Garten - vegetarian recipes

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Garten vegetarian recipes

Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette

November 15 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. I’ve been wanting to come up with a worthwhile roasted vegetable salad ever since the weather turned chilly. I can’t be the only one who loses appetite for cold, super-green, lettuce-y salads once it’s cold outside. I’ll still say yes to something like a hearty kale salad, but most other ones make me shiver, if not accompanied by something warm. This salad is anything but shiver-inducing. Fingerling potatoes, carrots, and red onion all get roasted together in the oven, then mixed with green split peas, parsley, and a very special miso vinaigrette. The result is a substantial and hearty fall salad that makes for a great side dish or even lunch. Lets talk about split peas for a second. Did you know they are not only good for soups? When I was growing up in the Soviet Union, split pea soup or split pea puree was on the menu of every kindergarten/­­school lunch, and neither item was my favorite. Since then Ive learned that I like my split peas left intact, with a little bit of bite even. They are protein-rich, instantly making any dish more nourishing, and they are great at drinking up any dressing that theyre mixed with, which makes them perfect for salads. They take this salad from being just a plate of vegetables to a complete, well-rounded dish, thats acceptable to eat on its own. Do you have any favorite split pea recipes? Whether you use split peas, beans, lentils or chickpeas, making a habit of incorporating at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week will lead to some sustainable, nourishing and affordable meals. For more recipes using pulses, check out our White Bean Tuna Sandwich, Smoky Chickpea Croutons, Fennel-Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans, Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans, Red Lentil Gazpacho, or any recipes on the Half Cup Habit website. Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the miso vinaigrette 2 tablespoons white miso paste 2 tablespoons brown rice vinegar 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime or lemon juice 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil 1 teaspoon tamari 1 garlic clove - minced ¼ cup olive oil for the salad 1 cup green or yellow split peas - soaked in purified water w/­­ a splash of acv overnight sea salt 2 lb fingerling potatoes - halved or quartered 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil - melted freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary (optional) 3 medium carrots - diced diagonally 1 medium red onion - cut into small wedges 1 small bunch parsley - finely chopped handful of dill - finely chopped (optional) Instructions to make the vinaigrette Place the the miso paste into a small bowl. Add 1 tablespoon of the brown rice vinegar and mix until smooth. Add the rest of the brown rice vinegar, lime/­­lemon juice, sesame oil, tamari and garlic, stir to combine. Continue stirring and slowly pour in the olive oil to emulsify. to make the salad Drain and rinse the split peas and combine them with plenty of purified water and sea salt in a medium pot. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook, partially covered, for about 30 minutes, until soft, but not mushy. Drain over a colander and set aside. In the meantime, preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare two parchment paper-covered baking trays. Place the potatoes on one of the trays, drizzle with half of the oil, sprinkle with salt, pepper, and half of the rosemary, if using, and mix. Put the carrots and onion on the second tray, do not mix them together. Drizzle both with oil, salt, pepper and the rest of the rosemary, if using, and toss to coat. Place both trays in the oven and roast for 30-40 minutes, until all vegetables are golden and cooked throughout. The onion might cook quicker than the potatoes and carrots. Remove it from the baking sheet earlier, if thats the case. Let the roasted vegetables cool slightly and combine them with the cooked split peas in a large bowl, add the herbs and the vinaigrette, and toss to coat. This salad gets even better with time, as everything marinates in the vinaigrette. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Metabolism Boosting Everything Salad Watermelon Panzanella Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Baked Veggie Spring Rolls .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes

November 28 2016 My New Roots 

Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes When I was in elementary school I ate in the cafeteria. It was the cool thing to do after all, since homemade brown bag lunches were sooo kindergarten. At the time, I thought that the highly processed offerings behind the sneeze guard were a dream come true: pizza, burgers, chicken fingers, fish sticks, mac n cheese. But the very best thing of all in my first-grader opinion? Sloppy Joes. For those of you who dont know what Im talking about (ahem, mostly everyone outside North America), a Sloppy Joe is like a stew-y, wet hamburger. Ive also heard it been called a loose meat sandwich. Stay with me, people – I realize how riduclously unappetizing this sounds. As a kid, eating a Sloppy Joe was like getting permission to make a mess - a rare, sanctioned moment to smear sauce all over your face, drip on your plate, and have your whole meal basically deteriorate into a pile of savoury, saucy, deliciousness that you were allowed to eat with your hands?! Isn’t this every kid’s dream? Because eating a Sloppy Joe is just that: its sloppy. And that is why its awesome. Sloppy Joes are definitely not on top of the sophisticated food list, but that does not mean that they should be discriminated against. When made with plant-based, whole food ingredients, they are in fact quite the respectable meal. Perfect for chilly autumn and winter nights when all you want to do is tuck into something super cozy and comforting, Sloppy Joes are a one-way ticket to the land of savoury satisfaction. Since the temperatures have dropped here in Copenhagen, Ive been craving this kind of meal like crazy, so Im more than happy to have a healthy solution at hand, and of course to share it with you. The classic Sloppy Joe recipe includes ground beef cooked with onions and garlic, crushed tomatoes, ketchup, sugar and some spices. Sometimes there are some token carrots and celery tossed in, sometimes vinegar, mustard, or chilies, but the basic idea is a moist mixture that you pile on top of a bun. But! In my vegan Plant-Powered version, Ive replace the ground beef with black lentils and mushrooms. I suggest using this type of lentil for this recipe since they are very small, and they maintain their shape and texture while cooking. And if you care about appearances, or perhaps fooling someone, they look the most like ground beef. Just sayin. The flavouring elements of the Plant-Powered Sloppy Joe mix are diverse and potentially strange-sounding, but trust me, altogether just right. Balsamic for a sweet hit of acidity, Sriracha for a little heat, and cumin and paprika add smoky complexity. I also tossed in some walnuts because I am a firm believer in texture, and all that mushiness needed buffering! I toasted them lightly before giving them a rough chop and a stir through the thick lentil mixture. I love how their nuttiness comes through the rich sauce and adds even more deliciousness. I also made a simple slaw from red cabbage to add more crunch and freshness, plus some token sprouts. These items are optional, but I really love the bright contrast they provide against the rich lentil filling. Fill up on Folate Lentils are one of the yummiest sources of folate. Just one cup of cooked lentils provides you with almost 90% of your daily recommended intake! And why is folate so important? Youve probably heard about this vital B-vitamin in regards to pregnancy, as it is critical in the prevention of birth defects, but folate also functions to support red blood cell production and help prevent anemia, allows nerves to function properly, helps prevent osteoporosis-related bone fractures, and helps prevent dementias including Alzheimers disease. Folate received its name from the Latin word folium, meaning foliage, so its not wonder that other excellent sources of folate are dark leafy greens (yum, your favorite!) - kale, romaine lettuce, spinach, asparagus, turnip greens, beet greens, mustard greens, parsley, and collards to name a few. This may explain why North American diets seem to be on the deficient end of things when it comes to this B-vitamin, as folate is available from fresh, unprocessed food. The good news is it is easily absorbed, used, and stored by the body. Folate is also manufactured by intestinal bacteria (remember those probiotics?), so if colon flora is healthy, we have another good source of this important vitamin. Find the most high-vibe buns or bread you can get your hands on for this recipe. I used wholegrain sourdough buns from my local organic bakery, then toasted them lightly before drowning them in vegan sloppy goodness. You can also eat these open-faced if youd like to cut back on the bread. Or pull an alt-bread move and wrap it in socca, a cabbage leaf, or use it to top a crispbread (although, lets be honest: the bun rules). I should also mention that the sloppy joe filling was totally delicious on its own as a stew, and thinned with a little water to make soup! Bonus.     Print recipe     Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes Makes 6-8 sandwiches Ingredients: 6-8 wholegrain sourdough buns 1 batch Simple Cabbage Slaw (recipe follows) 1/­­2 small red onion, thinly sliced sprouts for topping, if desired 1 cup /­­ 230g black lentils 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 1 medium onion, diced 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 3 cloves garlic, minced 135g brown button mushrooms, chopped 1 red bell pepper, diced 2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (hot or sweet, your choice) 1/­­2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 2 Tbsp. Sriracha 1 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 14oz. /­­ 400ml can crushed organic tomatoes 1/­­2 cup /­­ 60g walnuts, roughly chopped Simple Cabbage Slaw 2 cups shredded red cabbage 2 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup a couple pinches sea salt Directions: 1. Soak lentils overnight if possible. Drain, rinse, and place in a medium saucepan. Cover with about 3 cups /­­ 750ml water, bring to a boil and reduce to simmer until tender, about 15-20 minutes (cook time will depend on whether or not youve soaked them). 2. While the lentils are cooking, melt the coconut oil in a large skillet. Add the onions and salt, stir to coat, and cook for about 15 minutes until starting to caramelize. Add the garlic, mushrooms and red pepper and cook for about 5 minutes or so until fragrant. Next add the cumin, paprika, black pepper and stir to coat. Stir in the Sriracha, balsamic, and can of tomatoes. 3. Drain and rinse the lentils, add them to the pan with the veggies and spices. Give it all a stir and let simmer for a few minutes for the flavours to meld. 4. In a separate skillet over medium heat, lightly toast the walnuts until golden in places and fragrant. Give them a rough chop and add them to the lentil mixture. 5. Have a taste and adjust the seasoning to suit you. Add more salt if necessary, more balsamic for sweet-tartness, or Sriracha for heat. 6. Toast your buns and ladle and a generous amount of the sloppy joe filling over the top of one half. Top with the red cabbage slaw, red onion and some sprouts, if desired. Top with the other half of the bun, and tuck in! Show me your Sloppy Joes on Instagram: #MNRsloppyjoes The post Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes appeared first on My New Roots.

The Extreme Lengths I’ve Gone to, to Grow My Hair

October 26 2016 Vegie Head 

When I was five, I took a pair of scissors, and the morning of my kindergarten photos, I cut my fringe. My face said it all. I was SO happy with myself – my parents, not so much. That photo sits with pride on the mantlepiece at my parents house, and it no doubt shaped my lifelong obsession wit... The post The Extreme Lengths I’ve Gone to, to Grow My Hair appeared first on Vegie Head.

Vegan Flag Cake (Gluten Free. . .Born in the U.S.A.)

July 2 2016 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Flag Cake (Gluten Free. . .Born in the U.S.A.) All this cake needs is Bruce Springsteen and a sparkler and you'd be set.  I became Flag Cake obsessed this morning while catching up on some reading. More specifically this article on Food52. It showed up in my Twitter feed as I was scrolling through the "what you might like" links. Wow. They REALLY know me. The article is about the history of the (wait for it): Flag Cake. I read the entire history of this cake from Betty Crocker to Ina Garten and Taylor Swift til now. I always assumed Flag Cake was something our mom did to the store-bought angel food cakes to make us feel less poor. Turns out, we were poor, but this cake was not our mother's invention. (Let me give credit where credit is due, she did splurge on some sparklers and a few of those awful stick things where giant plumes of color flames flew out right there in our HANDs!)  I thought my cake making days were behind me. I mean, it's been years since I've made a cake. But being the OCD person that I am, I could not stop thinking about Flag Cakes. All morning. Until finally I announced we'd be having Flag Cake (while hiding in our home with two terrified dogs and Netflix streaming at its highest volume, fans running in every bedroom to drown out the noise. . . until this godforsaken holiday passes).  This cake typically gets made in a 9 x 13" pan. I opted to make mine a 9" square cake pan. There is nothing fancy about this cake. It's a basic vegan yellow cake (made with Bob's Red Mill Gluten Free Flour--the 1-to-1 kind), and your basic vegan buttercream frosting. I've made a hundred cakes just like this. What you want to keep in mind is that it is not going to have that airy, super crumbly texture you'd get were you using eggs and making it GF. You'll get a denser cake, which is fine because just look at the amount of berries you'll use. The cake weighs a ton, too. But serve it with a side of vanilla coconut ice cream and be ready to cry with happiness.   Couple things on the cake making front, you'll notice I've used Ener-G egg replacer in my cake AND a flax egg. Why? The original larger cake calls for SIX eggs! So as I was parsing out how to adjust for not only it being a no egg cake, but also how the GF flour would react to all this deviation and I figured it'd be best to err on the side of caution and did the more is better thinking here. It worked! Vegan Flag Cake (Gluten Free) 1 1/­­4 cup gluten free flour (I used Bob's Red Mill 1:1) 1/­­4 cup cornstarch (or arrowroot) 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/­­2 cup unsweetened almond milk 1 cup turbinado sugar 4 tablespoons vegan butter 3/­­4 teaspoon fine sea salt 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/­­2 teaspoon almond extract 3 teaspoons Ener-G Egg Replacer mixed with 6 tablespoons water 1 teaspoon ground flax with 2 tablespoons water plus 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 pints red raspberries 1 pint blueberries Buttercream Frosting 4 tablespoons vegan butter 4 tablespoons vegan shortening 1/­­2 teaspoon clear vanilla extract 2 tablespoons vegan creamer 3 cups powdered sugar Preheat oven to 350. Prepare a 9" square cake pan with a smear of butter and a dusting of flour to make it nonstick. Then line the bottom with parchment paper. Place all dry ingredients in a medium bowl and sift together. In another bowl, add the vegan butter and sugar, vanilla and almond extract and mix until light and fluffy. Prepare the vegan flax egg and egg replacer--then whisk them together. That's right, prepare them separately, then combine. Add this to the butter/­­sugar mixture. Mix well until fully incorporated. Add a third of the dry ingredients to the butter/­­sugar/­­egg mixture, and then add a third of the almond milk and mix well. Continue adding the flour, then milk until finished. Mix the batter until it is a smooth consistency. Pour into the prepared pan. Bake for 30-35 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to cool completely before frosting.  Prepare the buttercream frosting by adding the shortening and butter cream and extract to a medium bowl and mixing well until smooth. Then slowly add in the powdered sugar. Add more if the consistency seems too thin, and add less if the frosting seems too thick. Frost the cooled cake. Take a moment to outline with a toothpick or tip of a knife where you'd like the blueberries vs. raspberries to go. Chill in the fridge for an hour before serving. Serving the cake cooled yields a delicious cake. Trust me. 

Dig Inn is Changing the Way People Eat

June 1 2015 Meatless Monday 

Dig Inn is Changing the Way People Eat Dig Inn is a thriving chain of fast-casual restaurants thats making healthy food accessible like never before. As part of their Spring Into Summer promotion, Dig Inn is collaborating with Meatless Monday. Its less about a marketing tactic to get people in the door on Monday, said founder Adam Eskin. Its more, were in support of anything that furthers the cause. We see it as an opportunity to support an organization and a movement. Offering Meatless Monday options is not a big stretch for Dig Inn, since 70% of the food they serve is vegetables. We cook everything fresh here every day...and its crazy the amount of vegetables that we cook, said Dig Inn chef Matt Weingarten. When it comes to meat hes most concerned about finding the right source, for the highest quality and lowest environmental impact. But when it comes to cooking and recipes, he says, I spend more of my time thinking about how I cook our vegetables than how I cook our meat. Dig Inn already has eleven locations in Manhattan and by the end of 2016 they hope to be in Boston, Chicago, and L.A. They feature unique sandwiches and hearty protein-filled salads, but the signature offering is called Marketplates. You start with an entrée (salmon, steak, or veggie options like tofu) then you get to add ridiculously good hot sides (like roasted sweet potatoes and upstate mac) and cold sides (spinach w/­­ mango, asparagus w/­­radish.) By the time you get to the end of the line you want to double back and try all the things you couldnt fit this trip through. And you get all this for around $10-12. Affordable food for everyone, said Eskin. Whats the point otherwise? If we just wanted to do fancy, high-end vegetables, we could probably do well and make money, but what impact would that have? In order to have impact, accessibility has to be on your radar. But it cant be to the detriment of the quality of food you serve. Its a balancing act, but what weve been able to do with supply and food opps has allowed us to charge a little less than everyone else. With no restaurant experience other than being a busboy at age 15, Eskin was asked by the equity firm he worked for to parachute in and save a flagging restaurant investment. He soon saw that what was happening in the grocery channel with Whole Foods was going to happen in the restaurant world as well.  For me the idea became wildly obvious. This type of food, in this type of setting, he said, referring to his new Madison Park location. With this amount of speed and accessibility, at this price point, and with this much care and commitment to the food and where it comes from. For him its about building a nice business and having fun doing it, but its also about effecting change. Eskin is troubled by the obesity problem in the U.S., and got positively giddy when a large group of teens sat near us, their plates overflowing with Dig Inn specials. Thats what gets me excited. When you getem early, its like, You are eating kale for life, kid! Imagine what happens when theyre older and feeding their kids. Thats why the opportunity for us, as a business, is so important. The restaurant business is notoriously difficult, and when you add to that the extra prep that comes with a predominantly vegetarian menu, the desire to source ingredients locally, and relentless competition, its daunting. We didnt pick the easiest path, says Eskin. Actually just the opposite. We took the most complicated and challenging path and are trying to make that work. When it does, its very rewarding. One thing they have in their favor: theyve built solid relationships with their suppliers over time, to the point where they actually list farms where their food comes from on their menu. Whether its helping partners pay for seeds up front or sending them to Cornell to learn about food safety, they continue to invest in relationships and engage with partners at every level that is mutually beneficial. Another smart practice: recruiting people from outside of the restaurant industry. Were getting a ton of amazing talented people who want to join us just because of what were trying to accomplish, said Eskin. And were figuring out how to take their passion, intellect and experience and put it to use inside the four walls of our company. Analytics are at the core of their business. Youd expect that from a numbers guy like Eskin, but Chef Weingarten also sees their value. Analytics are huge for helping us understand our customers preferences and what is selling well. Im kind of a systems guy. I get geeky about how to get things done. And to work within this model and say, hey, we can cook vegetables this fast and this good in this many locations...for me as a craftsman, I love it.   Having come from a fine dining background, he feels fortunate to have learned under masterful chefs and brings that experience to what he does every day at Dig Inn. Thanks to analytics they could immediately answer what their most popular vegetables are – its seasonal, but Brussels sprouts lead over the year, with kale and cauliflower not far behind. We just put kale & rhubarb as one of our sides, said Chef Weingarten. Its pickled so it stays firm, crispy, and juicy, both sweet & sour. Folks internally said, I dont eat rhubarb but they tried it and...so far its got a 100% conversion rate.  Success for Weingarten is to introduce people to new flavors and new foods. To put out kohlrabi and have everyone digging on kohlrabi. And thats just a matter of time. These kids, he said referring to the teens, theyre going to be down with kohlrabi. Just as Meatless Monday is trending upward, Dig Inn is on a similar trajectory. Were leading the change and thats where we want to be, said Weingarten. We all want to have better food thats more accessible at an affordable cost. And the more the big food systems adjust to that, the better it is for all. The post Dig Inn is Changing the Way People Eat appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Spicy Currywurst with Mango Curry Sauce

April 20 2015 seitan is my motor 

Spicy Currywurst with Mango Curry SauceThis post is going to be about sausages, and food, and decisions you make as a parent. And it’s probably full of contradictions. But let’s start with something light. What did you eat this weekend? Did you eat out? Did you have takeout? Did you make a meal from scratch? On a typical weekend, I used to shop for groceries and then spent hours in the kitchen cooking. I always considered this very relaxing. It gave me time to unwind and think about stuff. But that was pre-child. These days I am lucky if I can prepare a sandwich without being interrupted. For several reasons there is not much time for quiet and long weekend cooking anymore. The main one is that we try to spend our weekends as a family. We want to go out and do stuff together. And then we get home starving and throw together whatever very quickly. Or we order a pizza. This habit has sneaked into our household since a really wonderful little pizzeria opened in our neighbourhood. They have terrific pizzas, fresh garlic oil,  and a vegan cheese option. It’s quick and it’s super convenient. If we do cook, it is not always very relaxing. Having a three year old person running around in your kitchen can sometimes be a little bit nerve-stretching. You have to think about putting the sharp knife away. You probably don’t want to leave your child unattended next to that pot of boiling spaghetti, and so on.  And then there is always: “Mum, when is the food ready? When? I am starving! Can we eat already?” But sometimes I think I am getting the hang of it. F knows she cannot touch my knife and most of the time she doesn’t.  She wants to take part in our daily activities and she loves to help us cook. She’s taking the tasks I give her super seriously and it’s pretty cute to see her so exited about making her own food.  I won’t let her cut stuff just yet, but she can stand on a chair next to the oven and stir vegetables in a pan. She’s often very close to hot pans and steaming water, but so far she hasn’t burnt herself. Once I let her cut some vegetables but that almost gave me a heart attack. I think she needs to learn handling knifes as soon as possible, but until I am ready for that, we’re concentrating on kneading stuff. Especially seitan sausages. All the food we make at home together is vegan food. Although our daughter is not vegan. Compared to me and P, she is growing up very differently. We live in a city, not a village, the food we eat never comes fresh from a farm. The only farms F ever sees are those idealized little fantasy farms in some of her books. I grew up in a village with lots of farmers around me. My grandparents were farmers, too. Many people told me how they saw someone kill and slaughter an animal when they were kids. They even helped to prepare food made from these animals. This often comes up when people argue that killing animals for food is natural. They say that it is important for children to see where their food comes from and I agree. Food production is very often tied to exploitation of both human and non-human animals. We shouldn’t hide that from our children. But what do we do with it? Do we have to agree with it? Do we have to accept it and just shrug our shoulders? Or shouldn’t we teach our child that exploitation is wrong and that we’re not always powerless about it? My daughter knows how “animal based” sausages are made and what the main ingredient in Haribo gummy bears is. But I am also trying to teach her that it doesn’t have to be like this. That we can change things by doing them just a little bit differently. That you can, for example, eat a sausage or a handful of gummy bears without having to accept that it is “normal” to base those foods on dead animals. And still we are not doing everything right. We are not living a perfect vegan life here. We buy stuff and that stuff is way too often based on exploitation. F is not always able to change things because we make other decisions for her. We agreed to raise F vegetarian and not vegan. We’re taking part in animal exploitation. Right now she’s just accepting things as they are. She’s still so small that she’ll base her decisions on what we tell her. She doesn’t eat meat and isn’t tempted to try it. But she does eat dairy although she knows where it comes from. Her father eats these foods too, so of course it’s okay for her. Although she also knows what I think about cow’s milk or cheese. Some people say this is an easy decision. If you want the best for your family, they should all go vegan. Maybe some would even soay I am not a “real” vegan because we have dairy in our house. I don’t think it is so easy though. For this family parenting and living together with others in a household is based on compromises.When I met my partner ages ago I was a vegetarian. He was a meat eater. I accepted his way of life, he accepted mine. When I went vegan years later, P did not judge me, he supported me the best way he could. When I got pregnant it suddenly felt difficult to have all these different lifestyles under one roof. We talked about how to raise our child, and what kind of food to cook. P knew I would not be able or willing to cook meat. So we settled on compromises. P went vegetarian. His compromise. My compromise: raising the child vegetarian, not vegan. At least not in the long run. At least not, if it wasn’t really doable. In the short run our daughter spent her first year as a vegan. It was really easy, she was with us all day, we cooked for her and there were no animal products in her life. But I knew this would change soon.  I am not a stay at home mother, I never wanted to be one. We don’t live in a very vegan friendly environment, at least not when it comes to childcare. Childcare is the main reason why F is not a vegan. Excuses, excuses, you say. Maybe. Being vegan all by myself is easy. But having a family, a job, and other things to do or to decide together often makes these things difficult. We always agreed on sending F to childcare once she would turn one. At that time it was really hard to find something, so there wasn’t much room for being picky. Our applications for a public daycare space was tuned down, so we looked at childminders. Most of them would serve meat almost every day and I felt very queasy about it. I knew I’d have to bring up the food subject. I was sure I would not be able to tolerate having my child eat meat. But I was willing to make some compromises, the compromises we had agree on before.  The person who finally became our childminder served meat only once a week.  She instantly suggested to make vegetarian food for F on that day. That was more than I had hoped for and I felt grateful. The childminder cooked her own food and fed the kids three times a day. I didn’t want to ask about vegan food and I didn’t. I thought I had already been lucky. And that is how our daughter became a vegetarian. Two years later we applied for a public kindergarten spot. We didn’t get a spot at the daycare we wanted, but we got a spot. I was feeling queasy again. We asked about the food and it tuned out they had a caterer who served meat once per week. The teachers told us to talk to the caterer, maybe they could provide an alternative? They had alternatives for allergy kids and muslims, too. But apparently being vegetarian doesn’t entitle you for an alternative meal. When they refused to provide for our  daughter, the kindergarten staff had no objections to homecooked alternatives. And I was willing to provide them. Once a week, I could do that. F is now the only vegetarian kid in a daycare with about 160 to 180 children. I admit that I would feel overwhelmed if I had to  provide all of her daycare meals. It’s a relief that she gets fed at daycare. The caterer, although stubborn, is a relief, too. I’ve seen other kindergarten menus, with lots of meat. I know we can always do so much better, it’s not perfect, sure. But it’s a start. And F, unlike many of her friends, knows where her food comes from and what’s it made of. I am trying to explain where eggs and milk come from and why I decided not to eat them, too. For now I am trying to make it about personal decisions although I don’t see veganism that way. If we were a family of vegans I probably could (or would) draw clear borders. Make it about them vs. us. But since we’re not I cannot make it that easy. And maybe that is a good thing, because things are never that easy. Well, you are probably still waiting for that recipe! This is another one F and I made together. It’s currywurst, a popular German fast food and maybe you have heard of it. I’ve made it before, you can find my basic recipe of the blog. It’s a fried sausage (bratwurst) smothered in a sauce that is made from ketchup, spices, and curry powder. For this new version I increased the amount of spices, starting with the sausage itself. And I made the sauce a little bit more interesting by using mango puree. (You can find that at Asian grocery stores.) The sausages can be made spicy or mild, depending on your preferences. For a milder version simply use mild smoked paprika powder instead of the chipotle plus a mild curry powder. If you feel that these don’t have enough spice, use one tablespoon of chipotle and reduce the amount of paprika powder to one teaspoon. Also use hot curry powder and double the amount. Note: This recipe calls for mushroom powder. I got the idea to use dried mushrooms from Vegan Yack Attack’s awesome currywurst recipe. The idea to pulverise them is courtesy of Celine Steen who uses mushroom powder in her latest cookbooks. Print Spicy Curry Sausages with Mango Curry Sauce IngredientsFor the currywurst 144 g (1 cup) gluten powder (vital wheat gluten) 16 g (4 tablespoons) nutritional yeast 1 tablespoon mushroom powder* 1 tablespoon Hungarian paprika 1 teaspoon garam masala 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon granulated onion 1 teaspoon chipotle powder 1 teaspoon hot or mild curry powder 1/­­4 teaspoon turmeric 300 ml (1 1/­­4 cups) water 2 tablespoons oil 2 tablespoons tomato paste For the mango curry sauce 80 ml (1/­­3 cup) ketchup 160 ml (2/­­3 cup) mango puree 2 tablespoons soy sauce 1 tablespoon hot sauce 2 teaspoons curry powder, hot or mild 1 teaspoon avage nectar 1 teaspoon white wine vinegar (or apple cider vinegar) oil for frying InstructionsCombine all dry ingredients in a large bowl. Whisk together water, oil, and tomato paste and add to dry mix. Knead well until everything is combined. Have four pieces of parchment paper and for pieces of aluminium foil ready. (About 38 x 21 cm or 15 x 8.3 inch) Divide the batter into four pieces and roll each piece into a 15 cm ( 6 inch) long log. Wrap in parchment and twist the edges, then wrap in foil. Place a steamer basket in a large pot and add water. Bring to a boil and add sausages. Reduce the heat so that the water is simmering and steam the sausges for 50 minutes. Remove and let cool in their packaging. Let the sausages sit in the fridge over night to improve flavour and texture. When ready to serve, whisk together the ingredients for the sauce. Heat a tablespoon of oil in a large pan and cut the sausages into small pieces. Fry for 2-3 minutes on each side, or until crispy. Serve with sauce and fries. Notes*For the mushroom powder simply place one ounce of dried porcini mushrooms in a coffee grinder and pulverise. Store leftovers in a glass jar and use in soups and sauces. 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­04/­­spicy-currywurst-with-mango-curry-sauce/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com Spicy Currywurst with Mango Curry Sauce is a post from: seitan is my motor

6 Reasons to Pack a Meatless Monday School Lunch

September 7 2015 Meatless Monday 

6 Reasons to Pack a Meatless Monday School LunchWith kids heading back to school, parents and teachers agree that a nutritious lunch is key to helping students succeed. While more and more schools are offering Meatless Monday dishes in the cafeteria, bringing lunch from home is another tasty option! There are many benefits to packing a creative, healthy lunch for students of all ages. Here are just a few reasons why packing a Meatless Monday lunch is an excellent choice for the student in your life! Nutrient-dense, plant-based foods are often thought of as side dishes or snacks. Make these foods the main event and youll have a lunch packed with all the things growing minds and bodies need (even protein!). Solve the picky-eater problem by creating new meals that will help them explore new foods. Have a kid that can’t get enough take-out? Pack them up a helping of tempeh fried brown rice. Have a student hooked on French fries? Whip up some sweet potato fries for a new twist. Encourage kids to connect with the planet by eating foods that are in season where you live. Talk to students about how plants grow, and why some fruits and vegetables in their lunches are only ripe at certain times of the year. Introduce students to cultural foods from family tradition or from other parts of the world. Part of the fun of Meatless Monday is finding delicious new-to-you recipes. Food can help kids learn about geography and social studies when they try new dishes! Turn a favorite snack into a meal that kids from kindergarten to high school will enjoy. Bananas quickly become peanut butter and banana sandwiches, while carrot sticks are transformed into tasty carrot slaw. Get kids excited about making meals by including them in planning and making their school lunches. Choose favorite fruits and veggies or experiment with new ones in the store, and encourage kids to help prepare meals with you in the kitchen. Send kids back to school with the best possible supplies: healthy meals to get them through the day. Nutritious food is key to helping students succeed - food that is rich in the vitamins, minerals, protein and fiber that kids need help them focus in class, get active on the playground, and grow and develop into healthy young adults. The post 6 Reasons to Pack a Meatless Monday School Lunch appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Banana Bread Pudding

April 25 2015 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

Banana Bread Pudding My “little girl” turned 18 last week. I feel like I should have something profound to say on this momentous occasion, but everything that comes to mind is so trite: “Time flies.” “They grow up so fast.” “It seems like only yesterday that she started kindergarten.” There’s a reason those expressions are so overused: The feelings of amazement, pride, and nostalgia you feel at seeing your child become an adult are both universal and indescribable. “Where does the time go?” (...) Read the rest of Banana Bread Pudding (722 words) (C) svoisin for FatFree Vegan Kitchen, 2015. | Permalink | No comment | Add to del.icio.us Post tags: Louisiana, Southern cooking, Soy-free

White Chocolate Lemon Tartelettes

March 12 2015 seitan is my motor 

White Chocolate Lemon TartelettesI made a resolution to post at least twice a week, but this resolution was crushed instantly when F woke up with a temperature of 40°C (104°F) a while ago. And then some random virus infection knocked her out for two weeks. At first she was fine. She’s always been one of those kids who don’t mind fever. She did enjoy being at home and we spent a lot of our time together cooking. But then one day I asked her if she wanted pancakes and if she’d like to prepare them. She didn’t. Instead her energy levels dropped and she needed a lot of rest. She spent over a week sleeping a lot and all she was eating were three spoonfuls of yoghurt per day. It’s interesting how different we react to illness. When I get sick I try to ignore it, grab a pain killer and some tissues and do business as usual. I want to function alright. Sometimes it works, but a sinus infection or the flu will force me to bed just like anybody else. F intuitively did the right thing. She slept a lot and refused to eat. That last part drove me crazy because she’s usually a pretty decent eater. She got checked up at the doctor’s office a couple of times and the virus was accompanied by a bronchitis. I am not very good at being patient and I was dreaming of a shot or some super pill that would make my kid act normal again. I hated sitting at home and I wanted to go back to our regular schedule. Of course a couple of days later my vegan superpowers (just kidding) left me and I got the same bug. At least we were sharing our misery now. I think I learned a lot during these two weeks. Not for the first time I had another lesson in parents don’t know best. Since a fever usually never lasts longer than 3-5 days with F I was pretty sure that she had to be seriously ill. I rolled my eyes when the doctor told my husband that all we could do was wait. They see these infections every day and even a hacking pertussis imitation cough won’t make them blink.  I couldn’t stand F refusing to eat day in day out. I didn’t really trust her body. But my child is tough and she knows what is best for her. Eventually the fever went away and she was feeling better. I realised this when I opened a cookbook at the table and she pointed out some brownies. She told me we had to make them. The next day we sent her back to kindergarten where she ate two servings of pasta for lunch. And when she came home, she ate two large squares of the brownies I had made for her. She was back to her old self. A while ago we also made some white chocolate and lemon tartelettes together. Yes, the ones I told you about. But while we were stuck in our flat trying to beat that bug, you probably ate all of that chocolate spread I told you not to eat. Well, that’s okay. I don’t blame you. Because while we made these tartelettes we had a similar problem.  F asked me about a hundred times: “Can I eat some now?” Because we have a lot on common: We are very impatient and we like to eat dessert.   Print White Chocolate Lemon Tartelettes For these vegan white chocolate and lemon tartelettes you wont need an oven. All you need is a little patience to let them set in the fridge. IngredientsFor the crust 200 g (7 oz) craham crackers or shortbread cookies 2 tablespoons oil For the filling 6 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 4 tablespoons water 6 tablespoons oat cream or coconut milk, divided 6 tablespoons sugar 1/­­2 teaspoon agar agar powder 2 teaspoons cornstarch For the topping 225 g (8 oz) white chocolate spread InstructionsHave 6 ramekins ready, about 9 cm in diameter. To make the crust, combine crackers or cookies and oil in a food processor. Process until coarsely cround. Divide between the ramekins and press firmly into the bottom. To make the filling, combine lemon juice, water, 4 tablespoons of oat cream and agar agar in a small saucepan. Combine the remaining 2 tablespoons of cream with the cornstarch and stir until dissolved. Bring the lemon mixture to a boil and cook for 1 minute. Add starch mixture and cook for another minute. Pour into the ramekins. To make the topping, place the spread in a small heat resistant bowl and melt over a water bath. Pour over the filling and place the ramekins in the fridge, until the tartelettes have set. Remove from fridge about 1 hour before serving. 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­03/­­white-chocolate-lemon-tartelettes/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com White Chocolate Lemon Tartelettes is a post from: seitan is my motor


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