Lassi - vegetarian recipes

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Malai ladoo recipe | malai laddu | milk ladoo | paneer ladoo

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Full of Veggies Minestrone Soup

Is Agave Vegetarian? The Truth about the Popular Sugar Substitute










Lassi vegetarian recipes

Vegan Aubergine Polpette - Three Ways

October 12 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Vegan Aubergine Polpette - Three Ways Our first thought was to do a classic Lady and the Tramp Spaghetti and Meatball dish with this polpette recipe, but then we decided that it was too expected. So here is instead another spin on our one makes three-series. Where we use one staple food in three different recipes. We really love this series because it reflects so much how we actually eat. It’s not always an entirely new meal every day but more of a flow where the same components are repeated with new pairings. These polpette or vegan meatballs are perfect for this. They are good on their own - tender and very flavorful. And they are also insanely versatile, rolled into a wrap, tangled into pasta, paired with a spicy tomato sauce and hummus or tossed in a crunchy vegan take on a caesar salad. Vegan Aubergine Polpette Makes around 40 balls 2 medium sized aubergines 2 red onions 4 tbsp olive oil 100 g /­­ 1 cup almond flour 120 g /­­ 1 cup cooked lentils 4 tbsp pickled capers, drained and finely chopped 2 tbsp raisins zest from 1 lemon 15 leaves basil leaves salt Preheat the oven to 200°C  /­­ 400°F. Peel and chop the onion finely and chop the aubergine into small dices. Stir fry both in a large skillet with the oil for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until very soft. When soft, add to a food processor with the rest of the ingredients. Pulse a few times to mix everything together. You want a very chunky sticky texture but dont pulse too much or youll end up with a mushy mixture. Remove the knife blades and shape 30-40 small balls with your hands. Place them on a baking tray covered with baking paper and bake for 25 minutes. Store in the fridge or freeze them. Scroll down for three ways to serve them. Hummus with spicy tomato sauce, polpette and cucumber salad 1 batch vegan aubergine polpette (see recipe above) 1 batch Hummus, see this recipe or store-bought hummus Spicy tomato sauce Serves 4 1 tbsp olive oil 1 red onion 1 garlic clove 1 tsp cumin 1 tsp harissa paste (or 1 red chili) 2 x 400 g tins tomatoes 1/­­2 tsp sea salt, to taste Heat the oil in a large sauce pan on medium heat. Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic and add them to the sauce pan  together with the spices. Let sauté for a few minutes until soft not browned and then add  the tomatoes and salt. Let cook for at least 20 minutes, until rich and fragrant. It will become sweeter and rounder in flavour the longer you leave it on. Store the sauce you are not using tonight in glass bottles in the fridge. Cucumber salad 1/­­2 cucumber 2 tsp olive oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice + zest 1 pinch sea salt 1 small handful fresh dill Finely dice the cucumber and place in a bowl. Add olive oil, lemon juice and zest, salt and dill and toss to combine. Arrange the hummus in shallow bowls and make a well in the middle. Place a couple of spoonfuls tomato sauce in the well, add a few aubergine polpette and a few spoonfuls cucumber sallad. Vegan Wrap with Polpette, Ajvar and Krauts Serves 4 4 wrap breads /­­ tortilla breads, gluten free or whole grain 4 lettuce leaves 4 cavalo nero or kale, stems removed 1 cup cooked white quinoa 4 tbsp ajvar dressing 1/­­2 cucumber, cut into sticks 4 tbsp sauerkraut (see recipe here) 1 batch aubergine polpette (see recipe above) Place one lettuce leave and one kale leave on each tortilla bread, then place 2-3 tbsp quinoa in the middle, a dollop ajvar, cucumber slices, sauerkraut and top with a couple of aubergine polpette. Fold the top and bottom edges over the filling. Roll the whole tortilla from left to right to wrap in the filling. Roll some parchment paper around them and tie with a string to hold them together. Vegan Ceasar Salad with Polpette Serves 4 1 head Cosmopolitan lettuce 1 batch aubergine polpette (see recipe above) 2 avocados, stone/­­peel removed and sliced 2 small apples, cored and sliced 2 tbsp sunflower seeds, toasted Dressing 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml cold pressed neutral oil (organic rapeseed) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml soy milk, unsweetened 2-3 tsp lemon juice 1 tsp dijon mustard 1 tbsp pickled capers, drained 1 large pinch salt Add all dressing ingredients to a tall glas or blender cup. Mix with a stick blender on high speed for about 15 seconds or until you have a creamy white dressing. Taste and adjust the flavours to your preference. Add more oil and blend again if you like it thicker. Tear the lettuce into bite size pieces and place in a mixing bowl. Add 2 tbsp vegan mayo dressing and toss to cover. Then transfer to a serving platter and arrange avocado slices, apple slices and aubergine polpette and last, scatter over toasted sunflower seeds.

Best Vegan Restaurants - San Jose

October 11 2018 VegKitchen 

Best Vegan Restaurants - San Jose The San Francisco Bay Area is one of the best places in the US to be a vegan. The variety of vegan restaurants, cafes, bakeries, and eateries is stunning. Many non-vegan places also have vegan options on their menus. Where are the best vegan restaurants? San Jose has some of them. 1. Happiness Cafe Happiness Cafe is one fine eatery that ranks among the best vegan restaurants San Jose has to offer. It is located on Hostetter Road and is open every day of the week. This place is exclusively vegan and offers a wide range of delicious dishes. The drinks on the menu include a wide range of smoothies, freshly pressed juices, cold drinks, coffees, teas, and more. The food menu is made up of vegan sandwiches, snacks, rice and noodle meals, pasta, and salads. House specials include the waffle nugget and Phish and Fries--a vegan take on the classic fish and chips recipe. 2. Curry Up Now If youre up for Indian and Mexican street food, be sure to drop by Curry Up Now. The place is located on Zanker Road and opens up at 11:30 AM. They also take catering and online orders. Though primarily vegan/­­vegetarian, Curry […] The post Best Vegan Restaurants - San Jose appeared first on VegKitchen.

Tofu and Vegetable Stew

October 10 2018 VegKitchen 

Tofu and Vegetable Stew My kitchen is a laboratory of vegetarian meals. These days, I’m still experimenting with new ingredients, new meal ideas, and revisiting classic dishes to make vegetarian versions. Last week, I wanted a comforting hot meal, and nothing is better than a good stew to get better! This stew is so consistent and comforting that it has even been gobbled up by my family members who aren’t vegetarian. The taste is amazing, the texture is interesting, and it has great nutritional value. Because of the tofu in the recipe, this stew provides plant-based protein to the body. Tofu is the traditional meat substitute that comes to mind when considering vegetarianism or a meatless diet. Despite its neutral taste and soy composition, the tofu quickly absorbs the flavor of the food with which it is prepared! Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking time: 30 minutes Servings: 4 to 6 Ingredients 400 gr firm Tofu 3 Potatoes 3 Carrots 3 celery 1/­­2 cup puree of tomatoes 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 onion 1 clove garlic 1 teaspoon of dry oregano and basil 3 tablespoons of fresh coriander Salt pepper Instructions Over medium eat brown cook the onion and garlic in a little olive oil for 3 […] The post Tofu and Vegetable Stew appeared first on VegKitchen.

Smoky Chickpea Salad with Mango and Avocado

October 9 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Smoky Chickpea Salad with Mango and AvocadoToday is publication day for One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded Edition! To celebrate, I’m sharing my recipe for Smoky Chickpea Salad with Mango and Avocado from the book. Roasted chickpeas were a favorite snack of my grandmother, who first introduced me to the savory, protein-rich treat many years ago. These days you can find spin-offs of classic roasted chickpeas that feature various spice blends and sauces from curry to tamari. This one takes a smoky route. Once roasted, the chickpeas take on a lovely mahogany color and a deep smoky flavor that complements the other salad components. The luscious mango dressing can be made with your choice of Dijon mustard or sriracha sauce. Smoky Chickpea Salad with Mango and Avocado Roasted chickpeas were a favorite snack of my grandmother, who first introduced me to the savory, protein-rich treat many years ago. These days you can find spin-offs of classic roasted chickpeas that feature various spice blends and sauces from curry to tamari. This one takes a smoky route. Once roasted, the chickpeas take on a lovely mahogany color and a deep smoky flavor that complements the other salad components. The luscious mango dressing can be made with your choice of Dijon mustard or sriracha sauce. Smoky Chickpeas: - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) pure maple syrup - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) wheat-free tamari - 2 teaspoons liquid smoke - 2 teaspoons olive oil - 1 teaspoon nutritional yeast - 1 teaspoon smoked paprika -  1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder -  1/­­4 teaspoon freshly ground - black pepper -  1/­­4 teaspoon salt - 1 1/­­2 cups (246 g) cooked chickpeas or 1 can (15.5 ounces, or 440 g) of chick-peas, rinsed and drained Dressing: - 1 small mango pitted, peeled, and chopped - 3 tablespoons (45 ml) freshly squeezed lime juice - 1 to 2 tablespoons pure maple syrup - 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard or 1/­­2 teaspoon sriracha sauce -  1/­­2 teaspoon liquid smoke - Salt and freshly ground black pepper Salad: - 8 ounces (225 g) spinach or watercress (or a combination), thick stems removed - 1 ripe mango - 1 ripe Hass avocado - For the smoky chickpeas: Preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C, or gas mark 5). Line a shallow baking dish with parchment paper or spray it with nonstick cooking spray. - Place all of the chickpea ingredients in a bowl and toss to combine and coat the chickpeas. Transfer the chickpeas to the prepared baking dish and spread them out in a single layer. Bake for 30 minutes, stirring once about halfway through. The chickpeas should be lightly browned and nicely glazed. The chickpeas can be made in advance of the salad, if desired. Store in a tightly sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. - For the dressing: Combine the chopped mango, lime juice, agave, mustard, and liquid smoke in a high-speed blender or food processor. Blend until smooth, adding 1 to 3 tablespoons (15 to 45 ml) of water as needed to achieve the desired consistency. Season lightly with salt and pepper, blend again, and then taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. - For the salad: Place the greens in a large salad bowl or mound onto individual plates. Top with the chickpeas. Pit, peel, and dice the mango and avocado or use a small melon baller to scoop them into balls and then add them to the watercress and chickpeas. Drizzle the dressing onto the salad or serve the dressing on the side. From One-Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2018 Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc. Used with permission   The post Smoky Chickpea Salad with Mango and Avocado appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Everything You Should Know About Building Muscle While Eating Vegetarian

October 7 2018 Oh My Veggies 

Contrary to popular belief, it is actually possible to gain muscle while on a vegetarian diet. Many people still think that the supposed lack of protein in a vegetarian diet does not allow for sufficient results in the gym. However, this is nowhere near the truth. Whether youre eating meat or not, building muscle involves a strict dietary regimen designed to optimize the quantities of the nutrients your body requires. Your diet should include minerals, fiber, vitamins, and of course protein to ensure you get the desired results. Similar to non-vegetarian fitness enthusiasts, vegetarian gym goers need to follow a prescribed dietary regime and have a good understanding of their body. If you optimize your diet, you shouldnt have any problems building muscle while eating vegetarian. Types of Vegetarians There are four different vegetarian categories and each involves different dietary habits. It is important to have a clear understanding of which category you belong to because it can largely determine your gym diet. All vegetarians can generally be classified into the following four categories: Pescetarians, who eat fish Lacto-ovo vegetarians, who eat dairy and eggs Lacto-vegetarians, who eat dairy products Vegans, who are solely on a plant-based diet There is […]

Coconut Spinach and Lentil Dal

September 18 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Coconut Spinach and Lentil DalThis Coconut Spinach and Lentil Dal recipe combines two Indian classics: lentil dal and saag paneer. The spinach from saag paneer (without the cheesy cubes of paneer) is paired with a protein-rich lentil dal in a creamy coconut sauce. Coconut Spinach and Lentil Dal This recipe combines two Indian classics: lentil dal and saag paneer. The spinach from saag paneer (without the cheesy cubes of paneer) is paired with a protein-rich lentil dal in a creamy coconut sauce. - 1 cup dried lentils - 1 teaspoon ground turmeric - Salt - 1 tablespoon neutral vegetable oil or 1/­­4 cup water - 1 medium yellow onion, chopped - 1 clove garlic, minced - 2 teaspoons minced fresh ginger - 1 hot green chile, seeded and minced - 1 teaspoon ground cumin - 1 teaspoon ground coriander - 1 teaspoon garam masala - Pinch ground cardamom, optional - 1 14.5-ounce can diced fire-roasted tomatoes, drained and finely chopped - 8 to 10 ounces fresh or frozen spinach, steamed and chopped - 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro leaves - 1 13.5-ounce can unsweetened coconut milk - Combine the lentils in a large saucepan with 3 cups of water. Bring to a boil. Decrease the heat to low, add the turmeric, and simmer partially covered for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Uncover and continue to simmer until the lentils are soft and the liquid is absorbed, about 15 minutes. - While the lentils are cooking, heat the oil or water in a medium skillet over medium heat. Add the onion, cover, and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic, ginger, and chile, and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the cumin, coriander, garam masala, cardamom, if using, and tomatoes, stirring constantly for about 30 seconds longer. Stir in the spinach, coconut milk, and cilantro and simmer for 5 minutes. Add the spinach mixture to the lentils and stir well to combine. Taste to adjust the seasonings, if needed. Serve hot. This recipe is from Vegan Without Borders (C) Robin Robertson, 2014, Andrews McMeel Publishing, photo by Sara Remington. The post Coconut Spinach and Lentil Dal appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegetarian Chili with Corn and Soy Beans

September 15 2018 VegKitchen 

Vegetarian Chili with Corn and Soy Beans Here is a tasty recipe for a small budget. This is where the chili comes in--this great classic, a thousand times reinvented. This is a really simple version that is prepared in a single saucepan in an hour! If you want to spoil yourself a little bit more, serve it with a vegetable sour cream, avocado, fresh tomato cubes, and organic corn chips. But its honestly so tasty that you can eat it plain! You can also serve it as a garnish on fries, on nachos, on a baked potato, on a veggie dog, or even in a sloppy joe! The possibilities are endless when you have a creative imagination. Preparation: 5 minutes Cooking: 1 hour Total: 1 hour 5 minutes Servings: 4   Ingredients  1 tablespoon olive oil 1 large chopped onion 3 chopped garlic cloves 1 can (28 oz) drained diced tomatoes 1 can (28 oz) crushed tomatoes 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 to 2 tablespoons chili spices 1 tablespoon ground cumin 1 tablespoon ground coriander 1 tablespoon sugar 3/­­4 cup frozen corn kernels 3/­­4 cup canned red kidney beans, rinsed and drained 3/­­4 cup thawed frozen soy beans (edamame)   Preparation In a saucepan, heat the oil to medium […] The post Vegetarian Chili with Corn and Soy Beans appeared first on VegKitchen.

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

August 29 2018 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterThe Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl This year I traveled to Ethiopia in the weeks before Easter - one of several special times of fasting, when the majority of the country eats entirely vegan! I explored the central cities, traveled overland to the north, went trekking in the highlands and stayed with families in remote villages. As with all my travels and culinary research, I am extremely grateful for the privilege to learn, share & exchange, and be guided & supported by many families and professional cooks who invited me in their kitchens and shared amazing meals with me. Since returning to Berlin, I’ve been cooking Ethiopian and Eritrean food practically non-stop, recreating recipes and dishes, constantly inviting friends and guests to my cooking studio for lunch and dinner parties. Abebech showing me traditional village cooking in the Ethiopian Highlands. Making Injera for the first time in Ethiopia The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA is my newest cookbook with original recipes, artwork, photography and stories inspired by these latest culinary adventures. It includes over 70 recipes based on the mouth-watering meals in bustling cities & towns, at road-stop eateries, and in rural highland villages. As with my previous 5 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. The Lotus and the Artichoke is the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. The ETHIOPIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 6th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 140 pages with 70+ recipes and over 60 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by my travels and culinary adventures in East Africa - Also based on experiences with international communities of Europe (London, Paris, and Berlin) and North America (Philadelphia, New York, and Washington D.C.) and over 25 years of vegan cooking - Ethiopian & Eritrean classics, familiar restaurant & family favourites, delicious delights, wonders & surprises, and creative culinary experiments - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Doro Wat – spicy seitan stew Spinach Dinach Butecha – Chickpea “Egg” Salad Minchet Abish – spicy soy mince & walnuts Duba Wot – pumpkin stew Shimbra Asa – chickpea “fish” Asa (Jackfruit) Tibs Fosolia – green beans & carrots Pizza Lalibela Ingudai Tibs – spicy mushrooms Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping Ambasha – sweet bread Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA - Traditional Berbere spice mix (simple + advanced) - Nitir Qibe – spiced butter/­­oil - Mitmita – extra hot spice mix - Yewot Qimen – black pepper spice mix - Shiro – chickpea/­­bean spice mix - Data (Yekarya Delleh) – roasted chili, garlic, onion & herb sauce - Traditional Injera – Ethiopian sourdough crepe - Quick Injera - Ambasha - sweet raisin bread - Doro Dabo – baked stuffed bread - Difo Dabo - spiced bread - Pizza Lalibela - with tomato sauce & roasted potato topping - Sambosa – savory pastry with lentil filling - Senig Karia – roasted spicy stuffed chilies - Injera Firfir – traditional flatbread with spicy tomato sauce - Yesuf Fitfit – chopped injera & lemon sunflower seed dressing - Kita (Injekita) – sweet breakfast flatbread & jam - Chornake /­­ Pasty – fried bread - Genfo – roasted wheat & barley porridge - Selata - super simple salad - Selata Delux - with mango, dates, avocado mixed greens & lentils - Butecha - chickpea “egg” salad - Selata Timtim - tomato salad - Selata Dinich - potato salad - Selata Bekarot - carrot salad - Telba - roasted flax dressing - Shiro Wot - chickpea puree - Misir Wot – red lentils - Doro Wot – spicy seitan - Soy Tibs - spicy soymeat strips - Ingudai Wot - spicy mushrooms - Bamia - spicy okra - Minchet Abish - spicy soy mince & walnuts - Shimbra Asa – spicy chickpea “fish” - Kik Alicha – yellow lentils - Atakilt Alicha – cabbage, carrots & potatoes - Keysir - beet root - Duba Alicha - pumpkin stew - Tikr Gomen - greens with garlic - Spinach Dinich - spinach & roasted potatoes - Fosolia – green beans & carrots - Asa Tibs – lemon pepper jackfruit fritters - Tofu Alicha - batter fried tofu in mild garlic & onion sauce - Ingudai Alicha – mushrooms w/­­ creamy cashew, lemon, pepper, thyme, parsley - Peppers & Potatoes - garlic ginger stir-fry - Inkulal Firfir – spicy tofu scramble & tomatoes - Ful – fava beans - Ayib – cottage cheese - Bedergan – roasted eggplant - Vegetable Lentil Soup - Vegetable Pasta – spaghetti with mixed chopped vegetables - Macaroni Firfir – noodles with garlic onion tomato sauce on injera - Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping - Ethiopian Mashed Potatoes - Traditional Coffee Ceremony - Spiced Black Tea - Roiboos tea with lemon, ginger &cardamon - Mango Moringa Banana Smoothie - Injera w/­­ dates - Banana Bread - Fasting Muffins - Rooibos Tea Ice Cream Video: Justin P. Moore Music: Nils Kercher Nanfulle from Ancient Intimations (live) (C)2016 Ancient Pulse Music PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl The post ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Summer Cobb Salad with Coconut Bacon

July 20 2018 My New Roots 

Summer Cobb Salad with Coconut Bacon Summer is HERE! Wowee zowee its been a beautiful July filled with plenty of sunshine, swimming, fresh fruit, and family time. Its also a very special feeling being in Canada for the whole spring-to-summer transition once again. Its one of my favourite things, watching this little part of the world turn green and warm, for the lakes and rivers to invite us in, for the farmers markets to burst with local goodness, and for the long days to stretch into equally enchanted nights. I dont cook a whole lot this time of year - I like to keep my food really fresh, mostly raw and pretty light.  If I am turning the stove or oven on, its often to make staples that I can keep on hand in the fridge to amp up a salad or sandwich. Lentils, beans, and quinoa are some rotating essentials that I can add a bunch of fresh veggies to, or turn into a dip. I also love to have some coconut bacon from my second cookbook, Naturally Nourished, on hand to add awesome flavour and texture to something as basic as avocado toast. The inspiration for this salad came when I had just made a fresh batch of this magical stuff, and I was trying to come up with some alternative uses for it (besides the best B.L.T. ever) when I remembered another classic bacon meal: the Cobb Salad! If you live outside of North America, chances are youre not familiar with this iconic dish, a texture-rich combination of chopped romaine, avocado, tomato, chives, hard-boiled eggs, bacon, and chicken. Its a rich and protein-heavy salad, often smothered in a creamy blue cheese dressing. Whoa! Major. Needless to say, I knew that this was perfect makeover fodder, and I had everything I needed to get started. To turn this indulgent dish into something just as delicious, but actually a salad, was relatively easy. First, I decided to turn up the green and add some spinach to the mix. This small addition delivers more iron, protein, vitamin C and folate. Instead of chicken, I pointed my garden arrow at peas, to add body and filling fiber. Cooked chickpeas, butter beans or French lentils would also work beautifully in their place. Watermelon radishes just came into season here, and it was a total no-brainer to add them to this version, since they add great crunch, delicious earthiness, and pink. Because pink! And of course I kept the avocado...duh. The Creamy Chive Dressing is such a win here. I created it in hopes of maintaining that rich and satisfying mouthfeel that blue cheese dressing lends to the classic Cobb, but without the cheese, cream, sour cream and mayo (I mean, holy cow). Instead I used hemp seeds, which are rich in Omega-3 fats, and protein to energize our summer bods. Its tangy, a little garlic-y, and super fresh. And since my recipe makes more than enough for this salad, pour the rest over thickly sliced beefsteak tomatoes, grilled eggplant and zucchini, or fold it into cooked grains and greens.      My version of Cobb Salad is more of a concept than a recipe - so feel free to play around a bit with what you have, in the amounts that you have. And if youve got some other salad-y things kicking around that would work here, toss them in! No rules, just a clean-out-the-fridge kinda deal. Its summer. Lets keep things easy and flowin! To say Im obsessed with this salad is an understatement. Its the perfect summer meal and has everything going on with its fresh, crunchy, garden-fresh veggies and greens, creamy avocado, juicy tomatoes, rich and smoky coconut bacon, smooth and tangy chive dressing, satisfying eggs, and if you dont want to dive face first into that bowl right now I dont think well ever be friends ; )     Print recipe     Summer Cobb Salad with Coconut Bacon Serves 2 as a meal, 4 as a side Ingredients: 1 head of romaine lettuce a couple large handfuls of spinach a few handfuls fresh peas, raw or lightly steamed 2 medium watermelon radish 1-2 ripe avocados, depending on how hungry you are 2-3 soft-boiled eggs, optional a couple handfuls of Coconut Bacon (recipe follows) a generous drizzle of Creamy Chive Dressing (recipe follows) chives for garnish flaky salt and pepper for garnish Directions: 1. Roughly chop the romaine and spinach, and place in a large salad bowl. 2. Thinly slice the watermelon radishes, peel and slice the avocado, cut the eggs in half, and add these ingredients to the greens. Scatter peas throughout, toss on the Coconut Bacon, drizzle with the Creamy Chive Dressing and garnish with chives, salt and pepper. Devour and rejoice. Coconut Bacon Makes 5 cups /­­ 200g Ingredients: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml tamari 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml maple syrup 3 Tbsp. melted coconut oil 1 Tbsp. liquid smoke 1 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper 1/­­2 tsp. garlic powder 5 cups /­­ 200g coconut flakes Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 325°F /­­ 160°C. 2. Whisk all wet ingredients together in a large bowl. Add coconut flakes and toss well to coat. Let the coconut sit and marinate in the liquid for about 5 minutes. 3. Place coconut on a parchment-lined baking sheet, spreading it out evenly. Bake for 20-30 minutes, stirring every 7 minutes or so, until fragrant and crispy. The coconut will crisp up outside the oven as well, so take that into consideration. Store in an airtight container for up to three weeks. Creamy Chive dressing Makes 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 375ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 100g hemp seeds zest of 1 lemon 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 clove garlic 2 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 2 tsp. pure maple syrup 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water, or more as needed 3 Tbsp. finely minced chives Directions: 1. Place all ingredients except for the chives in a blender (a high-speed blender is definitely recommended) and blend on high until completely smooth and creamy. Add the minced chives and pulse once or twice just to incorporate them. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. If the dressing is too thick, add a little water and blend well again. 2. Pour dressing into a glass jar and store leftovers in the fridge for up to one week. Show me your salad on Instagram: #mnrcobbsalad The post Summer Cobb Salad with Coconut Bacon appeared first on My New Roots.

Kichadi: The Realistic Reset

January 16 2018 My New Roots 

Kichadi: The Realistic Reset Happy 2018 dear friends! I hope that you all had a restful and relaxing holiday, and that youre ready to take on the new year. As most of you know, the past few months have been all-over-the-place (literally) for my family and I, so Ive been giving myself plenty of freedom when it comes to what Im eating and how often Im exercising. With my regular routines out the window, Ive felt an immense sense of liberation - its great to let go once in a while! - but now its gotten to the point where my body is really craving some stability and grounding, especially after the holidays. Sometimes I like to go drastic and embark on a 10-day juice fast or something like it, but my body and my mind arent feeling a hard-core anything at the moment, so Im turning to kichadi to gently ease my way back into eating with more balance. Kichadi, sometimes called and spelled khichdi, kitchari, kitcheree or khichri, is the famous one-pot wonder Indian dish that combines rice and lentils or quick-cooking pulses or legumes, such as mung beans. Its best known in Ayurvedic tradition as a cleansing and complete protein meal, very easy to digest, and a cinch to make! It is delicious, super comfort food, and even if youre not down with eating the exact same thing for every meal for several days in a row, youll be thrilled to learn its also the perfect thing to tuck into on a cold winter night. Because of its simplicity and ease, many people find that doing a kichadi “mono-diet” is very pleasant and far less of an ordeal than a juice fast for example (although I need to be clear that a juice fast is far deeper and more effective). Taking three to seven days to eat this dish exclusively gives the digestive organs a serious break since kichadi is very easy to break down and assimilate. And because digestion is at the core of human health, putting a practice in place that supports this essential process makes room for the miracle of self-healing: something the body is constantly striving for, but often distracted from by poor dietary and lifestyle choices. When we forgo processed foods, alcohol, caffeine, and common allergens for a few days, we give our bodies the space it needs to do what it naturally does anyway: clean itself up! I like to eat a kichadi diet in the colder months when the weather is unfriendly and I need some reassuring, grounding, warm food - and juicing sounds about as fun as a hole in the head. Its also a wonderful way to glide yourself into the process of cleansing if youve never tried it before. Since it doesnt involve abstaining from food, most first-timers find it totally do-able, and dare I say it, enjoyable! Ive just completed three days of eating kichadi for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and Im feeling sooo much more balanced, clear-headed, and energized - the ways I would like to feel at the beginning of a brand new year! I hope that this simple and realistic reset is up your alley, and that you give it a go. First things first, youre going to need to do a bit of planning for the kichadi diet. Set a realistic goal for yourself - ideally youll be eating this dish for at least three days, up to seven, but if one is all you can handle, that is okay too. Since youre eating throughout this practice, going about your regular life is usually fine, but if you want to go the extra mile and give yourself a real treat, do the kichadi diet over a long weekend or break from work so that you can focus on some other cleanse-enriching experiences, such as a massage, a sauna visit, daytime napping, reading an actual book, and maybe even going offline completely. Gasp! I started my kichadi diet on a Monday and carried out my normal routine with work and family life, and just made sure to give myself lots of juicy personal time in the evenings (essential oil bath, yin yoga sesh, early lights out etc.). Aside from a cleanse-classic mood swing on the last day, no one around me even noticed what I was doing. Since they were too busy eating pizza.    Before you begin youll want to start by cutting back on alcohol, caffeine, sugar, meat, dairy, processed foods, and anything else you know is throwing you off balance. If you abstain from these things for at least a couple of days before you begin, your experience will be much smoother, as you won’t be distracted by gnarly withdrawal symptoms while you’re trying to chill. You can also add any bad habits you have to your hit list, and reduce or eliminate the daily practices that arent making your life extra groovy. Whatever day you are starting the kichadi on, soak the rice and pulses /­­ legumes together the night before. This step is important for improving the digestive qualities of kichadi, but if you are really pressed for time or you forgot, get them in water as soon as you can. Remember that even soaking for an hour is better than nothing! Cook the kichadi daily if possible, since the fresher the food is, the more energy, or prana it contains. My recipe makes about six servings for my appetite (eight for people who eat less) and I can easily stretch one batch over two days if no one else in my family wants it. Regardless, youll have to make at least two batches if youre going for three days, and I would not recommend keeping kichadi around for longer than that. Freezing is an option, but freeze it in the portion size youd want to eat so that youre not heating more than you need at one sitting.        Daily routine The night before: soak the rice and pulses together in plenty of filtered water overnight. Morning: upon rising, drink a large glass of warm water with freshly squeezed lemon juice, followed by another glass of pure water. Make your first batch of kichadi, and enjoy it for breakfast. Store leftovers in the fridge. Midday: Drink a couple large glasses of water at least 30 minutes before eating. Heat your desired amount of kichadi and enjoy it for lunch. Evening: Drink a couple large glasses of water at least 30 minutes before eating. Heat your desired amount of kichadi and enjoy it for dinner. Night time: Drink a cup of herbal detox tea if desired, enjoy something that nourishes you (bath, meditation, stretching) and go to bed early. Repeat for three to seven days. Kichadi Reset tips 1. Eat when youre hungry. This may seem like an obvious one, but many people eat according to the clock, instead of listening to their bodies. Take these days to really tune in and see when your body actually desires food, and how much you need to eat to feel satisfied. When you feel real hunger, your body is giving you the signal that it is actually ready to receive. 2. Cook mindfully. Remember that cooking is something to be grateful for. If you normally approach cooking from a lets get this over with standpoint, use this opportunity to make your meal prep a ceremony, and see it as a gift to yourself. Take your time washing and cutting vegetables, delight in the sound of the spices popping, the scent that wafts up while youre peeling ginger. The attention and intention you put into your food will come back to you, and nourish you in ways that you never thought possible. 3. Keep things interesting, by adding a squeeze of lime instead of lemon to your kichadi. You can use parsley instead of cilantro, and adjust the spices to suit your personal taste. If you really need some variety, top the kichadi with some of your favourite sprouts, grated raw carrot, or fold in some spinach while its still hot. 4. Cravings are normal, especially when youre knowingly depriving yourself! If you feel a craving coming on, first identify what the craving is. Be curious...maybe it has nothing to do with the food, but more your emotional or mental state. If you really cant shake the feeling, drink water first, then try a piece of fruit, or some raw veggie sticks. 5. Drink a lot of water. The body functions optimally when properly hydrated. It is especially important when were resetting, since were letting go of things that need to be flushed out. Water is essential to this process, but it will also prevent cravings, combat fatigue and brain fog, and keep the bowels moving. Remember to drink water away from mealtimes for optimal digestion (30 minutes before eating, 2-3 hours after unless youre very thirsty). Other beverages, even if they are mostly water like coffee and tea, are not water. Only water is water. After the Kichadi diet Although it is extremely tempting to celebrate and indulge after denying oneself certain things, this is not the best time to do so. Even though this process keeps your digestive system humming along, your body is still in a sensitive place. Introduce new foods slowly, and keep combinations small and uncomplicated (i.e. dont have a meal with 20 different foods together). Limit meat, dairy, sugar, and processed foods for as long as possible. That congratulatory slice of cake should wait until youre pretty much back to normal, or maybe even find an alternative ; )     Print recipe     Simple and Cleansing Kichadi Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 1/­­2 Tbsp. cumin seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. mustard seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. coriander seeds 1/­­2 tsp. ground turmeric 1 cinnamon stick 1-2 Tbsp. minced ginger (to taste) 1 large tomato, chopped (optional) 2 medium yellow onion, diced 2 medium carrots, chopped 1 small /­­ 250g sweet potato (or other seasonal root veggie), chopped 1 cup /­­ 200g brown rice 1/­­2 cup /­­ 110g mung beans or brown lentils 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 cup /­­ 140g green peas, frozen or fresh 4 cups /­­ 1L water (or more, as needed) a couple handfuls finely chopped cilantro lemon to garnish Directions: 1. If possible, soak the rice and pulses together overnight, or for 8-12 hours. Drain and rinse very well. 2. Melt the oil in a large stockpot. Add the cumin and mustard seed and fry just until the mustard seeds start to pop. Add the remaining spices, stir and then add the tomato and ginger (if youre opting out of the tomato, simply use a few splashes of water). Fry for a couple minutes until fragrant. 3. Add the onion, carrots, sweet potato, brown rice, mung beans, salt, and water. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer and cook for about 45 minutes, until the rice and beans are soft. About five minutes before serving, add the peas whether fresh or frozen, and cook until they are warm. Add more water for a stew-y consistency, or if the pot becomes dry while cooking. 4. Serve kichadi hot, garnished with cilantro and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. Give thanks and enjoy. I hope that many of you try the kichadi diet out, and rejoice in the fact that there is no need to do something radical and overly deprivational during the winter. This is a time for closing in, for being quiet and gentle, and nourishing oneself in a tender way. And remember, you can enjoy this delicious kichadi even for a day, and any season of the year when you need to find your equilibrium once again. Its a tasty way to come back to center, every time, anytime. In health, vibrancy, and abundance for the year ahead, Sarah B. Show me your kichadi on Instagram: #mnrkichadi The post Kichadi: The Realistic Reset appeared first on My New Roots.

Big Batch Golden Milk

December 18 2017 My New Roots 

Big Batch Golden Milk So we moved. Across the ocean. Its been a wild ride so far with plenty of excitement and relief coupled with awkward transitioning, and astronomical culture shock (small town Ontario is preeeeeetty different from Copenhagen). Were also renovating a very old home by Canadian standards, and the hidden surprises lurking under every lifted floorboard are creating a project slightly larger and lengthier than predicted. But wouldnt it all be so boring and predictable without those fun discoveries?! Right! Who needs a kitchen anyway? Oh wait. Amongst the self-inflicted chaotic state of affairs, Ive actually found some peace in the simple living weve got going on. Since we dont really have any friends in our little village yet, theres been plenty of time to actually take care of myself and our family. Afternoons are spent building toy train sets, cooking big batch meals, and making snacks for the days ahead. Ive started taking aerial yoga and NIA, going for nature walks every day, and having candlelit baths on the regular. Funny what removing ones social life will make room for! An important part of my self-care routine these past weeks is my simple ritual of making golden milk. Warm, comforting, and satisfying, this drink has everything needed to combat winter blues and movers remorse (I kid, I kid). Usually I make golden milk on the fly, one cup at a time, but recently I realized how handy it would be to just make a huge batch and have it ready to spoon into some hot milk when the mood strikes. Genius. For those of you that arent yet familiar with this wonder drink, Im excited for the vibrant, spicy world that is about to open up to you. Golden milk, or haldi ka doodh, actually dates back thousands of years in Ayurvedic tradition where it has been used to aid digestion and respiration, prevent colds and flu, decongest the liver, ease sprained muscles and joint pain, purify the blood, clear the skin, and aid sleep. The main ingredient in golden milk responsible for all of this awesomeness is the curcumin in turmeric, a compound that is responsible for its vibrant hue. Curcumin has been widely studied for its powerful anti-inflammatory properties, but it is also supports detoxification, helps balance blood sugar, and lowers the overall risk of cancer. How do we get the most out of this powerful phytonutrient? Simply by combining it with black pepper and fat - two important ingredients in golden milk! A compound in black pepper called piperine actually helps the body absorb curcumin, and shows to increase the bioavailability of it by up to 2,000 percent. And the good news is, you only need a very small amount to reap the synergistic benefits. Then melt a little coconut oil in, and the curcumin can be directly absorbed into the bloodstream through the lymphatic system. That’s a cooperative one-two punch of absorption and deliciousness. Once mixed, your Big Batch Golden Milk spice blend will last for up to six months. Keep it in a cool, dry place out of direct light - a closed cupboard is perfect. Do not store it right next to the stove or on top of the fridge, where the warm environment will speed spoilage. We wanna keep our medicine fresh! The Big Batch Golden Milk recipe below makes about 120 servings, so there is plenty to divvy out to your most beloved, and even save some for yourself. Make sure to include the directions so that your lucky recipients can make golden milk themselves. Ive divided them below so that you can print out just the single serving instructions for your friends and family. I’ve also included a recipe if you want to sample just one cup for yourself before committing to an entire jar. My version of golden milk has a few more spices than some blends that Ive tried, but this unique combination just tastes that much better. If youre on a tight budget, or you simply cannot find some of the spices listed, leave them out. The main ingredients you need are the turmeric, ginger, cinnamon and black pepper. The others are there for added health benefits and of course flavour, but the recipe will still be delicious without them. The milk for this recipe is totally flexible. Coconut is classic, but almond, cashew, or hemp are tasty options. You can also do half milk, half water if you like. It will be less creamy, but its great if youre trying to make your milk stretch a little farther! The most important thing to remember when making golden milk is to not overheat the spices, as they will become bitter-tasting and therefore not all that enjoyable. If you choose to use milk in your recipe, warm it gently on the stove, then remove from heat and gently whisk in the golden milk spice blend. If youre going with water, do NOT pour boiling water over the spice blend, but instead pour the recently-boiled water into a cup, let it cool for 30 seconds or so, then whisk in the golden milk spice blend. I also advise you not to add the honey or coconut oil until the spices have been stirred into the liquid youre using, as theyll incorporate easier if the spices have dissolved. If you want to use a vegan sweetener, maple syrup is my favourite choice, but brown rice syrup, coconut palm sugar, and stevia are also good options. I also love adding a sprinkling of vanilla powder right at the end for some extra va-va-voom. I recommend enjoying your golden milk first thing in the morning (right after your lemon water, of course!), or right before bed. If its a particularly cold day outside, this intelligent spice combo will warm your cells up from the inside out. Or, if youre looking for a luxurious way to unwind down after a long day, I find that golden milk is also a very effective sleep tonic. Whatever the time you choose to enjoy this drink, you will absolutely love its warm, and satisfying vibes. Make it a ritual yourself: spoon lovingly, stir consciously and sip gratefully. One more thing I should mention, is that the Big Batch Golden Milk spice blend is not only delicious as a drink, but that it can also be incorporated into a number of your favourite recipes. Toss a teaspoon into a smoothie, stir some into your morning porridge or pancake batter, fold it into a basic cookie dough or cake batter, and even try it in curries, soups and stews. The flavour is warming and pungent, so use it anywhere youd like a burst of sunshiny spice that is as good as gold.     Print recipe     Big Batch Golden Milk Spice Blend Makes approx. 120 servings Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 200g ground turmeric 2/­­3 cup /­­ 70g ground ginger 1/­­3 cup /­­ 35g ground cinnamon 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground black pepper 2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground cardamom scant 3 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground cloves 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground nutmeg 3 Tbsp. 20g ground star anise 1/­­4 cup 20g ground coriander Directions: 1. Combine all spices in a large bowl. Stir well, then transfer to a large jar or several smaller ones, and seal with an airtight lid. Keeps for up to 6 months.     Print recipe     Golden Milk Ingredients: 1/­­2 Tbsp. golden milk spice blend 1 cup milk of your choice (coconut milk is classic, but I also like cashew milk or hemp milk) 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. virgin coconut oil 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. sweetener of choice (I like raw honey) Directions: 1. In a small saucepan over medium heat, warm milk until just before it simmers. Whisk in golden milk spice blend until smooth. Remove from heat and stir in coconut oil and sweetener, if desired. Enjoy!     Print recipe     If you want to make just one batch of my golden milk, heres the single-serve recipe. Single-serving Golden Milk Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 tsp. turmeric 1/­­2 tsp. ginger 1/­­4 tsp. cinnamon pinch black pepper pinch cardamom pinch cloves pinch nutmeg pinch star anise pinch coriander I wish you all a super sweet holiday with tons of delicious food shared amongst family and friends, and that your 2018 is bursting with health and happiness. Much love to all out there, from my chilly, but cozy, little corner of the world to yours. xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * In wrapping up 2017, I cannot help but look on the Wild Heart High Spirit retreats with deep gratitude and pure joy. I had a strong vision for the endeavor from the beginning: gather women in a beautiful and serene space, teach them how to reconnect to their bodies through food and movement. But I never imagined just how deep these lessons would go, how profound the changes would be, and how much fun we would have! After three this year, I can confidently say these experiences are incredibly special, and I feel very lucky to work with such a talented partner to create them. Thank you to all of the women who have traveled from all corners of the earth to join us. We love you! Here are some highlights from our trips to Bali, Ibiza, and Portugal. Click on the images below to see photos from each of our magical locations. .       We also have some very special community partners who have generously made our experiences even more abundant! Big thanks to: Naturgligolie Coconut Bowls Jukserei Pachamama Raw Bite Four Sigmatic Gourmet Print Shop We are now weaving plans for future retreats. If you are interested in learning more or joining us one day, please sign up to our mailing list to be kept up to date. We hope to see you one day soon! The post Big Batch Golden Milk appeared first on My New Roots.

lauki ka halwa recipe | dudhi halwa recipe | loki ka halwa recipe

December 1 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

lauki ka halwa recipe | dudhi halwa recipe | loki ka halwa recipelauki ka halwa recipe | dudhi halwa recipe | loki ka halwa with step by step photo and video recipe. botte gourd recipes are very common during the festival seasons and is heavily prepared during navaratri fasting or for during any vrat season. loki ka halwa is one such common dessert recipe prepared with 2 purpose. obliviously it is a classic desert for any festival, but also high in nutrition and fibre and hence ideal for fasting. Continue reading lauki ka halwa recipe | dudhi halwa recipe | loki ka halwa recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Fill Your Plate with Meatless Sides for Thanksgiving

November 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

Fill Your Plate with Meatless Sides for ThanksgivingEven if youre not going meat-free for Thanksgiving, you can still keep your sides plant-based! Meatless Monday has several recipes for delicious side dishes that are rich with veggies and flavor. If youre tired of the sides you serve every year, put a new, vegetarian spin on some old classics! There are so many great meatless dishes that you can feel free to fill your plate with sides and skip the turkey. Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts Mushroom Pie Squash and Sunchoke Mac and Cheese Savory Soy-sage Stuffing Arugula Fig Almond Salad   Make sure to tune into Facebook today at 12:00 noon EST to watch Goyas Chef Fernando Desa make Quinoa and Brown Rice Stuffing and Coquito Coconut Eggnog in preparation for the Thanksgiving holiday! We’ll be streaming at https:/­­/­­www.facebook.com/­­GoyaFoods/­­. The post Fill Your Plate with Meatless Sides for Thanksgiving appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cherry Chocolate Banana Shake

October 23 2017 Meatless Monday 

Chocolate and cherries are a classic combination, but when better to execute it than on Meatless Monday morning? This ice cool breakfast shake is a surefire way to wake up feeling refreshed. This recipe comes to us from Lisa of Barefoot in Her Kitchen. Serves 3 -  1/­­2 cup ice - 1 banana, peeled - 10 cherries, pitted - 1 heaping tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder - 1 teaspoon agave nectar* -  1/­­2 cup rice or soy milk - or -  1/­­2 cup nonfat milk - 1 1/­­2 cup ice cold water - 1 teaspoon chocolate flavored whey protein** * Agave (ah-Gah-vay) nectar is similar in taste & texture to honey but has a lower impact on blood sugar when compared other sweeteners. Agave can be found in the health food or specialty food aisle of most grocery stores. **optional. Found in health food stores. If you are not using the chocolate whey protein, double the cocoa powder and agave nectar in the smoothies.   Place the ice in a tall blender or pitcher if youre using a hand mixer. Add the banana, cherries, cocoa, agave nectar, milk, water and whey protein if using. If you are not using the whey protein, double the amount of cocoa and agave. If youre using a blender, pulse briefly until the mixture is somewhat crushed, but not pureed. If youre using a hand mixer, pulse the mixer in an up and down motion until the ice is smashed and the fruit begins to soften and blend, but the mixture is not liquefied. After mixture is blended, cover the cup or pitcher and shake distribute the ice and fruit evenly. Serves immediately and enjoy. The post Cherry Chocolate Banana Shake appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Best Vegan Restaurants - San Francisco

October 9 2018 VegKitchen 

Best Vegan Restaurants - San Francisco The San Francisco Bay Area is among the most vegan-friendly places in the US. Whether you like Chinese, Japanese, or Thai food, San Franciscos got it. Mexican, classic BBQ, healthy smoothies, and delicious vegan cookies--whatever you think of, youll likely find it here If youre looking for cafes and restaurants with excellent plant-based menus, heres a short list of some of the best vegan restaurants in San Francisco. 1. Golden Era Vegan With an immense reputation and exceptional food and service quality, Golden Era Vegan Restaurant qualifies as one of the best vegan restaurants San Francisco has to offer. The restaurant is located on Golden Gate Avenue and is open daily from 10:30AM to 8:30PM. The substantial menu is completely meat-free and covers breakfast, lunch, and dinner options. Some of the most popular dishes include the Shrimp Delight, the garden vermicelli, the spicy noodle soup, and the curry beef. When it comes to desserts, the mocha cake and the Oreo cake are the crowd favorites. 2. Shizen Vegan Sushi Bar & Izakaya Shizen Vegan Sushi Bar & Izakaya offers a mix of traditional Japanese izakaya foods and modern American restaurant aesthetics. This fancy eatery is located on 14th Street and […] The post Best Vegan Restaurants - San Francisco appeared first on VegKitchen.

Best Vegan Restaurants - Charlotte

October 2 2018 VegKitchen 

Best Vegan Restaurants - Charlotte Charlotte is the most popular answer when you ask folks from the Tar Heel State where to find the best vegan restaurants. The city has numerous places that offer vegetarian and vegan-only menus, some of which have been around for a long time. When youre traveling through Charlotte, dont waste time searching for one or two plain vegan burgers at classic BBQ joints. The following restaurants make it their mission to offer plant-based menus, including a wide assortment of deep fried mock meat dishes. 1. Ma Ma Wok Ma Ma Wok may not have started out as a vegan restaurant, but since 2017 its menu has been completely vegan. If you want to dine at one of the best vegan restaurants, Charlotte gives you Ma Ma Wok, opened six days a week. The menu consists of mostly Chinese dishes, so there will always be a symphony of color and taste on your plate. The menu offers a wide range of rolls, fried rice, soups, and lettuce wraps to choose from. They also have a wide selection of mock meats for pretty much any dish you envision having at a spicy Chinese vegan eatery. 2. Living Kitchen South End Located on 2000 […] The post Best Vegan Restaurants - Charlotte appeared first on VegKitchen.

Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook!

September 18 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook! It’s been around three years since we started working on this cookbook, so finally telling you about it today feels monumental, exhilarating, and terrifying all at the same time. Our new cookbook is called Simply Vibrant: All-Day Vegetarian Recipes for Colorful Plant-Based Cooking, and it’s available for pre-order now! It’s written by me, Anya, and photographed by Masha – the same mother/­­daughter team that’s behind this blog. Today, we are sharing some key details about the book, accompanied by a book trailer (above), sneak peak photos and ways to pre-order. We’ll also be talking about the pre-order bonus recipe bundle, which is a free gift that we created for anyone who pre-orders the book. SO excited to share all of this with you :) About the Book -- Simply Vibrant will be released on February 6th, 2018, but it’s available for pre-order now. Anyone who pre-orders the book will have access to a free bonus recipe bundle, consisting of 10 brand new, plant-based recipes, which won’t be published anywhere else. Just save your receipt! This is our way of thanking you for your support :) More on the bonus below. -- There are 129 recipes in the book, all of which are vegetarian, 124 of them are vegan, and 109 of them are gluten-free or gluten-free adaptable. My goal was to create healthful, everyday recipes that require accessible, whole food ingredients – mainly vegetables, fruit, herbs, spices, grains, and legumes. The recipes are very much influenced by the seasons, too. Our hope is that you’ll be able to find whatever good-looking produce you picked up at your market or store in the index of the book, and get some ideas on preparing it. -- I used comfort food classics from around the world as inspiration for the recipes in the book, which also influenced the book’s organization. The chapters are as follows: Morning Porridges and Pancakes – this chapter contains breakfast recipes for every season, both savory and sweet. Salads and Bowls – this one has a grain bowl recipe for every season, as well as plenty of vibrant salads for every occasion. Wraps and Rolls – this chapter celebrates the wrapping techniques seen in cuisines all around the world. There are recipes for summer rolls, enchiladas, burritos, maki (sushi), collard green wraps, and more. Soups and Stews – the recipes in this chapter range from hearty winter stews to refreshing and light summer soups. Risotto, Paella and Pilaf – for this chapter, I took the format of well-loved rice dishes from around the world, and reinvented them with the use of different vegetables and grains (there are even a couple of completely grain-free risottos!). Noodles, Pasta and Pizza – this one is all about the coziest foods out there, reimagined to be more vegetable-forward – there are recipes for homemade pasta and dumplings, but also for noodles and pizza crusts made with vegetables. Fritters and Veggie Burgers – this chapter has a veggie burger recipe for every season, as well as plenty of lacy, plant-packed fritters. Just Veggies – this chapter is here to prove that seasonal vegetables only need a simple nudge to taste amazing – there are techniques for marinating, pickling, braising, stewing, and glazing that will take your produce to the next level. Sweets for Every Season – the title of this chapter speaks for itself – there are brownies, galettes, pies, cakes, and pots de creme, made with unrefined sweeteners, fruit, and even some vegetables. Basics and Sauces – a foundational chapter, which will supply you with ammunition for creating vibrant meals quickly – from mind-blowing sauces to broth that will cost you $0 in extra groceries. -- I’ve been thinking a lot about the amount of waste we produce as humans, and I’ve been working on developing techniques for using up all parts of the produce I buy. I present some of these ideas in this book, from the aforementioned veggie scrap broth, to a watermelon rind marmalade, broccoli stem risotto, and more. -- The introduction has a story about my shoemaker grandfather, which has basically become folklore in our family. I was very excited to immortalize it in a book. -- If you have our first cookbook, The Vibrant Table, this book is a follow-up to that. While The Vibrant Table focused on creativity in plant-based cooking, Simply Vibrant is much more focused on the everyday. It’s all about putting breakfast, lunch and dinner on the table. -- The book is 328 pages long, hardcover, and 7.5″ x 10″ in size. Every recipe is accompanied by a beautiful photograph, with the exception of a few sauces. Praise Here are some kind words we’ve heard about the book from people and publications we greatly admire. “Simply Vibrant captures the kind of accidentally-vegetarian food we want to eat right now.” --Bon Appetit Simply Vibrant is intuitively organized and brilliantly executed. It illustrates how many of us are striving to eat these days: crave-able, template-style recipes with seasonal touches, simple techniques, and an underlying nourishing essence that reads as encouraging, rather than prescriptive. Anyas approach starts with a deep-rooted reverence for what nature provides in all of its seasons--and in all of its sometimes neglected or wasted forms. The thoughtful uses for carrot tops, chickpea soaking liquid, and barley cooking water--like the rest of the books delicious plant-based recipes--speak to both virtue and pure enjoyment. This book inspires me to cook (and live!) with a deeper sense of care and appreciation. --Laura Wright, author of The First Mess Cookbook Anyas approach to food and the seasons always stands out as creative, inventive, and colorful. Simply Vibrant contains an abundance of inspiring recipes and clever tricks to add more nourishment and adventure to your everyday meals. --Amy Chaplin, James Beard award-winning author of At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen Anya has the incredible ability to inspire her readers to cook, but more importantly, she helps them tap into their own intuition to create delicious meals in a more relaxed way. I love her emphasis on seasonality, and her creative approach to leaf-to-root cooking, using every ingredient to its fullest potential without wasting a single seed! This recipe collection is bursting with global flavors, unique ingredient combinations, and of course, vibrancy on the highest level. --Sarah Britton, holistic nutritionist and author of My New Roots and Naturally Nourished   We are longtime fans of Golubka Kitchen and Anyas creative and beautiful plant-based recipes. Her new book is jam-packed with healthy, flavorful, and simple recipes and lots of interesting suggestions on how to cook with the odds and ends of produce that usually are discarded--like making marmalade from watermelon rinds and risotto using broccoli stems. So clever! --David Frenkiel and Luise Vindahl, creators of the blog Green Kitchen Stories “Exciting, vegetable led food.” -- Anna Jones, author of A Modern Way to Cook, A Modern Way to Eat and columnist for The Guardian “What made me want to cook from Simply Vibrant is its more relaxed approach to plant-based cooking” --Toronto Star Pre-Order Here’s where you can pre-order Simply Vibrant. Many of these outlets are selling the book at a discounted price while it’s still in the pre-order stages. Amazon Barnes & Noble Roost Powell’s IndieBound Book Depository (ships worldwide for free) Amazon Canada Indigo Pre-Order Bonus Recipe Bundle To show our immense gratitude to anyone who pre-orders the book, we made a little thank you gift in the form of a free Bonus Recipe Bundle PDF. It’s sort of like a mini e-cookbook, complete with 10 brand-new, plant-based recipes that won’t be published anywhere else. The style of the recipes is very similar to that of the recipes in the actual book – everyday meals to make your home cooking more delicious and vibrant. Click here for instructions on how to claim your pre-order bonus and see a preview of the recipes within. Thank You This book only exists because of this blog, and this blog exists because of you – your support, kindness, and curiosity in visiting this space, cooking from our recipes, and reading our stories. Seriously, none of this would be here without YOU. So thank you! Truly, from the bottom of our hearts. – Anya and Masha The post Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook! appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Blackberry and Currant Clafoutis

September 14 2018 My New Roots 

Blackberry and Currant Clafoutis The first time I heard the word, I knew I would love it. Clafoutis. Clah. Foo. Tee. It felt so good just to say it, like a laughing cloud floating off my tongue, I was certain it would taste even better. I was right. Clafoutis is a classic French dessert; a custard tart of sorts but without a crust. It is traditionally made with flour, milk, sugar, and eggs, and a fruit, the most popular being black cherries. Arranged in a buttered dish, the fruit is bathed in rich batter and baked, then served lukewarm with a dusting of powdered sugar and sometimes cream. The concept is brilliantly simple and I knew that with a few adjustments, the clafoutis of my dreams could become a reality. For my first cookbook, I took the plunge and came up with an easy, grain-free and dairy-free foolproof recipe that I can honestly say I make more than any other dessert in my repertoire. I always have the batter ingredients on hand, and I always have seasonal fruit, so when I need something sweet on short notice, this dish often makes a delicious appearance. The only teeny issue with my original version, is that it required a food processor to blend up toasted almond flour. When I set out to make a clafoutis a couple weeks ago, we were living pretty simply at the family cottage in Denmark without any kitchen equipment to speak of, and I was left scratching my head. I knew I could simplify the calfoutis even more, so I endeavoured to make it an equipment-free recipe, and edited a couple of steps so that there wasnt even a bowl to wash. Instead of roasting the almonds in the oven, I purchased almond flour, then toasted it in a large skillet over medium heat until golden brown. Then, once the pan had been removed from the heat and cooled a bit, I mixed the remaining ingredients right there in the skillet! The last step was to simply pour the batter into the prepared baking dish with the fruit, and place it in the oven. So easy! The final results were just as good - if not better - than the more complicated version of the recipe. Since blackberries and red currants were absolutely dripping from the bushes around the island, I knew that these two berries, as untraditional as they were, would be delicious in this context. The sweet batter in contrast against the sour-tart, juicy jewels worked so perfectly. Some notes on the recipe: the reason that I measure the fruit out by volume may seem unusual, but its because the physical space that the fruit takes up in the clafoutis is more important than the weight of it. The goal is to fill the bottom almost entirely with few gaps, so that every bite contains tons of juicy fruit pieces.  You are welcome to use any fruit that is available to you, with the exception of anything with a very high water content - melon, citrus, and pineapple make the tart too soggy. I love rhubarb in the spring, cherries in the early summer, stone fruits in the late summer, and figs in the autumn. You can also add spices to the batter, such as cinnamon and cardamom, and even dried fruit like raisins, cranberries, apricots, figs or dates. I have not tried making a clafoutis without eggs. The vegan versions Ive seen online rely on either tofu or aqufaba for body and binding, and Im not overly enthusiastic about either one of those ingredients. Plus, I really love eggs. It may be groovy to try with a coconut milk + chia + arrowroot combo, but I cannot reliably say it would work since Ive never tried it before - this is just a hunch!     Print recipe     Blackberry and Currant Clafoutis Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 100g almond flour 3 large organic, free-range eggs 3/­­4 cup /­­ 100g coconut sugar 1 vanilla bean, seeds scraped or 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1 cup /­­ 250ml full-fat coconut milk 1/­­4 tsp. flaky sea salt 4 cups /­­ 1 litre fresh blackberries and currants coconut oil for greasing coconut yogurt or other cool, creamy thing to serve with (optional) Directions: - In a large skillet over medium heat, toast the almond flour, stirring often until golden. Remove pan from stove and let cool. - While the almond flour is cooling, preheat the oven to 350°F /­­ 180°C. Wash the fruit and remove any stems or debris. Rub just a little coconut oil on the bottoms of a 9 /­­ 23cm tart pan or any ovenproof dish. Scatter the fruit in the pan. - Crack eggs into a small bowl and whisk well. - To the skillet with the almond flour, add the eggs, coconut sugar, vanilla, coconut milk and salt and stir until smooth and fully combined. - Pour the batter mixture over the fruits and bake for 45 minutes on the middle rack until risen slightly and golden brown. Serve warm with a dollop of coconut yogurt and more fresh fruit, if desired. Store leftovers in the fridge for up to four days.   I’m sure you’ve noticed that look of the blog has changed a little bit. I felt that it was time for a freshen up, and I hope you take a moment to visit my homepage and have a look around. And for this first post since the redesign, I decided to make a small photo essay to convey the gorgeousness of our village on Bornholm. Bornholm is a small, Danish island in the Baltic sea off the southern tip of Sweden. My husbands family have a cottage there, in an old fish smokery right on the ocean. The light on the island is particularly special, the colour of the sea an unique shade of blue, and the air is soaked with the scent of rose hips, sun-baked rocks, salt water, and elderflower. Its one of my favourite places on earth, and I always leave feeling so inspired, and connected to nature. I hope you enjoy.     *   *   *   *   *   *   Something exciting on the way! Hi friends! I have some very exciting news to share…we are releasing the first official My New Roots Subscription Box! Each box will be filled with ingredients to make one of my vegan and gluten-free recipes, a beautifully designed recipe card, and a few products Ive personally selected that will compliment your cooking experience. And everything about this box – from the packaged products inside right down to the packing tape – was scrupulously selected and designed to have as little environmental impact as possible. Subscriptions will officially open up Friday Oct 5th. Since we only have a limited supply of boxes available, I want to give you the chance to be notified when we launch before I make the announcement across my social platforms. To stay in the loop, visit the this link and enter your email. Everyone who provides their email will also be entered for a chance to receive their first My New Roots box free of charge! 3 emails will be selected from the list at random. Weve been working on this project for a long time and Im so thrilled that its almost here! Thank you in advance for your support and ongoing love for all things MNR. xo, Sarah B   The post Blackberry and Currant Clafoutis appeared first on My New Roots.

Khasta Mathri - Indian Savory Crackers

August 26 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Khasta Mathri - Indian Savory Crackers (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Khasta Mathri – Indian Savory Crackers Khasta Mathri is a popular, classic savory snack. You can serve these Mathries with pickle at tea time or you can enjoy as is! For all the upcoming holidays, Mathries make a good snack to have around to serve to all guests. They also make for a simple but special homemade gift. - 1 cup all-purpose flour (maida or plain flour) - 2 Tbsp sooji (semolina flour) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­4 tsp black pepper (crushed) - 1/­­4 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 2 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable oil) - 1/­­2 cup chilled water - 2 drops lemon juice - oil to fry -  Mix the flour, sooji, salt, black pepper, cumin seeds, lemon drops and oil. Note lemon should be just 2-3 drops, we are not adding this to flavor, lemon is added to give the crispness, also Mathries will absorbed less oil. - Add the chilled water slowly, mixing with your fingers as you pour. Do not knead the dough. The dough should be soft. -  Cover the dough and let it sit for at least fifteen minutes. Divide the dough into about 20 equal parts, I decided to make 14. - Take each part of the dough and make a flat ball shape. Roll them into 2-inch circles. Prick each mathri with a fork about 6-8 places, both sides each, to prevent puffing the mathri when frying. - Heat the oil in a frying pan on low medium heat. The frying pan should have at least 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put a small piece of dough in the oil. The dough should make the oil sizzle and come up slowly. -  Fry mathri in batches, making sure to place just enough mathri to cover the frying oil. Fry them until both sides are a light golden-brown. This should take about 5-7 minutes. Take them out over paper towel, which will absorb the extra oil Suggestions Serve the Khasta Mathri with cranberry pickle, or Chatpata Aloo Khasta Mathris can be stored for a couple of months in airtight containers. If the mathris are cooked on high heat, they will be soft.   The post Khasta Mathri – Indian Savory Crackers appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Danish Summer Tacos

July 8 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Danish Summer Tacos Here is an unconventional but yet great taco recipe that we want you to try. It includes making tortillas from grated zucchini/­­courgette and filling them with a creamy and crunchy yogurt, cucumber and potato salad. Think of it as a light and summery take on tacos that probably will drive taco conservatives mad but make the rest of us happy. Because one more way to eat taco is not a bad thing. The zucchini tortillas is a recipe we have been making for the past couple of months, using egg, almond flour and parmesan to bind them together. We first saw this idea floating around on various Pinterest boards. If you have been making our vegetable flatbreads, this is a thinner version that is more elastic (mainly because of the cheese) and therefore works great as a soft tortilla shell or wrap. The creamy yogurt salad is our version of a Danish summer salad (sommersalat). It is traditionally made on smoked fresh cheese, creme fraiche, radishes, cucumber and chives and it is a classic summer dish, served on top of a sm?rrebr?d or inside a sandwich. We have upgraded the traditional version with strawberry, apple, dill, parsley and cooked potatoes and it is truly a delightful combination of flavors and textures. The sweet and fruity notes works very well with the fresh herbs and cooked sliced potatoes. It is pretty difficult to come by smoked fresh cheese if you live outside of Denmark so our version instead has full fat yogurt, lemon juice and dill. If you do find smoked fresh cheese you should definitely replace half of the yogurt with it in this recipe. We are actually writing this from Denmark as we are spending a few summer weeks with our Danish family so apart from smoked cheese, we will also be feasting on r?dgr?d med fl?de, sm?rrebr?d and p?laegschokolade. Leave us a comment if you give this a try, we’d love to hear what you think. Happy summer! Danish Summer Zucchini Tacos Makes 6 Zucchini Tortillas 2 zucchini (4 cups grated) 1 large egg 1/­­2 cup loosely packed grated parmesan cheese 25 g /­­ 1/­­4 cup almond flour sea salt & pepper Danish summer salad 4 cooked new potatoes 1/­­2 cucumber 4 radishes 6 small tomatoes 10 strawberries, pitted 1 apple, cored 4 stems dill 4 stems parsley 1 cup thick plain yogurt 2 tbsp mayonaise (optional) 1/­­2 lemon, juice sea salt & pepper For assembling 6 crispy lettuce 6 tbsp alfalfa sprouts Preheat the oven to 200°C and line a baking tray with baking paper. Grate the zucchini on the roughest side of a box grater. Place in a sieve and squeeze out any excess water from the grated zucchini. Transfer to a mixing bowl and combine with a whisked egg, grated cheese, almond flour, salt and pepper. Measure out 60 ml /­­ 1/­­4 cup of batter for each flatbread, place on the baking paper and use the palm of your hand to shape them into flat discs. Bake in the oven for about 20 minutes until golden and firm. Cut potatoes, cucumber, radishes, tomatoes, strawberries and apple into small cubes and transfer to a mixing bowl. Finely chop dill and parsley. In another bowl stir together dill, parsley, yogurt, mayonaise, lemon juice, salt and pepper and add to the cubed ingredient bowl. Gently combine so all ingredients are covered in the herby yogurt mixture. When the zucchini tacos/­­tortillas have cooled slightly, place a lettuce in each and 2 spoonfuls of summer salad and top with sprouts. Serve immediately.

Proof that Not All Vegan Food Has To Be Healthy

January 8 2018 Happy Cow veggie blog 

If youre under the impression that vegan food is boring and that all we eat all day are carrots and kale, Vegan Junk Food Bar in Amsterdam is the perfect place to go to get your stereotypes absolutely rocked. Full of punk styling and off the wall flavors, Vegan Junk Food Bar offers the perfect place to go when you need to get your fix of burgers and fries, among many other classic fast food favorites. Theyve got two locations in Amsterdam, so theres always one close by when the craving for a double double with a shake on the side hits. I had the chance to speak with the manager of their newly opened Marie Heinekenplein location, which is hard to miss because the interior is neon pink and bubblegum blue, and he excitedly told me that their new location is doing great and theyre thrilled to be able to offer even more vegan options to an already vegan-hungry crowd of tourists and Amsterdam locals. While there, I got to try the Notorious Sumo Burger, a double patty with melty cheese and all the fixins as well as theyre Amsterdam Bitterballs and Flashy Loaded sweet potato fries. Everything was […] The post Proof that Not All Vegan Food Has To Be Healthy appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Kitchen Creativity

December 12 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Kitchen Creativity In a break from my usual recipe posts, I’d like to share an excerpt from Karen Page’s new book entitled Kitchen Creativity. Beyond a cookbook, Kitchen Creativity is a guide to inventive cooking (without recipes!) that will inspire you to think, improvise, and cook like the world’s best chefs. Great cooking is as much about intuition and imagination as it is about flavor and technique. Kitchen Creativity gives insights into these creative processes from more than 100 top restaurant kitchens, including the Bazaar, Blue Hill, Daniel, and Dirt Candy. Based on four years of research and dozens of in-depth interviews, Kitchen Creativity illuminates the methods of culinary invention. Part I reveals how to learn foundational skills, including how to appreciate, taste, and season classic dishes before reinventing the classics from a new perspective. Part II’s A-to-Z entries are an invaluable culinary idea generator, with exercises to prompt new recipe ideas and combinations. While not a cookbook, nor a vegan book, for that matter (although vegan chefs and ingredients are very well represented), Kitchen Creativity has a lot to offer for cooks looking to broaden their creativity in the kitchen.  The following is an excerpt from Kitchen Creativity on one of my favorite topics, umami… “Umami” from Kitchen Creativity by Karen Page The taste of umami is imparted by glutamate, a type of amino acid discovered in 1908 by Dr. Kikunae Ikeda of Tokyo Imperial University. In studying kombu (kelp), Ikeda managed to isolate glutamate as its own compound, giving it the name of umami, which translates as savoriness. Thus, 5,000 years after the discovery of salt, and 4,000 years after the discovery of sugar, and 3,500 years after the discovery of sour (vinegar), umami is a relatively new taste concept. Japanese cooks had been using umami-rich ingredients intuitively for centuries, long before their scientific properties were discovered to enhance flavor. While we first mentioned umami in our 1996 book Culinary Artistry, it did not begin to gain more widespread acceptance until after 2000 when glutamate receptors were discovered on the tongue. The main sources of umami are those deriving from 1) the amino acid glutamate (found in, e.g., kelp); and those deriving from 2) so-called nucleotides--such as a) adenylate (aka AMP, which is found primarily in fish and shellfish), b) guanylate (aka GMP, which is found primarily in plants and fungi, e.g., shiitake mushrooms, esp. dried), and c) inosinate (aka IMP, which is found primarily in meat and fish, e.g., bonito flakes). The big umami magic happens when one or more nucleotides are combined with glutamate, as there is a synergistic affect--resulting in umami with as much as eight times the potency. Umami Dynamics Umami can enhance a bland dishs appeal with mouth-filling savoriness. Umami can also enhance a dishs perceived sweetness, while tempering its perceived bitterness. If you find yourself with too much of a good thing when it comes to umami, try balancing with salty, sweet, bitter, acidic, or piquant ingredients. Umami is a taste that tends to linger on the palate--something referred to as a long finish in the wine world. Because it contributes to the qualities of deliciousness and satiation, umami is especially prized as a taste in dishes and menus. Note: Certain herbs and spices can also emphasize a dishs savory aspects, such as bay leaf, cumin, oregano, paprika, sage, and thyme. Using Umami Chefs praise black garlic (aka fermented garlic) for its ability to add depth and earthiness to dishes ranging from vegetables to meats. If you doubt umamis importance as one of the five primary tastes, consider the fact that leading chefs like Michael Anthony, Eric Ripert, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten believe dashi to be a key component of their cooking. Some chefs use it to replace liquids in countless preparations, from brines to broths to salad dressings. Chefs have rising enthusiasm for all manner of fermented ingredients (e.g., fermented soybeans, kimchi, miso, pickles, sauerkraut), which bring umami to dishes including vegetables. The corn smut known as huitlacoche is prized as a Mexican delicacy, not only by chefs cooking in the vernacular like Rick Bayless, but also mainstream chefs who find themselves using it in quesadillas, soups, and tacos. Sean Brock declares is insanely delicious and luxurious, like black truffles. Kombu (aka kelp, the sea vegetable) is prized for its umami by Yoshihiro Narisawa. Brad Farmerie is fanatical about miso, which allows him to achieve a rich mouthfeel without butter or cream. Miso is an integral part of Farmeries roasted chile caramel Brussels sprouts, which involve caramelizing sugar (sweet) before adding chiles (hot), cilantro stems (bitter), lime juice (sour), fish sauce (salt/­­umami), and miso (richness). He adds miso to sweet potatoes + brown butter + rosemary to create another dish hes not able to take off the menu. Other chefs will add misos (e.g., white) to salad dressings or soups for an umami boost. From his time in Japan, Michael Anthony picked up a love of sea weeds and pickles. Thomas Henkelmann describes rich, flavorful stocks as essential for cooking in every season. Umeboshi paste is prized by chefs, including Isa Chandra Moskowitz of Omahas and Brooklyns Modern Love, for its umami quality. Moskowitz adds it to her Caesar salad dressing for its anchovy flavor. Even native Brits like Mark Levy fall prey to the charms of white truffles, which he prizes for their mysterious aroma and short availability. Excerpted from Kitchen Creativity: Unlocking Culinary Genius--with Wisdom, Inspiration, and Ideas from the Worlds Most Creative Chefs by Karen Page (Little, Brown, October 31, 2017). Save Save Save Save The post Kitchen Creativity appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Black Bean Truffles

November 30 2017 Veganpassion 

Black Bean Truffles The best gift you can give someone is something home-made. With this black bean truffles you are going to please everyone the health freak just as the sweets lover. Making truffles from black beans might not be the first thing that pops in mind when thinking about a delicious treat but trust me they're worth a try! Makes 25 truffles Ingredients: 1 can /­­ 4 cups (250g) cooked black beans 2 tbsp (25g) oats 4 tbsp (40g) cocoa 4 tbsp coconut blossom sugar 2 tbsp (60g) coconut oil Cocao powder for coating Rinse the black beans. Grind oats, cocoa and coconut blossom sugar in your mixer. Add in melted coconut oil and beans and mix until it forms into a smooth batter. Form 25 truffles, toss them in cocoa powder and store in an airtight container to prevent from getting dry.

Middle Eastern Lentils & Rice

November 13 2017 Meatless Monday 

In this Middle Eastern classic also known as Mujaddara, onions are caramelized until sweet and brown to season the green lentils and hearty brown rice. Cinnamon and cumin complement the caramelized onion to spice this traditional dish which wont break the bank. This recipe comes to us from Anne of Apron Strings. Serves 6 - 1 cup brown rice - 2 cups green lentils, rinsed and sorted - 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided - 3 large onions, sliced - 1 teaspoon cumin - 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon - 1 teaspoon salt - freshly ground black pepper, to taste - 1 cup flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped - a sprinkle extra virgin olive oil, for serving Place the rice in a saucepan over medium high heat with 2 cups of water and a dash of salt. Bring the rice to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer, cover and cook for 45-50 minutes, or until the rice is cooked through. Drain. While the rice is cooking, cover the lentils with 2 inches of water in another pot over medium high heat. Bring the lentils to a boil and continue boiling for about 20-25 minutes, or until the lentils are cooked through, but not yet mushy. Drain. While the lentils and rice are cooking, place the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the onions, stirring to make sure the slices have separated and are coated in oil. Reduce heat to low and cook for about 25 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions have caramelized. When the rice, lentils and onions have completed cooking and caramelizing, toss them together in a large bowl. Season the rice, lentils and onions with the cumin, cinnamon, salt and black pepper to taste. Divide the lentils and rice into 6 equal servings. Sprinkle each serving with the parsley and drizzle with the extra virgin olive oil and enjoy! The post Middle Eastern Lentils & Rice appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast)

October 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast) We went to Italy earlier this month and visited the Amalfi Coast and Rome. Having visited the Abruzzo region a few years ago, I continue to be amazed at how different Italy is from region to region. They are almost like separate, tiny countries. It was a great trip – we lucked out with the weather, all our extensive train, plane, bus and boat journeys went pretty smoothly, and we got to see so many breathtaking things. The only complaint we had is a classic one – not enough time there. Below are some photos from the trip, as well as some notes and suggestions that we hope will be useful to future travelers :) Amafli Coast Our first impression was that this is an amazingly beautiful area that’s been completely overrun by tourism. That being said, there are still ways to enjoy it less like a tourist and more like a visitor, and it’s honestly so breathtaking that it’s very worth the visit. We stayed in Vettica, a quiet village right next to Amalfi, in a tiny Airbnb with a big terrace overlooking the cliffs and the sea. For us, it was the best of both worlds. We saw close to no tourists in Vettica, and instead got to see how people lead their lives in such an amazing setting. We watched locals going to church, to the market, feeding their cats, and being completely unaffected by the copious amounts of stairs in their cliffside neighborhoods (we were out of breath every time). Yet Amalfi was close enough (still a 45 minute walk or a stressful bus ride, but totally doable) that we had access to the boats and buses that shuttle people to Capri, Positano, and other beautiful places on the coast. It was really nice to have some distance from Amalfi, because it’s incredibly crowded with tour groups on any given day, but you have to go through it to get pretty much anywhere on the coast. Capri Once we got to Capri, we were wishing that we could spend the night there. There’s so much to do and it’s so incredibly beautiful. Take the chairlift up to Monte Solaro, the highest peak, to see the insane panorama that opens up. Walk around both Capri and Anacapri. Capri is better for partying and Anacapri – for quiet walks on tiny streets. Visit the Church of San Michele in Anacapri to see the intricate, hand-painted floor. Eat torta caprese and caprese sandwiches in the spirit of true tourism :) A complete must is a visit to the Villa San Michele, a villa built by Axel Munthe, the Swedish physician and author. Munthe was a collector of classical artifacts, so the whole villa is tastefully decorated by objects from the antiquity, some of which were found right on site during the construction of the villa. There is a lush garden, a breathtaking panorama of the island and the sea, and every inch of the place is pristine and photogenic. Positano Although Positano is an incredibly beautiful town with stunning architecture, we concluded that we would have been better off having a second day in Capri instead of coming here. The reason: it is swamped with tourists and touristy shops in a way that feels quite forced and concentrated (Capri, though also very touristy, had a more spread out feel). Maybe we went to the wrong places? If you have more than four days on the Amalfi coast, which is all we had, we would still recommend coming here. It also largely depends on your goals for your travels, of course :) Ravello We went here mainly because the host of our favorite Russian travel show visited the town in one of the episodes, and it looked totally breathtaking. Ravello is a town very high in the mountains, and the bus ride up took us on some of the tightest serpentines we’ve ever seen. The views from the top are the pay off, and the air feels different – very much like the freshest mountain air. Another beautiful villa to visit is the Villa Cimbrone in Ravello, full of ancient structures, fountains, sculptures, a beautiful garden and yet another breathtaking panorama. Food We were surprised to learn that the region is actually not known for its food, and finding a good, authentic meal isn’t easy because large amounts of tourists equal large amounts of tourist trap restaurants. It is Italy however, where even bad food is decent. We did manage to find some gems, but Rome really took the prize over Amalfi in the culinary department. Here are a few favorites: Pizzeria Da Nino, Conca dei Marini A charming, small restaurant in the town neighboring Vettica, with home-cooked food and a super charming owner (Nino!) that greets you at the door and is easy to understand even when you don’t speak a word of Italian. Go for the fresh-made pasta. Al Pesce d’Oro, Vettica A restaurant at a bed and breakfast in Vettica with good pizza. We went for the zucchini and squash blossom one and were pleasantly surprised at how solid and tasty it was. Da Ferdinando, Positano An outdoor restaurant right on the beach in Positano, with a really fun atmosphere and tasty dishes. La Vecchia Cantina, Ravello When visiting Ravello, lunch presented itself as a problem, because we didn’t research anything beforehand. We wandered off the central square and into this restaurant, and ended up having a pretty solid meal with very nice service. Bar Ferraro, Anacapri Went here when visiting Capri to try the mandatory torta caprese. It was very good, and so were the little frozen ricotta shortbread cookies. Rome We are so completely in love with Rome. We only had three days there, which is nothing! It was hard to cover everything we wanted, but we tried our best. We stayed in a really cool Airbnb near Campo de Fiori, which is a centrally located square that’s busy at all times of the day. Luckily, our actual location was on a very quiet, narrow street, so it was the best of both worlds. We visited the main historic sites (the Forum, Colosseum, Pantheon etc.), as well as the Jewish Ghetto, Trastevere, Testaccio and Monti. Below are some favorites. Sites The obvious: the Forum, the Colosseum, Ponte Sant’Angelo, Piazza del Popolo, Piazza Navona, the Pantheon. Even though the Pantheon was incredibly crowded, it was still super impressive. This inscription on Raphael’s burial is still in my mind: ‘Here lies Raphael, by whom nature herself feared to be outdone while he lived, and when he died, feared that she herself would die.‘ Wow. Churches: Santa Maria del Popolo, Santa Maria Sopra Minerva, San Luigi dei Francesi, Santa Maria in Trastevere, it’s endless really :) Food La Montecarlo A really fun place that serves Roman-style thin crust pizza and more, crowded with locals at any given time. They casually line each new customer’s table with white paper in place of a tablecloth, and write out the check on the paper at the end of the meal, from memory. The service is fast and efficient. We liked the super thin-crusted pizza (endless topping options), the pesto pasta and mushroom pasta, and of course, the arancini (fried rice balls served as an app). Roscioli If you’ve ever watched any food & travel shows about Rome, chances are Roscioli was featured as a mecca for everything delicious in the center of the city. Roscioli has a whole cluster of eateries right near Campo de Fiori: a deli/­­restaurant, a cafe with a coffee counter and bite-sized pastries, a bakery, and a full-on pizza restaurant called Emma. The coffee at the cafe is excellent. At the bakery, get any of the delicious by-the-slice pizzas that they are putting out all day, as well as the bread. We liked the bread so much, we smuggled a loaf home in our luggage. If you go to Emma, definitely try the pizza, since it’s the specialty there, and apparently a whole lot of effort went into developing the pizza dough recipe. If you go to the restaurant/­­deli, Katie Parla has some great advice on navigating the menu there. Antico Forno Cordella (or Urbani) If you find yourself in the Jewish Ghetto in the morning or afternoon, stop in here for a slice of their delicious, thin and crispy pizza rossa. Pianostrada A fun dinner place with neat decor and a more modern, deconstructed take on Roman classics. Urbana 47 If you go to the Colosseum, you might as well stop here for lunch, as it’s about a 10 minute walk away. They focus on local and seasonal ingredients, and we really loved every pasta dish we ordered here. (Thank you Pauline for the recommendation!) Sant’Eustacchio il Caffe We really enjoyed sitting at an outside table here with a cappuccino and a cornetti (both very good), watching the morning world go by. Go here on your way to the Pantheon and/­­or Piazza Navona, both are super close. Don’t miss the church Sant’Eustachio that’s right there, with a beautifully sculpted deer head on the facade. Volpetti If you are in the mood to visit a serious deli, check out Volpetti in Testaccio. They carry an overwhelming amount of cheeses, meats, olives, marinated veggies, pizza by the slice, and fried snacks. They are also able to vacuum wrap anything you buy, so that you can put the stuff in your luggage with little fear of it being taken away at the airport. Sack Food Another really interesting delicatessen that carries really unusual cheeses and meats. If you are anything like us and gift food as travel gifts to your omnivore friends, this place is great. You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Travel Notes: Chicago Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Saveur Magazine Best Food Blog Awards, Golubka in Special Interest .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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