesale from us because theyd like to continue to exploit their sources and maintain their ridiculously high margins, Im in this for the long game and their reckoning will come. It always does. Apologies if I sound cold and jaded, business is vicious and Ive had to steel parts of myself to tolerate it all. --  What are some of your favorite ways to use Diaspora Co. turmeric? Honestly, turmeric was so woven into the fabric of my childhood that it was invisible to me. We cooked with it, made beauty treatments with it, and we used it to mark life and death. So even now, my favorite way to use turmeric is still in simple Indian vegetable dishes – lightly cooked okra tossed in cumin, turmeric and salt is the definition of comfort for me, or a coconut milk turmeric chicken broth with squash and long beans. Comforting, vegetable heavy home cooking is how I innately know how to use turmeric. Lattes just arent for me. --  We love your photos! How did you become a photographer? When I was 14 and going through a really tough phase at school (bullying, puberty, the patriarchy et all), my parents taught me how to use their DSLR. Ive used photography as the lens through which I make sense of and connect with the world ever since. When my academic pursuits turned to food and agriculture in college, my lens turned to it too. In so many ways, I recognize that I was never particularly talented or the best or the brightest, I was always just a really solid worker, and entirely self motivated, and that meant that once I started photographing, I just never stopped, and now here we are. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Ive found that balancing my role as a business owner with my role as a photographer is what gives me the most joy professionally. So I have a couple exciting photo shoots planned for the coming months that will be a welcome respite to the chaos of holiday e-commerce. That, and I havent seen my girlfriend and pup in almost a month since Ive been in India and I miss them terribly, so very excited to come home to my two favorite living beings. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Were so lucky to live in Oakland, where eating out is an incredible experience, especially at a time where women chefs are absolutely excelling in their field. So eating delicious meals by our favorite local women chefs is my favorite treat – Cosecha Cafe (Mexican), Nyum Bai (Cambodian), Champa Garden (Laotian) and 20th Century Cafe (Eastern European) to name a few.  -- A book to feed the soul:  I just finished reading Yvon Chounards Let My People Go Surfing and its been so deeply inspiring to me. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Akwaeke Emezi, they are my favorite writer, a member of this third culture/­­diaspora/­­immigrant excellence interweb community and has navigated their self care so beautifully and visibly through the years. Id love to learn more from them. Photos by Sana Javeri Kadri, Sophie Peoples, Assad Keval /­­/­­ This post contains Amazon Affiliate Links You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Ashley Neese Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Amanda Forcella Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Butternut Squash & Black Bean Enchiladas

October 8 2018 Meatless Monday 

For these seasonal enchiladas you can use either fresh butternut squash from your local farmers market or save time with pre-chopped squash from your grocery store’s produce section. Either way, youll have a great fall recipe: a little spicy, a little cheesy and lots of flavor. Round out the meal with a small side of rice and some fresh salsa. This recipe comes to us from Kelly of The Quotable Kitchen. Serves 5 - 2 teaspoons olive oil - 1/­­2 cup,  chopped onion - 4 cloves, minced garlic - 2 teaspoons taco Seasoning - 1 chopped red bell pepper - 1 can black beans (15.5 oz) - 3 cups butternut squash, cooked and chopped into small pieces - 10 medium flour tortillas - 2 – 10 oz cans enchilada sauce - 8 oz, shredded cheddar cheese - Cilantro – for topping   Preheat oven to 350°. Saute the onion and garlic in olive oil in a medium-sized pan over medium-high heat until onions are soft. Add in the taco seasoning, red bell pepper and black beans and saute for five minutes. Set aside. Pour one can of enchilada sauce in an oven-safe pan. To assemble the enchiladas: spoon 2 heaping tablespoons of the black bean mixture onto one tortilla. Top with 2 tablespoons chopped butternut squash and one tablespoon cheese. Roll up tightly and place in pan over the enchilada sauce. Repeat with remaining tortillas using any leftover butternut squash as a topping. Pour remaining can of enchilada sauce over the rolled enchiladas. Top with additional cheese and butternut squash (optional). Bake in preheated oven for twenty minutes until cheese is melted and enchilada sauce is hot. Garnish with fresh cilantro (optional) and serve over rice or with a small side salad to round out the meal. The post Butternut Squash & Black Bean Enchiladas appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Restaurant Highlight: Vx In London

October 3 2018 Happy Cow veggie blog 

London is truly a melting pot of tastes from all corners of the world. Every fleeting food interest that has crossed my mind while staying in the city has been quickly satisfied by a HappyCow search. Last time I passed through the city, my craving of the moment just happened to be vegan junk food. After consulting my maps, I was ecstatic but unsurprised to find that my longing would be fulfilled by a short walk. I strolled hungrily down the street from Kings Cross St. Pancras (home to the notorious Platform 9 3/­­4 from Harry Potter), listening to the tune of English accents that filled my ears with nostalgia. When I arrived to my destination, my jaw dropped with the realization that I had been to this café before. I vividly recalled this spot as the location of the hands-down best vegan chocolate cake I tasted when I lived in London four summers ago. The mouthwatering sight of its blueberry layer atop its moist, layered interior was forever etched into my memory. I stepped inside with delight, starving for a second taste. Vx may be dear to the hearts of many plant-based eaters who have crossed its path. As […] The post Restaurant Highlight: Vx In London appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Vegan Cardamom Cookies – Cardamom Snickerdoodles

September 4 2018 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Cardamom Cookies – Cardamom SnickerdoodlesEasy Vegan Cardamom Cookies. These soft cookies are a cross between cardamom shortbread and Snickerdoodles. Vegan Soyfree Palm Oil free Recipe. Glutenfree option.   Jump to Recipe If you love cardamom, you will love these cookies! Soft, melt in your mouth cookies that remind you of shortbread, snickerdoodle, and Indian Desserts, all rolled into one.  I use seeds from whole green cardamom pods and ground cardamom for extra flavor punch. The nut butter and almond flour add the texture. The cookie is easily refined sugar free and is palm oil free. Change up the spices to cinnamon, chai, pumpkin pie spice for variation.  Continue reading: Vegan Cardamom Cookies – Cardamom SnickerdoodlesThe post Vegan Cardamom Cookies – Cardamom Snickerdoodles appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Happy Mothers Day!!

May 12 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Happy Mothers Day!!Happy Mother’s Day to all the great mothers out there! As you know, this Sunday is the big day! I’m sure you are in the midst of planning something special for Mothers Day. Now that Spring is officially here and the weather has been great here in San Diego, I think a fun idea is to celebrate with a picnic. It’s an easy and simple way to enjoy the abundant sunshine and fresh air. My grandkids especially enjoy picnics because they can run around and use up their energy! We enjoying playing frisbee, soccer, and most importantly munching on delicious treats. When my grandkids get together there is always the sound of laughter. It means so much to me that I get to watch them. It’s the best excuse to bring the family together. Here are some ideas of delicious munchies to bring to a picnic: Bread Pakoras Puries rolled with Chatpate Aloo (spicy potato): Puri Chatpate Aloo Masala Mathri You can pair the above with a variety of chips, cookies and fruit. I also like to bring homemade lemonade to cool off. Lemonade The post Happy Mother’s Day!! appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Black Bean Brownie Bites

December 8 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Black Bean Brownie Bites The moment I placed these brownies in the oven, I started whining like a disgruntled teenager because Luise had persuaded me to only sweeten them with dates and mix a whole can of black beans into the batter. “They are going to taste like sh*t” might have been the carefully formulated phrase I used. Baking brownies was my idea to start with and I usually don’t complain about healthy desserts, but I was tired that day and my mind was set on the caramel-tasting brownies from the bakery across the street. More than the flavor, it was their texture I wanted to recreate. The crusty top and caramel fudge center that you only can achieve with sugar, butter and flour. I knew these would be far from that. And in my mind that was all Luise’s fault. The whining escalated into a discussion (aka argument) and by the time the timer on my phone rang, things were, well, kind of tense between us. I cut off a corner piece of the baked brownie and quickly realized that they weren’t as awful as I had expected. Of course when Luise asked me, I did what any 36-year old teenager would do and grunted: “They were okay I guess”. In reality, they were actually pretty good. They didn’t have that crusty texture or typical sugar taste but they were still sweet, gooey but not heavy, chocolatey, energy packed and rich. I added frosting to make them a little more sassy - using dates as sweetener and avocado and coconut oil for an ultra lush and creamy consistency. They turned out really beautiful and jam-packed with good stuff. Rather than a dessert, I’d say that this is more like an energy bar-style brownie, and I found myself sneaking back to the fridge several times that day for another bite. We’re sharing the recipe and some notes below. But first, check out this little video from our youtube channel where we demonstrate how to make them. Since that first batch of brownies, there have been at least six more batches. A few vegan attempts and various flavor and texture variations. I have gathered a few notes that might come useful in case you want to give them a try. - We use very soft fresh dates that we buy in card board boxes and they are pretty affordable compared to loose weight or medjool dates. Sizes differ so use a scale if you want to be exact. - If you can’t find fresh dates you can use dried dates that you soak in water for a couple of hours. Drain the water before mixing. However, I wouldn’t use dried dates for the frosting as they need the dates to be super soft to achieve a smooth consistency. Try maple syrup instead. - If you arent used to sugar free desserts, you can add a couple of tablespoons maple syrup, honey or sugar to the batter. We have tried this recipe both with and without additional sweetening and they taste good both ways. It all depends on what you are used to and your expectations are. - We use a quite mild olive oil and it works really well with the chocolate flavor (not strong at all). However, if you don’t like olive oil, you can use, coconut oil, rapeseed oil or butter instead. - We have also tried a vegan, egg-free version using aquafaba (chickpea water) that we are sharing at the bottom of the recipe. We also tried making aquafaba using black bean water (because it’s a rest product of the beans in the recipe). It didn’t firm up as much when whisked but it did work as a binder. However, it looked kinda gross and added more bean flavor so we decided to stick with chickpea water instead. - We add coffee to the frosting to disguise the avocado flavor. If you dont like coffee, you can use almond butter or peanut butter instead to give it a flavor twist. - Sea salt flakes are great on top and we love the salt + chocolate combo, but desiccated coconut would also look good. - If you are allergic to nuts, you can mix toasted sunflower seeds into a flour and use instead of almond flour. And use pumpkin seeds instead of walnuts. Black Bean Brownie Bites with Chocolate Avocado Frosting Makes 24 bites These taste sweet but not overly so, see notes above if you prefer to make them sweeter. Vegan version below. 20 soft dates (approx 230 g /­­ 8 oz) 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 185 g cooked black beans (rinsed) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml olive oil or other neutral oil 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml plant milk or regular milk 3 eggs 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50 g oat flour (or same amount rolled oats, mixed into a flour) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50 g almond flour 6 tbsp cacao powder 1 tsp baking powder 1 pinch salt 1 handful crushed walnuts (optional) Chocolate Avocado Frosting 6-8 soft dates 3 tbsp coconut oil 2-3 tbsp strong coffee 3 tbsp cacao powder 1 avocado Sprinkle with Sea salt Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 350°F. Pit the dates and add them to a food processor along with the rinsed black beans. Mix on high speed. Add oil, milk and eggs (leave out if you are vegan) and mix until smooth. Add almond flour and oat flour (you can make oat flour from rolled oats by simply blending them in a food processor or grinding them in a mortle and pester), cacao powder, baking powder and salt and pulse until everything is mixed. Stir in walnuts (and whipped aquafaba if you are making the vegan version). Place a baking paper in a 28 x 20 cm /­­ 11 x 8 inch rectangular baking dish and bake for 30 minutes. Remove the brownies from the oven once they are firm to touch and leave until completely cool. Make the frosting by mixing all the ingredients in a food processor until completely smooth. Taste and adjust the flavors, adding more dates (or maple syrup if you want it sweeter) and more cacao powder if you want it richer. Spread the frosting over the brownies, sprinkle with sea salt flakes and cut into bite-size pieces. Store in the fridge. To make them vegan: Use 3 tbsp more oat flour. Leave out the eggs and whisk 1/­­3 cup aquafaba (chickpea water) into soft peaks that you stir into the mixed batter together with the walnuts. The vegan version needs approx 45-50 minutes in the oven and will come out slightly stickier but firms up once it cools.

Vegan Cheesy Crackers

November 21 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Cheesy CrackersIts easy to find crackers without animal ingredients, unless of course, your favorite crackers happen to be the cheesy ones. Now you can make vegan Cheesy Crackers at home, complete with the delicious crunch and flavor you love but without the animal ingredients and additives.   Cheesy Crackers Now you can make vegan Cheesy Crackers at home, complete with the delicious crunch and flavor you love but without the animal ingredients and additives. - 1 cup all-purpose flour - 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast -  1/­­2 teaspoon baking powder -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt -  1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder -  1/­­4 teaspoon smoked paprika - ? teaspoon turmeric - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 tablespoon vegan butter - 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice - 5 to 6 tablespoons cold water, or more as needed - Preheat the oven to 350°F. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, nutritional yeast, baking powder, salt, garlic powder, smoked paprika, and turmeric. Mix well. Add the olive oil, butter, and lemon juice, mixing with a fork until the dough is fine and crumbly. Add the water a tablespoon at a time until the dough becomes cohesive. - Transfer the dough to a piece of parchment paper large enough to fit a large rimmed baking pan. (You can use a Silpat instead, if you have one.) Top the dough with another sheet of parchment paper and roll out the dough until thin, measuring about 11 x 13 inches. Transfer the parchment paper and rolled-out dough to a large rimmed baking sheet. Remove the top sheet of parchment paper and cut the rolled dough into 2-inch squares. If desired, remove any uneven pieces of dough from around the edges and press together into a small disk and roll it out to get more crackers that are a uniform size. (Otherwise, youll have a few partial crackers from around the end to nibble on!) - Bake for 15 to 17 minutes, or until the crackers are baked but not browned. The color should be golden. Cool completely on the baking sheet. These crackers keep well for a week in a sealed container at room temperature. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by William and Susan Brinson. Save Save The post Vegan Cheesy Crackers appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King

September 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Today’s self-care dialogue is with LA artist and meditation teacher, Lauren Spencer King. We first learned about Lauren a few years ago, when we came across her bimonthly moon writings that ring incredibly true and clear up a lot of things for us every month. Since then, we’ve fallen in love with Lauren’s art and meditation work, which is centered around breath work and her extensive knowledge about the healing powers of minerals. Lauren was kind enough to open up a space for us in her 4 day online meditation workshop for stress and anxiety, and we had the most lovely and calming time following her techniques and suggestions, which we often use to this day. Lauren’s self-care routine is as inspiring as it is down to earth, with a focus on finding the wisdom in the inner self. In this interview, Lauren tells us about the Ayurvedic cleanse she’s on, what minerals she keeps next to her bed, her ideas about exercise and beauty, why she sees the concept of a work-life balance as a myth, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think in my everyday things do feel open and free, its part of the benefit of being an artist and working for yourself. But, I do find routine within that freedom. Days are also made up of habits (good and bad), and trying to prioritize things that are important and meaningful. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I like to have a few hours to wake up and start my day. I like the quiet of the mornings, the possibility of a new day. Sometimes if I happen to wake up really early for some reason, like 5:00am, I like to read in bed for a bit, or watch a scary movie early in the morning. Its weird... I know. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? On good nights I am in bed early and read before I go to sleep. I love reading in bed, there is something about it that feels so intimate. On a not so good night I will work too late, and fall asleep to a movie. I do like to sleep with a few minerals next to my bed, some make their way under my pillow at certain times: purple fluorite to relax my mind, danburite for sweet dreams, aquamarine for calming, a piece of dream quartz, and a piece of shungite that is next to my phone (on airplane mode). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: I am on an Ayurvedic cleanse right now. I have been working with this great Ayurvedic practitioner, her name is Meredith Carter. Years ago I did panchakarma (here), and if I could afford it I would do it annually. Its incredible. What I am doing now is like panchakarma lite! Breakfast – In the morning I make homemade almond milk. I will warm the almond milk and mix in my herbs and adaptogens, sometimes I will add fresh turmeric. I have been obsessed with making sweet potato toasts. I will top them with tahini and a cooked fruit compote (been loving cherry, wild blueberry, or pear ginger), with some pistachio nuts or pumpkin seeds. If I need some protein then I will eat two eggs toped with basil, and a tangerine. Lunch – I make fresh dahl with special non-heating spices and ghee, all of which I get from Surya Spa, they have the best mung beans and spices. Dahl is very healing. I will have a bowl full with some steamed chard or beet greens, black lava sea salt, toasted pumpkin seeds and lots of parsley or coriander on top. Snack – right now cherries are in season and they are making me so happy, I will have a bowl full of them with a handful of pistachios (lets be honest, like 1/­­2 a bag, I love pistachios). And some fresh ginger tea. Or I will make some beet hummus and have that with my favorite almond crackers. Dinner – I have been getting really into making soups! My two favorite are a green soup made with celery /­­ chard /­­ beet greens /­­ asparagus /­­ Japanese sweet potato. And a kabocha /­­ carrot /­­ginger soup. Or I will cook a big artichoke and dip the leaves into a melted ghee, lemon dip. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? None, I have never even had a cup of coffee. I usually have a huge jar of warm water with lemon or fresh ginger in the morning. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to when I was younger, until I developed all sorts of health problems because of it, some that I still deal with even over a decade later. I was living in Paris and eating nothing but delicious breads and sweets! It really took a toll on my body and since then I have cut both out. But, I still dream of flaky French almond croissants. Maybe in another life I will get to enjoy them again. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I love eating a spoonful of Chyawanprash in the morning. My good friend who runs Rebbl and develops all of their delicious drinks sent me a wellness mixture, it has very high grade reshi, ashwaganda and maca in it. I have that every morning. I love QuintEssentials 3.3 minerals. I also swear by Alexis Smarts flower remedies, she is amazing! I also almost always tend to all ailments physical and emotional with a homeopathic remedy from her. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I have an aversion to most forms of exercise, especially any kind of class where an instructor is wearing a headset and yells things at you like, Its almost swimsuit season, ladies. But sometimes I get into a routine where I go to yoga. I like to take hikes and go on walks, and I love to dance. But, my favorite is swimming. Recently I was swimming laps, and was having one of those days where I was feeling very unkind and judgmental of my body, and there was this older man in the lane next to me, he was a very serious swimmer, he might have even been a swim coach at some point, you could just tell. And I stopped to catch my breathe and he asked me how I had such a strong breaststroke. I told him it was because I was on swim team for years as a kid and maybe because I was tall. We talked for a bit about it and then I got back to my laps. And I started to think that in day to day life what I criticize most about my body in other contexts I use to my advantage. In this case, that my un-slender legs and bigger hips and butt actually made me a stronger swimmer and made my stroke more powerful. It really changed the way I thought about my body. I try to remember this. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really love natural beauty, which to me means being whole and owning all of who you are. You know, there are times when I see someone crying, and they dont maybe look their best, but they are so beautiful to me, because they are so present and authentic. Bodies arent meant to be perfect, thats not why we have them. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love oils and go through different phases of them on my face and body. Right now at night I use a hazelnut or arnica oil from a Paris apothecary for my face. I am also completely obsessed with Sans Ceuticalss Activator 7 Oil. I use it everywhere – body, face and hair! I dont really wear make up but when I do it is from RMS. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I either dry brush or do abhyanga massage with basil oil every day, its more for the internal lymphatic system, but it makes my skin really nice. Eating well and drinking enough water are also key. And a little sun is always nice. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I love using my jade face roller to refine the tone of my skin as well as relieve some tension I carry in my jaw. I also am into my second year of no bra, for the most part. For a few reasons, one of them being that they actually arent good for your body. No products with chemicals. My mum was a natural beauty, she really taught me what that was, she had a style that was all her own. She was radiant from the inside out. I sometimes think this is something you are born with. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Stress is often what I teach most about in class, because it has been the biggest teacher to me. I feel I am always at a growing edge with it. I try not to over schedule myself. Rest is a big part of being healthy for me. I have gone through some very difficult periods in my life of having sever adrenal fatigue, which comes from stress of all kinds. So, I have to listen really carefully not to push myself too hard, despite at times wanting to ignore my limitations. Recently I have been working with someone to understand the deeper level of stress that I unconsciously take on from people around me and from living in a city. It has been fascinating. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Yes, sometimes stress can not be avoided, like when I have a show, or need to be on the computer all day, or travel. Those are the big ones for me. I have to really work hard to stay grounded. Its really all sorts of little things, that when I do them really add up. And I just do the best I can, its not about perfection. Even stopping to dance the stress out of my body for five minuets really helps. Stress is more physical than we think. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Stop everything. Get into bed in something comfy with socks. Sleeping as much as I can. Raw garlic. Olive Leaf supplements. Colloidal silver. Apple Cider Vinegar if I have a sore throat. Hot shower (or bath) with eucalyptus oil. Thieves oil on my chest and throat. Lots of water. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I honestly think this idea of work /­­ life balance is a myth. At least it is for me. Sometimes its only about working on Fields of Study, sometimes I am all about being in the studio, sometimes its more relaxing and I can see friends and go on a trip or a weekend getaway. There is balance within the year if I am lucky. I recently just let this idea go, I was making myself feel so bad trying to make that ideal happen on a daily or even weekly timeline. I am also a bit of a workaholic, never feeling like I am doing enough. Thats something I am trying to work on. But, this pressure for balance seems like a modern day version of the women can have it all mantra. There are always compromises and I think its more empowering if we own that and voice it and have conversations about it. Instead of silently thinking that there is something wrong with us. Motivation -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Its not one single thing, but if it was it would be learning to listen to my body. My health and understanding of health has come from a bumpy road of making lots little shifts. I dont believe in a one size fits all mentality for health. I think we are all different and in every moment we need different things. I am wary of the companies and self proclaimed health gurus out there right now that give sometimes ill informed blanket recommendations. I think it is up to us to empower ourselves and take the time to learn about our bodies and ourselves. Its important to have support and create a team of people that can help you. I have an amazing doctor, a homeopathist, an Ayurvedic practitioner, a woman who I do energy work with, and a therapist that have all at different times saved my life in various ways. It can take time, but finding the people that resonate with your understanding of health is key. I have learned so much about my body and what health and healing is from working with all of them. And remembering that deep and true healing takes time. Its always a process. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. What came to mind was this movie Agnes Martin made called Gabriel. Its terribly long and boring. It is about the boy on a walk in nature, and it is very stripped down and minimal, no dialog and most of the movie is silent, it has one tiny part with music. But, I think it relates to the way I think about self-care in a way because it is about listening to the subtleties, and how all of that gets lost when there is a lot going on. Once I really started refining my diet, routine, relationship to my energy, my intuition, etc... I started to really be able to notice those subtle changes and messages my body was sending me, and as time goes on I keep going deeper and deeper. Its like in Martins paintings, when color is introduced, it feels monumental. Like for me, bananas are just too sweet now. Knowledge -- You are well-versed in so many amazing practices! Could you tell us a little bit about each of them: – Your art (would love to know more about your process on the mineral paintings) After graduate school I started making my own watercolors out of historical pigments, mostly from minerals and some earth pigments. I taught myself how to make paints the way they were made for centuries before there were synthetic colors. The mineral monochromes are just one aspect of the work I make, and they are about many things. But, the main ones are a redirection of how we think about representation. I think of them as representational paintings, as they are made of the very thing they are depicting: malachite, azurite, agate, epidote... They are also about an interest in the healing powers of art. They are made with the intention that the viewer and the space receive the same healing properties of the minerals and the earth from which they are sourced. I usually pair them with a highly rendered graphite drawings or watercolors. –  Fields of Study and mineral meditations Some years back after teaching meditation for a bit I was longing for an alternative to what I was seeing in the ways of spiritual teachings and mediation work, both in approach and aesthetic. I wanted to support people and teach them tools they could use in their every day life, while also creating a container for all the things I was interested in and all the things that I brought into my own spiritual practice, which I feel I am always shaping and discovering. Something that would allow for a deep conversation that also had breadth, and was based in every day life and could be accessible. Something that could be malleable and evolve as I did. And Fields of Study was born. I originally wanted to open up a non-profit space that would be like a modern day community center with classes and workshops for the community, as well as have a little shop and a residency space. And someday this might happen. But for now its just me – working to change the world, one person at a time. I say this with some humor, but its also a very real desire to be in service and help instigate change. The same goes for how I teach about minerals, I want to present an alternative, something that resonates with me and represents how I grew up with minerals in my home because of my mother, who was a silversmith. The goal of all those workshops is really to show people that they know more than they think they do, about most things, minerals included. And its not really about helping people feel like they know everything, but showing them that when they ask and they trust themselves they can source the answers. The participants really end up teaching the workshop, which I think is pretty amazing. – Your Moon writings I have been writing about the moon twice a month for about six years now. It really came out of a desire to understand its energy on a deeper level, and also to check in with myself about what I was feeling on a bimonthly basis. Its hard to take credit for the writing as I feel I have gotten to a place with it where I just sit down to write and something comes through me. As out there as that sounds, thats really what happens. I just listen as best as I can, I have gotten pretty good at listening. Writing in this way has really strengthened my intuition, its really incredible. Its also nice to get conformations from people when they write to tell me how right on it was for them. It reminds me that we are all connected. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Swimming in the ocean. The hot springs in Ojai or a trip to Joshua Tree. A bad movie. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Golden Bough and She by Robert A Johnson Song/­­Album – Gamelan Orchestra music, JD Emmanuel, and Neil Youngs album Harvest Moon, particularly Natural Beauty. Its my favorite song. Movie – The Color of Pomegranates Piece of Art – Fragonard, Brancusi, and John McCracken. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Funny enough I just re-read this essay from The White Album where she talks about her packing list related to her being a journalist. At the very end she mentions that the one thing she never had was a watch, which she supposes is some reflection of the climate of the late 60s. But, a watch is the thing I always have, perhaps that says something about me and the times we are living in now. When I travel I also always wear this gold Victorian compass. You never know when you will have to find your way home. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? My Ayurvedic practitioner – Meredith Carter, my Homeopath – Alexis Smart, or anyone of the ladies on the @onigiriemoji Instagram feed I am a part of. Its a feed where a group of friends post what they are cooking and eating. Also, I wish you could have interviewed my mum, she was the best cook, I wish I learned more about cooking from her. Photos by Lauren Spencer King, Claire Cottrell and from Lauren’s shop. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Baked Apples with Spiced Oatmeal

August 26 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Baked Apples with Spiced Oatmeal Just checking in quickly today to share a nice little apple breakfast recipe that we have been making a lot lately. We know that August hasnt ended yet and we all want to hold on to summer for as long as we can and pretend that winter isnt coming. But we thought we’d provide you with a little something for when the first chillier days arrive (which has already happened here btw) and you hear raindrops come knocking on your window sills. For those moments, you can just bust these baked apples out of the oven, let the scent of warm cinnamon spread through your home and immediately feel a little better about the whole situation. We have been making variations of this both as breakfast and dessert - filling them with oatmeal topped with yogurt for breakfast, and a date and almond paste topped with whipped cream for dessert. The idea to pimp regular oatmeal/­­porridge by stuffing it inside baked apples is pretty great in its simplicity. But here we make it a tad more special and extra delicious by cooking the oatmeal with pure apple juice/­­cider, spices, butter or coconut oil and chopped almonds for extra rich flavor and texture. We then top the baked apples with a thick yogurt and drizzle with ginger honey for sweetness. And if you’ve got a little nut butter at home, that’s also good on top. Always use local apples if they are available and in season, they taste way better! Id love to chat more, but it was my birthday yesterday and Luise surprised me with a dinner, sleepover and breakfast at Stedsans in the Woods. It’s a restaurant in the middle of the Swedish forest with great food, beduin tents, outdoor showers and a floating sauna. So we’re pretty eager to experience it. I’ll probably share a few snaps on my Instagram stories later tonight, if you want to check it out. Oh, and if you have the feels for more apple recipes, check out these ones from our blog archive: o Apple, Almond & Buckwheat Muffins o Apple & Cinnamon Tray Cake o Chia Parfait & Apple Crunch o Hazelnut, Chocolate & Apple Buns o Apple & Oat Biscuits Baked Apples with Spiced Oatmeal and Ginger Honey We made this recipe with 10 apples because we wanted to make a large batch, but you can just as well make it for two or four people by reducing the amounts. 10 apples juice from 1/­­2 lemon Apple Oatmeal 1 cup rolled oats 1 cup unfiltered and unsweetened apple juice/­­cider (or milk of choice or water) 1 1/­­2 cup water 2 tbsp almonds, finely chopped 1/­­2 tsp ground cinnamon 1/­­2 tsp freshly ground cardamom 1/­­4 tsp ground vanilla 3 tbsp butter (or coconut oil) 10-15 almonds, chopped a large pinch salt Serve 1 cup full-fat greek yogurt (or coconut yogurt) Ginger Honey (simply stir lots of freshly grated ginger into honey over low heat) 10-15 almonds, chopped ground cinnamon Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400 °F. Prepare the apples by cutting off the top and then, using a sharp small knife or apple corer, scoop out the seeds and core in the center of each apple. Use a small spoon to scoop out enough apple flesh to make room for the porridge. (The flesh can be chopped and mixed into the oatmeal before filling the apples). Rub the inside of the apples with a little lemon juice and place them in a baking tray with high sides. Add all the oatmeal ingredients except butter and to a medium sized sauce pan and bring to a boil while stirring. Lower the heat and cook until creamy. Stir in the butter (or coconut oil) and almonds towards the end and then fill the apples with the oatmeal, top with a pinch extra cinnamon and put the apple tops back on. Add 2 tbsp water to the bottom of the baking tray and bake for 25-30 minutes or until the apples are soft. Keep an eye on the oven as different apple varieties need different baking time. Serve the apples on a plate, topped with a dollop yogurt, chopped almonds, cinnamon and a drizzle of ginger honey.

Our Favorite Gua Sha Routine – Video

November 11 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Our Favorite Gua Sha Routine – Video Today, we thought it would be fun to share a video on our favorite, slow and gentle way to do gua sha, the facial massage that has its roots in Chinese medicine. Facial gua sha is a beauty treatment, but I try to give it more credit than that. The practice has the potential to be meditative, is incredibly relaxing, and yes, a direct route to some simple self-love. To me, it’s all about the meaning we assign to our actions throughout the day – you can gua sha in front of your laptop while immersed in youtube videos, or you can do it while aiming to be totally present in whatever space you are in, aware of the sounds and smells around, noticing to the sensations in your skin. Although practicing the same action, you’ll end up with two totally different experiences. While I do both, I like to remind myself that I’ll get twice the benefits from gua sha as an active meditation, way beyond just toning my skin, de-puffing my face, etc. What Facial gua sha is a massage practice thats deeply rooted in the ancient traditions of Chinese medicine. A special (and affordable) jade or rose quartz tool is used to perform various, sweeping motions on the face and neck, which increases circulation, helps move lymphatic fluid, sculpts the features, and relaxes facial muscles. Benefits of gua sha include better overall complexion, reduced blemishes, and toned skin. It can help relieve neck pain, jaw tension, puffiness, and even headaches. Its a direct route to more glowy skin and its the most relaxing, anti-aging facial treatment that you can give yourself in the comfort of your own home. Its also a great practice for showing some love to yourself. Carving out some quiet time to slow down and direct your attention towards yourself and your well-being by practicing any small ritual is already the ultimate act of self-care. * Gua sha massage is also practiced on the body, with more pressure on the tool, and you will usually need to see an acupuncturist for that. We are only focusing on facial gua sha in this post. The Tool Gua sha tools come in different shapes, most commonly in jade and rose quartz. For this routine, we use a heart-shaped jade tool, but you can use a rose quartz tool with the same results (just choose the kind of stone that you are more drawn to). The shape can vary a bit too. If you have a gua sha tool, chances are you already have one that will work for this routine. Just make sure that the tool has a notch and a flat (or slightly curved) edge. It can be square like this one or heart-shaped like this one. Our Favorite Routine The gua sha routine we practice is a little different from some of the ones weve seen out there. It was introduced to us by our acupuncturist, and has you work your way from the bottom of your neck and face up to the forehead, since lymph drains down into the terminus, which is the area right above your collarbones. This way, you awaken the tissues and stimulate circulation at the base of your neck, so that theres an opening for excess fluids from the middle and top of the face to drain into. Its sort of like a faucet that needs to be opened at the bottom in order to let out the water. This routine is also quite slow, relaxing, and based in light touch. Also, if you don’t vibe with this particular gua sha routine for any reason, there are many more gua sha videos on Youtube that you might like! When and How There’s no right or wrong way to practice this gua sha routine. Do it as often as you like/­­can and whenever it feels best for you. It’s great in the morning, because it helps move stagnant lymph and de-puff, plus it can seamlessly incorporate into a morning mindfulness routine. It’s also amazing before bed, because the light and slow massage is incredibly relaxing. My Experience I had been hearing about facial gua sha for a while and finally decided that this year would be the year Ill try it out. I ended up falling in love with the practice, and my gua sha tool is now a permanent fixture on my bedside table (Ive also tried using a jade roller and although it feels nice, to me theres no question that gua sha is much more effective). The positive effects of gua sha are not necessarily immediate and tend to build over time, but your face will be visibly more sculpted after one self-massage session, which is always encouraging. To test this out, do all the steps on one side of your face first, and then observe how your features are more sculpted, your eyes are more open, and your eyebrows are more lifted on that side. For me, this is especially noticeable in the eye and eyebrow area. The number one positive physical change that Ive noticed from having a regular gua sha practice (I do it about 2-3 days a week) is less puffiness in the morning, which is a big one for me. My favorite time of day to practice facial gua sha is in bed right before I go to sleep. I find it to be incredibly relaxing, and the neck sweeping helps me work out tension in my neck, which I regularly experience after a typical day of work on the computer. Since my skin tends towards puffiness in the mornings, I notice that I dont wake up looking as puffy if I do gua sha the night before. Sometimes, if I eat a late, salty dinner or simply dont get enough sleep and wake up extra puffy, I do the routine in the morning. In this case, I love running my gua sha tool under cold water and wiping it dry, so that I have a cool stone to work with. This feels so good and does away with the puffiness in no time. I truly look forward to the routine and all of its relaxing, beautifying benefits and try to squeeze it in as many times a week as I can. I think youll really love it.   You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lucy Vincent Self-Care Interview Series: Jessica Murnane Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Our Favorite Gua Sha Routine – Video appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Easy Homemade Cashew-Oat Yogurt

October 24 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Easy Homemade Cashew-Oat Yogurt This is a recipe that we’ve been excited to share for a while! The number of plant-based yogurt options has been growing like crazy on health food store shelves, which is amazing, and I always love seeing how companies innovate in this field. Still, I rarely buy yogurt. There are a few things that I find less than ideal about it: the single-use (mostly plastic) packaging, the presence of weird ingredients or additives (gums, etc.), and/­­or the price, which can often be quite steep. Knowing that I can easily make really good vegan yogurt at home is another huge reason. This recipe takes care of a few common problems that I’ve personally noticed when it comes to homemade, plant-based yogurt making: it’s not at all finicky (unlike coconut yogurt), and it’s not overly bland (looking at you, 100% cashew yogurt). Coconut yogurt is notoriously tricky to make at home. The ingredients couldn’t be simpler (just coconut milk + probiotic), but achieving the right texture is not easy. It’s common for coconut yogurt to refuse to thicken and remain the texture of milk, albeit a probiotic one. This is when you start getting into the nuances of which brand coconut milk works and which doesn’t, and what probiotic capsules to use. Not very universal. There are some incredible coconut yogurt brands out on the market (like Anita’s and Coconut Cult), but they are very expensive, hard to find, and honestly so incredibly rich that I can only handle one spoonful at a time. On the other hand, perfectly creamy cashew yogurt is very easy to make at home, but I find it to be pretty bland. It can also end up being fairly pricey to put together, since you are only using cashews, water, and probiotic, and you need quite a bit of cashews to bulk it up. Enter this cashew-oat yogurt recipe! It’s foolproof in my experience, always comes out luxuriously creamy, and has an interesting yogurt-y savoriness from the addition of oats. You don’t have to use as many cashews, which cuts down on price, and it seems to work with many probiotic brands. Here are a few more things to expect from this yogurt: - This yogurt does not taste like dairy yogurt, but it does have a satisfyingly creamy, fatty body, which goes well with fresh fruit, much like regular yogurt. - The texture of this yogurt is unique. It’s not fluffy like well-made coconut yogurt and not pudding-like, like store-bought yogurt that contains gums. It’s thick but pourable. - The flavor is unique, too. The cashews contribute fattiness and richness. The oats, once fermented with a probiotic, acquire a pleasantly sour, almost cheesy/­­yogurt-y type of flavor that I personally find delicious. We hope you’ll give it a try :) Easy Homemade Cashew-Oat Yogurt   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 cup raw cashews or cashew pieces - soaked in purified water for 4 hours or overnight ⅓ cup gluten-free, old-fashioned rolled oats - soaked in ½ cup purified water overnight ¾ cup purified water 2 probiotic capsules (I use this one) Instructions Drain and rinse the cashews. Combine them with the soaked oats (the oats should absorb the water by now, so no need to drain) and water in an upright, high-speed blender and blend until smooth. Pour into a glass container, leaving some room at the top for the yogurt to expand. Open the probiotic capsules and pour the powder into the yogurt mixture. Stir with a wooden (or any non-metal) spoon to incorporate thoroughly. Cover the container with a piece of cheesecloth or breathable fabric, fixing it in place with a rubber band (or I use my nut milk bags here) and let culture in a dark place (no direct sunlight), at room temperature for 24 hours. Taste the yogurt. If it tastes good and yogurt-like enough to you, its ready. If not, leave it to culture more, for up to 48 hours total. The timing will depend on the temperature in your house and the probiotic you use. Once ready, keep refrigerated in an air-tight container. Notes When you are ready to make the next batch of this yogurt, you can save a few tablespoons of yogurt and use it as a starter for your new batch. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Banana Toffee Tart Cauliflower Pesto Pasta Yellow Split Pea Chowder from Power Plates Asian Flavoured Veggie Burgers with Asparagus Fries .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Easy Homemade Cashew-Oat Yogurt appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Aubergine Polpette - Three Ways

October 12 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Vegan Aubergine Polpette - Three Ways Our first thought was to do a classic Lady and the Tramp Spaghetti and Meatball dish with this polpette recipe, but then we decided that it was too expected. So here is instead another spin on our one makes three-series. Where we use one staple food in three different recipes. We really love this series because it reflects so much how we actually eat. It’s not always an entirely new meal every day but more of a flow where the same components are repeated with new pairings. These polpette or vegan meatballs are perfect for this. They are good on their own - tender and very flavorful. And they are also insanely versatile, rolled into a wrap, tangled into pasta, paired with a spicy tomato sauce and hummus or tossed in a crunchy vegan take on a caesar salad. Vegan Aubergine Polpette Makes around 40 balls 2 medium sized aubergines 2 red onions 4 tbsp olive oil 100 g /­­ 1 cup almond flour 120 g /­­ 1 cup cooked lentils 4 tbsp pickled capers, drained and finely chopped 2 tbsp raisins zest from 1 lemon 15 leaves basil leaves salt Preheat the oven to 200°C  /­­ 400°F. Peel and chop the onion finely and chop the aubergine into small dices. Stir fry both in a large skillet with the oil for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until very soft. When soft, add to a food processor with the rest of the ingredients. Pulse a few times to mix everything together. You want a very chunky sticky texture but dont pulse too much or youll end up with a mushy mixture. Remove the knife blades and shape 30-40 small balls with your hands. Place them on a baking tray covered with baking paper and bake for 25 minutes. Store in the fridge or freeze them. Scroll down for three ways to serve them. Hummus with spicy tomato sauce, polpette and cucumber salad 1 batch vegan aubergine polpette (see recipe above) 1 batch Hummus, see this recipe or store-bought hummus Spicy tomato sauce Serves 4 1 tbsp olive oil 1 red onion 1 garlic clove 1 tsp cumin 1 tsp harissa paste (or 1 red chili) 2 x 400 g tins tomatoes 1/­­2 tsp sea salt, to taste Heat the oil in a large sauce pan on medium heat. Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic and add them to the sauce pan  together with the spices. Let sauté for a few minutes until soft not browned and then add  the tomatoes and salt. Let cook for at least 20 minutes, until rich and fragrant. It will become sweeter and rounder in flavour the longer you leave it on. Store the sauce you are not using tonight in glass bottles in the fridge. Cucumber salad 1/­­2 cucumber 2 tsp olive oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice + zest 1 pinch sea salt 1 small handful fresh dill Finely dice the cucumber and place in a bowl. Add olive oil, lemon juice and zest, salt and dill and toss to combine. Arrange the hummus in shallow bowls and make a well in the middle. Place a couple of spoonfuls tomato sauce in the well, add a few aubergine polpette and a few spoonfuls cucumber sallad. Vegan Wrap with Polpette, Ajvar and Krauts Serves 4 4 wrap breads /­­ tortilla breads, gluten free or whole grain 4 lettuce leaves 4 cavalo nero or kale, stems removed 1 cup cooked white quinoa 4 tbsp ajvar dressing 1/­­2 cucumber, cut into sticks 4 tbsp sauerkraut (see recipe here) 1 batch aubergine polpette (see recipe above) Place one lettuce leave and one kale leave on each tortilla bread, then place 2-3 tbsp quinoa in the middle, a dollop ajvar, cucumber slices, sauerkraut and top with a couple of aubergine polpette. Fold the top and bottom edges over the filling. Roll the whole tortilla from left to right to wrap in the filling. Roll some parchment paper around them and tie with a string to hold them together. Vegan Ceasar Salad with Polpette Serves 4 1 head Cosmopolitan lettuce 1 batch aubergine polpette (see recipe above) 2 avocados, stone/­­peel removed and sliced 2 small apples, cored and sliced 2 tbsp sunflower seeds, toasted Dressing 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml cold pressed neutral oil (organic rapeseed) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml soy milk, unsweetened 2-3 tsp lemon juice 1 tsp dijon mustard 1 tbsp pickled capers, drained 1 large pinch salt Add all dressing ingredients to a tall glas or blender cup. Mix with a stick blender on high speed for about 15 seconds or until you have a creamy white dressing. Taste and adjust the flavours to your preference. Add more oil and blend again if you like it thicker. Tear the lettuce into bite size pieces and place in a mixing bowl. Add 2 tbsp vegan mayo dressing and toss to cover. Then transfer to a serving platter and arrange avocado slices, apple slices and aubergine polpette and last, scatter over toasted sunflower seeds.

Vegan Pumpkin Pie Truffles

October 4 2018 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Pumpkin Pie TrufflesVegan Pumpkin Pie Truffles or No Bake Pumpkin Donut Holes. 7 Ingredient No oil, No Refined Sugar. These fudgy bites are perfect for fall. Vegan Glutenfree Soyfree Recipe  Jump to Recipe Fudgy Bites, that taste like Pumpkin Pie in a fudge form! hell yes! 7 Ingredients, No Bake, No oil, No Refined Sugar! And ready in 15 mins. It cannot get easier and tastier than this! Pumpkin puree gets heated with maple syrup to thicken slightly, then mixed with almond and coconut flours, as much pumpkin pie spice as you like, then rolled in a mix of cinnamon and coconut sugar. Bliss. Make a double batch! You can also make your own pumpkin pie spice, or use store bought or use just cinnamon, or other spice blends like chai.Continue reading: Vegan Pumpkin Pie TrufflesThe post Vegan Pumpkin Pie Truffles appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Cinnamon Roll Cookies – Oilfree

September 24 2018 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Cinnamon Roll Cookies – OilfreeVegan Cinnamon Roll Cookies. Shhortbread like cookie dough dusted with cinnamon sugar, rolled, sliced and baked for cinnamon roll bites. Refined Oil-free Vegan Recipe.  Cinnamon Rolls, but in a cookie form with shortbread dough, rolled up with cinnamon sugar filling = Addictive!   These cinnamony bites are a perfect treat for fall or the holidays. No added oil in these cookies! The nut butter and nut flour makes them a sturdy shortbread like cookie, which is crisp and soft with a cinnamon sugar filling. Add an icing if you like. Change up the spice to pumpkin pie spice. These cookies are Easy, delicious and a favorite of everyone.  Continue reading: Vegan Cinnamon Roll Cookies – OilfreeThe post Vegan Cinnamon Roll Cookies – Oilfree appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Smashed Cookie Salad with Strawberries

May 30 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Smashed Cookie Salad with Strawberries Cookie Salad? Cookie Salad! This is not your typical salad but with the first local strawberries of the year popping up here in Scandinavia, a smashed cookie salad seemed like a proper way to celebrate. Every country think their strawberries are the best, but Swedish strawberries around June and July are truly unbeatable. They are plump, deep red, very sweet and so so good simply served in a bowl with just a dash of oat milk or cream. Delicious as that may be, it is not a recipe to blog about or to celebrate summer with. Hence, this cookie salad. We bake a giant cookie, smash (!) it into bits that we layer with strawberries, whipped cream and elderflowers. Apart from the childishly pleasing feeling of smashing cookies, all those oddly sized bits and pieces also are what makes the salad interesting. It has a great mix of textures and flavors, looks pretty and is very simple. It is a good dessert to make for your friends or family. You can bake the cookie ahead of time (or use any store-bought cookie) and ideally, you want to smash the cookie and assemble the salad in front of your guests. We’ve gathered a few recipe notes and suggestions how to change it up here below. But first, check out the recipe video we made. Luise is doing a little intro talk in this video and we’d love to hear if you like us to develop this style more, or if you prefer them with just music. We are having a bit of hard time deciding ourselves. We are planning some more videos (and a new video series) so subscribe to our youtube channel, if you haven’t already and you won’t miss out on any of it. We love the Swedish allemansrätt! Recipe notes: o We made the cookie vegan to make it as inclusive as possible but you can replace coconut oil with butter if you are more into that. Vegans would obviously also use whipped coconut cream or whipped soy cream. o Use cert gluten-free oats if you are gluten intolerant. o The buckwheat flour can be replaced with regular flour if you like. o You can make this into an Eton Mess by adding a larger amount of cream (and maybe even meringues) and serving it in glasses. o You can swap the whipped cream for greek yogurt and serve this as a weekend breakfast. Or do 50/­­50 cream and yogurt for a more tangy dessert. o If you have mint or lemon balm at home, those would be great additions to the salad. o You can add any edible flowers and they are of course also entirely optional. o If your berries are imported or not sweet enough, simply drizzle a little maple syrup, honey or elderflower syrup over the salad. Strawberry and Smashed Cookie Salad Vegan Chocolate Oat Cookies 200 g /­­ 2 cups rolled oats 65 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup buckwheat flour 4 tbsp cacao powder 3 tbsp chia seeds 150 g /­­ 1 cup mixed almonds and pumpkin seeds (or any other nuts or seeds), coarsely chopped 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 110 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup coconut oil or butter 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup maple syrup 125 ml /­­  1/­­2 cup plant milk Salad elements 450 g /­­ 1 lb fresh strawberries 1 knob fresh ginger, grated 1 small lemon, juice elderflower and lilacs or other edible summer flowers 250 ml /­­ 1 cup whipping cream or whipped coconut cream (or Greek yogurt) Set the oven to 200°C/­­400°F. Mix together the dry ingredients in one bowl. Add coconut oil, maple syrup and plant milk. Stir together and let sit for 20 minutes to allow the chia seeds and oats to thicken. Meanwhile, rinse the strawberries, cut in halves and place in a mixing bowl. Add grated ginger, lemon juice and a few elderflower florets (and honey or maple syrup if you don’t think your berries are sweet enough). Leave to infuse while you whip the cream. Pour onto a baking sheet covered with a baking paper. Flatten out and shape a large, round cookie using your hands. Bake in the oven for about 20 minutes or until golden and firm (it will firm up more once it cools). Leave to cool and then crush the cookie into pieces. Transfer the juicy strawberries to a large serving platter. Add dollops of whipped cream (or yogurt) and tuck in the pieces of broken cookie all over. Scatter over the cookie crumbles and decorate with more elderflowers and lilacs. Crush a few strawberries in your palm to drizzle strawberry juice over the cream. Serve and enjoy!

Spring Picnic Bread

April 16 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Spring Picnic Bread Picnic season is finally upon us and we have been kicking it off with two new favorite things. The first one is a bike and the other is a bread. We have been dreaming of a Danish cargo bike for years and years, and last month we finally splurged on this one. It’s the perfect vehicle for us because we can fit all three kids in it with seatbelts and all. It’s ideal to bring home heavy grocery bags with. And it’s environmentally friendly. All practicalities aside, it is also so much fun to ride around with and we are roaming from playground to picnic spots without a hitch. Just packing a few blankets, a big smoothie, a rhubarb compote and this beauty of a bread. We created this recipe for all type of picnic situations. We wanted something spring-y and savory that tasted awesome and could manage a bumpy bike ride. It’s basically like a savory muffin that we bake in a sheet pan. It serves many, is easy to make, super moist and flavorful and you can make lots of variations on it (although I love the look of thinly shaved asparagus on top). Needless to say, this is also ideal for a brunch or or other weekend gatherings. Just like a foccacia, the bread acts as a base and you can play around with all kind of toppings. Here are a few variations: o Swap some of the potatoes in the bread with grated carrots, parsnip or swede. o A teaspoon of mustard in the batter adds some complexity to the flavor. o Any fresh herbs can be mixed into the batter. o Olives or capers could be good on top. Spinach could also be used instead of asparagus. o You can use a dairy free yogurt instead of buttermilk and leave out the feta cheese if you prefer it dairy free. o We havent tried a vegan version but replacing the eggs with chia eggs (1 egg = 1 tablespoons chia seed + 3 tablespoons water) has worked for us on similar recipes. Asparagus & Potato Picnic Bread Serves 12 Dry Ingredients 100 g /­­ 1 cup oat flour (or the same amount rolled oats, blitzed into flour in a food processor) 100 g /­­ 3/­­4 cup rice flour (or buckwheat flour or spelt flour) 1 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 1 tsp sea salt flakes Wet Ingredients 3 free-range eggs 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup olive oil or coconut oil, at room temperature 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup cultured buttermilk (or yogurt or plant-based yogurt) 1-2 spring onions 3-4 potatoes (2 cups /­­ 250 g grated) 1 handful fresh parsley, finely chopped 100 g feta cheese Topping 3 raw asparagus 1/­­3 cup pumpkin seeds 2 tsp quality olive oil 2 tsp honey a handful chive Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 350°F bake mode and grease a 30 x 22 cm /­­ 12 x 9 inch tray or line it with parchment paper. Add all the dry ingredients to a large mixing bowl and stir until combined. Make a well in the centre and set aside while preparing the wet ingredients. Whisk eggs in a separate bowl, then add oil and buttermilk. Finely chop the onion. Peel the potatoes, grate them coarsely and add them to the wet mixture along with the onion and parsley. Crumble in half of the feta cheese. Give it a good stir and then pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the flours. Use a wooden spoon or spatula to combine the batter and then pour it onto the tray. Use a peeler to shave the asparagus into thin ribbons and spread them out over the batter. Crumble the remaining feta cheese on top. Combine pumpkin seeds, oil and honey and sprinkle them on top as well, along with the chive. Bake for approximately 40 minutes or until golden and a skewer inserted in the centre of the cake comes out clean. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly in the tin before transferring to a wire wrack to cool completely. Store the cake at room temperature in an airtight container and it will keep for a few days. Great to bring on a picnic and serve with a tangy rhubarb compote or chutney. Enjoy!

Coconut Kiwi Date Granola

December 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

Rolled oats are tossed with coconut and honey then baked in the oven until crispy and golden. Sliced kiwi gives this sweet granola a slightly tart fruit topping or try adding puréed banana and concoct this breakfast with the ultimate texture. This recipe comes to us from Trudy of veggie.num.num. Serves 16 - 9 ounces rolled oats - 3 1/­­2 ounces sweetened coconut, shredded - a pinch salt - 1/­­4 cup vegetable oil - 1/­­2 cup golden syrup* - or - 1/­­2 cup honey - 3 1/­­2 ounces dates, chopped - 1 kiwi, peeled and sliced *golden syrup is made by refining cane sugar juice back into sugar. It can be found in the sweetener section of some grocery stores. Preheat the oven to 300 degrees. Line a large baking tray with parchment or wax paper. Combine the oats, coconut and a pinch of salt in a large bowl. Pour the oil and syrup or honey over the oat mixture. Toss and stir well to combine all ingredients, making sure the oats and coconut are well coated. Spread the oat mixture over the prepared tray evenly. Place in the oven for cook for 35-40 minutes, or until the granola is golden. While the granola bakes, toss it gently every 5-10 minutes, so that the oats cook evenly. Add the chopped dates and toss to combine. Allow to cool before eating or storing, as the granola becomes crunchier as it cools. Serve topped with sliced kiwi and enjoy. The post Coconut Kiwi Date Granola appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pumpkin Cinnamon Oatmeal

November 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

This simple recipe is easy to adapt, so feel free to toss in some dried fruits or nuts at the end. Please note that pumpkin puree is not the same as pumpkin pie filling. Canned pumpkin puree is available in most supermarkets; stir remaining canned pumpkin into risotto or use in place of pizza sauce for a unique twist. This recipe comes to us from Kristi Arnold of Veggie Converter 365. Serves 2 - 2 cups water - 6 tablespoons canned pumpkin puree - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground cinnamon - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground cloves - 1/­­4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg - 1 cup rolled oats - Pure maple syrup, to taste In a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, combine water, pumpkin puree, cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg; bring to a boil. Stir in the oats, reduce heat to medium-low and cook about 15 minutes, or until oats are tender. Drizzle with maple syrup to taste. The post Pumpkin Cinnamon Oatmeal appeared first on Meatless Monday.

No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars

September 6 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars It’s been difficult for me to contain my excitement about these Blueberry Coconut Bars ever since I nailed the recipe a few weeks ago. They check all the boxes: easy/­­no-bake, gluten-free, vegan, refined sugar-free/­­not too sweet, fun to put together, and so so delicious. It’s the perfect recipe for those wanting to hold on to summer with all their might. These bars are made up of three complementary layers: there’s a crumbly, no-bake ‘shortbread’ crust, followed by a rich coconut creme layer, which is then topped with a juicy, no-cook blueberry chia jam. The combination is truly heavenly, especially since this is a lighter dessert that won’t weigh you down. You can see all the steps of the cooking process in the video we made above (P.S. We have a Youtube channel with lots of cooking videos, you can subscribe here). These bars are a definite, universal crowd pleaser – absolutely all the friends and family that have tasted them genuinely loved them. They would be the perfect, easy yet impressive dessert to bring to a gathering. Or just make the bars for yourself/­­your family for the week ahead, they’ll keep well in the refrigerator. Hope you’ll give these a try :) No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars   Print Serves: 16 square bars Ingredients for the blueberry chia jam 3 cups frozen blueberries - thawed (do not use fresh, non-frozen blueberries for this recipe) juice of 1 small lemon 3 tablespoons maple syrup 3 tablespoons chia seeds 3 tablespoons chia meal (ground chia seeds) for the shortbread ¾ cup gluten-free rolled oats 12 Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes ¾ cup coconut flour ¼ cup melted coconut oil 1 tablespoon lemon juice pinch of sea salt for the coconut creme 1 can full fat Thai coconut milk - refrigerated overnight to separate fat from water ½ cup unsweetened dried shredded coconut 2 tablespoons maple syrup splash of vanilla extract Instructions to make the blueberry chia jam Thoroughly mix all the ingredients in a medium bowl. Cover and refrigerate for a few hours or overnight, until the chia seeds have bloomed and the mixture resembles a jam-like consistency. Mash the berries partially with a potato masher, leaving plenty of them whole. to make the shortbread Put the oats in a food processor and grind them into a flour. Drain the dates and add them to the food processor, along with the rest of the ingredients. Process until you have a well-combined dough that sticks together when pressed between your fingers. Prepare an 8 x 8 baking dish by lining it with parchment paper, extending the paper up the sides of the dish. Press the shortbread into the bottom of the dish in an even layer. Set aside. to make the coconut creme Scoop the separated coconut fat from the top of the can of coconut milk into a food processor (use the leftover coconut water in smoothies, soups, porridges or lattes). Add the shredded coconut, maple syrup and vanilla extract to the food processor and process until well combined. Be careful not to over-process, as the coconut fat can separate and curdle. to assemble the bars Spread the coconut creme over the shortbread in a thin, even layer. Take the blueberry jam our of the refrigerator and spread it on top of the coconut creme in another even layer. Place the dish into the refrigerator for a few hours or overnight, for the shortbread and coconut layer to set. Once the shortbread and the coconut layer have set, lift out the bar from the dish onto a cutting board, using the extended edges of the parchment paper. Cut into 16 squares or any size/­­shape of choice. Keep refrigerated. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Multigrain Pear Ginger Cakes with Macadamia Whipped Cream Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder Rose and Lavender Parfait and a Breakfast with Friends .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Beet Tartare with Sesame Labneh + Amsterdam

August 19 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Beet Tartare with Sesame Labneh + Amsterdam Earlier this year we were in New York to launch Green Kitchen at Home. We had a blast doing a live cooking session at Food52, teaching a cooking class and had a book signing in a tiny but packed little store in Greenwich Village. But what I really wanted to talk about today was our night off. When we tucked baby Noah (formerly known as Gabriel) to sleep in his stroller and headed to ABCV for dinner. Side note: You should know that for being a food writing couple, Luise and I very rarely go out and eat at proper restaurants. With kids, it’s just easier to do takeaway or pick places where it’s okay that they climb, run and crash. Also, fancy restaurants make me feel awkward. But we had an epic evening at ABCV. We tried the tasting menu of which I can’t even remember half of the dishes. But I know that there were simple crudités with lots of spreads, some kind of soft beet carpaccio/­­tartare with a little bit of sting to it, a whole roasted cauliflower with turmeric tahini dressing(!), avocado lettuce cups, roasted shiitake and a couple of desserts. And what made the evening even better was that Noah slept through almost the entire dinner (thank you jetlag!). We have been talking about that beet carpaccio (and the cauliflower with tahini turmeric dressing) a few times since we got back. And when Luise recently spotted a recipe for roasted beets and sesame labneh in the latest issue of Jamie Magazine, we started talking about it again. Looking through our recipe archive, it is pretty obvious that we’ve got a love for beets. They are sweet and mildly earthy, have an awesome color, can grow in our harsh Swedish climate and are cheap! What’s not to love? So a couple of days ago, we picked up a few bunches of beets, started cooking and here we are. With some kind of beetroot tartare (mixed minced beets), dollops of sesame labneh and a few suggestions on what can be used to scoop it into your mouth, apart from crackers. And as a last minute contribution, we are also offering a less fancy way of serving this, inside a rye waffle toast (yup, you might want to scroll down to it right away). This recipe is great as a starter, at a buffet table or a party. It’s pretty and impressive, creamy and delicious with plenty of flavor from fresh dill and mint and a little sting from horseradish. Since we love yogurt just as much as we love beetroots, we invited labneh (yogurt’s fancy cousin) to the party. We totally stole the idea to mix tahini into labneh from that Jamie Mag article. You should too. You need at least two hours to let the yogurt drain into labneh cheese but I’m still going to claim that this is an easy recipe - only a few ingredients and apart from draining the yogurt, it’s all pretty quick.  I imagine that a quick cheat version could be accomplished by simply using thick yogurt without draining it and buying pre-cooked beetroots. I can’t promise that it will be as good, but it’ll at least be quick and effortless. http:/­­/­­www.greenkitchenstories.com/­­wp-content/­­uploads/­­2017/­­08/­­Labneh_­drip.mp4 Okay, I can hear Isac trying to teach baby Noah how to roar like a lion with the only result that little brother cries like a baby. So I better post this now before major chaos is breaking out. No proofreading needed because yolo. Enjoy the recipe and check out info below re Amsterdam. Ciao! Beet Tartar & Sesame Labneh Serves 4 Recipe is inspired by a recipe from Jamie Magazine, Aug 2017 and a dinner we had a ABCV NYC. Sesame labneh 2 cups /­­ 500 g Greek or Turkish Yogurt 1/­­2 tsp salt 2 tbsp tahini 1 tbsp olive oil Beet Tartare  1/­­2 kg /­­ 1 lb  beetroots 2 tbsp capers juice from 1/­­2 lemon 1 tsp horseradish (or mustard) 1 handful fresh dill 1 handful fresh mint leaves salt & pepper Topping 1 handful pistachio nuts, finely chopped fresh dill, chopped fresh mint leaves, chopped 2 tbsp capers, halved lemon slices olive oil Serve with rye bread crisps, tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices Start by making the labneh. Add salt to the yogurt and stir until smooth. Wrap the yogurt in a cheese cloth or other clean thin cloth and tie it over a bowl for about 2 hours or more to allow liquid to be drained (meanwhile, cook the beetroots). You can leave it for 24-36 hours if you prefer a thicker labneh but 2 hours and a gentle squeeze (to get rid of some extra liquid) works fine. Stir in tahini, transfer to a serving bowl and top with a little bit of olive oil. Peel the beetroots, divide them in quarters and cook in salted water for approx 20 mins min or until tender. When ready, let cool and then transfer them to a food processor along with capers, lemon juice, horseradish, fresh dill, mint and seasoning. Pulse a few times until the beetroot has the consistency of course grits. Not too much though or you will end up with a sauce. You can also dice them finely. Arrange the beet tartare on a large serving plate. Fold in large dollops of sesame labneh and top with pistachio, fresh herbs, capers and lemon slices. Add a drizzle of olive oil and serve with crackers or thin rye bread crisps (thin rye bread pieces toasted in a pan or the oven for a couple of minutes), tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices to scoop with. Beet & Labneh Rye Waffle Toast We made this Waffled rye bread toast with the leftovers.  It’s a family favorite and we’ve got another recipe and the whole story behind this method in our latest book. Here are some quick instructions: Simply smudge labneh on two pieces of dark rye bread, add some spinach, fresh dill and mint and a thick layer of beet tartar. Brush a hot waffle iron with butter or coconut oil, combine the two slices and place inside the waffle iron, pressing together lightly. When you’re bread has got a nice and brown waffle pattern, the toast is ready. Cut the waffle toast in half and eat it while it’s hot. **************************** AMSTERDAM & ANTWERP - 7-9 September Green Kitchen at Home is being released in Dutch next week and to kick things off, we are coming to Amsterdam and Antwerp for a couple of press events, signings, dinners and talks. We will have a little talk, signing and dinner at the bookstore ‘t Stad Leest in Antwerp at 19.30 pm on 7 September. Tickets can be booked here. We are having a little talk + Q&A and a book signing at Limon in Amsterdam on 9 September between 10.30-11-30. There will be nibbles from the book served and we will end with a book signing. There will also be a lunch afterwards (between 12.00-14.00) and we will try to move around so we get the chance to chat with all of you. You can either buy tickets for both the talk and lunch, just the talk or just the lunch. Follow this link to read more about it in Dutch: Greenkitchenbooks.nl  


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