Pasta - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Vegan Cinnamon Streusel Pancakes

Pasta with Vegan Alfredo Sauce

Citrus and Poppy Seed Cake

Dali toyi recipe | dal tove recipe | dal recipe – konkani style










Pasta vegetarian recipes

Pasta with Vegan Alfredo Sauce

February 11 2019 VegKitchen 

Pasta with Vegan Alfredo Sauce If youve been looking for a healthier pasta Alfredo recipe (that’s also vegan!), here it is. This one, which you can make with either silken tofu or cannellini beans, is mild and creamy, but harbors a fraction of the fat and calories of the traditional cream-based sauce. Continuing reading Pasta with Vegan Alfredo Sauce on VegKitchen

Show Your Heart Some Love for Valentine’s Day

February 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Show Your Heart Some Love for Valentine’s DayThis week is Valentines Day, a good time to express your love for your heart and all it does for you. Celebrate by cooking up a heart-friendly meal for Meatless Monday. By choosing not to eat or serve meat just one day a week, you are giving a valentine to your loved ones every Monday, or 52 times a year. This simple gesture of adding more plant-based foods to your diet can have profound health benefits for your heart. Research has found meals rich in fruits, vegetables, and legumes contain natural antioxidants that actually benefit cardio-health. Add some wow factor to Valentines Day, and every Monday, with plant-based dishes for the people you love. To everyone around the world, Happy Valentines Day! My Heart Beets Salad by Apron Strings Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta by Healthy. Happy. Life. Quinoa Kale Risotto with Pistachios by Sharon Palmer, the Plant-Powered Dietitian   Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post Show Your Heart Some Love for Valentine’s Day appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta

February 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Cinnamon, citrus, maple, mushroom, chickpea, almond, garlic and rosemary sing in this creamy, yet hearty-textured pasta. With all the light citrus and cinnamon flavors this pasta can be easily served for brunch, lunch or dinner. This recipe comes to us from Kathy of Healthy. Happy. Life. Serves 8 For the butternut squash sauce: - 2 cups frozen butternut squash cubes, frozen - 1 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed - 1 teaspoon garlic powder - 1 tablespoons maple syrup - 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - dash of salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon black pepper - 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast* For the chickpeas: - 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, to coat the skillet - 1/­­2 small white onion, diced - 1 15 ounce can chickpeas, drained - 1 large portobello mushroom, diced - 1/­­8 teaspoon cinnamon - 1 tablespoon lemon juice - 1 cup roasted, unsalted almonds, slivered To complete the Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta: - 1 pound orecchiette pasta, cooked - additional nutritional yeast, for tossing the cooked pasta* - a little extra olive oil, for tossing the cooked pasta - 1 orange, sliced into segments - 1 teaspoon orange zest *optional. Found in health food stores of the health food section of some grocery stores. To make the Butternut Squash Sauce: Place the frozen, cubed butternut squash in a skillet over medium high heat. Season with the rosemary, garlic powder, maple syrup, olive oil, salt, pepper, nutritional yeast, orange juice and orange zest. Cook for 3-5 minutes, working the seasonings into the squash with a fork, until the squash has softened into a lightly mashed mixture. Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat and begin cooking the orecchiette according the package directions. To make the chickpeas: Place the olive oil and chopped onion in a skillet over medium-high heat. Cook the onions for 4-5 minutes, or until they become translucent. Add the chickpeas and diced Portobello mushroom to the pan and season with the cinnamon and lemon juice. Cook for another 4-5 minutes, or until the chickpeas begin to brown and the Portobellos begin to become tender. Add the almonds and sauté for just 1 minute more. To complete the Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta: Drain the orecchiette when it has completed cooking. Toss the cooked pasta with a few dashes extra virgin olive oil and nutritional yeast, if using. Toss the pasta with the butternut squash sauce until fully coated. Fold in the chickpeas. Serve in a bowl with fresh orange slices and a dash of orange zest on top. The post Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Instant Pot Ziti with Tomato Sauce 20 Mins!

February 8 2019 Vegan Richa 

Instant Pot Ziti with Tomato Sauce 20 Mins!Instant Pot Ziti with Tomato Sauce. Date Night Quick Pasta Meal with Ziti, sprinkled with vegan parm and fresh herbs. 1 Pot! Vegan Soyfree Recipe. Easily Glutenfree, Nutfree.  Jump to Recipe Sometimes you just need a simple pasta meal! And in a jiffy. This Ziti with herbed tomato pasta sauce fits just there. Put everything in an Instant Pot, pressure cook and done. 20 minutes to a fabulous meal. Add some vegan parm, cashew milk or vegan mozzarella for creamier or cheesier flavor. Add some veggies in with the sauce, fresh herbs for garnish and serve with some crusty garlic bread.  This Vegan Ziti comes together really quickly. It has some amazing flavor from the gently toasted garlic, tomato sauce that gets cooked to a wonderful flavor under pressure and the pasta that cooks right with it. Sprinkle with some toasted breadcrumbs and vegan parm for a Baked Ziti kind of effect. Use other pasta shapes of choice. Continue reading: Instant Pot Ziti with Tomato Sauce 20 Mins!The post Instant Pot Ziti with Tomato Sauce 20 Mins! appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Glazed Tempeh Steaks with Rosemary Mushroom Gravy

February 6 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Glazed Tempeh Steaks with Rosemary Mushroom Gravy Hi friends! Checking in really quickly with a favorite dinner as of late. I think tempeh is one of those things that people either love or hate, but there’s a few ways of cooking it that I’m pretty sure would make anyone like it. ‘Glazing’ it is one of those. It’s a decadent method that leaves you with irresistibly golden tempeh ‘steaks’ with crispy edges. Today we’ve got a cozy rosemary, mushroom and white bean gravy to top it with. I thought I’d also share something that’s been helping me stay on track with eating the foods that make me feel good after an indulgent December and January. I noticed myself falling into some not-so-great eating patterns ever since the holidays. Things like treats after dinner almost every night, or buying salty processed snacks more often than I like (have you tried Hippeas?!). None of them are a big deal, but it’s things that don’t contribute to me feeling 100%. So I’ve been aiming to gently steer my focus towards the food that gives me the most energy: whole plant foods. I like the idea of Dr. Michael Greger’s daily dozen checklist, which is his proposed list of the most nourishing plant foods to try to fit into your daily routine. It goes as follows: beans, berries, other fruit, cruciferous vegetables, greens, other vegetables, flax seeds, nuts and seeds, herbs and spices, whole grains, beverages (water), along with the suggested number of servings. So, I’ve been aiming to check off most of the items with my meals every day. At first it becomes a fun game, and then turns more and more into a habit. Of course, it’s not realistic to expect yourself to eat that way every single day, and some days I don’t even eat half of the things listed, but it’s also easier than you might think to get these things in. These tempeh steaks, for example, check off 4 of the items! I make sure to use this tool as a gentle reminder, definitely not as a way to control my eating or stress myself out in any way. There’s a daily dozen app that lets you check off the items, which I used at first, but now I just think about the checklist when buying groceries for the day/­­week, and it helps so much with building out nourishing meals. Just wanted to share this, in case anyone else finds it helpful. Have a great rest of your week! Glazed Tempeh Steaks with Rosemary Mushroom Gravy   Print Serves: 4 medium portions or 2 large Ingredients for the tempeh steaks 8 oz tempeh (we used 3-grain tempeh) 1 teaspoon sesame oil 1½ tablespoons tamari or coconut aminos 1 tablespoon brown rice vinegar or mirin 1 teaspoon maple syrup 1 tablespoon avocado oil or olive oil for oiling the pan for the rosemary mushroom gravy avocado or olive oil 1 yellow onion - diced sea salt 1 lb crimini mushrooms - sliced 2 cloves of garlic - minced 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 cups or 1 can of cooked white beans (any variety) 1 tablespoon white miso 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard splash of Sriracha/­­chili sauce or a pinch of red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon chopped rosemary freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup white bean broth (if cooking white beans from scratch), veggie broth or water parsley, cilantro, or other herbs - for serving Instructions to make the tempeh steaks Slice the tempeh in half crosswise and then slice each half in half lengthwise, so that you end up with 4 thin, square or slightly rectangular pieces. In a shallow dish, whisk together the sesame oil, tamari/­­coconut aminos, vinegar, maple syrup, and oil. Place the tempeh pieces into the shallow dish with the marinade and let it marinate while you make the gravy. To cook the steaks, heat oil in a large pan over medium heat. Remove the tempeh from the shallow dish, leaving the marinade in the dish. Place the tempeh in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes on each side, until golden. Pour the remaining marinade over the tempeh, letting it bubble up and create a glaze over the tempeh. Serve right away with the mushroom rosemary gravy. to make the rosemary mushroom gravy Heat some oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and cook for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms, stir once, and then let them sit without stirring for a minute or two. Cook for another 7 minutes, or until all the liquid, released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the garlic and stir for about 30 seconds, until fragrant. Add the balsamic and cook for another few minutes, until the vinegary flavor of the balsamic cooks off. Add about a ¼ of the amount of the mushrooms to an upright blender. Add half of the white beans, miso, mustard, chili sauce/­­red pepper flakes, rosemary, black pepper, more sea salt, and broth/­­water. Blend until smooth, adding more broth if needed. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Add the blended gravy back to the pan with the mushrooms, along with the remaining white beans. Heat everything through, adding more broth if necessary to achieve a gravy-like consistency. Serve the gravy over the tempeh steaks, garnished with herbs. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Grain-Free Tomato Tart with Cauliflower Ricotta Barley Tomato Salad Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash Pasta e Ceci - The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Glazed Tempeh Steaks with Rosemary Mushroom Gravy appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Candied Chocolate Dipped Citron + Video

January 31 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Candied Chocolate Dipped Citron + Video I’m constantly amazed by the fact that nature gives us the exact things we need during each given season. Citrus season might be my favorite fruit season, just because it’s such a ray of sunshine in the midst of winter bleakness. The contrast between the quiet darkness of this time of year and the bright, juicy, sweet citruses that spring up at the stores is especially intense. Our grocery store is exploding with all kinds of citrus varieties, more than I can count on my two hands. I couldn’t resist getting a few citrons, since they smelled amazing, and I had never tried them before. I knew that they have a really thick rind (they are mostly rind really), which is great for candying. After doing some research, I also learned that citron is one of the original citrus fruit, from which a lot of the other household citruses were developed. So, to celebrate this year’s citrus season, I made some candied, chocolate-dipped citron. The process will make your kitchen smell amazing, and the result is such a unique and delicious treat, with a perfect balance of sweetness, bitterness, and citrusy zing. I also made a ‘day of eating’ video, which takes you through the whole candying process, as well as a day of plant-based meals. All the recipes and things mentioned in the video are linked below :) Video links: Magic Moisturizer Gua Sha Routine Shortcut Steel Cut Oats Pasta e Ceci (Chickpea Noodle Soup) Candied Chocolate Dipped Citron   Print adapted from David Lebovitz Serves: about 1½ cups Ingredients 2 citrons 1½ cup maple syrup or a mixture of maple syrup and honey (not vegan) 1 cup water, plus more for blanching the citron pieces ½ - ¾ cup chocolate chips Instructions Wash and dry the citrons. Cut out any flesh and seeds (you can juice the flesh and use the juice in your water, in salad dressing, or as an acidic finish to any savory dish), then cut the rind into strips. Put the rind strips in a medium pot, cover with water, and blanch the citron pieces in simmering water for 30 minutes, until translucent. Drain the citrons and return to the same pot. Add the maple syrup/­­honey (if using) and water. Bring the mixture up to a boil, stirring a few times. Turn the heat down to establish a strong simmer, and simmer until the syrup reduces, almost completely. You should be left with candied citron strips, covered in a thin layer of syrup. This will take about an hour or more. Let cool for about 15 minutes. Transfer the strips to a wire drying rack to let any excess syrup drain off. Meanwhile, melt the chocolate chips on a double boiler. Dip each citron strip into the chocolate, so that its about half way covered. Transfer back to the drying rack. Once youve dipped all the citron strips in the chocolate, transfer the whole rack to the refrigerator to let the chocolate harden. Keep the candied citron refrigerated in an airtight container. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Rose and Lavender Parfait and a Breakfast with Friends Chocolate Avocado Truffles and Concord Grape Sorbet Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats Clementine Fudge Cake .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Candied Chocolate Dipped Citron + Video appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreat Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap

January 23 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreat Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap We are so excited to announce that registration for our next retreat in Abruzzo, Italy is now open for the Fall of 2019! We hosted our first foraging and cooking retreat there this past October, and it really exceeded all of our expectations. We are elated to announce that this time around, we will have an on-site Acupuncture Physician and an on-site Yoga Teacher! In addition to cooking, eating, foraging, hiking, and sightseeing in the beautiful Abruzzo countryside, we will be exploring the ways to inner balance through yoga, meditation, and ancient techniques of Chinese Medicine. Read on for retreat registration, testimonials, and a photo recap of our first retreat. We hope to see you in the fall :) Forage, Cook and Re-Center Retreat 2019 with On-Site Acupuncture Physician and Daily Yoga/­­Meditation (September 30th - October 6th, 2019) Activities and Services will include: one-on-one appointments with on-site Acupuncture Physician (diagnostic consultation, acupressure, deeply relaxing facial and body gua sha massage), daily yoga with on-site certified yoga instructor, meditation, forest-bathing, plant-based meals prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, foraging, truffle hunting, meditation in a 600 year old olive grove and olive oil tasting, winery visit and wine tasting, plant-based cooking, medicinal jam, and herbal tonic classes with the Golubka Kitchen team, cooking with Abruzzo locals, and more! Click to Book | Click to See a Sample Itinerary Testimonials “Having the opportunity to explore a lesser known region of Italy to find its hidden gems in the Culinary arts was such an enriching experience! Getting to see first hand how the people in these areas live, visiting locals in their homes... From truffle hunting to tasting oil from 600 year old olive groves... Wild foraging for greens & making pasta in an Italian womans kitchen.... Not the typical trip to Italy. It was a delightful & delicious experience!” – Rachel, Alabama “I loved the retreat. It was well managed, we had the best food, awesome accommodation, great people, perfectly sized travel group and great tour guides. I had looked very much forward to this retreat and it was even better than I imagined. You created an amazing experience, with wonderful and very unique accommodations, the best meals I have ever had, set in a beautiful landscape, off the beaten path. The silence was palpable and so welcome to step out of the noisy and hectic lifestyle most of us have these days. I seriously consider joining you again, so I can have more of those meals, go back to the medieval village of Santo Stefano and the unique scattered hotel. We also had an awesome group, which made it even more special!” – Claudia, Massachusetts “It was a trip of a lifetime. Abruzzo could not have been more beautiful! I loved the diversity of the land, the hiking, cooking and loved loved loved the food. I also was glad that it was not a large group…I liked the intimacy of the smaller number of participants. It truly was a remarkable 6 days and you all were so kind, knowledgeable and pleasant to be with.” – Helen, Michigan “Thank you for the wonderful trip. It was so much more than I thought it would be. A deep dive into the food, culture and people of Abruzzo. I had experiences that I could never have on my own. I thought we were a good mix of ages, interests and countries. Diversity makes things so interesting.” – Maudia, Michigan “I’ve been to Italy before but never like this! We visited magical places that I’d never know about on my own: Santo Stefano with its fairytale charm, the beautiful truffle plantation, ancient olive grove, a winery located right in a family home’s basement… Every single one was a unique, unforgettable experience. Thank you!” – Katya, Sochi Truffle Hunting & Tasting We visited a family truffle plantation, where the sweet truffle-hunting dogs Rita and Nina dug up about 1kg of summer truffles right in front of us. We then got to have home-cooked lunch at the truffle plantation owners’ house, where we sampled the day’s harvest, as well as the family’s line of truffle pastes. Hiking and Foraging We hiked up beautiful mountain paths to see historical castles, churches, and hermitages, and foraged for wild herbs, berries, and fruit along the way. We foraged rosehips, wild mint, wild chicory, figs, and even jujube dates. Exploring Local Villages & Towns Pictured below are the breathtaking towns of Pacentro, Sulmona and Santo Stefano (we stayed in Santo Stefano in this experience of a hotel), where we had the pleasure of sightseeing and visiting local artisan businesses, as well as a bustling farmer’s market. Visiting Local Artisans We visited a local wine producer (also a family business) and sampled their exquisite wines. We also had the transcendent experience of wandering around an olive grove with trees up to 600 years old, and got to taste incredibly fresh olive oil, made with the olives from those trees. Cooking, Eating & Drinking! Eating well was the main mission of this retreat, and I think it’s very safe to say that the mission was accomplished. We tasted vegan and vegetarian food from a variety of cozy restaurants, cafes, artisans, and local’s homes. We foraged and ate wild chicory, learned to make pasta and cookies, and got to know famous Abruzzo ingredients, like their local lentils, solina flour, spelt, and more. You might also like... Abruzzo, Italy: Join Our Vegan/­­Vegetarian Forage and Cook Retreat Pasta e Ceci - The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreat Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Pasta Jambalaya

January 21 2019 VegKitchen 

Pasta Jambalaya Here’s one of my favorite uses for vegan sausage. The bold flavor is used to full advantage in this hearty Creole-flavored pasta dish. If you have more time, make a pan of vegan corn bread, it’s a wonderful addition to this meal, as is Creole Coleslaw. Continuing reading Pasta Jambalaya on VegKitchen

The Epic Travel Salad

January 4 2019 My New Roots 

The Epic Travel Salad   When I saw the number, I couldnt believe it: 29 hours. It was undoubtedly going to be one of the longest travel days of my life. Ive been to Bali twice before, but always from Copenhagen, which is about half the distance from Toronto. I almost gave it a second thought since spending that amount of time sitting upright just felt like it might end me, but the retreats were booked, and there was no backing out! I knew what would get me through, and that was food. Lots and lots of delicious, nourishing, consciously-created food. I always always make a point of preparing meals for traveling, since eating mini, microwaved mystery munch seriously kills my vibe. Plus, the amount of calories in one of those airplane trays is barely enough to get me through one romcom and you know that Im watching at least five in a row. When youre about to face any length of time on an airplane, there are a few things to take into consideration. First, fill your snack pack with foods that are hydrating: cucumbers, romaine, bell peppers, carrots, apples, oranges, celery, berries, grapes, and melon. Depending on where youre traveling to, it can help to have the fruits and veggies already prepared or sliced, since some countries wont let you bring in whole fruits and veg, but they will let you bring them in if they look ready to eat. It sounds nonsensical, but it works! I love having huge vegetable salads with lentils and /­­ or whole grains to keep me full too, since I have a tendency to stress-eat when Im in transit and will totally mow down a bag of chips if theyre put in front of me (okay, sometimes I also eat those chips, and that is okay too, but I notice that it always prolongs my jetlag). For other filling munchies, I like my almond flour cookies, nuts like pistachios or walnuts, and granola – especially crossing so many timezones, which requires breakfast-y things. Veggie sticks are also nice, light fare that keep my crunch cravings under control.     As you can see from the photo, I bring my food in reusable containers, use washable wooden cutlery and a straw, all of which are convenient to have once Im at my destination to use for my own cooking and storage. I also always have my 800-ml water bottle with me when I travel. Ive mentioned it in previous posts, but it begs repeating: jetlag is exacerbated by dehydration, and drinking about half a liter (16 oz.) per hour of flight will make such an immense difference, you may never experience jetlag again. I used to suffer terribly from exhaustion for days post-travel (which really ruined my trip when it was a short one), and now its no big deal. I arrive, wait until a mildly appropriate time to go to bed, and wake up feeling about as normal as one could hope to. Yes, youll have to make friends with the flight attendants, since they are the keepers of the water, but go visit them at the back of the plane every so often for a refill, treat them like humans, and youd be amazed at how accommodating and helpful they are. Make sure you fill your bottle before landing as well, since you never know how long it will take for you to get through customs, baggage claim and the taxi line. It always pays to have hydration close at hand. Avoid the plane food if you can, since it is overly salted and often has added sugar. Our taste buds are actually less receptive at high altitudes, due to low air pressure, low humidity, and high levels of white noise. Yup - that is an actual thing. The way our brains interpret flavour signals is impaired, therefore, things taste different, so airlines pump up the levels of salt and sugar in their food to make them taste the way they would at ground level. If you ate that travel-sized chicken or pasta at your dining room table youd be surprised at how exaggerated the flavours were.     Why is this the most epic travel salad? Because its got All. The. Things. Rich, hearty beets, protein-rich and satiating lentils, so its filling, but its not going to leave you feeling stuffed. And because of that whole flavours-being-less-powerful-at-high-altitudes thing, I endeavoured to add as many potent tastes as possible. Lemon, pomegranate, parsley, cumin seeds, and olives are like flavour fireworks that you can safely ignite at 30,000 feet. There is a Middle Eastern vibe going on for sure, and the multitude of textures tick every single box. You dont want your mouth getting bored while youre hurtling through the sky, and this combination will ensure that each bite is a surprise party. Olives that come without their pits are often mushy and less flavourful, so I always opt to remove them myself, or leave them in until I eat them. The problem with leaving the pits in the olives in this situation, is finding a place to put them on your teeny table real estate (the airsick bag is a great option, just sayin...and yes, Ive really thought of everything). If you do want to remove them beforehand, its easiest to do so by smashing the olive with the flat side of a knife blade, then simply pulling the pit out. You can roughly chop the olives from there. If you dont have any black lentils, Du Puy or French lentils work just as well, with green and brown lentils as a passable fallback. I dont dig these types of lentils in salads since they tend to be water-y and dilute the flavour of the dressing, but if it keeps you from making a special trip to the store, by all means just use them. And normally I wouldnt include alliums in a plane salad since your neighbours might give you the stink eye when you pop open your lunch box, but Ive tempered their potency by pickling them ever-so-slightly. This is done in the same container that youre going to put your salad in, preceded by mixing up the dressing right in there too. Easy peasy! I guess I should mention that this salad is not just delicious on a plane - its also fabulous enjoyed at ground level. Perfect for road trips, picnics, school or office lunches, just make sure you make it the day before so that all the ingredients are cool. If you travel with this salad on the warm side, it could spoil in transit.     Maybe its a bit strange to have a travel salad as the first post of the year, but Im a bit tired of the whole new year, new you rant. People expect me to talk about cleansing or detoxing in January, and although Im all for reflecting and re-evaluating ones lifestyle choices, Im a bit bored of the narrative saying that the first day of the new year is the time to atone for all our dietary sins. Why do we need a specific day to act as a reason to start treat ourselves well? If there a New Years resolution to pull out of this post, it should be to resolve to make yourself delicious food when you go anywhere. Avoid the overpriced convenience food, no matter how healthy it is, since nothing sold in a package will ever compare to the freshness, or high-vibrational energy of food youve lovingly prepared for yourself. Case closed! If you’d like more travel food recipes, tips, and inspiration, check out my two previous articles here and here.       Print recipe     The Epic Travel Salad Makes enough for 2-3 meals Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 170g dry black /­­ beluga lentils, soaked overnight if possible 2 1/­­2 pounds /­­ 1200g beets 1 shallot, sliced into rings 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt zest and juice of 1 large organic lemon 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1 Tbsp. cumin seeds 1/­­3 cup /­­ 60g pumpkin seeds 1 tsp. honey (vegans sub with maple syrup) 3 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil heaping 1/­­2 cup /­­ 80g pomegranate seeds heaping 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100g olives, with pits 1 cup /­­ 25g parsley 1/­­2 tsp. flaky salt, or more to taste 1 small head romaine lettuce Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Place whole beets (with the skin on) on a rimmed baking sheet and roast for around 45-60 minutes, until you can easily insert a sharp knife into the center (baking time depends on the size of your beets). Remove from oven, let cool completely, then slip the skins off. Slice into bite-sized batons. 2. While the beets are roasting, cook the lentils. Drain and rinse well (if youve soaked them overnight), and place them in a pot, cover with plenty of fresh water, and bring them to a boil. Reduce to simmer, place a lid on the pot, and cook until tender (about 15-20 minutes if youve soaked them, a little longer if you havent). Salt the lentils a few minutes before theyre done - if you salt them at the beginning of cooking, the skins will be tough and theyll take longer to soften. Drain and rinse lightly. Set aside. 3. While the lentils are cooking, prepare the dressing. Slice the shallot into very thin rings, then place them in the container that youre going to use to store the salad. Add the salt and combine them well. Wait about 2 minutes, then add the lemon zest, juice and apple cider vinegar (these ingredients will lightly pickle the shallots, plus act a as a base for your dressing). 4. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast the cumin seeds until fragrant, set aside to cool. Without washing the pan, toast the pumpkin seeds until fragrant and popping, then set aside to cool. 5. Back to the dressing: whisk in the honey and olive oil. Add the prepared beets, lentils, pomegranate seeds, olives, parsley, toasted cumin seeds, pumpkin seeds and flaky salt. Fold to thoroughly combine. Taste and add more salt if necessary (remember that the ingredients will absorb some salt while marinating, and that it will taste milder in the air). 6. You can either chop the romaine lettuce up and place it on top of the salad (dont mix it in - it will get totally mushy), or you can leave the head whole and peel off the leaves and use them as little salad boats. If youre going for the latter, wrap the washed head in beeswax cloth to keep it fresh. The Wild Heart High Spirit Retreats are starting tomorrow, and I cannot wait to embrace each of the women who have traveled from every corner of the earth to join us here in Bali. We are going to eat the most delicious food, practice yoga, dance, laugh, learn, and celebrate the joy of being alive together! We have one space left for the second week, so if youre interested in joining us in tropical paradise, please visit our site for more information. Peace and blessings for an abundant, healthy, vibrant year ahead. Thank you for being here. I love you. xo, Sarah B The post The Epic Travel Salad appeared first on My New Roots.

Vegan Mac and Cheese Powder – Cheese Mix Recipe

December 15 2018 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Mac and Cheese Powder – Cheese Mix RecipeThis Easy Vegan Mac and Cheese Powder is perfect to whip up mac and cheese within minutes when needed. It also makes a great gift! Add flavors and herbs for variations. Soyfree Vegan Mac and Cheese Mix Recipe. Glutenfree Nutfree Option.  Jump to Recipe  You know when you need some mac and cheese fix super quickly and without having to think much about what to add when and how much! Or a Creamy Cheese Sauce to dip some veggies, This mix comes in handy! Just mix or blend with non dairy milk, simmer and done. Add cooked pasta, sauteed veggies or salsa for a dip! Saute some onion, garlic and veggies such as mushrooms to  the cheese sauce for variation. Add some flavors such as chipotle pepper or cajun or garam masala. Play away! You can use the mix to make a fabulous cheese sauce to dress roasted veggies or bowls or use as a dip! You can also make a casserole with it. Add more herbs of choice. Lots of options!Continue reading: Vegan Mac and Cheese Powder – Cheese Mix RecipeThe post Vegan Mac and Cheese Powder – Cheese Mix Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Butternut Squash Pasta

December 3 2018 Meatless Monday 

How better to enjoy seasonal winter squash than with pasta! Make this dish rich by using heavy cream in the sauce, or lighten it up with almond milk. This recipe comes to us from Christopher Mohs of Pumpernickel&Rye.   Serves 4 - 1 1/­­2 lbs. butternut squash (cubed) - 1 lb. trottole pasta - 1/­­4 cup dark brown sugar - 3 tbsp olive oil - 1/­­4 tsp salt - 1/­­4 tsp pepper - 3 tbsp heavy cream (or substitute almond milk) - 1/­­4 cup pumpkin seeds - 1 tbsp fresh thyme plus sprigs for garnish   Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. In a bowl, combine the butternut squash, dark brown sugar, olive oil, salt, and pepper and toss to coat the squash evenly. Pour into a roasting dish, cover with aluminum foil and roast for 45 - 60 minutes. In the last 20 minutes of roasting, boil and cook the pasta. When the pasta has cooked, strain and return pasta to the cooking pot, remove the roasted butternut squash from the oven and place a 1/­­4 of the butternut squash into the pot with the pasta (these are chunky bits for the final dish). Put the remaining squash in a blender and puree until smooth; add the heavy cream (or almond milk) and give one quick blitz. Pour the pureed squash along with fresh thyme and pumpkin seeds to the pasta and stir to combine and coat the pasta. Serve and enjoy! The post Butternut Squash Pasta appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook + Free Drinks Ebook

December 1 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook + Free Drinks Ebook It’s been around three years since we started working on this cookbook, so finally telling you about it today feels monumental, exhilarating, and terrifying all at the same time. Our new cookbook is called Simply Vibrant: All-Day Vegetarian Recipes for Colorful Plant-Based Cooking, and it’s available now! It’s written by me, Anya, and photographed by Masha – the same mother/­­daughter team that’s behind this blog. Today, we are sharing some key details about the book, accompanied by a book trailer (above), sneak peak photos and ways to order. We’ll also be talking about the free ebook that we created for anyone who buys the book and leaves a review. SO excited to share all of this with you :) About the Book -- Simply Vibrant comes out on February 6th, 2018. Anyone who orders the book and writes a review will also have access to a free drinks ebook that we made as a little thank you gift. More on that below. -- There are 129 recipes in the book, all of which are vegetarian, 124 of them are vegan, and 109 of them are gluten-free or gluten-free adaptable. My goal was to create healthful, everyday recipes that require accessible, whole food ingredients – mainly vegetables, fruit, herbs, spices, grains, and legumes. The recipes are very much influenced by the seasons, too. Our hope is that you’ll be able to find whatever good-looking produce you picked up at your market or store in the index of the book, and get some ideas on preparing it. -- I used comfort food classics from around the world as inspiration for the recipes in the book, which also influenced the book’s organization. The chapters are as follows: Morning Porridges and Pancakes – this chapter contains breakfast recipes for every season, both savory and sweet. Salads and Bowls – this one has a grain bowl recipe for every season, as well as plenty of vibrant salads for every occasion. Wraps and Rolls – this chapter celebrates the wrapping techniques seen in cuisines all around the world. There are recipes for summer rolls, enchiladas, burritos, maki (sushi), collard green wraps, and more. Soups and Stews – the recipes in this chapter range from hearty winter stews to refreshing and light summer soups. Risotto, Paella and Pilaf – for this chapter, I took the format of well-loved rice dishes from around the world, and reinvented them with the use of different vegetables and grains (there are even a couple of completely grain-free risottos!). Noodles, Pasta and Pizza – this one is all about the coziest foods out there, reimagined to be more vegetable-forward – there are recipes for homemade pasta and dumplings, but also for noodles and pizza crusts made with vegetables. Fritters and Veggie Burgers – this chapter has a veggie burger recipe for every season, as well as plenty of lacy, plant-packed fritters. Just Veggies – this chapter is here to prove that seasonal vegetables only need a simple nudge to taste amazing – there are techniques for marinating, pickling, braising, stewing, and glazing that will take your produce to the next level. Sweets for Every Season – the title of this chapter speaks for itself – there are brownies, galettes, pies, cakes, and pots de creme, made with unrefined sweeteners, fruit, and even some vegetables. Basics and Sauces – a foundational chapter, which will supply you with ammunition for creating vibrant meals quickly – from mind-blowing sauces to broth that will cost you $0 in extra groceries. -- I’ve been thinking a lot about the amount of waste we produce as humans, and I’ve been working on developing techniques for using up all parts of the produce I buy. I present some of these ideas in this book, from the aforementioned veggie scrap broth, to a watermelon rind marmalade, broccoli stem risotto, and more. -- The introduction has a story about my shoemaker grandfather, which has basically become folklore in our family. I was very excited to immortalize it in a book. -- If you have our first cookbook, The Vibrant Table, this book is a follow-up to that. While The Vibrant Table focused on creativity in plant-based cooking, Simply Vibrant is much more focused on the everyday. It’s all about putting breakfast, lunch and dinner on the table. -- The book is 328 pages long, hardcover, and 7.5″ x 10″ in size. Every recipe is accompanied by a beautiful photograph, with the exception of a few sauces. Praise Here are some kind words we’ve heard about the book from people and publications we greatly admire. “Simply Vibrant captures the kind of accidentally-vegetarian food we want to eat right now.” --Bon Appetit Simply Vibrant is intuitively organized and brilliantly executed. It illustrates how many of us are striving to eat these days: crave-able, template-style recipes with seasonal touches, simple techniques, and an underlying nourishing essence that reads as encouraging, rather than prescriptive. Anyas approach starts with a deep-rooted reverence for what nature provides in all of its seasons--and in all of its sometimes neglected or wasted forms. The thoughtful uses for carrot tops, chickpea soaking liquid, and barley cooking water--like the rest of the books delicious plant-based recipes--speak to both virtue and pure enjoyment. This book inspires me to cook (and live!) with a deeper sense of care and appreciation. --Laura Wright, author of The First Mess Cookbook Anyas approach to food and the seasons always stands out as creative, inventive, and colorful. Simply Vibrant contains an abundance of inspiring recipes and clever tricks to add more nourishment and adventure to your everyday meals. --Amy Chaplin, James Beard award-winning author of At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen Anya has the incredible ability to inspire her readers to cook, but more importantly, she helps them tap into their own intuition to create delicious meals in a more relaxed way. I love her emphasis on seasonality, and her creative approach to leaf-to-root cooking, using every ingredient to its fullest potential without wasting a single seed! This recipe collection is bursting with global flavors, unique ingredient combinations, and of course, vibrancy on the highest level. --Sarah Britton, holistic nutritionist and author of My New Roots and Naturally Nourished   We are longtime fans of Golubka Kitchen and Anyas creative and beautiful plant-based recipes. Her new book is jam-packed with healthy, flavorful, and simple recipes and lots of interesting suggestions on how to cook with the odds and ends of produce that usually are discarded--like making marmalade from watermelon rinds and risotto using broccoli stems. So clever! --David Frenkiel and Luise Vindahl, creators of the blog Green Kitchen Stories “Exciting, vegetable led food.” -- Anna Jones, author of A Modern Way to Cook, A Modern Way to Eat and columnist for The Guardian “What made me want to cook from Simply Vibrant is its more relaxed approach to plant-based cooking” --Toronto Star Order Here’s where you can order Simply Vibrant. Many of these outlets are selling the book at a discounted price. Amazon Barnes & Noble Roost Powell’s IndieBound Book Depository (ships worldwide for free) Amazon Canada Indigo Free Ebook: Simply Vibrant Drinks To show our immense gratitude to anyone who orders the book and leaves a review, we made a little thank you gift in the form of a free drinks ebook. It’s sort of like a mini e-cookbook, complete with our favorite, lush drink recipes that won’t be published anywhere else. Click here for instructions on how to claim your ebook and see a preview of the recipes within. Thank You This book only exists because of this blog, and this blog exists because of you – your support, kindness, and curiosity in visiting this space, cooking from our recipes, and reading our stories. Seriously, none of this would be here without YOU. So thank you! Truly, from the bottom of our hearts. – Anya and Masha The post Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook + Free Drinks Ebook appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Basil Pesto

November 23 2018 VegKitchen 

Basil Pesto Bold-flavored pesto sauce is arguably the most celebrated use for basil. Here’s a basic recipe, just right for a good-sized amount of your favorite pasta. It’s also good used as a sandwich spread, as a change of pace pizza sauce or dressing for potato salad. Serves: about 6 (about 1 cup, enough for 10 to 12 ounces of pasta) 1 cup firmly packed basil leaves 1/­­4 cup walnuts or toasted pine nuts 1/­­4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 1/­­4 cup grated Parmesan-style non-dairy cheese Juice of 1/­­2 lemon 1 to 2 cloves garlic, optional (see note) Hot or warm cooked pasta Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste Combine all of the ingredients in a food processor. Process until the mixture is a rough but evenly textured paste.  Toss the pesto with pasta, season with salt and pepper, and serve. Note: If you like garlicky pesto, but not the aftertaste of garlic, you can sauté the pesto in a little of the olive oil beforehand. Here are lots more recipes for simple sauces and such. The article Basil Pesto appeared first on VegKitchen.

Split Pea Pesto Spread

November 12 2018 Meatless Monday 

This flavorful spread pairs split peas with pine nuts, basil and garlic, adding a punch of protein to the traditional pesto recipe! Its perfect to serve on crostini with your choice of toppings. This recipe comes to us from our friends at USA Pulses. Serves 4 - 1/­­2 cup cooked split peas - 1/­­4 cup pine nuts, toasted - 2 cups fresh basil - 2 cloves garlic, roughly chopped - 1/­­2 cup Parmesan cheese, shredded - 1 tsp salt - 1/­­2 cup olive oil   Combine the split peas, pine nuts, basil, garlic, Parmesan and salt in a food processor. Pulse for about 10 seconds until roughly chopped and combined. Slowly add the olive oil with the food processor running, stopping to scrape down the sides of the bowl as needed. Continue to pulse until mixture reaches desired consistency. Use immediately as pasta sauce, or spread on crostini or crackers with your toppings of choice. Transfer unused portion to air-tight container and store in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. The post Split Pea Pesto Spread appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Tempeh Tacos from Betty Goes Vegan

February 8 2019 Oh My Veggies 

I get migraines. Crazy migraines. Migraines that make me see strange glowing orbs. Migraines that make me leave hair salons in ambulances. But the worst thing about my migraines is that they cause me to have weird aversions to certain foods. So, for example, when I had a peanut butter and jelly sandwich for lunch and got a migraine a few hours later, suddenly I could no longer stomach PB&Js. The very thought of them would make me feel sick to my stomach. Usually I get over these aversions after a few months, but then there was the time I got a migraine after eating tacos–oh, it was bad. And I wasn’t able to eat tacos for a full year. The Year Without Tacos will go down as one of the worst years ever. Because along with veggie burgers and pasta, tacos were part of the trifecta of easy go-to meals in our household. I felt a little bit lost without taco night. Tacos are fast! They’re delicious! And putting them together is kind of fun too, right? It was a happy day when I finally found myself thinking, “Hey, you know what? I feel like tacos for dinner! I […]

Golden Roasted Cauliflower with Red Onion

February 4 2019 VegKitchen 

Golden Roasted Cauliflower with Red Onion Curry and lemon add an offbeat flavor and vivid color to this roasted cauliflower dish. Red onion and garlic add depth of flavor. Use on its own as a tasty side dish, or toss with pasta or grains. Continuing reading Golden Roasted Cauliflower with Red Onion on VegKitchen

Pasta e Ceci – The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo

January 24 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Pasta e Ceci – The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo We had the most transcendent experience eating this simple, Italian peasant soup during our retreat in Abruzzo this past fall. We had just returned to our b&b from a beautiful mountain hike, where we foraged rosehips and mint, and everyone was very ready for lunch after that good dose of exercise and fresh air. Our hosts at the bed and breakfast served a homemade pasta e ceci (pasta and chickpea soup), and it really hit the spot with its coziness and simplicity. There are still spots open for our retreat in Abruzzo this coming October! You can read all about our past retreat here, complete with photos and testimonials. This time around, we will be focusing on re-centering and relaxation, together with exploring beautiful Abruzzo. We are super excited to have an on-site yoga/­­meditation instructor and an on-site acupuncture physician, both offering daily services. There will be lots of fun and useful cooking workshops with us, as well as visits to an olive grove, winery, and a family truffle plantation. You can see our whole sample itinerary below, and book here! Click Here to book a spot at the retreat! Abruzzo 2019 Retreat Sample Itinerary *details are subject to change /­­ all meals are vegan with a vegetarian option DAY 1 – Pick up in Rome at 1:30 PM, Piazza Bologna – Drive to Abruzzo – Unpack and relax – Aperitif and dinner prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team DAY 2 – Morning yoga and meditation with our on-site certified yoga instructor – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration (different recipe every day) – Diagnostic consultations, facial and/­­or body gua sha massage, and acupressure with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (1 individual appointment included in the cost of the retreat, additional charge for all follow-up appointments) – Lunch prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team – Time to relax, forest bathe, and hike the grounds after gua sha/­­acupressure appointments – Dinner at a local restaurant – Optional evening meditation DAY 3 – Morning yoga and singing bowl meditation – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration – Diagnostic consultations, facial and/­­or body gua sha massage, and acupressure with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (1 individual appointment included in the cost of the retreat, additional charge for all follow-up appointments) – Lunch prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team – Foraging walk to gather herbs + medicinal jam and herbal tea workshop with the Golubka Kitchen team – Dinner prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team – Optional evening meditation DAY 4 – Morning yoga + sun gazing/­­A.M. sun therapy – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration – Visit to an olive grove with 600 year old trees + meditation and grounding in the orchard – Sample olive oil made with the olives from the grove + light picnic-style lunch – Plant-based cooking & meal planning workshop with the Golubka Kitchen team – Dinner – Optional evening meditation * Option to bypass any of the P.M. activities for an additional gua sha massage/­­acupressure appointment with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (at additional cost). DAY 5 – Morning yoga and singing bowl meditation – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration – Truffle hunting in Villa Santa Lucia – Truffle lunch in a locals home – Pasta-making workshop with an Abruzzo local + vegan cheese workshop with Golubka Kitchen – Pasta and vegan cheese dinner – Optional evening meditation * Option to bypass any of the P.M. activities for an additional gua sha massage/­­acupressure appointment with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (at additional cost). DAY 6 – Morning yoga and meditation – Breakfast prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, with superfood latte/­­smoothie demonstration – Visit a 200-year-old family-run winery + wine tasting and light lunch – Magic Moisturizer + homemade skincare workshop with the Golubka Kitchen team – Goodbye dinner at a local restaurant – Optional evening meditation * Option to bypass any of the P.M. activities for an additional gua sha massage/­­acupressure appointment with our on-site Acupuncture Physician (at additional cost). DAY 7 – Breakfast – Head back to Piazza Bologna in Rome (12:30 PM drop-off) Click Here to book a spot at the retreat! Let’s talk more about the soup! Pasta e Ceci is not a strictly Abruzzese dish, it’s made all over Italy, in slightly different variations. This recipe is inspired by the Abruzzo version. This soup completely blew us away with its ratio of simplicity to flavor. All the ingredients are very, very modest. You start out by making a good broth, with chickpeas and some aromatics. Then while the broth simmers, you make a very rustic, eggless pasta dough, which is then cut into short, flat noodles, called sagne pasta. The pasta then gets cooked right in the chickpea broth, and everything is served as a chunky soup, with plenty of olive oil and some spicy red pepper on top. There’s also an ingenious, crispy element that helps switch up the textures in the soup. Some of the fresh pasta gets toasted on a dry skillet, until it turns into crispy strips, that are then used to garnish every plate. It is so good. This is a great time to say that you can totally use store-bought pasta here! The eggless sagne pasta is easy to make, but it’s still much more of a project than just opening up a package and being ready to go (just skip the crispy pasta element). If you’re ever craving something resembling chicken soup from your childhood, this is a great, vegan version that still hits all of those comfort notes. Enjoy! Pasta e Ceci - The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the soup 1 cup chickpeas - soaked overnight in purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2 ribs celery - sliced in half 1 yellow onion - quartered, skin on 2 cloves garlic - smashed 2 bay leaves 10 cups water sea salt black pepper 2 medium carrots - grated red pepper flakes - to taste handful chopped parsley - for garnish olive oil - for garnish fresh sagne pasta (recipe below) or about 12 oz dried store-bought pasta for the sagne pasta 1½ cups spelt, whole wheat, or sprouted spelt/­­wheat flour ½ teaspoon sea salt 1 tablespoon olive oil ½ cup purified warm water, plus more as needed Instructions to make the soup Drain and rinse the chickpeas. In a large soup pot, combine the chickpeas, celery, onion, garlic, bay leaves, and water. Bring up to a boil over high heat. Turn down the heat and simmer, covered, or until the chickpeas are cooked and tender (this might take up to an hour or even longer for older chickpeas). Make the pasta while the broth is cooking. Salt the broth well at the end. Remove the aromatics (celery, onion, garlic, bay leaves) with a slotted spoon and discard. Add black pepper to taste to the broth, along with the carrots and red pepper flakes. Bring everything up to a boil, then simmer for 10 more minutes, or until the carrots are cooked through. Meanwhile, heat a dry pan over medium-high heat. Add ¼ of the amount of the pasta to the pan and toast, stirring often, until the pasta becomes crispy. Use the crispy pasta to garnish the soup. Bring the soup back up to a boil, add in the rest of the pasta (recipe below) and cook for 30 seconds to 2 minutes, until al dente. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the soup, topped with crispy sagne pasta, parsley, and a drizzle of olive oil. If using dried store-bought pasta, cook it into the soup until al dente, and skip the crispy pasta step. to make the sagne pasta Mix the flour and salt together in a large bowl with a fork. Make a well in the center and pour in the oil and water. Begin to mix with a fork, slowly incorporating the flour into the well of oil and water. When all the flour is mixed in, transfer the dough to a floured surface and knead it for 10 minutes, until smooth and elastic. All flour takes on water differently, so add more water, 1 tablespoon at a time, if your dough seems dry. It should feel smooth, but not too wet, with no cracking. Form a ball with the dough and tightly wrap it in plastic wrap, or cover with a damp kitchen towel in the bowl. Let the dough rest for 30 minutes at room temperature. Place the dough back on the well-floured work surface and knead it for another 10 minutes, until even more springy. Cut the dough in half and keep one half covered with a damp kitchen towel while you roll out the pasta. Keep your working surface well-floured. Roll one piece of dough at a time into a paper-thin sheet. Cut the rolled-out dough into the sagne pasta shape, about 1½ x ¼, using a pizza cutter or a knife. Transfer the pasta to a parchment-covered tray, sprinkled with plenty of flour to prevent sticking. Continue rolling out and cutting the rest of the dough. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Colourful Veggie Falafel with Pickled Turnips Lemongrass Mung Beans over Spaghetti Squash Tomato Dahl with Gluten-Free Naan Roasted Garlic and Parsnip Hummus .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Pasta e Ceci – The Coziest Pasta and Chickpea Soup from Abruzzo appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Tortellini with Roasted Pepper Sauce

January 23 2019 Oh My Veggies 

When the only things on your shopping list are stuffed pasta and a vegetable, that’s what we call a simple recipe. But not only is this recipe simple, it’s also super tasty! In this recipe I use tortellini to switch it up from the traditional penne and spaghetti. Quick tip: If want to remove the skin from your roasted peppers, remove peppers from the oven, put the pepper pieces in a paper  bag, and wait a few minutes. Once the bag fills with steam, you will be able to easily remove the pepper skins with a knife.

Italian Pasta and Bean Soup

January 11 2019 VegKitchen 

Italian Pasta and Bean Soup Like Minestrone, Italian Pasta and Bean Soup is a classic, sometimes referred to as pasta e fagiole. It’s a meal in a bowl that you can complete easily with fresh garlic bread and a big salad. Adapted from Vegan Soups and Hearty Stews for All Seasons by Nava Atlas. Continuing reading Italian Pasta and Bean Soup on VegKitchen

american chop suey recipe | veg american chopsuey | veg chopsuey recipe

December 17 2018 hebbar's kitchen 

american chop suey recipe | veg american chopsuey | veg chopsuey recipeamerican chop suey recipe | veg american chopsuey | veg chopsuey recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. chopsuey recipes are popular across america and are mainlay prepared with pastas. traditionally it is made with meat, particularly the grounded beef with sauteed onions and tomato based thick sauce. but this recipe is vegetarian alternative to the popular american chop suey recipe. The post american chop suey recipe | veg american chopsuey | veg chopsuey recipe appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Mushrooms (Pasta Alfredo, Minestrone, Gravy)

December 12 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

I’ve noticed a pattern that I fall into every fall. At the very start of it, right as there’s the first serious chill in the air, I get in the mood for all the cozy fall foods. For me, those always involve tons of root vegetables and winter squashes, and I enjoy them very, very thoroughly for the next month or two. That must be why I’m generally already sick of roasted root vegetables and almost can’t look at another squash right around the holidays. Meanwhile, there’s still January, February, and March (maybe even some of April?) to endure. I’m pretty sure I’m not alone in this :) Thankfully, there are mushrooms. They have all the elements needed for fall/­­winter cooking: they are earthy, versatile, satisfying, do well with wintery preparations, and pair well with cozy spices and herbs (and they are decidedly unlike root vegetables or squash). So today we are sharing a meal plan, consisting of 3 distinctly different, umami-bomb mains, centered around a batch of sautéed mushrooms: pasta alfredo, minestrone, and gravy with mash. And as usual, there’s a shopping list and step-by-step prep tips. Hope you guys enjoy this one! Menu - Mushroom Pasta Alfredo - Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone - Mushroom Gravy over Potato-Parsnip Mash *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free if needed, see the recipes for serving sizes Shopping List (Print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan mini. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Add whatever other ingredients you’ll need for the week here, if doing shopping for the whole week. Produce 2 large yellow onions 2 lbs mushrooms of choice (ex: crimini and shiitake) 1 large head of garlic 2 medium-large Russet or Yukon Gold potatoes 2 large parsnips 2 lemons 1 small bunch kale of choice 1 large bunch of parsley rosemary (2 sprigs) Bulk 1 cup chickpeas 1/­­2 cup cashews Staples/­­Other sea salt olive oil or other oil of choice miso balsamic vinegar kombu (optional) 10-12 oz penne pasta (gluten-free if needed) Basic Prep Complete these three steps on the weekend (or whenever you have the time), and these meals will be a breeze to put together during the week, thanks to all the prepared components. 1) Cook the Mushrooms Here, we are cooking our mushrooms with onions and garlic (don’t worry, 2 lbs of mushrooms cook down quite a bit) to use as a base for all three of our meals. Half of them will be left whole and the other half will be blended into the creamy Mushroom Alfredo sauce. Sautéed Mushrooms   Print Ingredients oil of choice 2 large yellow onions - chopped sea salt 2 lbs any mushrooms of choice (we used a mix of crimini and shiitake) - sliced 3 cloves of garlic - minced Instructions Heat a generous glug of oil in large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onions and a pinch of salt, and cook for about 10 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms and another pinch of salt. If your large pan is still not large enough to fit all the mushrooms, add them in batches, they will cook down significantly. Cook for another 10-15 minutes, until all the liquid released by the mushrooms evaporates. Store refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226   2) Cook the Chickpeas and Vegetables for the Mash + Make Veggie Broth all in one go I love this step so much. Cooking beans (don’t forget to soak them overnight) is such a perfect opportunity to also make delicious, homemade veggie broth, and maybe even to boil a few vegetables for another dish in the process (which only further deepen the broth flavor). Here, we are cooking chickpeas for the Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone, boiling potatoes and parsnips for the Potato-Parsnip Mash and magically making a very flavorful broth in the meantime. The broth will be used in the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce and the Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone. Chickpeas, Potatoes, Parsnips & Broth   Print Ingredients 1 cup chickpeas - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2 medium-large potatoes, Russet or Yukon Gold - peeled and cut into large chunks 2 large parsnips - peeled and cut into large chunks 2 cloves garlic - smashed 2 bay leaves 1 sprig of rosemary 1 small sheet of kombu seaweed (optional) any other vegetable scraps that you might have on hand (leek tops, onion skins, etc.) 14 cups purified water sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the chickpeas. Place them in a soup pot, along with the potatoes, parsnips, garlic, bay leaves, rosemary, kombu and any other vegetable scraps, if using. Cover with 14 cups of water. Place the pot over high heat and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook covered, for 30 minutes, or until the chickpeas, potatoes, and parsnips are all cooked. Generously salt the broth towards the end of cooking. Tasting is very important here - the broth should taste very flavorful and well-salted. Remove the potatoes and parsnips with a slotted spoon. Store them away in an air-tight container in the refrigerator, until you are ready to make the Potato-Parsnip Mash. Remove the bay leaves, rosemary, kombu, and any vegetable scraps, if using, and discard. Measure out 9-9½ cups of the broth and leave it in the pot with the chickpeas. This will be your base for the Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone. Store the rest of the broth in a separate airtight container, you will be using it for the Alfredo and gravy and mash. Keep the broth and chickpeas refrigerated right in the soup pot if possible, since youll be using it for minestrone later in the week. Notes Chickpea cooking times vary depending on their age, so you might have to cook them longer than 30 minutes. If you find yourself having to cook the chickpeas much longer, take out the potatoes and parsnips with a slotted spoon to avoid the vegetables getting mushy. 3.5.3226   3) Make the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce This is a play on a creamy pasta sauce, complete with the earthy and sweet flavors of sautéed mushrooms and onions. Other flavor superstars like balsamic, miso, and lemon juice take this vegan ‘Alfredo’ to the next level. We’ll be using this sauce in the Pasta, Minestrone, and the Mushroom Gravy. Mushroom Alfredo Sauce   Print Ingredients half of the sautéed mushrooms and onions (from above, about 2¾ cups) ½ cup cashews - soaked in purified water for 2-4 hours, or boiling water for 10 minutes 1 tablespoon miso 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons olive oil juice from ½ lemon salt and pepper - to taste about ¾ cup chickpea broth (from above) - to achieve a saucy consistency Instructions Combine the mushrooms and onions, cashews, miso, balsamic, olive oil, lemon juice, salt, and pepper, in a high-speed blender and pulse until smooth. Stream in the chickpea broth with the blender still running, until you achieve a good sauce consistency. The sauce shouldnt be too thick or too runny, aim for the sweet spot in between. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Store the sauce refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226   Recipes This dreamy pasta dish comes together in a flash, thanks to all the weekend prep from above. It’s so cozy and full of deep, wintery flavors from the Mushroom Alfredo and meaty slices of sautéed mushrooms. Lemon juice and fresh parsley provide some necessary brightness, and a dusting of nutritional yeast gives that final, cheesy finish. Mushroom Pasta Alfredo   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients 10-12 oz penne pasta - gluten-free if needed ⅔ of the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce (from above, about 2 cups) ⅔ of the remaining cooked mushrooms and onions (from above) 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast, plus more for sprinkling juice from ½ lemon ½ large bunch of parsley - chopped Instructions Cook the pasta al dente, in a large pot of well-salted water, according to the instructions on the package. Reserve ¼ - ½ cup of pasta water before draining. Meanwhile, place a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce, cooked mushrooms and onions, nutritional yeast, and reserved pasta water. Stir to mix and heat through. Once the pasta is done, add it to the pan with the sauce and gently stir to coat. Add the lemon juice and parsley and carefully stir to incorporate. Enjoy right away, reserving 2¼ cups of the mushroomy pasta for the minestrone (recipe below). Keep the reserved pasta refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226     This Minestrone gives a second life to the Mushroom Pasta Alfredo from above. Minestrone is traditionally a soup made of whatever ingredients are around, and a perfect fridge-clean-out dish. We are honoring that here by adding some of our reserved mushroomy pasta to the flavorful chickpea broth and chickpeas that we cooked during prep. The sauce from the pasta gives even more depth to the broth, and the pasta makes the dish perfectly filling and satisfying. There’s also rosemary, kale, lemon juice, and black pepper. All simple ingredients that come together to make a layered and comforting soup, perfect for any winter meal. Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 cup cooked chickpeas (from above) 9-9½ cups vegetable broth (from above) 1 tablespoon chopped rosemary 1 bunch kale - stems removed, torn into bite-size pieces 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast, plus more for serving 2¼ cup reserved mushroom pasta (from above) freshly ground black pepper juice from 1 lemon parsley - for serving Instructions Combine the chickpeas and broth in a soup pot (if not already combined). Optionally, add ½ cup of the chickpeas, ½ cup of the broth, and the rosemary to an upright blender and blend until smooth. Pour the mixture back into the soup and mix it in for a creamier consistency. Bring the broth up to a boil and reduce the heat to a simmer. Add the kale to the simmering broth and cook, covered, for about 10 minutes, until soft. Also add the rosemary with the kale if you didnt blend it in earlier. Stir in the nutritional yeast, reserved mushroom pasta, and black pepper to taste, and bring the soup back up to a boil once again. Turn off the heat, stir in the lemon juice, and enjoy, garnished with parsley. 3.5.3226   Continuing on our journey of giving a new life to leftovers, we are turning the Mushroom Alfredo into a gravy and serving it over a potato and parsnip mash. The mash is quickly thrown together with the vegetables we boiled while making the chickpeas and broth during prep day. Easy and so satisfying! Mushroom Gravy over Potato-Parsnip Mash   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients for the potato-parsnip mash olive oil 1 large clove of garlic - minced 2 boiled medium-large potatoes, Russet or Yukon Gold (from above) 2 boiled large parsnips (from above) about ¼ - ½ cup warmed chickpea broth (from above) sea salt and black pepper - to taste for the mushroom gravy remaining Mushroom Alfredo Sauce (from above, ⅓ of the total) remaining cooked mushrooms and onions (from above, ⅓ of the total after sauce) about ¼ cup chickpea broth (from above) salt and black pepper - if needed, to taste parsley - for serving Instructions to make the potato-parsnip mash Warm a generous glug of olive oil on a medium pot over medium heat. Add the garlic and stir around for about 30 seconds, until fragrant. Mash the potatoes and parsnips in the same pot with a masher. Add the broth and more olive oil to taste, and continue mashing to a desired consistency, incorporating the garlic and oil from the bottom of the pot and warming the mash over medium heat. You can make the mash smooth or a bit chunky, however you prefer. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve right away. to make the mushroom gravy In a small saucepan, combine the Mushroom Alfredo, cooked mushrooms and onions, and just enough of the chickpea broth to achieve a gravy consistency. Warm the gravy over medium heat. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the gravy right away, on top of the potato-parsnip mash, garnished with parsley. Notes Any leftover broth can be frozen for future use. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage No-Recipe Healing Soup Daikon Radish Pasta With Corn and Tomatoes in Creamy Coconut Sauce One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Mushrooms (Pasta Alfredo, Minestrone, Gravy) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreats Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap

December 2 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreats Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap We are so excited to announce that registration for two of our retreats in Abruzzo, Italy is now open for the Spring of 2019! We hosted our first foraging and cooking retreat there this past October, and it really exceeded all of our expectations. We are elated to announce that this time around, we will have an on-site Acupuncture Physician (for one of the retreats) and an on-site Yoga Teacher (for both retreats)! In addition to cooking, eating, foraging, hiking, and sightseeing in the beautiful Abruzzo countryside, we will be exploring the ways to inner balance through yoga, meditation, and ancient techniques of Chinese Medicine. Read on for retreat registration, testimonials, and a photo recap of our first retreat. We hope to see you in the spring :) 1) Re-Center Retreat 2019 with On-Site Acupuncture Physician and Daily Yoga/­­Meditation (May 27th - June 2nd, 2019) For the wellness enthusiast and vegan or vegetarian (or plant-loving) foodie looking to relax and re-center. Activities and Services will include: one-on-one appointments with on-site Acupuncture Physician (diagnostic consultation, acupressure, deeply relaxing facial and body gua sha massage), daily yoga with on-site certified yoga instructor, meditation, forest-bathing, plant-based meals prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, foraging, truffle hunting, meditation in a 600 year old olive grove and olive oil tasting, winery visit and wine tasting, plant-based cooking, medicinal jam, and herbal tonic classes with the Golubka Kitchen team, cooking with Abruzzo locals, and more! Click to Book | Click to See a Sample Itinerary 2) Forage, Cook & Yoga Retreat (June 4th - June 10th, 2019) For the vegan or vegetarian (or plant-loving) foodie, who also enjoys daily yoga and meditation. Activities and Services will include: sampling the best of Abruzzo’s plant-based fare, truffle hunting, wine tasting, 600 year old olive grove visit and olive oil tasting, pasta-making class with Abruzzo locals, cooking classes with the Golubka Kitchen team, foraging and cooking local edible plants, mountain hikes and visits to mountain villages, daily yoga with on-site certified yoga instructor, meditation, and more! Click to Book | Click to See a Sample Itinerary Testimonials “Having the opportunity to explore a lesser known region of Italy to find its hidden gems in the Culinary arts was such an enriching experience! Getting to see first hand how the people in these areas live, visiting locals in their homes... From truffle hunting to tasting oil from 600 year old olive groves... Wild foraging for greens & making pasta in an Italian womans kitchen.... Not the typical trip to Italy. It was a delightful & delicious experience!” – Rachel, Alabama “I loved the retreat. It was well managed, we had the best food, awesome accommodation, great people, perfectly sized travel group and great tour guides. I had looked very much forward to this retreat and it was even better than I imagined. You created an amazing experience, with wonderful and very unique accommodations, the best meals I have ever had, set in a beautiful landscape, off the beaten path. The silence was palpable and so welcome to step out of the noisy and hectic lifestyle most of us have these days. I seriously consider joining you again, so I can have more of those meals, go back to the medieval village of Santo Stefano and the unique scattered hotel. We also had an awesome group, which made it even more special!” – Claudia, Massachusetts “It was a trip of a lifetime. Abruzzo could not have been more beautiful! I loved the diversity of the land, the hiking, cooking and loved loved loved the food. I also was glad that it was not a large group…I liked the intimacy of the smaller number of participants. It truly was a remarkable 6 days and you all were so kind, knowledgeable and pleasant to be with.” – Helen, Michigan “Thank you for the wonderful trip. It was so much more than I thought it would be. A deep dive into the food, culture and people of Abruzzo. I had experiences that I could never have on my own. I thought we were a good mix of ages, interests and countries. Diversity makes things so interesting.” – Maudia, Michigan “I’ve been to Italy before but never like this! We visited magical places that I’d never know about on my own: Santo Stefano with its fairytale charm, the beautiful truffle plantation, ancient olive grove, a winery located right in a family home’s basement… Every single one was a unique, unforgettable experience. Thank you!” – Katya, Sochi Truffle Hunting & Tasting We visited a family truffle plantation, where the sweet truffle-hunting dogs Rita and Nina dug up about 1kg of summer truffles right in front of us. We then got to have home-cooked lunch at the truffle plantation owners’ house, where we sampled the day’s harvest, as well as the family’s line of truffle pastes. Hiking and Foraging We hiked up beautiful mountain paths to see historical castles, churches, and hermitages, and foraged for wild herbs, berries, and fruit along the way. We foraged rosehips, wild mint, wild chicory, figs, and even jujube dates. Exploring Local Villages & Towns Pictured below are the breathtaking towns of Pacentro, Sulmona and Santo Stefano (we stayed in Santo Stefano in this experience of a hotel), where we had the pleasure of sightseeing and visiting local artisan businesses, as well as a bustling farmer’s market. Visiting Local Artisans We visited a local wine producer (also a family business) and sampled their exquisite wines. We also had the transcendent experience of wandering around an olive grove with trees up to 600 years old, and got to taste incredibly fresh olive oil, made with the olives from those trees. Cooking, Eating & Drinking! Eating well was the main mission of this retreat, and I think it’s very safe to say that the mission was accomplished. We tasted vegan and vegetarian food from a variety of cozy restaurants, cafes, artisans, and local’s homes. We foraged and ate wild chicory, learned to make pasta and cookies, and got to know famous Abruzzo ingredients, like their local lentils, solina flour, spelt, and more. You might also like... Abruzzo, Italy: Join Our Vegan/­­Vegetarian Forage and Cook Retreat .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreats Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Creamy Sun Dried Tomato Pasta with Garlic Soy curls

November 28 2018 Vegan Richa 

Creamy Sun Dried Tomato Pasta with Garlic Soy curlsCreamy Sun Dried Tomato Pasta with Garlic Soy curls. 20 Gm of Protein. Vegan Tuscan Garlic “Chicken” And pasta. Vegan Recipe Can be Soyfree with Mushrooms or Seitan. 30 Mins. Gluten-free and nutfree option  Jump to Recipe  This Luscious 30 Minute pasta is a vegan version of a dish I used to get in some restaurant more than a decade ago. Wow that was specific Anywho, the Creamy garlicky sauce with sun dried tomato some grilled chickin gets a vegan makeover! The Soy curls and soaked in garlic veggie broth, then toasted with more garlic and freshly ground black pepper. Then added to the cream base. Sun dried tomato, herbs, fresh thyme, pasta such as farfalle or fettuccine. Bliss.  This sauce and pasta are flexible to taste and ingredients. Use gluten-free pasta if needed, some nutfree non dairy cream for no nuts and use seitan, tofu or mushrooms to sub soy curls.  Easy, Quick and Delicious! Lets make this Luscious Meal. Continue reading: Creamy Sun Dried Tomato Pasta with Garlic Soy curlsThe post Creamy Sun Dried Tomato Pasta with Garlic Soy curls appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi

November 14 2018 My New Roots 

Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi   You know that game where you give someone a word and they have to make up a story with that word in it? Im like that, except with food. Give me an ingredient, and magically, as if out of nowhere, an entire recipe (or several!) will appear in my head. I could even give you the amount of salt it needs, how the vegetables should be sliced, the oven temp, and what it should be garnished with. Its a tad psycho, but my best party trick hands down. When my friend Christiann Koepke emailed me about coming to visit her in Portland, driving to the Pacific coast, and photographing some recipes together, I was all in. And then when she suggested we put seaweed into something (because ocean) it was like someone had opened the flood gates in my brain and alllll the ideas came rushing to me. Neat! And very convenient. But what do we really want to eat at the beach when its chilly and maybe windy, maybe raining, maybe freezing-raining (it is the Pacific Northwest, after all)? The answer is soup. And I knew it was going to be a creamy, dreamy, sea veggie-kissed broth with all the tasty toppings.     When seaweed is a featured ingredient in a recipe, I tend to channel Asian flavours like miso, ginger, wasabi, toasted sesame, to compliment to the unmistakably briny, salty, ocean-y flavour of seaweed. Eaten as a staple food throughout China and Japan for thousands of years, sea vegetables are rich in essential minerals, trace minerals, chlorophyll, iodine, fiber, and lots of protein. Some sea vegetables even contain vitamin B12 - a rare element for a plant! Sea vegetables are less complex than their land-dwelling relatives. Without intricate root systems or tissues, seaweeds get their nutrients from the waters they grow in. To survive, they form root-like parts to attach themselves to rocks or other stable elements. There are three categories of sea vegetables; brown, red, and green. Brown algae thrive in cool water at depths of around 50 feet. The most commonly known brown seaweed is kelp, which can grow up to 1,500 feet (500 meters) long! Red algae, like dulse, contain elements that can gel foods. Green sea vegetables bridge the gap between land and sea plants, as they can store food as starch, just like vegetation found out of the water. The most popular kind of green algae is nori, which is what your sushi comes wrapped in.      Seaweeds range in flavours from mild to wild. Some are sweet and nutty, while others are pungent, funky, and an acquired taste. If youre a seaweed newb (which most Westerners are), I suggest starting out with a less challenging one, like arame. Arame is in the brown category of sea vegetables, but when you buy it, it will appear closer to jet black. It has a stringy texture, and almost looks like wiry hair, but will soften into tender, noodle-y strands after being soaked. Before it is packaged, arame must be cooked for seven hours, and then dried in the sun. To use, simply re-hydrate by soaking it in room temperature water for 10-15 minutes until it is soft and has doubled in volume. Arame is very high in calcium, rich in iron, potassium, vitamin A and the B vitamins. And like other brown seaweeds, arame contains sodium alginate, a compound that helps to convert heavy metals in the body into harmless salt, which is easily excreted. Besides soup, I like to put arame in stews, stir fries, and salads (heres a great recipe from the archives...check out that incredible food photography!). The flavor of arame is saline and a bit funky, but mostly sweet. The texture is like an al dente pasta, and I think it adds amazing meaty-ness to a dish, with its satisfying chew.     This soup is well balanced, and hits all the notes: sweet and creamy from the butternut, savoury from miso, chewy from the arame, warming from the ginger, spicy from the wasabi, and nutty and crunchy from the toasted sesame. You could theoretically use any kind of winter squash here, like a Hokkaido pumpkin, acorn or delicate squash. Scale back on the ginger and perhaps leave out the wasabi if youre making this for kiddos. And if you dont have arame, or youre simply not into sea vegetables, leave it out, or replace with some coconut bacon. It should be noted that once youve added the miso to the soup base, its important that you dont let it boil if you reheat it. Miso is contains delicate probiotics and enzymes that will be destroyed by high heat. The soup freezes well, but leave the wasabi out until you serve it since the flavour will fade if once its frozen.             Print recipe     Butternut Squash Miso Soup with Wasabi and Arame Serves 4 (Makes 8 cups /­­ 2 liters) Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 10g dried arame 1 large yellow onion 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 4 cloves garlic 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 25g minced fresh ginger approx. 3 lbs. /­­ 1 1/­­2 kg butternut squash 2 Tbsp. expeller-pressed coconut oil 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water, more if needed 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml white miso, or more if desired 3 Tbsp. black sesame seeds 1 tsp. wasabi powder microgreens and wasabi arugula for garnish, if desired Directions: 1. Place the arame in a medium bowl and cover with a few inches of water. Let soak while you cook the soup. 2. Roughly chop the onion, peel and mince the garlic and ginger. Peel and cube the butternut squash. 3. Melt the coconut oil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add the onions and salt, cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic and ginger, stir, and cook for another couple of minutes. When fragrant, add the butternut squash, stir and cook for 4-5 minutes with the lid on. Add the water, replace the lid, bring to a boil, and then reduce to simmer. Cook until the squash is tender, about 15 minutes. 4. While the soup is simmering, toast the sesame seeds by placing them in a small skillet over medium heat. Stir occasionally until they begin to pop. Remove from heat and let cool completely. 5. Carefully transfer the soup to a blender (or simply use an immersion blender), and blend on high until completely smooth. Add more water to thin, if necessary. 6. Place miso and wasabi powder into two small, separate bowls. Add a bit of soup to each bowl, stir well, then add just the miso blend to the blender, and blend once again to incorporate. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. Keep the wasabi to the side until serving. 7. Drain and lightly rinse the arame. 8. To serve, place the piping hot soup into bowls, drizzle with the wasabi and swirl, sprinkle with sesame seeds. Top with a handful of the arame, some microgreens, and enjoy.   Christiann and I had such an incredible time at the ocean, pulling this whole miracle off together. The weather - although abysmal every other day that week - was beyond beautiful from the moment we set foot on the sand, to the second we decided it was time to call it a night (and then it started pouring, ha!). We caught an epic sunset by the fire, exhausted and so grateful for the stars aligning in every way possible, to make this day possible. And it was such an honour to work alongside a photographer that has inspired me for years - if you havent checked out her genius yet, here is a link to her website and Instagram. Thank you, Christiann for making this dream a reality! I had such a blast! We have another post coming up in the New Year I cannot wait to share it with you, dear friends. Big love to all and I hope autumn is treating you well. Happy American Thanksgiving to all my loves stateside! xo, Sarah B photo credits: images 4, 6, 7, 8, 9 Christiann Koepke *   *   *   *   *   * Good news friends! Due to the overwhelming feedback, we’ve extended the period of sign-ups for the Life-Changing Loaf Subscription Box that can be shipped before the holidays. If you’re looking for a great gift for a family member or friend (or need to hand out suggestions for yourself!), this is the perfect thing – it’s the gift that keeps on giving To give the box as a gift, simply click “ship to a different address” when you check out. Thank you for all the support so far! Your loaf is on the way!     The post Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi appeared first on My New Roots.

40 Vegan Thanksgiving Sides – Glutenfree Soyfree Options

November 10 2018 Vegan Richa 

40 Vegan Thanksgiving Sides – Glutenfree Soyfree Options40 vegan thanksgiving sides. Easy Gravy, Mashed Potatoes, Pasta, Soups, Stuffing, Baked Mac, Biscuits and more. Glutenfree Soyfree Nutfree Options Plan ahead with these popular and loved Vegan Thanksgiving Sides and Soups! For Mains, see this Thanksgiving Mains collection, For Desserts see here. Many of these recipes are gluten-free, soy-free, nut-free or have options. Many of the pasta dishes can be made gluten-free with glutenfree pasta.. There are several Instant Pot recipes too (the recipes have both Instant Pot and Stove top instructions.)Continue reading: 40 Vegan Thanksgiving Sides – Glutenfree Soyfree OptionsThe post 40 Vegan Thanksgiving Sides – Glutenfree Soyfree Options appeared first on Vegan Richa.


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