Allergie - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Vegan Tofu Eggs in Purgatory

Easy Weeknight Instant Pot Meals

Satisfying Plant-Based Protein Swaps

Sausage Oatmeal Pancakes










Allergie vegetarian recipes

Burn the Best: Beeswax Candles

March 5 2021 My New Roots 

Burn the Best: Beeswax Candles I was at a health food store with a friend the other day, cruising the aisles when he asked: Hey Sarah, why do beeswax candles cost so much more than regular candles? Well, I had to admit that he had me stumped there. I had heard that beeswax candles were better to burn than their paraffin counterparts, but I didnt know why exactly. Oohhh so exciting – I couldnt wait to get to the bottom of this one! With a little research I found some truly shocking information that was certainly blog-worthy… Before I explain why beeswax candles are so superior, first let me give you the low-down on the downsides of the alternatives. Paraffin origins Most candles we buy are made from paraffin wax. Paraffin is a petroleum by-product, left over after producing many of the other common petroleum products such as gas, oils, pavement, etc. This material is then bleached with 100% strength bleach creating toxic dioxins, before being refined into solid paraffin using various carcinogenic, solidifying chemicals. Candle companies purchase paraffin wax and then add various other texturizing chemicals, artificial dyes for colour, and synthetic fragrances. When synthetic fragrances are burned, they produce toxic fluoro-carbons and other polluting by-products. Inhaling these fluoro-carbons damages the receptors in our nasal passages that detect scent, and over an extending period of time diminishes the overall abilities of your olfactory senses by wearing them out. This is one of the reasons many people seem to require increasingly stronger-smelling candles (or synthetic air fresheners), etc., to experience any enjoyable aromas at all! Last, but certainly not least, is the indirect cost of burning a fuel like paraffin in your home, which emits black soot that coats your walls, household furnishings and curtains, and least desirably, your lungs and skin. It is a proven fact that paraffin, with its associated synthetic scents and other additives, causes headaches, allergic reactions and difficulties with sinuses and lungs. Anyone with respiratory problems should not burn paraffin candles, nor should those that want to prevent said problems. I hope this sheds some light (ha!) on the perils of paraffin to your health, home and environment. Now let me introduce you to beeswax and the incredible properties it has to offer. Beloved Beeswax Burning beeswax candles is better for you and the environment for so many reasons. First, burning beeswax produces negative ions, which benefit us and the air we breathe by attracting pollutants, in much the same way that a magnet attracts iron fillings. Negative ions attach to positively charged ions that hold onto dust, dander, molds and other air borne contaminants. Once attached, the positive ions are weighed down and this drops both the ions and the contaminants to the ground to be swept up or vacuumed away. Bottom line: burning beeswax will actually clean your air. Beeswax candles are the best choice for the environment since the material used is 100% renewable, and in its native, raw state does not require bleaching or hydrogenation. The production of paraffin (a non-renewable resource), and even soy and palm waxes, involves chemical intervention to modify the raw material into a wax form and then into a candle. This means that beeswax is a better choice for the environment, since its processing is minimal, does not require chemicals, and the end product is completely biodegradable. You can burn beeswax in an unventilated room without fear of pollution. In fact, many people report that burning a candle in the bedroom for 30 minutes or so before falling asleep produces a more restful sleep. Beeswax is hypo-allergenic, benefits those with environmental allergies, sensitivities, and even asthma. To keep your air as clean as possible, just remember to trim your wicks before each use, and extinguish the candle by submerging the wick in its own wax pool instead of blowing it out, as both these measures prevent smoke. Lastly, the quality of the golden light given off by beeswax candles is unsurpassed by its paraffin counterparts. Because of the high melting point of the wax, beeswax burns stronger and brighter than paraffin, in addition to emitting the same spectrum of light as the sun — how amazing is that! The Overall Cost So to answer my friends question: while the initial cost may seem higher than paraffin candles, beeswax burns for much longer – two to five times the burn time of other candles. Beeswax has a much higher melting point than paraffin – in fact, the highest melting point of any wax, so it burns far more slowly. Costing only pennies an hour to burn, beeswax is much more economical than paraffin over time. You can purchase beeswax candles at farmers markets, health food stores and of course online. The candles in this post are from The Beeswax Co., an American company committed to tradition and quality, they ship internationally, and I highly recommend them. Wherever you choose to purchase your candles, beware of imitations! Look for 100% pure cappings beeswax, which is the wax that comes from the seal around each cell in the honeycomb. Some companies will cut their beeswax with paraffin, palm or soy waxes and still call them beeswax candles, so read the labels. Also, make sure the wick is made of a natural fiber (like cotton or hemp) and that it doesnt contain a metal wire (which can sometimes contain lead), and that there arent any artificial scents or chemical colours added. Pure beeswax should smell like honey, and have a natural, golden hue. Burn, baby. Burn! The post Burn the Best: Beeswax Candles appeared first on My New Roots.

12 Road Trip-Worthy Snacks

September 25 2020 Vegetarian Times 

If the walls of your home feel like theyre closing in, youre not alone. Two-thirds of Americans (67%) say that staying home due to the COVID-19 pandemic has made them want to take a vacation, according to a survey conducted by Harris Poll on behalf of Shell.  But with so many travel restrictions and concerns about health safety while flying, its no wonder that many people trying to scratch their travel itch are turning to good, old fashioned road trips -- 36% of Americans say that they are more likely to take a road trip now than they were prior to the COVID-19 pandemic and 61% of Americans are now more interested in taking a local road trip to explore areas close to home.  Before you hit the open road, theres plenty to do: packing, creating a playlist that captures the vibe of your destination, planning your itinerary and, of course, stocking up on car-friendly snacks. While vacation may seem like the perfect excuse to indulge in junk food, those snacks could leave you feeling lethargic and bloated during a time when youd much rather feel energetic and carefree.  Thankfully, theres no shortage of vegan-friendly snacks that are mess-free, nutritious, and tasty. Weve rounded up some of our favorites: Quinn Grain-Free Pretzel Chips Nothing beats the crunch of a pretzel -- and everyone living a gluten-free lifestyle knows that grain-free pretzel replacements typically leave a lot to be desired. Not the case with Quinn Grain-Free Pretzel Chips; youd never know it was grain-free thanks to its near-identical texture (they are made from cassava flour, a gluten-free root vegetable) and spot-on flavoring (shout out to the Cracked Black Pepper variety!). Theyre non-GMO, gluten-free, vegan, dairy-free, and the shape makes them perfect for dipping into your favorite condiment (but maybe not in the car, okay?). Shop now Pans Mushroom Jerky Beef jerky is a classic road-trip snack -- but who needs the beef? Pans mushroom jerky is made from shitake mushrooms, which is one of the meatiest mushrooms. Plus, mushrooms impart that beloved umami flavor everyone craves. These fiber-filled snacks are rich in vitamin D, vegan, gluten-free and theres flavor for any mood youre in: Zesty Thai, Applewood BBQ, Salty & Pepper and Original.  Shop now SkinnyDipped Nuts When you cant decide if you want salty or sweet or chocolate, reach for a bag of SkinnyDipped Super Dark + Sea Salt almonds -- these almonds are dipped with extra dark 73% artisan cacao, and sprinkled with a hint of sea salt. A serving size of these vegan goodies offers 5 grams of plant protein and less sugar than an apple. The whole line is vegetarian, including the SkinnyDipped Cashews in Dark Chocolate Cocoa and Dark Chocolate Salted Caramel. Shop now Undressed Salad Bar Salads arent exactly considered a portable snack, which is why Anne Klassman founded Undressed to throw in her purse or glove compartment -- its a salad in a bar form, with 5-7 grams of protein from its toasted almond base and a full serving of vegetables. Choose from Chipotle Cranberry, Cilantro Lime, Honey Mustard and Sesame Ginger depending on your craving. Theres no sugar added, and these vegan bars are gluten-free, too. Shop now Omnom SuperChocoBerryBarleyNibblyNuttylicious Nope, that wasnt a typo -- when something is this tasty, it deserves a name that stands out from the crowd! Picture a delicious, nutritious dark chocolate bar made from organic Tanzanian cocoa beans thats sprinkled with cranberries, salted almonds, puffed Icelandic barley and cacao nibs. And voila, you have a SuperChocoBerryBarleyNibblyNuttylicious bar. Hot tip: Theres no need to relegate Omnoms superfood creation to your car -- its also a great way to boost your energy on a hike. Shop now Natures Garden Omega-3 Deluxe Mix No road trip is complete without a healthy dose of trail mix, but traditional peanuts and granola dont hold a candle to Natures Gardens Omega-3 Deluxe Mix. This blend of ingredients was thoughtfully chosen for its nutritional qualities: almonds for vitamin E, pecans for fiber, walnuts for omega-3 fatty acids, cranberries for adding more fruit to your day, pistachios for protein and vitamin B6, and pepitas for magnesium and iron. Bonus: The bag is resealable, so you wont have any messy spills in the car. Shop now LesserEvil Veggie Sticks A salad you can eat with your fingers? Its not rude, its LesserEvils new Grain Free Veggie Snacks! The two flavors -- Himalayan Pink Salt and Vegan Ranch -- offer up grain-free goodness made with organic olive oil. Organic veggies are the first ingredient (a blend of vegetable flours and powders), and they are certified USDA organic, vegan, paleo, non-GMO, grain-free, gluten-free and kosher to boot. Pro tip: Your kids will love them and have no idea they are ingesting an extra helping of veggies. Shop now Seven Sundays Muesli While road trips may evoke fond memories of your childhood, the sugar-laden and gluten-packed muesli of your formative years are best left behind. Instead, choose Seven Sundays Muesli, which is chockfull of nutrient-dense superfoods. The Rise & Shine Strawberry Banana Nut Mix -- a cereal/­­trail mix hybrid, so feel free to add almond or oat milk as desired -- has only 5 net carbs, and is grain-free, gluten-free, and keto-friendly. Plus, you can easily pronounce every ingredient: Almonds, coconut, sunflower seeds, dates, Bing cherries, pecans, chia seeds, sesame seeds, bananas, flax seeds, pumpkin seeds, strawberries, cinnamon, and pure vanilla extract.  Shop now Biena Chickpea Snacks Chickpeas to go? Yes please! Bienas Chickpea Snacks are light, crispy roasted chickpeas that boast 5-6 grams of plant protein and fiber. The vegan varieties include Barbecue, Habanero, Ranch and Sea Salt -- and they are non-GMO, grain-free, gluten-free, and nut-free. They are perfect to pop in your mouth on the road, and back home they work well as salad and soup toppers. Shop now CaPao Smoothie Balls Missing your morning smoothie while on the road? CaPao Smoothie Balls may help keep your routine intact. These plant-based snacks are made from zesty cacao fruit pulp, nuts and seeds. Choose from Apricot, Plant Protein and Golden Berries, Golden Berries, Apricot and Chia Seeds, and Mango, Cashew and Coconut. Cacao is the same magical plant that gives us chocolate -- but 75% of the cacaofruit is underutilized or simply thrown away after the cocoa beans are extracted for making chocolate, leaving behind husk, pulp and cocoa butter. So, CaPao uses the wasted nutrition found in the pulp and husk in its products, as these components contain magnesium, iron, zinc, potassium, fiber and many essential B vitamins. Shop now ZENB Veggie Bites Veggies are one of the healthiest snacks, but who has time to peel and prep a bunch of produce before a road trip? When youre away from home, rely on ZENBs Veggie Bites. They offer a full cup of vegetables in each pouch and use the whole vegetable -- stems, skin, seeds and all -- so you get extra nutrition, like fiber. The vegan, non-GMO, organic and gluten-free bites come in a resealable package with five flavors: Edamame, Red Bell Pepper, Summer Beets, Sweet Potato and Sweet Corn. Shop now The Goods Mart Vegan Snack Box Dont have time to shop for individual snacks? Want to try something new? Let The Goods Mart -- a socially conscious convenience store in Soho, NYC -- curate and ship a vegan snack box especially for you. Simply choose the size of your box, let them know whether youre craving salty, sweet or savory, and alert them to any allergies. All the snacks are non-GMO, contain no artificial colors or flavors, and are sure to satisfy any craving that pops up during your travels. Shop now The post 12 Road Trip-Worthy Snacks appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Sundried Tomato Mac & Cheeze

April 19 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Sundried Tomato Mac & Cheeze Serves 6 to 8-ish Lets just cut to the chase. Or just cut to the cheeze, har har. There are a lot of vegan macs out there, but this might just take the noodle. Its nut-free and thats cool in case you have allergies but also I am in love with it. It just might replace my cashew based staple mac sauce. Yes, I am covering my cashew’s ears as I say that. You will never guess the ingredients (except the one in the title) so Im just going to tell you. Coconut milk, sundried tomatoes (in oil), miso, nooch and onion powder. And that is it. And it is good. Real good. Just feed it to someone who doesnt know and see what they think is in it! The coconut flavor magically transforms into something completely creamy and savory when blended with these intensely umami flavors. Its great for a pound of pasta, but I can also see it being used as a queso base or wherever your cheezy desires take you. Recipes Notes ~I don’t know how this will come out with sundried tomatoes that aren’t in oil. My guess is not very good. It needs the oil. So do what you must but don’t come for me if you end up eating wallpaper paste. ~I used Thai Kitchen coconut milk (full fat) and I would recommend that brand! It does have a little guar gum in it according to the label and that might have aided in the thickening, but let me know if you use a different brand. Make sure it’s unsweeteened! ~I used red miso (Miso Master) which has soy and I loved it. However I think chickpea miso would be just awesome, too! Ingredients 1 15 oz can coconut milk 3/­­4 cup sundried tomatoes in oil (it was about 1/­­4 cup of oil, if that helps) 2 tablespoons miso 1/­­2 cup nutritional yeast flakes 2 teaspoons onion powder 1 lb macaroni Black pepper and something green to garnish, if ya want. Directions Put everything in a blender and, uh, blend. Until totally smooth. Cook noodles in salted water, drain them and return the pot. While still hot, add the sauce and mix with a rubber spatula. Taste for salt, I didnt need any because miso and sundrieds were salty. Serve!

kashaya recipe | kashayam powder recipe | shunti jirige kashaya

March 30 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

kashaya recipe | kashayam powder recipe | shunti jirige kashayakashaya recipe | kashayam recipe | kashayam powder | shunti jirige kashaya with step by step photo and video recipe. indian cuisine has a strong influence from ayurveda and can be easily seen in day to day recipes. most of these heavily revolve around the myriad spices which in used with specific combination helps to recover from common allergies and deceases. one such simple and refreshing warm drink is kashaya recipe known for its strong spice flavour. The post kashaya recipe | kashayam powder recipe | shunti jirige kashaya appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya

December 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya Satsuki Shibuya is an artist and spiritual thinker based in L.A. We are in awe of Satsuki’s intuitive watercolors, her constant willingness to go deeper, and her incredibly thoughtful approach to work and life as a whole. In this interview, Satsuki tells us about her morning, bedtime, and exercise routines, as well as love as a form of self-acceptance, what it’s like to see the energy of others, her unique approach to her life schedule, her mother’s universally wise beauty advice, the lifestyle change that helped clear up her skin, nourishment, stress, and so much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I find myself being right in-between, but veer on the side of things being more open and free within a loose schedule. It is dictated not so much by a 9-5 setting, but more dependent on what my body is communicating for the day. I’ve found that the more I am able to flow naturally, without resistance, better work is produced. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. My mornings are usually the same -- wake up sometime between 7 and 7:30am, wash up, meditate/­­journal/­­read for about an hour or some light gardening. Around 8:30am, start preparing breakfast for the household and eat while catching up on some articles online. By 10am, I am warming up to start the work day. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Not a bedtime ritual, per se, but I do find my biological clock the happiest when I am in bed by midnight. Any later and I will wake up feeling groggy. Unfortunately, some of the best messages come through from the Universe around this time and find myself writing clear into the witching hour. -- We read that you have a unique approach to your work schedule. Can you tell us about it and why it works for you? Sure. It’s not so much as my work schedule, but life schedule as a whole. As I am quite sensitive to energies, especially from people, as much as I love being with others, I also need a lot of down time to recharge, otherwise, burn out. The best balance I’ve found thus far is to have a point system where each time I am interacting with another, depending on the intensity, receives a particular number of points. For example, going to a doctor’s appointment would be 1/­­2 a point since there is not much interaction, overloading of the sensory system, and is one-on-one contact, which doesn’t require too much processing of different energies. On the other hand, if I am scheduled to do a talk or to meet people at a large gathering, it would be 2-3 points. The points correlate with how many days it might take me to recover and recharge. 1/­­2 point would be half a day of recharging afterwards whereas 2-3 points would be two to three days of recharging necessary after the event. Then, I go week by week and figure out how many points are available for social interactions. If a week is only 3 points maximum, then that might mean 1 meeting and 1 doctor’s appointment (1/­­2 point + 2.5 points) and the rest would be downtime, meaning minimal outside interaction. Depending on where my entire being is (body, mind, soul), the weekly points, or I usually go monthly, will fluctuate. If I am getting over a cold, there may only be so many points available to a week, but if balanced, there may be more available. When I first started this system, it was more rigid, but now, relaxed as it has become second nature. This helps not only to keep a balance, but also to set boundaries in order to create space in my heart. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Something light, centered upon veggies and fruits with some grains. I usually opt for some gluten free toast, an avocado with hummus, and either dried or freshly cut fruit or miso soup with rice. Light and simple. Lunch – The heaviest meal of the day and usually containing either a plant-based or animal-based protein. It can be anything from a rice bowl to a large salad, but usually a variety of ingredients. Snack – I have a soft spot for chips or crunchy nibbles so like to have something around 3:30pm and/­­or a piece of fruit. Dinner – A medium sized meal, usually Japanese-based, but other times adventure elsewhere. Mostly veggies and some protein, usually not much carbs as it tends to make the digestive system a bit sluggish before going to sleep. Some tea afterwards while doing dishes is always a treat. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I am not able to partake in caffeine as it makes my heart pitter-patter like no other, but do love the smell of coffee or English Breakfast tea.  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to have a horrible sweet tooth where if I did not have at least one thing sweet each day around tea time, whether cake or a sweet bean bun, I would be the crabbiest crab of the land! I’ve since stopped eating sugar (going on 4 years now) due to health reasons and thankful for the difference in my health -- it is night and day! -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I see a Naturopathic Doctor regularly and through her, work with supplements, herbs, and tinctures/­­tonics, which do truly help to keep my body in balance. Otherwise, on my own, I find meditation, working with crystals, burning incense specifically from Ry?an-ji temple in Kyoto, and spraying Aura Cleanser from Botanical Alchemy works wonders for my overall well being and energy. I do know this formula may be different for each individual due to our aura body make-up, but currently, this program seems to work best. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I wouldn’t say I’m a gym bunny, but do love the feeling of working with the body/­­mind simultaneously and yoga seems to fit the bill quite nicely. Still a long ways to go, but hoping to be able to integrate yoga into my morning preparations for the day. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I wish I could say I love to exercise, but in truth, it does take a lot of willpower to get myself to do physical activities. I’ve never been very competitive in nature and therefore sports did not appeal as a possible opportunity for exercise, but since meeting yoga, feel I’ve finally found something that speaks to my spirit. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I believe the internal comes through to the external in all aspects -- if our organs are taken care of, our skin clears, if our emotions are balanced, our smiles appear, and when our soul is nourished, our being glistens. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Simple seems to be the way my entire being prefers things, including skincare for face and body. I’ve been a huge advocate for natural skincare and use one that consists of face wash, toner, moisturizer, Balancing Oil for night time and eye cream. Sometimes spot cream for blemishes and face scrub/­­face pack a few times a week. For body, I use a 5-ingredient, shea butter bar soap. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? No sugar. This alone has cleared up my blemish-prone skin considerably. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Nothing much, except for beauty advice my mother has shared since I was young, “Invest in your skin, trim your hair often, and moisturize your elbows.” I continue to follow her advice. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? I try my best to keep a balance in my schedule, not overload it with activities and make time to tune into my higher self. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? To close my eyes and tune into my breath. Speak slower. Concentrate on one happening at a time. To hide away in the bathroom for a few minutes and catch my breath. Check-in internally and focus on my root chakra. Ground my energies into Mother Earth. Also, to understand that nothing is permanent and the stressful situation, too, shall pass. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Eat shiitake mushrooms, drink a hot tea of lemon with manuka honey, down some bio-available vitamin C, up the liquids including broths, and consciously raise my energy. Also, lots of sleep. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Work/­­life balance is key to my well-being. I continue to let go of rules that I have placed upon myself in order to feel complete in the world and instead, tune into what makes me feel whole. Saying yes to what resonates and no to the things that do not fulfill my spirit. My approach is to tune into my intuition and let it be the guide towards where I need to go next. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself. The simple answer to this is love. Not so much the cliché love we think of, but of accepting oneself for where we are currently and not force ourselves to be someone we are not. With acceptance, comes letting go and by letting go, we are able to fill in our space with a being entirely made up of our true selves. When this can be done, we are able to share love with ourselves and in turn, share love with others. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? To not worry about success in terms of monetary gain, but of spiritual awareness. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Allowing the lack of inspiration and procrastination to take me where I may go. Not to try and stop it, but to experience it fully and understand where it is originating. I don’t necessarily think it is a bad thing -- sometimes we need rest to appreciate our next step. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a painter? After being on hiatus for a year and a half due to an unexplainable illness, I received a message to paint. After reconnecting back to my childhood self, of sensing and seeing beyond the physical realm, leaning into this part of my being opened up new ways of communicating beyond and through this, the message came through. -- Intuition plays a key role in your watercolor work. Why do you find it to be crucial to your approach? The medium has shown the necessity of letting go, trusting the process and understanding that there is more than what we can see in the physical realm. By approaching my work intuitively, it becomes almost meditative, channeling energies beyond and appearing as is, without any manipulation. -- Can you tell us a bit about the energy readings that you do? When did you discover that you have the ability to feel an individual’s soul energy and aura? It was by accident. I’ve always been able to read others’ energies and since young, would do so to the detriment of my own health. I found myself at the doctor’s office, when often, every other week, to which many times, no illness could be found. During my year and a half of being ill, I began to understand what I was sensing since young and honing in, began to receive messages in code. After deciphering many of these messages in my journal, I decided to share my internal self with my mother, who was in the dark about this internal world, to which she was extremely shocked. It took her a good week, after speaking with many of her friends who have known me since I was born, to figure out that she was actually the only one  not recognizing this ‘other self’. After coming full circle with my mother, during a gathering consisting of elder buddhist practitioners, which I attend with my mother from time to time, I shared my spiritual insights with the group. A woman sitting next to me whom I met for the first time that day, asked if I could read her energy. I’d never explicitly read another’s energy before and did not know what to expect, but agreed as I, too, was curious as to what would come forth. I saw images, colors, movie-like scenes, shapes, sensed emotions, all flashing, happening and shared, as if a translator, all I was seeing, experiencing simultaneously to her. After finishing, she looked at me and said, “How do you know all these things about me?” To which I said, “I don’t know. I just said what I saw.” Since then, I’ve done many energy readings and now have a better understanding of what happens during a session. I liken it to a translation of the other’s energy, subconscious, and higher self; sometimes beyond. What is important to note, though, is that all the things I see, sense, and share are things the individual already knows, whether consciously or subconsciously. I just bring it to the forefront and at times, help word it in a way so that the message can understood in the best possible way. -- Besides being a painter, you also write poetry, play music and make books. Do you feel that all these disciplines are interconnected for you, or do you treat them as separate entities? Yes, they are all interconnected, all coming from the same source, just expressed differently. I would say painting is the most direct form of expressing what I experience internally, without translation. The next being words -- a way of describing what I am experiencing. Music being another translation, although not as intuitive as painting or writing. Books are my passion and feel it is a way to leave energies in this world even after passing onto the other side. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love watching Japanese comedy shows and dramas, while eating chips. In an ideal world, though, instead of chips, I would be eating a fruit tart. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Untethered Soul by Michael A. Singer Song/­­Album – All Things Must Pass by Rourourourous Movie – Laputa by Studio Ghibli Piece of Art – Any of the older pieces created by Agnes Martin -- What are your favorite places to eat in LA? Rice in Manhattan Beach -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? For carry-on: - a comfortable eye mask - slippers and socks - pressure point bands - iphone for listening to music and audio books - bottled water purchased after passing through security For suitcase: - jeans - sneakers - flat shoes that are a bit more dressy, but still comfortable - small travel pillow as I have a sensitive neck - food stuffs for my dietary needs (I have a many food allergies) - book, journal, pencil case - tshirts, long shirts, under shirts, and extra underwear - a warm top - and anything that allows me to be comfortable while still feeling in line with my own style - slippers for usage in room - warm socks as my feet tend to get cold - pajamas - room wear - pyrex for heating up my own food - liquid dish soap for washing dishes/­­utensils - one set of semi-dress up clothes, in-case  -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Rei Kawakubo. Artwork by Satsuki Shibuya. Photos by Sisilia Piring and Women With Superpowers /­­ Tasya Van Ree + Nitsa Citrine. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Brew your own Kombucha!

July 20 2016 My New Roots 

Brew your own Kombucha! This post has literally been years in the making. After countless requests for a kombucha brewing method and recipe, I finally feel confident enough to write about such a HUGE topic. Considering the fact that there are entire books about this one subject, Ill start off by saying that I do not consider myself a kombucha-brewing expert. Although Ive brewed hundreds of liters of the stuff by now, I am still learning and just happy to share my processes and experiences with you so far. Everyone has a slightly different way of brewing and this is mine - it works perfectly for me and I hope for you too! Making kombucha, like any kitchen project seems pretty daunting until you actually do it. Once you take the first step and brew your own batch, you wont believe how simple and easy it is to make your own kombucha and be able to drink it every day of your life! Youll also wonder why you waited so long to start. With just a 20-minute time investment every 7-10 days youll have access to the most delicious, high-vibe kombucha youve ever tasted at a faction of the cost of buying from the store. Plus, if you make it yourself, it will be 100% raw and full of those precious, digestion-supporting enzymes that our diets are typically lacking, whereas commercial kombucha has often been pasteurized – a process that destroys enzymes. You can ferment it to suit your taste, make it as fizzy as you desire, and even add flavourings. How rad is that? What is Kombucha? Although kombucha is experiencing a major surge in popularity, it has actually been around for thousands of years. It is essentially sweetened tea, fermented with the help of a SCOBY, transformed into a fizzy, effervescent drink. SCOBY is an acronym, which stands for Symbiotic Culture Of Bacteria and Yeast. Its an odd-looking thing - often compared to an organ, a slippery mushroom, or a rubbery pancake - but its the essential ingredient in making the miracle beverage that is kombucha. Its flavours can range from pleasantly vinegar-y to champagne-like, with sweetness varying according to the original brew and second fermentations. Where can I get a SCOBY? Since the SCOBY duplicates every time you make kombucha, there are plenty out there in the world for free! I recommend asking at your local health food store - in my experience it seems like the place to either purchase one, or connect with someone who brews and enjoys spreading the kombucha gospel and giving their extra SCOBYs away. Alternatively, try your local Craigstlist to find a culture. You can even buy them online. Here is a worldwide source: www.kombu.de What about sugar? Yes, you need sugar to brew kombucha but that doesnt mean that youll be consuming it - its only food for the SCOBY! What starts off as very sweet tea completely transforms through the fermentation process, and that SCOBY turns all of that food into a delightful mixture of beneficial organic acids, B-vitamins, and enzymes. If its something you are concerned about, just let your kombucha ferment for the full 10 days, or longer. The longer the tea ferments the less sugar it contains. Usually by day 10 there isnt a trace left - but your tea will be rather acidic-tasting just so you know! There are a few types of sugar you can use for feeding the SCOBY, but cane sugar is the most recommended by seasoned brewers. I use the least processed form of cane sugar I can find - organic evaporated cane juice - but even the most sugar-avoiding, health-conscious people I know brew with refined white sugar. Remember: the sugar feeds the SCOBY, not you! What about caffeine? The caffeine range in kombucha is extremely broad, and is mostly dependent on the type of tea used to brew it. Black tea contains substantially more caffeine than green tea for instance, and since I am sensitive to caffeine, I always brew with green tea. In general, brewed kombucha will contain approximately 1/­­3 of the caffeine of the original tea. If black tea contains 30-80mg of caffeine per cup, the same sized up of kombucha would contain 10-25mg. Green tea kombucha may have just 2-3mg per cup. Whatever you do, do NOT use decaffeinated tea to brew kombucha. Instead, blend the black tea with green tea or simply use green tea alone. What about alcohol? Fermenting anything sweet with yeasts is going to produce booze, that is just nature! With kombucha youre looking at an average of 0.5 – 1% alcohol by volume. With home-brewing, there is always a risk of more alcohol forming since it is in an uncontrolled environment, so keep that in mind if that is a concern for you or someone you are serving it to. What are the health benefits of Kombucha? First, kombucha is a probiotic drink, so it is an excellent beverage for improving digestion, and supporting healthy bacteria in the gut. Its high enzyme content also promotes healthy digestion and nutrient assimilation. Lab tests show that kombucha has antiviral, antibacterial, and antifungal properties, and the ability to improve liver function and reduce oxidative stress in the body. Many people report success in relieving their symptoms of arthritis, allergies, chronic fatigue, hypertension, metabolic disorders, and digestive issues. What I think is very exciting and promising about kombucha however, are the acids formed during fermentation. These acids have incredible detoxifying and antioxidant capabilities. Glucuronic acid, for example, is the bodys most important detoxifier and made by the oxidation of glucose. Glucuronic acid binds to toxins in the liver and flushes them out through the kidneys. It also works in conjunction with gluconic acid, which binds with heavy metals and ushers them out of our systems. Acetic acid inhibits the action of harmful bacteria. Usnic acid protects against viruses through its antibiotic properties. Malic acid helps detoxify the liver. Butyric acid is produced by the beneficial yeasts in kombucha and protects cellular membranes and combines with gluconic acid to strengthen the walls of the gut to combat harmful yeasts such as candida albicans. Of all the healthy habits Ive adopted in my life, Id say that drinking kombucha has actually made a difference in how I feel. Every time I take a sip it feels like every cell of my body is screaming YAAAAAHHHHHSSSSSS! Really and truly. To me, it is life elixir, and a fabulous drink to add to your healthy lifestyle. But I will also say that kombucha is not a panacea. The hype around this beverage has reached astronomical heights and I believe its important to consume kombucha without the expectation that its going to change your life. What works for me, may work for you and it may not. At the end of the day, kombucha is purely delicious and I think its best to enjoy it for that reason alone. Can I drink too much kombucha? Kombucha, like anything, should be enjoyed responsibly. Just as you wouldnt eat a pound of chia seeds in a sitting, nor should you drown yourself in kombucha (although it would be a delicious way to go). If you have never had kombucha before, start out with about half a cup (125ml) and work your way up over the course of a few weeks or months. I probably drink around 1-2 cups a day (250 - 500ml) but my body is used to it and I too eased into this amount. Remember: food is medicine! You never know how your body will react, so its best to take things slow with such powerful potions. Second fermentation – flavouring your brew and making your kombucha fizzy Although kombucha straight after the first fermentation is delish, I love to flvour it and make it really fizzy through a second fermentation. This involves adding a sweet substance, like fresh fruit or juice (I use unfiltered apple juice), to the bottles of brewed kombucha and letting it sit, sealed at room temperature for another couple of days instead of refrigerating it right away. This extra dose of sugar will feed the kombucha further and produce gas, which builds up inside the sealed bottle. This step is optional, but will make your kombucha really special and sparkly! Its essential that you use flip-top bottles with good seals for this step, since you want the gas to build inside the bottles at this stage. But because the pressure can be quite strong, I always recommend burping your bottles once a day until they have reached the amount of fizz youre after. Simply flip the top on the bottles and you should hear the gas escaping, which is just enough to take the pressure off - there will still be plenty of sparkle in the kombucha. If you fail to burp your bottles, you may end up with an explosion on your hands! Needless to say this is quite dangerous, so set a timer for once  day if youre a forgetful person. Taking a break from fermenting There will come a time when youll have to pause your kombucha brewing cycle – perhaps if youre traveling for a period of time, or simply feel like stopping - in which case, you need to know how to take a break. Remove the SCOBY from the jar, separate the mother and the baby and put them into the same or separate glass jars (separate if youre giving one away) with enough brewed kombucha to cover it, and seal with a plastic lid (remember that kombucha can not come into contact with metal, so stay on the safe side and use plastic). Keep this in the fridge where the temperature will slow down fermentation, and it will keep for many months. When you want to brew your new batch, remove the SCOBY from the fridge and let it come to room temperature before adding it to the sweetened and cooled tea, along with kombucha from your last batch, the SCOBY and the liquid it was stored in. If you can time it properly, its a nice to be able to bottle your last batch right before you leave so that you can put your SCOBY away at the end of a cycle. I time it so that my second fermentation ends on my travel day so that I can store my bottles in the fridge while Im gone. If it doesnt exactly line up, you can do this by increasing the first or second fermentations by a few days. Remember that if you bottle early, it will be sweeter, and if you leave it longer it will be more acidic. Some people will leave their kombucha brewing for up to a month and that may suit you, but I personally wouldnt leave mine for more than 2 weeks. If you are flexible on the taste and dont mind these flavour variations, it will be a lot easier to time your break. Whatever you do, dont start a brew right before you leave for more than a couple weeks (unless you like very vinegar-y kombucha), and definitely dont leave your second fermentation bottles out at room temperature! Youll come home to an epic mess or worse.     Print recipe     Homebrewed Kombucha Makes 1 gallon /­­ 4 liters Equipment: something to brew tea in (very large teapot or stockpot) 1 five-quart /­­ five-liter glass jar 4 one-quart /­­ one-liter flip-top glass bottles tightly woven cloth (a clean tea towel, paper towel, or many layers of cheesecloth) rubber band wooden spoon Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 210g organic, evaporated cane juice or raw sugar (you can also use refined white sugar) 2 Tbsp. loose black or green tea OR 8 tea bags (I prefer green) 4 quarts /­­ liters water 2 cups /­­ 500ml kombucha tea (from your last batch or acquired) 1 SCOBY (from your last batch or acquired) Second fermentation (optional): 3 cups /­­ 750ml fruit juice of your choice OR 1 cup chopped fresh or dried fruit Optional flavourings: fresh or dried fruit fresh ginger /­­ ginger juice fresh or dried herbs and spices honey or maple syrup food-grade essential oils Method: 1. Brew the tea. Use unchlorinated /­­ unflouridated water. Bring to the boil and pour over the tea of your choice and let steep for 20-30 minutes (you want it to be very strong). If using a small tea pot, brew two pots and pour brewed tea into your kombucha container. 2. Sweeten the tea. Add the 1 cup /­­ 210g of sugar and still well to dissolve. 3. Cool the tea. This step is important since the SCOBY does not tolerate heat and has the potential to die if added to hot liquid. To speed up the cooling process, I brew 8 cups /­­ 2 liters of strong tea, then add 8 cups /­­ 2 liters of cold water. This way, it usually takes only an hour or two to reach room temperature. 4. Add 2 cups /­­ 500ml pre-made kombucha and the SCOBY. Add the pre-brewed kombucha, which raises the acidity level of the tea. This aids the fermentation process, but also protects the SCOBY from harmful bacteria during the initial fermentation phase. If it is your first time brewing kombucha, simply purchase 2 cups /­­ 500ml of kombucha to add to the cooled tea, along with whatever liquid your SCOBY came with. If you are bottling your own kombucha, simply add 2 cups /­­ 500ml from your last batch. Remove all of your jewelry and wash your hands thoroughly. Gently slip the SCOBY into the tea. 5. Cover. Use a piece of fabric that is tightly woven (a clean tea towel works well) or several layers of cheesecloth, secured with a rubber band. You can even use a piece of paper towel or a coffee filter. The point here is to allow air to flow in and out of the brewing container, while keeping pests like fruit flies out - they love this stuff! 6. Give your kombucha a home. Place the kombucha container in a place where it will not be disturbed or jostled, out of direct sunlight, but where it will get enough airflow (a small cupboard is therefore not the best place). I leave mine out on the counter where I can keep an eye on it, but I do not move it until day 7 when I start tasting. 7. Let ferment for 7-10 days. During the fermentation time, you may see a lot of activity in the brewing container. Bubbles, film-y bits, and the mother SCOBY floating and around and changing positions are all normal occurrences. After a few days youll notice the surface of the tea changing and becoming cloudy or opaque-looking. This is the new SCOBY forming and is a great sign that you have a healthy brew on the way! As the days The fermentation time depends on a few factors, such as the temperature of the environment (warmer temperatures speed fermentation), but also your preferences. If you like a sweeter kombucha, one week may be enough time. If you like a less sweet, more vinegar-y kombucha then allowing the brew to ferment for 10 days or more may be what youre into. I recommend tasting the kombucha every day from day 7 onwards and bottle it once its reached a taste that you enjoy. Its totally subjective and totally up to you! Thats one reason its so great to brew your own. 8. Remove SCOBY and 2 cups /­­ 500ml kombucha. Once your kombucha tea tastes just the way you want it to, prepare to bottle it. Take off all your jewelry and wash your hand thoroughly. Remove the SCOBY 9a. Bottle kombucha and repeat the process. I like to pour the kombucha tea from the large brewing jar into a container with a spout to avoid spills. You can also use a funnel for this process. Seal the bottles and place in the fridge. And now it’s time to brew a fresh batch! Start up at step 1 and complete the cycle. Now you’re a kombucha brewer! 9b. Second fermentation – optional. If you want to carry out the second fermentation, divide the juice or fruit among the bottles first, then add the brewed kombucha on top. Seal the bottles and let at room temperature for 2-3 days until it is carbonated to your liking, then store in the fridge. Very important: remember to release the pressure in the bottles every day that they sit at room temperature - this is called burping - open the lid briefly to let any excess gas out, which will prevent an explosion (I am totally not kidding). 10. Enjoy! It’s finally time to enjoy your kombucha! Drink it as is, or flavour it further as you like. I like to add sliced seasonal fruit to my glass before serving, a few slices of ginger, essential oils, superfoods like spirulina or more fresh juice. Important things to note: 1. Kombucha survives and thrives on cane sugar. You can use raw cane sugar like I do, instead of bleached white sugar, but both work fine. Honey, maple syrup, coconut sugar etc. and other healthier alternatives have very mixed results. I realize its hard for any health-conscious person to use sugar, but remember that the SCOBY is fed, not sweetened with sugar. 2. Always use unchlorinated /­­ unflouridated water for brewing the tea. 3. Do not use herbal tea or any tea that contains flavourings or oils, Earl Grey tea for instance. Stick with organic, pure black or green tea leaves /­­ bags. 4. Do not allow the SCOBY to come into contact with metal at any time (remember to remove your jewelry before handling the SCOBY). 5. Wash your hands and your equipment extremely thoroughly every time. Vinegar is better for cleaning than soap as it does not leave any residue that can harm the SCOBY. 6. Keep the critters out! Use very tightly woven fabric to cover your brewing container. 7. The SCOBY is very sensitive to air contaminants, so dont burn incense or smoke near the brewing container. 8. If mold forms, or if you see any worms /­­ flies in the kombucha or on the SCOBY, toss the entire batch including the SCOBY and start over. Do not be discouraged - it happens! I know that this seems like a lot of information, but I wanted this post to be thorough so that you could have all the information you need to start brewing! If you have another variation on brewing, or tips and tricks that you think others would find helpful, please let me know in the comments! And because I know you’re going to have a lot of questions, I’ll try to check in on this post more often to answer them. Here are some great online resources for those who want more information on brewing kombucha: - The most in-depth kombucha brewing info and how-to videos: Cultures for Health - Step-by-step photos: The Kitchn - Excellent troubleshooting resource: Bestweb Remember that it may take a few batches (and a few SCOBYs) to get your kombucha just the way you like it, but its a really fun, empowering and delicious project that will make you feel like you can do anything in the kitchen! Did I mention youll get to drink kombucha every day for the rest of your life? Yes, theres that too. All love and happy brewing, Sarah B. Show me your kombucha on Instagram: #MNRkombucha *   *   *   *   *   * More news! The My New Roots recipe app now has an updated iPad design and it synchronizes your favorites, shopping list and recipe notes between your iPhone and iPad. In other words: make your shopping list on the iPad, and you’ll have it right on the phone when you’re in the store. Neat! If you already have the app, just update it. If not, click here to go to the App Store. The post Brew your own Kombucha! appeared first on My New Roots.

Better Skin Secrets from The Gentle Cleanse

January 18 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Better Skin Secrets from The Gentle CleanseHealthy cooking expert and Skinny Chef Jennifer Iserloh shares secrets and tips for getting better skin. Jennifer is the author of numerous best selling health books including, 50 Shades of Kale, Secrets of a Skinny Chef, and Healthy Cheats. Shes also the instructor for our easy-to-follow online course, Gentle Cleanse, which features recipes and guidelines for gently detoxing with healthy recipes and making lifelong dietary changes to feel your best. Sign up for exclusive free tips and discounts for the Gentle Cleanse course!   The secret to smoother, more vibrant skin may be waiting for you right in your very own kitchen. Your eating habits and meals have a huge impact on the quality of your skin, since skin health relies on a wide range of nutrients. Doing a light detox program, like our Gentle Cleanse is just the ticket for an easy detox program that naturally integrates skin-healing foods. Even if you are already a healthy eater, pollution, regular alcohol consumption, stress, and pet allergies can wreak havoc on your skin. So if you havent detoxed in a while, youre skin could be a bit backed up with toxins since your skin is the largest detox organ. Heres a quick rundown on five skin-enhancing foods that are the cornerstones of the Gentle Cleanse: Red Bell Pepper Red bell pepper is one of the top sources of Vitamin C which protect the quality of your skin by stabilizing collagen. Kale Kale is one of the richest sources of glucosinaloates, important sulfur compounds that boosts your bodys ability to detox from your internal organs to your skin. Beans and Legumes Black beans have the highest antioxidant activity among legumes, trailed by red, brown, yellow and white beans, in that order. Lentils are high in zinc, which stabilizes cell membranes in your skin. Almonds The high levels of Vitamin E in almonds  boost the livers ability to detox more efficiently. Turmeric Turmeric is the gold standard when it comes to detox, and studies have shown its ability to soothe skin disorders like psoriasis.

8 Delicious Vegan Entreés Featuring Peanut Butter

July 30 2015 VegKitchen 

8 Delicious Vegan Entreés Featuring Peanut ButterEverything tastes better with peanut butter! Except, of course, for those with peanut allergies. Luscious and high in protein, peanut butter isnt only for PBJ sandwiches or desserts (though its awesome in both -- see our listing of sweet treats using it) Here are 7 tasty ways to use it in vegan main dishes. First off, heres an easy rendition of Cold Peanut Butter Sesame Noodles (above), with a dollop of tahini and a dash of spice. Delicious as a summer dinner served with an easy tofu dish and a simple salad of tomatoes, cucumbers, and basil. Another noodle dish, Kid-Friendly Peanut Butter Noodles is designed for kids whose preference runs to milder flavors. Adults can enjoy this basic recipe as well by spicing up their portion with hot sauce like Sriracha, or dried hot red pepper flakes, and a sprinkling of scallion. According to Isa Moskowitz, Curried Peanut Sauce Bowl with Tofu and Kale is the peanut sauce of the gods: a gingery peanut sauce with curry powder that will have you licking the spoon, then licking your plate ... Robin Robertsons West African Spinach with Spicy Peanut Sauce is delicious served over rice or couscous. Let your own heat tolerance be your guide on the amount of chiles to use. Admittedly rich, this traditional Southern-style Virginia Peanut Soup has an intensely nutty flavor. Even served in moderate portions, its immensely satisfying, and you can build a meal around it. Another soup you can look forward to that’s especially good for fall (but which can be enjoyed any time of year) is Broccoli-Apple Soup with Cashew or Peanut Butter. So rich and comforting, and filling enough to be a main dish serves with fresh bread and salad. In Dr. Joel Fuhrmans Spicy Thai Braised Kale and Tofu, peanut butter is the key to creating this tasty, nutrition-packed dish. Serve with brown rice or quinoa and a colorful salad for a great weeknight meal. Tempeh is a great source of protein, and peanut butter enhances its fermented flavor in this tasty Tempeh Satay with Asian Greens. Serve with your favorite grain.

Shop Like a Chef: How to Buy Non-Dairy Milks

June 29 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Shop Like a Chef: How to Buy Non-Dairy Milks Whether you’re lactose-intolerant, follow a vegan diet, or just want to switch it up, non-dairy milks (also known as alternative milks, or alt milks) make a tasty and versatile addition to try. There are many varieties on the market today--we arent limited to just soy milk anymore. While the milks may come across as straightforward, here’s some important label lingo to know: o BPA-free You may associate this term with cans, but in fact, the Tetra Paks that non-dairy milks are packaged in are often lined with BPA. This helps maintain freshness, and the lining is slippery, so there is no residue left in the package when you pour. However, some health risk concerns have been raised about this chemical, so look for packages marked BPA-free. o Carageenan This is a sea vegetable that is used to slightly thicken and stabilize non-dairy milks. It is used in very small amounts, but some people dont want any additives in their products, and some have sensitivities to it. Making your own milk from scratch--or choosing non-dairy milks made without carageenan--can solve this problem. o Organic This is especially important for soy milks. Over 80% of the soy production in the U.S. is GMO, and before we have solid scientific evidence of its effect on our health in the long run, its best to avoid it. If a product is certified organic, then you can rest assured there are no GMO ingredients in it. o Protein levels Different non-dairy milks have different levels of protein. Soy has the highest, at around 9 grams per serving, while rice milk has almost none. Protein needs vary per individual, so check the nutritional panel if youre watching your intake. Ready to go shopping? Here are some alt milks youre likely to find at the market: o Soy Its high in plant-based protein, but be sure to buy organic and unsweetened. o Hemp This variety has around 5 grams of protein per serving and has high levels of good-for-you omega-3 fatty acids. o Oat This ones high in fiber but tends to be high in sugar too--buy unsweetened. o Almond This milk has about 2 grams of protein per serving. While almonds are high in protein, packaged milk is mostly water. o Rice The amount of protein in rice milk is negligible, but its a great option for those with gluten or nut allergies. Tip Using your milk beyond smoothies and cereal? No problem. In baked goods, non-dairy options can be substituted seamlessly. For cream sauces and ice creams, making your own milks is best. Most commercially made milks are very thin, similar to skim milk consistency. They do not thicken when reduced and if used in ice creams, they crystallize and result in an icy texture. Meet the author: Barbara Rich is a full-time chef instructor at Natural Gourmet Institute. She holds a bachelors degree from Washington University in St. Louis, Miss., and a culinary degree from California Culinary Academy. Before teaching, she worked at Cardwells Restaurant in St. Louis, Zuni Café in San Francisco, and Danal in New York City. She is also an avid athlete, and has competed in half-ironman triathlons, long-distance open water swim races, and trail races, including the Trans Rockies 6-Day Ultra.

Chickpea Quinoa Burgers

April 20 2015 Meatless Monday 

Yams are cooked until tender and mixed with chickpeas and crunchy pumpkin seeds for a veggie patty which highlights the sweetly spiced flavors of autumn. If served without a bun, this burger is ideal for those who suffer from common food allergies; this recipe contains no soy, no wheat and no animal products. This recipe comes to us from Jen Brody of Domestic Divas. Serves 8 - 1 yam - 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil, divided - 1 cup quinoa, prepared according to package instructions - 1 (14 ounce) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed - 1 small onion, peeled and chopped - 1 red bell pepper, seeded and chopped - 2 carrots, peeled and chopped - 1 cup fresh spinach, tightly packed - 2 tablespoons sunflower seeds - 1 tablespoon pumpkin seeds - juice of 1 lemon - 1 tablespoon ground cumin - 2 tablespoons sesame tahini - 1 tablespoon hot sauce* - salt and pepper, to taste - a little flour, for dusting the burger patties *Optional Preheat an oven to 375 degrees. Poke several holes in the yam using a fork. Place the yam in a paper towel and microwave on high for 5 minutes. Flip the yam and microwave 5 minutes more, or until tender. Slip off the yams skin. Place 1 of the tablespoons of grapeseed oil in a sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onion and cook for 2-3 minutes, or until it begins to soften. Add the carrot and bell pepper to the pan and cook 3-5 minutes more, or until the veggies are just tender. Transfer the sautéed veggies to a food processor and pulse to chop. Add the spinach and pulse a few more times until combined. Transfer the veggies to a large mixing bowl. Add the chickpeas and tahini to the food processor and pulse until broken down and combined. Transfer to the mixing bowl with the veggies. Add the cooked quinoa, yam, sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds to the mixing bowl. Season the veggie quinoa mixture with the lemon juice, cumin and hot sauce, if using. Stir until well combined, taking care to ensure all ingredients are evenly distributed. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Shape the veggie quinoa mixture into 8 patties using your hands. Dust each patty with flour. Heat the remaining tablespoon grapeseed oil in an oven-safe skillet over medium-high heat. Add the burger patties and cook for about 2 minutes per side, or until browned on both sides. Transfer the patties to a baking sheet and bake about 10-12 minutes more, or until cooked through. Enjoy! The post Chickpea Quinoa Burgers appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Banana Buckwheat Pancakes

February 23 2015 Meatless Monday 

These flapjacks are rooted in American history as Laura Ingles Wilder and family used to bite into buckwheat banana pancakes in The Little House on the Prairie series. This version bakes the banana right in the middle for full fruit integration. This recipe comes to us from Jennifer Grayson of The Red, White and Green. Serves 3 - 1 cup buckwheat flour* - 1 teaspoon baking powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 2 tablespoons sugar** - 1 egg, beaten - 1 cup nonfat milk - 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - 1 banana, sliced thin - a little butter, as needed to prepare the pan *This rich, nutty flour is full of nutrients as well as gluten-free, so it can consumed easily by those with wheat allergies. Buckwheat flour can be found in the dry goods section, near standard flour, in most grocery stores. **optional In a large bowl, combine buckwheat flour, baking powder, salt and sugar if using. Whisk dry ingredients together to combine. One at a time, add the egg, milk and oil to the buckwheat mixture, beating the mixture well after each addition. Heat large skillet or griddle over medium heat. Prepare the heated skillet with small amount of butter. After the butter melts pour one small ladleful of pancake batter for each pancake onto the hot, greased skillet. Place three slices of banana onto each pancake. Cook each pancake for 1-2 minutes, or until the edges look brown and bubbles break the surface. Flip each pancake and cook on other side for approximately 1 minute, or until cooked through. Serve immediately. The post Banana Buckwheat Pancakes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

How to Eat for Allergy Relief

May 27 2014 Vegetarian Times 

How to Eat for Allergy Relief Spring Salad with Hemp-Nut Clusters and Blueberry Dressing   If you want some allergy relief this season, start by taking a good look at your plate. Is it full of fruits and veggies at every meal? It really should be, because the best remedy for seasonal allergies might be in these plant-based foods. Fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, seeds, and grains contain an enormous variety of nutrients that work together to keep you healthy even during the onslaught of seasonal allergies. Drink lots of water (preferably with fresh lemon), make sure you eat a balanced plant-based diet full of the foods below, and expect a happier allergy season. Spice it up with cayenne pepper. It contains capsaicin, a compound that has the power to ease congestion and inflammation, and boost your immunity. Its also incredibly easy to add to meals. Sprinkle cayenne pepper on prepared meals, add it to dressings and sauces, or drink it in a hot tea with ginger. Try these spiced roasted nuts for an allergy-fighting snack. Are omega-3s the new anti-histamines? Omega-3 fatty acids are known for their anti-inflammatory prowess, and that ability to fight inflammation is also responsible for lowering histamine response. Less sinus inflammation means less suffering from allergies. Omega-3-rich foods include ground flaxseed, chia seeds, walnuts, and hemp seeds; sprinkle them on salads and in smoothies. If you eat a whole foods plant-based diet, youre probably getting a good amount of vitamin C. This antioxidant is known for its role in keeping us healthy during cold and flu season, and it can also protect us from foreign invaders during allergy season. Some excellent sources of vitamin C include citrus fruits, papaya, red bell peppers, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts. Red Pepper-Carrot Soup     —— Jenné Claiborne is passionate about helping women adopt and maintain a plant-based diet so they can improve their energy, lose weight, and feel their very best. Founder of The Nourishing Vegan, a New York-based personal chef service, she is also the creator of Sweet Potato Soul, a vegan food blog that features recipes, tips, and cooking videos. In 2013, Jenné launched the 21-Day Vegan Blueprint, an interactive online program that takes the guesswork out of becoming vegan. Follow Jenné on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

One Soup - Three Ways

April 6 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

One Soup - Three Ways I feel extra enthusiastic about this post partly because I think we are on to something good here. But also because this headline speaks so much to my magazine-publishing-heart (my previous career). This is a dinner concept that we have played around with lately and it works particularly well for families with sensitive eaters or allergies. The idea is built around cooking one recipe base and then making some last minute add-ins to suit various preferences. Or to turn the leftovers of one dish into a new one the next day. The base can be anything from a salad, a basic stew, a cooked grain, a good sauce or, as here, a soup. In this recipe we are taking a simple tomato broth soup in three different directions. The kids love this with tortellini (or any other pasta) dropped into it. They actually prefer it to tomato sauce. Luise and I like to let a chunk of mozzarella (or burrata cheese) melt in the soup and serve it with some leftover cooked quinoa to make it more filling. Another favorite of ours is to stir chopped kale, chickpeas and a little chili paste into the broth and topping it with avocado for a chunkier vegan version. The way it usually works is that we cook one big batch of broth and then pour the kids version in a smaller sauce pan, drop in the ravioli and let it cook for another minute or two until soft. While we stir in or other add-ins to our version. It’s an excellent way to add some heat and more herbs to your own soup while keeping your kids or partners soup milder. You can of course keep it simple and just do one of these. Or mix them up, adding chickpeas to the ravioli or mozzarella to the kale. Or combine them all! Think of it as good base to build from and use the last minute add-ins to suit your personal preference. If you like this concept we might be back with the same ideas applied on other meals in a later post. Simple Tomato Broth Soup Serves 4 2 tbsp olive oil 1 onion, peeled and finely chopped 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped 2 tbsp tomato puree 1 tsp ground paprika powder 3 carrots 3 celery stalks 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz can crushed tomatoes 4 cups /­­ 1 liter vegetable stock sea salt Fresh thyme Fresh basil Heat oil in a large thick-bottomed sauce pan on medium heat. Add tomato puree, onion, garlic and ground paprika and let sauté for 5 minutes. Peel and clean the carrots and celery and chop into bite-sized dices. Add to the pan and let sauté for a few more minutes. Then add chopped tomatoes and vegetable stock and let simmer under a lid for 15-20 minutes. Taste and adjust the flavoring, adding some fresh thyme or basil towards the end. You can also add more stock, if needed. Choose your favorite way of serving this soup, see recipe ideas below. Vegan Cavolo Nero & Chickpea Soup Serves 4 1 batch Simple Tomato Broth Soup (see recipe above) 5 leaves cavolo nero or kale, coarsely chopped 1/­­2 can cooked chickpeas (approx 100 g) 1 tsp harissa or another chili paste (optional) 1 avocado, to serve lemon zest, to serve olive oil Stir in chopped cavolo nero, chickpeas and harissa to the soup during the last minutes of cooking. Laddle the soup into serving bowls and top with avocado slices, lemon zest and a splash of olive oil. Tortellini Drop Soup 1 batch Simple Tomato Broth Soup (see recipe above) 1 bag good quality fresh tortellini micro greens or sprouts, to serve grated vegetarian parmesan cheese, to serve Simply drop the tortellini straight into the soup as its cooking on the stove. After about two minutes (check the pasta package for exakt time), its ready to serve. Divide into soup bowls, grate over parmesan cheese and top with micro greens and drizzle with olive oil. Quinoa & Mozzarella Melt Soup 1 batch Simple Tomato Broth Soup (see recipe above) 2 cups cooked quinoa 200 g buffalo mozzarella or burrata cheese Laddle the soup into serving bowls and add a couple of spoonfuls cooked quinoa to each bowl. Break the cheese into smaller pieces and let it melt in the hot soup. Top with a drizzle of olive oil, black pepper and fresh thyme.

10 Tips for Raising Vegan Children

May 5 2017 VegKitchen 

10 Tips for Raising Vegan Children Raising vegan children in an omni world will test your patience with the next person who casually wonders aloud if your kids will get enough protein and calcium. Fear not though, its not as hard as it seems. In fact, with todays increasing allergies, and people becoming more aware of what exactly theyre eating, its starting […] The post 10 Tips for Raising Vegan Children appeared first on VegKitchen.

Baking Powder Sensitivity

May 3 2016 seitan is my motor 

I don’t like to make up conditions. And what I have is not a condition. It’s nothing serious, nothing to see a doctor for etc. It’s just that I have a problem with certain baking powders. I don’t have any allergies, I don’t have any food intolerances and it’s probably a bit exaggerated to callRead more The post Baking Powder Sensitivity appeared first on seitan is my motor.

How to Eat Healthy for Your Gut and Feel Better

January 11 2016 Vegetarian Times 

How to Eat Healthy for Your Gut and Feel BetterWe asked healthy cooking expert and “Skinny Chef” Jennifer Iserloh for tips on feeling our best in the new year. Jennifer is the author of numerous best selling health books including, 50 Shades of Kale, Secrets of a Skinny Chef, and Healthy Cheats. She’s also the instructor for our easy-to-follow online course, Gentle Cleanse, which features recipes and guidelines for gently detoxing with healthy recipes and making lifelong dietary changes to feel your best. Sign up for exclusive free tips and discounts for the Gentle Cleanse course! If youre lacking energy after the holidays, it may not only be stress or lack of sleep thats slowing you down. Getting more energy could be as simple getting good eats for your gut! Thats right, there are foods and meals that are especially healing for the colony of bacteria that live in your large intestines, called the microbiome. When your bacteria are unbalance (more bad than good) it could mean lack of energy, poor digestion, weakened immune system and brain fog.  Eating good things for your gut start by noshing on a plant based diet! Fiber and Prebiotic Foods Fiber isnt just important for weight loss and digestion, its crucial for our gut flora since thats what they eat.  And we cant be our healthiest without them - since these good bacteria are responsible for manufacturing B vitamins, vitamin K,  as well as strengthening our immunity, and breaking down complex carbohydrates.  So how do you make sure they get what they need?  Its easy –  add plenty of prebiotics foods like carrots, asparagus, and artichokes. They are rich in a particular fiber called inulin, that the good bugs love. Limit Gluten Not everyone has gluten sensitivities but giving gluten a rest for a few days when youre feeling slow, limiting gluten when you feel the drag is a good idea since gluten has been show to activate allergies, and can be tough to digest for those with sensitive stomachs.  Dont go for the package gluten free products since they can be loaded with sugar, unhealthy fats and salt.  Enjoy naturally gluten free grains instead like millet, quinoa, and brown rice.  If you want to learn the 101 on these grains while you go gluten free follow my 3 day mini cleanse.

(Audio) An interview with Jema-Lee on Gluten Free Living

July 12 2015 Vegie Head 

I had the pleasure of talking all-things Gluten Free with owner of Wellsome.com, Jema Lee. We speak about causes and symptoms gluten allergies, her journey, and how lucky we are to have such an abundance of Gluten Free food available to us. Here are some of my favourite Gluten Free recipes and infor...

8 Healthy Plant-Based Ingredients to Know and Love

June 16 2015 VegKitchen 

8 Healthy Plant-Based Ingredients to Know and LoveIf youre embarking on a whole foods plant-based diet (and a vegan lifestyle), youll be glad to know that most well-stocked supermarkets will have everything you need. There may be a few ingredients that are new to you, and that might requirer a trip to a natural foods store -- though  not necessarily. Many supermarkets carry these, as well. If you cant find these ingredients in a supermarket or natural foods store, they can be easily purchased online. The helpful list below is excerpted from The Abundance Diet: The 28-Day Plan to Reinvent Your Health, Lose Weight, and Discover the Power of Plant-Based Foods. (C) 2015 by Somer McCowan. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press LLC. Nutritional yeast: While not the same as bread yeast, this wonderful and flavorful food supplement is loved by vegans for its cheesy and savory flavor. Nutritional yeast is most affordable when purchased at a health food store in bulk bins, but it can also be ordered online. Just make sure that the brand you buy is fortified with vitamin B12 (most are).  Vegetable bouillon or quality vegetable broth: I use broth in all my soup recipes instead of water as it imparts a bolder, heartier flavor. Use caution when you buy prepared vegetable broths and bouillon cubes because some brands contain sugar, hydrogenated oils, and MSG. You want to go for a clean label, and my personal favorite is Better Than Bouillons Vegetable Base. Its a vegetable broth paste that you can find in well-stocked grocery stores or online. Make sure the label is vegan, and if you can get it, also organic. Use the instructions on the label to make up your liquid broth for recipes. For some of my recipes I prefer their No-Beef or No Chicken Base (both vegan). I also like the following brands of vegetable bouillon cubes: Edward and Sons, Rapunzel, and Massel. Bragg Liquid Aminos or tamari: I use Bragg Liquid Aminos as a seasoning almost on a daily basis, often to replace salt. Its a soy sauce alternative thats gluten-free and preservative-free. If you arent able to find it and dont have issues with gluten, regular soy sauce can certainly be used. You could also substitute tamari, which is a lovely soy sauce replacement. In most of my recipes, tamari and Bragg Liquid Aminos are interchangeable. Those with soy allergies can use coconut aminos instead of Bragg or tamari. Coconut aminos have less sodium than Braggs or tamari, so adjust the sodium in your recipes accordingly. Stevia: The sweet-tasting leaves of this South American plant are extracted and used as a sweetener and sugar substitute. Stevia is calorie-free and doesnt affect blood sugar levels, and it can be found in almost any grocery store in the sweetener section. If possible, look for versions without any additives. My favorite stevia is made by Nu-Naturals. I use it in all my smoothies, since the sweetness allows me to pack more greens into them. I use both liquid and powdered stevia; having both on hand can be helpful. If you are sensitive to stevia or dont enjoy it, try using one of these alternative low-calorie sweeteners instead: monk fruit, tagatose, lo han, xylitol, or erythritol. Some of these options have more calories than stevia, but are all low in calories compared to sugar, pure maple syrup, or agave.  Tapioca starch: Also called tapioca flour, this starch comes from the cassava root. I use it to give cheesy foods a realistic stretch. I also use it as an ingredient in my gluten-free flour. Tapioca starch can typically be found in the gluten-free section of your grocery store or online. Cornstarch or arrowroot can be used instead of tapioca starch, but results will differ slightly as each has varying thickening abilities. Miso: Typically made from brown rice and soy, this Japanese fermented paste has a lovely pungent flavor and aroma that add a nice umami element to the recipes I use it in. If you have soy allergies, you can source miso made from chickpeas. My personal favorite is mellow white miso. You should be able to find it at any health food store. Chickpea miso can be purchased online. Plant milks: For most of the recipes in this book I use unsweetened soy or almond milk. You can use whichever plant milk you prefer, or you can make homemade plant milk; there are lots of recipes online. Keep in mind that unsweetened plant milks are best. Garbanzo or chickpea flour: Also known as besan gram in Indian markets, this flour is made from ground dried garbanzo beans. I love the versatility of this ingredient. It can be used to replace eggs or create delicious gluten-free dishes. It is healthful, full of protein and fiber. You can find this ingredient at your health food store, online, or at an Indian grocer. I like Bobs Red Mill brand. Somer McCowan blogs at Vedged Out .

How to Join a Food Swap

March 18 2015 Vegetarian Times 

How to Join a Food Swap Trading edibles may be a time-honored school ritual, but adults looking for more variety in their menus are getting into the act too. Options include food swaps, package swaps, garden swaps, and community-supported agriculture box swaps. ?Take your pick, and start swappin. Why should kids have all the fun? Meet-and-Greet Swaps Cook up something delicious, package it in individual serving sizes, and when you arrive at your food swap location, set the servings on a table. Dont forget to put out samples! ?Now circle the table with other swappers. See something youd like ?to trade? On the sheet of paper next to the item, write your name and what youve brought to the table. ?When times up, check the sheet ?next to your item to see who wants ?to barter. Let the swapping begin! Samples, Please Among the 100 percent veg swaps youll find nationwide, the NW Philly Vegetarian/­­Vegan Food Swap meets the first Monday of the month. We all love cooking, and were all mostly health-conscious, says Amy Doolittle, who has been with the group since its inception. The DC Vegan Baking Swap gathers the first Saturday of the month. Every month we use recipes from a specific cookbook or blog, says Laurel Gowen, the groups organizer. Each member bakes ?a different recipe. Favorites include ?a mango lassi cake from Cheers to Vegan Sweets--Gowen requested it for her most recent birthday. Sign Up Visit meetup.com for food swaps in your community. Also check bulletin boards at local cooking schools, fitness studios, health-food stores, and community centers. Once you decide on a swap, Doolittle suggests you clearly identify what youre contributing and list ingredients so people with allergies can take note. And allow plenty of time for the swap, says Doolittle: Time can sneak up on you. Pen-Pal Swaps A package swap is like Christmas every month. Simply sign up ?with an online organizer, who pairs you with another swapper. Next put together a package filled with your favorite vegan or vegetarian items from your area. Send it off, and wait for your ?swap partners package to arrive. Samples, Please Im a dark-chocolate lover, says Chicago resident Diana Morrow. So when she opened ?a recent package from the Power to the Veg! swap, she was happy to see ?a 99% chocolate bar from trendy TCHO. Morrow has participated ?regularly in the swap, organized by Jessica Schoech as an offshoot of her Power to the Veg! Facebook group. Schoech figured that a swap box would be a great way to introduce ?new vegans to the lifestyle. Power to the Veg! swap partners can live anywhere in the U.S.; Vegan Package Swap is an international package swap: It would be easier to list countries ?not represented, but were in 40 countries for sure, says organizer Glauce Ferrari. The variety of products you can get from different countries is amazing! Sign Up Morrow offers this advice for putting together your ?first package: Ask questions of ?your partner in the first e-mail exchange, for example, Any dietary restrictions? Any kids or pets who might like a treat? Whats your favorite and least favorite cuisine? She also suggests mixing it up: Anything local and difficult to ?get elsewhere is appreciated. Ferrari cautions swappers to ?watch the weight of their package--otherwise shipping costs can be expensive--and avoid sending ?fresh fruits and vegetables to ?other countries, a no-no due to customs laws. Packaged goods ?are fine, however. So is chocolate, though usually not in summer. ?It makes a mess because it melts, Ferrari explains. Green-Thumb Swaps Knee-deep in zucchini? Overrun by oranges? The garden swap is an organized version of what gardeners have been doing informally for years: trading bumper crops. Similar to taking part in a meet-and-greet swap, you bring homegrown items to a central location, put them on display, and make note of what youd like to trade. Once everyones perused the options, the swapping begins. Samples, Please Every Tuesday evening, from April through October, the tiny town of Albany, Calif., holds a garden swap. Weve grown from 20 to up to 40 traders each week, says swap coordinator Mary McKenna. She notes the best exchanges arent always the fruits and vegetables: Ive learned more about gardening by listening to the tips and advice swappers give each other. Darnell Stewart, host of a weekly garden swap in Richmond, Calif., says its introduced him to new varieties of produce. In Maryland, the Eldersburg Branch of the Carroll County Library holds a different kind of garden swap: here, large boxes are put in the lobby, and anyone with extra produce to share places it in the box. Weve had everything from habanero peppers to zucchini and tomatoes, says library associate Christine Kirker, who started the program. Sign Up The best part about trading at a garden swap is your produce doesnt have to be perfect. Gardeners understand smaller fruits, bruises, and misshapen items, McKenna says. San Francisco-Bay Area residents can search playndirt?.com, a Web site organized by Stewart, for swaps close by. Elsewhere, check local libraries, garden clubs, community centers, and state extension offices (educational networks created by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture) for swaps in your area. Produce-Box Swaps You know those CSA boxes filled with fruits and vegetables grown by a local farmer? Sometimes, the box you receive is filled with items--say, radishes--that you rarely eat, and not nearly enough bell peppers for your famous stuffed-peppers recipe. What to do? If youre lucky, your CSA may offer a swap box. Samples, Please Our farmer brings an extra share of vegetables, which we put into the swap box, says Jen Robertson with the ?Greenwood Heights CSA in ?Brooklyn, N.Y. Every member ?is welcome to trade for something else. There is no guarantee that ?there will be anything in the swap box that you want to trade for, but there is the opportunity. Any leftover produce is up for grabs ?for members who work the shift, ?and what remains is given to people in need. Sign Up To learn more about CSAs, visit the Local Harvest Web site, localharvest.org/­­csa. Enter your location for a list of local farms that offer CSA subscriptions. Youll need to check with the farmers about whether they offer a swap box.

Miyoko’s Creamery cultured nut products – a review

December 13 2014 VegKitchen 

Miyoko’s Creamery cultured nut products – a reviewRecently I was the very lucky recipient of an array of Miyokos Creamery cultured nut products --aka vegan cheeses -- from the newly launched Miyokos Kitchen. * Miyokos Kitchen has generously offered VegKitchen readers $5.00 off all online orders. Use the discount code: VEGKITCHEN. Valid until 12/­­31/­­14, aka, through the end of this year. Shown above, Sundried Tomato Garlic. Miyoko Schinner -- author and entrepreneur -- is the brains behind these artisan treats.  Let me say up front that these aged nondairy cheeses are mind-blowing; the range of flavors and consistencies is astonishing. Ive shared my bounty at dinner parties and it was heartening to see how even non-vegans gravitated to these delicacies, leaving the dairy cheese on the adjacent platter virtually untouched. These nut-based cheeses are truly the answers to the refrain, But I could never give up cheese! Well, now you dont have to. Of course, it must be stated that since these products are nut-based, theyre not for those with nut allergies. From the web site, heres how Miyoko started this venture: “Our products were created by Miyoko Schinner, who embarked on a mission to recreate the range of flavors and textures she had once enjoyed from dairy cheeses before becoming vegan. Several years of experimentation culminated in the publication of her groundbreaking book, Artisan Vegan Cheese (Book Publishing Co., 2012), which she hoped would inspire others to make their own. Despite the success of the book, people frequently requested that she simply make and sell them. She knew that in order to succeed, she would need a passionate business partner with whom to launch and grow the business. She soon met Lisa Shanower, and the two of them embarked on their cheese journey to create Miyokos Kitchen. The two of them assembled an amazing team of passionate vegans with expertise in different areas, and Miyokos Kitchen was born!” I must admit that Im among those referenced above who wished someone would magically make these cheeses for me. While theyre not particularly difficult, they do require time, and a certain feel for creating them. Im just too lazy. So I was beyond thrilled to find out that Miyoko had launched this venture. Among the varieties I received in my Mikyokos Mix pack included: - Double Cream Sun-Dried Tomato Garlic - High Sierra Rustic Alpine - Fresh Loire Valley in a Fig Leaf - French-Style Winter Truffle - Aged English Sharp Farmhouse - Double Cream Garlic Herb - Country Style Herbes de Provence … And there are others. Just from the creativity of the names, you can almost taste the varieties of flavors, textures, and colors. Each cheese round is only 6.5 ounces, but Ive gotten as many as 12 wedges out of them because the flavors are so rich and robust. They also freeze very well. For a spontaneous party or holiday platter, plate a couple of varieties of Miyokos cheeses, some small bunches of grapes and/­­or sliced pears, and a variety of whole-grain crisp breads. Just add your favorite wine and youve got an instant party -- nothing could be easier, and few things are better! Ordering information from Miyokos Kitchen: - Miyoko’s Creamery cultured nut products are available in a growing number of California retail locations. - Order online: Miyokos Kitchen is only shipping to mainland U.S at this time. As a brand new company it will only be a matter of time before theyre able to add more shipping and retail options throughout the U.S. and internationally. - The last shipping day before Christmas will be Monday, December 22, for arrival on Christmas eve. If youd like your items to arrive before Christmas, please place your order no later than Monday, December 22 at 12:00 pm (PST). Miyokos Kitchen ships Mon., Tues., Wed., only via Fed Ex 2-day delivery. - Once again, remember that VegKitchen readers $5.00 off all online orders. Use the discount code: VEGKITCHEN. Valid until 12/­­31/­­14, aka, through the end of this year. From the bottom of my heart, I thank Miyoko for starting this company to further the message that giving up cheese is something anyone can do. Any step that each of us can take to do away with dairy does more good in this world than can be imagined.     * Full disclosure: VegKitchen received gratis samples of Miyokos Creamery Cultured Nut Products from Miyokos Kitchen, but the opinions expressed in this review are our own.


You will enjoy these as well ...

Found an error?
Help to fix it! Tell it us!



Our sites missing something? Suggest new content or features!



Have you any comments?
Send it us!