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Hart vegetarian recipes

Brioche Bagels

June 12 2019 Vegan Dad 

Brioche Bagels I recently saw brioche bagels at the grocery store and, quite frankly, they looked terrible. I was pretty sure I could make a vegan version that was so much better than whatever Loblaws was peddling. I was right! These are tender and absolutely delicious toasted with jam, or as a sandwich. They are the perfect addition to any brunch or lunch. The recipe is a Reinhart adaptation and mashup. You can also make two 1 lb sandwich loaves if that is more your thing.  INGREDIENTS Makes 8 large bagels Sponge - 2.25 oz bread flour - 8 g instant yeast - 4 fl oz lukewarm plain soy milk Dough - 2 oz cooked sweet potato - 4.5 fl oz plain soy milk (cold), or aquafaba* - 14.75 oz bread flour - 1 oz sugar - 1.25 tsp (10 g) salt (or generous .25 tsp (4 g) if using salted butter) - 4 oz vegan butter, at room temperature** Poaching Liquid - enough water the fill your pot about 1.5 high - 1 tbsp baking soda - 1 tbsp brown sugar * I did not find any difference between soy milk or aquafaba in a blind taste test. **You need a butter that will firm up when cold. I used home-made and Melt with great results. METHOD 1. Whisk together the sponge ingredients in a stand mixer bowl until smooth. Cover and let rise for 45 mins. 2. Blend together sweet potato and milk (or aquafaba) with an immersion blender in a small container (I use a pyrex 1 cup liquid measuring cup) until very smooth. Whisk into the sponge. 3. Add the flour, sugar, and salt, Use the dough hook to bring the ingredients together into a rough dough. Make sure all the ingredients are incorporated. Let rest for 5 mins. 4. With the dough hook running on medium speed, add the vegan butter about 2 tbsp at a time, waiting for it to be incorporated into the dough before adding more. The dough will start out tough but will soften as it takes on more fat. 5. Once the butter is incorporated, knead the dough for 5-7 mins, or until smooth.  6. Shape into a ball, place in a lightly oiled bowl, cover, and let rise for 60 mins.  7. Divide the dough into 8 equal pieces. Shape each piece into a ball.  8. Line a large baking sheet with lightly oiled parchment paper. 9. Pinch though the centre of the ball with your thumb and forefinger, then shape into a ring. (I find this method best because the final bagel is delicate and this allows it to withstand the poaching process without breaking apart).  10. Place the shaped dough rings on the prepared sheet, mist with oil, cover with plastic wrap, and immediately refrigerate for 8 hours, or overnight. The bagels will have risen and firmed up in the cold. 11. When you are ready to bake, preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Get the poaching liquid simmering in a large pot.  12. Add as many bagels as will comfortably fit in your pot (usually four), top side down (they should float). Poach for no more than 30 seconds, then flip over. Poach for no more than 30 seconds more, then transfer back to the prepared baking sheet. Repeat with remaining bagels. 13. Bake for 8 mins, then rotate the pan. If the bottoms of the bagels are browning too much, you can at this time place the baking sheet on top of an empty baking sheet to insulate the bottom. Bake for another 6-8 mins until golden.  14. Let cool and serve!

Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett

May 5 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett Rachelle Robinett is an Herbalist, Holistic Health Practitioner, and founder of Supernatural, a company dedicated to real-world plant-based wellness. Rachelle has been studying the relationship between plants and people her entire life – be that on a farm in the Pacific Northwest (where she grew up) to time with healers, specialists, and shaman in farther-away places. She now provides functional plant-based wellness services, products, and education to empower people to understand their health, and lean into it, naturally. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? This has changed a lot for me since launching my company and having total control of my schedule. I do schedule every thing, but also move through life very intuitively. For example, on a day off Ill plan to ride my bike but once Im on it, it doesnt matter to me where I go. There are things I do routinely (meal preparation, exercise, rituals, sleep) but I never ignore instincts or anything my body is telling me. I love to be surprised but also care so much about how I spend every moment that planning is a big part of my life. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. No more alarm clock! Or, infrequently, which isnt something I would have predicted for my life. Ill wake up to open windows and the sounds of birds on a breeze. A glass of water with a tincture and probiotics. If its a day off, Ill skip caffeine and head out for a run while Im still sleepy. I love waking up while I run. A work day means a small cup of cold-brew with MCT oil and (currently, though it changes as I work with different herbs) mucuna pruriens and L-theanine. I practice intermittent fasting daily so dont typically eat until 11am or later but in the morning Ill make a broth or giant green juice and also a smoothie, which becomes brunch. A meditation ritual with some South American plants Ive come to love and then its off to the races. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Getting away from blue light! If Im near screens, they have physical filters and apps (like flux) installed to reduce the effect. Dimmed lights, incense, my Zen Spa Stuff playlist, and something to drink. There are always herbs at night as my energy tends to run very high, naturally. I cycle between kava kava, skullcap, valerian, poppy, lavender, and more. Also very in love with a relaxing face-washing routine. :) -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Im working diligently at becoming a more regular meditator. Its most days now, but Id like to deepen it. Otherwise, yoga, running and long bike rides silence my mind. I can practice yoga (ashtanga) for hours a day and be thrilled. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – A giant smoothie made with fresh tropical fruits and fats, ideally picked from a jungle farm that morning. Lunch – All the vegetables, fresh and raw and local. Amazing olive oil, avocado, or coconut. Maybe some seeds. Seaweed too. Every color of the rainbow. Snack – 100% cacao. Local. Dinner - See lunch. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Currently I have about 1/­­2 cup of cold-brew coffee that we make at home. Im so high energy naturally that I often dont finish it. Green juice is my favorite energy support. Otherwise I use water, food, sunlight and breath to adjust my energy. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? Dark chocolate – often homemade but if bought its 92 – 100%. Ill eat that for breakfast, honestly. My sugar intake is so low that sweets cravings are rare but if they get aggressive Ill have extra cacao in smoothies or elixirs, or eat more fruit, sweet potatoes/­­yams, etc. Chocolate chip cookies are dear to my heart though. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? This evolves as I learn and grow too but ... – An excellent probiotic – Personalized herbs. For me those are mood-supportive and nervous-system soothing. I use a combination of herbal teas (infused overnight), tinctures (HerbPharm are my favorite!) and well-sourced powders. – Supplements depending on bloodwork, body composition and lifestyle. – Im seeing the greatest overall health changes in my clients who are working on gut health. It just affects so much! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I live to move. Every single day if possible! If I skip more than two days, I get really restless. Running and yoga are my favorite, but I need both. I joke that running is my church; I treasure it and find it extremely cathartic. Yoga keeps everything balanced and I hope to have the practice for life. Weather permitting, Ill ride my bike for hours but that just feels like play. Im also into strength training (aka lifting weights at the gym, which surprises people). Overall, I consider exercise as essential as good food, water, and sleep. My preference for high-intensity exhaustive stuff comes from my high-energy personality but isnt necessary for everyone. Ive seen some of the fastest changes in my body with a daily yoga practice, some walking, and an excellent diet. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? Absolutely heavenly. Excellent playlists are essential! Also, just do it. ;) Beauty -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I think people doubt me when I say greens, and especially green juice, are responsible for the glow but I really mean it. Veggies veggies veggies, healthy fat, tons of water, and sweat! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Aside from food, water, rest, and sweat, I find that a consistent routine of gentle exfoliation and good quality rehydration (topically, that is) work best for me. Continually renewing the surface, allowing skin to breathe, and keeping it nourished with really simple ingredients (I love Egyptian Magic and fruit enzyme or honey-based masks) gives really great face. That said, Im not an esthetician and have increasingly more respect for what I dont know about skincare (thanks to spending more time with the professionals at CAP Beauty, especially) and it will differ for everyone. What wont differ is the value of a right diet to help reduce inflammation, increase circulation, maintain hydration, and provide enough energy for both exercising and rest. :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Exercise and sleep have always been stress-reliefs for me. Ive recently integrated more meditation, and herbs of course (especially nervines). Whats making the greatest difference, though, is - as with most things - addressing the root cause or source of the stress. Rather than just trying to breathe between emails, Im looking at how to reduce email overall. Setting timers, limits on the number of meetings Ill take each day, inbox pausing, and scheduling (and sticking to) more time truly offline. Personal days, screen-free evenings or weekends, etc. If doing this, its important to prepare for there to be more to address when you return to it, so another part of the practice may be letting go of how much we want to engage with and choosing quality over quantity. Much harder said than done. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Heat and spice! I completely eliminate all sugar including fruit and yes, honey too. I put on three extra layers to get warm and stay warm. Garlic, ginger, and all sorts of spice. And rest. Essentially, Im aiming to help my body reach a sort of break-point with the cold/­­flu, or to sweat it out before it even reaches a peak, which Ive had a lot of success with. Medicinal mushrooms can also be great for cold/­­flu season. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? Im working on this. (See above regarding stress avoidance!) My work is my play is my passion is my love so whats not work is sometimes very hard to determine. My hypnotherapist friend suggests that if it makes me happy, perhaps its not important to distinguish. My partner has inspired me to take in information from sources entirely outside of my usual bubble, which is great for play, and avoiding a filtered or algorithmic existence. This is a new practice for me. I grew up in a home that didnt allow for play so its something Im creating space for and learning how to do as an adult. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Ive found that its just impossible to be my best self when Im not taking care. Its really priority number one (and two, and maybe three) at this point. That said, there are times when life when its worth compromising different things. Like, in my twenties when I worked my ass off (and loved it) in order to achieve certain things. Now, I feel freer to play and rest. These bodies are our only homes in this life. I am so grateful to have one; I really think of it like my best friend and partner in existence. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Learning how to eat entirely plant-based, and well. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Thankfully, I dont have these. But, the opposite side of that spectrum is overworking, under-socializing, or burnout. And, existential crises which seem to strike when things are best. Rest and changes of scenery can do wonders. (Lately, I have been exploring procrastination from the perspective of mindfulness, though. This is an enlightening talk on it.) -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Instead Ill choose a couple of people: My mom, who as a Dietician gave me the greatest start in understanding nutrition, but more importantly taught me how to listen to my body. Rather than bandaging symptoms, she showed us how to ask why and follow the clues to root causes. My dad, an Anaesthesiologist who - much the opposite of Mom - taught us about medicine yes, but of more value he gave me the travel bug and experiences with wild nature that started and perpetuate my relationship with earth. And, Wendy Green, who I met at the perfect time in my journey. She helped direct my then multitudinous health practices into a more singular approach, which Ive honed and deepened since we met years ago. She also showed me how much I love ashtanga yoga, which is the gift of a lifetime. Ill be back to her retreat for the third time this summer. Knowledge -- Do you have any recommendations for those thinking of taking their career in a similar direction? Where does one start, where to find the education, how important is certification, etc. This is one of the most common questions I receive! I appreciate Mountain Rose Herbs list of resources for those looking into schools, teachers, or even just books. Its worth knowing which certifications are recognized by The American Herbalists Guild, though many people disregard the value of that and choose to study from great herbalists or schools that exist outside of the system. Id recommend as much exploration and direct experience as possible in the form of classes, workshops, and apprenticeships before then committing to a longer-term study. Find someone whose approach you respect and identify with and learn from them in whatever ways are available. -- Tell us about HRBLS, your beautiful herb infused chew line! Woo, HRBLS! These are my babies! Long story short, I wanted to give people an easy, delicious, beautiful but still very effective form of herbs. The HRBLS are gummies, or chews, that are equivalent to a dose of a tincture, a strong cup of herbal tea, or some capsules. Theyre a marriage between functional food and herbal remedies. A snack medicine or treat with benefits. Nerve Less is the first flavor (honeyed lavender tarragon) and includes my favorite herbs for daytime stress and anxiety relief, which so many folks come to me for help resolving. In the near future, well announce the next flavor – okay flavor s. :) -- And a last, fun one: what are your three favorite plants for the spring season and why? – Nettle! Because its my bff (we grew up together) and the coolest combination of edible green, super-green plant medicine, and a natural antihistamine. – Dandelion: I love the multi-taskers and like nettle, dandelion is an edible flower and bitter green (great for digestion), and medicinal top to root. – Mimosa. The tree of happiness which blooms more in the summer than spring, but close enough. Aside from looking magical, its full of medicine – everything from antioxidants to DMT. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Deep massages – two hours with the strongest hands I can find please! Acupuncture. Running, yoga, riding. TRAVEL. The post Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Spinach Artichoke Dip Recipe 30 Mins!

January 31 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Spinach Artichoke Dip Recipe 30 Mins!Easy 1 Pot Vegan Spinach Artichoke Dip Recipe. Ready in 30 Minutes! This Creamy Cheesy artichoke dip is perfect for parties, picnics, game day. No Cream cheese or vegan cheese subs. Can be glutenfree, nutfree.  Jump to Recipe  Planning the Superbowl Party?! Add this creamy spinach artichoke dip to the line up.  Simple everyday ingredients, no cream cheese, Easy, creamy, cheesy and delicious! This Vegan Spinach artichoke comes  together within minutes, needs just 1 skillet and is a crowd pleaser. Scoop it up warm bread, pita bread, chips, carrots, or veggies. This dip also makes a great addition to wraps, topping on a pizza, or  spinach artichoke melt sandwich.  Add some roasted veggies or greens and a good helping of the dip and grill for a melty creamy sandwich. Lets make this! Change up the flavor, herbs to preference while cooking it in the skillet. See Recipe notes for nutfree and glutenfree options. Continue reading: Vegan Spinach Artichoke Dip Recipe 30 Mins!The post Vegan Spinach Artichoke Dip Recipe 30 Mins! appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Instant Pot Baingan Bharta Recipe – Spiced Mashed Eggplant

December 4 2018 Vegan Richa 

Instant Pot Baingan Bharta Recipe – Spiced Mashed EggplantInstant Pot Baingan Bharta Recipe – Spiced Mashed Eggplant. 1 Pot 30 Min. Serve as dip with flatbread or with curries or Dals. Add chickpeas to make a meal Vegan Glutenfree Nutfree Soyfree Recipe Stovetop option Jump to Recipe   Baingan Bharta translates to eggplant mash. The traditional bharta is a long process, Large eggplants are roasted over a flame or grill to char the skin. The skin is them removed and the partially cooked eggplant is mashed. Then added to a spiced onion tomato base and cooked to roast the eggplant with the spices and base.  In this instant pot version, cubed Eggplant gets pressure cooked with the onion tomato base, then mashed and cooked a bit to roast. Pressure cooking reduces the steps and also uses less bowls, vessels! I add some smoked paprika that adds a fresh smoked flavor that is  generally there in this dish if the eggplant was charred and cookes. Some liquid smoke will do that too, although I find that a bit too strong.  This spiced eggplant mash also makes a great dip with some hot pita bread. Add some chickpeas to make this into a meal or serve with a side of chickpea curry or dals.  This bharta is 1 Pot, needs just 15 mins active time, is Easy and Delicious!Continue reading: Instant Pot Baingan Bharta Recipe – Spiced Mashed EggplantThe post Instant Pot Baingan Bharta Recipe – Spiced Mashed Eggplant appeared first on Vegan Richa.

English Muffins

February 24 2018 Vegan Dad 

English Muffins I love English muffins but I find making them from a batter to be a real pain. Its hard to get quality muffin rings here, its not easy to make them a consistent size, and it seems to take forever to make them. So, I reworked a Reinhart recipe by significantly upping the liquid and working the dough more like a ciabatta. The end result is a delicious muffin with some respectable air holes in the dough. Not as many as with a batter, but still pretty good. A stand mixer is essential here to get the gluten to develop properly. You also need a griddle, preferably one big enough to hold 8 muffins at a time so you can whip these off in three batches.  INGREDIENTS (by weight, except where indicated) Makes 24. Cut in half if needed.  - 1 oz apple cider vinegar - 27 fl oz soy milk at room temperature - 1 lb 14 oz bread flour - 22g sugar - 16g instant yeast - 16g salt - 1.5 oz vegetable shortening METHOD 1. Mix the vinegar into the soy milk, then add to the rest of the ingredients in bowl of a stand mixer. 2. Using the batter attachment, mix together until combined. Increase the speed to med-lo/­­med and keep mixing until the dough collects around the beater (this will take about 5-7 mins).  3. Switch to the dough hook. Knead the dough on med-lo/­­med speed until it no longer sticks to the sides of the bowl (this will take a few minutes). 4. Transfer to a large, well-oiled bowl. With oiled hands, stretch and fold the dough 2-3 times. Let rest for 5 mins and stretch and fold 2-3 times again. Cover and let rise at room temperature.  5. While dough is rising, oil enough baking sheets to hold 24 muffins. 6. When dough has doubled in size, shape into 2.5 oz balls. Use oiled hands as necessary, and try not to degas the dough. Place on the prepared sheets. 7. Cover dough with cling wrap. Place a empty cookie sheet on top of the dough. Gently press down to flatten the dough into pucks. Let the dough rise with the sheet on top. If the sheet is too heavy and seems to be flattening the dough, dont use it. Just keep pressing the dough down with your fingers throughout the rise to keep a puck shape.  8. While dough is rising, preheat the oven to 350 degrees, and get a griddle heating to around 350 degrees.  9. Working in batches, cook the muffins on the griddle for about 4 mins per side. These get a great rise on the griddle, so use your fingertips to press and keep them into a puck shape when they first go on the griddle. 10. Transfer to a baking sheet and bake in the oven for 8 mins. Transfer to a wire rack to cool. TIPS: 1. Make sure to pinch the balls of dough tightly to seal the dough together. You need the good dough ball integrity (if that makes any sense) to get these to rise correctly. 2. Dont let the dough get too warm or it will get really hard to work with. Room temperature all the way. 3. Dont let the dough over-rise when shaped into balls. You want to bake these on the way up, so dont let them double. WHAT IF I DONT HAVE A STAND MIXER?! Never fear! You can still make these. Its going to take some muscle but it can be done. To help you. here is a picture essay. First, make sure to dissolve the yeast in the liquid before adding it to the flour. Second, use a strong wooden spoon to bring the dough together. I actually prefer this spurtle because you can muscle through the dough without too much resistance. When it looks like this, let the dough rest for a few minutes. Then get back at it. The idea is to get the dough to gather around the spurtle in a ball. A vigorous circular motion will accomplish this. If you feel the gluten offering too much resistance, let the dough rest for a few minutes and then try again. It should pull away from the sides of the bowl and gather around the spurtle.  When you have a fairly smooth dough, transfer it to to a lightly floured surface. You want enough flour to keep the dough from sticking.  With the help of a pastry scraper, stretch and fold the dough like a letter. If you dont know what a letter is or how to fold one, ask your parents (or maybe even your grandparents).  Rotate the dough 90 degrees and stretch and fold a second time. Transfer the dough to a well-oiled bowl and turn to coat. With oiled hands, stretch and fold the dough  a third time. Let the dough rest for 5 mins. What you are doing is building a gluten structure, and you should feel the dough firm up as you stretch and fold. When you can shape the dough into a ball like what you see below, your stretching and folding is done. Just keep the dough and your hands oiled, and stretch and fold until you reach perfection. Then cover and let rise.  Good gluten structure will give you a good rise. Now its time to shape some balls of dough! I keep the dough on my fingertips, using my thumb to push the middle of the dough down while the fingers of my other hand bring the sides of the dough up. You should feel the bounciness of the gluten and a firm ball forms and firms up. If the dough gets too sticky, just lightly oil your hands. The key is to seal the dough into a tight ball. This will give you a good rise.  Let rise on a well-oiled piece of parchment per the recipe above.  A good griddle is your friend.  Flip and bake per the recipe above.

Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov

September 24 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Today’s self-care dialogue is with Tonya Papanikolov, holistic nutritionist, plant-based chef, and creator of The Well Woman. Tonya is a true renaissance woman, well-versed in all things wellness, mindfulness, and natural healing. We are constantly inspired by her otherworldly plant cheese plates and other whole food creations, as well as her radiance and spirit. In this interview, Tonya tells us about her approach to exercise and stress, the protocol she’s been implementing for skin integrity and gut healing, her favorite facial massage tool, her path to holistic nutrition, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I honestly really need both! Routine is so important in keeping me aligned, on track and grounded however too much of it interferes with my natural creative process. I like routine for certain things like: waking up in the morning, meditation, yoga, bowel movements, meals. However, Im a very spontaneous person and I absolutely need the freedom to throw everything up in the air to do something unpredictable. Im distracted quite easily, which means I may go on a walk and begin to inspect the sap coming out of a cedar tree which derails my routine for dinner time, hypothetically speaking ;) Those are moments I happily take freedom over routine. But its all a fine balance. There cant be too much regimentation and there cant be too much freedom. The pendulum is always somewhere along the spectrum being balanced and fine-tuned. Right now in my life, based on various situations and work, I have very little routine and it is actually something Ill be working on in the fall! Calling in some solid routine. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. Mornings do differ from day to day. It just depends on what I have going on. My ideal morning would be waking around 6:30-7am and having a big glass of lemon water before a 30-minute meditation, followed by a return to bed for a cuddle and hug. Next I would have a quick cold shower and head to the kitchen to make a morning elixir. This might be a coffee with nut milk and herbs or matcha, pearl, collagen or whatever else I feel like throwing in my blender that day based on how Im feeling! But definitely a warm beverage and some reading material. I would then begin to prioritize my day and make a list of everything I want to accomplish. I really like to save some time in the mornings to respond to emails, its been a goal of mine this year to get better at responding to emails in a timely manner. But if we had to strip everything down to the bare essentials: the absolute perfect morning is any morning that I have prioritized my meditation before everything else. This is absolute self-care time and if I do nothing else but this, I am ready for my day. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Not specifically at this time. I feel very lucky to be a great sleeper. Bedtime is funny because on the one hand I know I should be going to bed earlier but on the other Im never tired in the evening and am extremely productive during these hours. It is the time of the day I love to work the most! I am the clearest, calmest, there are so few distractions for me and I never feel my energy dip at night (for better or worse). I rarely feel tired at any point in the day so I will happily stay working until 11pm. I do try to limit computer time at night and if I cant then I always have f.lux on my screen to cast off the blue light. Im really working on this! Id like to begin shutting down work by 10pm latest but when you are working for yourself, its not always possible! I feel quite blessed that I fall asleep as soon as my head hits the pillow and that I wake with ease as well. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast - a big green smoothie, a green juice, a warm elixir in the winter time, often with cacao. I will usually add a plant-based, raw, fermented protein to my smoothie or elixir. Sometimes Ill have a piece of sourdough toast from a local organic bakery with nut butter or some avocado and lemon. Lunch - a salad with raw seasonal vegetables or some cooked vegetables like broccoli, squash, sweet potato. Or steamed greens with sauerkraut, hummus and sprouts. Snack - some of my plant-based cheeses with chia/­­flax crackers Dinner - Soup, dahl, kitchari I love making elaborate meals for dinner gatherings and special evenings but when Im cooking for myself I like to aim for simple, healthy and balanced. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do! But Im not that religious about it. I have one drink in the morning that is caffeinated which will alternate between a high-quality coffee or a matcha. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I cant say I do. I dont consume any processed sugar so this helps keep everything in check. When I do bake or use a sweetener I go for maple syrup, honey or dates. I dont feel fiendish about sweet stuff or have cravings for it. I feel lucky for this. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I am just getting through a protocol for strengthening skin integrity and gut healing. I was using a potent antioxidant Quercetin, vitamin C, collagen, an EFA supplement and a general clean diet free of the major allergens. My skin issue cleared up very quickly once I begun this protocol. I also got a good dose of salt water and vitamin D from the sun which played a huge role and were the missing pieces. But in terms of everyday stuff I take a vegan probiotic and ashwagandha. I rotate other things in and out like maca, he shou wu, schisandra. I also drink a nettle and astragalus tea. Id like to say I get everything I need from a healthful diet and clean water but Im a very sensitive being and have a long history of gut trouble like IBS (its really good now!) but this means that I do take extra care with supplementation and herbs when Im feeling sensitive or stressed. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  My day to day is extremely active and yoga is my main form of routine movement. I also dance a lot. I find it to be a wonderful way to start the day. Im usually on my bike for over an hour a day as well and this definitely gets my heart rate up. I go on the occasional run or to a spin class but as we move into Fall Im going to be looking for a new form of movement and exercise - something a bit more strenuous. This is part of the routine Ill be looking to form for fall. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I do find it pleasurable. I dont think Id ever describe the process as torturous (ha!) but I definitely think the hardest part is just getting to the class. Having the motivation to go every day or every other. Once Im there I feel good instantly. The moving and stretching make me feel stronger as the class gets more intense. And of course afterwards, the feeling is the best. Endorphins, detoxing, cooling the body down. Sign me up! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I like to think of beauty from an energetic, magnetism point of view. When I feel my most beautiful its generally an energetic state Im in where I exude magnetism. And Im not talking about a physical beauty magnetism but more of an energetic allure for life, a curiosity. I think other people notice that. I definitely notice that in other people. I find food and nature to have so much physical beauty and that definitely effects the final dishes/­­plates I make. Im an aesthete through and through. My eyes see such beauty in ordinary everyday life moments: the colour of someones eyes, their laugh, the way they move their hands, little unnoticed smirks, hair blowing in the wind, a cluster of sunflowers growing toward the sun, the sound of leaves in the wind. This is all so beautiful to me. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Im big on my skincare regime! If I had it my way Id go for natural facials every month but it usually turns out to be once a season. I use natural products from Pure and Simple in Toronto, Naturopathica and Living Libations which is a Canadian company. Nadine makes incredible skincare products from Haliburton Ontario, you can read her interview on The Well Woman. I only use natural products on my skin which should come as no surprise! My regime is the usual: cleanser, toner, serum and cream. I also have a jade facial gua sha tool that I massage my face with after serum. Best Skin Ever is a pretty remarkable product, its an oil based serum. I try to stay on top of a weekly exfoliation and mask. If you notice your skin getting dull the best way to correct it is with some weekly exfoliation. I use a fig enzyme peel and a clay mask. I try to do this once a week. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water! The easiest way to get beautiful, hydrated and glowing skin is from drinking 2L + water a day. Other things that help are drinking bone broth, colonics or coffee enemas always make my skin and eyes glow because they are so beneficial to our gut health. Getting good sleep is key and meditation is always elevating and leaves me with a glow. A plant-based diet with lots of veggies, greens and fermented foods is also key. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My facial gua sha massage tool! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Meditation, yoga, breath-work, moving my body, laughing at myself, dancing. I use ashwagandha daily too. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? All of the above! I also will talk it out with friends and my sister, family, my therapist. My therapist uses an amazing method that she has been teaching me called the Sedona Method (its an amazing book that I highly suggest). Shes not your usual therapist who you just talk to. She makes me release on all feelings and this has been an incredible tool for releasing stress, fear or any negative emotion. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Oil of oregano, lots of water, a tea with ginger, turmeric and raw honey, minimal food (so that the body can send all of its energy into fighting off the bug instead of to digestion) and LOTS of sleep! -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? There is such overlap for me! Life and work are very intertwined, one in the same. And although I love it that way Im trying to implement some more boundaries and turn-off time. But the fact is that I love what I do so much so working doesnt come with a burden. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Some of the tools have become engrained at this point. I have a morning gratefulness practice of putting my hands toward the ceiling and going over everything I am grateful for in that moment. Its really just about making new habits and setting them as priorities. I try to take 20 minutes a day for stillness in the form of meditation and breath work. I journal regularly as well. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Eating a plant-based diet that consists of mostly vegetables, lots of green smoothies and healthy fats. Diet has been number one, followed by yoga and meditation. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Many books along the way. Siddhartha. The Great Work of Your Life (which not-so coincidentally appeared on my door step one day). All the books I read while studying at The Institute of Holistic Nutrition. Knowledge -- Have you always been interested in the connection between wellness and sustenance? What was your path to studying Holistic Nutrition?  My interest started quite young. I ate really healthy as a kid, my favourite food growing up were carrots (?!). The trend continued as a teenager but I definitely had a lot to learn. I knew I wanted to get into nutrition in high school and chose a university school and program accordingly. I studied nutritional science for four years at the University of Guelph and thought I would become a naturopathic doctor but decided to switch directions after school. I got into a totally different line of work in fashion, where I worked for a Canadian retailer doing fashion direction! It was a really fun job but after a substantial amount of stress and awakening, I decided to pivot back into health, wellness and food. I went back to school, to the Institute of Holistic Nutrition in Toronto. -- You make your own plant cheeses and even developed a plant cheese plate for the Toronto restaurant Nota Bene! How did you come across the plant cheese-making practice and develop your own recipes? What’s your favorite cheese that you make? I learned the process to make the plant-based cheeses while studying at Matthew Kenney Culinary in California, from there its just been experimenting and playing with new flavor and consistency combinations! Thats a tough question, I really love the truffle and charcoal flavor and the freshness of the dill and chive! -- You cook plant-based dinners for groups of people, often centering the food around beautiful themes, like your Spring Equinox dinner. Can you tell us a bit more about the dinners and your approach? Its really just about getting a group together to share in a healthy meal and to show people how versatile, delicious and vibrant a plant-based meal can be. The themes often come from inspiration around the seasons, a book, or an artist. I love the idea of working with a theme for dinners to tie everything together. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Ultimate unwinding is a weekend getaway to a cabin on a lake! Unwinding in nature is always my preference. I treat myself with a facial or going for acupuncture, reiki or to a restorative yoga class. Unwinding can be as simple as a walk. But the classic Tonya move is a back-scratch before bed. My! Favourite! -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book - You Are a Circle and You Are a Message Song/­­Album - This song that I wake up to each and every morning: Ik Ardas Wahe Guru by White Sun Movie - The Scent of Green Papaya by director Tran Anh Hung Piece of Art - Ronan Bouroullec drawings -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Toronto? Awai, Dandylion, Actinolite, nutbar, Kupfert and Kim, Earth and City -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I love this! Here are some of mine: - Probiotics - Oil of oregano - Camera - 2L of water - A book - My recipe/­­poetry notebook - A good pen - A homemade trail mix - My favourite copper spoon - My Jesse Kamms - theyre comfortable and I love wearing them travelling -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Nikisha Brunson! Photos by Nathan Legiehn, Kelly Brown and Tonya Papanikolov. 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Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade

June 11 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade Have you ever tried adding fresh aloe vera to your drinks? As soon as the days get unbearably hot around here, I like to keep a few aloe leaves in my fridge for a good number of reasons, especially for healing unexpected sunburns and making the most refreshing post-beach tonics. Aloe is one of those amazing, all-purpose healing plants; it’s anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, helps lower cholesterol, works wonders when applied topically to skin by moisturizing it and helping ease acne and blemishes, and the list goes on and on. If you’ve never taken apart a fresh aloe leaf before, its insides are made up of a clear, jellyfish-like material, which is where most of the healing magic is contained. The problem is that on its own, the flesh is quite bitter and soapy. I’ve noticed that citrus really helps neutralize that unpleasant taste, so I love adding aloe to lemonade. This lemonade recipe is pretty special – it’s just the most refreshing thing you can think of after a hot day outside. It’s minty, with a cooling effect from the cucumber and a nice tartness from freshly squeezed lemon juice. I also think it would make for a great summery cocktail mixer, if you feel so inclined :) One last aloe tip – when I’m cutting apart an aloe leaf in the kitchen and putting most of the flesh into the blender, I rub the green skins with any leftover flesh on my (clean) face, which makes for a refreshing face mask. There are some links below, Sunday hugs to you, friends. The Next Gluten Matthew Kenney on Pardon My French Human Design BodyGraph – sort of like an astrology birth chart, but it combines a bunch of traditional sciences like astrology, the Hindu-Brahmin Chakra system, the Zohar or Kabbalah, and the IChing to map out a ‘body graph.’ We found ours to be pretty accurate and fascinating. Patti Smith on Singing at Bob Dylan’s Nobel Prize Ceremony (make sure to watch the video) Six Seasons: A New Way with Vegetables – I’ve got my eye on this cookbook Roasted Poblano and Jackfruit Tacos – can’t wait to make these Our Youtube Channel – we are obsessed with making videos! Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade   Print Serves: 5-6 cups Ingredients 1 packed cup mint sprigs, plus more for serving 3 cups purified water half of a large cucumber 1 large aloe leaf 1 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (4-5 lemons) ¼ cup maple syrup Instructions Bruise the mint a bit by rubbing it between your hands. In a small saucepan, combine the mint sprigs and water, bring to a boil and let cool to infuse. Once cool, strain the mixture into an upright blender and discard the mint sprigs. Cut the cucumber half in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds. Optionally, shave off a few cucumber ribbons with a vegetable peeler for serving in the glass. Roughly chop the cucumber and put it into the blender. Cut the white base off the bottom of the aloe leaf, then cut off the spiky sides. Cut off the top layer of the skin lengthwise. Scoop out all the flesh into the blender using a spoon. Add the lemon juice and maple syrup to the blender and blend everything until smooth. Let cool completely in the refrigerator. Serve over ice, with cucumber ribbons and more fresh mint leaves. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Pi?a Colada Milkshake - Ice Cream Sunday Raw Spearmint and Chocolate Cheesecake Superberry Smoothie Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans + Quick Marinated Beans

April 30 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans + Quick Marinated BeansFagor recently sent me their 6 quart pressure cooker, and I was very excited since I’ve never had one before and knew that it would be a very practical addition to my kitchen. Aside from stews, soups, and rich veggie broth, I was especially thrilled about the prospect of perfect home-cooked beans. I’d heard that cooking beans in a pressure cooker makes them amazingly creamy, yet firm and intact, on top of significantly speeding up the cooking process. As an example, soaked kidney beans only take 5 minutes of active cooking time in the pressure cooker. Crazy stuff! All the rumors turned out to be true – my pressure cooker beans have been coming out amazingly buttery. The reason I’m so excited about a more efficient way to cook beans is that I really dislike buying canned ones. I’ll do it in case of an emergency, but it’s really not my favorite way to go. Firstly, canned beans never taste as good as my homemade ones, since I usually include some aromatics like peppercorns, garlic and bay leaf in the cooking water. Canned beans also seem to be harder on my digestion, since I take time to soak and rinse my beans, as well as cook them with kombu (more on that below), while most companies don’t. Maybe I’m just sensitive, but that’s a big factor as well. Plus, dried beans are more affordable than canned ones, and that’s always a great bonus. Today I’m sharing a few useful things I’ve learned about cooking my own beans after years of practice, as well as my favorite recipe for simple marinated beans. I like to make those on a Sunday and spoon them into meals throughout the week. Even if you don’t have a pressure cooker, there are still plenty of great tips and tricks that you might find helpful below. Have a great Sunday :) Soak I always soak dried beans before cooking them. I know, it seems like an annoying practice that doesn’t allow for any spontaneity in the kitchen, but it’s also really easy to make a habit out of it. Soaking reduces the cooking time, as well as helps eliminate the phytic acid (antinutrient) in beans and activates the germination process, making the beans easier to digest/­­more nutritious. To help break down phytic acid, especially during shorter soaking times, add a splash of acidic liquid, such as lemon juice, vinegar or even a few pinches of salt to your soaking water. Cover your beans with plenty of water and leave room in the bowl, since the beans will grow quite a bit as they take on the water. Once done soaking, rinse and drain the beans really well to wash off all of that unwanted stuff. I like to soak my beans overnight. I’ve gotten into the habit of asking myself if there’s anything that needs to be soaked before I go to bed, and sometimes I’ll just soak a cup of some bean/­­lentil/­­grain without even knowing what I’ll do with it the next day. If you happen to soak some beans and don’t have the time to cook them the next day, just change the water, cover, and put them in the fridge until ready to cook. Batch Cook & Freeze The trick that does allow for spontaneity when using home-cooked beans is batch cooking and freezing them for future use. Cook a whole pound of beans at a time and freeze them in 1 1/­­2 cup batches (equal to around a 16 oz can), and you’ve got a foundation for so many meals right in your freezer. It feels really good! You can freeze the beans in glass containers or zip lock bags for anywhere from 6 months to a whole year (labeling with a date is a good idea in these cases). A good tip I learned for preventing freezer burn is to cover the beans with their cooking liquid, then freeze. Add Aromatics & Kombu Another great thing about cooking beans at home is that you can flavor the cooking water any way you want. That will make the beans taste better, as well as provide you with a whole batch of broth, which you can use in place vegetable broth in any recipe. I pretty much never throw away the cooking water, and usually end up freezing it for future use. That way, I almost never have to buy boxed broth. The aromatics I personally like to add to the cooking water are bay leaf, black peppercorns and garlic. Some people add onions, carrots and herbs – the possibilities are endless. Another important addition to bean cooking liquid is kombu, which is a mineral-rich seaweed. Kombu yields all of its beneficial minerals to the beans and the water, as well as helps tenderize the beans and make them easier to digest – a life-changing tip I learned from Amy Chaplin. Pressure Cooking One quirk of pressure cooking is not being able to check the food for doneness while it’s cooking, since the pot cannot be opened while there’s pressure built up inside. It’s helpful to know how long your ingredient will take to cook ahead of time, and time the cooking process accordingly. Thankfully, there is this very helpful chart that tells you suggested cooking times for most common types of beans. I love that it has cook times for both soaked and unsoaked beans, since those vary pretty significantly, and I’ve found them to be very accurate. Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans   Print Serves: around 3 cups Ingredients 1 cup dried beans of your choice - soaked overnight in purified water w/­­ a splash of vinegar, lemon juice or salt 2 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife 2 bay leaves 1 piece kombu 1 teaspoon black peppercorns sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the beans very well. In a pressure cooker, combine the beans, garlic, bay leaves, kombu, peppercorns and plenty of salt. Cover the beans with plenty of water, water level should be about 4 inches above the beans. Remember that when cooking beans, you cannot fill up the pressure cooker any more than half way, since the foam from the beans might clog up the pressure release valve if there is too much water. Close the pressure cooker lid, set the pressure to high (15PSI) and turn up the heat to high. Wait until the pressure indicator shows that the pressure has been built up and turn the heat down to low. This is when your cooking time starts. Refer to this chart to determine the cook time for your beans and cook accordingly. Once the time is up, turn off the heat and let the pressure release naturally, which will take around 10 minutes. Open the pressure cooker, drain the beans, preserving the cooking liquid to use as broth or as freezing liquid. Discard the bay leaf, peppercorns and kombu. Enjoy the beans :) 3.5.3226   Quick Marinated Beans   Print Serves: 3 cups Ingredients 3 cups mixed cooked beans (I used baby Lima and kidney) handful of parsley - chopped handful of chives - sliced 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar juice of 1 lemon sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste Instructions In a bowl, combine the beans with parsley and chives and give everything a stir. Add the olive oil, vinegar, lemon juice, salt and pepper, and mix thoroughly. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Store the beans in the refrigerator, in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. The flavors will develop further as the beans marinate. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Pretzel Buns

August 21 2016 Vegan Dad 

Pretzel Buns With the new school year ready to start in just over two weeks, its time to get serious about baking for lunches. Of course, with two weeks of summer still left why not bake something that can also  help you get the most out of the waning BBQ season? These pretzel buns are perfect for a veggie burger, tofu salad, or my summertime favourite: tomato and cucumber. The dough recipe is more or less Peter Reinharts but I have altered the method so the end product has that deep brown pretzel colour but it still soft enough to function as a bun. INGREDIENTS Makes 12 buns Dough - 31.5 oz (6 3/­­4 cups) white bread flour - 16.5 g (generous 2 1/­­2 tsp) salt - 5 g (1 1/­­2 tsp) instant yeast - 18 fl. oz (2 1/­­4 cups) lukewarm water - 1.5 oz (3 tbsp) oil Poaching Liquid - 16 fl. oz (2 cups) water - 2 oz (8 tsp) baking soda - aquafaba for brushing - sesame seeds METHOD 1. Combine the flour, salt, yeast, water, and oil in a bowl. Bring together into a rough ball and let sit for 5 minutes. Knead (either by hand or a machine) until dough is smooth but slightly tacky (about 5 mins).  Add water or flour as needed). 2. Shape dough into a ball and transfer to a lightly oiled bowl. Cover and let rise for an hour, or until doubled in size. Punch dough down, knead lightly for a minute, reshape into a ball and let rise in the covered bowl for another hour (or until doubled). 3. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper and lightly spray with oil. 4. Divide the dough into 12 equal pieces and shapes into boules. 5. Roll each boule into a rope about 12 to 14 inches long. Shape into buns per the pictures below. a) Grab the rope with your left hand about 1/­­3 of the way up, with your right hand at the opposing end. b) Use your right hand to make a knot in the dough where your left hand is positioned. Use the fingers of your left hand to keep the knot open.  c) Tuck the end in your right hand under and through the hole (at 4:00 if the bun was a clock). d) Tuck the end in your left hand over and through the hole (at 7:00) to the back of the bun. Use the end that was formerly in your right hand to close the hole. 6. Mist the top of the buns with oil, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise for about 30 mins, until swelled but not doubled. 7. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. 8. Prepare the poaching liquid: in a large pot bring the water to simmer. You want about 1.5 inches of water it the pot, so adjust the amount above as needed. Make sure to increase the baking soda the same amount. When water is simmering mix in the baking soda and stir to dissolve. 9. Poach the buns (working in batches as your pot will allow) for 30-60 seconds each side, placing the top side in first. Remove with a slotted spoon back to the prepared baking sheet. 10. Brush each bun lightly with aquafaba and top with sesame seeds. 11. Bake for 16-18 minutes, rotating the baking sheet at the halfway point. 12. Let fully cool on a wire rack.

C-CAP Teens Rock the Veggie Burger World

May 23 2016 Meatless Monday 

C-CAP Teens Rock the Veggie Burger WorldGet the winning Taste of Korea Kimchi Burger recipe! The 2016 Careers through Culinary Arts Program (C-CAP) and Meatless Monday Recipe Contest just announced the winners of their annual contest for teenage chefs. This year the challenge was: get the beef off their buns and create the best veggie burger on the block. High school students from seven C-CAP markets participated, and some of the best chefs in America judged, including Rick Bayless, Chris Feldmeier, Scott Uehlein, and Jason Weiner, along with Meatless Mondays recipe editor Diana Rice, RD. C-CAP, the nonprofit organization that runs the annual contest, kicked off the campaign last fall by introducing teen chefs from around the country to the Meatless Monday public health campaign, which encourages everyone to start each week with a healthy, meatless meal. Winners beat out thousands of their high school peers from across the country with recipes you could place in any good restaurant. According to the judges, this years impressive ingredients ranged from unexpected fillings of kale, spinach, falafel, sun-dried tomatoes, tofu, and beets to a rich array of exotic spices. This years Grand Prize Winner of the C-CAP Meatless Monday $5,000 scholarship is Eubene Kim, a 12th grader from Chatsworth Charter High School, Los Angeles, for his Taste of Korea kimchi tofu burger. Sun-Dried Tomato Patty Recipe And new this year, C-CAP and Meatless Monday awarded $2,000 scholarships to six recipe contest finalists from each of the C-CAP markets. This way, all seven C-CAP markets have a winner! One of those scholarship winners, Tyler Ramos, currently a senior at Tottenville High School in Staten Island, NY, worked with her teacher Chef David Schwartz to come up with an Italian-style burger infused with rosemary, garlic, and sun-dried tomatoes. She also incorporated red potatoes and white kidney beans for protein. Try her veggie burger recipe just in time for grilling season! Says Chef Rick Bayless, one of the Chicago judges: Even having a contest like this shows the giant leaps forward were making when it comes to good food. I cant tell you how encouraging it is to see young people taking up the mantle of healthy eating. The experience of judging filled me with all kinds of hope. The $2,000 scholarship winners are: ARIZONA Juliet Auld, Mountain View High School, Tucson. Falafel, Spinach, Feta and Sundried Tomato Veggie Burger with Homemade Tzatziki Sauce CHICAGO Aliyah Taylor, South Shore International College Prep. Smoked Chipotle Rice Burger HAMPTON ROADS, VA Reece Conwell, Woodrow Wilson High School. Spicy TVP (Textured Vegetable Protein) on a Toasted Onion Bun NEW YORK CITY Tyler Ramos, Tottenville High School, Staten Island. Sundried Tomato Patty PHILADELPHIA Nyshiera Jones, Randolph Career and Technical High School. Beet Burger with Asian Slaw WASHINGTON, DC/­­PRINCE GEORGE COUNTY, MARYLAND Jasmine Blackwell, Cross Lane High School, MD. Kale Burger The post C-CAP Teens Rock the Veggie Burger World appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Spring for a Cleaner Planet — Every Meatless Monday

April 11 2016 Meatless Monday 

Spring for a Cleaner Planet — Every Meatless MondayIn celebration of Earth Month, each Monday in April were highlighting an environmental benefit of cutting out meat, one day a week. This week we focus on greenhouse gas emissions.   Did you know you could change your carbon imprint just by going meatless one day a week? Its true. A 2013 study by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization reports that meat production generates more greenhouse gases than all the worlds cars, planes, trains, and ships combined. That adds up to an estimated 15 percent of total greenhouse gas emissions. So, simply by changing whats on your plate, you can help the planet breathe more easily. Animal-based food products rank high on the CO2 emission chart. But luckily, some of our most delicious foods are far more environmentally friendly. Legumes, fruits and veggies all leave a much lower CO2 trace. Meatless Monday gives you an easy opportunity - one day a week – to make your personal mark on the environment. And Spring is such a great time to explore local seasonal produce for a meatless feast. Check out our delicious round-up of 15 seasonal springtime recipes! And if you dont want to cook, chances are you can find a restaurant nearby that is celebrating Meatless Monday as well. The post Spring for a Cleaner Planet — Every Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Pancakes & French Toast Recipes to Brighten Your Weekend

September 4 2015 VegKitchen 

Vegan Pancakes & French Toast Recipes to Brighten Your WeekendPancakes and French toast seem like two kinds of treats go by the wayside for vegans -- dont they need eggs, milk, and butter? Not at all! There are easy tweaks for making this leisurely breakfast fare without a trace of those ingredients. If youre gluten-free as well as vegan, weve got you covered there as well with a GF pancake and French toast recipe in this line-up. In Cinnamon-Apple Pancakes (pictured above), apples and cinnamon are folded into a whole-grain batter. This is a lovely leisurely weekend breakfast or brunch, especially in the fall, when apples are abundant. Robin Robertson offers another take on the apple theme with Apple-Almond Butter Pancakes. This delicious flavor combo can be enjoyed in these luscious pancakes. For gluten-free, use gluten-free flour. Make these fruity Strawberry Pancakes in late spring and early summer, when strawberries are at their best. After strawberry season has passed, frozen strawberries can stand in. Chef Jason Wyrick designed Corn Pancakes with Bourbon Agave Maple Syrup so each pancake is a meal in itself, with texture not usually expected from a pancake and a big flavor profile with a minimal amount of work. If youve got memories of buttermilk pancakes and syrup, Caryn Hartglass presents Gluten Free & Vegan Buttermilk Pancakes with Blueberry Syrup -- a version using soymilk soured with vinegar in place of buttermilk. Serve with the accompanying blueberry syrup - made only with blueberries!   Insanely Easy Vegan French Toast proves that y ou dont need a lot of bells and whistles for a great vegan French toast recipe. Its really more about the golden-brown of the result, the cinnamon, and the syrup. There are three components to this fantastic, healthy recipe for Berry-licious Vegan Stuffed French Toast -- the french toast itself, the blueberry cream cheese stuffing and the blueberry syrup. For Fantastic French Toast (Gluten Free) Julieanna Hever and Chef Beverly Bennett join forces to create a recipe thats great for a family breakfast or a small get-together. This recipe for Vegan Pumpkin Waffles is great for the waffle maker. Most vegan pancakes tend to be dense and the waffle maker gives it a bit more of a fluffy texture. If you want to use this as a pancake batter, by all means. Add 1/­­2 teaspoon of baking powder to the dry ingredients.

Aloo Bharta – Indian Mashed Potatoes

August 18 2015 Vegan Richa 

Aloo Bharta – Indian Mashed Potatoes Aloo Bharta, Bhorta, Chokha, bhaate are various names of similar mashed potato dish from different regions in India (from Bengal, Rajasthan, Bihar and other states). Mashed Potatoes are spiced and flavored depending on the the region, state, family, personal preference and served as side with dals and rice.  These mashed potatoes are lightly spiced, generally flavored with mustard oil. They are generally not made creamy with milk or butter or served with gravy. They are just spiced mashed potatoes. Often they are served as a scoop or ball for portion control. I mean mashed potatoes, in any form are addictive. You can also add some cumin, cayenne and garam masala to your favorite mashed potato recipe for a creamy spiced version.  This recipe uses mustard oil. You can use any other neutral oil and add ground mustard to taste. Or temper mustard seeds in hot oil until the seeds begin to pop and use the oil to flavor the potatoes. You can also use sweet potatoes. To use up leftover aloo bharta, shape into patties and pan fry over medium heat to serve as snack or breakfast. Continue reading: Aloo Bharta – Indian Mashed PotatoesThe post Aloo Bharta – Indian Mashed Potatoes appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Movie on a Mission: Seeds of Time

May 14 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Movie on a Mission: Seeds of TimePhoto: Damian Caisson The future of food is in peril, warns the documentary film Seeds of Time. Gorgeously shot, the film follows the global odyssey of agriculture pioneer Cary Fowler to help ensure food security for the worlds population. Here, we dig a bit deeper with Fowler about what makes for a sustainable food system. In the film you say agriculture is facing a perfect storm of threats. What do you mean by that? What makes the current situation so daunting is that agriculture faces multiple threats simultaneously, each of which would be difficult to address on its own: climate/­­weather, water availability, rising demand, loss of cropland and land degradation, new pests and diseases (plus increasing resistance to chemical controls), and terribly inadequate investments in agricultural research and plant breeding, particularly for crops other than the major staples. We need agriculture to produce 50 to 70 percent more food by midcentury, but little in our actions conveys confidence that were committed to making this happen. Yet, if it doesnt, hunger and malnutrition will increase dramatically, food prices will rise, and incidents of war and civil strife will likely increase. The Svalbard Global Seed Vault near the Arctic Circle has been called a Noahs Ark for the worlds crops. So why cant we simply sit back and rest secure that the work ends with stocking the vault? The Seed Vault has put an end to the extinction of the crop varieties it holds: 864,000 different ones at the moment. It is a backup to traditional seed banks, and is necessary because many of those seed banks operate sub-optimally, without the ability to guarantee conservation. Moreover, those seed banks--the depositors of seed in Svalbard--are responsible for researching the diversity they hold and providing it to plant breeders and other researchers. It is not enough simply to conserve diversity. We must build comprehensive inventories of the traits held in the seed samples so that when the need arises for a particular type of pest or disease resistance, for example, we will know where to find it. How would you respond to those who say the future of agriculture lies in genetically engineered crops? I dont think the future of agriculture lies with any particular technology, but I do think it depends significantly on research and plant breeding. With climate change we are entering unchartered waters and we are doing so very quickly. The adaptation and evolution of our domesticated crops is in our hands, and yet for a number of crops there are zero scientifically trained plant breeders. There are, I believe, only six yam breeders in the world. This is not a crop easily bred by farmers. How secure can the future of yams be in a rapidly changing environment? Sadly this is the situation faced by many crops. What can the average person do to help preserve our food heritage?  Many people can participate concretely in conserving diversity by growing endangered varieties and seed saving. If you have room for a tomato plant, you have room for a dwarf apple tree of a rare variety! But everyone--whether they have a garden or farm or not--has the ability to provide support to organizations active in this field, such as Seed Savers Exchange or the Global Crop Diversity Trust. Everyone also has the capacity to send a letter to their political representatives. Since our politicians dont expect any mail on this topic whatsoever, a single letter can grab their attention. Personally, I advocate more public support for our national germplasm [living genetic resources, such as seeds] system, including the national seed bank for the U.S. in Ft. Collins, Colo. Seed banks are never high on the priority list for funding. In fact, they are largely invisible. Imagine that--the biological foundation of agriculture, and its of no particular concern! In real terms, the national seed bank in Ft. Collins gets by at or somewhat below its budget of a decade ago. It rather should be getting more funding and gearing up to provide the tools needed to help our crop varieties adapt to climate change.

Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri

October 20 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri Sana on the left Sana Javeri Kadri is the founder of Diaspora Co., a radically different spice collective dedicated to equity, sustainable agriculture, and decolonization. We’ve been fortunate to try Diaspora’s heirloom, organic, single-origin turmeric powder, and let’s just say it’s going to be very hard to go back to enjoying any other powdered turmeric ever again. Sana lives between Mumbai and Oakland, California. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I crave routine and am most productive when Im following a routine. However, Im unable to do deep thinking work or larger creative work in the middle of a hectic routine, so I like to keep at least one day of the week wide open for creative projects and giving myself the time and space I need to create something important. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I have been trying really hard to wake up, spend as little time on my phone as possible and then make myself a nourishing drink and most importantly, make myself some breakfast. One of my worst habits is to wake up, get on my phone, start responding to emails and then quickly get changed for work and dive straight into a full workday without taking any time to nourish myself or check in with my body. It means that by 1pm Im starving, cranky and already tired for the day. The life changing power of breakfast is something Im still learning… -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My girlfriend and I try not to spend too much time on our phones before bed, or looking at a screen. She recently introduced a 20 mins of reading before bed practice that were trying to stick to, its my favorite way to wind down and Im committing to not responding to work emails at 10:45pm, even if its 11:15am in Mumbai and my team there is just getting fired up. Work in progress. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  My therapist guides me into mindfulness during our sessions every week because I often come in feeling stressed, frantic and a bit fragile. Shes always able to help me get back in touch with my body and begin to feel grounded again. At her urging, I handle all my stressful work calls or emails sitting outside in the sunshine, ideally with my bare feet in the ground. This practice of grounding has been particularly helpful to me in the past few months of managing a stressful season. I also recently downloaded the Headspace app, and just the five minutes everyday of meditation has made a huge difference to me. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – In Oakland – Bread srsly gluten free sourdough, crispy fried egg cooked in ghee topped with smoked paprika, turmeric and salt, sliced avocado or smoky pinto beans or sliced tomatoes or any veggie leftovers I can wrangle from the fridge, maybe a slice of bacon if Im wanting some extra fat. In Mumbai – a loaded crispy veggie dosa. Either way, I love hot and savory breakfast. The cold and sweet breakfast tradition isnt common in India so, cereal and granola with milk culture is something I find very odd about the United States. Lunch – Leftovers express. My girlfriend and I both work long hours, so our saving grace is prepping large meals a couple times a week and then subsisting on leftovers. Gluten-free pasta with canned early girls (I can 80 lb every summer so that we never have to buy store bought tomato sauce) with every vegetable in the fridge/­­our imperfect produce box and ground beef is a family classic. Rosie is always joking that my stomach doubles when it comes to pasta and shrinks for everything else. Shes not wrong. Snack – My favorite snack is stovetop popcorn. Growing up in Mumbai we never had a microwave, it was my parents most loathed kitchen appliance. So now Im following that tradition of never owning a microwave. My favorite stovetop popcorn is popped in ghee and then topped with nutritional yeast, turmeric, and salt. Its perfect. Dinner - My perfect dinner is khichdi (spiced rice and lentils cooked in ghee and heavy on the ginger, turmeric and cumin), thick full fat yogurt, masala okra, a little bit of pickle (Brooklyn Delhi achaars are divine) and a side of spicy amaranth battered fish. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I used to do caffeine, in a delicious ghee, turmeric, cardamom and coconut sugar concoction, but over time Ive stopped being able to handle it. It started to make my stomach hurt and made me anxious. So I now drink either matcha with rice milk and date syrup, or hot chocolate with hemp oil, coconut sugar and adaptogens if Im needing the extra nourishment. Some days, if Ive slept enough and rested enough, I do better on just water and breakfast, no extra boost needed. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? I had a notorious sweet tooth all the way until my early twenties – I couldnt be trusted with bars of chocolate and was known to sneak spoonfuls of cake first thing in the morning. However the older Ive gotten (Im still technically in the early twenties), sweets just give me a sugar crash and make me feel sluggish. As an avid lover of food, Id rather eat plenty of things that make me feel fantastic, than the things that make me feel terrible. Both Rosie and I have been surprised and how quickly our respective sweet tooths have disappeared since we started living together, and how easily weve been able to cut out sugar from our life once we could verbalize how terrible it made us feel. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I swear by cannabis tinctures. Im not big on cannabis in other ways, but I find cannabis to be the only way to really deal with chronic pain. Ive also started using Super Good Hemps Turmeric Full Spectrum Hemp Oil in my morning drinks, and I find that it has similar effects. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I used to weight lift and do Crossfit pretty intensely, but had a really awful injury in 2016. Since then, Ive really had to reframe my definition of exercise. Now, I consider it an extension of my healing process. Intense exercise just isnt possible for me in the same way, so I stick to swimming as often as I can (usually a couple times a week), doing Nike Training body weight workouts at home, and talking our dog for a long walk every evening. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I love exercise and do best when Im outside and moving my body. Rosie and I try to take our pup Lilly out for a hike at least once a week, and we notice how much more present are with each other and our work when weve exercised.  That being said, Im also an incredibly competitive person, so reframing exercise to no longer be an intensely competitive thing has been very hard for me. I find it difficult to work up the enthusiasm to go on a leisurely swim, without a team to train with, or a competition to work towards. Switching off my producing strategy is my biggest challenge. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Both! It took me a long time to love my face, acknowledge that it was beautiful despite not looking like everything I saw on magazines and on billboards. But that acceptance and love for my external beauty definitely came from tending to, and growing confidence in my inner beauty. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I grew up using raw honey as a face cleanser, handmade ayurvedic soaps for my body, and a mom who never used makeup. So that has informed a lot of my skincare today. My skincare guru is 300% Abena, the founder of Hanahana Beauty, I use her shea butter exfoliating body bar and swear by it, and I use Abenas recipe for a rose water, tea tree oil and jojoba oil soaked cotton pad as a cleanser morning and night, and it has been a complete game changer for getting my glow back. Ive also been using Curology, which is a custom dermatologist service, that is super affordable and came highly recommended by friends. They prescribed me their night cream, which has really taken care of my breakouts and blackheads. Im not usually big on using chemicals on my skin but have found Curology to be a minimalist option that really works. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Cutting out sugar and gluten entirely is the most obvious one – I break out as soon as I am eating sugar, so its first to go. I also use a turmeric, honey, hemp oil and cornmeal face mask every couple weeks that always makes me feel radiant. My dentist has noticed and commented on the huge difference in my teeth that shes seen since I stopped drinking coffee – theyre whiter than ever before and need much less cleaning, which for me is reason enough to skip the coffee. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Abenas DIY rose water, jojoba oil and tea tree oil cotton pads! I used to be a ardent fan of Thayers Rose Witch Hazel Toner but in my experience with skincare – once you go DIY, its impossible to go back :) That being said – I will admit to being a Glossier believer, I didnt use makeup until I discovered Glossier concealer and highlighter. Its so easy and lazy but it works so wonderfully. Stress, Etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Taking our pup out for a long walk by the water is a really grounding activity for me. I have no idea how I managed my stress before she moved in with us. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Honestly Im a spokesperson for not really managing my stress well. My partner often comes home to a fuming, off the hook Sana and it takes significant chatting, massaging and cuddling to work me out of the state that I can get into if Im very stressed.  Im an extrovert and a peoples person so being around people that I love is my best coping mechanism. That being said – I have to be careful not to emotionally dump onto my loved ones, just because theyre willing to be there for me. Ive definitely been guilty of that in the past. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? The first one is to make sure I get a really good nights sleep, and make sure Im not drinking alcohol, eating dairy or any processed food. Usually, managing my sleep and diet is the easiest way to kick a cold before it hits. If the cold cant be stopped, I usually start by accepting that my bodys way of asking for rest is by getting sick, and its important to just honor that and completely rest. Then – turmeric, ginger, honey tea all day long.  -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Ive been trying really hard to take weekends off, and any weekend that I succeed at that- the balance feels so much better. Honestly, as a young business owner, the hustle is so glamorized and romanticized. Youre told that now is your time to grind, and to get further in your career. Whilst this is true, Id also argue that now is the time to establish healthy boundaries and habits in your life so you learn how to maximize your productivity and your potential. Any day that I work a 16 hour day (which is too often), I know that I am not focusing on the bigger picture, and am actually sacrificing my long term goals as a business owner. Remembering that, and focusing on working more effectively, rather than working more, has been a huge step towards achieving healthier work life balance. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Therapy. Every week, no matter what. That perspective and process is something Im deeply committed to. Therapy rarely feels easy, but it is always in service of myself and my larger goals, so its the easiest way to feel on track. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Eating based on how it makes me feel, not how it sounds or tastes. As soon as I focused on how it made me feel, my taste buds changed, I lost weight, my skin issues cleared and I became a very healthy person, with remarkable ease. I know how obnoxious that sounds, Im sorry. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I fly home to India. I know this is incredibly privileged, and a bit excessive, but shuffling back and forth between two continents constantly gives me a broader perspective, and somehow – the psychology of taking an international flight is an incredibly cathartic and productive experience for me. I almost always come back from my trips to India with fresh eyes, new vision and a bigger picture. Thats true for all travel, in my opinion. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. The fundamental line of Crossfit – eat meat and vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch and no sugar. has influenced my self nourishment beyond any book or movie. I may not be a competitive Crossfit athlete any more but eating to nourish my body is so much more fulfilling than eating to nourish my cravings. Knowledge --  What was your path to starting Diaspora Co.? You can read a lot more about that here, but long story short – Ive been working in the food industry since I moved to the United States in 2012 and I quickly noticed that whilst the farm to table movement felt at its zenith in the Bay Area, it only applied to certain things. Spices and imported foods were somehow excluded from those quality standards. The idea for a new kind of import export company formed in November 2016, and in February 2017 I quit my job and embarked on seven months of research visiting farms, research institutions and markets across India. Diaspora Co. was formally launched as a direct trade sustainable food company with our first offering of turmeric in August 2017. Its been a total rollercoaster since then. --  Can you tell us about the kind of turmeric you sell and how it differs from most turmeric one can buy at a store today? Im biased, but Im also overly honest so I dont think it would be an exaggeration to say that we sell the worlds best turmeric. Historically, there hasnt ever been a quality standard for how to define the highest quality, beyond arguments and branding largely based in exoticism and the colonizer/­­savior mindset. It is the freshest, as in it was harvested in 2018 and is milled every 3 months, versus powders that can be up to five years old and still on a grocery store shelf, stale as ever. It is the most potent variety of turmeric out there, with a tested 4.7% curcumin content. It is a fragrant and exceptional heirloom rhizome variety that compares to other turmeric powders out there as an heirloom summer tomato would to a grocery store store tomato grown for storage not flavor. Finally, it is organically farmed in a spice agriculture landscape where pesticide overuse and residue is notorious. Phew! --  Can you tell us about your decision to pay your turmeric producer really well and about owning the fact that your product costs more because of this? I think part of our work is that what the industry considers paying our producer really well, we consider basic human dignity of paying a living wage and for the price of sustainability, flavor and honest work. If we didnt pay our partner farmers the prices that we do, they wouldnt have the power or the incentive to produce at the standard that they do. To me, this big word decolonizing really just means how are you going to empower the people around you who have historically been stripped of their power? Paying our farmers well is actually the easiest embodiment of our decolonizing mission. As for owning our higher prices – we simply couldnt exist without charging what we do. And ultimately, were dedicating to riding the fine line between being affordable to the home cook and being a leader of sustainability and supply chains and therefore being regarded as a luxury product. I have to believe that we can do both. Turmeric latte blends or turmeric centered businesses that dont want to pay our prices or wholesale from us because theyd like to continue to exploit their sources and maintain their ridiculously high margins, Im in this for the long game and their reckoning will come. It always does. Apologies if I sound cold and jaded, business is vicious and Ive had to steel parts of myself to tolerate it all. --  What are some of your favorite ways to use Diaspora Co. turmeric? Honestly, turmeric was so woven into the fabric of my childhood that it was invisible to me. We cooked with it, made beauty treatments with it, and we used it to mark life and death. So even now, my favorite way to use turmeric is still in simple Indian vegetable dishes – lightly cooked okra tossed in cumin, turmeric and salt is the definition of comfort for me, or a coconut milk turmeric chicken broth with squash and long beans. Comforting, vegetable heavy home cooking is how I innately know how to use turmeric. Lattes just arent for me. --  We love your photos! How did you become a photographer? When I was 14 and going through a really tough phase at school (bullying, puberty, the patriarchy et all), my parents taught me how to use their DSLR. Ive used photography as the lens through which I make sense of and connect with the world ever since. When my academic pursuits turned to food and agriculture in college, my lens turned to it too. In so many ways, I recognize that I was never particularly talented or the best or the brightest, I was always just a really solid worker, and entirely self motivated, and that meant that once I started photographing, I just never stopped, and now here we are. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Ive found that balancing my role as a business owner with my role as a photographer is what gives me the most joy professionally. So I have a couple exciting photo shoots planned for the coming months that will be a welcome respite to the chaos of holiday e-commerce. That, and I havent seen my girlfriend and pup in almost a month since Ive been in India and I miss them terribly, so very excited to come home to my two favorite living beings. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Were so lucky to live in Oakland, where eating out is an incredible experience, especially at a time where women chefs are absolutely excelling in their field. So eating delicious meals by our favorite local women chefs is my favorite treat – Cosecha Cafe (Mexican), Nyum Bai (Cambodian), Champa Garden (Laotian) and 20th Century Cafe (Eastern European) to name a few.  -- A book to feed the soul:  I just finished reading Yvon Chounards Let My People Go Surfing and its been so deeply inspiring to me. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Akwaeke Emezi, they are my favorite writer, a member of this third culture/­­diaspora/­­immigrant excellence interweb community and has navigated their self care so beautifully and visibly through the years. Id love to learn more from them. Photos by Sana Javeri Kadri, Sophie Peoples, Assad Keval /­­/­­ This post contains Amazon Affiliate Links You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Ashley Neese Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Amanda Forcella Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet Potato Challah

December 17 2017 Vegan Dad 

Sweet Potato Challah Ive been meaning to post this recipe for ages. Sweet potato is my new favourite way to replace eggs in enriched bread dough recipes. It makes the final loaf nice and soft, and adds colour to the dough that     mimics the many egg yolks of non-vegan challah. This is a version of Peter Reinharts recipe from Artisan Breads Everyday, but I use a blender to incorporate the potato into the liquid ingredients. You can let the dough rise in the fridge, then shape and bake the next day as he calls for, but I usually just do everything in the same day because I dont have the time or the fridge space to follow his method. The recipe produces reliable results every time. Trust me: I make at least two recipes a week so the kids have buns for school lunches. Makes 2 loaves, or 16 buns INGREDIENTS All measurements are weight, not volume - 17oz warm water - 2.5 oz oil - 4 oz cooked sweet potato (see note* way below) - 3 oz sugar - 14 g instant yeast - 19 g salt - 2 lb 3 oz bread flour - soy milk for brushing METHOD 1. Place water, oil, sweet potato, sugar, yeast, and salt in a blender. Blend until smooth. 2. Add liquid to flour in a large bowl and bring into a dough. Knead until smooth.  3. Shape into a ball and let rise, covered, in a large oiled bowl until doubled in size.  4. From here, YouTube is your friend. Determine how many braids you want in your loaf (the pic above is a 6 braid) and find a video for how to braid it. Remember that the recipe makes two loaves. 5. Place braided loaves on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper (ideally both loaves on one big sheet). Brush with soy milk. 6. Leave to rise, uncovered, in a warm place until almost doubled in size (about 1 hour). Keep brushing with soy milk every 15 mins or so, to keep the dough from drying out and to build up layers of soy milk (this will give the loaf that glossy finish when baked).  7. While dough is rising, preheat oven to 350.  8. Bake for 20 mins, then rotate the pan and bake for another 15-20 mins, until the loaves are evenly browned and sound hollow when thumped on the bottom. A convection oven really helps get an evenly browned loaf.  A NOTE ON BUNS This is also my go to recipe for buns--it makes 16 buns that I do as a 4x 4 batch bake on a large sheet pan. Brush them with soy milk like the loaves, but bake at 400 for 15-17 mins, rotating the pan half way through. Or, space them apart, slash the tops before baking, and sprinkle with sesame seeds after the last brushing with soy milk (as pictured below). Or do hot dog/­­sausage buns.  *Note: I prick the skin of a sweet potato a few times with a fork, then cook it in the microwave on the potato setting. Its fast and makes for a sweet potato that is not too wet. 

INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

July 7 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

INDIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterMy newest cookbook, The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the the INDIA cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2uGbsog My new INDIA cookbook has been years in the making - with recipes, stories, artwork & photographs inspired by 8 trips to my most favourite country. It’s a culinary love story of my favorite cuisine - based on a total of nearly two years in India and 25 years of devotion to Indian cooking. My first trip to India was in 2001: mostly North India and Nepal. I spent 4 months on that journey, then another 6 weeks in South India in 2006. I visited twice more, in 2009 & 2010, followed by living and working for a year (as an art teacher) in Central India, returning to Berlin in 2011. In Autumn 2016 & Spring 2017, I went back to India to taste and explore the last regions (and cuisines) of India still waiting for me. I traveled across Kashmir & Ladakh, trekking through mountain villages and exploring towns and cities, staying mostly with families and cooking together in their kitchens. Then I went deep into the Northeast: West Bengal, Assam, Sikkim, and Nagaland. I even met with world famous chefs at their restaurants - and homes - for incredible eats and great times in the kitchen. Now I’m back in Berlin, recreating the culinary wonders of the Indian subcontinent in my own kitchen. As with my previous 4 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. It’s a labor of love and the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. I’m back on Kickstarter for my 5th international cookbook project. You can join the crowdfunding which makes everything possible. It’s an adventure in itself, complete with backer-only updates, behind the scenes sneak peaks, exclusive travel videos & stories, recipe testing groups, and more. Pre-order a signed copy of The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA (including worldwide shipping, stickers & e-book for EUR25!) My INDIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 5th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 192 pages with 90+ recipes and over 70 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by 8 trips /­­ 21+ months of travel around India and over 25 years vegan cooking experience - Total variety of regional cuisines: Rajasthani, Gujarati, Punjabi, Kashmiri, Sindhi, Maharashtrian, Tamil, Kerelan, Karnatakan, Goan, Hyderbadi, Bengali, Assamese, Sikkimese, Ladakhi, Tibetan, Nepali - Indian classics & family favorites, timeless treats, new culinary wonders, mind-blowing mega-metropolitan snacks, fabulous village feasts, scrumptious street food, and insanely delicious desserts - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and awesome cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Shahi Bengan – Roasted Stuffed Eggplant Gobi Pakoras – Batter-fried Cauliflower Saag Paneer – Spinach & Fried Tofu Cubes Pani Puri – Street Food Favorite Aloo Paratha – Grilled Potato-Stuffed Flatbreads Shahi Paneer – fried tofu cubes in creamy tomato sauce Seitan Vindaloo – Goan Tangy Curry Samosas! Fried Potato-Stuffed Pastries Gajur Halava – Bengali Carrot Pudding Gulab Jamuns – Doughballs in Rose Syrup Berry Halava – Fruity Semolina Dessert Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA: - Garam Masala, Sambar Masala, Chaat Masala & Panch Puran - Tamarind Ginger, Pineapple, Tomato, Coconut, Chili & Bhang Chutneys - Aam Achar – Mango Pickle - Amitar Khar – Assamese papaya starter - Handvo – Gujurati zucchini cake - Uttapam – South Indian rice & lentil pancakes with tomatoes - Idly Paper Dosa – Karnatakan crispy rice & lentil crepes - Rava Dosa – Tamil semolina crepes - Dahi Vada Chaat – lentil cakes with yogurt & chutney - Hariali Paneer Tikka – Punjabi tofu skewers with spices & herbs - Gobi Pakora – batter-fried cauliflower - Mirchi Vada – Rajasthani batter-fried chillies - Aloo Tikka – spicy, fried potato cakes - Samosa – vegetable-stuffed fried pastry - Pani Puri – potato-stuffed fried pastry with tamarind spice water - Pav Bhaji - spicy vegetable mash with fresh baked buns - Momos – Tibetan vegetable dumplings - Shapaley – Tibetan vegetable pies - Kolkota Kathi Roll – spicy soymeat & shredded cabbage wrap - Sambar Bandhgobi Rolls – stuffed cabbage leaves - Aloo Dum – Kashmiri tomato potato curry - Shahi Tamatar – roasted stuffed tomatoes - Shahi Bengan – roasted stuffed eggplant - Shahi Mirch – roasted stuffed peppers - Shahi Paneer – tofu cubes in creamy, tomato curry - Paneer Jalfrezi – spicy tofu cubes - Saag Paneer – spinach & tofu cubes - Mutter Paneer - peas & tofu cubes - Xaak – Assamese greens, potatoes & cherry tomatoes - Bengan Bhartha – Kashmiri roasted aubergine - Malai Kofta – potato dumplings in creamy tomato curry - Bindi Aloo Tawa Masala – spicy stir-fried okra & potatoes - Khumb Kaju Makhani – Rajasthani cashew mushroom curry - Shukto – Bengali eggplant, potato & plantains - Pumpkin Posto – Bengali squash in creamy poppy seed curry - Seitan Vindaloo – Goan tangy curry - Black Sesame Seitan – Assamese spicy curry - Tamatar Pitika – Assamese tomatoes with herbs & spices - Aloo Pitika – Assamese potatoes with herbs & spices - Bol Tenga – Assames lentil dumplings in tangy curry - Mas Tenga – Assamese tangy jackfruit curry - Chupke – Tibetan dumpling soup - Tarka Dal – Punjabi lentil curry - Chana Masala – spicy chickpeas - Rajma - Kashmiri red kidney bean curry - Lobia Palak – black-eyed peas with lemon & spinach - Golden Rice - with turmeric & spices - Chana Pulao – rice with chickpeas - Pulihora – Tamil tamarind rice with peanuts & spices - Classic Biryani – Kashmiri rice dish with vegetables, nuts & spices - Jackfruit Biryani – Tamil coconut rice dish with spicy jackfruit - Tupula Bhaat – Assamese sticky rice steamed in banana leaves - Aloo Paratha – grilled flatbread stuffed with potatoes - Tibetan Bread – fried breakfast snack - Makki Roti – grilled cornbread - Roti – wholewheat grilled flatbread - Garlic Naan – traditional baked flatbread - Poori – deep-fried flatbreads - Date Ladoo – date & nut sweets - Besan Ladoo – chickpea sweet - Gajur Halava – spiced carrot pudding - Berry Halava – strawberry & blueberry semolina sweet - Mysore Pak – traditional sweet squares - Gulab Jamun – deep-fried dough balls in rose syrup - Rasmalai – cheese balls in saffron mango milk - Jalebi – fried, syrupy sweet - Peda – lemon cashew creamy sweet - Kheer – Kashmiri rice pudding with cardamom, nuts & raisins - Mishti Doi - Bengali sweet curd - Shrikand - Maharashtran yogurt dessert - Pista Kulfi – pistachio ice cream - Pitha – Bengali sesame & date pastry - Narikol Ladoo – Assamese shredded coconut balls - Kadala Parippu – Keralan sweet chana dal dessert - Ginger Chai – spiced black tea - Kahwa – Kashmiri green tea with almond & saffron - Badam Dudh – almond milk with cardamom & cinnamon - Anjoor Kaju Dudh – cashew shake with fig & date - Strawberry Mint Lassi – yogurt smoothie The post INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate

May 31 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate I’m so excited to talk bit about Heather Crosby’s new cookbook Pantry to Plate today. When I received my copy and took a scan from cover to cover, I was immediately blown away by the way this book kindly invites the reader to be both spontaneous and practical in the kitchen by working with the ingredients that are already on hand. With thirty clever recipe templates, Heather demonstrates how to improvise your way to delicious, plant-based meals. For example, Dense Veggies + Protein + Herbs + Binder + Spices = Vegan Meatballs (or Veggie Burgers)! The templates specify the required amount for each component, as well as which components are a must and which ones can be skipped altogether. In addition to the templates, the book is full of other useful tools that help make intuitive cooking a breeze: besides a regular recipe index, there is a cook by ingredient index, as well as mini-templates for creating flavor with aromatics, a whole bit on pairing spices, and a dressing and sauce section that has pretty much every staple sauce recipe you’ll ever need. If you don’t have a particular ingredient for a recipe, chances are you have something on hand that could act as a substitute, and there is a whole chart of interchangeable mix-and-match ingredients in the book to help you work through that. I’m quite terrible at sticking to recipes myself, since I always want to play, add, subtract and find alternative ingredients, so it’s as if this book was made for me. How Heather managed to define freestyle cooking in such clear, comprehensive terms, will remain a mystery to me :) Some more sections/­­recipes I’m most excited about: Coconut Yogurt, Dairy-Free Milks, Probiotic Cream Cheese, Veggie Fries, Cheesy Comfort Food, Hand Pies, Sneaky Brownies, Nice Cream. YUM! Onto the (not) meatballs. These Italian-style veggie meatballs come from the Veggie Burger section of the book and can be easily shaped into burgers or sliders, as Heather points out. They get their substance and ‘meatiness’ from lentils and portobello mushrooms, and a bit of sweetness from carrots and onions, while herbs like oregano, parsley and thyme, and spices like fennel and pepper give them that characteristic Italian flare. We enjoyed them two ways, the first day with zucchini noodles and pesto (pictured here), and the second day, a bit more traditionally, with real pasta and tomato sauce. Both were equally delicious. Heather also suggests to serve the meatballs in a sub roll, or even as an appetizer, along with some tasty sauce. Whether you live and breathe freestyle cooking, or you want to learn a bit more about being intuitive in the kitchen, check out Pantry to Plate, I have a feeling it will earn an important place on your bookshelf :) Italian Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate   Print Serves: 20 to 24 Meatballs or 5 to 6 Full-Sized Burgers Ingredients 2 tablespoons unrefined coconut oil, grapeseed oil, or avocado oil 2 cups (260 g) diced carrots 1 cup (70 g) chopped portobello mushrooms 1 cup (160 g) diced yellow onion 2 cups (400 g) cooked green, brown, or French green lentils (roughly 3/­­4 cup/­­140 g dry) 2 tablespoons water 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme 3 garlic cloves, minced 2 teaspoons ground psyllium husk 2 teaspoons rough-chopped fennel seed 1 teaspoon fresh-cracked black pepper 1 teaspoon sea salt, plus more to taste 1/­­2 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika Instructions In a skillet heated to medium, add 1 tablespoon of the oil and sauté the carrots for 20 minutes, until easily pierced with a fork but firm, not mushy. Add the mushrooms and onion and sauté over medium heat for 5 to 10 minutes, until softened and browning a bit. Transfer to a food processor with the remaining ingredients. Pulse together 30 to 35 times, until just broken up and sticky with texture and bits of color intact. Taste--if needed, season with more salt or seasonings. Pulse or stir to incorporate. Form 1 1/­­2 -inch (4 cm) meatballs with your hands. Heat a skillet to medium and add the remaining oil. Slow-cook the meatballs, rotating often, for 10 to 15 minutes, until browned on all sides. Serve warm. Notes Recipe from YumUniverse Pantry to Plate (C) Heather Crosby, 2017. Photographs copyright (C) Heather Crosby, 2017. Reprinted by permission of the publisher, The Experiment. Available wherever books are sold. theexperimentpublishing.com 3.5.3226 You might also like... A Salad for the Weekdays Roasted Pepper Lasagna Melon Basil Summer Rolls Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

A Vegan Protein Sources Chart

April 12 2017 VegKitchen 

A Vegan Protein Sources Chart It seems like when anyone goes vegan, the first question they’re asked is How do you get your protein? The idea that its hard to get enough protein on a plant-based diet seems hard to shake, even though its not difficult at all. The following vegan protein sources chart demonstrates what a wide array of healthful […] The post A Vegan Protein Sources Chart appeared first on VegKitchen.

Papaya Lime Sundae - Ice Cream Sunday

June 26 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Papaya Lime Sundae - Ice Cream Sunday Papaya is one of my favorite things to eat this time of year, so figuring out a papaya sorbet recipe that worked was very exciting. It admittedly took me a few tries. One version that involved banana came out tasting quite strange, while another one just tasted like plain ice.  Then I had a revelation about the fact that papaya always pairs amazingly well with lime – both are tropical in flavor, and lime gives creamy and mild papaya just the right hint of brightness and zing. Presented here as a very refreshing version of a sundae, with delicious and healthful add-ins – desiccated coconut, cacao nibs (which we sprinkle on everything sweet in this house), and a drizzle of Lady Date pure date syrup, an amazing new discovery (thank you Laura for the tip). In the absence of this sorbet, we’ve been having fresh papaya slices with all the same add-ins, as an easy summer dessert. Since our book manuscript is due this coming Thursday, we’ve had our heads down and haven’t had the time to read any interesting articles for our Sunday link list. Instead, we thought it would be fun to compile a list of old and new cookbooks that have been inspiring us and helping us get through these final stages of the manuscript, whether with their recipes, visually or both. Read on for the list and have a relaxing Sunday! Bowl by Lukas Volger Gjelina by Travis Lett Hartwood by Eric Werner Nopi by Yotam Ottolenghi Ayurveda: The Science of Self Healing by Vasant Lad Dandelion and Quince by Michelle McKenzie (got a sneak peak from my publisher and it’s a beauty) Ripe and Tender by Nigel Slater It’s All Easy by Gwyneth Paltrow At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen by Amy Chaplin Hot to Cook a Wolf by MFK Fisher Sweeter Off the Vine by Yossi Arefi Papaya Lime Sundae   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1 medium papaya - peeled, seeded and roughly chopped ½ cup freshly squeezed lime juice - from about 3 limes ⅓ cup maple syrup pinch sea salt cacao nibs - to taste desiccated coconut - to taste pure date syrup - to taste Instructions Combine all the ingredients, with the exception of cacao nibs, coconut and date syrup, in a blender and blend until smooth. Chill the mixture well in the refrigerator, preferably overnight. Churn in an ice-cream maker for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Spoon into a container and freeze for at least 2 hours before serving. Top with cacao nibs, desiccated coconut and pure date syrup. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Zucchini Blossoms with Roasted Eggplant Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Black Bean Chocolate and Fig Cookies Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Papaya Lime Sundae - Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

“Taste of Korea” Kimchi Burger

May 15 2016 Meatless Monday 

The 2016 Careers through Culinary Arts Program (C-CAP) Meatless Monday Recipe Contest challenged teen chefs to get the beef off their buns by creating innovative veggie burger recipes. The grande prize winner is this kimchi tofu burger from Eubene Kim of Chatsworth Charter School in Los Angeles, CA. Serves 6 - 1 red onion, finely chopped - 2 oz (200 g) cremini mushrooms, finely chopped - 12 oz (340g) extra firm tofu - 2-3 cloves of garlic - 1/­­2 cup spinach roughly chopped - 2 1/­­2 cups of kimchi - 1/­­4 cup kimchi juice - 1 cup panko bread crumbs - 1-1/­­2 cups (150gms/­­5oz) bread crumbs, extra - 6 whole grain bread rolls (or gluten free rolls) - 1/­­2 cup mayo - 1/­­4 cup red pepper paste - 2 oz baby spinach leaves, for garnish - 1 egg In a pan, heat about a tsp of olive oil and sauce the onions until soft. Add the mushrooms and cook for another 3-4 minutes and cool slightly. In a food processor, blend the tofu with garlic and spinach. Blend until smooth. Transfer this to a bowl and stir in the onion- mushroom mixture, breadcrumbs kimchi, and kimchi juices. Stir until well mixed and then refrigerate for about 30 minutes. Divide this mixture into 6 patties, pressing together well. Coat them well all around with the extra breadcrumbs In a pan add some olive oil to coat the pan and pan fry the patties. Cook them 3-4 minutes on each side or until they are golden. Make sure to turn them carefully to prevent them from breaking up. Drain on paper towels. (you can also season them with salt now.) Mix together the mayo and the red pepper paste. Cook the egg in a pan and top on the burger. Assemble. Add any spinach on top of the burger. The post “Taste of Korea” Kimchi Burger appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Trend Watch: 2016 is Already the Year of the Veggies!

January 18 2016 Meatless Monday 

Trend Watch: 2016 is Already the Year of the Veggies!Just a few weeks into 2016 experts are already calling this the Year of the Vegetable, and with good reason: around the world people are beginning to see that meat doesnt need to be at the center of the plate! NPRs food blog The Salt recently stated that vegetables would take center stage in home and restaurant kitchens, Parade.com has noted how popular vegetable-centric meals have become, while cover stories from Better Homes and Gardens and Eating Well have featured delicious fruits, vegetables, and smoothies. Restaurants have also been embracing the veggie-centric trend, with top chefs from Jason Weiner to Bryce Shuman proclaiming the flavor and culinary promise of meatless entrees and side dishes. In 2015 Eater recognized the rise of this trend, and its on track to be even more popular in 2016. With so much buzz about plant-based foods, the year of the veggies is the perfect time to start going meatless once a week on Mondays! January is often filled with resolutions to get healthy and eat better in the coming year, but research shows that theres a more effective way to change your habits thats also easier to stick to: small changes in your behavior, starting with Mondays. If you feel more energized about your resolutions, or inspired to make a fresh start on Mondays, science says you arent alone. New research form the University of Pennsylvanias Wharton School supports the idea that the beginning of the week is an effective time to initiate new goals. Mondays, and the start of the week, is a perfect time to recommit to resolutions if youve slipped up or been less committed than youd like. Need a little making a meatless meal plan during this veggie-focused year? Visit our recipe index for meal ideas, check out our Pinterest page for inspiration, or download one of our Meatless Monday e-cookbooks for ideas on how to make your Monday meals nutritious, delicious, and above all, meatless! The post Trend Watch: 2016 is Already the Year of the Veggies! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Pancakes & French Toast Recipes to Brighten Your Weekend

September 4 2015 VegKitchen 

Vegan Pancakes & French Toast Recipes to Brighten Your WeekendPancakes and French toast seem like two kinds of treats go by the wayside for vegans -- dont they need eggs, milk, and butter? Not at all! There are easy tweaks for making this leisurely breakfast fare without a trace of those ingredients. If youre gluten-free as well as vegan, weve got you covered there as well with a GF pancake and French toast recipe in this line-up. In Cinnamon-Apple Pancakes (pictured above), apples and cinnamon are folded into a whole-grain batter. This is a lovely leisurely weekend breakfast or brunch, especially in the fall, when apples are abundant. Robin Robertson offers another take on the apple theme with Apple-Almond Butter Pancakes. This delicious flavor combo can be enjoyed in these luscious pancakes. For gluten-free, use gluten-free flour. Make these fruity Strawberry Pancakes in late spring and early summer, when strawberries are at their best. After strawberry season has passed, frozen strawberries can stand in. Chef Jason Wyrick designed Corn Pancakes with Bourbon Agave Maple Syrup so each pancake is a meal in itself, with texture not usually expected from a pancake and a big flavor profile with a minimal amount of work. If youve got memories of buttermilk pancakes and syrup, Caryn Hartglass presents Gluten Free & Vegan Buttermilk Pancakes with Blueberry Syrup -- a version using soymilk soured with vinegar in place of buttermilk. Serve with the accompanying blueberry syrup - made only with blueberries!   Insanely Easy Vegan French Toast proves that y ou dont need a lot of bells and whistles for a great vegan French toast recipe. Its really more about the golden-brown of the result, the cinnamon, and the syrup. There are three components to this fantastic, healthy recipe for Berry-licious Vegan Stuffed French Toast -- the french toast itself, the blueberry cream cheese stuffing and the blueberry syrup. For Fantastic French Toast (Gluten Free) Julieanna Hever and Chef Beverly Bennett join forces to create a recipe thats great for a family breakfast or a small get-together. This recipe for Vegan Pumpkin Waffles is great for the waffle maker. Most vegan pancakes tend to be dense and the waffle maker gives it a bit more of a fluffy texture. If you want to use this as a pancake batter, by all means. Add 1/­­2 teaspoon of baking powder to the dry ingredients.

Tips for Cooking Indian Food, Book Errata and Availability update

June 25 2015 Vegan Richa 

A quick update about things going on with my book. Its already been a month! See the Errata at the bottom of the post for errors and missing things.  A big Thank you to everyone who has been cooking from it. I love seeing all the awesome food pictures!! Availability in UK: The book info has a later release date in UK and Europe on some websites as they need a metric conversion chart. The chart was missed in the first print and will be in the second printing. Books are however shipping, have shipped and are available to order since release date of May 19 on Amazon.co.uk  and Bookdepository.com. For other International availability links, see here.  If you find the book elsewhere, do leave me a comment with the link! International and kindle orders also quality for the Free Bonus recipe Bundle! That offer is only till the end of June(email me at veganricha @ gmail). Pictured above – Cabbage Kofta in creamy tomato sauce (Patta Gobi ke Kofte). Pictured Below – Saffrom Cream Fudge (Malai Peda) Dairy free! Now for some interesting Tips for cooking Indian food and some insider info from Vegan Richa’s Indian Kitchen.  1.  Asafetida (hing) is great to add to tempering for beans and dals to help with digestion. It has a fetid fragrance, but in cooked dishes it delivers a flavor reminiscent of leeks and garlic. Always store asafetida in an airtight container. Asafetida itself is gluten-free, but it is usually ground along with a starch which is generally wheat. Hence, the ground asafetida is generally not gluten-free. It can be found ground with rice flour/­­starch or corn as well. Always check the label. Get the whole asafetida crystals to avoid gluten contamination and get them ground at a spice shop with the flour/­­starch or choice. Continue reading: Tips for Cooking Indian Food, Book Errata and Availability updateThe post Tips for Cooking Indian Food, Book Errata and Availability update appeared first on Vegan Richa.

4 Reasons Why You Should Start Juicing

April 24 2015 VegKitchen 

4 Reasons Why You Should Start JuicingContributed by Garrick Dee Tan. When it comes to staying healthy and fit, a lot of health experts like dieticians and doctors would say that you should eat a lot of fruit and vegetables. How much? It varies. For instance if youre a 35 year old male who does not exercise a lot, you should eat at least 2 cups of fruit and 3 cups of vegetables. This handy tool from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will calculate how much you should eat depending on your age, sex and physical activity level. What counts as a cup? According to the CDC a whole small apple can be considered as a cup, a large banana is considered a cup, half a cup of sweet potato + half a cup of green beans is considered a cup. Heres the full chart. Eating all that vegetables and fruit really fills up your stomach which is great because itll leave less room for junk food but the digestive system gets overwhelmed. One option that will help health conscious folks like you and I consume more fruits and vegetables is juicing, and Ill share with you 4 reasons why you should consider incorporating this practice into your diet. - Allows you to consume more fruits and vegetables Like what I said earlier in this article depending on your age, sex and physical activity level you need to consumer 5 to 6 cups fruits and vegetables. Juicing helps you consume more because the process separates liquid from pulp. Whats left is a liquid brimming with live enzymes and nutrients get absorbed by the body without having to be digested by the gut. This in a way helps rest the digestive system. - Helps treat certain types of ailments like diabetes Diabetes is an epidemic that affects over 30 million Americans with over 1.5 million new cases per year. One of the best natural remedies used with success by a number of people to control diabetes is bitter melon. This (you guessed it) bitter fruit contains four ingredients that is known to help the bodys capability to absorb and process sugar. These four ingredients are vicine, polypeptide-P, charantin and lectin. It is so potent that doctors and health practitioners have warned against combining this with diabetic medication because it could cause hypoglycemia or a condition where the blood sugar falls to dangerously low levels. Dosages vary but the maximum you can safety take is around 2 bitter melons per day. If youve tasted bitter melon, it is very bitter and I doubt no matter how good the chef is you wont be able to eat a whole piece. An alternative is to juice bitter melon. This removes all the pulp and what you get is a concentrated drink that has helped thousands of people reverse type-2 diabetes. If pure bitter gourd is too bitter for your taste you can try adding these ingredients. Important note: If youre under medication, consult with a physician first before incorporating this into your diet because like what Ive said combining this with diabetic medication can cause hypoglycemia. And when you do take this regularly monitor blood glucose levels - if it falls within normal levels ask your doctor if you can discontinue medication. - Helps you lose weight No, Im not talking about a juice fast where youll eat nothing but juice. Im talking utilizing juicing into your diet in order to reduce hunger pangs. While a juice fast can work for the short term and Ive read a lot of success stories, the truth is it isnt sustainable for an extended period and can be dangerous if you do it the wrong way. What Im suggesting here is a solution where you dont need to starve yourself. The solution involves drinking fresh juice before a meal or in-between meals in order to curb the hunger pangs that normally would occur if we dont eat snacks in between meals. Health experts agree that eating smaller portions is the key in losing weight and keeping it off but if what you are eating in between meals is rich in fructose then this method can also work against you, which is why drinking juice or a smoothie /­­ juice combo is a better option. Not only will your body get the nutrients it craves for thus reducing appetite, it also lessens the carb and sugar intake. This will result in weight loss minus the nutrient deprivation. If you dont believe me, try some of these recipes before any meal and see if it helps in reducing hunger pangs. Some of these recipes have ingredients that help in weight loss like Avocado and Grapefruit. - Improves digestion A health digestive system is important to our overall health, in fact a third of our immune system is found in the digestive tract and research confirms this. Juicing helps indirectly by providing you with a healthier alternative to store bought juices. Fruits like lemon also help with the digestive system by lubricating the digestive system and softening the stool. Drinking a cup of warm lemon water in the morning will help improve in fact will help digestive health by stimulating the liver to produce bile which is a fluid needed to flush out waste from the gut. Another ingredient you can add to your juices to improve digestion is ginger. Eating a thumb of ginger is just plain impossible but juicing it is not and adding it adds a nice spicy contrast. Next week, Ill cover the most common mistakes a lot of people make when juicing. One of them is a key contributor in people gaining weight so please stand by for that. - For more juicing tips, visit Juicing with G.


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