My New Roots - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Vegan Corn Zucchini Fritters

Super-Quick Grain-Stuffed Peppers

Vegan Gluten-free Lemon Donuts. Grain-free Baked Vegan Doughnuts

Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight










My New Roots vegetarian recipes

Chickpea Pasta with Basil-Pea Pesto

July 4 2017 My New Roots 

Chickpea Pasta with Basil-Pea Pesto Its pretty redundant to say that I love cooking. So much. But even though I find myself enamoured with some small detail of every meal that I make, this chickpea pasta was next-level emotional. In fact, was one of the few recipes Ive made in my entire life that turned me into a wide-eyed child again, and reaffirmed my deep, unrelenting passion for creating food. Kneading the dough, rolling the pasta through this perfectly designed machine, seeing it transform before me, mysteriously almost nothing into so very much. Im not ashamed to say it nearly brought me to tears. There is something about cooking - and cooking something so ancient - that delivers a feeling of satisfaction that can hardly be described. Its entirely transcendental. And the best part? You get to eat it. It all started when one of my dear friends suggested making pasta out of chickpea flour and that she had seen a vegan version using ground flax seeds. I found the recipe and followed it, but it didnt work, I tried again, and after another pretty epic fail where I felt totally out of my depth, I decided to go the classic egg route. Not only was it better, it was absolutely, unbelievably delicious. In fact, I could hardly trust that what I was eating was made from chickpea flour, since it tasted so much like the beloved white pasta of my past. How is this not a thing?!  Its so easy and infinitely healthier, why isnt everyone and their uncle Bob making pasta with chickpea flour? I made this pasta three time in a week and found the prefect al dente cook time, all kinds of things to dress it with (olive oil, Pecorino, black pepper - guh.), and that I could freeze it to come back later and pop a nest into boiling water for almost-instant dinner that even my three-year-old loves. Rejoice! The only potential issue with using chickpea pasta like this is that since the chickpea flour is made from ground raw chickpeas, and some people who are sensitive to legumes may find this difficult to digest (i.e. lots of farts). I dont know how to overcome this issue since sprouting the chickpeas, then dehydrating them, then grinding them seems like a whole lotta rigmarole, so Im using chickpea flour and calling this an indulgence, like socca. If you know you have legume issues, I suggest purchasing sprouted chickpea flour, which is a little more challenging to find, but you can certainly buy it online. Now that I understand the correct moisture levels and consistency, Im going to go back and try the vegan version again, perhaps using something other than flax this time. If any of you have had success, please let me know! Do you need a pasta machine for this recipe? Kind of. Unless you are very skilled at rolling out pasta by hand, I recommend picking one up (theres always one at the second-hand store). Pasta machines are simple to use, and make this process very fast, fun, and satisfying. The one I have is pictured below (its Atlas brand #notsponsored), and it creates flat sheets that are perfect for lasagna or ravioli, or you can run the thin sheets through the spaghetti or tagliatelle roller, like I have done for this recipe. And theres another recipe in this recipe, and that is for the delightful Basil-Pea Pesto. Herb-y, nutty, and bright, its a cinch to whip up and keeps for 2-3 days in the fridge, so you can make it ahead or use the potential leftovers for many delish things (its a great dip or sandwich spread). Use frozen peas if thats all you have - no stress! And I like to use even more peas and basil to finish this dish off, so that it is even more satisfying with all the bright flavours and textures. I hope you enjoy it as much as my family does.     Print recipe     Chickpea Pasta with Basil-Pea Pesto Serves 4-6 Ingredients: 1 batch chickpea pasta (recipe follows) 1 batch Basil-Pea Pesto (recipe follows) 2 1/­­2 cups /­­ 350g shelled green peas (fresh or frozen) a small handful of basil leaves Olive oil to garnish flaky sea salt and black pepper Chickpea Pasta 2 - 2 1/­­2 cups /­­ 250 - 310g chickpea flour 3 large eggs, organic and free-range if possible 1 tsp. fine sea salt 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil Directions: 1. Measure out 2 cups /­­ 250g of chickpea flour and place in a mound on clean work surface. Make a large well in the center of the mound and crack three eggs into it, along with the salt and olive oil. Using your hands, mix the ingredients together until you have a smooth dough (if the mixture is dry, add a tablespoon of water to moisten it. If the dough is wet, add the remaining flour, one tablespoon at a time until it less sticky). Knead the dough for about five minutes, then cover tightly with plastic wrap and let rest at room temperature for at least half an hour. 2. Unwrap the dough and divide it into quarters, then again for that you have about eight equal portions. Work with one portion at a time, and cover the rest. Flour your work surface and work the dough into a square-ish shape, about the width of the pasta maker (the pasta will become much longer, not wider, so its best to take full advantage of the width). Flour the dough again and run it through the thickest setting on the machine (usually #1). Change settings to the slightly thinner setting (usually #2) and run it through the machine. If your pasta sticks at all, dust both sides with more flour. Repeat until the pasta is your desired thickness, then feed it through the cutter of your choice. I went to #6 before cutting it into tagliatelle. 3. As soon as the pasta comes through the cutter, toss it generously with flour and spread it out on clean work surface to dry, or use a pasta drying wrack if you have one. 4. Bring a pot of well-salted water to a rolling boil. Add the amount of pasta youre using to the water and cook for about 2-3 minutes (dont overcook! This pasta will disintegrate quickly if boiled for too long). The pasta should float to the top of the pot when its ready and be al dente. Drain and plate quickly. 5. You can finish this pasta two ways: one, place the pasta back into the pot and fold in the peas, basil, desired amount of pesto, and a glug of olive oil, the divide among the plates. Alternatively, divide the pasta among the plates, dollop with the pesto, drizzle with olive oil, and garnish with pine nuts and basil. Grind fresh pepper over the top and serve immediately. Basil-Pea Pesto Ingredients: 1 clove garlic 1/­­2 cup /­­ 55g pine nuts zest of 1 lemon 3-4 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil (as needed) 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 2 cups loosely packed /­­ 35g fresh basil leaves 1 cup /­­ 140g shelled green peas (fresh or frozen) Directions: 1. Bring a pot of salted water to the boil. Add peas and turn off the heat. If using fresh peas, let them sit for about 2-3 minutes until bright green. If using frozen, let them sit for about 5 minutes. Drain and set aside. 2. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast the pine nuts until lightly golden. Remove from heat and set aside. 3. Place peeled garlic in a food processor and pulse to mince. Add the toasted pine nuts (reserve a few for garnish), olive oil, salt, basil, and one cup /­­ 140g of peas and blend on high to mix. Add more olive oil if you like a looser pesto. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. Im currently on holidays in Canada and Im going to keep this post short and sweet so that I can get back to all of my funky food projects, reading on the dock, and naps. So many naps. I hope youre all having a glorious summer so far! Big love, Sarah B Show my your pasta on Instagram: #mnrchickpeapasta ***** Dear friends! I am getting SO excited about hosting my next wellness retreat in Ibiza, Spain, September 5-10 and September 17-23. And Ive decided to offer the same program twice so that more of you can join in. This is going to be an intimate group of 12 women only, housed in a stunning, 400 year-old finca in the hills surrounded by fig trees, wild herbs and carob. Come join me for seven days of total inspiration and rejuvenation - delicious and healthy meals, cooking and nutrition workshops, yoga, pilates, dance, and meditation that will balance your body and mind, and empower you to move forward on a path to greater wellness. I cant wait to see you there! Click the image below to go to the retreat page or click here for the booking page at Supersoul Yoga: Week 1 (Sept. 5-10) or Week 2 (Sept. 17-23) The post Chickpea Pasta with Basil-Pea Pesto appeared first on My New Roots.

Secret Ingredient Frozen Hot Chocolate

June 11 2017 My New Roots 

Secret Ingredient Frozen Hot Chocolate When I was in high school, the cool thing to do at lunch was eschew the basement cafeteria (obvi), leave the grounds altogether, and go to the local coffee shop. This made us feel like adults or something, sitting on plush velvet sofas, gossiping about so-and-sos new haircut, and whose older brother wed make out with while sipping a beverage that cost at least an hours worth of babysitting. Of course none of us really liked coffee, so we would blow our money on Italian sodas, fruity teas, and smoothies. When the warmer months rolled around, sandwich boards everywhere would announce that our very favourite, coffee-free drink was back in town: the Frozen Hot Chocolate. Now, if you have never lived in North America, the name and entire concept of this beverage Im sure eludes you. Isnt it an oxymoron, frozen hot chocolate? Yes, I suppose it is, but then I also suppose that is the point - to confuse you enough that you want to buy one. There is a famous restaurant in New York City that first came up with this drink, and although Ive never had the original, plenty of franchised cafes have made their own versions of what it essentially, a frothy chocolate milkshake. In the past few weeks the weather here in Copenhagen has warmed up and Ive finally been in the mood for cool, blended drinks again. But instead of using frozen bananas and other blood sugar-spiking fruits, Ive been experimenting more and more with frozen veggies instead. The results are surprisingly delicious and Im thrilled to have a few new veg-centric smoothies on lock. This is just one of them. The surprise ingredient in my frozen hot chocolate is...wait for it...cauliflower. Now this may sound totally weird, but please trust me, its delicious. Not even in a compromising way. The first sips are pure chocolate paradise, followed by a slight cruciferous waft, which then disappears again, conveniently, for those of us who perhaps dont like vegetables at all (Im looking specifically at my three-year-old son right now). All in all, this is one frosty, chocolate-y miracle of a drink for summer and Im making it every morning to celebrate liquid vegetables tasting like candy. Cauliflower Power Did you know that a cauliflower is actually a little head of thousands of compact flowers? Call me a hippie, but I like the idea of mowing down on a meadow. It makes me smile. Cauliflowers are white because they do not contain any carotene, the pigment found in things like carrots and broccoli, but what it lacks in vitamin A, it makes up for in potassium, folic acid, and vitamin C. And it may surprise you to learn that cauliflower is 25% protein and among the cancer-fighting cruciferous family that includes Brussels sprouts, cabbage and kale. Since this recipe calls for frozen cauliflower, I know some of you will be wondering if that changes the nutritional content in any way. Im happy to report that a recent study done on the freezing of cauliflower has shown its nutrients to be fairly stable after one-year freezer storage. Cauliflower in the study was blanched in near-boiling water for three minutes prior to freezing for one year. Numerous phytonutrients were evaluated in the study, including cauliflower’s sulfur-containing compounds. While nutrients levels were typically reduced after this year of freezer storage, loss of nutrients averaged about 15-35%. Although I always recommend eating fresh vegetables, there are some (fun!) applications that benefit from using the freezer. And its great to know that it doesnt pose too much a treat to those precious nutrients. Plus, frozen veggies (and fruits) can be lower cost, especially when the fresh version is out of season. If youre on a budget, frozen produce is a respectable way to get your plants in! The important part of this recipe is that you use frozen cauliflower, either purchased that way, or a head of cauliflower prepared ahead of time - washed, chopped into florets and frozen overnight. Similarly to how a frozen banana behaves in a blender, cauliflower too takes on a creamy-frothy consistency that works extremely well in this context. I also like to freeze the milk into cubes since this helps to keep the drink very cold and light. Dates sweeten the mixture, and you can scale these up or down depending on how hardcore you are. The cacao powder Ive used is raw, but you can also use regular cocoa powder in a pinch, or if youre on a budget. This recipe is a mere 4 ingredients, but if you feel like gettin fancy, by all means top that frozen hot chocolate with coconut cream (from a can of coconut milk, chilled in the fridge overnight) and some cacao nibs. You can also add some ingredients to the blend itself, like a handful of soaked cashews for extra richness, a scoop of protein powder (I like sprouted pea, sprouted brown rice or hemp), vanilla, or even fresh greens (spinach is very good at hiding in this too). The point of all this is to have fun and enjoy something that tastes like its pretty indulgent, but secretly good for you. Secret Ingredient Frozen Hot Chocolate Serves 2-3 Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 250g frozen cauliflower florets 1/­­3 cup /­­ 100g pitted dates 6 Tbsp. raw cacao powder approx. 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 350ml plant-based milk (I used oat milk) handful of ice cubes (made from either plant-milk ice or water) Optional ingredients: Pinch of vanilla powder coconut cream (from the top of a can of coconut milk)?cacao nibs handful soaked cashews protein powder Directions: 1. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend on high until smooth. Add more liquid if necessary (mixture should be relatively thick). 2. Top with coconut cream and cacao nibs, if desired. Enjoy immediately. *   *   *   *   * You guys!!! I am so pumped to finally announce my upcoming wellness retreats this fall. We are going to two spectacular European locations: Ibiza, Spain and Comporta, Portugal. Both simple and luxurious, we have found the perfect settings to unwind, and press the reset button. Our Wild Heart High Spirit program combines inspiring cooking classes and nutrition workshops (lead by yours truly) with delicious movement classes, yoga, pilates and dance by Living Yolates that will both strengthen your body and open your heart. These seven days will nurture you on all levels of your being, help you realign with your internal guidance system, and ignite you on your journey towards greater health! Join us for this incredibly special, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, with Golden Circle Retreats. The post Secret Ingredient Frozen Hot Chocolate appeared first on My New Roots.

Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines

April 28 2017 My New Roots 

Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines Done is better than perfect. I cant tell you how many times I repeat this to myself on a daily basis, as a sort of mantra to soothe and convince the perfectionist inside me to just follow through. To just put it out there. I almost pushed publish on this blog post yesterday afternoon, but something was holding me back. Two things, in fact. First, the photos werent what I wanted them to be: they were on the boring side without a lot of colour, and not really inspiring. Second, the recipe itself just wasnt there. I was trying to make a vegan yogurt coating with coconut butter and although it was tasty, the texture was all wrong: chunky and gritty. Was it good enough? Probably. Would anyone have noticed what I saw as shortcomings? Probably not. But could I deal with it? Apparently, no. As I was putting the finishing touches on the post, it hit me like a bolt of lightening: I needed to use cashew butter to achieve the silky consistency I was after. Noooo! It was the solution I had been calling in, but to arrive at the witching hour just seemed cruel. How could I start all over at this point? Was I crazy to even try, considering I didnt know for sure that it would work out? With only minutes to make a decision, I hopped on my bike and cycled to the health food store. Again. Cursing myself, my brain, my ridiculous inability to know when to let go, and my insistence that what I put out in the world is my absolute best, really started to annoy me. I bought all the ingredients for the third time, raced home, and got to work. The cookies were the best theyd ever been. Perfect, in fact. But was it worth it? For anyone out there nodding their heads in recognition that they too, have these borderline masochistic tendencies to achieve an arbitrary portrait of perfection, may I ask what it is that drives us to create and then hold it all back if its not exactly what we imagined in our heads? Because nothing is perfect! When do we draw the line and just push publish? Is done really better than perfect? Because done for me it seems like settling for mediocrity a lot of the time. Even if its just a friggin cookie. Im not looking for answers here, just venting I suppose. But if you want to share your similar struggles, feel free in the comments. Its not often I open up or vent in this space, so maybe we can all throw a perfectionist party, and make sure to have these very perfect cookies on the table. Speaking of! Florentines are traditionally almond-centric biscuits, sometimes with the addition of dried fruit like cherries and orange zest, with a rich chocolate coating on the bottom. Because I really love dessert for breakfast, I was motivated to make a morning-appropriate version that wouldnt make me feel like a glutton. I chose to add some buckwheat to the mix since I love to start my day with whole grains, and swapped out the chocolate for a vanilla-cashew butter coating that I basically want to pour over my entire life. Like I mentioned, my original thought was to go with something yogurt-like, but once I made this saucy concoction, there was no need to pretend it was something else. Pure, divine, silky-smooth pleasure glaze! Ahem. I love these cookies because they are so simple to make with just a few ingredients, and incredibly fast. On my third testing, they were done - mixed, baked and glazed – in 20 minutes. If youre in a rush to get your treat fix, leave the cashew coating out of the equation, and youll still have a gorgeously tasty and satisfying little snack. As far as additions and flavours go, these wicked little morsels are kind of a blank slate. I made a couple batches with orange zest and one without. Personally, I really loved the citrusy warmth that the orange lends, and its nod to morning fodder, but you can also omit it for a more neutral taste. Instead, spice them up with cinnamon, cardamom, lemon zest, rose, lavender, coconut etc. I think adding cacao nibs would also be really delicious, as would dried blueberries, dried figs, or apricots. Whatever you choose to do, get ready to be very excited to get up in the morning. Couple these cookies with a turmeric latte, a piece of fruit and youll be good to go. Until 4 oclock when you want another one.     Print recipe     Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines Makes 12 Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 90g raw buckwheat groats 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70g slivered almonds (or sunflower seeds) 1/­­3 cup /­­ 45g almond meal 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup a couple pinches sea salt zest of 1 organic orange, optional Vanilla Cashew Coating: 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml cashew butter 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml coconut oil 1 Tbsp. pure maple syrup seeds from 1 vanilla bean pinch sea salt Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. Line a rimmed cookie sheet with baking paper. 2. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast buckwheat until golden, about 3 minutes. Transfer buckwheat to a mixing bowl to cool. In the same skillet toast the slivered almonds until golden, about 2 minutes. Transfer them to the bowl of buckwheat to cool, add the almond meal and stir to combine. 3. In the same skillet (no need to wash) over low heat, melt the coconut oil and add the orange zest, if using. Turn off the heat and whisk in the maple syrup and salt. Pour the liquid over the buckwheat and almond mixture and fold to combine. Do not wash the skillet. 4. Using a tablespoon measure, scoop out the florentine cookie mixture and set each one on the lined baking sheet with plenty of space in between (I baked these in 2 batches of six). Using the back of the spoon, flatten the cookies out a little. Place in the oven and bake for 7-10 minutes until the edges are golden and bubbly. Remove from oven and let cool for about 5 minutes. Transfer to a cooling rack and repeat with remaining mixture. 5. While the florentines are baking, make the cashew coating. Melt the coconut oil in the same skillet over low heat, then add the cashew butter and stir well to combine. Once melted, add the vanilla bean and maple syrup. Stir well and turn off the heat. 6. Once the florentines have cooled, make sure that the cashew coating is still liquid. Spoon a couple teaspoons on the bottom of each cookie and spread it as evenly as possible. Place on a lined baking sheet, coating side up in the fridge or freezer to set. Once firm, repeat with remaining coating, except this time place the coating side down on the lined baking sheet. Place in the fridge or freezer to set, then enjoy! Store leftovers in the fridge or freezer in a tightly sealed container for up to two weeks. Once I started editing the new photos for this post, I realized that the last batch of Florentines werent as golden, or as flat as the previous batches. I decided to let that one go. And Im very proud of that. *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Copenhagen! Just a reminder about my first two cookbook events in CPH this Spring. The first will be an intimate talk and demonstration at SLOW Copenhagen, and the second will be a magical, celebratory dinner in collaboration with the local, organic grocer and kitchen, Kost. Click on the images for more info and tickets! Cant wait to see you there.  The post Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines appeared first on My New Roots.

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus

April 7 2017 My New Roots 

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus The first job I landed after moving to Copenhagen, was working as a chef in a little cafe. After a few weeks of consistently not burning lasagna and under seasoning everything, I was asked if I was interested in cooking on a few episodes on a local, public TV station. The producers suggested I choose a few dishes that I love, and filmed me in a friends kitchen, since mine was too small. My husband gently warned me beforehand that Danes dont respond well to overly-enthusiastic, hyperbolic Americans, so I faked it and was awkwardly not myself as I spoke lukewarmly about whole grains and beans, fermented things and dark leafy greens. The first recipe I made on the show was sprouted hummus, and although the recipe turned out well, I felt like a fraud. Because above all things, sprouts were, and still are, my true love. The show was on at 2 or 3 in the morning, and because I didnt have a television, I never actually saw it on air. Instead, I watched it on my computer on a borrowed CD, long after it had been on TV. Much to my dismay, the producers titled the show Cooking with Sareh, which still baffles me considering the fact that my name is spelled the exact same way in Danish. The program was poorly edited, badly lit, awkward in every sense, and in my attempts to come off as cool and nonchalant, I seemed utterly bored as I fondled chickpea sprouts - something that otherwise would get me pretty riled up. On the whole, this experience was totally mortifying, except for one small, redeeming factor. I was suddenly being recognized at work in the café, and on the bike paths of Christiania: hey sprout girl! theyd call at me. Its you! I didnt make your hummus, but your show is great, sprout girl, theyd say. If there was any consolation, this was it. I was Sprout Girl. So in case you missed my break out performance on Cooking with Sareh, and my reined-in, lackluster pitch about sprouts, here it is again. Because I am Sprout Girl forever and always. Sprouting is like any other kitchen endeavour: it seems pretty daunting until you actually do it, then youre left wondering what took you so long to try – a real facepalm moment. With simple equipment that you most likely have in your cupboard, and seeds that you already have in your pantry, its a fun and empowering practice that brings you one step closer to your food. Sprouts are so nutritious because they are life potential, ignited. When we soak a seed, we end its dormancy, and awaken the nutrition inside it needed to grow a plant which will in turn make more seeds and more plants. When we eat a sprout, we eat this potential! Pound for pound, sprouts have the largest amount of nutrients of any food. Did you get that? This is a big deal! And its all because sprouting increases vitamin content significantly, especially vitamin A, Bs, C and E, along with boosting calcium, iron, selenium, and zinc. The quality of protein and carbohydrates improves, as the sprouting process begins to break down the complex proteins and starches into amino acids, peptides, and simple carbohydrates needed by the seed to grow. At the same time, anti-nutrients such as phytic acid, protease and amylase inhibitors are neutralized. This makes a sprout very easy to digest with highly absorbable nutrients. Who is responsible for this influx of awesomeness? Its enzymes! Enzymes are compounds found in raw plants that are needed for nearly every biochemical process that takes place in our body, and something many of our modern diets are lacking. Sprouts are virtually loaded with them. There are up to 100 times more enzymes in sprouts than uncooked fruits and veggies! Enzymes are also what sets living food apart from raw food. Yes, raw foods still offer us enzymes, but eating a food that is alive guantees more enzymes, and in fact more nutrients altogether. As soon as a food is picked, it begins losing its nutrients. Imagine how much vitamin C is left in that orange, which has traveled hundreds, if not thousands of kilometers to get to your plate, and spent weeks, if not months in a storage facility before being dropped off at your local grocer. Sprouts are the remedy to this, pulsating with life and life-giving nutrients, and pretty much the freshest food you can eat outside of a garden. Sprouts are also incredibly low in calories, yet deliciously filling due to their high fiber and water content. A fantastic food to binge on, especially if youre trying to elbow out some of the other stuff from your diet. I love the versatility of sprouts, not only are there so many varieties, but they can be used in so many ways. Like this hummus for example! You can also go classic and top your sandwiches with sprouts, or fold them into grain salads, puree them into soups and even smoothies. I also love freshening up cooked dishes, like stir-fries, curries and pizzas with sprouts. Their crunch and earthy brightness are a welcoming balance to heavier, richer meals. If youre on a budget, sprouts are a sweet deal. Because the amount of food you sprout triples or quadruples in size, youll end up with way more to eat than you started with for the same price. Its kind of magical. Whats more, is that properly stored sprouts can last over a month, and some varieties up to 70 days. If youre prone to tossing away spoiled produce, sprouts will save you money, big time. Sprouting can take place anywhere you have access to fresh, clean water twice a day. Ive sprouted on road trips, beach holidays, visiting the in-laws...all over the place! And the groovy thing about taking your show on the road is that you can convince other people to get sprouting too. And sprouts are not just great for our health, but also the planet. Consider the fact that youre growing a garden right in your kitchen, using your own energy to make the magic happen. Its hyper-local food at its best! No chemicals or pesticides during the growing process, or fossil fuels for transportation. Could sprouts be the perfect food?! The answer is yes. But I may be a little biased. I am the Sprout Girl, after all. If you are concerned about mold or bacteria contamination, please understand that commercially-grown sprouts are propagated in an ideal environment for pathogens to proliferate. Just one more reason to grow your own sprouts at home where you can be sure of proper hygiene and care. Make sure that your jar or sprouting container is thoroughly clean, that youre rinsing your sprouts with cool water twice daily, and that your sprouts have plenty of airflow. After I drain my sprouts, I make sure that the seeds /­­ sprouts arent blocking the entire opening of the jar (see photo). If you follow these tips, you shouldnt have any problems. Scoring Seeds You can sprout just about anything, but the cheapest and easiest things are found in the bulk bin of your health food store! Lentils, beans, chickpeas, rice, buckwheat, wheat are all widely available and inexpensive. Its imperative that you choose organically-grown ingredients, as conventionally grown seeds are often irradiated, making them difficult, or even impossible to germinate. You can also purchase seeds online, especially the more specialty ones, like alfalfa, radish, onion, broccoli etc. Finding Equipment There are plenty of sprouting apparatuses that you can buy, but if youre just starting out, use a jar! I bet you already have one. – 1 sterilized, large-mouth, quart-sized glass jar with an airtight lid – small piece of cheesecloth – rubber band – a bowl or dish rack How to Sprout There are countless resources on this topic online, and even whole books written about sprouting, so I am presenting you with a very simple, yet rather foolproof technique. If you want to learn more (which I encourage you to do!) here’s a great place to learn about different methods, applications, as well as help and advice: Sprout People     Print recipe     Simple Sprouting Day 1 1. Prep (night) Take a quick glance at the seeds as you put them into the sterilized soaking container. Remove any stones, cracked /­­ damaged seeds, and rinse well. 2. Soak (night) A general rule is covering the seeds with 2-3 times the amount of water (e.g. 1 cup seeds : 2-3 cups water). Use pure, filtered, unchlorinated water. Skim off any seeds that are floating. Let sit for 8-12 hours. Day 2 1. Drain (morning) Put a piece of cheesecloth over the mouth of the jar and secure it with a rubber band. Drain the seeds letting all the water run out. 2. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 3. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 3 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 4 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) 3. Enjoy (night) Your sprouts are ready! The tail should be at least the length of the seed itself (if it is not quite there yet, continue with the rinsing and draining process until it is. Some seeds take a couple more days). If youre not going to eat all the sprouts right away, make sure you let the sprouts drain for at least 8 hours after their last rinse before you put them in the fridge. Never store wet sprouts, as they will spoil quickly. Store sprouts in the sprouting jar with an airtight lid for one month, or more.     Print recipe     Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus Makes 4 cups Ingredients: 2 cloves garlic 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml tahini 1/­­2 tsp. fine salt, to taste 2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (optional) zest of 1 lemon 4 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 4 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 4 cups /­­ 500g sprouted chickpeas (start with 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 300g dried chickpeas) Directions: 1. Pulse the garlic in the food processor until minced. Add all other ingredients, except for the sprouted chickpea and blend until you have a paste. Add the chickpeas and blend on high until as smooth as possible. Season to taste and adjust more salt /­­ spice if desired. To achieve an even smoother consistency, scoop hummus into a high-speed blender and blend on high for an additional 10-15 seconds. Serve immediately and store leftovers in an airtight container for up to five days. I hope that this process seems simple enough for you to try. I promise that once you start sprouting, you won’t be able to stop! It’s so easy, fun, and connecting – not to mention delicious. Good luck and happy sprouting, dear friends! xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Copenhagen! I am thrilled to announce my first two cookbook events in CPH this Spring. The first will be an intimate talk and demonstration at SLOW Copenhagen, and the second will be a magical, celebratory dinner in collaboration with the local, organic grocer and kitchen, Kost. Click on the images for more info and tickets! Can’t wait to see you there.    The post It’s Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

Double Chocolate Chunk Sunbutter Cookies

February 23 2017 My New Roots 

Double Chocolate Chunk Sunbutter Cookies Dear friends! Im on tour! And what a total blast and a half its been so far - my mind is blown by the outpouring of enthusiasm and pure LOVE here in New York City. Thanks to all of you for coming out to the events with your biggest smiles and warmest hearts. Taking my book on the road sure is a change of pace from my quiet, private, and relatively introverted life in Copenhagen. But, seeing as I like humans so much, I welcome the explosive energy, side-splitting laughter, and long hugs that this tour has brought so far. I feel like you, dear readers, are the most beautiful sort there are, and I am so lucky to have friends wherever I go. Thank you. Cannot wait to see what the next few weeks hold! Just a reminder that I am heading to Toronto, Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, San Fran and LA – check out my Events page for updated info! In case, you haven’t heard, this latest cookbook of mine, Naturally Nourished, is all about how to take grocery store staples and turn them into powerfully delicious and nutritious meals for you and your family. The recipes are on the simpler side than my first cookbook, and use only familiar ingredients. It was really fun to create this work, since you know how much I dig on the weird stuff: chaga, mucuna pruriens, schisandra berry, ho shu wu, pearl (yup, pearl). But lets get real, how many of you are going to go out and find ground up pearl to put in your morning elixir? Right. So, this book was a response to the way health food can be sometimes: inaccessible, alienating, and even elitist. I dont like to see the system moving in that direction because I believe that health is everyones right, and since we all have access to the good stuff at the local supermarket, lets not lose sight of the powerful foods that are right under our noses. Dark leafy greens, brassicas, root veggies, squash, stone fruit, citrus, herbs, garlic, ginger - you get where Im going with this. Naturally Nourished is a celebration of simple, honest, real food, and it will show you how to prepare it in a way that is easy, and crazy-tasty too. So these cookies. I am pretty over the moon for them. And they are definitely the most decadent recipe in the cookbook - loaded with serious chunks of dark chocolate, a moist, cake-y crumb and unparalleled richness. The sunflower seed crust around the outside adds fabulous texture and tooth, and the perfect crunchy contrast to the creamy chocolate. I know that the vegans out there may be a little disappointed with this recipe, but please know how darn hard I tried to make them just as good without the eggs! This cookbook was a challenge to see if I could use only very basic grocery store ingredients for every single recipe in the cookbook, so I couldnt cheat and employ a fancy vegan egg-replacer here, but I am pretty sure it would work. The eggs are important in the recipe not only to bind the ingredients together, but to dry out the dough in the oven, and create the fluffy consistency. Therefore, do not try this with a flax or chia egg - sad, sad results will ensue. Trust. Just a note for when you do make these: the cookie dough is very wet. Youll be raising an eyebrow for sure, wondering if youve done everything correctly, but stay the course and drop those cookie dough balls into the sunflower seeds - they not only act as a tasty, crunchy coating, they also help you with handling, and prevent the cookies from turning into total puddles in the oven. If youre pressed for time, skip making your own sunflower seed butter and just use store-bought. To ensure the cookies turn out just the way they are supposed to, use an unsalted, unflavoured sunbutter or another type of seed or nut butter altogether! Ive tried them with almond butter and they were bangin. You can also coat the cookies in another seed or chopped up nuts. Hazelnuts would be delightful. Or cacao nibs!     Print recipe     Double Chocolate Chunk Sunbutter Cookies Makes 20 cookies Ingredients: 2 large eggs 2 tsp. pure vanilla extract 1 cup /­­ 250ml Sunflower Seed Butter (recipe follows), or use storebought 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml pure maple syrup 1 teaspoon baking soda?1/­­4 teaspoon fine sea salt?1/­­2 cup /­­ 45g cocoa powder 3 1/­­2 oz. /­­ 100g dark chocolate (70% or higher), roughly chopped 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 170g raw, unsalted, shelled sunflower seeds Directions: 1. Preheat the oven to 325°F /­­ 160°C. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. 2. In a small bowl, whisk together the eggs and vanilla. Add the seed butter and mix thoroughly. Add the maple syrup, baking soda, and salt and fold together. Sift in the cocoa powder and stir to incorporate. Fold in the chopped chocolate. 3. Place the sunflower seeds in a separate bowl. Wet your hands slightly with water. Spoon the dough into about 20 portions and roll each into a rough ball (the dough will be very wet, but this is normal!). 4. Drop the dough balls into the bowl of seeds and roll to coat them in the seeds. Flatten the balls out slightly and place them on the prepared baking sheet about 2 inches /­­ 5cm apart (they spread a lot!). 5. Bake the cookies for 10 to 13 minutes. Let them cool slightly before serving. Store the cookies in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 1 week. Sunflower Seed Butter Makes about 1 1/­­2 cups Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 400g raw, unsalted, shelled sunflower seeds Directions: 1. Preheat the oven to 350°F /­­ 180°C. 2. Place the sunflower seeds in an even layer on a rimmed baking sheet and toast until golden and fragrant, 10 to 15 minutes. Remove them from the oven and let cool. 3. Place the cooled sunflower seeds in a food processor and blend, occasionally scraping down the sides, until smooth and creamy (this process can take 10 minutes or more, so be patient). If the seeds are not releasing their oil, add a little olive oil to help the process. Once the mixture is creamy, transfer to a glass jar with a tight-fitting lid, and store in the fridge for up to 1 month.   I am beyond thrilled to be on tour with this second book. To be meeting so many of you who have been following my kitchen adventures for years and years, is beyond amazing. I feel like Ive said it a thousand times, but I really mean it: your generosity of spirit and support with all that I put out in the world truly humbles me. I feel so lucky to do what I do, and you are the ones that make it possible. With joy and deep gratitude, Sarah B. The post Double Chocolate Chunk Sunbutter Cookies appeared first on My New Roots.

Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Skhug

December 21 2016 My New Roots 

Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Skhug If youve been reading My New Roots for a while, youll be familiar with my obsession with Middle Eastern cuisine. Ingredients like tahini, lemon, pomegranate, sumac, zaatar, cardamom, thyme, and sesame have big, bold flavours, and act as strong backbones for plant-based recipes, so I enjoy them on a regular basis and rely on them heavily in my recipe development. And if I am out and about in the world, I seek out restaurants serving this style of food, knowing that theyll have a solid selection of vegetarian options with satisfying flavours. Speaking of which, whenever I am back home in Toronto, I love going to a restaurant called Fat Pasha. Its an Israeli place that serves the most decadent, delicious, over-the-top versions of all my favourites: falafel, hummus, fattoush, pickles, salatim, shakshuka...but the menu show-stopper is their whole roasted cauliflower. Brought to the table like a holiday roast, a giant knife sticking out of the top, ready to be carved, I love the ceremony of the entire thing, and the myriad of flavours and textures that it delivers. Slathered in tahini sauce, topped with glistening pomegranate jewels and golden toasted pine nuts, it is savoury, salty, sweet, herby, spicy, crunchy, creamy, nutty, BAM. Stunningly beautiful and deliciously satisfying. At Fat Pasha, they also serve the whole roasted cauliflower with an incredibly spicy, tasty concoction called skhug. Skhug is a Yemeni hot sauce made from chilies, spices and fresh herbs, mainly cilantro. It ranges from wicked hot to warmly herbaceous, with cumin, coriander, cloves, and black pepper providing added depth and complexity. I friggin love this stuff (*pours skhug over entire life*). Its delicious with hummus and pita, but also yummy folded into a grain salad, stirred into soups and stews, and drizzled over roast veggies, and to whisked into dressings and sauces. Skhug comes in two varieties, red (skhug adom) and green (skhug yarok). Both are delicious, but I chose green for my version since it tends to me more common, and I was trying to get into the festive spirit and looking for a contrast to the pommies, which were so assertively red. Use the kinds of chilies you can get your hands on, and add them to suit your taste. I (embarrassingly) only used one green Thai chili for my sauce, but I also wanted to enjoy the other flavours coming through (and also because I am a wuss). It was still very spicy, but not so much so that I couldnt generously dollop it on my cauliflower. Trying to recreate the whole roasted cauliflower dish at home is all too easy and the results are extraordinary. First, the cauliflower is doused in a spice-infused coconut oil before being roasted to golden perfection (this on its own is waaaay delish). But taking it to the next level is easy with a simple tahini sauce and the skhug, followed by a generous topping of toasted pine nuts and pomegranate seeds. This thing becomes unreasonably beautiful, just a warning, and if youre looking for something truly special to serve at a holiday meal this year - whether youre vegetarian or not - this recipe will impress the pants off anyone.     Print recipe     Whole Roasted Cauliflower with Skhug Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 large head cauliflower 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. coconut oil 1/­­2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp. ground paprika 1/­­4 tsp. ground turmeric 1/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1/­­4 cup /­­ 30g pine nuts 1 small pomegranate, seeds removed Skhug: 2 bunches cilantro (about 3 cups chopped) 1 clove garlic, minced 1-2 green chilies, minced (add more to taste) 1/­­2 tsp. cumin 1/­­4 tsp. ground cardamom Pinch ground cloves a couple grinds black pepper 1/­­4 – 1/­­2 tsp. fine grain sea salt, to taste 1 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 2 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 2 Tbsp. water, or more as needed Simple Tahini Sauce: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml tahini 1 Tbsp. lemon juice 1 small clove garlic, minced pinch salt 1 tsp. honey or other liquid sweetener 4-6 Tbsp. water, as needed Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F/­­200°C. 2. In a small saucepan over low-medium heat, melt coconut oil and add spices and salt. Stir to combine and remove from heat. 3. Remove any outer leaves from the cauliflower and wash it well. Pat dry with a clean towel, then pour the coconut oil and spice mixture over the top and rub it in to all the nooks and crannies, making sure to coat the bottom as well. Place on a baking sheet and in the oven to roast for about 45 minutes. If it is getting too much colour before it is cooked, place a piece of foil over the top to prevent it from burning. The cauliflower is finished when it is tender. 4. While the cauliflower is roasting, make the sauces. Start by washing the cilantro well and spinning it dry. In a food processor or blender, add all the skhug ingredients and blend on high to make a smooth sauce, or pulse to make a chunkier one. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary. (Store any leftovers in the fridge for up to one week.) 5. To make the tahini sauce, combine all ingredients together in a blender and blend on high until smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary. (Store any leftovers in the fridge for up to one week.) 6. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast the pine nuts, stirring often, until they are slightly golden. Remove immediately from the heat and set aside. 7. When the cauliflower is cooked through, remove it from the oven and place on a serving plate. Top with the various sauces, and sprinkle with the pine nuts and pomegranate seeds. Serve immediately and enjoy. This will be my last post before 2017, so I want to wish all of you out there a warm, happy, healthy holiday and an abundant new year! Thank you for all for your love and support with all of my projects this year: the My New Roots app, Naturally Nourished, the Gourmet Print Shop and the blog too. You will never know how much you all mean to me! For real. In health and happiness, Sarah B. *   *   *   *   *   * Exciting announcement! The Gourmet Print Shop is officially open! My vision of creating affordable and beautiful art for your walls is now a reality. After so many of you have requested high-res images of my food photography to print, Ive answered the call with larger-than-life photo files that you can download and print yourself. Its a fast, easy, and inexpensive solution to fill that blank space above the sofa, add some colour to the desk at your office, and keep you inspired in the kitchen. Did I mention it makes the most perfect holiday or hostess gift? Obviously. Check out the Gourmet Print Shop today and get printing! The post Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Skhug appeared first on My New Roots.

Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba

November 2 2016 My New Roots 

Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba Danes are not big pumpkin eaters. Carrots, sure. Cabbage, indeed. Potatoes, definitely. But even though they seem to have caught on to the Halloween jack-o-lantern carving thing, actually consuming pumpkins is not high on their list. Just last week I was at the grocery store and saw a display of huge spaghetti squash on clearance, being promoted as autumn decorations.  Pfff, what?! I scooped up as many as I could (I mean, they were less than two bucks a pop) and I excitedly starting telling the cashier about the wild and crazy deal in the produce aisle, all the amazing things you could do with this gourd, and how it turns into freakin noodles. She raised an eyebrow, but was largely unimpressed. Maintaining conviction, I awkwardly carried my bushel of spaghetti squash to my bike, but not before telling two random customers on the way out as well. Just trying to spread the word, people! So aside from decorative (and reminder: totally edible) spaghetti squash, there is really only one proper pumpkin here in Denmark, and that is the Hokkaido. These spherical, bright orange beauties are available at most grocery stores, and for good reason: they are a very delicious and super versatile variety. They are yummy roasted, stuffed, baked, blended into dips, or in soups and stews. I dig them because you can eat the skin, which gives a serious boost of carotenes and fibre. Hokkaido pumpkins can also be called Kuri squash, and similar varieties include red Kabocha, Hubbard and Ambercup. As a PSA to Denmark, I would love to suggest growing these or other varieties of pumpkin since every single type has something special to offer, besides a being a decoration that is. Anyway, on to the recipe! As soon as the one-and-only pumpkin hit the stores a couple weeks back, I made this soup. Craving something creamy and soothing to combat autumn drizzle, I blended the steamed pumpkin with ginger and miso for the most luscious of broths, made even more satisfying with the addition of soba noodles. A few nights later I made it again and added even more goodies: spring onion, seaweed, toasted sesame and sautéed shiitake mushrooms. So. Good. I am obsessed with the combination of the sweet pumpkin and savoury miso, especially with the spicy warmth of the ginger to bring it all together. I also love the consistency of the soup, which is thinner than most of the purées I make. Its really more broth-like, and coats the soba in the perfect way. Unbelievably comforting on a chilly fall night, this dish will be on heavy rotation here this season, and I hope in your home as well. Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba comes together in under 30 minutes, so its the perfect weeknight dinner. Plus, it is made mostly with pantry staples, so all you need to pick up at the store is a pumpkin! If you want to make this meal even faster, you can skip the toppings altogether, as the soup on its own is totally delicious, and can be made in under 20 minutes. It also freezes well, so make a double batch and store half in the freezer for your next there-is-nothing-to-eat emergency. You can thank me later. Miso delicious! Most people are familiar with miso from Japanese restaurants where miso soup is served, but beyond that I think Westerners greatly under utilize this miraculous umami gift from the gods! It is a consistent condiment in my kitchen repertoire and most times when I use it in something Ive served to guests, they often ask why the dish tastes so special. The answer is miso. Miso is a Japanese word meaning fermented beans. Traditionally, miso is made from soybeans and is found in the form of a thick paste. The process of making miso involves soaking cooking, and mashing soybeans, then finally inoculating the mix with koji (a specific mold spore) and salt. This mixture is transferred to a crock or barrel where it is left to ferment for months or years. Miso comes in various colours, depending on whether or not other legumes or grains were used in the fermentation process, and the length of fermentation. White, yellow, red, brown and dark brown miso are some of the shades youll see in the store. In general, lighter miso tends to be sweeter and milder, while darker miso leans towards the saltier and pungent. I generally keep two kinds in my fridge, since they taste so incredibly different. This recipe calls for light miso, and I really stress using this variety since a dark miso would be far too rich and overwhelming. I prefer to use dark miso in things like gravies and sauces. Either way though, miso is an explosive umami bomb that will add tons of complex, satisfying flavour to many of your favourite foods. Because of this six taste, miso gives plant-based foods that umph that it can be lacking. When buying miso, look for an organic or non-GMO product that is raw /­­ unpasteurized. Unpasteurized miso will always come in the form of a paste, whereas the instant miso soup that you can find on the dry goods shelf is likely pasteurized and therefore not as health-promoting. If your miso comes packaged in plastic, transfer it to an airtight clean glass jar or ceramic crock when you get home, and store it in the fridge for up to a year. Unpasteurized miso is full of live cultures and for that reason it should never be boiled. If you read this recipe through, youll see that I only add the miso at the end when the soup is in the blender. This is to ensure that we preserve all of those delicate nutrients and precious enzymes that would be destroyed with high heat. If you are going to reheat this soup, make sure to do so gently and stir constantly to avoid scorching. Some notes on the recipe ingredients: if you absolutely cannot find light miso, a simple vegetable stock or bullion can be used in its place. But it’s worth tracking down. Soba noodles can be found at Asian supermarkets, health food stores, and gourmet foods shops. Make sure to look for noodles that are 100% buckwheat flour, as many brands of soba will add wheat flour to act as a binder, and keep in mind that these will not be gluten-free. Some people also find the taste of pure soba noodles off-putting since buckwheat can taste very strong, but I love it! Finicky kids (and adults) may prefer the milder-flavour of brown rice noodles, or even whole grain pasta.     Print recipe     Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba Serves 4 as a main, 6 as a side Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 medium yellow onion 3/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 3 cloves garlic 1 medium, 2 lb /­­ 1kg Hokkaido pumpkin (or other favourite hard winter squash) 3 – 4 cups /­­ 750ml - 1 liter water 3 – 4 Tbsp. white or light miso 1 Tbsp. minced fresh ginger 175g /­­ 6oz. soba noodles (100% buckwheat) toppings: spring onion sesame seeds sautéed shiitake mushrooms seaweed, optional (I used oarweed, but any sea vegetable is good!) Directions: 1. Roughly chop onions, mince garlic. Wash the pumpkin well (as youll be eating the skin), and chop into chunks. 2. In a large stockpot, melt the coconut oil. Add the onions and salt, stir to coat and cook for about 10 minutes until the onions are just starting to caramelize. Add garlic and cook for about a minute until fragrant. 3. Add the pumpkin and stir to coat. Add 3 cups /­­ 750ml of water, cover, bring to a boil, and reduce to simmer for about 15 minutes, until the pumpkin is tender. 4. While the soup is cooking, prepare the toppings: Bring a pot of salted water to the boil. Cook soba noodles according to package directions, drain and lightly rinse. Slice spring onion, lightly toast sesame seeds in a dry skillet over medium heat, about 2-3 minutes. Sauté mushrooms in a lightly oiled skillet over high heat for 5-7 minutes. 5. Transfer the soup to a blender and blend on high until completely smooth. Add more water if necessary - youre looking for a creamy consistency, but it should not be thick like a paste. I like the soup to be on the thinner side for this dish. Add the miso, ginger and blend again until smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning as desired. Transfer soup back to the pot and keep warm (reheat if necessary, but try not to boil). 6. Ladle soup into bowls, top with soba, spring onion, sesame seeds, mushrooms and crumble the seaweed over top. Serve immediately and enjoy. This soup is wildly tasty and saisfying, and will probably make you look forward to cooler temperatures and nights spent in. I hope you all are having a lovely fall so far. Sending big love and cozy moments to you all, Sarah B. Show me your soups on Instagram: #MNRpupmkinmisobroth The post Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba appeared first on My New Roots.

Grilled Vegetable Ratatouille - And my second Cookbook!

September 7 2016 My New Roots 

Grilled Vegetable Ratatouille - And my second Cookbook! Ratatouille is one of those dishes that always sounds really good in theory: peak-season vegetables stewed together in a rich, tomato sauce with herbs and olive oil. How could this be anything but delicious? But whenever Ive ordered it at a restaurant, my high hopes have been dashed with a pile of mushy vegetables that isnt really a soup, or a stew or even a main dish. After a farmers market blow out last week, I was preparing a bunch of veggies for the grill: eggplant, zucchini, peppers, and considering a tomato-basil salad for the side. As the veggies were grilling it dawned on me that I had everything I needed to make ratatouille. My first instinct was to run and grab the veg off the barbeque, but I stopped myself realizing the great potential of adding the grilled goodies to the tomato base instead of the traditional method of cooking everything together. Would this simple change-up make the difference and prevent mushy-ness? It was just crazy enough to work. I got to caramelizing onions on the stove to create the base, then added garlic, tomatoes, lemon slices and balsamic. So far, so good. The veggies were beautifully charred and grill-marked when I went to check on them, so I pulled them off, gave them a rough chop and added them to the simmering tomato mixture. So far, so really good. As I was contemplating how to make this a more substantial meal, I remembered that I had cooked lentils in the fridge. If you recall my slightly gripe-y post about restaurants halfway catering to vegetarians with dishes that were delicious but not all that complete, youll see how traditional ratatouille definitely falls into this category. The quickest fix and simplest solution is adding lentils, in those cases and this one. So without hesitation the pulses took the plunge and not only added protein and fiber, but gorgeous texture and colour as well. For the win! The final result is something I am pretty stoked about and definitely making again. Its a rich-tasting, chunky, hearty summer-in-a-bowl. My ratatouille may not have much in common with the classic version beyond its base ingredients, but I think that its far more filling and delicious. The grilled veggies prevent the mushiness from taking hold, as they miraculously hold their shape and tenderness while adding a bonus flavour layer of smokiness. If you dont have lentils, chickpeas or white beans would make fabulous stand-ins. You can also leave the legumes out altogether, but they definitely turn this light side dish into a more complete meal. To take my Grilled Vegetable Ratatouille over the top, serve it with plenty of olive oil drizzled over the top and a solid hunk of bread or toast on the side. This dish keeps well for up to four days in the fridge, or I imagine in the freezer for a few months. Ive already made another batch for a future dinner - I can hardly wait for the next time Im too tired to cook.     Print recipe     Grilled Vegetable Ratatouille Serves 4-5  Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 150g black or du Puy lentils (about 1 1/­­2 cup cooked or 1 can), optional 1 large red onion 2 Tbsp. coconut oil 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 4 cloves garlic 1 pint cherry tomatoes 1 pint mixed large tomatoes (whatever your market /­­ store has in season) 2 14oz /­­ 400ml cans whole tomatoes 4 slices of lemon 2 tsp. balsamic vinegar 1 large eggplant 2 red, yellow, or orange bell peppers 2 small green zucchini 1 small yellow zucchini generous handful fresh basil leaves, plus more for garnish small handful fresh oregano leaves 5 sprigs of fresh thyme cold-pressed olive oil for garnish crusty wholegrain sourdough bread or toast, for serving, optional Directions: 1. If possible, soak the lentils overnight or for up to 12 hours. Drain, rinse and place in a pot and cover with about 2 inches /­­ 5cm fresh, cold water. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer and cook until tender - about 10-15 minutes if youve soaked them, or about 20 minutes if un-soaked. Drain any excess water and set aside. 2. While the lentils are cooking, prepare the ratatouille base: slice the onion into thick rings and add them to a large saucepan with the coconut oil and salt. Once the oil has melted, stir to coat the onions and them let cook, stirring occasionally until the onions have lightly caramelized, about 15 minutes. Mince the garlic and add it to the onions, cook for a couple minutes until fragrant. Add the canned tomatoes and use the back of a large spoon to crush them up a little. 3. Roughly chop the large tomatoes and cherry tomatoes, leaving a few of the cherry tomatoes whole. Add all of the tomatoes to the pot and stir to combine. Add the lemon slices and balsamic vinegar, bring to a low simmer and cook covered while you grill the vegetables. 4. Preheat your grill to medium-high. Slice the eggplant and zucchini into rounds and slice the peppers in half then remove the seeds. Place the vegetables on the grill and close the lid. Cook for 5-7 minutes until the underside has slight grill marks. Flip and continue to grill on the other side until the vegetables are tender but not mushy. Let cool slightly, then roughly chop into bite-sized pieces. 5. Add the grilled vegetables to the pot along with the lentils, basil, oregano and thyme. Taste and add salt and freshly cracked black pepper to suit your taste. Stir well, bring to a simmer and let cook for about five minutes. Divide ratatouille among bowls. Drizzle generously with olive oil, garnish with basil, and serve hot with crusty bread. The next thing Im going to tell you has been the second most difficult secret Ive ever kept...Ive written another cookbook!!! Its called Naturally Nourished: Healthy, Delicious Meals made with Everyday Ingredients, and it will be available for purchase February 14, 2017. This book was a major departure from the first cookbook, and a true response to the feedback Ive received from you. Some readers found the ingredient lists from the first book too daunting, expensive, or unfamiliar, so the recipes from this next one can all be found at a discount grocery store! I wanted to remind everyone (including myself) that we all have access to fresh, healthy food in our supermarket, and that by preparing it consciously with simple techniques, we can make incredibly tasty meals every day on any budget. I absolutely loved creating this book as it pushed myself to the creative limits. I am so proud of the recipes and I know youre going to love them as much as I do! Ill keep you all updated as far as pre-orders go and my book tour. Thank you all again for inspiring me to write this book! All love, Sarah B Show me your Grilled Vegetable Ratatouille on Instagram: #MNRratatouille The post Grilled Vegetable Ratatouille – And my second Cookbook! appeared first on My New Roots.

Brew your own Kombucha!

July 20 2016 My New Roots 

Brew your own Kombucha! This post has literally been years in the making. After countless requests for a kombucha brewing method and recipe, I finally feel confident enough to write about such a HUGE topic. Considering the fact that there are entire books about this one subject, Ill start off by saying that I do not consider myself a kombucha-brewing expert. Although Ive brewed hundreds of liters of the stuff by now, I am still learning and just happy to share my processes and experiences with you so far. Everyone has a slightly different way of brewing and this is mine - it works perfectly for me and I hope for you too! Making kombucha, like any kitchen project seems pretty daunting until you actually do it. Once you take the first step and brew your own batch, you wont believe how simple and easy it is to make your own kombucha and be able to drink it every day of your life! Youll also wonder why you waited so long to start. With just a 20-minute time investment every 7-10 days youll have access to the most delicious, high-vibe kombucha youve ever tasted at a faction of the cost of buying from the store. Plus, if you make it yourself, it will be 100% raw and full of those precious, digestion-supporting enzymes that our diets are typically lacking, whereas commercial kombucha has often been pasteurized – a process that destroys enzymes. You can ferment it to suit your taste, make it as fizzy as you desire, and even add flavourings. How rad is that? What is Kombucha? Although kombucha is experiencing a major surge in popularity, it has actually been around for thousands of years. It is essentially sweetened tea, fermented with the help of a SCOBY, transformed into a fizzy, effervescent drink. SCOBY is an acronym, which stands for Symbiotic Culture Of Bacteria and Yeast. Its an odd-looking thing - often compared to an organ, a slippery mushroom, or a rubbery pancake - but its the essential ingredient in making the miracle beverage that is kombucha. Its flavours can range from pleasantly vinegar-y to champagne-like, with sweetness varying according to the original brew and second fermentations. Where can I get a SCOBY? Since the SCOBY duplicates every time you make kombucha, there are plenty out there in the world for free! I recommend asking at your local health food store - in my experience it seems like the place to either purchase one, or connect with someone who brews and enjoys spreading the kombucha gospel and giving their extra SCOBYs away. Alternatively, try your local Craigstlist to find a culture. You can even buy them online. Here is a worldwide source: www.kombu.de What about sugar? Yes, you need sugar to brew kombucha but that doesnt mean that youll be consuming it - its only food for the SCOBY! What starts off as very sweet tea completely transforms through the fermentation process, and that SCOBY turns all of that food into a delightful mixture of beneficial organic acids, B-vitamins, and enzymes. If its something you are concerned about, just let your kombucha ferment for the full 10 days, or longer. The longer the tea ferments the less sugar it contains. Usually by day 10 there isnt a trace left - but your tea will be rather acidic-tasting just so you know! There are a few types of sugar you can use for feeding the SCOBY, but cane sugar is the most recommended by seasoned brewers. I use the least processed form of cane sugar I can find - organic evaporated cane juice - but even the most sugar-avoiding, health-conscious people I know brew with refined white sugar. Remember: the sugar feeds the SCOBY, not you! What about caffeine? The caffeine range in kombucha is extremely broad, and is mostly dependent on the type of tea used to brew it. Black tea contains substantially more caffeine than green tea for instance, and since I am sensitive to caffeine, I always brew with green tea. In general, brewed kombucha will contain approximately 1/­­3 of the caffeine of the original tea. If black tea contains 30-80mg of caffeine per cup, the same sized up of kombucha would contain 10-25mg. Green tea kombucha may have just 2-3mg per cup. Whatever you do, do NOT use decaffeinated tea to brew kombucha. Instead, blend the black tea with green tea or simply use green tea alone. What about alcohol? Fermenting anything sweet with yeasts is going to produce booze, that is just nature! With kombucha youre looking at an average of 0.5 – 1% alcohol by volume. With home-brewing, there is always a risk of more alcohol forming since it is in an uncontrolled environment, so keep that in mind if that is a concern for you or someone you are serving it to. What are the health benefits of Kombucha? First, kombucha is a probiotic drink, so it is an excellent beverage for improving digestion, and supporting healthy bacteria in the gut. Its high enzyme content also promotes healthy digestion and nutrient assimilation. Lab tests show that kombucha has antiviral, antibacterial, and antifungal properties, and the ability to improve liver function and reduce oxidative stress in the body. Many people report success in relieving their symptoms of arthritis, allergies, chronic fatigue, hypertension, metabolic disorders, and digestive issues. What I think is very exciting and promising about kombucha however, are the acids formed during fermentation. These acids have incredible detoxifying and antioxidant capabilities. Glucuronic acid, for example, is the bodys most important detoxifier and made by the oxidation of glucose. Glucuronic acid binds to toxins in the liver and flushes them out through the kidneys. It also works in conjunction with gluconic acid, which binds with heavy metals and ushers them out of our systems. Acetic acid inhibits the action of harmful bacteria. Usnic acid protects against viruses through its antibiotic properties. Malic acid helps detoxify the liver. Butyric acid is produced by the beneficial yeasts in kombucha and protects cellular membranes and combines with gluconic acid to strengthen the walls of the gut to combat harmful yeasts such as candida albicans. Of all the healthy habits Ive adopted in my life, Id say that drinking kombucha has actually made a difference in how I feel. Every time I take a sip it feels like every cell of my body is screaming YAAAAAHHHHHSSSSSS! Really and truly. To me, it is life elixir, and a fabulous drink to add to your healthy lifestyle. But I will also say that kombucha is not a panacea. The hype around this beverage has reached astronomical heights and I believe its important to consume kombucha without the expectation that its going to change your life. What works for me, may work for you and it may not. At the end of the day, kombucha is purely delicious and I think its best to enjoy it for that reason alone. Can I drink too much kombucha? Kombucha, like anything, should be enjoyed responsibly. Just as you wouldnt eat a pound of chia seeds in a sitting, nor should you drown yourself in kombucha (although it would be a delicious way to go). If you have never had kombucha before, start out with about half a cup (125ml) and work your way up over the course of a few weeks or months. I probably drink around 1-2 cups a day (250 - 500ml) but my body is used to it and I too eased into this amount. Remember: food is medicine! You never know how your body will react, so its best to take things slow with such powerful potions. Second fermentation – flavouring your brew and making your kombucha fizzy Although kombucha straight after the first fermentation is delish, I love to flvour it and make it really fizzy through a second fermentation. This involves adding a sweet substance, like fresh fruit or juice (I use unfiltered apple juice), to the bottles of brewed kombucha and letting it sit, sealed at room temperature for another couple of days instead of refrigerating it right away. This extra dose of sugar will feed the kombucha further and produce gas, which builds up inside the sealed bottle. This step is optional, but will make your kombucha really special and sparkly! Its essential that you use flip-top bottles with good seals for this step, since you want the gas to build inside the bottles at this stage. But because the pressure can be quite strong, I always recommend burping your bottles once a day until they have reached the amount of fizz youre after. Simply flip the top on the bottles and you should hear the gas escaping, which is just enough to take the pressure off - there will still be plenty of sparkle in the kombucha. If you fail to burp your bottles, you may end up with an explosion on your hands! Needless to say this is quite dangerous, so set a timer for once  day if youre a forgetful person. Taking a break from fermenting There will come a time when youll have to pause your kombucha brewing cycle – perhaps if youre traveling for a period of time, or simply feel like stopping - in which case, you need to know how to take a break. Remove the SCOBY from the jar, separate the mother and the baby and put them into the same or separate glass jars (separate if youre giving one away) with enough brewed kombucha to cover it, and seal with a plastic lid (remember that kombucha can not come into contact with metal, so stay on the safe side and use plastic). Keep this in the fridge where the temperature will slow down fermentation, and it will keep for many months. When you want to brew your new batch, remove the SCOBY from the fridge and let it come to room temperature before adding it to the sweetened and cooled tea, along with kombucha from your last batch, the SCOBY and the liquid it was stored in. If you can time it properly, its a nice to be able to bottle your last batch right before you leave so that you can put your SCOBY away at the end of a cycle. I time it so that my second fermentation ends on my travel day so that I can store my bottles in the fridge while Im gone. If it doesnt exactly line up, you can do this by increasing the first or second fermentations by a few days. Remember that if you bottle early, it will be sweeter, and if you leave it longer it will be more acidic. Some people will leave their kombucha brewing for up to a month and that may suit you, but I personally wouldnt leave mine for more than 2 weeks. If you are flexible on the taste and dont mind these flavour variations, it will be a lot easier to time your break. Whatever you do, dont start a brew right before you leave for more than a couple weeks (unless you like very vinegar-y kombucha), and definitely dont leave your second fermentation bottles out at room temperature! Youll come home to an epic mess or worse.     Print recipe     Homebrewed Kombucha Makes 1 gallon /­­ 4 liters Equipment: something to brew tea in (very large teapot or stockpot) 1 five-quart /­­ five-liter glass jar 4 one-quart /­­ one-liter flip-top glass bottles tightly woven cloth (a clean tea towel, paper towel, or many layers of cheesecloth) rubber band wooden spoon Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 210g organic, evaporated cane juice or raw sugar (you can also use refined white sugar) 2 Tbsp. loose black or green tea OR 8 tea bags (I prefer green) 4 quarts /­­ liters water 2 cups /­­ 500ml kombucha tea (from your last batch or acquired) 1 SCOBY (from your last batch or acquired) Second fermentation (optional): 3 cups /­­ 750ml fruit juice of your choice OR 1 cup chopped fresh or dried fruit Optional flavourings: fresh or dried fruit fresh ginger /­­ ginger juice fresh or dried herbs and spices honey or maple syrup food-grade essential oils Method: 1. Brew the tea. Use unchlorinated /­­ unflouridated water. Bring to the boil and pour over the tea of your choice and let steep for 20-30 minutes (you want it to be very strong). If using a small tea pot, brew two pots and pour brewed tea into your kombucha container. 2. Sweeten the tea. Add the 1 cup /­­ 210g of sugar and still well to dissolve. 3. Cool the tea. This step is important since the SCOBY does not tolerate heat and has the potential to die if added to hot liquid. To speed up the cooling process, I brew 8 cups /­­ 2 liters of strong tea, then add 8 cups /­­ 2 liters of cold water. This way, it usually takes only an hour or two to reach room temperature. 4. Add 2 cups /­­ 500ml pre-made kombucha and the SCOBY. Add the pre-brewed kombucha, which raises the acidity level of the tea. This aids the fermentation process, but also protects the SCOBY from harmful bacteria during the initial fermentation phase. If it is your first time brewing kombucha, simply purchase 2 cups /­­ 500ml of kombucha to add to the cooled tea, along with whatever liquid your SCOBY came with. If you are bottling your own kombucha, simply add 2 cups /­­ 500ml from your last batch. Remove all of your jewelry and wash your hands thoroughly. Gently slip the SCOBY into the tea. 5. Cover. Use a piece of fabric that is tightly woven (a clean tea towel works well) or several layers of cheesecloth, secured with a rubber band. You can even use a piece of paper towel or a coffee filter. The point here is to allow air to flow in and out of the brewing container, while keeping pests like fruit flies out - they love this stuff! 6. Give your kombucha a home. Place the kombucha container in a place where it will not be disturbed or jostled, out of direct sunlight, but where it will get enough airflow (a small cupboard is therefore not the best place). I leave mine out on the counter where I can keep an eye on it, but I do not move it until day 7 when I start tasting. 7. Let ferment for 7-10 days. During the fermentation time, you may see a lot of activity in the brewing container. Bubbles, film-y bits, and the mother SCOBY floating and around and changing positions are all normal occurrences. After a few days youll notice the surface of the tea changing and becoming cloudy or opaque-looking. This is the new SCOBY forming and is a great sign that you have a healthy brew on the way! As the days The fermentation time depends on a few factors, such as the temperature of the environment (warmer temperatures speed fermentation), but also your preferences. If you like a sweeter kombucha, one week may be enough time. If you like a less sweet, more vinegar-y kombucha then allowing the brew to ferment for 10 days or more may be what youre into. I recommend tasting the kombucha every day from day 7 onwards and bottle it once its reached a taste that you enjoy. Its totally subjective and totally up to you! Thats one reason its so great to brew your own. 8. Remove SCOBY and 2 cups /­­ 500ml kombucha. Once your kombucha tea tastes just the way you want it to, prepare to bottle it. Take off all your jewelry and wash your hand thoroughly. Remove the SCOBY 9a. Bottle kombucha and repeat the process. I like to pour the kombucha tea from the large brewing jar into a container with a spout to avoid spills. You can also use a funnel for this process. Seal the bottles and place in the fridge. And now it’s time to brew a fresh batch! Start up at step 1 and complete the cycle. Now you’re a kombucha brewer! 9b. Second fermentation – optional. If you want to carry out the second fermentation, divide the juice or fruit among the bottles first, then add the brewed kombucha on top. Seal the bottles and let at room temperature for 2-3 days until it is carbonated to your liking, then store in the fridge. Very important: remember to release the pressure in the bottles every day that they sit at room temperature - this is called burping - open the lid briefly to let any excess gas out, which will prevent an explosion (I am totally not kidding). 10. Enjoy! It’s finally time to enjoy your kombucha! Drink it as is, or flavour it further as you like. I like to add sliced seasonal fruit to my glass before serving, a few slices of ginger, essential oils, superfoods like spirulina or more fresh juice. Important things to note: 1. Kombucha survives and thrives on cane sugar. You can use raw cane sugar like I do, instead of bleached white sugar, but both work fine. Honey, maple syrup, coconut sugar etc. and other healthier alternatives have very mixed results. I realize its hard for any health-conscious person to use sugar, but remember that the SCOBY is fed, not sweetened with sugar. 2. Always use unchlorinated /­­ unflouridated water for brewing the tea. 3. Do not use herbal tea or any tea that contains flavourings or oils, Earl Grey tea for instance. Stick with organic, pure black or green tea leaves /­­ bags. 4. Do not allow the SCOBY to come into contact with metal at any time (remember to remove your jewelry before handling the SCOBY). 5. Wash your hands and your equipment extremely thoroughly every time. Vinegar is better for cleaning than soap as it does not leave any residue that can harm the SCOBY. 6. Keep the critters out! Use very tightly woven fabric to cover your brewing container. 7. The SCOBY is very sensitive to air contaminants, so dont burn incense or smoke near the brewing container. 8. If mold forms, or if you see any worms /­­ flies in the kombucha or on the SCOBY, toss the entire batch including the SCOBY and start over. Do not be discouraged - it happens! I know that this seems like a lot of information, but I wanted this post to be thorough so that you could have all the information you need to start brewing! If you have another variation on brewing, or tips and tricks that you think others would find helpful, please let me know in the comments! And because I know you’re going to have a lot of questions, I’ll try to check in on this post more often to answer them. Here are some great online resources for those who want more information on brewing kombucha: - The most in-depth kombucha brewing info and how-to videos: Cultures for Health - Step-by-step photos: The Kitchn - Excellent troubleshooting resource: Bestweb Remember that it may take a few batches (and a few SCOBYs) to get your kombucha just the way you like it, but its a really fun, empowering and delicious project that will make you feel like you can do anything in the kitchen! Did I mention youll get to drink kombucha every day for the rest of your life? Yes, theres that too. All love and happy brewing, Sarah B. Show me your kombucha on Instagram: #MNRkombucha *   *   *   *   *   * More news! The My New Roots recipe app now has an updated iPad design and it synchronizes your favorites, shopping list and recipe notes between your iPhone and iPad. In other words: make your shopping list on the iPad, and you’ll have it right on the phone when you’re in the store. Neat! If you already have the app, just update it. If not, click here to go to the App Store. The post Brew your own Kombucha! appeared first on My New Roots.

Sanity-Saving One Pot Pasta

May 26 2016 My New Roots 

Sanity-Saving One Pot Pasta Life is beautifully full these days. Between caring for an energetic toddler and running my own business while attempting to carve out some time to cook, have a social life, exercise, pursue creative things and do laundry? Its full-on. And wonderful. And then there are days when I feel that I may just lose it. We were sitting down to dinner the other night, to a very simple meal that I had thrown together in a mad dash. My husband took a few bites, looked up and said: This is really, really good. Really? I asked in disbelief. I actually cooked the whole thing in 10 minutes and in the same pot (a triumph for me - Im a bit of a tornado in the kitchen). This is the kind of thing you should blog, Sarah. People like simple things. Not that I had forgotten this fact, but I also feel the need to like, blow your minds most of the time. Or at least attempt to, ya know? This was not a blow-your-mind kind of dinner. It was made on a busy weeknight from stuff we had in the fridge and pantry, while a hangry 2-year-old clung to my bare legs since he had already pulled my pants off. If this situation sounds familiar, this dinner will be your new go-to. It’s simple, fast, easy, and most importantly, very delicious. Just because you’re going insane doesn’t mean that you’ve lost all sense of taste. In fact, saving one’s sanity often hinges on proximity to good food, as evidenced by post break-up ice cream binges, and bad-day-at-work pizza parties. I get it. Legume-based pastas have been popping up in regular grocery stores all over Copenhagen lately, and I am loving them! They are made from just legumes (red lentils, green peas, adzuki beans etc.), they cook in about 6 minutes and contain unbelievably high amounts of protein and fiber, thanks to the only ingredient being, well, legumes. Although I have some rules in my diet which exclude most things that I couldnt recreate in my own kitchen, these pastas are a serious life-saver when I dont have a ton of time to make dinner, and a seriously great alternative to wheat pasta. I will compromise a little when my sanity is on the line, won’t you? The brilliance of this dish, besides the fact that it is so fast to make, is that its cooked in just one pot! Although it differs from the one-pot pastas Ive seen online where everything is cooked together from the beginning, my version requires a little bit of timing on your part, adding the asparagus and peas about three minutes before the pasta is cooked. Theoretically, you could toss everything together in the same pot from the get-go, but this produces overcooked veggies, and no one really digs that. You can use any legume-based pasta you like this, in any shape that appeals to you. And, you can really pick any seasonal veggies that cook in the same amount of time or slightly less than the pasta. Its great with broccoli, sweet potato, green beans, zucchini or snap peas. I even enjoy this dish cold - so its the perfect make-and-take meal for a picnic dinner. If you are not vegan, this is delicious with some grated Pecorino Romano grated in, or crumbled feta.     Print recipe     Sanity-Saving One Pot Pasta Serves 4-6 Ingredients: 200g legume-based pasta (I used mung bean fettucini) 1 lb. /­­ 500g asparagus 2 cups /­­ 300g fresh or frozen shelled green peas sea salt for cooking water and garnish 4 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil zest of 1 organic lemon 3 Tbsp. capers (about 1 small 60g jar) A large handful fresh mint, leaves only Directions: 1. Put a large pot of water on the stove and heat over a high flame. 2. While the water is heating up, wash, trim, and chop the asparagus. Shell the peas (or take them out of the fridge /­­ freezer). Wash and roughly chop the mint. Once the cooking water is boiling, salt it generously (it should taste salty). 3. Add the pasta and set a timer for about 3 before the suggested cooking time. Three minutes before the pasta is done, add the asparagus and peas. Cook for three minutes. Drain well and place back in the pot. Add the olive oil, lemon zest, drained capers and a few pinches of sea salt. Season to taste. Fold in the fresh mint and serve. Show me your pasta on Instagram: #MNRsanitypasta The post Sanity-Saving One Pot Pasta appeared first on My New Roots.

Emmas Tahini, Orange + Coconut Muesli

April 29 2016 My New Roots 

Emmas Tahini, Orange + Coconut Muesli I cant recall the exact day that I stumbled into Emma Galloways world, but I do remember being completely and utterly awe-struck, inspired, and grateful. Her blog, My Darling Lemon Thyme has been on my highly edited list of sites that I actually read, and her delicious, innovative recipes have been making regular appearances in my kitchen ever since. Joy of joys, Emma released a cookbook, and just like the blog, it is a true gem. Flipping through this book is kind of like shopping in a store where everything fits you perfectly, is the exact colour you want, and strikes the perfect balance between need and want. For instance, I need a recipe for gluten-free sourdough bread, and, I want another recipe for granola. She takes familiar ingredients and genius-ly transforms them into something unique and special that makes you ask: why didnt I think of that?! Sweet Potato and Kale Latkes, Mung Bean Pancakes, Buckwheat Tabouli – the list goes on. Emma uses exclusively plant-based, gluten-free, whole food ingredients, and taste comes first! I want to tuck into every single one of her meals and treats. Although it was nearly impossible to choose just one to share here, the recipe I settled on was Tahini, Orange + Coconut Toasted Muesli, as it sounded like the best and most exciting new way of enjoying granola, and the perfect way to bid farewell to those last winter oranges in the market. The idea of adding tahini to granola was totally brilliant (thanks again, Emma), along with the flavours of toasted coconut and oranges. Yum. After baking, the additions of dried fruit are really special and deliver bright, juicy hits throughout the toasty nuts, seeds and grains. Its incredibly balanced and tasty, and makes a stupendous topping for yogurt, porridge - even as snack eaten right out of the jar. A bag of this on a recent trip halfway across the world proved to be a real lifesaver! The next time I make this recipe, I am going to try it with rolled oats instead of the quinoa flakes. Although it was a nice change to use a different grain, I find the texture of quinoa flakes a little too light and powdery - I prefer the heft and crunch that oats give to granola. Ive even wondered about using buckwheat groats, which I love in cereal. I will keep you guys posted when I try something new!     Print recipe     Tahini, orange + coconut toasted muesli Makes 1.5kg /­­ 2 pounds Ingredients: 5 cups /­­ 500g quinoa flakes 2 cups /­­ 180g unsweetened shredded or flaked coconut 1/­­2 cup /­­ 65g cashews, roughly chopped 1/­­2 cup /­­ 75g whole raw almonds, roughly chopped 1/­­2 cup /­­ 65g pumpkin (pepita) seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 60g sunflower seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35g sesame seeds 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml virgin coconut oil 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml un-hulled tahini 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml honey, pure maple or brown rice syrup (I used maple syrup) 1 tsp. pure vanilla extract the finely grated zest of 2 oranges 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 cup /­­ 200g natural raisins or sultanas 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 165g dried cranberries 1 cup /­­ 95g firmly packed dried apple slices, roughly chopped 1/­­2 cup /­­ 80g pitted dried dates, roughly chopped Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 180°C. Combine quinoa flakes, coconut, cashews, almonds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower and sesame seeds in a large bowl using your hands to combine thoroughly. Combine coconut oil, honey or syrup, tahini, vanilla, orange zest and sea salt in a small pan and bring slowly to the boil, stirring constantly until melted and combined. Pour over dry ingredients and mix well. 2. Transfer to a large deep baking sheet and bake for 25-30 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes, until toasty and golden brown. Watch those edges like a hawk as they have a tendency to burn. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool. Stir in the dried fruit and transfer to a large glass jar or airtight container. Will keep for 2-3 weeks as long as airtight.   Thank you, Emma, for sharing your gifts with the world. We love granola, and we love you. xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * I’m also really excited to share some (hopefully) helpful information for you in the new Resources section here on the blog. Since I get many, many emails with similar questions about the practicalities of running My New Roots, I have decided to write a few pieces on the inner workings of this food blog – and where I don’t have the answer I have asked my team to kindly chip in… you know, about hosting and coding and technical stuff that makes my brain hurt Have a look and let me know if there is anything else, you’d like a writeup about! xo, Sarah B. The post Emma’s Tahini, Orange + Coconut Muesli appeared first on My New Roots.

Chickpea Tortilla Nachos

March 2 2016 My New Roots 

Chickpea Tortilla Nachos My husband and I come from two different worlds: a potato chip world and a tortilla chip world. I distinctly remember the moment we realized this, on our honeymoon, deep in a Whole Foods vortex deciding which chips to buy for our three-week road trip across California. We were undoubtedly surprised and perhaps a little dismayed that we had committed our lives to each other without discussing this one rather important preference, but in the spirit of everlasting love and compromise, we pretended like it was no big deal. We bought two bags of chips and ate them separately. We remain happily married to this day. I guess growing up in North America has had a real influence on me (shocking, I know). Tortilla chips and salsa was a classic childhood snack, especially at backyard barbeques, birthday parties and sleepovers. We would take a family-size bag out on picnics, road trips, and sometimes my dad would toss a few in my lunchbox, right beside the Wonderbread sandwich and fun fruits. Not joking. Anyway, I dont really eat a lot of chips these days (another shocker), but that doesnt mean that the occasional one doesnt somehow sneak past my lips from time to time. Im only human. This idea to make tortilla chips from chickpea flour literally came out of nowhere. I dont even remember what I was doing when the lightening bolt struck me, but it was fast and furious and I dropped absolutely everything to make them immediately, almost like I didnt want the inspiration to get away on me! Thirty minutes later, the chips were in my belly. So fast and easy, I couldnt believe it. Which lead my overly-excited mind, hepped on folate and molybdenum, to turn towards nachos. I mean, why wouldnt I go there? These chickpea tortilla nachos are crisp and golden, just like tortilla chips, but with a more satisfying and substantial heft to them, delivered by pure chickpea goodness. They are so filling and rich that its impossible to overeat them (that is not a challenge). And with really just two ingredients, how can you go wrong?! Im going to experiment with making large rectangular flatbreads out of this dough too, which will be prefect for lunches, maybe with some seedy add-ins, spice blends, and I am dying to try a Doritos knock-off! I have a Cool Ranch makeover itch that needs to be scratched, if you know what Im sayin. Snack smarter! If youre an enthusiastic snacker like myself, youll relate to the challenge in finding snacks that are balanced, healthy, and actually sustain you for some time until the next meal. Food satiety, is the measure of how full food makes us feel and how long it keeps our appetite at bay. Although calories definitely contribute to the of feeling fullness, a high calorie count does not always reflect the satiating power a food has. Factors that effect food satiety also include fiber, protein, and water content. And it is surprising that high fat foods, which are typically very caloric, tend to have lower satiating power. Because of their high fiber and protein content, along with their remarkable ability to stabilize digestion, chickpeas and things made with chickpea flour (like these chickpea tortilla nachos) fall into the category of serious filler-uppers, even though they only contain a moderate amount of calories. Its a win-win. One serving of these chips (about one-quarter of the recipe /­­ 12 chips) delivers 11 grams of protein (!!!) and 5 grams of fiber for under 300 calories. Not that I am a numbers girl at all,  it can be helpful to take note of these things, especially if you are someone interested in weight management. Other snacks that rank high on the food satiety scale are popcorn, pears, raspberries, oatmeal, beans, avocado, and chia seeds. Fill up on these guys to get, well, full. If you’re buying chickpea flour for the first time, know that its available at most health food stores and natural grocers, where it can sometimes be sold under the names garbanzo bean flour and cici flour. Your most reliable source however, is an Indian grocer or market, where it is typically labeled besan or gram flour.  So yea, nachos. The chips kind of demanded it. And I had more legal fun making a mountain of food than you could ever imagine. Layer upon layer of black beans, lime, avocado, onion, toasted pumpkin seeds, chili...bah! And the cilantro avocado crema is soooo delicious - not essential - but a major flavour and texture bonus. You can dollop it throughout the nacho pyramid as you build, kind of like tasty spackle, or put the crema into a squeeze bottle for drizzle fun. Everyone loves drizzle fun. The plate comes together like youre witnessing some sort of awesome miracle take place, and then you get to eat it. And just for the record my potato chip-loving husband devoured these tortilla chips. He would like to add that he is not a convert, just appreciative.     Print recipe     Chickpea Tortilla Chips Makes about 50 chips Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 250g chickpea flour 1 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper 1 tsp. baking powder 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml coconut oil, melted 4-6 Tbsp. warm water Directions: 1. Sift the chickpea flour, salt, pepper and baking powder into a large mixing bowl. Add the coconut oil and mix with your hands until the dough is crumbly. Add 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml warm water and stir until the dough comes together. If the dough is not sticking together add more water, a teaspoon at a time, until it does. Do not overwork the dough. 2. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. 3. Place the ball of dough onto a sheet of baking paper and flatten into a rough disc. Place another sheet of baking paper on top of the dough and using a rolling pin, roll out as thin as possible – I cannot emphasize this enough (if you dont have large baking sheets, it may help to divide the dough in half and work in two batches). The thinner the dough, the lighter and crispier your chips will be. Remove the top layer of baking paper and score the dough into triangles. Slide the baking paper and dough onto a baking sheet and place in the oven. Bake for 10-13 minutes until the chips are golden around the edges. 4. Enjoy chips warm on a nacho plate, or once completely cool, transfer them to an airtight container where they will keep for up to two weeks. Avocado Cilantro Crema Makes about 1 1/­­2 cups Ingredients: 1 small clove garlic 2 large, ripe avocados 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lime juice a couple pinches sea salt a pinch ground cayenne pepper, if desired 1 tsp. pure maple syrup water to thin, as needed 3 Tbsp. cilantro leaves, minced Directions: 1. Place the clove of garlic in the food processor and pulse to mince. 2. Cut avocados in half, remove the pit and scoop the flesh into the food processor. Add the lime juice, salt, cayenne, maple syrup and blend on high until smooth. Add water to thin as needed, and blend. Next add the cilantro leaves and pulse just until combined. Season to taste, adding more salt or lime juice as desired. Store leftovers in an airtight glass container in the fridge for up to three days (however, fresh is best). Nachos with Chickpea Tortilla Chips Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 batch Chickpea Tortilla Chips (about 50 chips) 1 batch Avocado Cilantro Crema 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 225g black beans (about 1 can) 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 1 lime, divided 1/­­2 ripe avocado 1/­­2 small red onion 2 Tbsp. pumpkin seeds sprouts of your choice handful cilantro crushed chili flakes for garnish Directions: 1. Combine the black beans with the olive oil and the juice of half a lime. Stir and season to taste. Mince the red onion. 2. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast pumpkin seeds stirring often, until they are fragrant, about 3-5 minutes. Remove form heat, let cool, and roughly chop or pound in a mortar and pestle (optional). 3. Place about one quarter of the chips on a plate. Top with the black beans, a few dollops of crema, a sprinkling of onion, pumpkin seeds, sprouts and cilantro. Repeat with another three layers of chips and toppings until you have used everything up. Garnish with half an avocado, sliced, a squeeze of half a lime and a sprinkling of crushed chili flakes. Devour immediately, rejoice! I hope you guys dig this recipe as much as I do. These chips are going to be a new staple in my house! I can’t wait to really start playing with different flavours and add-ins – let me know if you do the same. xo, Sarah B Show me your chips on Instagram: #MNRchickpeatortillachips #MNRnachos The post Chickpea Tortilla Nachos appeared first on My New Roots.

Chickpea & Sweet Potato Noodle Soup

January 28 2016 My New Roots 

Chickpea & Sweet Potato Noodle Soup Its pretty clear how Im handling winter this year: lots of big, bold, spicy food. Chili, saffron, ginger, and paprika are on heavy rotation these days, and Im surviving cold days with hot meals infused with far-away flavours. The inspiration for this dish came from harira, a spicy Moroccan and Algerian soup that is traditionally eaten during Ramadan. I made it a lot when I first went vegetarian, about 16 years ago, but after adding several more recipes to my repertoire, kind of forgot about it. In the interest of internally thawing out my bod, I thought I would dust off this old favourite and give it a couple updates. Youll often see a lot of harira recipes calling for rice or pasta, but I wanted to go the grain-free route on this one, so I pulled out my trusty spiralizer and make noodles out of sweet potatoes! As much as I love raw noodles like spiralized zucchini and beet and carrot, lets face it: beyond their appearance, they arent fooling anyone into believing they are pasta. But something really amazing happens when you cook vegetable noodles just a little bit - they actually become rather tender, yielding, and able to absorb other flavours. Sweet potato noodles are definitely a favourite of mine, especially in cooked dishes like this one. They add great texture, and of course, noodle-free oodles of nutrients (try saying that five times). You dont have to soak the lentils for this dish, but it will cook faster it you do, plus the lentils themselves will be far more digestible. And of course you can use canned chickpeas instead of cooking them from dried, but because you wont be blending them up (into hummus, for instance) I promise its worth the effort for not-totally-mushy results. If youve never tried cooking your own chickpeas from scratch, maybe now is the time to take the plunge! Youll never go back, I promise.      Print recipe     Spicy Chickpea & Sweet Potato Noodle Soup Serves 4-6 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 2 tsp. ground turmeric 2 tsp. ground ginger 1 tsp. caraway seeds 1 tsp. hot smoked paprika 1/­2 tsp. ground cinnamon 1/­2 tsp. freshly grated nutmeg 1 pinch saffron (about 40 threads) soaked in 2 Tbsp. hot water 3 medium onions 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 14 oz /­ 400ml canned whole tomatoes 6oz /­ 170g tomato paste (1 small can) 1 1/­2 cup dried chickpeas OR 3 cups /­ 500g cooked chickpeas (about 2 cans) 1 cup dried lentils, soaked overnight if possible 1 medium sweet potato 3 slices lemon 5 cups water 1/­2 cup /­ 20g cilantro, leaves and tender stems only, plus more for garnish 1/­2 cup /­ 20g flat-leaf parsley, leaves and tender stems only, plus more for garnish sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste cold-pressed olive oil and lemon wedges for serving Directions: 1. If using dried chickpeas, soak them in pure water overnight with an acidic medium, such as apple cider vinegar or lemon juice. The next morning, drain and rinse. Place in a large stockpot, cover with fresh water, bring to a boil and simmer until tender, about 45 minutes. About 30 minutes into cooking, add about a tablespoon of salt. Drain and rinse. 2. Place saffron threads in a small cup with about 2 tablespoons of recently-boiled water. Let steep for 10-15 minutes. 3. Peel and dice onions. Heat coconut oil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add the turmeric, ginger, caraway, paprika, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Stir to blend, and cook for 1-2 minutes until fragrant. Lower the heat to medium, add onions and salt, stir to coat. Cook until translucent and slightly caramelized, about 10 minutes (add a little water to the pot if it becomes dry). Add the steeped saffron liquid, the canned tomatoes (break up any large pieces), tomato paste, chickpeas, lentils, lemon slices and water. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer and cook covered until the lentils are tender, 15-25 minutes depending on whether or not you soaked them. 4. While the soup is cooking, make the sweet potato noodles. Scrub the sweet potato well under running water if it is organic, and peel it if it is not. Spiralize the potato if you have a spiralizer, or use a julienne peeler to create long, thin noodle-like strips. Wash the herbs well, spin dry and roughly chop, removing any tough stems. 5. Add the sweet potato noodles and herbs to the pot, stir to incorporate and let simmer for 5 minutes. Season to taste. 6. Ladle out desired amount of hot soup into bowls. Drizzle each serving generously with olive oil and top with more herbs. Serve with a wedge of lemon, and enjoy.   In other news, I’ve added two new recipes to the My New Roots App! If you’re craving a little more in the way of raw, juicy sunshine, here are two brand-new and exclusive smoothie bowls for your pleasure: the Zippy Zucchini Smoothie Bowl and the Plum Dandy Smoothie Bowl. If you have the app already simply update it, and if you don’t, you can download it here. And this week I’m in Sri Lanka, all thanks to Cinnamon Hotels for kidnapping me from the icy cold and transporting to me to a tropical paradise full of exotic fruits, cerulean 29° ocean water, and annoyingly perfect palm-tree-sunset-white-sand-beach situations. If you don’t want to be jealous, you should probably avoid my Instagram, okay? Stay cozy out there! xo, Sarah B The post Chickpea & Sweet Potato Noodle Soup appeared first on My New Roots.

Gingersnap Eggnog Ice Cream Sandwiches

December 22 2015 My New Roots 

Gingersnap Eggnog Ice Cream Sandwiches Dear friends, Ive been hit with the Christmas spirit! Perhaps a little slow on the uptake, this recipe was the absolute magic that knocked me sideways, and its better late than never. Especially in this case. To keep this level of deliciousness to myself would be decidedly Scrooge-like indeed. Two treats come to my mind when I think about Christmas: gingersnaps and eggnog. I thought about just posting a raw vegan egg nog ice cream or just gingersnap cookies, but then I realized that combining these two things would be utterly insane in the best way possible. So I did just that, and the first bite I took actually caused me to laugh out loud. These ice cream sandwiches are so delectable that I beg you to make them. This ice cream is everything. Its super rich, creamy, decadent with plenty of warming nutmeg spiciness to conjure up egg nog memories without any egg to speak of. Or cream. Or milk. Its vegan and raw believe it or not, but you tastebuds wont know that – they will only thank the dear heavens for being born in a body that gets to eat this gorgeous stuff. The Gingersnap cookies are also vegan, gluten-free, and delicious on their own, or embracing a giant scoop of egg nog ice cream (obviously). They cleverly employ rolled oats that are turned into flour right in your food processor, creating a satisfyingly-textured treat that Im sure you will make over and over again. The brown rice syrup is worth finding if youre into a super crisp cookie, where the barley malt syrup can be used in its place but the results will be chewier.  Because the flavours in this recipe rely heavily on spices, I thought the following reminder would be helpful. Most people assume that spices are just inanimate powders that they can keep forever, but they are actually very delicate creatures that change both flavour-wise and nutritionally over time. Buying spices whole will ensure that they will keep their taste and nutritional potency for up to twelve months, while ground spices will last for only six months. If youre like my mom and have had the same dusty jar of chile powder kicking around since 1992, do yourself a favour and discard it, buy some fresh, and enjoy. Life is too short for stale spices!  There are times when ground spices are appropriate, especially for convenience sake. Cinnamon, ginger, paprika, cayenne, turmeric, cumin and cardamom are the ones I usually have ground since I go through quite a lot of each of these over the course of half a year. Spices that I always keep whole include nutmeg, clove, allspice, coriander, fenugreek, star anise and peppercorns.  Although it is commonplace for people to store spices next to the stove for easy access, this is not the best place. Spices should be kept away from heat and light and be tightly sealed in a glass or ceramic container. Metal canisters may contain compounds that can interfere with the spices chemically, while plastic containers encourage condensation, which leads to spoilage. Keep spices in a cool, dark place, and put a date label on the jar to remind yourself when to toss any remaining product after it has expired. The Eggnog Ice Cream recipe calls for nutmeg, which I will implore you to grate fresh, because it is a revelation! Ground nutmeg loses its flavour very quickly that the results of this recipe will be completely different. If pre-ground nutmeg is all you have then you may need to increase the amounts Ive called for. And in that case, ask for a couple whole nutmegs for Christmas.      Print recipe     Raw Vegan Eggnog Ice Cream Makes 1 quart /­ 1 liter Ingredients: 2 heaping cups /­ 300g cashews 2 ripe bananas 1 vanilla bean 1/­8 tsp. sea salt 1/­2 cup /­ 125ml maple syrup 1 tsp. freshly-squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. freshly grated nutmeg, to taste 1/­4 tsp. ground cinnamon, to taste Directions: 1. Soak cashews for a minimum of 4 hours or overnight. Drain, rinse well and place in a blender (a high-speed blender is recommended) with all other ingredients. 2. Blend on high until completely smooth. Taste and adjust spices to suit your taste. 3. Pour mixture into a metal or glass container and place in the freezer to set, for at least 4 hours. Once frozen, place plastic wrap directly on top of ice cream to prevent it from absorbing any other flavours in the freezer. Let thaw 15-20 minutes before serving so that it is easy to scoop. Enjoy! Gingersnap Cookies Makes 20 cookies Ingredients: 2 1/­2  cups /­ 250g rolled oats 1/­2 cup /­ 75g coconut sugar 1 1/­2 Tbsp. ground ginger 1 tsp. ground cinnamon 1/­2 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1/­2 tsp. baking soda 1 tsp. baking powder 1/­3 cup /­ 80 ml coconut oil 1/­3 cup /­ 80 ml brown rice syrup or barley malt 2 Tbsp. water 1 tsp. vanilla extract Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350°F /­ 175°C. 2. In a small saucepan over low-medium heat, melt coconut oil. Whisk in brown rice syrup, water and vanilla. Remove from heat and set aside. 3. In a food processor blend oats until you have a rough flour. Add to a large bowl with all other dry ingredients. Stir to combine. 4. Add wet ingredients to dry ingredients and fold to combine. 5. Spoon out dough into balls onto a lined baking sheet – give them plenty of room because they spread a lot! ( I use at 2-3 baking sheets to bake the whole batch) Bake for 10 minutes until golden brown. Remove from oven, let sit for five minutes, then transfer to a cooling rack. Store in a tightly sealed container for 5 days. Assembly 1. Remove Eggnog Ice Cream from the freezer at least 15-20 minutes before serving. 2. Scoop a generous ball of ice cream and place on top of a cookie. Add another cookie to the top and press to set. Enjoy immediately, or wrap sandwiches in plastic wrap and place in the freezer until ready to eat. Assembled ice cream sandwiches will keep for 1 month in the freezer. I wish all of you out there a delicious, magical, safe, healthy, and abundant holiday. And I want to thank each and every one of you for your love and support this year in making my dreams a reality. From the blog, to my cookbook and the My New Roots app, your ongoing enthusiasm for what I’m doing really motivates me to keep going. Big love to you all. Peace, blessings, and happy holidays! Sarah B. Show me your ice cream sandwiches on Instagram: #MNRicecreamsandwiches

The My New Roots App

December 11 2015 My New Roots 

The My New Roots App You guys. Its here. After countless requests Im bringing you, dear readers, the My New Roots smartphone app! And now over 100 of your favourite (and my favourite!) recipes are in one easy place with features that help you browse, organize, and cook the dishes you love the most. Ive made it possible to create shopping lists for ingredients, keep a collection of favourites, and filter recipes to suit your preferences: vegan, gluten-free, grain-free, raw – or skip right to the desserts! Its been a really fun process going through the last nine years of recipes and stories from the blog. Along with the amazing memories, Ive rediscovered so many incredible recipes that have fallen off my of my radar! Ive been sitting on a gold mine! I guess one of the ironies of constantly developing new material is that I often forget to make my old favourites. I am excited to dig up these tried, tested, and true gems, and put them in the app for you to enjoy as well. The feature that I am really excited about however, is the menus! Since I typically publish just one recipe at a time here on the blog, creating an entire menu with multiple dishes would be a tad overwhelming for a single post. The app has inspired me to change that and create multiple- course menus for all occasions.  The first menu Ive made is for the holiday season, and includes five brand-new, and crazy-delicious dishes to impress your best guests. On the menu: Wild Rice and Shiitake Soup, Grilled Radicchio with Golden Beet and Pomegranate Salsa, Shoe String Sweet Potato Fries with Miso Tahini Gravy, Vegan Shepherds Pie, and Spiced Date Pomegranate Cupcakes. These recipes are designed to be cooked together to create a complete holiday dinner, but can easily be enjoyed separately all year round. They will not be found on the blog, but included in the app exclusively, and you can get them today! There are over 100 recipes in the app, and that number will grow with each update, both with recipes from the blog and menus I make exclusively for the app. I hope you will enjoy it as much as I do, and if you have any suggestions of how I can improve it, features to add, or even ideas for recipes, just write to apps(at)mynewroots.org . Your feedback is so important to me and I want to make this app the best it can be for you.  Happy cooking, friends. I really hope that my app will inspire you to get into the kitchen and  create even more delicious, nourishing food for yourself and the people you love. Thank you for your ongoing support and encouraging to take the leap to make this dream a reality! You can download the app here! Questions: Is there an app for Android and Windows phone? Unfortunately no, not at this time. The app is currently only for iPhones and we’re planning an iPad optimized version (it will open on an iPad though). What iPhone can I use? The app works with iPhone 4S or newer, with iOS 9.0 or higher installed. Is there an iPad app? The app works on an iPad but it doesn’t have an iPad specific design yet but we’re working on it… Do I have to pay for the app? Yes, the app costs $4.99 Will I also have to pay for the blog? No, the My New Roots blog will always be free. Feel free to ask questions or send ideas to apps(at)mynewroots.org  

Fantastic Falafel Waffles

December 1 2015 My New Roots 

Fantastic Falafel Waffles Falafels. These definitely sit at the top of my list for most attempts at a healthy makeover and at the bottom of the list of success. How to get them crisp without deep frying? How to get them to hold together without eggs? What is the right balance of herbs and spices? Why are they so darn delicious at a restaurant and so darn underwhelming at home?! First, it involves NOT cooking your chickpeas. Nope. Not even for a second. Of course I know that this is the traditional way to do it,  but I was skeptical for some reason. Skeptical that I wouldnt turn into a giant, human gas factory. Any of you have had the misfortune of eating poorly cooked legumes will understand what Im talking about. Its pretty uncomfortable. And not just for you. BUT! Miracle of miracles, this did not happen, and on top of a happy tummy, my falafels came out crisp, deliciously spiced, and they didnt fall apart at all. The chickpeas must start out raw and they must be soaked for 24 hours. Make sure to add an acidic medium to the water ( I use lemon juice or apple cider vinegar), give them a good rinse after draining, and you should be okay. I used chickpea flour as a binder, instead of all-purpose flour (duh) and this worked great to hold it all those tasty ingredients together. If you cant find chickpea flour, try another gluten-free flour, which Im pretty certain will work just as well. Fresh herbs are also a must for flavour – I chose both flat-leaf parsley and cilantro – so that the dough will look rather verdant once blended up. The second trick is contact with high heat. Deep frying gives us the most crisp and delicious falafels, but it also gives us a whole host of un-want-ables, like oxidized fats and free radicals. Boo. You can cook falafels in the oven, but the dough is never going to get super crisp because the heat is surrounding the falafel instead of connecting directly with it. Again, boo. Enter: the waffle iron. A waffle iron uses high heat that can come into direct contact with the dough, and with minimal fat. Plus its fun to say. Falafel Waffle. Obviously, this was meant to be. Chickpea Party Tricks We all know that chickpeas are fiber all-stars, providing 50% of your RDI in just one cup, (whoa!) but they have another party trick up their sleeve that I bet you didnt know about. Two-thirds of the fiber in chickpeas is insoluble, meaning that it doesnt break down during digestion, but instead moves through our digestive tract unchanged until it hits the large intestine. The fun starts here, where friendly bacteria (think probiotics!) go to town on said insoluble fiber and actually break it down to create short-chain fatty acids, including acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid. These short-chain fatty acids can then be absorbed by the cells that line the wall of our large intestine and used for energy! How rad is that?! Butyric acid is in fact the preferred source of energy for the cells lining our colon, and with this bonus fuel comes greater potential for optimally active and healthy cells. This translates into a reduced risk of colon problems including colon cancer. So friends, invite chickpeas to your next dinner party – theyll feed you and your colon cells. Can your pot roast do that? I cooked several (ahem) of these waffles over the course of my day, you know, for research purposes.  The ones I made first were the lightest and the crispiest. I still liked the ones that I cooked later on, but I found their consistency was a little dense and chewy, so I recommend using up the dough right away instead of making it ahead of time. I made a couple little extras to accompany the Falafel Waffles, but these are merely (really delicious) suggestions. The Bright Cabbage Slaw take about 2 minutes to whip up, and lends a welcome, acidic top note to the dish as a whole. Try the Harissa Tahini Sauce as well – its savoury, creamy, and a little bit spicy. I was inspired by the one Jessie made over at Faring Well – thanks for the spark! Serve the falafels with whatever else you have on hand; avocado is really tasty, sprouts, fresh chilies, pickles, roasted veggies etc. You can also toss a falafel waffle into a pita or wrap if you want to take it to go, or serve them on top of a bed of whole grains for an even more substantial meal.       Print recipe     Falafel Waffles Makes 10-12 waffles Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 400g dried chickpeas 2 cloves garlic 1/­­2 cup chopped + packed /­­ 45g flat-leaf parsley 1/­­2 cup chopped + packed /­­ 35g cilantro 11/­­2 Tbsp. ground cumin 11/­­2  tsp. ground cinnamon 2 tsp. ground coriander 11/­­2 tsp. fine grain sea salt (to taste, depends on if using canned) 1 tsp. cracked black Pepper zest of 1 lemon 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 2/­­3 cup /­­ 115g chickpea flour 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml water, as needed 1 tsp. coconut oil for greasing the waffle iron 1 batch Harissa Tahini Sauce (recipe to follow) 1 batch Bright Cabbage Slaw (recipe to follow) To serve: 2 Tbsp. sesame seeds, lightly toasted finely sliced red onion sprouts avocado roasted vegetables (pumpkin and cauliflower are yummy) crushed chili flakes Directions: 1. Cover chickpeas with plenty of water and 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice or apple cider vinegar. Let soak for 24 hours. Drain and rinse very well. Set aside. 2. In a food processor mince garlic. Add the chickpeas, chopped herbs, spices, lemon zest and juice. Pulse until the chickpeas are very finely minced, but not paste-y. Transfer contents to a large mixing bowl. 3. Add the chickpea flour and mix well, then add the water a few spoonfuls at a time until the mixture holds together well when pressed. 4. Make the Bright Cabbage Slaw and Harissa Tahini Sauce, if using. 5. Heat your waffle iron to medium-high. Brush with a little coconut oil. Divide the falafel dough into 10-12 equal portions, Gently pack each portion together so that it holds well, especially around the edges. Flatten out the portion you are using and press into the hot waffle iron, lower the lid and cook anywhere from 5-10 minutes, depending on your equipment. The falafel is done when it is golden brown and crisp. Remove from waffle iron and place in a warm oven until ready to serve. 6. Serve hot falafel waffles with the Bright Cabbage Slaw, Harissa Tahini Sauce, red onion, avocado, sprouts, chili flakes and anything else you fancy! Enjoy. Bright Cabbage Slaw 4 cups /­­ 300g finely shredded red cabbage 3/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 11/­­2 Tbsp. lemon juice or apple cider vinegar 1 tsp. maple syrup or honey, to taste a handful of chopped parsley, cilantro, or both Directions: Combine the cabbage, salt, and lemon juice in a large bowl. Massage the salt and lemon into the cabbage for about a minute until it begins to wilt. Drizzle with maple syrup if desired, season to taste and fold in the herbs. Harissa Tahini Sauce Makes about 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml tahini 1 large clove garlic, finely minced 2 Tbsp. freshly-squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 2 tsp. Harissa paste (available at Middle Eastern grocers) pinch of salt, to taste 1 tsp. maple syrup or honey approx.1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water, as needed Directions: Add all ingredients to a blender and blend on high until smooth and creamy, adding water to thin as desired. Store leftovers in the fridge for up to one week. Show me your falafels on Instagram! #MNRfalafelwaffles

Butternut Squash, Leek and Apple Soup

November 3 2015 My New Roots 

Butternut Squash, Leek and Apple Soup Back in the summer, I was asked to be the guest chef at a restaurant here in Copenhagen for the upcoming fall season. But not just any restaurant: a hyper-local organic restaurant sourcing 95% of their ingredients from within 200 kilometers of their front door, and one that holds classes to educate and inspire city dwellers to eat sustainably all year round. Oh, just kind of up my alley. And it is run by a woman who I clicked with instantaneously, our first conversation touching on everything from mushroom foraging to manifesting ones own reality through the power of positive thinking. I said yes because I was so moved by her ultimate mission, what the restaurant stood for, and not really taking into account that I hadnt cooked in a professional kitchen in many years. But after giving me permission to call the event The Grand Pumpkin Orgy, how could I possibly say no? Fast forward a few months to a couple weeks ago. I am standing at the cutting board preparing vegetables for soup. The soup to be served at the restaurant, which will be full of guests, all there to eat my food. I feel confident and excited, using all of my pumpkin comprehension to develop a menu of stellar proportions, and not letting the true weightiness of the event bog me down. Once cooked, everything goes into the blender. I puree it. I taste it. And its delicious. Without any major adjustments at all, it is exactly what I wanted it to be: clean and pure and tasting of the ingredients it is made with, only better. Then the doubt creeps in. Wait a second. That was easy. Is this really good enough? How can I serve such a simple dish to all these people with undoubtedly high expectations of what this dinner is supposed to be? Why did I ever think I could do this in the first place?! BAH! I brought my recipes in for the chef to review, sheepishly handing them over as if there was something wrong with them; not impressive enough, flashy or complex – just what I believed to be delicious. After a raised eyebrow, he said that he wasnt sure apple and butternut squash would go together. I gulped, but told him as confidently as I could that I believe in the intelligence of the season, and trust that whatever grows together, goes together. Right? The soup was a hit. Clean and pure and tasting of the ingredients it was made with, only better. Not only was the chef impressed (and later excused himself for judging my soup before making it himself), but the guests as well. As I went around to the tables asking everyone how it was, they all reaffirmed my belief that my instincts are not completely out of whack, and that, quite simply, good ingredients make great food. After several years eating locally-grown, seasonal produce Ive learned that you can pretty much step back and let the ingredients do the work for you, since true deliciousness needs little intervention. Cooking like a pro, to me, means respecting the ingredients and doing as little as possible to bring out their tastiness. So, this soup is that soup. The one I served at the restaurant to all of those people that scared me, but also reminded me that simple is best. It is a deep and delicious love song to autumn. The ingredients are inexpensive, widely available and the process is foolproof. Its an oven soup! Thats right: everything cooked together right on a baking sheet so there isnt even a pot to wash. Me likey. Butternut Squsah: the Nutrient Storage Facility Winter squash rocks because it is a virtual storehouse of nutrients. Unlike summer squash (re: zucchini, crooknecks, pattypans), winter squash has had a lot more time to develop and pump itself full of vitamins and minerals throughout its lengthy life on the stem. Were talking oodles more vitamin A (in the form of beta-carotene), vitamin C, manganese, potassium, and even some extra dietary fiber thrown in. This combination of nutrients spells good news for asthma sufferers, those with heart disease, elevated cholesterol, or inflammatory conditions such a rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Nature designed summer squash to be rather delicate, with a high water content for those hot summer days when we need a cool down. Naturally, their shelf life is rather short during our abundant harvest season when produce is plentiful. On the flip side, winter squash has a tough outer skin and lower water content, which allows it to be stored for a very long time - some varieties up to six months. This means that we can keep these vitamin bombs around for a long time after the first frost to provide our bodies with the nutrition we need to see us through the long months of winter when there is nothing fresh in sight. Put that in your oven and roast it! The Garlicky Rye Bread Croutons, although an additional element to create, are the crowning glory of the dish, and really make it special. If youre not into bread, try toasting some pumpkin seeds for the top, or something else crunchy to add contrast to the silky smooth soup. It begs mentioning that the apple cider vinegar in this recipe is not optional. Why? Because it adds acidity. Acidity is the one thing missing in almost every home cooks food because, well, we are never really taught about its importance. If you read the introduction in my cookbook, I have a section called The Holy Trinity of Flavour explaining that salt, sugar and acid are the three foundation flavours of any successful dish. Adding just a touch of apple cider vinegar or lemon juice to almost anything you make (no kidding!) heightens and brightens the other flavours and creates a surprising balance of tastes. Try it and see for yourself.     Print recipe     Butternut Squash, Leek and Apple Soup with Garlicky Rye Bread Croutons Makes at least 2 quarts /­­ 2 liters, Serves 4-6 Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. melted coconut oil (or ghee) 3 leeks 1 medium onion 5 cloves garlic 1 large butternut squash (mine was about 2 lbs. /­­ 1 kg) 1 large, tart apple 4 - 6 cups /­­ 1-1 1/­­2 liters vegetable broth, as needed 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp. ground cardamom 1/­­2 tsp. ground star anise apple cider vinegar to taste (start with 1/­­2 tsp. up to 1 Tbsp.) 1 batch Garlicky Rye Bread Crouton (recipe to follow) Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. 2. Prepare all vegetables: chop leeks and onions, peel garlic (but leave it whole), peel butternut and cut into cubes, chop apple. 3. Place all vegetables on a baking sheet with the coconut oil, toss to coat, and set in the oven to roast for 25-35 minutes until tender. 4. Transfer roasted vegetables to a blender and add the spices and hot vegetable stock (you may need to work in batches). Blend on high until completely smooth. Taste, then add salt and apple cider vinegar, blend and taste again. Adjust seasoning to your taste, and add stock until the desired consistency is reached: I like mine quite thin so I use the full 6 cups /­­ 1 1/­­2 liters of stock. 5. Transfer soup to a large cooking pot over medium heat to warm, if necessary. Divide soup equally among bowls and serve with the Garlicky Rye Bread Croutons and freshly cracked black pepper. Garlicky Rye Bread Croutons Serves 4 Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 200g stale dark sourdough, cut into generous cubes (any bread here would work, but make a healthy choice) 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee (ghee is definitely the tastiest) 2 fat cloves garlic, finely minced or grated on a microplane a couple pinches flaky sea salt Directions: 1. Melt oil in a small saucepan over low heat. When it is melted, add the garlic and stir to combine. Cook just until the garlic starts to simmer, immediately remove from heat and let cool slightly. Preheat oven to 350°F/­­175°C. 2. Cut bread into generous cubes and place in a medium sized bowl. Pour the garlic oil over the top and toss to coat, using your hands to squish the oil into the bread. Spread out bread cubes on a cookie sheet, sprinkle with salt and place in the oven. Toast for 15-20 minutes, tossing a couple times during cooking. Croutons are ready when they are crisp and golden around the edges. Once cool, store leftovers in an airtight container for up to three days. You guys. I’m making app! It’s almost ready! I can’t wait! The My New Roots iOS app will include your favourites from the blog, plus 5 exclusive app-only holiday recipes, perfect for the upcoming season. Click the link below to go to the App site where you can sign up to be notified when the app is out (soon, I promise!) and receive my brand-new recipe for Crispy Sweet Potato Shoe String Fries with Miso Tahini Gravy, like right now. Thank you for all for encouraging me to do this, and your ongoing support. I like you very much. xo, Sarah B  

Cauliflower Buns & Bagels

September 19 2015 My New Roots 

Cauliflower Buns & Bagels You guys. Cauliflower. Buns. I am crazy stoked about this. The idea for these simply brilliant, delicious, and totally surprising rolls came from my good friend Sophie, a vibrant, health-conscious lady that I actually met through my mothers group. We quickly bonded over a shared love of cooking and raising healthy kids, so it didnt take long before we were meeting up outside of the group for smoothie dates and trading kitchen secrets. A couple months ago she mentioned making bread out of blended cauliflower and I thought it was just about the neatest idea Id heard in a while, especially since my son and I love starchy baked anything, and Im always keen to have a wide range of options. I set out to make my own version and this was the happy result. Despite being totally flour-free, these buns are surprisingly light and fluffy. They taste of cauliflower (or should I say, cauliflour? HA!), but the garlic powder takes them in a different direction so that you dont feel like youre just eating a ball of blended cruciferous. I added nutritional yeast as well, which lends a wonderful cheesiness along with its B-vitamins, and almond meal for protein, fat and flavour. A sprinkling of dried onions or sesame seeds on top also add a great taste and texture. The psyllium husk is not totally necessary, but the buns are a little drier with this addition, plus without it, they are nearly impossible to slice without breaking. I prefer them baked with just eggs - but I also like just scarfing these, no slicing please. To answer the question many of you will inevitably ask me, yes, I made a vegan version of these, but sadly, they did not work. I replaced the eggs with psyllium husk exclusively and the buns practically melted into weird cauli-puddles (bizarro!). And as psyllium contributes a rather rubbery texture, I also found that using it as a binder instead of eggs yielded an unappetizing consistency - most certainly un-bread like. If any of you are up for the challenge, please experiment and let me know in the comments. Id love to post a vegan alternative! One thing I should bring up is that these buns, despite tasting really good even a few days after baking, begin to smell rather sulfuric (a.k.a. fart-y). I cant even tell you the looks I got after opening my lunchbox stocked with cauliflower buns on an airplane a couple weeks ago. It wasnt me! It was the buns! This is due to the naturally-occurring and health promoting sulfur in the cauliflower. Nothing to worry about, but I thought it begged mentioning so that you know what to expect, and dont jump to the conclusion that the buns have spoiled. Or that you keep the buns in a tightly sealed container and open it in a confined public space. If you can time your baking of these to serve with a meal, I suggest you do so, as they are so delicious fresh from the oven, cooled just slightly, with a slather of good-quality butter. Yes, butter. Id go so far as to say that its important to the recipe because the buns have very little fat in them, so butter really takes the taste experience to the next level of yum.     Print recipe     Cauliflower Buns & Bagels Makes 12-16 buns or bagels Ingredients: 1 large cauliflower (1200g) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 20g almond meal 1/­­4 cup /­­ 20g nutritional yeast 1 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 tsp. garlic powder 2 large organic eggs 1 Tbsp. dried onions or sesame seeds 1 Tbsp. psyllium husk (optional, will make the buns drier) Directions: 1. Wash and chop cauliflower into chunks. Place in a food processor and blend until as fine as possible (you may need to do this in several batches as the cauliflower wont process if the machine is too full). Transfer cauliflower to a large mixing bowl. Add the almond meal, nutritional yeast, salt, garlic powder and psyllium husk, if using. Stir very well to combine. 2. Preheat oven to 400°F/­­200°C. 3. Whisk eggs together in a separate bowl. Add the eggs to the cauliflower mixture and stir until the dough is moist and will hold together. 4. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Taking baseball-sized amounts of dough, squeeze them into a rough ball shape, then drop them from about 1 foot (30cm) onto the baking sheet (this helps to compact them). If you want to make bagels, simply use your finger to poke a hole in the center and shape the rest with your hands. Sprinkle the tops with the dried onion or sesame seeds and place in the oven. Bake for 20-30 minutes until the buns are golden brown around the edges. Enjoy warm with butter, and store leftovers in the fridge for 3-4 days.   Give this recipe a shot you guys – especially if you are skeptical! Love and buns, Sarah B Show me your buns! #MNRcauliflowerbuns *   *   *   *   *   * Hey guys! I have a couple new interviews up online if you’d like to check them out… Remarkable Magazine Psycle London

Summer Celebration Fruit Tart

July 20 2015 My New Roots 

Summer Celebration Fruit Tart Hello summer people! Its celebration time! Im here to deliver the party favours ...a seriously tasty treat and a whole lotta food porn. Ready?   This tart is everything you want from a summer recipe: quick to make, foolproof, delicious, and uses all the delights of the season. Since I am well aware that you would rather be spending your time at the beach or on the dock and not in the kitchen, making this treat will only take up about half an hour of your day, and the rest you can enjoy nibbling and relaxing! I couldnt quite settle on which meal this recipe would best be suited for, so Ill let you decide on that one. Its a perfectly respectable breakfast (you’re welcome), but would also make a lovely brunch side, afternoon iced tea accompaniment, or after dinner dessert. Because you can make the crust ahead of time, it can also be taken to a picnic or barbeque and assembled before serving. The crust is vegan and gluten-free, made with toasted sunflower seeds and buckwheat flour, with a touch of lemon for zing. It is a good, all-around pastry base that can also be pressed into a tart form if youd like a more tidy-looking dessert. I like the un-fussiness and rusticity of just rolling out the dough (and because Im lazy). With its tattered edges and uneven shape, it looks like we all should in summer: loose, wild, and free! For a big time saver, Ive opted to use yogurt for the topping instead of making a cashew cream. If you would prefer a non-dairy option, try the cashew cream recipe from this post.  It would be smashing on this tart! The fruit is also your call, just use whatever is in season around you. We are finally enjoying the annual berry explosion here in Denmark, the one I wait for the entire year, and this recipe is truly a celebration of the juicy abundance, sumptuous colours, and bright flavours all around. Toss on a combination of favourites, or go for a solo fruit that you really want to highlight. This tart can carry itself well into the autumn as well, using plums, pears and figs as well. As for garnishes, although they arent totally necessary, this tart is really delicious with the addition of a few extras. I tossed on a small handful of fresh herbs; peppermint and lemon balm, because I happened to have them on hand, but what a difference they made! Verbena would be so delicious too, or spearmint, bergamot, or even chocolate mint. And because I am obsessed with bee products, I couldnt resist sprinkling the tart with pollen and topping each slice with a good chunk of honeycomb. Nothing is bad with honeycomb on top. Ever. With that, I leave you with the recipe, and sun-drenched love wishes to all of you out there romping around and being wild little bunnies. Big hugs and fruit tarts, Sarah B     Print recipe     Summer Celebration Fruit Tart Serves 4-6 Sunflower Buckwheat Crust Ingredients: 1/­3 cup /­ 45g sunflower seeds 1 cup /­ 160g buckwheat flour pinch sea salt zest of 1 lemon 3 Tbsp. coconut oil, very cold 1 1/­2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1-3 Tbsp. ice water, as needed Topping: 1 cup Greek-style, plain yogurt (preferably from goat or sheeps milk) seeds from 1/­2 vanilla bean 1 Tbsp. pure maple syrup or honey a few handfuls of seasonal fresh fruit (I chose cherries, strawberries, red currants and gooseberries) fresh herbs (I used mint and lemon balm) bee pollen + honeycomb, if desired Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 375°F /­ 190°C. 2. In a dry skillet over medium heat toast sunflower seeds, tossing frequently, until fragrant and golden, 3-5 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool. Place seeds in a food processor and pulse until they resemble sand. Next add the remaining crust ingredients, except the ice water. Pulse to bring everything together and incorporate the oil. With the motor running, dribble in the water, one tablespoon at a time until the dough is no longer crumbly - do not add more than you need. 3. Empty the dough onto a large piece of parchment paper. Gather it into a rough ball, then place a sheet of parchment paper on top and using a rolling pin roll out into a circle about 12 /­ 30cm in diameter. Slide crust onto a baking sheet and place in the oven to bake until golden, about 20-25 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool completely. 4. While the crust is baking, combine the yogurt, vanilla seeds, and maple syrup. Set aside. Wash all fruit and slice if desired. 5. Assemble tart right before serving (otherwise the crust will get soggy) Spread yogurt onto the crust, and top with fruit. Garnish with fresh herbs, bee pollen and honeycomb if desired. Enjoy immediately.

Inspirational Sunflower Seed Risotto

June 10 2015 My New Roots 

Inspirational Sunflower Seed Risotto Inspiration is a perplexing creature. As someone who relies on a constant stream of ideas to do what I do, having an endless supply is rather essential. Of all the questions I am asked, the most common of them all is where my inspiration comes from. The funny thing about this is, I cant really give a straight answer because I get ideas from everywhere. Literally. Yes of course there are the obvious places like cookbooks, the farmers market, my vegetable garden, but Ive had ideas strike me like lightening while listening to music, smelling a certain scent wafting on the breeze, the colours in a particular vintage dress. My main motivation for writing a cookbook actually came from a postcard I found randomly, which pictured a faceless girl picking wildflowers. Nothing to do with food. At this point Ive learned that the most important thing for me is to put myself in the way of beauty as often as possible, keep an open mind, and not do discount any sources or ideas as weird, because the best things most often come out of the seemingly strange. I will say that one thing that consistently brings me a lot of inspiration, is just talking to other people who really love food. Sometimes getting out of my head and into someone elses, or at least hearing about their experience with a particular dish or special ingredient can help jumpstart a flood of ideas. For instance, the last time I was in Amsterdam teaching cooking classes, one of the attendees came up to me at the end of the day and told me about a very exciting meal she had eaten in Copenhagen, of all places. It was a risotto made out of sunflower seeds. Sunflower seeds! At first this sounded totally bizarre, but then again, I havent been able to stop thinking about this seriously inspiring idea ever since. I knew that sunflower seeds were about the same size and shape as grains of rice. They were nearly the same colour. But how would they taste? How would they become creamy? What is it like to boil them? When I googled it, all the recipes called for a pressure cooker, which makes sense for those that arent familiar with the awesome power and health benefits of soaking. I knew that that spending the day in a warm bath would make the sunflower seeds totally relaxed and willing to tenderize in a sultry spa of caramelized alliums for dinner that evening. Also, I dont own a pressure cooker. So setting out to make this, I anticipated a weeks worth of trial-and-errors, a pile of dirty dishes and a lot of semi-edible sunflower seeds. But I treated the seeds very much like I would treat rice in a risotto and after one (one!) attempt, it was pretty darn near perfect. And pretty darn inspiring. To say that this recipe is totally surprising is an understatement. The sunflower seeds are tender and chewy, with just the slightest bit of tooth still left - not unlike the real deal. Its remarkably simple to make with just a few common ingredients, truly delicious and deeply satisfying. You can make it suit any season as the seeds create a foundation to build upon no matter what time of year youre enjoying. Since we are finally getting some lovely fresh spring produce here in Denmark, I chose to go that route. I found some beautiful young rainbow carrots, peas in their pods, white and green asparagus and some super fresh watercress. This would be equally lovely with sautéed mushrooms, roasted root vegetables, pumpkin or squash. I am sure youre wondering how the seeds get creamy from cooking, and the truth is they dont – youll need to help them out a little. When cooking a rice-based risotto, starch emerges from the grains as they cook, and magically melds with the broth to create a velvety texture. To mimic this I simply blended some of the soaked seeds with equal parts water and added it back into the mix at the end of cooking, the results astounding. This makes the risotto rich and creamy without any starches or carbohydrates. But what shocks me most of all is how darn flavourful the dish is with such minimal ingredients. The caramelized onions and garlic are really all you need (in this dish, as well as life, I wager) although herbs would be a welcome addition; dried ones during cooking or fresh ones stirred in at the end. My version uses watercress as a finishing touch and is totally lovely with its peppery bite, but I will leave the brilliant blank canvas for you project your own inspiration on to. Everyone Loves the Sunflowers Easy-to-find, inexpensive, and nutrient-rich, sunflower seeds are one of my favourite additions to a number of dishes that I make, from breakfast to dinner and snacks in between. They are delicious toasted or soaked, blended up into seed butter or even milk! Sunflower seeds are one of natures highest sources of vitamin E, the bodys primary fat-soluble antioxidant. Vitamin E is important for overall health, as it functions as a free-radical neutralizer and prevents damage to fat-containing structures and molecules, such as brain cells, cholesterol, and cell membranes. When the fats in cell membranes become damaged, the function of the cell itself can be compromised. This is why researchers have studied whether diets low in Vitamin E are associated with many diseases associated with aging. Sunflower seeds are so high in vitamin E, that just one serving of this risotto contains over 100% of your daily recommended intake! Because sunflower seeds have such a high (and healthy!) fat content, it is best to store them in a tightly sealed glass container in the refrigerator. Keeping them cool will help preserve their delicate, nourishing oils, which can then in turn nourish you! They will also last much longer stored this way. If you purchase shelled sunflower seeds in bulk make sure to sniff the bin first: it should smell fresh and nutty, without any traces of sourness, which can indicate that the fats have become rancid. And always have a good look at the seeds to ensure that they are not discoloured or damaged.     Print recipe     Celebration Sunflower Seed Risotto Serves 4 Ingredients: 2 1/­­2 cups /­­ 350 g shelled, raw, unsalted sunflower seeds 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 2 medium onions, finely diced 5 cloves garlic, minced a generous pinch of sea salt 2-3 cups /­­ 500 – 750ml vegetable broth Spring vegetables for four people + cooking times: 8 spears white asparagus - 10 min 140 g. /­­ 8 young carrots - 4 min 16 spears green asparagus - 3 min 1 cup /­­ 150g shelled green peas - 2 min handful per person watercress - stirred in right before serving Directions: 1. Soak sunflower seeds overnight or all day in pure water with 2 tablespoons of sea salt. 2. Drain and rinse sunflower seeds. Remove about 1 cup /­­ 135g of the soaked seeds and place in a blender with 1 cup /­­ 250ml water. Blend on high until completely smooth. Set aside. 3. Melt coconut oil in a large stockpot. Add onions and sea salt, stir to coat and cook over medium-high heat until translucent, about 5-7 minutes. Add garlic and cook 2 minutes, then add sunflower seeds and about 2 cups of the broth. Bring to a simmer and cook covered for 20-30 minutes, depending on the size of your seeds, adding more broth as needed. When cooked the seeds should be al dente: tender with only the slightest crunch still left in them. If there seems to be a lot of liquid left in the pot, let it simmer uncovered for about 5 minutes to evaporate the excess. Add the sunflower cream from the blender and stir to combine, and heat gently. Season to taste. Remove from heat and fold in a few generous handfuls of watercress. 4. Blanch the vegetables in the same pot of salted water for approximately the time indicated, testing as you go. Do not overcook! 5. To serve, place about a quarter of the risotto on each plate, then top with the vegetables. Drizzle with olive oil, lemon juice and a sprinkling of flaky sea salt. Top with extra watercress and enjoy warm. Where do you get your inspiration from? How does it come to you? What have you been inspired by lately? Tell me! Especially if it’s about food… Wishing you an inspired day! Love always, Sarah B

A Book Tour and a Full Heart

May 11 2015 My New Roots 

A Book Tour and a Full Heart Hi. Its been a while. I guess I should have expected that touring with my cookbook would be more than just totally life-affirming and amazing - turns out its quite a time-intensive thing, and in between gigs I find it difficult to much other than feed myself and rest! But I am not complaining, just explaining my absence. I could actually fill this entire post with my overflowing gratitude for everything thats happened in the past few weeks. But I think some pictures would help tell the story - I once heard that each one is worth a thousand words. I will take a brief moment however to say thank you. Everyone who has been a part of and engaged in this tour in some way has really put it all in perspective for me. Its so strange how most of what I do is completely solitary, and even when I put a post out into the world, I cannot see who is reading, where, or that they actually cook the recipes. In a way, I like it this way - less pressure and responsibility for little ol me, because if I were to actually comprehend the scope of this I may feel slightly overwhelmed. But this project, my cookbook, finally being out in the physical world and me along with it, has shown me that My New Roots is so much bigger than I could have imagined. Meeting so many of you at book signings, lectures, cooking demos, and connecting through conversation across a dinner table, hearing your stories, how this little blog has touched you or changed your life in some way, feels like a miracle to me. And I am so, so humbled. Ive received boundless inspiration through these connections, and proof that this isnt just some teeny project anymore, but a veritable force. Much like literal roots this has grown silently under the surface, going deep and lateral and gaining enough life force before breaking through to where it receives the light it needs to thrive. That is what this tour is: a surfacing and a confirmation that we are building a powerful community of healthy people. I feel like every drop of energy Ive put into My New Roots from the first day has just hit me like a spectacular tsunami of love. A question I was asked a lot on tour was about the food blogging community, and whether or not I think it is competitive. Without hesitating, I always said heck no!, because my experience is quite the opposite. Among my peers I feel nothing but support, camaraderie, and celebration for one anothers achievements. When I asked fellow bloggers to review the cookbook, of course they said yes, because that is how we roll. I am honoured to post their gorgeous photos below, and share their perspectives on my recipes. So if you havent received a copy of the book yet, you can try out a number of the dishes from their posts! Thank you to everyone who participated. You are such an inspiring and talented bunch of people, and I am proud to share the blogosphere with you. Laura at The First Mess took a stab at making my raw vegan version of the Ben & Jerry’s classic and well-loved Chunky Monkey, and definitely one-upped me by adding a swirl of date syrup for a ripple effect. Nice one, Laura. You rock. Get the recipe here. Sara of Sprouted Kitchen tested and wrote about one of my favourite recipes in the book, Sunflower Sesame Seed Brittle, and one that I made many times on tour for readers to taste! You can read her post here. Emma from My Darling Lemon Thyme made my scrumptious Roasted Pumpkin on Black Rice with Tangerine Tahini Sauce. This sauce is boss, ya’ll. Pour it on everything! Check out the post and recipe here. Angela over at Oh She Glows made my scrumptious Banoffee Pie! A combination of banana, toffee, and coconut cream. Get the recipe here. Lane of Green Spirit Adventures made my Oyster Mushroom Bisque. Check out the recipe here. If you’re making recipes from the book and want to tag them, here’s what I’m using: #MNRcookbook And now for just a few highlights from the events in North America. Thank you again to everyone who helped put these together, and to all of you who came out to give me a high-five. It meant so much to me. A stunning dinner at Burdcok & Co. in Vancouver. The meal was all spring recipes from the cookbook. My interview and audio-only cooking demo – an interesting experience! – with the imcomparable Cherly McCay of CBC radio. Hear the program here, and skip to 35:45 to catch my segment. Enjoy! Barbara-Jo’s Books to Cooks hosted a My New Roots dinner right in the bookstore! A night to remember for sure. I did three televised cooking demos in Canada. Thanks to Global and CTV for their support! Book signing at the always inspiring Moon Juice in Los Angeles. I was high on green nut milk and all the love! Getting a tad silly with Jo and my Pi?a Colada Passionfruit Popsicles at Delish.com. I’ll post the video once it’s live. It’s a real hoot! Food52 invited me for lunch! I cooked my Ghee-Poached Radishes on Dandelion Greens with Smoked Sea Salt for lunch.  The Q&A and book signing at NeueHouse in NYC. Thanks to my gorgeous friend Pippa of Sous Style for the incredible night! Lastly, an interview at my all-time favourite station Heritage Radio Network in Bushwick, Brooklyn. And quite possibly the coolest recording studio of all time. I’ll post the podcast once it’s online!   So, I’m back in my kitchen now. A new blog post (a very rad one) is on the way and I know you’re going to love it. Stay tuned dear friends. xo, Sarah B

Winter Rainbow Panzanella

March 16 2015 My New Roots 

Winter Rainbow Panzanella Dear colour. I miss you. Please come back soon. Your pal, Sarah B Ive joked before about the oh-so dark, single-toned, and super grey city Copenhagen becomes in the winter. After months upon months of this, I feel as if my eyes have turned into little slits, and only capable of seeing in black and white. Needing some kind of sign that I wasnt turning into a subterranean mammal, I cycled down to the central market of Copenhagen last week to find some inspiration in the form of light and colour. I was pretty shocked when I arrived to see a plethora of vibrant veggies, all lined up and waiting for me take them home. I guess Id gotten into such a routine with my shopping that I had failed to remember that winter does in fact offer a lot of brightly hued food, and that I am, undoubtedly, a human. Excited and hungry, I hurried home with a whack-load of produce and a plan brewing in my brain. Oh the colours! Oh the possibilities! Oh what a nerd I am! With some stale sourdough rye sitting on the counter and a knob of ginger in the fridge, a hearty, satisfying salad began to take shape in my mind, a rainbow swathe of vegetables stretched out before me like a beacon in an stubborn steel grey sky. Super Cool Kohlrabi Kohlrabi is a mysterious and intimidating vegetable, dont you agree? Ive gotten a lot of questions about this prehistoric looking creature, as many of you out there seem to be quite scared of even taking it home! Well fear not. Kohlrabi is not going to take off a finger or worse if you approach it with a knife. It is a rather gentle and yielding brassica, a cross between a cabbage and a turnip that can be enjoyed cooked or raw. Its pleasantly crisp texture is perfect julienned in salads, but its also a tender treat roasted in the oven in slices or batons. The flavour is somewhere near to broccoli but a tad milder and sweeter. I really like it in soups as well, blended up with white beans or chickpeas. The leaves are also edible and very delicious in salad or stir-fried with garlic like collards or Swiss chard. Key nutrients in kohlrabi include vitamin C, for fighting infection, vitamin E for preventing arterial plaque build-up, and a range of B-vitamins for combating stress. The potassium in kohlrabi helps the body maintain proper fluid balance, while the calcium manages the acid/­­alkaline balance of our blood. Other minerals in kohlrabi include iron, magnesium and zinc. When buying kohlrabi, look for bulbs that are firm, smooth and free of holes or cracks. Typically this part of the vegetable is pale green, but you can also find purple varieties like the one pictured above. The younger ones can be eaten with the skin on, but as their season (late fall to early spring) stretches, youll find peeling the more mature bulbs is a tastier choice. The leaves should be taut and unblemished. To prolong the kohlrabis shelf life, remove the leaves and wrap them in a damp towel, place them in a plastic bag in the fridge for up four days. The root bulb can be stored separately in the crisper as well, and will keep well for couple weeks. To the panzanella! Traditionally, this is a salad made with stale white bread and tomatoes, a popular dish in Tuscany. My version is a far, Nordic cry from the classic, but its a meal in itself and a very satisfying one at that, since there is just so. much. going. on. The key to building this dish, or any dish for that matter is layers and balance; flavours, textures and of course, colours. Taking into consideration that the base of this dish would be hearty winter greens I knew that I needed something creamy and yielding, like roast veggies, and something dense and crusty, like the Garlic Sourdough Rye Bread Croutons to contrast and compliment. From a flavour perspective, especially in salads, balancing tastes is very important for success. Because the roast vegetables are so sweet, its important to have an acidic hit to add brightness. I made some very tasty Ginger-Pickled Carrots in advance, but capers would also be a nice touch if you are pressed for time. The point is to step back and look at your dish as a whole, then adjust all the levels of salt, sugar, and acid as needed tipping the scales until everything is just right. And just a special note about these croutons, because they are so darn delish. I first came up with these in the good ol days when I was cooking at a very small café here in Copenhagen, inventing new dishes every day and being creative with what I had available. The odd time we had any leftover rye bread, I would make these garlic croutons, few of which actually made it onto any finished dishes because I would typically eat them all up before service with my kitchen mates. They are addictive. The kind of thing you wouldnt necessarily think of as a terrific little snack, but wow, are they ever hard to stop eating! There is a high amount of garlic-to-bread ratio, but because Danish rye is so rich and flavourful, youll need that amount of garlic to be heard. If youre using a lighter bread, a spelt loaf for instance, you can scale back just a touch unless you really love your garlic and/­­or not planning on making out with anyone for a couple days. This dish may seem component-heavy, but most of these elements can be made in advance so the whole thing comes together when youre ready. The only thing you need to do before serving in fact, is massaging the kale and kohlrabi leaves. Now excuse me as I dive face first into this bowl of rainbow ecstasy! Okay, good-byyyyyyeeee!     Print recipe     Winter Rainbow Panzanella Serves 4 Ingredients: 4 cups /­­ 100g shredded kale and kohlrabi leaves (or any hearty winter green) 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 1 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice a couple pinches sea salt A variety of winter vegetables suitable for roasting. I chose: – sweet potato – golden & red beets – kohlrabiparsnip – Brussels sprouts Other suggestions: – celeriac – butternut squash – purple potatoes – Jerusalem artichokecauliflowerbroccolileeks Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F/­­200°C. 2. Scrub veggies well, chop into similar sized pieces (no need to peel!) and place on a baking sheet with a few knobs of coconut oil or ghee. Place in the oven and when the oil has melted, remove pan from oven, toss to coat veggies and return to the middle rack. Bake for 25-35 minutes, depending on the size of your veggies. Remove from oven, season with salt and pepper, and a drizzle of olive oil. 3. While the veggies are roasting, prepare the kale and /­­or other greens. Wash and dry then well and chop into small pieces. Place in a large bowl and dress with olive oil, lemon juice and sea salt. Vigorously massage the oil and juice into the greens for two whole minutes until they are tender and dark green. Season to taste. 4. To assemble salad, Top the greens with the roasted veggies, add as many pickled carrots as you like, drizzle the dressing over and toss. Top with garlic croutons and serve. Overnight Ginger-Pickled Carrots Ingredients: 300g carrots 1 cup /­­ 250ml apple cider vinegar 1 cup /­­ 250ml water (or more if needed) 1 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1/­­2 Tbsp. fine grain sea salt small knob of ginger (about 10g), peeled and sliced Directions: 1. Scrub carrots well. Using a vegetable peeler, slice the carrots lengthwise into long, thing ribbons. Place into a 1-quart /­­ 1 liter glass container. 2. In a measuring cup combine the vinegar, water, maple syrup, salt and ginger, and stir to dissolve the salt. Pour over the carrots and top up with more water as needed to cover them completely. Place in the fridge for 24 hours and enjoy the next day. Grainy Mustard Dressing Ingredients: 3 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1 Tbsp. whole grain mustard 1 tsp. maple syrup generous pinch of sea salt Directions: 1. Whisk all ingredients together. Season to taste. Garlic Sourdough Rye Bread Croutons Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 200g stale dark sourdough, cut into generous cubes (any bread here would work, but make a healthy choice) 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee (ghee is definitely the tastiest) 2 fat cloves garlic, finely minced or grated on a microplane a couple pinches flaky sea salt Directions: 1. Melt oil in a small saucepan over low heat. When it is melted, grate in the garlic and stir to combine. Cook just until the garlic starts to simmer, immediately remove from heat and let cool slightly. Preheat oven to 400°F/­­200°C. 2. Cut bread into generous cubes and place in a medium sized bowl. Pour the garlic oil over the top and toss to coat, using your hands to squish the oil into the bread. Spread out bread cubes on a cookie sheet, sprinkle with salt and place in the oven. Toast for 10-15 minutes, tossing a couple times during cooking. Croutons are ready when they are crisp and golden around the edges. Once cool, store leftovers in an airtight container for up to three days. *   *   *   *   *   * Hey guys! I have some very exciting news...Im going on tour with my cookbook! Although we are still working out some of the hard details, I wanted to let you know when and where Ill be so you can make a note of it. It would be so rad to meet you, and I hope that you can come out and celebrate! I will update this page and post the events on my Events page and Facebook as they are finalized. Looking forward to it, more than you know! TORONTO April 9-14 VANCOUVER April 15-17 LOS ANGELES April 18 + 19 NEW YORK April 22 + 23 I hope that everyone who has pre-ordered the book is enjoying the Bonus Pack of recipes! Thanks for all of your very positive feedback so far. There is still time to get yours if you’re interested…click here!

Deluxe Butternut Macaroni n Tease

February 18 2015 My New Roots 

Deluxe Butternut Macaroni n Tease Im over winter, but winter definitely isnt over. Although I really cant complain about the balmy temps here in Denmark, its dark and damp and I would probably pay a lot of money to see the sun right about now. And my heart does go out to all my family and friends freezing their tooshies off stateside. Yikes! Im here to help. Or at least, this recipe is here to help. Like most kids, I ate a lot of macaroni and cheese growing up, the kind that came in a blue box with the magical, neon orange flavour powder. Sometimes my mom would toss in a few slices of bell peppers and cocktail wieners and my brother and I felt like kings. Kings! Those were the days. In fear of falling short of that level of awesomeness, I havent actually attempted to make mac n cheese on my own past the days of high school. Until recently this winter, a gnawing hunger for warmth, comfort and nostalgia took hold and just wouldnt let go. If youre anything like me (a human) youll love tucking into this tasty meal every week until spring hits. So, what makes this mac n tease a tease? Its vegan! Not one speck of cheese or milk or butter or cream in sight. Nope. Instead the delectable sauce is a winning combination of roasted butternut squash and garlic, creamy butter beans, and cheesy nutritional yeast. Although not exactly like the cheese sauce of yore, it is still completely smooth and creamy, rich, unctuous, and deeply satisfying when combined with fat noodles and the most amazing non-breadcrumb-topping made out of sunflower seeds. Thats right. Nutritional Yeast: A Cheesy Tease Although the name is slightly unappealing, nutritional yeast is a delicious and versatile seasoning to have in your pantry. Made from a single-celled organism called, Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, the yeast is grown on cane or beet molasses, fermented, then deactivated with heat to stop the growing process. The yeast is sold both as flakes and powder (use half the amount of powder if a recipe calls for flakes). The natural colour of nutritional yeast is vibrantly golden. The flavour is often described as cheesy, which makes it a perfect substitute for dairy products in dressing and sauces. I sprinkle nutritional yeast on popcorn, salads, sandwiches, soups, blend a little into hummus and other savory dips. Because of its high nutritional content, many people treat nutritional yeast as a food supplement. First and foremost, nutritional yeast is an excellent source of B-vitamins, and in many cases B-12 (though not all brands, read the label to make sure). Our bodies need B-vitamins to convert food into energy, keep stress at bay, alleviate insomnia, nervousness, fatigue, PMS, and mood swings (so, kind of important). Nutritional yeast also contains high amounts of protein with 4 grams per tablespoon, and contains 18 amino acids. It is a good source of dietary fiber, folic acid, selenium, and zinc. It is gluten-free and vegan. In North America nutritional yeast is available at natural grocers and bulk food stores. In the UK, it is sold under the brand name Engevita; in Australia, it is called savory yeast flakes; in Scandinavia it is sold as yeast flakes or B-yeast /­ B-gaer (due to the high B-vitamin content). Among cool kids, nutritional yeast is referred to simply as nooch. Drop that bomb at your next vegan potluck for major street cred. It should also be noted that nutritional yeast is not the same as brewers yeast, dry active yeast or baking yeast. Do not use these as a substitute for nutritional yeast in any recipe. It will be gross. If you suffer from Candida or suspect that you have yeast issues, not to worry. Nutritional yeast is totally safe and will not infect you or exacerbate yeast conditions. It should be avoided however by those that are allergic to yeast and yeast products, like bread products, grapes and beer. The shape of pasta you use for this really matters. I chose a large, deeply ridged, tubular pasta that said macaroni on the package, but its much closer to rigatoni if you ask me. Rigatoni, penne, classic macaroni, ziti, or even conchiglie (shells) would work here, as the ultimate goal is to get as much sauce in and around each noodle as humanly possible. In fact, I guarantee when you make the sauce youll be questioning my recipe amounts - there is a lot of it, people. But once you pour it over the cooked pasta and start stirring, it magically disappears into the nooks and crannies only reappear later in your mouth, like a rich and savoury flavour explosion from heaven. Tubes work best for obvious reasons, but Ill let you decide how you want your sauce delivered. And I hope that it goes without saying that you should make an effort to find the most high-vibe pasta you can. There are so many on the market these days, even at regular grocery stores, so no excuses! No white pasta! And yes, there is topping. In keeping with the gluten-free theme I went with a Sunflower Crumble Topping that I am quite chuffed about. Its savoury, crunchy, and totally takes this meal to the next level - better than breadcrumbs I tell ya! And its delicious not only on mac n cheese, but garnishing avocado toast, grain salads, and roast veggies. You may have a little extra of the topping, but my casserole dish is relatively deep and narrow compared to most, and I wanted to make sure you had plenty to cover the top of yours. If you want to save time and skip steps, the pasta and sauce alone is super delish all on its own. But. The topping. After cooking up this meal, I looked around the kitchen at the dish carnage and shrugged my shoulders. You know why? So worth it. Yes, you will use pretty much every cooking element and piece of equipment you own, but make it a Sunday project, invite some buds over and have them clean up. You did cook them a totally awesome meal after all, its the least they can do.      Print recipe     Deluxe Butternut Macaroni ‘n Tease Serves 6 Ingredients: 1 large butternut squash (mine was 1.25kg /­ 2.75 pounds) 4 cloves garlic 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 1 1/­2 cups /­ 250g cooked butter beans (about 1 can) 3/­4 cup /­ 45g nutritional yeast flakes 1 tsp. Dijon mustard 1 1/­2 tsp. fine grain sea salt 2 tsp. paprika 2 Tbsp cold-pressed olive oil 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar 2 - 3 cups /­ 500 - 750ml plant-based milk, as needed (I used rice milk) 4 cups /­ 340g whole grain gluten-free macaroni (or your favourite pasta) Sunflower Crumble Topping 1 cup /­ 130g sunflower seeds 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 Tbsp. nutritional yeast flakes 1/­2 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1/­4 tsp. garlic powder 1/­4 tsp. ground paprika parsley for garnish, if desired Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F/­200°C. Peel and cube butternut squash, peel the garlic cloves, and place everything on a baking sheet with the coconut oil. Place in the oven to melt coconut oil, remove from oven and toss to coat, then set them back in the oven to cook, about 15-20 minutes. The butternut should be slightly blistered and tender. 2. While the squash is roasting, make the Sunflower Crumble Topping. In a large dry skillet over medium heat, toast the sunflower seeds, tossing often so that they do not burn, about 3-5 minutes. Remove from heat and transfer the seeds to a large plate to cool. Place them in a food processor with the remaining topping ingredients and pulse several times to combine and chop up some of the seeds. Season to taste. Set aside. 3. Transfer the roasted squash and garlic it to a blender with all ingredients except for the milk. With the motor running, add the milk until the desired consistency is reached: you are looking for a very thick, yet pourable sauce. Add milk until the blend is smooth, creamy and just the right consistency. 4. Set a pot of water on to boil with plenty of salt. Cook pasta according to package directions. Drain, and return to the pot, drizzle with a little olive oil, toss to coat, and keep the lid on to retain the heat. 5. Pour sauce over the pasta in increments and keep stirring so that it folds into all of the nooks and crannies. You should be able to use up all of the sauce, but if you have any leftovers serve them with the finished dish or store in the fridge for up to 3 days. 6. Turn down the oven temperature to 325°F/­160°C. Transfer the pasta to a casserole or baking dish. Sprinkle the top generously with the Sunflower Crumble Topping. Bake until warmed through and golden on top, about 20 minutes. Garnish with chopped parsley, if desired. Serve hot.

Seriously Super Cereal

January 22 2015 My New Roots 

Seriously Super Cereal If you were to nominate one meal a day for a facelift, would it be breakfast? I thought so. Breakfast can be a challenge for many people, including myself. I get into super groovin streaks with morning meals for weeks on end at times, feeling like Im sooo on top of everything in my life. Then something happens, breakfast becomes less of a priority and I end up making the same smoothie or sourdough smeared with almond butter over and over again. Okay, now that I am writing this down, it really doesnt sound all that dreadful, but for me, starting the day in not only a conscious, but enthusiastic way sets me up for the rest of my waking hours. It fuels me in ways that go beyond calories: its self-love, ceremony, and celebration. Ironically, I make a very complete and healthy breakfast for my 14-month old every single day without even thinking about it. Before I go to bed at night, I soak whole grains, nuts and seeds, rinse them in the morning and cook them with fresh fruit, spices and superfoods. So, um, what about mum? Funny how it wasnt until recently that I thought about myself and how I would like the break the fast. I guess thats just being a parent sometimes, but I am now committed to making a change. It is a New Year after all. Serious Cereal and a Plea for Carbohydrates When someone says that they eat cereal for breakfast, what do you picture? A bowl of steaming hot whole grains, or sugary flakes in milk? I tend to imagine the latter, and I suppose its because that was my breakfast growing up. We had a few kinds of packaged cereal, and not total junk food, but I do recall the odd time we could convince my mom to buy some rainbow-hued concoction in a moment of weakness. I get it: boxed cereal is mindlessly easy, requires no cooking, soaking, stirring or waiting. But this. This is serious cereal. Real cereal. The kind that stands behind its name, and not the kind that has led us so far astray from what cereal actually is that weve mostly forgotten its meaning. Its unprocessed, unrefined, completely whole and natural, and the real way we are meant to eat grains. And while were on the subject, I would like to make a case for carbs. When yet another friend of mine felt the need to accuse all carbohydrates of being evil, I wonder how weve become prejudice against macronutrients?! Its like the diet dark ages. Carbohydrates are not the devil. Many modern eating plans out there vilify them for various reasons, but we need to remember that the majority of grains and grain-related products that people in developed counties consume are highly processed, refined, and stripped of nearly all their nutrients. This was originally done to prolong shelf life, but continues as weve developed a taste for them! It turns out we prefer sweeter food that is faster to cook and easier to chew (go figure). From a biological standpoint, this makes perfect sense, so its rather difficult trying to convince people to spend more money on food that spoils faster, takes longer to cook and eat! Argh. I can only promise you it is worth it. And once you start replacing refined grains with whole grains you will feel why. Eating them in balance with both fats and proteins is a much healthier and quite simply, a more sustainable way of living. My point here is this: lets stop looking at food in its respective parts (carbs, fats, proteins), and get back to the whole picture, the whole food. Choosing a balanced way of eating, as close to nature as possible is the most realistic plan for eating long term. Going to extremes (low-carb! no-carb! fat-free! high-protein!) is not a sustainable way of eating or living. What I propose instead is a sensible, flexible dietary strategy that we can incorporate successfully over a lifetime. McKel Hill wrote a couple stellar articles about carbohydrates over on her site, Nutrition Stripped. Check them out - very clear and thorough reads for those of you who want to know more! I made this cereal blend with a few things in mind. For one, I wanted the mix to be gluten-free so that we can all enjoy it. I wanted something that could keep outside of the fridge, as rolled grains spoil relatively quickly if left at room temperature (how long have those quick oats been sittin in your cupboard, yall?) so I chose only whole grains that are relatively shelf stable. And of course, I also wanted the cereal to actually taste good, which it does. The texture is also very pleasing, not mushy or glue-y like some of the other porridges Ive tried. The sunflower seeds add a wonderful tooth and the grain size differences make for a satisfying mouthfeel (yes, I just used that word). Although I highly recommend soaking the cereal overnight, you can of course cook it from raw the morning you are eating it. In both cases however, rinse the cereal under cool running water before cooking. I use a very fine mesh sieve for this, as the chia and amaranth seeds will fall through large holes. Once cooked, add whatever you like to the porridge. I love a little nut milk poured over the top for creaminess, plus a drizzle of maple syrup or honey, which makes everything delish. I made up a couple seasonal bowls in hopes of inspiring you: one with pear, roasted hazelnuts, and pomegranate seeds; the other with persimmon, toasted coconut flakes and bee pollen. Warming spices like cinnamon and cardamom are tasty stirred in, as are dried fruit, like apricots, raisins, goji berries, mulberries, or figs. Basically, this breakfast is infinitely customizable for every palate and season. Find your groove and just enjoy filling yourself with nourishing goodness from mornings first light. The below batch recipe is a good starting amount, and will make 18-19 portions if you go with 1/­4 cup /­ 50g servings. I find this amount is perfect for me once I add in fruit, some nuts or seeds and superfoods, but if your calories needs are higher, go for 1/­3 or 1/­2 cup servings. If you want to double, triple or quadruple the batch amount, feel free to do so. I just recommend making this amount first and testing it to make sure you really like it, then you can make it your go-to cereal.     Print recipe     Seriously Super Cereal Makes 18-19,  1/­4 cup /­ 50g portions Ingredients: 1 cup /­ 170g buckwheat 1 cup /­ 200g millet 1 cup quinoa /­ 170g 1 cup amaranth /­ 190g 1/­2 cup /­ 70g sunflower seeds 1/­4 cup /­ 40g chia seeds For soaked cereal: 1/­4 cup Seriously Super Cereal blend 1 tsp. acidic medium (apple cider vinegar or lemon juice are good choices) 1/­2 cup /­ 125ml water Directions: 1. Rinse cereal blend well in a very fine mesh sieve. 2. Place in a small saucepan with your acidic medium and cover with water, preferably from a recently boiled kettle. 3. In the morning, drain and rinse grains well. Place back in the saucepan, add 1/­2 cup /­ 125ml water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer and cook 10 minutes, until the grains are tender. 4. Enjoy warm with milk and sweetener of your choice, fresh fruit, spices, and superfoods. For un-soaked cereal: 1/­4 cup /­ 50g  Seriously Super Cereal blend 1 cup /­ 250ml water cook 20 minutes Directions: 1. Rinse porridge mix well in a very fine mesh sieve. 2. Place in a small saucepan with 1 cup /­ 250ml water, bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer, covered, for about 20 minutes, until the grains are tender. 3. Enjoy warm with milk and sweetener of your choice, fresh fruit, spices, and superfoods. *   *   *   *   *   * For those of you that follow me on Instagram will know that I received the first hard copy of my cookbook this week! Eek! I just wanted to take this opportunity to thank you all SO MUCH for the incredible love and enthusiasm. I couldn’t write this post and not tell you how much I appreciate your words. Sheesh! I am bursting with gratitude. I have to mention again that the book is only available for preorder at this time, here. The book drops in North America March 31, UK and Australia April 9, Denmark May 21, Netherlands in June and Germany this summer. Thanks everyone!! with a full heart, Sarah B Show me your Seriously Super Cereal on Instagram: #seriouslysupercereal

Healthy Holiday Gingerbread Cookies

December 15 2014 My New Roots 

Healthy Holiday Gingerbread Cookies Hey guys. Remember how I like pretending that baking is easy? Well, I’ve done it again! I actually wanted to make a gingerbread recipe last year. I even went out and bought a cute set of cookie cutters for the occasion as soon as they appeared in the stores. Let me just preface this by saying, this was at the very end of my pregnancy and pre-baby. Bahahaaa! How I thought that I would have time, energy, or sanity after giving birth to make cookies is beyond me, but I can at least laugh at my extraordinary naiveté. So, fast-forward to the present moment: my mental wherewithal mostly in tact after the first 12 months of motherhood, and the desire to be involved in some kind of holiday tradition tugging at my heart strings. I was actually so excited to make gingerbread, once and for all, and blog about how easy it was. If you follow me on Instagram, you will recall a certain Michelin-man-shaped gingerbread puddle that I posted last week. Yea. Like I said, I forgot that baking is not easy when you’re silly enough to invent recipes of which you have zero experience, under crushing time pressure. Okay, well, no big deal. Roll up my sleeves and start again, right? To rectify the poofing, I decided to eliminate the baking soda, baking powder and all liquid. Genius! Instead of a puffed up puddle, the cookies were rock hard and greasy. Gingerbread: 2, Sarah B: 0. At this point, in a frustrated frenzy, my husband chimed in for the pep talk. Hun, you know that this happens every time you bake. Its science! And youre bad at science (Im paraphrasing). Just give it one more try and I bet youll nail it, because in the end you always do (he forgot about the carrot cake debacle, bless his heart). So this morning began in the kitchen, sleeves rolled up, and ready to face this worthy opponent with a veritable village of gingerbread casualties in my wake. Except this time, I won. Everything Youve Ever Wanted to Know About Molasses Isnt it ironic that the waste product of manufacturing white sugar, is a nutrient-rich, low-glycemic syrup? I’m talking about molasses. That gooey, rich, unmistakably black-brown nectar with a rather divisive flavour. There are a few varieties of molasses, but to understand how they vary, lets first look at how molasses is made. Molasses is created from either sugarcane or sugar beets (but because the molasses made from beets can be quite bitter, sugarcane molasses is the most common variety available for human consumption). These plants are harvested, and then cut, crushed, and mashed so that the juice is extracted. Fancy Molasses is the first product to be made, but is in fact the only type of molasses that is not a by-product of sugar processing, but instead a direct product from sugar cane. This type is super sweet and is most commonly enjoyed as the syrup straight on pancakes or waffles, and as an ingredient in baked goods. Varieties of Molasses The real deal molasses comes from boiling the juice of sugar cane down to crystallize the sugars, producing a concentrate, the first of which is called First Molasses, First Strike Molasses, Barbados Molasses, Light Molasses, Mild Molasses, or Sweet Molasses. This comes from the first boiling of the sugar. It is light in colour and mild in flavour. Some people also enjoy this type directly on their food, like fancy molasses. It is about 65% sucrose. Next up is Second Molasses, Second Strike Molasses, Dark Molasses, or Full Molasses. As you may have guessed, this is made from the second boiling of the extracted cane juice, a process that extracts even more sugar, producing a darker, thicker syrup typically used as a cooking ingredient in sauces, marinades and baked beans. It is about 60% sucrose. Blackstrap molasses is likely the one all you health foodies out there know and love. This type of molasses is made by boiling the cane syrup a third time, which extracts even more sugar and concentrates the flavour. By this point, the sucrose content is so low (about 55%) that the syrup no longer tastes sweet, but slightly bitter. The colour is nearly black, and the consistency is very thick and viscous. Blackstrap molasses is used in baking, sauces, stews and even as a food supplement due to its high nutrient content. Nutritious and Delicious Blackstrap molasses is highly concentrated in essential minerals, such as iron, calcium, selenium, manganese, potassium, copper, and zinc. As I mentioned above, this type of molasses is sometimes used as a dietary supplement or tonic. One tablespoon stirred into warm water is a food-based way to boost mineral levels, especially iron, as this small amount contains a whopping 20% of your RDI. You can also enjoy it in foods such as smoothies, tea, warm cereal, or dressings, sauces and stews. Remember to eat iron-rich foods with vitamin C to enhance its absorption. I like to use a little lemon juice. Blackstrap molasses is one of the few sweeteners that is low on the glycemic scale with an index classification of 55. This means that it metabolizes slowly in a controlled way, demands less insulin production and wont cause a spike in blood glucose levels. All in all, blackstrap molasses is a fantastic, healthy sweetener to which I enthusiastically give a thumbs up! Buying and Storing When purchasing molasses, read the label to ensure that what you are buying is 100% pure molasses (some companies will cut blackstrap molasses with corn syrup to make it sweeter) and that it is unsulfured. Sulfur dioxide can be added to all grades of molasses to help preserve it, as it prevents the growth of bacteria and mould. From a health perspective, sulfur can cause reactions in sensitive people (you can read more about that here). Sulfur dioxide also has a very bitter flavour, and can drastically alter the flavour of the dish you are making. Look for organic molasses whenever possible too. Store unopened molasses in a cool, dark place for up to one year. Opened containers must be stored in the fridge and will last for up to six months. So this gingerbread, this is really it. Its deeply spiced, perfectly balanced in sweet and salt, and super addictive. I love the special flavour and richness that molasses brings to the cookies as well. Its a must-have component of this recipe for sure, and should not be substituted with other sweeteners due to its properties in the baking itself. The cookies are totally vegan (!!!), made with whole spelt flour and natural sweeteners. But the coolest part of this recipe? If you like a chewy cookies, bake them for 7 minutes, and if you like a crispier version, bake it for 10. Science! I tried two versions with this batch of cookies, and although I prefer the chewy ones, my husband really likes the crunch of the longer-baked variety. I am really, really proud of my gingerbread, especially after persevering through three rounds of total uncertainty and insanity. Although the first two recipes, according to some were just fine, I couldnt post a recipe here on My New Roots that is just fine. Never! I want everything I put out into the world to be my best, and this, I am so pleased to say, (finally) qualifies. Whew. As I was very anxiously waiting for this last trial to bake, I whipped up a Cashew-Cacao Butter Icing to decorate the little guys with (I got it on the first try too!). As I was making it however, I used honey to sweeten it, and then promptly delivered myself a swift forehead slap realizing that the rest of the cookie recipe was vegan! Argh. So, if you dont want to use honey to sweeten this icing, I am confident that maple syrup or coconut nectar would work in its place. I havent tried making this recipe in a regular blender, only a Vitamix, so I know that the icing consistency may be a little grainy if you dont use a high-powered machine.     Print recipe     Healthy Holiday Gingerbread Makes at least 2 dozen medium-sized cookies Ingredients: 2 1/­­2 /­­ 350g whole spelt flour 1/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1/­­2 tsp. baking powder 1 Tbsp. ground ginger (or less if you prefer more mild gingerbread) 1 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cloves 1/­­2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg 5 Tbsp. coconut oil, melted 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70g coconut sugar 1/­­2 cup unsulfured blackstrap molasses 3 Tbsp. unsweetened applesauce 1 tsp. vanilla extract Directions: 1. Sift the dry ingredients together. 2. In a small saucepan, melt the coconut oil, then whisk in the molasses, applesauce, and vanilla. 3. Pour the wet ingredients over the dry, and fold to combine - you may need to use your hands to mix this, but dont overwork the dough. Fold just until the ingredients come together evenly. Turn dough out onto a piece of plastic wrap, make a ball, then flatten into a large disc. Wrap and place in the fridge for at least 1 hour. 4. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. Remove dough from the fridge, unwrap and cut in half. Wrap one half and return it to the fridge. Place the other half of the dough between two pieces of baking paper and roll out (if it is very stiff, you may need to let it warm up just slightly). Remove top half of the paper and cut out desired shapes with a cookie cutter or a knife. Slide a knife or thin egg lifter under each shape and place on a lined baking sheet. Ball up the scraps of dough, roll it out between the parchment and start again. Once the dough becomes too warm, return it to the fridge and repeat the entire process with the other half of the chilled dough. 5. Place cookie sheet in the oven and bake for 7-10 minutes (7 minutes produces a softer, chewier cookie, while 10 minutes produces a crispier one). Remove from oven and let cool on pan. Decorate with the Cashew Cacao Icing if desired (recipe follows). Cashew-Cacao Butter Icing Makes about 3/­­4 cup Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 65g cashews a few pinches of sea salt 3 Tbsp. /­­ 40g cacao butter, melted 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. raw honey (or liquid sweetener of your choice) 1/­­2 vanilla bean, seeds scraped 3 Tbsp. hot water Directions: 1. Soak cashews with sea salt for four hours, or overnight. 2. Drain, rinse and place cashews in the most powerful blender you have along with all other ingredients. Blend on high until as smooth as possible. 3. Pour into a piping bag and store in the fridge until it firms up, about 2 hours, then use. Store leftovers in the fridge or freezer. If you do not have a piping bag, you can also use sandwich bag with a teeny corner snipped off, which is what I did! For those of you living in Copenhagen, Ive only found one shop that carries molasses and its the Super Brugsen on N?rrebrogade. I know at least one of you is going to ask! And finally, I want to say a HUGE Happy Holidays to everyone out there. I hope that your days are filled with wonder and delight, family and friends, and above all, delicious food. I can’t help myself – it’s what I live for! All love and sparkling winter holidays, Sarah B. Show me your gingerbread on Instagram: #MNRgingerbread

Sweet Potato Skillet Hash

November 25 2014 My New Roots 

Sweet Potato Skillet Hash   Rituals. With the holidays coming up, I cant help but think about them, the role they play in all of our lives, and how grateful I am for them. Every month (or as often as our schedules allow) my little family and two others get together for brunch. Its pretty much like a scene from Thirty Something (remember that show?!), babies crawling around under the table, toddlers walking into walls and disintegrating into fits of hysteria, but somewhere in between diaper changes and breastfeeding, the grown-ups feast. We always do this potluck style, that way the couple who is hosting doesnt have to sacrifice their entire week planning and cooking for Sunday, because that is laughably unrealistic. And even though we never talk about what well be bringing, the spread is always totally rad and over-the-top. And just what the adults need. The first time we got together, I made this dish. It was about this time of year, and I felt like something savoury, spicy and just plain yum. Sweet potatoes, believe it or not, are kind of a special thing in Denmark (especially organic ones!) so upon finding a few at my local health food store I knew that they were destined for Jacob and Milles skillet with some eggs, and chilies and herbs. The dish was a hit, and so it has become kind of expected that aside from the other amazing things that turn up, that I bring the ingredients for this too, nearly every time. Its a good social meal to make because most of the cooking time is largely unattended, allowing one to indulge in too many of Sillas raw cake bites before even sitting down. Its also fun to have this piping hot centerpiece on the table and let everyone just dive right in.   The dish opens with caramelized onions, so right off the bat, you know its gonna be good. Lots of cumin and coriander take things to best-buddy spice town, with chili flakes giving some heat and a good dose of sea salt to help those onions melt down. Honestly, you could just turn off the stove after the onions are caramelized and eat these on toast with poached eggs, they are that good. But wait! Sweet potatoes join the party, and cilantro and whatever else you think youd like to nosh on. Its great with avocado, lime, some sprouted corn tortillas, hot sauce...you see where Im going with this. Although it’s a fabulous thing to serve at a brunch, this hash also makes a pretty delicious weeknight dinner. If you want to make a vegan version, simply leave out the eggs - its wonderful this way too. Ive seen other kinds of sweet potato hash, but for some reason the recipes always suggests roasting or boiling the sweet potatoes first, then putting them in the skillet and then cooking more? Too much work, I say! This recipe is all on the stove, one pan, no fuss, just tasties.   Lessons in Lecithin Have you heard of lecithin before? My guess it, probably not. Well, I bet if you were to go into your fridge or pantry right now, you could find at least one packaged food that contains this stuff, especially if youve got some ice cream lurking around, yoghurt, cheese, margarine, even bread or granola bars. But what the heck is this stuff? Lecithin is a nutrient produced by the liver, and is found in both whole and processed foods. Its function in the body is to emulsify fats, and enhance the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins, namely vitamin A. The big reason for consuming lecithin however is the fact that nearly 1/­­3 of your brain is made of the stuff. Did you get that?! 30% of your brains dry matter is lecithin. Seriously. You can imagine then, that lecithin is rather vital to proper brain function, increasing mental activity and enhancing memory. Lecithin also exhibits a calming effect and can be helpful in reducing hyperactivity. Whats more, lecithin protect against gallstone formation, high blood pressure, and cholesterol excesses. Whole food sources of lecithin include egg yolks, rice bran and soybeans. Processed foods often contain soy lecithin (does that ring a bell?) to ensure that the fats and water-based substances do not separate, and to make the food creamier.  It is added to baked goods to prevent the dough from sticking and to improve its ability to rise. Because soy is a very inexpensive and widely cultivated crop, it makes sense to use its byproduct in food processing (soy lecithin comes from the production of soy oil). The lecithin found in eggs is of high quality and should be eaten with enthusiasm, not fear! Does this mean that egg white omelets are a thing of the past? In my opinion, yes. So much of the good stuff is contained in that gorgeous yolk, but heres the kicker: you have to keep those bad boys runny. Lecithin is a very delicate nutrient and is destroyed with heat. You know that when the yolks are hard, as in very cooked scrambled eggs or hard-boiled eggs, youve gone too far and the lecithin is no longer viable. Poaching, soft boiling, and steaming are therefore your best choices for preserving the many health benefits of that precious lecithin.       Print recipe     Sweet Potato Skillet Hash Serves 3-4 Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 2 tsp. whole cumin seeds (1 tsp. ground cumin) 2 tsp. whole coriander seeds (1 tsp. ground coriander) 1/­­2 tsp. chili flakes, plus more for garnish a few generous pinches sea salt 2 medium onions (I like using red onions for this) 3 medium sweet potatoes (about 1 pound /­­ 500g), scrubbed and cut into cubes 1/­­2 cup – 3/­­4 cup /­­ 125ml – 175ml water or vegetable broth organic, free-run eggs, as many as youd like 1/­­2 cup cilantro, roughly chopped Serve with: sliced avocado lime wedges bread or tortillas hot sauce extra cilantro flaky sea salt and freshly ground black pepper Directions: 1. Crush the cumin and coriander seeds in a mortar and pestle (the bottom of a drinking glass will work in a pinch!). In a large skillet, preferably cast-iron, melt the oil over medium heat. Add the spices, including the chili flakes and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. 2. Add the onions, a few pinches of salt, and stir to coat. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook the onions, stirring occasionally, until they have caramelized, about 20-30 minutes. 3. Add the sweet potatoes and toss to mix with the onions and spices. Add about 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water or broth, cover skillet with a lid and let cook undisturbed for 15 minutes, this will allow the sweet potatoes to steam. If the potatoes are not cooked through, put the lid back on and cook for another five minutes or so, adding more water if necessary. If there is water in the pan remaining, simply remove the lid and allow it steam off. 4. To cook the eggs, make a few divots in the hash and crack eggs into them. Put the lid back on and allow the eggs to cook for about 3-5 minutes. Alternatively, you can put the whole thing, without the lid, under the broiler. What youre after is eggs whose whites have set, but yolks are runny. 5. Just before eating, sprinkle the top with chopped cilantro and some extra chili flakes. Serve with avocado and lime wedges on the side, and crusty bread or tortillas. Allow each person to scoop out their own portion and eggs. Enjoy hot. What rituals mean a lot to you? What ceremonial events see you through the year? With American Thanksgiving in just a couple days, Id hope that many of you will be gathered around a table celebrating your own special times with people who you care about. As a Canadian living in Denmark, Ill be celebrating the glorious in the every day, and looking forward to the next brunch. Happy holidays. All love and light, Sarah B

Cream of Broccoli and Cashew Soup

October 24 2014 My New Roots 

Cream of Broccoli and Cashew Soup   Have you ever convinced yourself that something is delicious so you can actually handle eating it? Let me count out a few of my least favourite-tasting healthy things that I consume with disdain: spirulina, chlorella, most sea vegetables, flax seed oil, and wheatgrass juice. I have also been like this with broccoli, probably my entire life. Especially after studying nutrition and learning just how incredibly good this veggie is for us, I’ve really forced myself to eat more of it, regardless of how yucky it tastes to me. The challenge lives on. Although I have found suitable homes for most of the aforementioned foods in smoothies (thank goodness for smoothies), broccoli just doesnt work all that well blended up with banana. Call me crazy. My first introduction to broccoli was cream of broccoli soup, of the canned variety: salty white mire with infinitesimal flecks of green, which I suppose was supposed to make whoever is eating feel a little healthier. But the broccoli? Is it even in there? All I remember is a hot bowl of thick, sulfur-flavoured cream, and the only indication of broccoli being the putrid fart-y stench. My five-year-old self was put off to say the least, and broccoli quickly made it to the top of my ick list. Although Ive made it a habit to cover up the taste of broccoli more often than letting its true flavour shine through, this soup is different. First of all, its mostly broccoli. And its scrumptious. It doesnt hide underneath crazy cheese sauce or dressing because it doesnt need to! Its earthy and delightful. Its shockingly green and decidedly not fart-y because the broccoli isn’t overcooked. It’s rich and creamy with a hint of spice that you can dial up or down depending on whom youre cooking for. I used cashews to deliver that unctuous richness, and nutritional yeast to mimic the cheese-y taste of dairy. Not only does this really take the soup to a whole other level, swirling that velvety cream through the bowl of green creates a beguilingly beautiful result. I mean, just look at it. This is satisfying and stick-to-your-ribs kind of fare, which is perfect as the autumn wind begins to blow. I am proud of this soup. It marks a grown-up kind of shift in my palette and my diet. A soup to celebrate not just health, but deliciousness.   How to make Broccoli not a bummer Brassica vegetables! Repulsing children since the beginning of time! Okay, why do kids hate this group of veggies so darn much? Even adults tend to shy away from them in many cases. I believe sulfur is to blame - that uber-healthy, yet stinky and gas-producing compound naturally found in broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kale and the like. There is a very important trick to remember when cooking these beauties up, and that is to not cook them very much at all! Broccoli contains good amounts of chlorophyll, the life blood of plants, which actually helps counteract the sulfuric taste, smell and wind-making properties. Chlorophyll, however, is very sensitive to heat and once its gone, that rotten egg scent which would otherwise be neutralized, will likely spoil all hope of your munchkins munching the veg. Five minutes is all it takes to lightly cook most brassicas, while maintaining their high levels of chlorophyll and vitamin C. This will also reduce gas, and that makes everyone happy. Steaming is the healthiest way to enjoy broccoli, especially if you consume the steaming water as well. In this case of this soup, the water in which the broccoli is cooked, gets blended up into the final dish, making this a mineral-rich soup where very little nutrition is lost. If you are going to cook the stems of broccoli (waste not want not!), steam them 2-3 minutes before adding the florets, as they take a little longer. Remember that the broccoli leaves are completely edible as well and loaded with nutrients.       Print recipe     Cream of Broccoli Cashew Soup Serves 6 Ingredients: 1 lb /­­ 500g onions, chopped 1 knob coconut oil 1/­­2 tsp. sea salt 6 cloves garlic, minced 2 lbs /­­ 1kg broccoli, chopped into florets 6 cups vegetable broth fresh green chili, minced (enough to suit your taste) 1/­­2 cup nutritional yeast 1 cup packed flat-leaf parsley, leaves and tender stems only 2 tsp. lemon juice sea salt to taste chili flakes for garnish, if desired Cashew Cream 1 cup /­­ 150g raw cashews 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml water 2 cloves garlic 2 tsp. lemon juice 1/­­4 tsp. sea salt Directions: 1. Place cashews in a large bowl and cover with water. Add 1 teaspoon of sea salt, stir and let soak at room temperature for about 4 hours (overnight is fine). Drain and rinse. 2. Place cashews in a blender, add all other cashew cream ingredients and blend on the highest setting until completely smooth. Season to taste. Set aside. 3. Heat a knob of coconut oil in a large stockpot. When melted, add onions and a few pinches of sea salt, stir, and cook until the onions have softened, about 5-7 minutes. Add garlic and chili, stir, cook for 2 minutes. Next add the vegetable broth, and bring to a boil. Add the broccoli florets and simmer for just five minutes - do not overcook! The broccoli should be bright green and slightly al dente. 4. Remove about half of the cashew cream from the blender and set aside. Add the stockpot contents to the blender (you may need to do this in batches) and blend on the highest setting until smooth. Add the nutritional yeast, parsley, and lemon juice. Blend on high until smooth. Season to taste. 5. To serve, pour the soup into bowls. Add a few spoonfuls of the leftover cashew cream and swirl into the soup. Sprinkle with chili flakes and a couple parsley leaves. Enjoy hot.   By the way, thank you all SO much for an absolutely fabulous time in Amsterdam! The cooking classes, lectures, cookbook event, and Restaurant De Kas dinner were tons of fun for me and I hope you enjoyed them as much as I did. I have plenty of beautiful photos so stay tuned to Facebook where I will share them very soon! With gratitude and broccoli, Sarah B Show me your soup on Instagram: #MNRbroccolisoup

Late Summer Abundance Bowl

September 10 2014 My New Roots 

Late Summer Abundance Bowl   I have a serious shopping addiction. But its not for clothes, or house wares, or even kitchen tools. No. Its for health food. Although I am incredibly excited to go back to Canada every summer to see my family and friends, the other thing I unapologetically look forward to the most, is browsing the aisles of the natural foods co-op. Oh, I could spend hours upon hours wandering around, checking out whats new and exciting in the world of loose leaf teas, gluten-free bread, vegan ice cream, and sampling the latest nut butters. Did you know they now sell dehydrated kombucha scobies in bulk? Omigod, reeeally? So yea. I have a problem and Im not afraid to admit it. This year I found something very thrilling, and that was sorghum. I had heard of it before, but only in relation to the syrup that is made from the plant. I didnt know that the plant also produced a cereal! Omigod, reeeally? The silliest things light my fire. I guess you know this by now. Anyway. Sorghum. Its gluten-free, high in fiber and rich in iron and the B-vitamins. Sorghum is also very high in protein (more than quinoa!), yet it lacks lysine, an essential amino acid, so combining it with something that contains this amino acid is important. I chose chickpeas in this case so that we can cover our bases, and indeed make a perfect protein. Sorghum originates from Africa, then traveled through the Middle East and Asia along ancient trade routes and the Silk Road. Today sorghum is a staple food in India and Africa, but did you know it is the third most important cereal crop grown in America? Insanity!   Sorghum is very similar to millet in its nuttiness and dry quality. For this reason, it is perfect for cold salads and pilafs as the grains dont stick together. Like millet, this grain requires a lot of water for cooking too, at a 3:1 ratio. Although there was no mention of soaking the sorghum prior to cooking, I found that cooking it straight from dried took a very long time (more than one hour) and even required more water than suggested. When I cooked it again after soaking it overnight, the sorghum cooked a little faster (about 45 minutes) but still took almost 3 cups of water to reach the desired tenderness. You can find sorghum (obviously) at health food stores and gourmet grocers. I suspect that it will get more attention in the coming years as words of its awesomeness spreads, so be on the lookout. You heard it here first.   As summer wanes, we begin to see the gorgeous produce burst forth from all the warm temperatures and soft rains. Its a beautiful time of year because its the season when almost everything is in season! Tomatoes and cucumbers are at their best, fully ripe and juicy and sweet. My late summer abundance bowl celebrates all of this, with an Indian twist honoring the traditional Indian grain, sorghum. I played around with it quite a lot and eventually settled on using curry and coconut as base flavours, then combined with a kachumber salad and chickpeas. The cilantro, cumin seeds and citrus are bright and playful against the rich coconut-y vibes. You will love it.     Print recipe     Late Summer Abundance Bowl Serves 3-4 Coconut Curry Sorghum Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 200g sorghum, soaked overnight in 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 2 1/­­2 – 3 cups water 5 cardamom pods 1 cinnamon stick 1/­­2 tsp. whole black peppercorns 2 tsp. curry powder 2 slices organic lemon 3/­­4 tsp. sea salt 3/­­4 cup coconut milk Directions: 1. Rinse sorghum well, then place in a pot, cover with a few inches /­­ centimeters of water (recently boiled is best) and add the vinegar. Stir. Let sit overnight (or for 8 hours). Drain rinse and add to a pot with 2 1/­­2 cups of water, all spices, lemon, and salt. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer and cook, covered, for 45-60 minutes. The sorghum is cooked when it is chewy and tender. If there is any crunch left in the grain after the water has been absorbed, add an extra half-cup (125ml) of water and simmer until the grains are tender. 2. Take sorghum off of the stove, remove the lemon and whole spices if possible (you can leave the peppercorns however). Pour in the coconut milk and fold to combine. The hot sorghum will absorb the coconut milk as it cools. Kachumber Salad 1 lb. /­­ 500g variety of Heirloom tomatoes 1 large English cucumber, sliced small handful cilantro, roughly copped 1/­­2 fresh chili, minced (green is traditional, but I used red Serrano) 1 tsp. whole cumin seeds 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 1 Tbsp. lime juice a few pinches sea salt Directions: 1. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast the cumin seeds until fragrant (be careful not to burn them!). 2. Cut the tomatoes into whatever shapes you like, according to the size of the fruit (the larger Coeur de Boeuf tomatoes I left in generous, thick slices). Place in a large bowl. Add the sliced cucumber, chopped cilantro and chili. 3. Whisk the olive oil, lime juice and salt together. Pour over the tomatoes and cucumber and fold gently to combine. Sprinkle with cumin seeds and serve. To Assemble: Coconut Curry Sorghum Kachumber Salad Chickpeas 1. Place sorghum, salad and chickpeas in a bowl. Sprinkle with flaky sea salt and extra cilantro if desired. Serve and enjoy. *   *   *   *   *   * Great news everyone! Registration is now open for the cooking classes, lectures, and other events taking place next month in Amsterdam. I am so pumped to finally be teaching breakfast classes! Hoorah! My fav meal of the day plus tasty snacks - what could be better? Nothin. I will also be presenting 2 different lectures, giving a (free!) Q&A session at the America Book Center, and hosting a collaborative dinner at the world-renowned restaurant, De Kas. I am over the moon to be touring, teaching, and above all, connecting with you in person once again. Please visit Healthy Happy to learn more about all the events and book your space today. Looking forward to seeing you there!    

Sarah Bs Bubble Tea

August 19 2014 My New Roots 

Sarah Bs Bubble Tea I get some pretty interesting recipe requests from you, my readers, and although I receive far more than I could ever fulfill, I do like to rise to the occasion. I am especially inclined to answer the call if more than one person asks for the same thing: gluten-free vegan lasagna, healthy cookies, and easy breakfasts are just a few of the cravings Ive tried to satisfy. It seems that over the past year, bubble tea has become a popular item for health-ifying, and Ive gotten several emails about this very thing. How can we take a pretty sugar-laden, artificially-coloured-and-flavoured beverage and turn it into something beneficial, light, and refreshing? Here I am to the rescue! But can I make a confession? Ive never actually tried it before. Most of the time I do my research in order to gear up before making something out of my wheelhouse, but this time it was just too much to swallow. I actually did go to a teashop though, with my best intentions to sample a bevy of bubbles. I walked in, saw all the crazy colours, dubious juices and syrups, pulled a 180 and headed straight to the health food store instead. I did leave with bubble tea straws, of course. That much I know is essential. So, that all said, if I get this totally wrong, I do apologize. This is my version and I quite like it. Sarah Bs bubble tea is not pretending to by anything other than what it is - a bubble tea all its own. Tapioca Pearls of Wisdom What makes those darn bubbles anyway? Its tapioca, in fact. Tapioca is the dried starch from the root of the cassava plant, a tuber native to South America. It has a naturally sweet taste, which is why it is so often used in candies and desserts, most familiar of them being tapioca pudding. Tapioca also the amazing ability to absorb and thicken liquid. Being naturally gluten-free, it is has become a popular gelling agent to use in foods, as opposed to fillers containing wheat. You can use tapioca flourstarch /­ powder in place of arrowroot or cornstarch in most recipes. Tapioca is a staple food in many countries throughout the world due to its high concentration of carbohydrates, low levels of fat and dietary cholesterol, and its vitamin and mineral balance. Key nutrients in tapioca include calcium to support bone health, magnesium to help control inflammation, phosphorus for protein synthesis, and vitamin A for glowing skin. You can find tapioca at most health food stores where it is often sold in powder, flaked, or pearled form. For bubble tea, look for large pearls instead of the small ones that are typically used to make tapioca pudding. Make sure that the only ingredient in the pearls is tapioca starch, and organic if possible. Many novelty pearls contain food coulouring and flavouring agents, and its best to avoid those for obvious reasons. Natural peals are pure white and are almost completely flavourless, except for a hint of sweetness. Peaches and plums have just come into season, so Ive decided to use those as the fruit base for my teas. You can use whatever is available where you are of course, and match the brewed tea flavours accordingly. I chose chamomile to pair up with the peach and green tea to go with the plum. These were really delicious combinations, but are by no means the only options. Rooibos would be tasty with peaches too, and maybe jasmine with plums? Im just guessing here - get creative!     Print recipe     Sarah B’s Peach and Plum Bubble Tea Serves 4-6  Ingredients: 1/­2 cup large pearl tapioca 6 cups water, divided 2 - 3 Tbsp. maple syrup or raw honey (to your taste) 4 peaches 4 plums 2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. dried chamomile flowers (or 2 chamomile tea bags) 1 Tbsp. loose leaf green tea (or 2 green tea bags) milk of your choice for serving (optional) Directions: 1. Bring 3 cups /­ 750ml water to a roiling boil, add the tapioca pearls and stir. Reduce the heat to simmer and let cook for 25-30 minutes, then turn off the heat and let sit covered, for another 30 minutes until the pearls are translucent (if a few of them have slightly white centers, this is okay, but test one to make sure that it isnt powdery in the middle). 2. While the pearls are cooking, add 3 cups /­ 750 ml of cold water to a large glass jar or container. Stir in the liquid sweetener of your choice to dissolve. Once the pearls have cooked, add them to the jar of cold sweetened water and let sit in the fridge until ready to use. If the water does not entirely cover the pearls, add just enough water to do so. 3. Brew the tea. Bring enough water for 4 cups of tea to the boil. Let cool slightly and pour over tea bags (I used two different tea pots for the two different flavours). Let steep for at least 10 minutes. Remove tea bags and discard. 4. Peel the peaches and plums. Add peaches and 1 teaspoon lemon juice to a blender and blend on high until totally creamy and smooth. Repeat with plums and remaining lemon juice. Set aside. 5. To serve the tea, place desired amount of tapioca pearls in each glass, fill 3 glasses about half full with chamomile and the others with green tea. Spoon peach purée into the chamomile glasses and plum purée into the green tea glasses. Add a squirt of milk if desired. Stir with a large straw, sweeten to taste and enjoy. So what else do you want to know about? What other kooky experiments will you have me diving into? Bring ‘em on! If you are so inclined to send me an email, type “recipe request” as the subject line and I’ll squirrel it away for a time when I’m a bit stumped for what to make next. And you never know, I may just answer your call. Hope you are all having a gorgeous summer! Sorry for the radio silence on my end – I’ve been giving the cookbook so much attention, it’s hard to keep the blog up to speed. I promise it will be worth the wait though. Good golly am I excited!!! *   *   *   *   *   * Show me your bubble tea on Instagram: #MNRbubbletea

post3

August 5 2014 My New Roots 

Post 3 content Does anyone out there latch onto a food and become totally obsessed with it? Do you find it making its way into almost everything you make? Lately, Ive been riding the buckwheat wagon hard. And although I am not so much into food trends, I predict that buckwheat is going to be the new hotness. You heard it here first.

post1

August 5 2014 My New Roots 

Post 1 content Does anyone out there latch onto a food and become totally obsessed with it? Do you find it making its way into almost everything you make? Lately, Ive been riding the buckwheat wagon hard. And although I am not so much into food trends, I predict that buckwheat is going to be the new hotness. You heard it here first.

Raspberry Ripple Buckwheat Porridge

July 17 2014 My New Roots 

Raspberry Ripple Buckwheat Porridge Does anyone out there latch onto a food and become totally obsessed with it? Do you find it making its way into almost everything you make? Lately, Ive been riding the buckwheat wagon hard. And although I am not so much into food trends, I predict that buckwheat is going to be the new hotness. You heard it here first. Okay, maybe its just me. This little seed (yes, its a seed!) has tumbled its way into my little heart and made a triangular burrow so deep that I cant imagine what my life was like before it. Those beautiful, variegated, pale green-and-sand coloured pyramids, so humble yet majestic. The way it crisps up in the oven, like teeny, crunchy fireworks. The soft, creamy texture it has after cooking, and how it absorbs so many flavours, leaning either savory or sweet. The rich and nutty flour that turns into noodles, bread, muffins, pancakes, scones and waffles so deliciously. And while I thought I had buckwheat all worked out, he pulled out his wildcard and now Im scarfing raw buckwheat porridge like its my job. Looking for a power-packed breakfast this summer? High protein, high fiber, gluten-free, versatile, portable, and insanely delicious. Its also super easy to make, and perfect for those mornings when you need to get outside in the sun as quickly as possible. Obsessed! How is the porridge raw you ask? The trick to making this treat, is soaking overnight. Its an easy way to enjoy completely uncooked grains, in their full nutritional force. The Right Way to Soak Although soaking grains in pure, un-chlorinated water is good, if you really want to go the extra mile, the key is dropping some acid! And what I mean by that is, adding something acidic to the soaking water, fresh lemon juice and apple cider vinegar being my top picks. For every cup of grain, use 1 tablespoon of acidic medium (dont worry -the sourness will not be noticeable in the end product, cooked or raw). It also helps if the water is relatively warm, recently boiled but cooled off to some extent. Suggested soaking time is 7-8 hours, such as an overnight. Leave whatever you are soaking at room temperature. I just keep mine on the counter, covered with a clean tea towel. In the morning, drain the grains in a sieve and rinse well. FYI – buckwheat has a very unique property of making goo. Dont be alarmed if your groats are on the snotty side the morning after - this is totally normal and it is easily rinsed off. What these elements add up to, is making the grains far more digestible. Warm, acidic water helps to remove phytic acid, which would otherwise interfere with mineral absorption, and neutralize enzyme inhibitors. Soaking also allows the enzymes, lactobacilli (friendly folk bacteria) and other helpful organisms to break down some of the harder-to-digest starches. Overall, its a really good idea, even if you are in excellent health with stellar digestion. Its these little steps that quickly add up to major life change - I can certainly attest to that. This porridge was actually inspired by my mother, eternal lover of raspberry ripple ice cream. As a kid, I could never understand how you could waste an entire trip to the ice cream shop on fruit. I mean, really. But I get it now, and raspberry swirling through a blushing pink, creamy, vanilla porridge seems almost too good to be true for breakfast. If you have never eaten soaked, blended buckwheat before, be prepared for a pleasant surprise. Its mildly nutty, and slightly sweet flavour make it a perfect breakfast food during the warmer months. Plus, it is the easiest thing to whip up, taking less than five minutes from start to finish. The texture is up to you: if you like a chunky porridge, blend it just a little, or if you like it smooth, let your machine run for 30 seconds or so until it is beautifully silky. Even though you can use milk in this recipe, you will certainly achieve a creamy consistency with water alone. That is the magic of buckwheat! The raspberry is the shining star of this breakfast, giving the porridge a beautiful colour and juicy tartness. If raspberries arent in season where you are, use whatever berries or fruit you have. I added a little lemon juice for brightness and cardamom for a richer spiced flavour. This is optional, but really delicious. The frozen banana ups the creaminess, sweetness, and makes the porridge cold, which I really dig, but you could replace it with dates, honey or maple syrup too. The bee pollen is not essential to the recipe, but a wonderful way to boost the nutritional content of this dish even more. If its your first time using bee pollen, start small and work your way up. The amount given here is for those just starting out.     Print recipe     Raspberry Ripple Buckwheat Porridge Serves 3-4 Ingredients: 1 cup buckwheat groats, soaked overnight 1 Tbsp. acidic medium, such as lemon juice or apple cider vinegar 3 Tbsp. hemp seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml milk of your choice or water 1 frozen banana 1 Tbsp. bee pollen (optional), plus more for garnish juice of 1/­­2 lemon 1/­­2 tsp. ground cardamom 1 vanilla bean, seeds scraped Raspberry Ripple 3 cups 275g raspberries (fresh or frozen, organic if possible) 1 Tbsp. maple syrup Directions: 1. Cover buckwheat with warm water and one tablespoon of the acidic medium of your choice. Let sit overnight. The next morning, drain and rinse very well. 2. In a blender, food processor, or high-speed blender (this works the best) blend the raspberries and maple syrup until they are liquid. Spoon out about 3-4 tablespoons worth of puree and set aside. 3. Without removing the remaining raspberry puree or cleaning the machine, add in the drained and rinsed buckwheat groats, and all other ingredients. Blend on highest setting until desired consistency is reached (I like mine rather smooth, but some may like a little tooth to it). Season and sweeten to taste. 4. To assemble, spoon some of the buckwheat porridge into a bowl and swirl with about a tablespoon of the raspberry puree per portion, and sprinkle with bee pollen. To make a fancy presentation, use a glass, such as a tumbler. Layer the porridge and raspberry puree, then drag a spoon up the side of the glass, swirling the two shades of pink together. Garnish with bee pollen and a raspberry. Store leftovers in the fridge for up to two days. Show me your porridge on Instagram: #buckwheatporridge

Strawberries and Danish Summer Cream

June 22 2014 My New Roots 

Strawberries and Danish Summer Cream To say that Danish people have a strong food culture would be selling it short. Very short. After living in Denmark for nearly six years now, I have had the priviledge of witnessing and taking part in many of their passionate and long-established table traditions, celebrating the seasons through what they eat and vice versa. They are proud, and borderline obsessive about certain aspects of their food, and it is this fervour, this dedication, even if it is often for pork products, that I so strongly resonate with and connect to. When I first met my husband, it drove me kinda nuts how stubborn he was with his traditional Danish meals: no, this has to go with that. And you need to eat this on top of this in this special way, then cut it like this and put it on this special plate. Open-faced sandwiches are actually served on their own teeny wooden boards, and have very specific and time-tested combinations of foods that are not to be contested or fooled around with. No. But many meals are like this. The first day of advent, you eat yellow split pea soup. At Easter you have lamb. And as the weather warms up (if it ever does) you have koldsk?l. Say what? Directly translated, cold bowl. Koldsk?l, is a beguiling combination of creamy buttermilk, egg yolk, lemon, vanilla and sugar. I know it may sound a little strange, but trust me, it’s heaven. It is often served with Danish strawberries (which, sorry Ontario, are the best strawberries in the world) and always with kammerjunkere: very crispy little biscuits flavoured with cardamom and lemon. Think of them as Danish biscotti. And they only go with koldsk?l. Thats a rule. I tried the real koldsk?l last summer when I was pregnant and feeling very strong urges to eat dairy products. I have to say, as much as I wanted to be against it, the stuff was insanely delicious. Addictive even. And the mere act of slicing up a bowl of freshly-picked berries, then pouring silky white cream across their blood-red facets struck a deep, primordial pleasure chord. In that moment, a voice called out from inside me and cooed in all of its ancient wisdom, that this was going to taste really, really good. Needless to say, it did and I was hooked. What is not to love about ripe fruit, tangy, cold creaminess and crunchy crumbled cookies? Right. Moving on. Since that fateful day, Ive discovered that koldsk?l is very easy to make and can be tweaked a little to be much healthier than the traditional version (which is why I am calling it something totally different). My twist uses sheep yogurt instead of buttermilk, leaves out the eggs and sweetens with maple syrup. The biscuits are gluten-free and vegan and sweetened with coconut sugar. All things considered, this would make a rather respectable breakfast, albeit with a rather hefty dose of strawberries, as I tend to make it. Now, if I am all for tradition, why I am messing with a perfect thing? Switching out the buttermilk for goat or sheep yogurt? Well, you know my M.O. is to make things both tasty and healthy. In this case, its a small change in flavour for a big change in nutrition. For one, goat and sheep milk are easier to digest than cow milk due to the fact that the protein molecules found goat and sheep milk are smaller and in fact more similar to the protein found in human milk. In addition, the fat molecules in goat and sheep milk have thinner, more fragile membranes - half the size of those in cow milk. This leads to an average curd tension that is literally 1/­2 that of cow milk (36 grams for goat milk and 70 grams for cow milk). Curds from milk form in the digestive tract or during cheese or yogurt making (anywhere that the milk is subjected to acid). Having less curd tension means that the milk is less tough, and easier to digest. Dr. Bernard Jensen (my personal hero) showed that goat milk will digest in a babys stomach in 20 minutes, whereas pasteurized cow milk takes 8 hours. The difference is in the structure of the milk. Goat and sheep milk boast twice the healthful medium chain fatty acids than that of cow milk, such as capric and caprylic acids. These fatty acids are highly antimicrobial. Capric and caprylic acids are used today in dietary supplements to inhibit the growth of Candida albicans and other yeast species. They also boost the immune system and enhance energy.  To serve koldsk?l in our house, we slice up a large amount of berries and divide them among the bowls. Then each person pours their own cream (obviously, because this is the most fun part) and crumbles the biscuits over top, or leaves them whole according to their liking. The cream must be very cold. The strawberries must be very ripe - none of those ones that picked before they are ready and that are still white in the center - no! The red juice must run into the cream as you eat it, swirling about and staining the whole concoction a delicate, blushing pink by the end. Guh. I also like to sprinkle fresh elderflower over the top for fun, since I love eating flowers too. This is totally unnecessary, and completely divine.     Print recipe     Danish Summer Cream Serves 4 Ingredients: 2 cups /­ 500ml sheep or goat yogurt 1 1/­2 Tbsp. maple syrup or honey (or more to your taste) zest of 1 small organic lemon 1 vanilla bean, seeds scraped Directions: 1. Stir all the ingredients together, right in the yogurt container if you like. Sweeten to taste. If the yogurt is too thick to pour, add water, a little at a time until the desired consistency is reached (you are aiming for thick cream) Enjoy very cold over strawberries with Lemon Cardamom Biscuits. Lemon Cardamom Biscuits Makes approx. 80-90 biscuits Ingredients: 3 cups /­ 300g rolled oats (gluten-free, if desired) 1 tsp. ground cardamom 1/­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 tsp. baking powder zest of 1 large organic lemon 1/­2 cup /­ 75g coconut sugar 1/­2 cup /­ 125ml unsweetened applesauce 3 Tbsp. coconut oil, melted 1 tsp. pure vanilla extract brown rice flour for dusting (any flour will work) Directions: 1. In a food processor pulse the oats until you have a rough flour.  Add the baking powder, cardamom, salt, lemon zest and coconut sugar. Blend for a few seconds to combine. 2. In a measuring cup, measure out the applesauce, then add the coconut oil and vanilla, whisk to combine. Pour the wet ingredients into the food processor and pulse until fully incorporated. The dough should be sticky and wet, but not pasty. If it is too wet to work with, add a little more oats or oat flour. Preheat oven to 350°F/­175°. 3. Dust a large, clean working surface with flour. Empty dough out on to the floured surface and gather into a rough ball shape. Divide dough into quarters. Working with one quarter at a time, roll dough into a log, approximately 10/­25cm long. Then slice log into 1/­2 /­ 1 1/­4 cm rounds. Place on a lined baking sheet. 4. Bake biscuits for 10-12 minutes until just turning golden on the bottom, then turn the oven off and let the cookies sit in there until the oven is cool (this step simply helps dry the biscuits out). Once cool, store biscuits in an airtight container for up to two weeks. To Serve 1lb /­ 500g organic strawberries, sliced 1 batch Danish Summer Cream, very cold handful of Lemon Cardamom Biscuits elderflowers for garnish, if desired Place sliced strawberries in each bowl. Let each person pour their own cream. Drop biscuits in or crumble them up over the top. Take a deep breath. Enjoy.   If I have learned anything during my time here in Denmark, its that traditions exist for a reason. That certain foods taste best with other certain foods and that is just the way it is, no reason trying to fight it. In this case, strawberries and cream and cookies are best enjoyed together, and I am certainly willing to uphold this tradition for the good of us all.

Tropical Groove Smoothies

May 22 2014 My New Roots 

Tropical Groove Smoothies I just got back from the island of Gili Air, a pinprick of land off the west coast of Lombok. Being so isolated and teeny, you can imagine the food in this particular place wasnt so high-vibe. Not a raw food, vegan buffet in sight! Gasp! Somehow, I survived, har har, but what truly got me through were the smoothies. Every single restaurant and cafe, no matter how small and unassuming, had a long list of tropical blends to enjoy. I had it made in the shade, just sippin on my whizzed up fruits and ice. So simple, refreshing - it reminded me that easy edibles are sometimes the best. When I got back to civilization here in Bali, I had a serious date with my blender. Nothing fancy, just local, seasonal, simple mixes to beat the heat. I came up with these two beauties, inspired by the foods and flora around me. The first smoothie is a Mango Coconut Jamu. Jamu is a traditional Indonesian turmeric tonic that has been made for centuries. With endless variations, some recipes including botanical ingredients such as flowers, fruits, seeds, bark, leaves, and roots, its fun to be creative with exotic blends, with a touch sweetener such as honey or palm sugar to mellow out the bitter edge. My version takes advantage of the newly-in-season mango (!!!) and fresh, young coconuts which are literally falling off the trees all around me. If you dont have access to coconuts, just use canned coconut milk instead for a decadent, tropical treat. And as for the turmeric, use as much as you can handle. The recipe calls for only half a teaspoon of fresh turmeric, but I probably put in twice that amount in my own because Im wild about that little tuber. Dried and powdered turmeric is fine to use too, just try to find organically grown if possible. The second smoothie I made just had to be green, because this island is so inspiringly lush and leafy! I have been digging the traditional avocado-based drinks that are actually referred to as juice here, even though the avocado has been blended. They are thick, creamy, cold, and not overly sweet. My juice is spiked with a hearty dose of digestive ginger and tangy lime. If you want to get things even greener, toss in a handful of tender greens, such as kale or romaine and get glowing! Either of these shakes would make a fabulous breakfast, as they are literally a meal-in-a-glass. They also satisfy as an afternoon snack, maybe split between two people. How to Drink Smoothies Is there a big question mark sitting above your head right now? How hard is it to drink a smoothie?! Even though we may think just guzzling down a big glass of food is simple enough, there are in fact some ways we can optimize the digestion of these veritable meals-in-a-glass. Smoothies are a wonderful way to enjoy a whole host of foods easily, as the masticating has been done for us. But, it is still essential to chew your smoothies! Why? Because digestion begins in the mouth and bathing our liquefied food in saliva is very important for the enzymatic action to take place. Especially for the first few sips, chew the smoothie or swirl it around in your mouth as you would any other food. This also sends a signal to your stomach that something good is on the way down and to prepare for the work ahead. It feels a little funny at first, but your tummy will thank you for giving it some time to put things in order before your smoothie arrives. Its also a good idea to avoid consuming really cold smoothies, as freezing drinks actually shut down our digestive system. A cold beverage will sit in your stomach until it reaches core temperature before moving onto into the small intestine, so the colder something is to begin with, the longer it will take to digest. Once blended, smoothies look quite small, but remember that they are still a lot of food! If you were to sit down and eat an entire coconut, mango, and half a banana, it would take you quite a while. Smoothies are caloric and condensed, so keep that in mind when blending up your meal - a lot turns into a little.     Print recipe     Tropical Groove Smoothies Mango Coconut Jamu Serves 1 Ingredients: 1 medium mango 1/­2 frozen banana or 1 tsp. raw honey, to your taste (or your favourite sweetener) flesh from 1 young coconut (substitute 1/­4 cup /­ 60 ml coconut milk) 1 cup /­ 250 ml coconut water (or regular water, or nut/­seed milk) 1/­2 tsp. freshly grated turmeric (or 1/­4 tsp. dried turmeric powder) 2-3 ice cubes (if desired) Directions: 1. Peel and cut mango into chunks. Place in a blender with all other ingredients and blend on high until smooth and creamy. Sweeten to taste. Enjoy immediately.   Ginger Lime Avocado Juice Serves 1 Ingredients: 1 medium avocado juice and zest of 1 lime 1 tsp. minced ginger 1 cup /­ 250 ml coconut water (or regular water, or nut/­seed milk) 1/­2 frozen banana or 1-3 tsp. raw honey, to your taste (or your favourite sweetener) 2-3 ice cubes (if desired) Directions: 1. Slice the avocado in half, remove pit and scoop out flesh into the blender. Add all other ingredients and blend on high until smooth and creamy. Sweeten to taste. Enjoy immediately. Living a in a tropical climate and being surrounded by all this incredible fruit has inspired me to do a mini-cleanse of sorts. Ill be eating raw for the next three days, and even though I am practically doing that anyway, this is a conscious, and very intentional move away from anything resembling the ubiquitous white rice and occasional fried tempeh Ive been enjoying (soooo good...). I just feel like a little freshening up and finding my balance once again. If youd like to join me on my veggie and fruit feast, eat raw for the next three days and see how you feel! Ill be enjoying these smoothies, simple fruit and vegetable salads as well as some of the other recipes from the site (here is a link). With the warmer temperatures and sun shining, it is a perfect time to step away from the stove. Ill be Instagramming my food during the raw refresher, so follow along my adventures here. *   *   *   *   *   * Show me your smoothies on Instagram: #tropicalgroovesmoothies #mangococonutjamu #gingerlimeavocadojuice 

Recipes and Tips for Healthy Travel II

April 21 2014 My New Roots 

Recipes and Tips for Healthy Travel II First of all, wow. I won the Saveur award! Because of you! Seriously friends, I cannot thank you enough for voting, and for supporting what I do. This achievement means more than you know and I feel more motivated than ever to keep on going. I love this blog and knowing you do too makes every post all the more worthwhile. From the bottom of my heart, thank you. So, I am writing this from 30,000 feet in the air, somewhere high over the Middle East. The digital map on the screen in front of me revealing the names of cities Ive never even heard of. It feels good to be traveling again in totally unfamiliar territory. We are off to Bali, my family and I. For six weeks we will be living there, tucked away in a rice field somewhere, completely away from the life we know in Copenhagen. We have never been to Asia before, and feeling excited for the adventures that lay ahead. Its been a dream of mine to visit Bali since I was about 18, and I am sure that my high school self never would have believed that my first time going would be with my husband and baby. This trip is not an epic one in distance per se, like the 38-hour schlep last year to Kauai, but throw a breastfeeding 5-month-old in the mix and suddenly Ive got calorie and nutrient requirements totally un-fulfillable by miniature airplane meals. So what am I bringing along this time? Heres my list: - Black Bean Quinoa Salad with Cumin-Roasted Carrots (recipe below) - Curried Hummus (recipe below) - mung bean and lentil sprouts - cucumber sticks - dried figs - apples - Chunky Chocolate Buckwheat Granola (recipe here) - Crispy Seed Flatbread (recipe coming!) In all the years Ive been traveling, Ive learned quite a few things about which foods work on the road and those that turn into an unpalatable mess after a few hours outside of the fridge. Ive also figured out which foods fuel the body in the proper way; nothing too heavy, as Im sitting for most of the trip after all, and sticking to high protein and carbohydrate-rich foods definitely seem to be best for me. Including fruits and veggies with a high water content is also important, as nothing is more dehydrating than flying. Cucumbers and apples are always high on my list. On todays menu, Ive got a pretty wide selection of plant-based delights, all quite simple, but that require a bit of planning ahead. The Black Bean and Quinoa Salad with Cumin-Roasted Carrots is delicious, filling, and travels very well. One thing I cannot stand about plane food is the singular texture (i.e: mush), so that is why my meals always cover the bases with lots of different consistencies: creamy beans, tender carrots, crunchy cabbage, and crispy toasted seeds. I dont want my mouth getting bored halfway through my dinner, after all. If you are not a fan of cabbage, or you tend to become rather, ahem, windy, form eating it (soooo not awesome on a plane), choose a sturdy leaf that doesnt cramp your style. Kale would be a good choice, or perhaps romaine. Do not choose a wimpy lettuce thats going to wilt and goop up the rest of the dish - that would be ever so sad. Although its great for a plane ride or road trip, this salad is tasty enough to make the small journey from your kitchen to the dining room table too. If you are going to make it for traveling though, I would suggest keeping the cabbage (or greens) on top of the salad, instead of mixing it in right away. This will help keep the cabbage crisp until you are ready to eat. The Cripsy Seed Flatbreads are actually amazing, but I want to perfect the recipe just a little more before putting it out, so youll have to wait just a bit. Deal? Thanks. I also made a really simple hummus for the trip, because dipping is fun no matter what altitude youre at. I have been on a bit of a curry kick lately, so curried hummus is was - but feel free to toss in any spice mix you have, or just kick it classic style it with cumin. I do remember saying that curry was a no-no in my previous travel post, but I kept things pretty mild since I knew Id be on a plane rubbing shoulders with unappreciative co-passengers. My biggest piece of advice for getting any dip through security is to keep things thick. If your hummus is runny at all, or resembles paste they may confiscate it (and be prepared to throw out your container too if this happens). It can help to actually put the veggie sticks into the Tupperware with the dip itself, so the discerning agents can get a handle on the fact that youre just an über-prepared foodie. Prepare the salad and hummus well in advance of leaving for your trip – the day before is ideal. You need to make sure all the ingredients are cool before you make both dishes, so that they will keep for many hours outside of the fridge. If they are warm when you leave, they may spoil en route. If you want lots more travel tips, check out my post from last year which discuses everything from avoiding jet-lag to how to make a thoughtful homecoming for yourself. Happy trails!     Print recipe     Black Bean Quinoa Salad with Cumin-Roasted Carrots Serves 2 Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 cups black beans (approx. 1 can) 1 cup cooked quinoa (approx. 1/­­2 cup dry, uncooked) 5-6 carrots (about 1lb /­­ 500g) 1/­­2 Tbsp. cumin seeds (or 1 tsp. ground) 1/­­2 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee, melted 1/­­2 Tbsp. maple syrup a couple pinches sea salt 1 small red onion 1-2 large handfuls shredded spring cabbage (kale would also be good) 1/­­3 cup /­­ 50g pumpkin seeds Dressing: 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. lime juice 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. cold pressed olive oil 1 tsp. honey or maple syrup a couple pinches sea salt a couple pinches of ground chipotle or smoked paprika Directions: 1. Cook black beans and quinoa. Let cool completely. 2. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Wash and remove tops from carrots (leave the skin on). Slice however you like, ensuring that they are relatively the same size so that they cook evenly. In a mortar and pestle roughly grind cumin seeds. Toss carrots with oil, maple syrup, a few pinches of salt and the cumin. Place on a baking sheet and roast in the oven until tender and fragrant, 15-20 minutes. 3. While the carrots are roasting, prepare the rest of the salad. Whisk dressing ingredients together in the bottom of your travel container, then add the cooled quinoa and black beans, folding to coat. Slice red onion and cabbage and add to the top, along with the carrots. 4. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast pumpkin seeds until they begin to pop. Remove from heat and let cool slightly. Add to salad. Simple Curried Hummus Makes about 2 cups Ingredients: 1 clove garlic 1/­­2 – 1 Tbsp. curry powder (depending on how strong you like it) 1 tsp. ground cumin 4 Tbsp. tahini zest and juice of 1 organic lemon 2 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 1 tsp. maple syrup 2 cups cooked chickpeas water to thin, as needed sea salt to taste (this will depend on whether or not your beans are salted) Directions: 1. Cook chickpeas if using dried. Let cool completely. Canned is fine. 2. In a food processor pulse peeled garlic cloves until minced. Add all other ingredients, except chickpeas and blend until you have a thick paste. Add chickpeas and blend on high until smooth, adding water to thin as you desire (remember to keep it rather thick so it makes it through security!). Season to taste. Store in a container in the fridge until you leave the house. Although my time in Bali is most definitely a holiday, Ill still be blogging (cant help myself!) and on Instagram, where you can follow my culinary adventures. Good grief, I cannot wait to EAT! I hope the island is prepared for me and my hollow leg. If any of you have been to Bali, Im totally up for advice, tips, recommendations on stuff to do, where to eat, etc. Let me know in the comments, and thank you in advance! Until the next post, heres to flying high with happy meals. Much love and gratitude, Sarah B …and because I know someone will ask, my bamboo travel utensil set is made by To-Go Ware.

Genius Chickpea Tofu

April 1 2014 My New Roots 

Genius Chickpea Tofu As someone who eats a predominantly plant-based diet, you can imagine that Ive enjoyed a long history of consuming soy-based foods. When I became a vegetarian at 16 and vegan thereafter, there wasnt the variety of plant-based protein foods readily available as there are these days, nor was I educated about alternatives to meat back then. Soy became my answer and my replacement for everything from dairy to eggs to chicken nuggets (eew). Before I knew it, I was eating some form of soy up to three or four times a day, when things started to get weird. Without going into too much detail Ill just say that my PMS and menstrual issues became incredibly, ahem, challenging. I didnt even like being around me. Period. Ha. Once I started studying holistic nutrition, I began to think that perhaps my issues lay in the hands of the health food industrys little darling. Yes, soy. Seeing as I was really grooving on being a human guinea pig while studying, I decided to give up the soy for other foods, such as hemp, chia, nuts, seeds, leafy green, other legumes just to see what would happen. Call it a coincidence, but after a couple months, my symptoms started to clear up and I returned to my regular, only slightly neurotic self, every 28 days. Did I miss tofu? Actually, yes. And I still do from time to time, which is why Im pretty darn excited to share this recipe with you today. A recipe for tofu, made from chickpeas. But first, lets discuss soy. Ive gotten a lot of emails and inquiries from many of you regarding this topic, because soy and soy foods are drowning in controversy these days. What is all the fuss about? Well, there are two schools of thought: one being that soy is a highly valuable source of plant-based protein because it is complete (meaning that it contains all essential amino acids). The other school of thought is that soy is bad, or even harmful for you if it is not fermented. This brings up a good point, and its great to hear that more people are turning toward fermented foods, especially legumes and grains. But the idea that unfermented soy is downright dangerous to eat is blowing things a little out of proportion if you ask me. If we are going down that road, then we also have to say that all legumes, grains, nuts and seeds are harmful if not fermented. The process of fermentation neutralizes some of the naturally occurring phytic acid (a compound that binds to minerals in the digestive tract making them difficult to absorb), while breaking down some the hard-to-digest proteins. Soy actually contains less phytic acid than some of its vegetable counterparts, like flax, sesame, Brazil nuts, and pinto beans. This is why soaking legumes, grains, nuts and seeds before eating them is important for better digestion, nutrient assimilation, and therefore overall health. That is a statement I can get behind. Fermented soy foods include tempeh, miso, and naturally brewed soy sauces, like tamari. I for one have been eating fermented soy foods exclusively for the past few years just because I feel better eating that way. I also choose non-GMO and organic soy because I support those agricultural practices. In conclusion, I will say that eating any food in balance is okay, as long as it is minimally processed. That definitely excludes tofu chicken nuggets, soy cheese, soy eggs, and even most soymilk (always check the ingredient list - some brands are good and some contain a laundry list of un-pronounceables). My rule of thumb with any food, is that if you cant make it at home, dont eat it. Although tofu and tempeh are bit of an ordeal to make yourself, Ive done it and it is possible. Tofu chicken nuggets? Good luck with that one. Okay, onto the Chickpea Tofu! Although this stuff is pretty genius, I am not the genius who came up with it. Its a traditional food originally from Burma, and often referred to as Burmese tofu or Shan tofu (here’s the original recipe I followed). It is easy to make with just a few basic ingredients and is a tasty, soy-free alternative to regular tofu that I think will be on the regular rotation in my kitchen. I think the really surprising thing about Chickpea Tofu is its texture. It is lusciously creamy and silky, not unlike silken tofu in fact. It is delicate yet firm, and kind of melts in your mouth. Ive found it works really well fresh in salads (a traditional way of serving it), and in soups. This way you can really enjoy its unique consistency. I liked the it in a simple miso-ginger broth with a few rice noodles swirling around too. Ive even seen recipes online for egg salad sandwiches and coconut curries. Yum! The downside of Chickpea Tofu is that it doesnt do all the things that tofu can do. It doesnt fry very well (deep fried however, Im sure would be ah-mazing), nor can you really bake it to crisp up as I had hoped. But, I am pretty new at this game and looking forward to trying out more recipes with it. If anyone out there really knows how else to work with Chickpea Tofu, please clue me in down below in the comments section! I am so curious to learn more. Some thoughts on the recipe... You can purchase chickpea flour at most health food stores, but it is also available (and tends to be much cheaper) at ethnic grocery stores. Chickpea four is also called garbanzo bean flour, gram flour, and cici flour. It also falls under the name besan, an Indian flour made from both chickpeas and yellow split peas. This will work just fine for the recipe. I think making a half batch of this would be a good idea. This made so much tofu that I had to freeze the majority of it, and I have no idea what it will be like after thawing. I used turmeric in my recipe, which is a traditional ingredient for colour. This is optional but gives the tofu a lovely golden hue. I also added garlic powder - a decidedly untraditional ingredient but I am really happy that I did because it gave the tofu a mellow garlicky flavour, which I love. This is also optional.     Print recipe     Genius Chickpea Tofu Makes more tofu than you could ever eat Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 350g chickpea flour (or besan, a yellow split pea + chickpea flour combo) 15 cups /­­ 3 1/­­2 liters water 1/­­2 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 2 1/­­2 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 Tbsp. ground turmeric (optional) 1 tsp. garlic powder (optional) Directions: 1. In a very large stockpot (make sure that is has capacity to hold over 20 cups /­­ 4 1/­­2   liters), combine the chickpea flour and water. Place somewhere to sit where it will not be disturbed. Let sit overnight, for about 12 hours. 2. In the morning, without moving the pot, carefully remove 6 cups of water from the top of the mixture with a ladle, and discard. 3. In a medium stockpot, melt the oil over medium heat. Carefully pour in the remaining liquid, without disturbing the bottom too much (what youll be left with is a thick chickpea sludge, which will be used as the thickening agent). Add the salt, and turmeric if using, and whisk well to combine. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently for 20-30 minutes, until the mixture begins to simmer and thicken. 4. Add the chickpea sludge. Like magic, you will notice almost immediately that the mixture thickens. To avoid the bottom burning, whisk vigorously and continuously for 10 minutes. 5. Line a 7×10 (18x25cm) baking pan with a clean cotton tea towel or cheesecloth (something you dont mind being stained with turmeric!). This is important because the fabric will help absorb excess liquid. Pour the thickened chickpea mixture into the pan and smooth out the top. Fold the edges of the cloth over the top and let sit at room temperature until the evening, when it is ready to eat (about 8 hours). 6. To remove tofu from the pan, place a cutting board on top and flip over, pull cloth away. Store leftovers in the fridge for up to five days. The salad in the top photo was a very quick dish I threw together to enjoy the tofu with, and it turned out so well I thought I should share it with you. I took the dressing from this recipe and combined it with shredded purple cabbage, spring onion, and plenty of cilantro. Later in the evening for dinner, I tossed the leftovers together with brown rice pad thai noodles, and it went over very well with the husband. He said it tasted better than junk food, which, coming from him, is the biggest compliment ever. *   *   *   *   *   * In other news, I am thrilled to mention that Ive been nominated again this year for the Saveur Best Food Blog Awards! Super cool. And congrats to the other nominees in my category of Special Diets - what an honor to be in your company! If youve been enjoying My New Roots in the past year, show some love and vote for me (scroll down to the bottom of the page to the last category). Thank you a ton for your support. Im still wild about writing this blog and it feels good knowing youre wild about reading it. Hugs and Chickpea Tofu, Sarah B.

Chunky Chocolate Buckwheat Granola

March 6 2014 My New Roots 

Chunky Chocolate Buckwheat Granola Having a baby really puts your priorities under a microscope, because the little time that they are actually asleep during the day is your opportunity to get important things accomplished. Things like bathing, eating, laundry, doing your taxes, calling you mom. Funny then, that lately my priorities dont include any of those activities. Instead it seems that the most critical thing to do as soon as my son shuts his eyes, is making chocolate granola. And yes, I really need a shower. This trend began a couple weeks ago, nearly at the completion of my cookbook manuscript, the most overwhelming deadline of all time looming over me, that I got the most intense craving, not only for carb-y chocolate yum yums, but just to do something other than work and change diapers. When I finally put my finger on what it was I wanted, I whipped up a batch of chocolate granola so fast I even had time to sit and enjoy it before I heard the little waking whimpers of my babe. It was awesome. Needless to say, that huge jar of chunky, chocolate-y, uber-satisfying granola was sooooo gone almost as fast as I had made it. Obviously this granola recipe is really, really yummy. Dangerously so. In fact it is so good, Ill admit to pulling a slightly crazy/­­selfish move and telling my husband that it was burnt granola so he wouldnt eat any of it. When asked why I was shoving scorched cereal into my mouth I sheepishly told him that I didnt want to waste any food. Shameful! And since hes reading this, now he knows Im crazy. This granola is the kind of thing that you can eat right out of the jar by the handful, and its saved me on all the afternoons when I needed something filling and indulgent-tasting when my energy was waning. Although you can eat this stuff for breakfast, its a little on the rich side for my taste so early in the morning. I like to think of it more as snacking granola. Ill leave the application up to you. Your Buddy Buckwheat One of my latest obsessions, besides this granola, is buckwheat. Although the name suggests otherwise, buckwheat is actually not related to wheat, nor is it even a true grain. Buckwheat is the fruit seed of a plant similar to rhubarb and sorrel and a super substitute for people with wheat or gluten sensitivities. Buckwheat has a high protein content, and contains all essential amino acids, making it an excellent choice for vegans and vegetarians. It is high in magnesium, a mineral with a pleasant muscle-relaxing effect. Side-note for the ladies: eating magnesium-rich foods before your period will help ease cramping, headaches and back pain. Buckwheat is a wonderful food for improving cardiovascular health. Buckwheat contains rutin, a flavanoid that helps to maintain blood flow, keeps platelets from clotting, and strengthens capillaries. Buckwheat also reduces serum cholesterol and lowers blood pressure. If youve ever tasted buckwheat honey or anything containing buckwheat flour, youll know that it has a strong, assertive flavour. Although its delicious as a porridge, or replacement for grain in a salad, stir-fry or stew situation, I would call it an acquired taste. In this granola however, it just becomes crispy, crunchy and adds a great texture You can find whole buckwheat, often referred to as buckwheat groats at natural food shops and good grocery stores. Its natural colour is verging on pale green and has a distinctive, pyramid shape. The dark brown variety of buckwheat is called kasha, which has been toasted. Although delicious, for this recipe you are looking for the raw version of buckwheat so that you can toast it yourself. Although you could pretty much use any grain you like in this recipe, I chose oats and buckwheat for a tasty, textured balance of gluten-free goodness. And I can say with total confidence (as I admit to testing this recipe more than once) that any nut would be delish - hazelnuts and walnuts were my favourites, but almonds, cashews, pecans or Brazil nuts would also be great. To serve, get creative. I really dug this granola with sliced bananas and homemade almond milk (which turns into chocolate milk!!!), but it would be delicious with yogurt, kefir, or sprinkled on top of cooked cereal, such as oatmeal. And as previously suggested, delish right out of the jar by the paw full.     Print recipe     Chunky Chocolate Buckwheat Granola Makes 8 cups Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 300g rolled oats (gluten-free if necessary) 1 cup /­­ 200g buckwheat 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 65g coconut flakes 1 cup /­­125g hazelnuts (walnuts are also delicious) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 30g chia seeds 1/­­2 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35g coconut sugar 1/­­3 cup honey or maple syrup 1/­­3 cup coconut oil 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1/­­2 cup cocoa powder (organic, fair-trade if possible) Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°F. 2. In a large bowl combine oats, buckwheat, coconut flakes, chia seeds and coconut sugar. Roughly chop nuts and add them to the mix. 3. In a small saucepan over low-medium heat, melt coconut oil. Add honey or maple syrup, vanilla, salt and cocoa powder. Whisk to combine until smooth. 2. Pour liquid ingredients over dry and fold coat. 3. Spread mixture out in an even layer on a lined baking sheet and press firmly with the back of a spatula to ensure that the mixture is compact. Bake for 15-20 minutes. Remove from oven, flip granola in large chunks, and place back in oven to bake for another 10 minutes, stirring every 3-4 minutes until toasted and fragrant. The dark colour of the granola makes it hard to tell if it is cooked or not, so go by smell. Another good way to test it is by tasting a hazelnut, which takes the longest to cook - it should taste nutty and pleasantly roasted. Whether you choose to eat this granola for breakfast or an afternoon snack doesnt matter. What does matter is that you make chocolate granola a real priority in your life. Laundry can wait, emails can wait, and your hair looks just fine a little on the greasy side.

Valentine Rawlos

February 9 2014 My New Roots 

Valentine Rawlos For a girl who is decidedly not into Valentines Day, I bet youre already confused. Well, me too. Lets blame my overflowing sentimentality these days - Ive realized motherhood can do a real number on your sappy side - but one of the few times Ive been out of the house alone in the last few months I found a heart-shaped chocolate mold at the dollar store and didnt even think twice about it. Nope. I knew exactly what I wanted to make. Rolos. No wait, rawlos. A major childhood throwback made over into the healthiest chocolates I could possibly invent. I had done the nut buttercup thing, but hadnt tackled caramel before, so this seemed as good a time as any. Coincidentally, its almost Valentines Day. Not that I care. If you havent ventured into raw chocolate making before, you are going to want to marry me (Im taken). Its so easy and so versatile, plus actually healthy. Healing fats, nutritious sweeteners and antioxidant-rich cacao are all that these little chocolate-caramel bombs are made of. No schwaggy unpronounceables. No weird waxes or emulsifiers or artificial flavours and colours. If you really care about your valentine, this year make them something that will love them as much as you do! Like I said, I was aiming for a Rolo thing and I am very happy with the results. The chocolate of course, is out of this world. Dark and rich and so intense. The caramel inside was the question mark, but it turned out perfectly: creamy and sweet and just runny enough. I added some salt to the caramel to make these a little more to my taste, but you can leave it out if you like. I almost feel embarrassed calling this a recipe because it really is that simple, but youre into that eh? If you cant get your hands on cacao butter, just use coconut oil in its place. They wont have the exact same melt-in-your-mouth quality, but it will certainly work in a pinch. And please make sure that your coconut oil is flavour-neutral (i.e. that is does not taste like coconut), otherwise youre going to end up with some very tropical-tasting candies, my friend.     Print recipe     Valentine Rawlos Makes 15, 8ml chocolates Ingredients: Raw Chocolate 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml coconut oil, melted 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g cacao butter, melted 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. raw honey (or maple syrup) 4 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 30g raw cacao powder 1/­­8 tsp. sea salt Caramel 1/­­4 cup /­­ 55g pitted dates (soak dates in warm water if they are firm, then drain) 2 Tbsp. maple syrup sea salt to taste Directions: 1. In a double boiler or heatproof bowl over a simmering saucepan of water, melt cacao butter and coconut oil. Remove from heat and whisk in honey until incorporated. Sift in cacao powder and salt (to avoid lumps) and whisk to combine until smooth. 2. In each chocolate mold, spoon in some of the liquid chocolate. Tilt the mold so that it coats the sides. Place in the freezer to set for about 10 minutes. 3. In a food processor blend dates and maple syrup until smooth. Add as much salt as desired, blend and taste. 4. Remove the chocolates from the freezer. Spoon a little of the caramel into each mold on top of the set chocolate. Spoon remaining liquid chocolate over top, covering the caramel completely. Place back it the freezer to set. Wait until the chocolate is totally firm before taking it out of the mold, at least 1 hour. Remove from mold and place chocolates in a tightly sealed container in the freezer for one month (or store them in the mold and remove just before serving). Do not store chocolates at room temperature for more than 1 hour. Whether you’re celebrating Valentine’s Day or not this year,  I hope you give yourself the chance to make these treats for yourself or someone you love. Chocolatey hugs, Sarah B

Coconut Black Rice Breakfast Pudding

January 20 2014 My New Roots 

Coconut Black Rice Breakfast Pudding The holidays are over. The rush of New Years has passed. And now we plummet, head first, into the depths of winter. Well, that was uplifting, Sarah. Okay, perhaps it feels a little doomsday around here with the weather as it is. It rains, it pours, today it snowed, and I have to turn the lights on in the house at 2pm. Sometimes Copenhagen is so dark, I pretend that I am living on some groovy planet in another galaxy far away where there is no sun. For some reason, this makes things more bearable. But you know what else makes things more bearable? Delicious food! Ahh...works every single time. Last weekend I had my darling friend, Earthsprout Elenore over for a sleepover with our babies (and husbands!), and for breakfast I made this Coconut Black Rice Breakfast Pudding. We were instantly transported to another place, far, far away. Instead of a not-so-groovy, poorly-lit planet we were on a tasty tropical paradise island - at least our tummies were - and I knew that I had to share the experience with you. Let me start by saying that I am not a huge fan of rice pudding. I find it rather boring, in fact. But I had a light bulb moment recently when cooking up a pot of black rice, thinking about how creamy and sweet it was, that maybe using it instead of white rice would be pretty darn delish. When I considered the other ingredients used to make rice pudding, dairy milk, white sugar, butter, I realized that this was one recipe that could easily become a high-vibe bowl of goodness with some simple substitutions. Okay, its true that the combination of coconut milk and black rice have been thought up before (oops) but it was news to me! And such a welcome change from the humble bowls of oats that Ive been eating for breakfast lately. My Passion for Passion Fruit If you can believe it, I ate my first passion fruit about three years ago. I could barely handle how delicious it was! The flavour of it was so explosive, bursting with high-vibe vibrancy - a golden, succulent miracle! And can I share what made me avoid these fruits for so long? I simply had no idea what to do with them. Seriously. Id see them in the store, shrug, and walk by.  It wasnt until working at a restaurant here in Copenhagen where we also sold organic fruits and veggies, that one of my co-workers sliced one open for me to try. I was floored. The thing that tripped me up, and undoubtedly many others, is that when a passion fruit is ripe, it looks like something that got lost in the back of your fridge for a month, that you almost want to remove with tweezers. Okay perhaps that is a slight exaggeration, but ideally, that little golf ball should be well wrinkled before you cut it open. The inside of the passion fruit is not much better either: something along the lines of alien offspring. Once past the shriveled visage and goopy interior, youre in for a real treat. The flavour is kind of like eating perfume, in the best way possible. It is sweet-tart, slightly acidic, and bathes your tongue in beguiling, tropical fragrance. Passion fruit is quite the little health bomb too. Loaded with vitamins A, B6, and E, calcium, iron and zinc, the fleshy interior also contains crunchy, edible, fiber-rich seeds. Three passion fruits contain only 54 calories and supply your body with 189 milligrams of potassium, and 27 percent the recommended daily allowance of vitamin C. The final result of this pudding is silky, creamy and totally divine. Ive always thought that black rice has a real perfume, somewhat similar to vanilla, so I tossed in half a pod after scraping the seeds out and it really added something special, while intensifying that unmistakable delicate vanilla bouquet of the rice itself. In keeping with the tropical theme, I went all out. I biked to the local market and bought every single fruit that squeals of sunshine and sparkles and life. Mango, banana, pomegranate and passion fruit were my selections, and I felt like I was eating mouthfuls of vanilla clouds with juicy glitter on top! No big deal at all. Yes, this was my breakfast, but I think it would make a delicious dessert after a light meal too. Today I ate it for lunch next to a protein-rich green smoothie - a fantastic combination! For research purposes I made this pudding twice: once with soaked rice and once with raw rice. The texture of the soaked rice was better, and as a bonus, it cooked in about half the time. If you can remember to soak the grains the night before you are going to make the pudding, it will be tastier and faster, plus much easier to digest. To learn why soaking grains is a very good idea, read more here.     Print recipe     Coconut Black Rice Breakfast Pudding Serves 3-4  Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 200g black rice, soaked overnight (if possible) 1 can full-fat coconut milk (reserve a couple tablespoons for garnish, if desired) 1/­­2 cup water with soaked rice, 1 1/­­2 cups water with un-soaked rice 1/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1/­­2 vanilla bean (optional) 1 Tbsp. maple syrup (or other sweetener of your choice) 1/­­3 cup coconut flakes, lightly toasted Fruits of your choosing: mango passion fruit pomegranate banana kiwi pineapple Directions: 1. Measure out rice, rinse and cover with water. Let soak overnight or for up to 8 hours (even one hour makes a difference!). Drain and rinse well again. 2. Place rice in a pot with coconut milk, salt, vanilla bean (seeds and pod) and the indicated amount of water. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer and cook covered, stirring frequently, until the rice is tender and most of the liquid has been absorbed (you still want a little liquid). Times vary depending on whether or not you soaked the rice: for un-soaked rice, cook 45-60 minutes; for soaked rice, cook about 25-30 minutes. Add maple syrup and fold to combine. Remove from heat and set aside. 3. While the rice is cooking, prepare all the fruit that you would like to accompany the pudding. 4. To assemble, scoop out desired amount of black rice into a bowl, top with fruit, toasted coconut, and a drizzle of coconut milk. Enjoy. I hope this dish brings a little sunshine to all of your lives as we plod along into winter. You know, its not so bad when you have happy, healthy food to get you through. Lets all keep our spirits high, fill our bellies with tropical tinsel and march onward! With passion, fruit, and passion fruit, Sarah B. *   *   *   *   *   * While we are on the subject of breakfast and Elenore of Earthsprout, I would love to share with you her amazing new app that she just launched: 30 Raw Breakfasts. This 30-recipe app is your ticket to inspired, healthy, whole-food morning magic (but gosh, I have to say that almost every one of these treats could double as dessert!). Shes giving away one app to you, the fabulous My New Roots reader. All you have to do is post your favourite breakfast in the comments section of Elenore’s post (on her blog, not mine!), and she will choose a winner at random. Good luck, and make sure you invite me over for breakfast!  

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl

March 10 2017 My New Roots 

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Poke seems to be everywhere these days, from fine restaurant menus, to fast-casual and even food trucks. Chefs are coming up with clever combos and creative reinterpretations - even fish-free versions for the veg set. I knew had to take a stab at it. Or at least a poke. Sorry. For those of you hearing about poke for the first time, this fresh and tasty dish (pronounced POH-kay), hails from Hawaii. In its most unadulterated form, poke is raw fish, originally combined with sea salt, candlenut and seaweed. It evolved over the years as ingredient availability increased, and the salt was replaced with soy sauce, the seaweed with spring onion, the candlenut with sesame and so on. Once it hit mainland America a few years ago, poke mania ensued and the dish evolved to become more of a meal - not just a snack. Now it is often served atop rice and garnished with all manner of innovative ingredients. Fully-focused poke restaurants have established themselves in major cities across North America. Many of these eateries allow their patrons to customize their bowls with veggies, sea weed, pickles, beans, nuts, and alt-grains, tapping into the to the fact that fast, fresh, healthy meals are becoming mainstream. Which totally rocks. I had most of the elements for my own poke-inspired version in my head...except for the fish (the most important part?). I racked my brain to come up with something that looked just like tuna or salmon, but didnt want to use fruit, like watermelon or papaya, since I didnt want the dish to be sweet. It wasnt until I was trying to fall asleep one night, that it came to me...chiogga beets! Chiogga, or candy-striped beets are gorgeously two-toned when they are raw. Sliced thin horizontally, they reveal rings of deep pink pigment and creamy white, resembling something that your grandmother keeps on her coffee table in a crystal dish. But for anyone who has ever roasted these stunning creatures will know that the magic doesnt last; the magenta bleeds into the white during cooking, resulting in an almost homogenous pale pink, with slight variegation. WHICH LOOKS EXACTLY LIKE TUNA. I almost couldnt sleep. Too excited. The next day I gathered up all the things Id like in a poke bowl: short grain brown rice (not long grain - an important distinction), spring onion for bite, carrot for crunch, edamame for pop and protein, and avo for creaminess. I took this last one a step farther and blended it with lemon and wasabi for the most boss sauce ever. This alone would be delish on most things...please try it. And for the fishy component, I thought back to the raw vegan tuna I made for my first cookbook, and how effective adding a sprinkle of nori was to boost that fresh-from-the-sea flavour. This is not a deal breaker for the overall dish, but it definitely made it taste complete. If you cant find nori flakes, just crunch up a couple sheets of the stuff that youd use to make sushi. Easy fix! I like to use wasabi powder in the avo cream since the pre-made stuff in a tube is questionable. Have you ever read the ingredient list on one of those packages? It can be scary stuff. In a pinch, use it, but tracking down the powder is worth it from a nutrition standpoint, and also a flavour one. The real stuff tastes infinitely better! What a shocker. Wasabi is Japanese horseradish, and like its western counterpart, it belongs to the Brassica family, like cabbage, broccoli and mustard. The root is dried and then pulverized, which gives us the powder that we can blend with water to create wasabi paste. It is a difficult crop to grow, which explains the high price for the genuine product. Most wasabi powders dont contain any wasabi at all, but are instead a mix of mustard powder and regular horseradish mixed with green food dye. A high-quality wasabi powder should be organic and contain only horseradish and wasabi. The colour should be pale green - not disco neon. Most health food stores carry wasabi powder. This is a good brand. Everything unfolded just as Id hoped it would. The beets came out perfectly pink with those thin white stripes that look just like fat striation. The marinade that I tossed them around in was acidic and ginger-y and just plain yum. Building the meal up with the rice, the beans, the veggies, a dollop of cream, a sprinkle of nori and roasted sesame, was ever so satisfying and fun. This healthy, fresh meal is calling you. No need to poke about, just make it. Again, sorry.     Print recipe     Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Serves 3-4 Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 200g short grain brown rice, soaked overnight if possible 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 2 cups /­­ 250g edamame beans, fresh or frozen 2 tsp. cold-pressed olive oil a couple pinches flaky sea salt Beets & Marinade 3 medium Chiogga (candy striped) beets 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1 tsp. finely grated ginger pinch fine sea salt Avocado Wasabi Cream 2 medium ripe avocados 2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1-2 tsp. wasabi powder, to taste pinch fine sea, to taste 2 spring onions, sliced lengthwise into ribbons 2 medium carrots, julienned 2 Tbsp. sesame seeds 3 Tbsp. nori flakes Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Wrap beets in aluminum foil and place on a baking sheet in the oven. Roast until tender, about 45 minutes (to check doneness, peel back the foil of one beet and insert the tip of a sharp knife. If there is little resistance, its ready). Peel back foil from each beet and let cool slightly. 2. While the beets are roasting, make the rice. Drain and rinse well. Place in a pot with 2 cups /­­ 500ml of fresh water and salt. Cover, bring to a boil and reduce to simmer. Cook until tender (add more during cooking if necessary), about 45 minutes. 3. While the rice is cooking, make the Avocado Wasabi Cream. Scoop out the flesh from both avocados and add to a food processor. Blend on high, then add the lemon juice, wasabi powder and salt. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. 4. In a medium bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil, ginger and salt. Slip the skins off the cooled beets. Cut the beets into cubes and toss in the marinade. Let sit for at least 20 minutes. 5. While the beets are marinating, bring a medium pot of water to the boil. Add a few pinches of salt and the edamame. Simmer for a couple minutes until bright green and tender (do not overcook!). Drain and rinse under cold water to halt cooking. Toss with a little olive oil and sprinkle with flaky salt. 6. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast sesame seeds, stirring often until fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside. 7. Julienne the carrots. 8. To assemble, divide the rice among the bowls. Add the marinated beets, edamame, carrots and a dollop of Avocado Wasabi Cream. Sprinkle with nori flakes, the toasted sesame seeds and top with the spring onions. Enjoy! I’m on my last few days of the North American tour now. Honestly, it’s been just magical and I am so grateful to all of you who came out to show some love and connect with the healthy community around them! I have just one more event left, and if you’re in LA, please come to The Springs tomorrow! I’ll be giving a lecture on Improving Immunity, Digestion and Detoxification, serving a delicious lunch, and launching a recipe collaboration with their chef! Hope to see you there. All love and smiles, Sarah B Show me your bowls on Instagram! #mnrpokebowl The post Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl appeared first on My New Roots.

Sarah Bs Balinese Gado Gado

February 5 2017 My New Roots 

Sarah Bs Balinese Gado Gado First of all, hello you. Its been a while. I can hardly believe that the holidays are behind us and even the whole of January. What happened?! Well, before I launch into the recipe, I just wanted to update you all on a couple things. I need to start by saying that the Wild Heart High Spirit Bali Retreat was, without a doubt, one of the coolest projects Ive ever had the pleasure to work on. Mikkala Marilyn Kissi and I welcomed and held space for 16 women to totally transform, and come out on the other side of seven days, new humans. We all landed back into our physical bodies, rediscovering the euphoria of movement and breath, the taste of real food, the feeling of laughter in our cells, sun on our skin, smiles in our hearts. I could go on forever about how deeply moved I feel about the whole thing, but I will just say thank you to everyone who came, and that we are going to do another one very, very soon. There are a few photos from the retreat at the bottom of this post - I hope you enjoy, and join us next time. Also. Cookbook tour. Its happening. Naturally Nourished officially lands in North America February 14th and I am close behind. Ill be visiting New York, Toronto, Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles. There are more details at the bottom of this post and on my Events page, so please have a look. For all other countries, please stay tuned! Now, its recipe time. If youre a vegetarian traveling through Indonesia, gado gado will save your life. Its the dish that is on every single menu, a veggie-loaded, protein-rich salad drenched in the most flavourful, luscious peanut sauce that youve ever tasted. Combining raw and slightly steamed or blanched vegetables and bean sprouts, it is typically served with fried tofu or boiled eggs and prawn crackers, but so easily made vegan. The first time I traveled to this part of the world, I ate gado gado so often, that I almost grew tired of it. Almost. What was my initial meal to celebrate the return to the magical island of Bali this time? Naturally, gado gado, and it did not disappoint. There is something incredibly satisfying about the dish, something that grabs a hold and makes you coming back for more - I believe it is the exquisite balancing act of flavours and textures. The veggies are light and tender (never mushy!), the sprouts are crunchy and fresh, but the true magic lies da sauce. It hits all the notes with its creamy, rich, salty, sweet, acidic, toasty and spiciness. While eating it youre coming up with ways to justify pouring it on everything (Rice? Yes! Spring rolls? Obviously! Roasted veggies? Of course! Bean salad? Why not?!). Of all the dishes I taught during my retreat cooking classes in Bali, this is the one that the ladies really went wild for. Because sauce. I will mention that I am taking major liberties with the traditional recipe, keeping my version vegan and soy-free, and switching out the peanuts for more health-supportive almonds. I realize that this is akin to making pasta out of vegetables (i.e. not at all pasta), but we often and readily make allowances for the promise of something healthier, so just roll with me on this one, okay? Thanks. But Sarah, whats wrong with peanuts? You may recall me tackling this subject before, but for those of you who are hearing just learning that peanuts and the things made with it are less-than-awesome, lets recap! Although there are a lot worse things you could be eating, there are also plenty of healthier choices than peanuts, and heres why. First of all, peanuts are a bit of an odd duck plant. Not a true nut, but a bean in fact, peanuts grow underground in their thin-skinned pods, which come into direct contact with the surrounding soil. Because this soil is often moist and warm, it presents the ideal environment for fungus to proliferate. Now, its not the fungus that is the issue in this case, but the poison it releases, called alflatoxin, which is a cancer-causing agent that attacks the liver. What is the most shocking news, is that the highest levels of alflatoxin arent found in big brand peanut butters, but in the peanut butter ground fresh in health food stores. Second of all, conventionally-grown peanuts are sprayed with very high levels of pesticides and are one of the most contaminated crops in the North America. They are also often genetically modified. Thirdly, peanuts contain very high levels of Omega-6 fatty acids, an essential fat that we consume too much of in general. Ideally, Omega-6 and Omega-3 fats should be consumed in a 3:1 ratio (like the ratio found in hemp seeds!), otherwise inflammation erupts in the body. If youre a serious peanut and peanut butter lover, there are a few things you can do. For starters, find a brand of peanuts that have been grown organically in a dry environment (New Mexico for instance). Dry environments mean drier soils, which means less fungus. Make sure the nuts you are buying are very fresh and raw, since the word roasted cruelly translates to deep fried. Dry-roasted are okay since they dont use oil in the cooking process, but these nuts are typically old. But the best alternative of all? Other nuts! Like almonds. Almonds are high in vitamin E, a potent antioxidant that makes our skin look radiant, and helps protect again heart disease. Almonds have been proven to help lower cholesterol, the risk of weight gain and diabetes. They have about half the amount of Omega-6 fats that peanuts do, along with fewer calories. I snack on almonds and almond butter whenever I can, and have successfully replaced peanuts with this healthier option. I hope youre inspired to do the same! The cool thing about this dish is that you can make it any time of year with seasonal veggies and prepare them the way that suits you and the outdoor temperature, while keeping the sauce exactly the same. I like to eat veggies almost entirely raw in the summer, and include things like cucumber, green beans, radish, and lettuces. In the winter however, gado gado is truly the prefect cold-weather salad since everything can be slightly cooked and enjoyed warm. For this version, I chose two kinds of cabbage, kale, carrots, sweet potato, and freshly sprouted mung beans. An improvement Ive made since teaching this recipe at the retreat was tossing the still-warm vegetables in virgin coconut oil - best decision. This adds a whole other layer of flavour and creaminess, plus adds even more richness, which need this time of year. Did I mention theres also sauce?! There are a couple ways of making my version of gado gado sauce. The best method, for sure, is roasting your own almonds and making your own fresh nut butter. The flavour will truly blow your mind if you go in this direction. But! If you are pressed for time and /­­ or dont feel like going through the rigmarole, you can totally use store-bought almond butter. Just make sure that it is unsweetened and made from roasted almonds, not raw. We want the full depth of flavour here - raw almond butter is too mild and will be overwhelmed by the other sauce ingredients.     Print recipe     Sarah B’s Balinese Gado Gado Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. cold-pressed coconut oil 1/­­2 small head savoy cabbage, shredded 1/­­2 small head red cabbage, shredded 6-7 lacinato kale leaves, ribbed and sliced into ribbons 2 medium sweet potato 4 carrots, julienned or spiralized 2 cups packed /­­ 180g mung bean sprouts (or any sprouts!) 2 shallots, sliced into rings 1 small bunch cilantro, roughly chopped a few pinches flaky sea salt limes for serving, optional Almond Gado Gado Sauce 350g almonds = 1 cup /­­ 250ml almond butter 1 small chili, to taste (use as much or as little as you like) 1 clove garlic 2 Tbsp. tamari juice of 1/­­2 lime 2 Tbsp. coconut sugar 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml full-fat coconut milk 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml water, to thin as needed Directions: 1. Make the almond gado gado: preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. Spread almonds out evenly on a cookie sheet and roast until fragrant and golden, about 10-15 minutes. Check often - they burn quickly! Remove from oven and let cool. 2.  Place the almonds in a food processor and pulse to chop them up, then remove a good handful for garnish. Blend the remaining almonds on high, scraping down the sides every so often, until the mixture becomes smooth and liquid. Depending on your food processor, this may take up to 10 minutes - be patient, it will work! 3. Roughly chop the chili and garlic, add them to a food processor, along with the tamari, lime juice, coconut sugar and coconut milk. Blend on high and add water to achieve the correct the consistency: the sauce should be thin enough to pour, but not water-y. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. Store in a glass jar with an airtight lid (keep leftovers in the fridge). 4. Wash and prepare the vegetables: cut the sweet potato into wedges, spiralize or julienne the carrots, shred the cabbage and kale. Set a steamer over boiling water and place the sweet potato inside first, cover, and set a timer for 6 minutes. If the sweet potatoes are tender at this point, remove them from the steamer and set aside and toss with a little of the coconut oil, then cover to keep warm (if they are still raw, continue to steam until tender). Next place the carrots and cabbage in the steamer and cook for 2-4 minutes until tender-crisp, then toss with remaining coconut oil. In a large bowl combine all the steamed veggies with sprouts, shallots and cilantro. Sprinkle with salt and toss. 5. To serve, spoon a generous portion of sauce onto each plate. Lay the salad on top (or arrange it neatly as I have), sprinkle with chopped, toasted almonds, more cilantro and shallots, as desired. Top with more sauce, if desired. Dig in.   Here are some shots I took during the retreat in Bali. It was beyond magical. If you’d like to stay updated about the next one, please sign up for our newsletter and be the first to know once we announce! And now for the book tour! I am so insanely excited to get on the road with my latest cookbook, Naturally Nourished, which you can preorder here. I’ll be in New York City and Toronto first, and tickets for the events in those cities are now available. Check the Events page, Instagram and Facebook for the remaining cities, Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles. See you soon! February 20th My New Roots x The Aerie Collective: WisdomShare “Turning Your Creativity Into a Career” Spend an evening with Sarah for an inspiring presentation about how she has grown her food blogging passion into a thriving career. Her book is available for purchase & signing. Click here for tickets and more details February 21st My New Roots + Food52 Livestream Tune in to Food52’s Facebook at 3pm EST, for a live broadcast of Sarah Britton demonstrating two of her favourite recipes from her new cookbook Naturally Nourished. Live event link: www.facebook.com/­­food52 February 21st My New Roots + Jessica Murnane + Julia Turshen A very special night of inspiring conversation + a celebration + great women in food! Join us for the launch party of two beautiful & brilliant new cookbooks: Sarah Britton’s Naturally Nourished and Jessica Murnane’s One Part Plant With the conversation led by the highly acclaimed author & chef, Julia Turshen. Come for the bites, drinks, and book signings by all three women – stay for the good times & (selfies)! Click here for tickets and more details February 22nd My New Roots + Amy Chaplin + The Finch: Plant-based Dinner Celebration We’re thrilled to invite you to a very special dinner collaboration at Michelin-starred restaurant The Finch, celebrating two fantastic women in food. Join us for this inspired & intimate gathering. Click here for tickets and more details TORONTO February 24th My New Roots x The Aerie Collective: WisdomShare “Turning Your Creativity Into a Career” Spend an evening with Sarah for an inspiring presentation about how she has grown her food blogging passion into a thriving career. Her book is available for purchase & signing. Click here for tickets and more details February 25th Naturally Nourished Book Launch at Appetito! We’re very happy to welcome you to join us for an excting interview with Sarah, Q&A, recipe tasting from the cookbook, book purchasing & signing. Click here for tickets and more details February 26th My New Roots + The First Mess: Cookbook Celebration Gathering Together with Sarah, Laura and an incredible community we would love to invite you to meet, feast & celebrate in their cookbook launch! Click here for tickets and more details The post Sarah B’s Balinese Gado Gado appeared first on My New Roots.

Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes

November 28 2016 My New Roots 

Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes When I was in elementary school I ate in the cafeteria. It was the cool thing to do after all, since homemade brown bag lunches were sooo kindergarten. At the time, I thought that the highly processed offerings behind the sneeze guard were a dream come true: pizza, burgers, chicken fingers, fish sticks, mac n cheese. But the very best thing of all in my first-grader opinion? Sloppy Joes. For those of you who dont know what Im talking about (ahem, mostly everyone outside North America), a Sloppy Joe is like a stew-y, wet hamburger. Ive also heard it been called a loose meat sandwich. Stay with me, people – I realize how riduclously unappetizing this sounds. As a kid, eating a Sloppy Joe was like getting permission to make a mess - a rare, sanctioned moment to smear sauce all over your face, drip on your plate, and have your whole meal basically deteriorate into a pile of savoury, saucy, deliciousness that you were allowed to eat with your hands?! Isn’t this every kid’s dream? Because eating a Sloppy Joe is just that: its sloppy. And that is why its awesome. Sloppy Joes are definitely not on top of the sophisticated food list, but that does not mean that they should be discriminated against. When made with plant-based, whole food ingredients, they are in fact quite the respectable meal. Perfect for chilly autumn and winter nights when all you want to do is tuck into something super cozy and comforting, Sloppy Joes are a one-way ticket to the land of savoury satisfaction. Since the temperatures have dropped here in Copenhagen, Ive been craving this kind of meal like crazy, so Im more than happy to have a healthy solution at hand, and of course to share it with you. The classic Sloppy Joe recipe includes ground beef cooked with onions and garlic, crushed tomatoes, ketchup, sugar and some spices. Sometimes there are some token carrots and celery tossed in, sometimes vinegar, mustard, or chilies, but the basic idea is a moist mixture that you pile on top of a bun. But! In my vegan Plant-Powered version, Ive replace the ground beef with black lentils and mushrooms. I suggest using this type of lentil for this recipe since they are very small, and they maintain their shape and texture while cooking. And if you care about appearances, or perhaps fooling someone, they look the most like ground beef. Just sayin. The flavouring elements of the Plant-Powered Sloppy Joe mix are diverse and potentially strange-sounding, but trust me, altogether just right. Balsamic for a sweet hit of acidity, Sriracha for a little heat, and cumin and paprika add smoky complexity. I also tossed in some walnuts because I am a firm believer in texture, and all that mushiness needed buffering! I toasted them lightly before giving them a rough chop and a stir through the thick lentil mixture. I love how their nuttiness comes through the rich sauce and adds even more deliciousness. I also made a simple slaw from red cabbage to add more crunch and freshness, plus some token sprouts. These items are optional, but I really love the bright contrast they provide against the rich lentil filling. Fill up on Folate Lentils are one of the yummiest sources of folate. Just one cup of cooked lentils provides you with almost 90% of your daily recommended intake! And why is folate so important? Youve probably heard about this vital B-vitamin in regards to pregnancy, as it is critical in the prevention of birth defects, but folate also functions to support red blood cell production and help prevent anemia, allows nerves to function properly, helps prevent osteoporosis-related bone fractures, and helps prevent dementias including Alzheimers disease. Folate received its name from the Latin word folium, meaning foliage, so its not wonder that other excellent sources of folate are dark leafy greens (yum, your favorite!) - kale, romaine lettuce, spinach, asparagus, turnip greens, beet greens, mustard greens, parsley, and collards to name a few. This may explain why North American diets seem to be on the deficient end of things when it comes to this B-vitamin, as folate is available from fresh, unprocessed food. The good news is it is easily absorbed, used, and stored by the body. Folate is also manufactured by intestinal bacteria (remember those probiotics?), so if colon flora is healthy, we have another good source of this important vitamin. Find the most high-vibe buns or bread you can get your hands on for this recipe. I used wholegrain sourdough buns from my local organic bakery, then toasted them lightly before drowning them in vegan sloppy goodness. You can also eat these open-faced if youd like to cut back on the bread. Or pull an alt-bread move and wrap it in socca, a cabbage leaf, or use it to top a crispbread (although, lets be honest: the bun rules). I should also mention that the sloppy joe filling was totally delicious on its own as a stew, and thinned with a little water to make soup! Bonus.     Print recipe     Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes Makes 6-8 sandwiches Ingredients: 6-8 wholegrain sourdough buns 1 batch Simple Cabbage Slaw (recipe follows) 1/­­2 small red onion, thinly sliced sprouts for topping, if desired 1 cup /­­ 230g black lentils 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 1 medium onion, diced 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 3 cloves garlic, minced 135g brown button mushrooms, chopped 1 red bell pepper, diced 2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (hot or sweet, your choice) 1/­­2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 2 Tbsp. Sriracha 1 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 14oz. /­­ 400ml can crushed organic tomatoes 1/­­2 cup /­­ 60g walnuts, roughly chopped Simple Cabbage Slaw 2 cups shredded red cabbage 2 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup a couple pinches sea salt Directions: 1. Soak lentils overnight if possible. Drain, rinse, and place in a medium saucepan. Cover with about 3 cups /­­ 750ml water, bring to a boil and reduce to simmer until tender, about 15-20 minutes (cook time will depend on whether or not youve soaked them). 2. While the lentils are cooking, melt the coconut oil in a large skillet. Add the onions and salt, stir to coat, and cook for about 15 minutes until starting to caramelize. Add the garlic, mushrooms and red pepper and cook for about 5 minutes or so until fragrant. Next add the cumin, paprika, black pepper and stir to coat. Stir in the Sriracha, balsamic, and can of tomatoes. 3. Drain and rinse the lentils, add them to the pan with the veggies and spices. Give it all a stir and let simmer for a few minutes for the flavours to meld. 4. In a separate skillet over medium heat, lightly toast the walnuts until golden in places and fragrant. Give them a rough chop and add them to the lentil mixture. 5. Have a taste and adjust the seasoning to suit you. Add more salt if necessary, more balsamic for sweet-tartness, or Sriracha for heat. 6. Toast your buns and ladle and a generous amount of the sloppy joe filling over the top of one half. Top with the red cabbage slaw, red onion and some sprouts, if desired. Top with the other half of the bun, and tuck in! Show me your Sloppy Joes on Instagram: #MNRsloppyjoes The post Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes appeared first on My New Roots.

Sourdough Salad Pizza

October 14 2016 My New Roots 

Sourdough Salad Pizza Along with ice cream, chocolate, and burgers, pizza was definitely on my hit list when I started eating healthier. But like every single one of those foods, I have come up with a way of making them not only not bad for me, but actually good for me. If you live in the pizza is junk food world, this is the post for you, as I will single-handedly convince you that this universally loved indulgence can in fact, be nutritious. It starts with the crust. The pizza youll get at your local restaurant, in the freezer section of your grocery store, or out of the backseat of a teenage kids delivery car, is typically made with white flour. It also likely contains commercial yeast, the magical ingredient that makes dough rise quickly and predictably. There are of course other ways of making dough or crust, but these ingredients and methods can be more expensive and take more time. Most places stick to the quick and cheap, which almost always compromises our health. How do we make a healthier crust? The answer is fermentation! Sourdough: whats the big deal? Sourdough is essentially fermented flour. And if youre familiar with fermented foods, youll know that they are easier to digest, and contain far more nutrients than the original ingredients themselves. Sourdough bread is made by combining flour and water together with the natural yeasts that live on everything - our hands, our food, swirling around in the air - and after letting it hang out for a few days, youll have whats called a starter.  This starter is added to a basic combination of more flour, water and salt, essentially inoculating it with all of the good bacteria and friendly yeasts. These organisms create lactic acid, which neutralize phytates, making nutrients more easily absorbed by the body. Lactic acid slows down the entrance of glucose into the blood stream, preventing the infamous glycemic index roller coaster. But my favourite of all, is that lactic acid helps break down the complex structure of gluten, making it far easier to digest. That means that people who have a sensitivity to gluten (except celiacs) can potentially eat sourdough bread without digestive upset, as the protein has been changed into a simpler arrangement that is easier to break down in the body. Three cheers for that, eh? Down below Ive included the recipe for both sourdough starter and making pizza from that starter. I think sourdough pizza is a great place to begin because it is far easier to pull off than bread, in my experience. No matter if your dough gets a solid rise or not, youll still end up with a gloriously crisp, chewy crust that will your body will also thank you for. Toppings: not just a pretty face The toppings on a pizza will make or break the overall flavour, but also the potential health benefits. It doesnt take a rocket scientist to know that gobs of cheese and pepperoni are not the most health-supportive choices. So, see topping your pie as an opportunity to get creative, while sneaking in all of those veggies! The best advice I can give you on this front, is to remember to prepare the toppings – meaning that they should be in the state that you’d enjoy eating them before putting them on the pizza. Since this style of pizza is cooked very quickly, things like garlic, onions, mushrooms, and greens are not going to change all that much in the oven. If you wouldnt mow down on a bunch of raw Swiss chard, take those leaves on a tour of a hot skillet first. Mushrooms should be marinated or cooked beforehand (unless you like them raw), and onions, in my opinion should be caramelized. Things like olives, zucchini, tomatoes, capers, and bell peppers can be added raw since they are delicious eaten that way. Sauce is optional, especially if youre going to use juicy toppings, but if you are using it, keep it sparse and dont let it sit on the dough too long, otherwise it will get soggy and sad. Pesto is a great alternative to traditional sauce, as is tapenade, roast veggie puree, romesco, chimichurri, and harissa. And while were on the subject of health, did you know that pizza is THE perfect vehicle for salad? I discovered this a couple years ago when trying to make my healthy pizza even healthier. Instead of putting salad on the side, I thought, why not pile it on top? This delivers a fantastic textural contrast, while delivering that much-needed hit of freshness and bright acidity to cut the richness of the pizza. How is this not a thing?  I posted a shot on Instagram some time ago and it received a lot of positive feedback, so it seems like many of you are down with the salad pizza idea. It’s two of the world’s best foods combined, and that equals true tummy happiness. Every summer I go to my friends cottage, just down the river from my own in the Thousand Islands. They are enthusiastic foodies and love to cook and eat good food as much as I do. They are also passionate about a plant-based diet, fermentation, pickling, and sourdough - all things healthy and delicious! Needless to say, this weekend has become the culinary highlight of my summer. The only difference between this year and previous ones, is that this time I was able to talk myself into snapping a few pics during this process and waiting to eat! Not an easy feat for me, you must know, but well worth it if it inspires any of you to try this recipe. Creating the sourdough starter Although it may seem daunting, creating a sourdough starter, culture, or mother is far easier than you may think, and only requires three simple ingredients: water, flour, and a little patience. A starter takes about five days to develop, but perhaps more or less depending on temperature, humidity, and the type of flour youre using. Nevertheless, its NOT complicated, and a very gratifying way to connect more to your food. Heres what you need: 4oz. /­­ 115ml filtered water (un-chlorinated) 4oz. /­­ 115g flour (choose whichever kind of grain-based flour youd like – 100% rye and spelt are great choices) a medium-sized glass container Method: 1. Stir the flour and water together for about 30 seconds until it is a consistent batter. Cover the container with a tea towel, secure with a rubber band and set in a warm place. 2. After 24 hours, feed the starter with the same amount of flour and water. Stir to combine. 3. After another 24 hours, repeat with the feeding. By this time, you should see bubbles forming and smell something slightly sour. This is a good sign, and means that the wild yeasts are active. If there are no bubbles or sour aroma, keep feeding the starter and looking for signs of life. 4. After 24 hours, repeat with the feeding. By this time, you should see many bubbles of varying sizes and the aroma should be pleasantly strong. 5. Around day five, the starter should have doubled in size from day four, and is ready to use. If the starter has not risen, continue with the feeding program until it has. This process can take a few extra days if youre in a colder environment. Dont give up! Storing your Sourdough Starter If you would like to use the starter daily, then I recommend feeding it daily. Keep it at room temperature on your counter top so that youll remember to do so, and remove half of the starter each time so that there is always room for the fresh flour and water. If you would however like to store your sourdough for occasional use, keep it in the fridge where the fermentation process will slow down and will only require a feeding once a week. To use again, simply remove the starter from the fridge about 12 hours prior to baking. Feed the starter to wake it up from hibernation. After about 12 hours from the last feeding, and once the starter is bubbly and smelling sour, its ready to go again! Resources and Troubleshooting There are so many resources for sourdough making out there, Ill leave you with a few that I really like in case you run into any issues. Cultures for Health Nourished Kitchen The Kitchn     Print recipe     Sourdough Salad Pizza Makes 4 individual pizzas Dough: 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 350ml sourdough starter 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 350ml wholegrain flour, I like spelt or light spelt for making pizza (plus more for dusting) 1 Tbsp. coconut oil, melted 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1. Combine all ingredients in a large mixing bowl. Stir with a large wooden spoon until incorporated. Then turn out dough onto a clean, floured surface and knead for 5-10 minutes, until it is no longer sticky (add additional flour, as needed, or add water if the dough is too dry). 2. Split the dough into four balls and put them on a floured baking sheet. Cover with a moist kitchen towel or plastic wrap put them in the fridge for 12-24 hours. 3. Take the dough of the fridge out about 30 minutes before you plan to make the pizzas. Toppings: Tomato sauce Local, seasonal veggies (our favourites include zucchini, eggplant, caramelized onions, fresh tomatoes, sweet and /­­ or spicy peppers, mushrooms, olives, sundried tomatoes, crushed chili flakes Greens such as beet tops, kale, Swiss chard, spinach Cheese such as Pecorino Romano, ch?vre, feta, goat or sheeps milk mozzarella Fresh herbs Salad greens such as arugula, baby spinach, leaf lettuce, tossed in lemon, olive oil, and salt Directions: 1. Preheat your oven to 500°F /­­ 260°C. If you have a pizza stone, place it in the oven while it preheats, or use a baking sheet. 2. Flour your work surface well and roll out the dough to desired size (tip: rolling out onto baking paper makes transferring the pizza much easier). 3. Spread a thin layer of sauce over the dough, followed by desired toppings (except for salad greens). Work quickly - you dont want the sauce sinking into the dough, as it will become soggy. 4. Slide the pizza (on the baking paper or not) onto the pizza stone or baking sheet. Let bake for 7-10 minutes until the crust is golden and the toppings are bubbly. 5. While the pizza is cooking, dress your greens with a little lemon juice, olive oil and salt. Toss to coat and set aside. (This step is optional, but delicious!) 6. Remove the pizza from the oven, let cool for five minutes, then top with greens, slice and enjoy!   I hope that this post puts you in touch with your inner baker, and that you commit to starting your sourdough culture TODAY. Through this miraculous process, you’ll be joining centuries of tradition, ritual, and connection. Not to mention that your pizza will suddenly be good for you. And that is the most important thing of all, amiright? Happy fermenting, friends! xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * In other THRILLING news, I’m co-hosting a retreat in Bali this coming January! Wild Heart, High Spirit is a 7-day revitalizing retreat for women, aimed to restore balance, cultivate inner peace, and nourish the body from inside out. Learn to take care of yourself on a deep level, and feel empowered moving forward in your life beyond our week together. Join Mikkala Marilyn Kissi of Living Yolates and I for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity on the enchanted island of Bali to connect with your wild heart and your high spirit! Click here to find out more.  The post Sourdough Salad Pizza appeared first on My New Roots.

Maple Cinnamon Grain-Free Granola

August 9 2016 My New Roots 

Maple Cinnamon Grain-Free Granola Cruising the health food store a few months back, I happened upon a bag of locally made, grain-free granola that really spoke to me. Something about its un-designed packaging, its minimalistic ingredients and flagrant chunks flirting with me through the cellophane window, begged me to take it home. The $15 price tag begged me to leave it on the shelf. So I went and perused the tea section, while spiritually distracted by the promise of crunchy sunflower seed clusters and juicy raisins. I went back. I picked up the bag and walked swiftly to the cash register so that I wouldnt change my mind on the way there. I bought it, ran home, tore open that bag and sat gorging myself on handful after handful of total luxury granola bliss. I did again the next week. And the following week too. It took about five rounds of $15 granola before I realized, firstly, how insane it was that I, Sarah Britton, would spend such a preposterous amount of money on something like breakfast cereal, and second, that I wouldnt just figure out how to make it myself. Grain-free granola is nothing new, but nothing Id ever tried making before since I love grains so very much. But as I tend to enjoy grain-centric breakfasts, pouring a bunch of mostly-oat granola on top of mostly-oat porridge seemed like oat overkill, ya know? It didnt take long to perfect this recipe and secure its place as a rotating staple in my household. I eat it on all kinds of things besides porridge too. Its great on top of chia pudding, smoothie bowls, chopped fruit, coconut yogurt, waffles and pancakes, and ice cream (the healthy kind, of course). And like all other granolas, this stuff is pretty addictive. Im warning you. This recipe is excitingly versatile, so dont get too caught up on the ingredients themselves - instead think of them as inspiration. If youre allergic to nuts, or you simply want to cut down on the cost of this recipe, simply swap out the nuts for more seeds. You can also replace the coconut if youre so inclined, use another spice instead of cinnamon, honey instead of maple syrup...you get the idea. Just make sure that whatever you choose to alter is substituted with the same amount of something else. If you dig dried fruit, chop up a bunch and add it to the mix after it’s cooled down. Apricots, figs, mulberries, and raisins are some of my favourites with this mix.        Print recipe     Maple Cinnamon Grain-free Granola Makes 8 cups /­­ 2 liters Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 275g raw nuts (I used almonds and hazelnuts) 2 cups /­­ 250g raw, shelled sunflower seeds 1 cup /­­ 80g unsweetened desiccated coconut 1 cup /­­ 60g large flaked coconut 3 Tbsp. chia seeds 1 Tbsp. ground cinnamon 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml expeller-pressed coconut oil, melted 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml maple syrup 1 tsp. vanilla extract (optional) Directions: 1.  Preheat oven to 300°F /­­ 150°C. Line two rimmed baking sheets with baking paper. 2. Add the nuts to your food processor and pulse to roughly chop. Add sunflower seeds and pulse to chop, until all nuts and seeds are about the same size. If you dont have a food processor, this step can be done by hand. 3. Place chopped nuts and seeds in a large mixing bowl. Combine the coconut, chia seeds, cinnamon, salt. Pour in the coconut oil, maple syrup and vanilla extract. Mix well to coat. Divide the mixture in half and spread out evenly onto the lined baking sheets (you can do this on one baking sheet if that is all you have, but in my experience it cooks more evenly with two). 4. Bake for 30-35 minutes, stirring a couple times from the 15-minute mark. The granola is ready when it is golden and fragrant. It will crisp up outside the oven as it cools. 5. Store fully-cooled granola in an airtight glass container at room temperature for up to one month.      This recipe was included in my online video series, Healthy Kickstart, that I produced with my friends over at Cody! If you’d like to see me making this recipe in the flesh, and the many other breakfast delights (such as the Grab-and-Go Carrot Bread below), click here. I had such a blast with this series, as I feel passionate about helping you to create mornings that are as delicious, vibrant and easy as possible! I hope you all enjoy. Deep gratitude for all of your ongoing support of My New Roots! In light, Sarah B Show me your Maple Cinnamon Grain-free Granola on Instagram: #MNRgrainfreegranola The post Maple Cinnamon Grain-Free Granola appeared first on My New Roots.

5-Ingredient Magical Fudgesicles

June 17 2016 My New Roots 

5-Ingredient Magical Fudgesicles Fudgesicles were a mainstay in the freezer of my childhood, and my go-to sugar fix if the cookie jar was empty. Since weve been blessed here in Copenhagen with a warm spring and early start to the summer season, day after day of blue skies and sundresses has jumpstarted my summer food fantasies. I felt like revisiting the frosty, chocolate-y pops that were such a relief in the sweltering heat, but this time, with a healthy plan of attack. In my cookbook, I made a killer ice cream from avocados and cashews. Knowing how creamy and delicious this combination was, I wanted to recreate a similar base, with dates as the sweetener and raw cacao powder as the chocolate element. So, I made a couple versions of these fudgesicles, since I wanted to eat more be thorough. The first experiment was with just cashews and avocado. The results were pretty delicious but pretty expensive, and a few of my taste-testers found the ice cream bars a little dry in the mouth. For the second version I scaled way back on the cashews and used coconut milk to enhance juiciness while maintaining creaminess. I also upped the cacao. Because chocolate. It was a perfectly balanced combination, and the version I am presenting you with today. The magical version. These are so lusciously creamy, sinfully rich-tasting – the kind of thing you put in your mouth and kind of can’t believe what’s happening. Vegan, almost raw, and full of whole food ingredients, they are also downright filling! They make a fabulous mid-morning or afternoon pick-me-up, especially with the raw cacao component, a deliciously effective, energy-boosting food. Dress them up with your favourite add-ins, or keep it simple and enjoy them as the five-ingredient bliss bars that they are. Cashew News! I was snacking on some cashews the other day (as one does) and offered some to a friend of mine, who declined. Her reason? Cashews are so fattening. Wait a minute, what? who started this ugly rumour?! Maybe this is news to you too, but cashews are actually one of the lowest-fat nuts out there. Weighing in at only 67% fat, next to almonds at 76%, hazelnuts at 86%, and macadamia nuts at 93%, cashews rank pretty low on the scale - and lets keep in mind that 66% of the fat in cashews is the heart-healthy, monounsaturated variety. Rejoice! And while we are clearing up misconceptions, cashews are not technically nuts, but seeds that adhere to the bottom of the cashew apple, an edible fruit native to South America. Cashew trees are in the same botanical family as mango and pistachio. The multi-step process to make cashews edible is quite involved, and typically includes steaming the whole seed pod, removing the outer shell, drying, and skinning. The inner shell layer of the cashew nut contains a caustic resin that can cause significant skin rashes, and is toxic if ingested. The raw cashews that you purchase at a grocery store health food shop are not typically raw, just not roasted. Because of the steaming step in conventional cashew processing, cashews cannot be considered a truly raw product. Truly raw cashews are available on specialty websites and in some health food stores, but at a premium since separating the cashews from their shell without the nut coming into contact with the resin is time consuming and must be done by hand. Cashews are an excellent source of the mineral copper. Copper helps our body utilize iron, eliminate free radicals, and build bone and connective tissue. It is also an essential component of a wide range of enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) which aids energy production and antioxidant defence. One-third of a cup of cashews delivers over 100% of your recommended daily intake of copper. A high-speed blender is recommended for this recipe, but if you dont have one make sure you blend until the mixture is as smooth as possible. You can add water to thin the mixture if it is too thick to blend, but keep in mind the more water you add, the less creamy the bars will be - more crystalline. No matter what, they will taste amazing. Because they’re magic. The fudgesicle recipe below is unreasonably delicious as-is, but it can act also as a base for you to flavour as you like! You can add toppings after removing the fudgesicles from their mold too. This involves melted raw or regular chocolate and your creative spirit! Dip or drizzle the chocolate over the frozen bar, and sprinkle away. MAGIC WANDS. This would make a very popular activity at a kids birthday party. Or my birthday party. Stop looking at me like that. Ive included some options for both flavourings and toppings to inspire you, but these are merely suggestions. I know all of you super enthusiastic foodies out there will come up with some stellar combos. Let me know in the comments if you do!     Print recipe     5-Ingredient Vegan Magical Fudgesicles Makes 4 cups /­­ 1 Liter /­­ 10 fudgesicles Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 75g unroasted, unsalted cashews 1 14-oz can /­­ 400ml full-fat coconut milk 1 large, ripe avocado 1 cup /­­ 250g pitted, packed soft dates 1/­­2 cup /­­ 55g raw cacao powder (cocoa powder will also work) Optional add-ins: a few pinches sea salt vanilla (seeds from 1 pod, powder, or extract) a few drops of food-grade essential oils (peppermint, orange, almond etc.) finely diced fresh fruit (strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, mango etc.) a pinch of cayenne pepper espresso powder finely chopped toasted nuts (cashews, hazelnuts, almonds, pistachios etc.) Optional toppings: melted raw chocolate (recipe here) or melted dark chocolate cacao nibs finely chopped toasted nuts (cashews, hazelnuts, almonds, pistachios etc.) dried fruit (I used raspberry on the ones pictured) citrus zest (lemon, orange, lime) hemp seeds unsweetened desiccated coconut bee pollen Directions: 1. Place cashews in lightly salted water and let soak for 4-8 hours (overnight is fine). 2. Drain the cashews and rinse well. Add to a blender (a high-speed blender is highly recommended) with the remaining ingredients (and any flavourings, if using) and blend on high until as smooth as possible. Add water only if necessary - you want to mixture to remain quite thick. 3. Spoon mixture in popsicle molds. Firmly knock the molds on the counter a few times to remove any air bubbles. Insert a popsicle stick into each mold and place in the freezer until set - at least 6 hours. To remove popsicles, run the mold under hot water until you can easily pull a fudgesicle out. 4. If you want to decorate your fudgesicles, dip or drizzle them with melted chocolate and sprinkle with desired toppings. Eat immediately, or place back in the freezer to set until ready to enjoy. *   *   *   *   *   * In other very magical news, my latest Cody app video series is now online! This one is all about my favourite subject: SNACKS!!! Super-Charged Snacks to be exact. And every recipe is brand-new, incredibly delicious, and of course über healthy. If you haven’t seen the Protein-Rich Cacao Brownie video on my Facebook page yet, go have a look! You can preview all of the recipes here and purchase the plan too (it’s on sale!). Thank you so much for your ongoing support of My New Roots! Big love and gratitude, Sarah B. The post 5-Ingredient Magical Fudgesicles appeared first on My New Roots.

Sensational Sweet and Spicy Sambols

May 13 2016 My New Roots 

Sensational Sweet and Spicy Sambols Being someone who loves a meal with many elements, Sri Lankan food was pretty much my dream come true. Every meal is served with plenty of sides: sauces, chutneys, relishes, and pickles, to make each bite unique and surprising. Sambol is the word for this seemingly endless collection of condiments, and I lost count trying to sample them all in a week. I believe I mentioned in my previous post about Sri Lanka, how spicy the food is there. Like, blow-your-head-off spicy. And as if the curries themselves werent hot enough, the chili-based sambols on the side will certainly commit your taste buds to perplexing levels of pain. Pol sambol is the ubiquitous, fiery condiment served at breakfast, lunch, and dinner. It is probably one of the simplest dishes to make, consisting mainly of chili, shredded coconut, chili, lime, and chili - did I mention the chili? Yea. This mix ranges from very spicy to volcanically hot depending on whose table youre sitting at. On the second day of the trip, my tongue seeking refuge in something, dare I say it, borderline bland, I discovered one of the most delicious things I have ever tasted - and it wasnt bland to say the least, just not sweat-inducing. Seeni sambol, a fragrant, Sri Lankan caramelized onion jam, turned out to be incredible on everything from hoppers to curries, and could turn a pretty plain bowl of red rice into something remarkably special. I became totally obsessed with this sambol and it was the very first thing I attempted to make when I came home. I really cannot tell you enough how awesome this stuff is. Do yourself a favour and make a batch soon! The most memorable experience I had in Sri Lanka was learning to cook traditional recipes with two women in the local village. It was likely one of the most eye-opening culinary experiences Ive ever had - not only learning from such passionate and experienced cooks, but seeing their traditional kitchen, tools, and techniques really inspired me. Take their stove, for example. A large clay bench with large mounds molded into it held the earthenware pots in place, and the heat underneath was adjusted by adding more sticks to the fire, or taking them away. Genius. Above the stove was a large wooden wrack to hang beans, seeds, and herbs for fast drying, which I thought was a brilliant way to take advantage of the residual heat. Ingredients were prepped on the floor, since its cooler down there, and also nice to sit while youre working. The knife to cut veggies was actually attached to a stool, and instead of holding the blade, you hold the vegetables and basically drop them on top, slicing them in the air to fall onto a grass mat. The sambol was made by grinding all the ingredients together on a huge flat stone designed specifically for this task, and as such took all of ten seconds to prepare. Spoons were made from dried coconut shells. The plates were made of woven grass, topped with fresh lotus leaves from the nearby creek. The leaves protected the plates from the saucy curries, and when you were finished your meal, youd discard the leaf into the compost, so that there was literally nothing to wash! I mean. This day made me take a long hard look at how much stuff I use in the kitchen. Water, electricity, appliances - these women were literally using nothing but things from the earth around them and it made me wonder how weve come so far from that connection. Cooking has become so overblown, and it was this experience that reminded me to cook simpler and eat simpler. Get closer to the earth. I dont have some grand solution, but its food for thought. I’ll share a few notes on the recipes… You will likely think Ive lost my mind when you begin the task of slicing two pounds of onions (#worthit), but I promise you it is the correct amount, and youll see that it cooks down to nearly nothing. I tried half this amount my first time and it just simply wasnt enough. If youre going to go for this, you may as well make a batch that will last you at least a few meals, right? Fresh curry leaves are a definite preference for this recipe, but Ive never been able to find them here in Copenhagen so I used dried. Theyre not great, but better than nothing. If you dont want to gnaw on whole spices or curry leaves you can remove them after the seeni sambol is cooked, but it can be a bit of a treasure hunt situation, just sayin. Once Ive smashed the cardamom pods, I like to remove the outer skin and just add the inner seeds to the spics mix. I tend to leaves the cloves and curry leaves in since I like those bursts of flavour. The pol sambol recipe Ive written here is admittedly, a wimps version. Ill admit that I can only tolerate spice until it begins to overwhelm the other flavours in the food, so mine is strong but still edible on its own. I invite you to go with your instincts on this one and dial up the heat to suit your tastes. If you can find freshly grated coconut (or a fresh coconut that you can grate yourself) by all means use that instead of the desiccated variety! Some versions of pol sambol include curry leaves, but because I only had dried I left them out. If you can find fresh ones, add about a sprig for this recipe, and crush them well before incorporating. As far as serving these two sensational sambols go, they are pretty much great with All. The. Things. Rice dishes, curries, stews, soups, wraps, sandwiches, salads...I mean it! Once you taste them Im confident youll find infinite uses for them. The first photo is of steamed brown rice and the Kale Mallung recipe that I wrote from the last Sri Lankan post - still a major fav around here. I love this meal for breakfast with a poached egg, lots of seeni sambol and, ahem, lightly sprinkled with the pol sambol.     Print recipe     Seeni Sambol Makes 1 heaping cup /­­ 300ml Ingredients: 2 lb. /­­ 900g red onions 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml coconut oil 10 green cardamom pods 8 cloves 3 Tbsp. dried curry leaves (or 2 sprigs fresh curry leaves if you can find them!) 1 cinnamon stick 2 tsp. fine sea salt 2 tsp. coconut sugar Directions: 1. Peel and slice the onions. 2. Pound the cardamom pods in a mortar and pestle until they have split open. You can remove the outer skin and just save the seeds inside, but its only if you dont like eating the exterior. 3. Place a large, heavy-bottomed pot over medium-high heat and melt the coconut oil. Add the cardamom pods, cloves, curry leaves, and cinnamon stick. Stir and cook until fragrant, about 3-4 minutes. Add the onions, salt and sugar, stir very well to coat and cook uncovered, stirring every couple minutes until the onions have completely melted down - this can take anywhere from 30-45 minutes. Be patient and enjoy the process! 4. Transfer seeni sambol to a glass jar and store in the fridge for up to one month. Remove from fridge at least half an hour before serving, as the coconut oil will cause the sambol to solidify in the fridge.   Pol Sambol Makes 4 cups /­­ 1 liter Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 180g desiccated coconut 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml warm water or coconut water 1 clove garlic 2 shallots or small red onions 1-3 red chilies (or as many as you think you can handle!) I used fresh Thai chilies 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. chili powder (or as much as you think you can handle!) juice of 1 lime Directions: 1. Combine the desiccated coconut with the water and stir thoroughly to combine. Let sit for 15-30 minutes until softened. 2. Place the garlic in a food processor and blend to finely mince. Roughly slice shallots and chili, and place them in the food processor with the garlic and blend to mince.  Add the softened coconut, salt, chili powder and lime juice. Blend on high to fully incorporate. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired.   A huge thanks to Cinnamon Hotels and Resorts  and Sri Lankan Airlines for making this incredible trip possible! Show me your sambols on Instagram: #MNRsambol The post Sensational Sweet and Spicy Sambols appeared first on My New Roots.

The Colossal Healthy Chocolate Bar

March 30 2016 My New Roots 

The Colossal Healthy Chocolate Bar Being a recipe developer means grocery shopping almost every day. On my way out the door I always ask my husband if he would like anything from the store, and more often than not he says: a treat, please. Now, he doesnt mean a lovely bag of blood oranges or a pint of juicy strawberries - he means a chocolate bar. Not a healthy chocolate bar. A low-vibe, sugar-laden, not-real-food chocolate bar. But I do not judge him. I just buy the thing and pick my battles (toilet cleaning and garbage disposal rank higher on my list). Recently, standing near the cash register and cruising the candy bars like a very reluctant weirdo, I actually experienced a pang for one myself. That rich and total over-the-top decadence is not something I am often drawn to, but for whatever reason the Snickers and the Twix bar spoke to me like long lost friends. And that was the exact moment I decided that I was going to makeover my two favourites with the best whole food ingredients I could find, that would deliver both total satisfaction and nutrients. A healthy chocolate bar to end all healthy chocolate bars. Could such a dream be realized? Oh yes, the universe loves us and wants us to be happy. The Colossal Healthy Candy Bar is three tasty parts. First, the bottom biscuit layer inspired by Twix, is a mildly sweet, vegan and grain-free cookie made with coconut flour. It is crisp when it comes out of the oven, but goes pretty cake-y once it is combined with the other ingredients. Delicious nonetheless, and a pretty important counter-point to all the richness of the other layers. Second, the caramel-and-nut layer inspired by Snickers, but with a twist: instead of just using dates in the caramel, I balanced out the sweetness by adding a healthy dose of hazelnut butter. Wowzers. This was a very delicious decision. The caramel became far more complex, rich-tasting, and it is essential to note that this would make a fantastic spread or topping all on its own. If you do not have hazelnut butter, I recommend almond or cashew in its place (click here for instructions on how to make your own nut butter). Instead of using peanuts, I used roasted hazelnuts to sink into the top of the caramel for awesome texture and crunch - almonds could also be used here. Lastly, each bar is enrobed in luscious, raw, dark chocolate. I usually use coconut oil in my raw chocolate recipes, but after reading the (incredible!) new cookbook Clean Cakes by Henrietta Inman I was convinced that using solely raw cacao butter was the way to go. It delivers a crisper finish and creamier texture. If you want to make things simpler and faster, feel free to use a ready-made bar of chocolate in this recipe instead of making your own. Raw chocolate is of course the healthier choice, but if youre pressed for time or ingredients, this is a good shortcut to take. Coconut Flour Power! With so many diets and lifestyles focusing on gluten-free and grain-free eating, coconut flour is wonderful option for many people. Made entirely from dried coconut flesh that is pulverized into a soft, fine powder, coconut flour is a nutrient-dense alternative that is increasingly available at health food stores and even supermarkets. Score! There are several benefits of coconut flour, my favourite being that it is remarkably high in protein and fiber. Translation: super filling and satisfying! It is low in sugar and digestible carbohydrates, and scores low on the glycemic index, so it a perfect choice for paleo eaters and diabetics. Its also nut-free and non-allergenic. The flavour of coconut flour is slightly coconut-y, but not overwhelmingly so. I like it in things like these chocolate bars where there are many other strong tastes going on that overshadow the taste of the flour. If you want to compliment and enhance the flavour of the flour, use coconut milk as the liquid portion of a baked good. Seriously yummy. Whats the catch I can hear you asking. Well, there are a few downsides to using coconut flour, mainly due to its density, dryness, and lack of elasticity. Its certainly not a flour to experiment with if youre looking to replace wheat flour for instance, as the two behave completely differently (that goes for using coconut flour in place of almost any other flour, whether grain, seed, or nut-based). Coconut flour is also crazy-absorbent and needs quite a large proportion of liquid to solid to avoid crumbly results (I’ve read the comments below and it seems like a lot of you are struggling with this factor!) Most recipes Ive found online remedy this by using a lot of eggs, but I used applesauce and flax seeds instead with good results. Once you get the correct ratio down its pretty easy to work with, but Ive learned the hard way that its best to use tried and true recipes with this finicky ingredient! Back to the candy bars. Which are insane. These truly colossal creations have everything you could ever want: tasty cookie, ooey gooey chewy caramel, crunchy roasted nuts, divinely rich chocolate, and tiny salt kisses. I am so darn proud of this recipe, and I cant believe that such a decadent thing can exist without making me feel lousy after eating it. In fact, Ill go so far as to say that I feel colossally healthy after eating one. Or two. Stop looking at me like that.     Print recipe     The Colossal Healthy Candy Bar Makes 16 bars Coconut flour cookie bottom 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 175g coconut flour 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml unsweetened applesauce 2 Tbsp. ground flax seeds 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml coconut oil, melted 2-3 Tbsp. maple syrup, as needed Date and nut caramel 1 1/­­4 cup /­­ 325g pitted soft dates 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80 ml nut butter (I used hazelnut) seeds of 1 vanilla bean 1/­­2 tsp. sea salt Roasted nuts 3/­­4 cup /­­115g raw hazelnuts or almonds Raw chocolate coating 8.8 oz. /­­ 250g cacao butter (not coconut butter or coconut oil) 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 150g raw cacao powder 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml maple syrup pinch of sea salt Note: raw chocolate can be substituted with two 3 1/­­2 oz. /­­ 100g bars of dark chocolate (minimum 70% cacao). Directions: 1. Start by making the cookie bottom. In a small bowl stir the applesauce and the ground flax together. Set aside and let gel for 15 minutes. Preheat the oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. In a large bowl sift together the coconut flour and sea salt. Stir in the melted coconut oil, two tablespoons of maple syrup, the applesauce-flax mixture and blend until the mixture holds together when pressed. If not, add the remaining tablespoon of maple syrup and stir to combine. 2. Line a brownie pan with baking paper and firmly press the mixture into the pan, especially around the edges. Place in the oven and bake for 12-15 minutes until the edges are beginning to turn golden. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool at room temperature. 3. Lower the oven temperature to 300°F/­­150°C. Spread the nuts out in a single layer on baking sheet and roast for 20-30 minutes until fragrant and slightly darker in colour (a good way to check is to cut one in half and check the colour in the center. Instead of cream, it should be golden). Remove from oven and let cool completely. If you are using hazelnuts, rub them together to remove as much of their skins as possible. Roughly chop and set aside. 4. Make the nut caramel. Add the pitted dates to a food processor and blend until creamy. Add the nut butter, vanilla bean, and sea salt. Taste and adjust according to your tastes. 5. Spread the nut caramel in an even layer over the cooled cookie bottom. Cover the caramel with the chopped toasted nuts, and press them down so that they are slightly sunken, reserving a few for garnish. Place the pan in the freezer to firm up for at least 4 hours (frozen bars are easier to cut and coat with chocolate). 6. Prepare the chocolate. Melt the cacao butter in a double boiler over barely simmering water. Remove from heat, stir in the maple syrup and salt, then sift in the cacao powder. Whisk together until smooth. 7. Remove the brownie pan from the freezer and pull up the edges of the baking paper to remove the filling. Place on a cutting board and slice into 16 equal bars. 8. Roll each bar in the melted chocolate, then pick up using a fork, allowing most of the excess chocolate to drip off. Set on a wrack and let harden. Take remaining chocolate and drizzle across the width of the bar to create a design (this step is optional, but it makes the bars look really beautiful). While the chocolate is still wet, sprinkle with remaining hazelnuts and let set. Place all bars in the freezer to firm up. Store in an airtight container in the freezer, and remove 10-15 minutes before serving. (Note: these are okay outside of the freezer, but if you’re using raw chocolate they will be relatively soft if left at room temperature). I hope you guys find as much satisfaction in this recipe as I have. Its pretty rad to have a stockpile of candy bars in your freezer for when the urge strikes, and to keep you out of the chocolate aisle on your next trip to the store! For the record, if you see me there, Im buying treats for my husband...since Im really bad at sharing. Show me your candy bars on Instagram: #MNRchocolatebars The post The Colossal Healthy Chocolate Bar appeared first on My New Roots.

Sri Lankan Beetroot Curry & Kale Mallung

February 18 2016 My New Roots 

Sri Lankan Beetroot Curry & Kale Mallung Where do I even begin? I guess Ill start by saying that I feel like I am waking up from the most spectacular, flavourful, technicolour dream. Sri Lanka deeply touched me, from its incredible landscape, beautiful people and of course, the food. The food! The food. When I was first invited by Cinnamon Hotels and Resorts to go on a food tour of Sri Lanka, I was a bit uncertain - to be honest, I didnt know anyone who had visited Sri Lanka before, and I especially had no idea what the cuisine was like. I assumed that it was probably very much like Indian, but what I discovered is that it has its own totally distinctive flavours and cooking techniques. Sri Lankan people are very passionate about their food and the culture around it. From my perspective, they seemed especially connected to the earth and the bounty that springs year-round from their incredibly fertile land. Many of the worlds spices are grown on the island, so you can imagine how rich and complex their traditional dishes are. Sri Lankan food is also hot. Like, crazy hot. Chilies play a dominant role in everything from curries to relish and are accompany every meal of the day - even breakfast. An interesting way to start your morning, I might add, is being startled awake by an explosive plate of food. And with coconuts quite literally dripping from the trees everywhere you look, the backbone of many Sri Lankan dishes, both savoury and sweet, is coconut water, milk and flesh. Heavenly. And a welcome antidote to all that chile. Rice and curry is a Sri Lankan staple, and in fact the word food there is synonymous with this combination. Happily for me, there are countless vegetarian and vegan options to choose from. My favourites were jackfruit curry (mindblowing!), cashew curry (yes, a whole pot of cashews cooked in coconut milk), wingbean curry, mung bean curry, eggplant curry, lentil curry, and pumpkin curry. But my favourite curry of all? Beetroot curry. Surprising, eh? The first time I was offered this dish, I kind of thought that it was an accommodating east-west mashup or something, but no! Its a thing. And a wildly delicious thing at that. I never imagined combining beets and coconut before, but it works incredibly well. The earthiness of the beets contrasts perfectly with the sweetness of the coconut milk, and the beets are neither crunchy or mushy, but a perfectly balanced succulent-tender texture that pairs so well with rice. The other major love affair I had in Sri Lanka was with all the little side dishes that come with the curries themselves: sambol and mallung (or mallum). Sambol is like a relish, typically based on freshly shredded coconut (but not always), with a featured vegetable, along with chilies and lime. Pol sambol (coconut sambol) is ubiquitous and served at every meal I can remember. It varies in spiciness from table to table, but more often than not I couldnt eat more than a couple teaspoons with my curry - which was already insanely hot enough, thank you. Mallungs are “green dishes” made with cabbage, kale, broccoli, beans or other leafy veg. These are always cooked without any oil, and instead use just the heat of the pan and a little bit of water to steam the vegetable – a groovy technique in my opinion. Spices are used in mallung as well, and vary from recipe to recipe. They can be served warm or at room temperature, almost like a lightly cooked salad. Curry leaves are an essential ingredient in Sri Lankan food. Many people are confused by this name because they associate curry with a spice blend, and assume that curry powder must then come from dried and ground curry leaves. In truth the word curry vaguely refers to a dish prepared with spices, but means very little to Indian or South Asians, where curries originate. Curry powder is largely a Western creation, and should in fact be referred to as masala, meaning a spice mix. Most curries in Sri Lanka rely on whole spices, not ground or pre-mixed ones, so that the cook can balance flavours according to his /­­ her tastes. Anyway, back to the curry leaves. Small, dark green and glossy, they are deeply aromatic with a distinctive savoury-smoky scent that is difficult to describe. And no, they dont smell like curry powder - weve already established that. They can be difficult to find fresh here in Copenhagen (and I would imagine, many places in the world!), but dried ones are available at most ethnic grocers or specialty shops. With about half the pungency of fresh curry leaves, the dried ones are an okay substitute if thats all youve got, but do try and seek out some fresh ones - youll never look back! Plus, if you find them fresh, you can easily freeze them until your next curry. It was very difficult to decide what kind of Sri Lankan dish I would post first (oh yea, theres more to come...) but I chose beetroot curry and kale mallung because they are both relatively seasonal here in Denmark, and because I think that both of these recipes take us out of our comfort zone with familiar veggies, and make use of entirely unique cooking techniques. Youll find both applications totally surprising, I guarantee that, and I hope that they inspire you to make curry out of things you wouldnt normally, or try an oil-free, steamy stir-fry. Yum town. There is so much complexity and diversity to Sri Lankan food and I am forever inspired. I cannot wait to go back to this enchanted island to explore, and eat, once again.     Print recipe     Sri Lankan Beetroot Curry with Kale Mallung Serves 3-4 Ingredients: 1.3 lbs /­­ 600g red beetroots 1 large onion, finely chopped 3 cloves garlic 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 tsp. black mustard seeds 1 teaspoon coriander seeds 20 dried curry leaves curry leaves (or 1 sprig fresh) 2-3 small green chilies, finely chopped 1 cinnamon stick 1 tsp. fine sea salt, plus more for finishing 1 14 oz. /­­ 400ml can full-fat coconut milk juice of 1 lime large handful of cilantro 4 portions of cooked red or brown rice (red is more traditional) 1 batch Kale Mallung (recipe to follow) lime wedges to serve Directions: 1. Peel beets and cut them into matchsticks. Chop onions, slice garlic. Set aside. 2. In a large pot over medium-high heat, melt coconut oil. Add the mustard seeds, stir, and let cook for a couple minutes until they begin to pop (be careful that they do not burn!). Add the coriander, curry leaves, chilies, and cinnamon, stir well, and cook for one minute until fragrant. Add the onion and salt, stir to coat and cook until the onions are translucent, about 5-7 minutes. Add garlic, stir and cook one minute. Add beets and coconut milk, bring to a simmer, reduce heat and cover (make sure that the liquid is simmering very lightly, not boiling. Boiling over high heat will cause the coconut milk to split). Cook until the beets are tender, about 15-20 minutes. 3. While the curry is cooking, wash and roughly chop the cilantro. 4. To finish the curry, squeeze in the lime juice, stir, and add more salt to balance the flavours. Add cilantro and serve immediately over rice with the kale mallung and extra lime wedges. Kale Mallung Serves 3-4  Ingredients 1/­­2 cup /­­ 45g unsweetened desiccated coconut 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml coconut water 4 cups /­­ 130g shredded + packed kale 1 small red onion 1 tsp. ground cumin 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt, plus more for garnish 1 green chilli, if desired Juice of 1/­­2 lime, plus extra for garnish Directions: 1. Combine desiccated coconut and coconut water in a small bowl and let soak for about 30 minutes. 2. Slice onion in thin sections. Mince chili. Wash kale and spin dry. Remove any tough ribs, stack leaves and cut into thin ribbons. Set aside. 3.In a large, dry pot over medium heat, add the onions, salt and cumin. Stir often, letting the onions soften in the pan. Add a couple tablespoons of the liquid from the soaking coconut if the pot becomes too dry (reserve as much liquid as you can, however). After about 8-10 minutes, add the kale and the coconut mixture. Stir to coat, and quickly cover the pot with a lid so that the kale steams inside. Wait just 30-60 seconds – the kale is ready when it is bright green and tender. Remove from heat and squeeze in the lime juice. Season to taste. Serve warm or at room temperature.   A huge thanks to Cinnamon Hotels and Resorts for making this incredible trip possible!   The post Sri Lankan Beetroot Curry & Kale Mallung appeared first on My New Roots.

Harissa Carrots and Fennel with Lentils

January 14 2016 My New Roots 

Harissa Carrots and Fennel with Lentils My trip to Seattle to work on the Cody nutrition video series proved to be a pretty ragin food fest. The pre- and post-production days, along with nights off gave me some time to explore the city, meet the amazing locals, and sample, er, quite a bit of fantastic food. You know, for research purposes. When I travel, I put wish-list restaurants in two groups: the vegetarian restaurant, and the non-vegetarian restaurant that has enough veg-friendly options to be worth the visit. As much as I find a lot of inspiration at both of these types of establishments, they can also have their drawbacks. First, the vegetarian restaurant, bless them, can tend towards the dated, you know what I mean? Overly-sauced, overly-cheesed, overly seitan-ed out places that offer satisfying, but not very health conscious dishes reminiscent of 1997. Yea. The second place is great if you want to eat out with meat-loving friends (and thank goodness most American restaurants recognize that vegetarians dont always travel in packs!). The issue is that these places dont recognize that we also need substance. There are plenty of creative veggie-centric plates, but nothing that is going to really fill me up! When I was in Seattle, I rarely saw a single bean, lentil or a cube of tempeh on a menu. If I was lucky enough to see a whole grain, it was a sprinkle on top like a garnish. I feel like Im always compromising somehow, which sounds ridiculously gripe-y, but maybe this is my PSA to say that both types of restaurants are so close to getting it so right that it is worth putting it out there in hopes that someone hears my cry. One of my most favourite dishes at a hip and trendy non-vegetarian spot was a roasted carrot, fennel, harissa and yogurt combination, that was as strong in its presentation as it was in flavour. The plate was literally piled with roasted carrots and fennel - a stellar sight for ravenous eyes – bathed in the silkiest scarlet sauce, all nestled in a generous swathe of thick yogurt. It was kind of thing I could barely wait to dig into (I had to share with the rest of my table...rough!), and sad to see the server remove the licked-clean plate. BUT! Where was the rest of it? I realize that this was intended to be a side dish, but there were literally no other options on the menu unless I was to join my table mates and dig into a roast chicken. Being back home in Copenhagen in the thick of winter, I felt the urge to bring a little light and spice to the table. Fondly recalling the jolt to my taste buds that carrot dish conferred, I decided to make my own version that included a simple upgrade with lentils that any vegetarian would be happy to call dinner. Or anyone for that matter. Harissa is a north African chili pepper paste traditionally added to meat and fish stews, and to spice up couscous, but I think its delish with all the things, especially winter veg that could use a major flavour injection. If you have not made your own harissa before, its a relatively quick and painless process that can give your food a serious wake-up. It is bright, bold, spicy, smoky and just plain yummmm. It keeps well in the fridge and a delightful thing to have on hand when youre not really sure what to do with that pumpkin (slather it in harissa and roast it!) or that tempeh (marinate it in harissa and fry it!) or that kale (dress it in harissa and stuff your face!). If you cant wait another second to make this dish, you can also buy pre-made harissa paste at ethnic grocers and gourmet markets. Its sold in small tins, tubes, or jars - just look for versions without any preservatives or unpronounce-ables (but it goes without saying that the homemade kind is best, obvi). You can really use any kind of chili to make harissa, and I suggest a variety to achieve a deep and complex flavour. Some of the ones I chose (based solely on the fact that I already had them in my pantry) were smoked whole ?oras peppers, guajillo, and birds eye for some serious heat. Chipotle would be very tasty (its a good idea to have at least one smoked pepper variety), or de arbol, jalepeno, ancho...you get the idea. You can also make harissa with crushed chili flakes if that is all you have, just make sure that you balance it out with perhaps more tomato paste and roasted bell peppers. I believe that you should be able to eat a small spoonful of pure harissa without blowing your head off. Youre after something spicy, but also rich and savoury, so strike that balance as youre choosing the ingredients. Its Getting Hot in Here Chili peppers are a fantastic food to add to your diet, especially in the colder months, as they actually heat us from the inside out! Chilies contain an active substance called capsaicin that significantly increase thermogenesis (a.k.a. heat production), in our bodies. This is precisely why eating spicy food makes us turn read. break a sweat, and can even aid weight loss, as thermogenesis literally burns calories! These burned calories translate into warmth in the cells and therefore heat in the body. This is the exact same process that takes place in hibernating animals to stay warm. Other foods that have this thermogenic effect are horseradish, mustard, cinnamon, fennel seed, garlic, ginger, ginseng, and turmeric. I love this kind of dish from a construction standpoint. The first bites deliver the big bold flavours of the roasted veg dripping in smoky sauce alone, and then as you begin to go further and dig around, everything kind of melds together, creating mouthfuls with a little bit of this, a little bit of that. The lentils start hanging out with the lemon-spiked yogurt giving the smooth consistency some tooth and texture, which the veggies then become coated in. The harissa drippings work their way into all the nooks and crannies, and the mint pokes you every so often with a hello, my name is FRESH! It hits all the texture notes, the flavour notes, and youre left feeling, well, really satisfied. Not to mention, full. This dish is totally vegan aside from the yogurt, which could even be replaced with a cashew yogurt, like the one in my cookbook, or another plant-based one. You can even leave it out all together if you like, but its a great team player with the other elements. The lentils could easily be replaced by the beans of your choice, and the veg you can change up according to what you have available. You can even make the harissa dressing for any manner of green salad and serve it over raw things too. This dish would also be really tasty with some toasted nuts or seeds sprinkled on top.     Print recipe     Harissa Paste Makes about 1 1/­­4 cup /­­ 300ml Ingredients: 25g dried chilies of your choice (choose a few types and include one smoked and one spicy variety, if possible) 2 red bell peppers 6oz /­­ 170g can tomato paste (1 small can) 2 cloves garlic 2 tsp. cumin seeds 2 tsp. coriander seeds 2 tsp. caraway seeds 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice a couple pinches sea salt cold-pressed olive oil, to cover Directions: 1. Soak the dried chilies in just-boiled water for about 30 minutes until softened. Remove stems and seeds (wear gloves if youre handling really spicy ones). Save soaking liquid. 2. Preheat the oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Rub the bell peppers with a little coconut oil and place on a line baking sheet. Roast for 20-30 minutes until blistered and turning black in spots. Remove from oven and place in a bowl, cover with plastic wrap and let cool for 15 minutes (this process will help steam the peppers making them really easy to peel). Once cool enough to handle, simply slip the skins off of the peppers, remove the stem and seeds, and the discard them. Put flesh aside. 3. While the peppers are roasting, toast the spices in a dry skillet over medium heat until fragrant, 3-5 minutes. Transfer to a mortar and pestle or a spice grinder and grind until powder-y. 4. Peel garlic and place in the food processor. Pulse to mince. Add the soaked dried chilies, roasted red peppers, ground spices, tomato paste, lemon juice, and salt. Blend on high until relatively smooth (add some of the chilli soaking liquid to thin, if desired). Season with salt to taste and add more lemon juice if desired. 5. Transfer harissa to a clean glass jar and cover with a thin layer of olive oil - this will help prevent it from spoiling. Cover with a tightly-sealed lid and store in the fridge for up to one month.   Roasted Carrot and Fennel with Harissa, Black Lentils and Yogurt Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 pound /­­ 500g carrots 1 pound /­­ 500g fennel (about 2 medium bulbs) 2 medium red onions 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil a couple pinches salt and pepper 1 cup /­­ 250ml Greek-style yogurt (preferably goat or sheep) zest of 1 lemon pinch of sea salt 1 cup /­­ 225g black lentils (Du Puy or French lentils would also work), soaked if possible 1/­­2 tsp. sea salt 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil a handful of mint leaves, roughly chopped flaky sea salt, to garnish Harissa Dressing 1/­­4 cup cold-pressed olive oil 1-4 tsp. harissa paste, to your taste (I used 3 tsp.) 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1/­­2 Tbsp. maple syrup pinch sea salt, to taste Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Scrub carrots well and slice them in half lengthwise (if they are relatively large, slice them in quarters lengthwise). Wash fennel and slice lengthwise into thin sections. Peel and slice red onion into eights. Place carrots on a baking sheet and rub with a little coconut oil. Place fennel and red onion on a separate baking sheet and rub with a little coconut oil. Place in the oven to roast for 25-35 minutes until tender and charred around the edges (the fennel and onions may take longer than the carrots, so remove carrots first if necessary). Remove from oven and season with salt and pepper. 2. While the vegetables are roasting, cook the lentils. Wash lentils well, drain and rinse until water runs clear. Place in medium saucepan and cover with plenty of water. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer and cook covered for about 15 minutes. Add about a half teaspoon of salt, stir and continue to simmer covered, until the lentils are tender, about 5 more minutes. Drain and rinse. Stir in olive oil and season to taste. 3. While the lentils are cooking, whisk the dressing ingredients together. Start with a teaspoon of harissa paste and add more to suit your taste. The dressing should be spicy, but palatable. Add the roasted vegetables and fold to coat well. 4. Combine the lemon zest and yogurt. 5. To assemble, divide the yogurt and lentils among four plates. Pile the vegetables on top, sprinkle with flaky salt, mint, and drizzle any remaining dressing over the top. Enjoy. *   *   *   *   *   * Oh yea, Happy New Year everyone! I hope everyone’s 2016 has started off on the right foot. Here are a couple things I’ve been up to: Cody app and I have collaborated to create an online video series with 21 episodes geared towards anyone who wants to learn how to cook healthy, plant-based meals! I have been wanting to put together an educational + cooking video program for so long now, and I am very proud of how this has turned out. I hope you check it out. The entire program is on sale until the end of today (01/­­14/­­16, PST time zone) so act quickly if you want to get the bundle at a great price! We’ve added four brand-new and exclusive recipes to the My New Roots app. These recipes are specifically for cleansing and detoxification, so if you’re January hasn’t been as “clean” as you would have liked, maybe this will give you some inspiration! Update your app or download it now and get this recipe for Nori wraps with Cleansing Broccoli Pesto along with three other delicious and detoxifying delights (use the filter button to select “Super Clean 2016″) Check out the recipes here. And I was invited to speak on Jessica Murnane’s podcast, The Things that Freaked my Week. It was fun. Listen here. BIG love and best wishes for your year ahead. xo, Sarah B Show me your harissa on Instagram: #MNRharissa

The My New Roots Recipe App

December 11 2015 My New Roots 

The My New Roots Recipe App You guys. Its here. After countless requests Im bringing you, dear readers, the My New Roots recipe app! And now over 100 of your favourite (and my favourite!) recipes are in one easy place with features that help you browse, organize, and cook the dishes you love the most. Ive made it possible to create shopping lists for ingredients, keep a collection of favourites, and filter recipes to suit your preferences: vegan, gluten-free, grain-free, raw – or skip right to the desserts! Its been a really fun process going through the last nine years of recipes and stories from the blog. Along with the amazing memories, Ive rediscovered so many incredible recipes that have fallen off my of my radar! Ive been sitting on a gold mine! I guess one of the ironies of constantly developing new material is that I often forget to make my old favourites. I am excited to dig up these tried, tested, and true gems, and put them in the app for you to enjoy as well. The feature that I am really excited about however, is the menus! Since I typically publish just one recipe at a time here on the blog, creating an entire menu with multiple dishes would be a tad overwhelming for a single post. The app has inspired me to change that and create multiple- course menus for all occasions.  The first menu Ive made is for the holiday season, and includes five brand-new, and crazy-delicious dishes to impress your best guests. On the menu: Wild Rice and Shiitake Soup, Grilled Radicchio with Golden Beet and Pomegranate Salsa, Shoe String Sweet Potato Fries with Miso Tahini Gravy, Vegan Shepherds Pie, and Spiced Date Pomegranate Cupcakes. These recipes are designed to be cooked together to create a complete holiday dinner, but can easily be enjoyed separately all year round. They will not be found on the blog, but included in the app exclusively, and you can get them today! There are over 100 recipes in the app, and that number will grow with each update, both with recipes from the blog and menus I make exclusively for the app. I hope you will enjoy it as much as I do, and if you have any suggestions of how I can improve it, features to add, or even ideas for recipes, just write to apps(at)mynewroots.org . Your feedback is so important to me and I want to make this app the best it can be for you.  Happy cooking, friends. I really hope that my app will inspire you to get into the kitchen and  create even more delicious, nourishing food for yourself and the people you love. Thank you for your ongoing support and encouraging to take the leap to make this dream a reality! You can download the app here! Questions: Is there an app for Android and Windows phone? Unfortunately no, not at this time. The app is currently only for iPhones and we’re planning an iPad optimized version (it will work on an iPad though). What iPhone can I use? The app works with iPhone 4S or newer, with iOS 9.0 or higher installed. Is there an iPad app? The app works on an iPad but it doesn’t have an iPad specific design yet but we’re working on it… Do I have to pay for the app? Yes, the app costs $4.99 Will I also have to pay for the blog? No, the My New Roots blog will always be free. Feel free to ask questions or send ideas to apps(at)mynewroots.org   The post The My New Roots Recipe App appeared first on My New Roots.

The My New Roots App

December 11 2015 My New Roots 

The My New Roots App You guys. Its here. After countless requests Im bringing you, dear readers, the My New Roots smartphone app! And now over 100 of your favourite (and my favourite!) recipes are in one easy place with features that help you browse, organize, and cook the dishes you love the most. Ive made it possible to create shopping lists for ingredients, keep a collection of favourites, and filter recipes to suit your preferences: vegan, gluten-free, grain-free, raw – or skip right to the desserts! Its been a really fun process going through the last nine years of recipes and stories from the blog. Along with the amazing memories, Ive rediscovered so many incredible recipes that have fallen off my of my radar! Ive been sitting on a gold mine! I guess one of the ironies of constantly developing new material is that I often forget to make my old favourites. I am excited to dig up these tried, tested, and true gems, and put them in the app for you to enjoy as well. The feature that I am really excited about however, is the menus! Since I typically publish just one recipe at a time here on the blog, creating an entire menu with multiple dishes would be a tad overwhelming for a single post. The app has inspired me to change that and create multiple- course menus for all occasions.  The first menu Ive made is for the holiday season, and includes five brand-new, and crazy-delicious dishes to impress your best guests. On the menu: Wild Rice and Shiitake Soup, Grilled Radicchio with Golden Beet and Pomegranate Salsa, Shoe String Sweet Potato Fries with Miso Tahini Gravy, Vegan Shepherds Pie, and Spiced Date Pomegranate Cupcakes. These recipes are designed to be cooked together to create a complete holiday dinner, but can easily be enjoyed separately all year round. They will not be found on the blog, but included in the app exclusively, and you can get them today! There are over 100 recipes in the app, and that number will grow with each update, both with recipes from the blog and menus I make exclusively for the app. I hope you will enjoy it as much as I do, and if you have any suggestions of how I can improve it, features to add, or even ideas for recipes, just write to apps(at)mynewroots.org . Your feedback is so important to me and I want to make this app the best it can be for you.  Happy cooking, friends. I really hope that my app will inspire you to get into the kitchen and  create even more delicious, nourishing food for yourself and the people you love. Thank you for your ongoing support and encouraging to take the leap to make this dream a reality! You can download the app here! Questions: Is there an app for Android and Windows phone? Unfortunately no, not at this time. The app is currently only for iPhones and we’re planning an iPad optimized version (it will open on an iPad though). What iPhone can I use? The app works with iPhone 4S or newer, with iOS 9.0 or higher installed. Is there an iPad app? The app works on an iPad but it doesn’t have an iPad specific design yet but we’re working on it… Do I have to pay for the app? Yes, the app costs $4.99 Will I also have to pay for the blog? No, the My New Roots blog will always be free. Feel free to ask questions or send ideas to apps(at)mynewroots.org  

Beet, Raspberry and Vanilla Smoothie Bowl

November 13 2015 My New Roots 

Beet, Raspberry and Vanilla Smoothie Bowl Hey buddy, hows your blood doing these days? Is it healthy and flowing? Full of oxygen and freshly-made red blood cells? Have you ever even thought about this?! The answer is, not likely. And that is nothing to be ashamed about. We are never really taught to think about our blood, how to nourish and take care of it, how to tell if something is missing. When I studied Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) I learned about blood building, a term to describe nourishing the body with the nutrients required for ample and healthy blood. For some reason, I took a particular interest in this field, and have been a passionate blood builder of my own ever since. If this sounds dorky (it is) and a little confusing, think of your blood almost like a muscle. We are more familiar with the idea of muscle building, in that our muscles require specific macro and micro nutrients to grow and thrive. Same as blood. Pretty simple, except you cant do it at the gym – you gotta get in the kitchen.  The role of blood in our body is to transport nutrients, oxygen, immune cells, and hormones, along with removing toxins and waste, and disperse heat. The components that make up our blood are used and disposed of extremely quickly, so there is a high cell turnover, which also means high nutritional requirements. Iron, folic acid, vitamin B-12, and protein are the major building blocks of blood. All of these things work synergistically to make your blood as potent and healthy as possible. Besides folic acid, you can see from the list that most of these nutrients are found abundantly in animal foods, but not so abundantly in the wonderful plant kingdom. So how do vegetarians build blood anyway? First and foremost eating a wide variety of fruits, veggies, legumes, whole grains, nuts, seeds, and superfoods is a good place to start. Hey wait! That sounds like a balanced diet. So if youre already there, great. If youre just starting out, your blood is about to get real strong. More specifically, the best blood building foods are the darkest of dark leafy greens and their powders, such as spinach, kale, beet greens, wheatgrass, barley grass, spirulina and chlorella, and deeply pigmented red foods such as beets, cherries, raspberries, goji berries, raisins, kidney beans, adzuki beans, and blackstrap molasses. I also find that drinking a cup of nettle tea every day, which contains high amounts of iron, is really effective in helping to tone the blood. This smoothie bowl is a one tasty blood builder. Its got a solid dose of greens (think iron, folic acid, and protein) from the spinach and wheatgrass, with beet, raspberry and prunes (lots of deep, dark, iron-rich goody goodies!) plus lemon for a vitamin C boost – since we cant absorb iron from plants unless we have a little help from vitamin C.  Although you may think that putting raw beetroot in a smoothie is a little odd, I was shocked at how utterly DELICIOUS the combination was with the raspberry. Its altogether earthy, sweet and tart, with a divine vanilla kiss that makes me swoon. Plus can we talk about the colour?! I can practically feel it feeding my blood with all of those juicy pigments and nutrients. Gosh. Isnt life grand? Smoothie bowls are a divine invention because you can eat them with a spoon, and you can top the heck out of them for a real meal situation. Although Im sure its just a psychological thing,  I sometimes feel a bit under-fed after a smoothie in a glass. Plus I like chewing a lot, and chewing a beverage can sometimes be boring without some chunks involved. Dont you agree? Ive topped mine here with raspberries, pomegranate, sea buckthorn, bee pollen and almond butter, but get creative with this on your own! Ive listed some other topping ideas in the recipe. And I will also say that taking just one extra minute to decorate your bowl delivers major self-love points and satisfies the creative genius in us all. There are no wrong answers or unattractive smoothie bowls! Go wild, you strong-blooded creature, you!     Print recipe     The Blood Building Beetroot, Raspberry and Vanilla Smoothie Bowl Serves 1 Ingredients: 1 small beet, peeled and chopped 1 cup raspberries, fresh or frozen (I use frozen) 2 cups packed /­­ 45g spinach 3 prunes, soaked in 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water small wedge organic lemon (including the peel!) 1-2 scoops protein powder (I use sprouted brown rice or pumpkin seed protein powders) 1-2 tsp. wheatgrass powder (or spirulina /­­ chlorella) a generous pinch ground vanilla powder (or 1 tsp. vanilla extract) 1/­­2 cup water or milk of choice Toppings pictured: frozen raspberries pomegranate seeds sea buckthorn berries bee pollen raw almond butter Other topping ideas: sliced fresh fruit fresh berries hemp seeds toasted nuts and /­­ or seeds chia unsweetened coconut granola cacao nibs goji berries Directions: 1. Soak prunes overnight in water, or for a minimum of one hour. 2. Pour the soaked prunes and their liquid into a blender. Add all remaining ingredients and blend on high until completely smooth (if you do not have a high-speed blender, this may take a minute or so). Taste and adjust sweetness /­­ vanilla /­­ lemon as desired. 3. Pour contents into a glass or bowl and garnish with desired toppings. Enjoy!   I hope you guys are fired up to build your blood now. Happily, it involves eating and not donning spandex and running on a treadmill. Although, that is important too. The running part. The spandex I’ll pass on, thank you. Cheers to your blood, Sarah B. Show me your smoothies on Instagram! #MNRbeetsmoothie  

White Lentil Risotto with Mushrooms

October 18 2015 My New Roots 

White Lentil Risotto with Mushrooms Eating out is a grand seduction. From the moment I step into a restaurant, I am totally open and utterly surrendered to the experience. The first thing I notice when I enter is the smell - I actually like it to hit me with an assertive thwack - like someone proudly shouting a rainbow of aromas to my face that something amazing is happening in the kitchen. I love sitting down at the table, gently touching the cutlery, unfolding the napkin and placing it in my lap, the first exchange with the server, opening the menu. Its all very weighty, very important, very ritualistic for me. While I was on my cookbook tour, you can imagine that I ate out a lot. Mostly out of the necessity of not having a kitchen, but also because going to restaurants is a rare privilege for me and Ill take any excuse. During my few harried days in New York City I went to dine at a new, hip joint in the west village that came highly recommended (although I’ll refrain from naming names). The place was packed with an intimidating blend of gorgeous locals and well-dressed, in-the-know tourists. The menu looked incredibly promising with Sarah B. favourites and buzz ingredients like chia seeds, cashew cheese, baby kale, and turmeric oil. I was explosive with anticipation. I immediately committed myself to the ivory lentil risotto with peas. Id seen ivory lentils at the market before but never bought them, and had never had the revelation to try making risotto with them. I could feel my expectations soar and the desire pulsing between us. Hold me back! The dish arrived, its scent wafting up from the pristine white bowl and pools of amber oil intermingling with green globes of seasonal spring perfection. I looked at my friends with great eagerness, dipped my spoon in and took the first bite. The lentils were raw. No, not al dente. Raw. Crunchy. Hard. Uncooked. I rarely, rarely send something back to the kitchen, but because I was so seduced by the idea of this dish and it completely fell flat, I just had to. The lentils had obviously been cooked, but so far from properly cooked that it baffled me - what kind of chef would send a dish out like this unless by mistake? It must have been a mistake. I could feel myself loosing trust in this impeccably designed, obviously happening restaurant, but how could all of these hipsters be wrong? The waiter returned and said that there was nothing wrong with the dish. The chef meant it to be that way. He placed the plate of cold food back on the table in front of me, smiled, turned, and left. I was crushed. After all wed been through. Although it has been months since this experience, I cant shake it - the lunch bag letdown of a genius concept failing to meet its true potential, the fact that I was served undercooked legumes, and that I paid $30 for them. In order to right all of these wrongs, I headed to my local Indian grocer, bought some white lentils and made a date with my stove. What manifested was not just a better meal, but a new favourite one. Its pretty clear that Im into making risotto out of anything besides rice, such as the Miraculous Riceless Risotto and the Inspirational Sunflower Seed Risotto, but Im digging this new recipe for a lot of reasons. First, its grain-free and in my rice-loving life its nice to have an alternative. Its very high in protein, something that Im always mindful of as it is so important to balanced health. It cooks quickly so its perfect for a weeknight, and its endlessly customizable to the season simply by changing up the veggies on top. Its divinely creamy, rich and velvety and so much like risotto (by far the closest Ive come so far!). If you are looking for me this fall, you can find me tucked into a big bowl of this stuff. Its like eating hugs. Yum, Yum, Molybdenum Chances are you havent heard of molybdenum, but I will wager that you had to sound it out a couple times (let me help you: muh-LIB-duh-num). Moylbdenum is an essential trace mineral and happens to be wildly abundant in our pal, the lentil. It is found first in the soil where we grow our food and water, so healthy soil and groundwater is essential for healthy plants that contain good amounts of this stuff. In our bodies it is stored in the liver, kidneys, adrenal glands bones, and skin, but it is present in some amount in all of our tissues. Molybdenum is important because it is part of several enzyme systems, the most notable being that of xanthine oxidase. Xanthine oxidase (XO) helps the liver mobilize iron for use in the body and aid uric acid metabolism. Molybdenum also helps us digest and assimilate carbohydrates and detoxify the body from exposure to sulfites. Besides lentils, other sources of molybdenum include dried peas and beans, oats, tomatoes, romaine lettuce, cucumber, celery and eggs. A few notes on the recipe. First, white lentils are available at Indian grocery stores, but Ive also seen them at Middle Eastern markets and online. If you cant find white lentils, its good to know that they are also called urad daal or urid daal. To confuse you a little, the unhulled lentils themselves are called black lentils or black gram since their skins are completely black. It should be obvious, but Ill advise against buying the unhulled kind or you will have a very different result - a black one to be precise. Because someone will inevitably ask if they can make this with any other colour of lentil, I will say a half-hearted yes, but I wouldnt recommend anything other than red lentils due to their properties. Second, you can definitely make this a vegan recipe by leaving out the cheese rind, but good golly, it really makes for some delicious eating. I also like a grate a bunch of pecorino over the top right before serving, but Im pretty wild like that. Oh baby. Third, I got pretty fancy and bought (not foraged - the shame!) wild mushrooms for this because I just love them so, but when I originally tested the recipe I used good ol brown button mushrooms and portobellos. Whatever mushrooms you choose the biggest secret to cooking them is not moving them too much. Like pancakes, grilled cheese, and I would imagine, a steak, dont stir them for crying out loud. Get the pan pretty screeching hot, melt some ghee (or coconut oil), throw in the mushrooms, toss to coat, then just back away. Sure, you can watch them sizzle, talk to them, Instagram them, but do not touch them. The secret to really great mushrooms is a caramelized crust and that only happens with high heat and no mucking about. You are allowed to check the bottom of one (one!) after 3-4 minutes, but if there is no colour yet, flip it back until you have some serious golden going on. Also, dont crowd the pan too much - this causes the mushrooms to steam instead of fry - an important distinction.     Print recipe     White Lentil Risotto Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 1/­2 cups /­ 325g white lentils, soaked for 8-12 hours if possible 2 Tbsp. ghee or coconut oil 2 medium /­ 200g onions, finely diced 1/­2 tsp. fine grain sea salt 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 rind Pecorino Romano, optional but delicious (a parmesan rind also works) a generous grating of Pecorino Romano to garnish (optional but delicious) 4-5 cups /­ 1-1 1/­4 liters vegetable broth 1 lb. /­ 500g mixed mushrooms, cleaned of all dirt and debris, and roughly chopped (I chose golden and trumpet chanterelles, and oyster mushrooms, but any type work) a few sprigs fresh thyme, leaves removed, plus a few for garnish 2-3 Tbsp. ghee, butter, or coconut oil a couple pinches sea salt freshly ground black pepper 2 cloves garlic 2 tsp. balsamic vinegar, optional Directions: 1. Wash lentils well, drain and rinse until water runs clear. Set aside. 2. Melt ghee in a large stock pot. Add onions, salt and stir to coat. Cook over medium heat for about 10 minutes until the onions are softened and just starting to caramelize - dont brown them too much or they will colour the dish! Add garlic, the lentils, 3 cups /­ 700ml vegetable broth and the cheese rind, if using. Stir well and make sure that the broth is covering the lentils by at least a few centimeters /­ half an inch. If not, add more. Bring to a simmer, stir and cover. 3. Over the next 30 minutes or so (cook time depends on whether or not you soaked the lentils), stir the pot every few minutes (this helps release the starch and add creaminess) and check the broth level, adding more as needed to just cover the lentils. 4. After about 20 minutes, start to prepare the mushrooms. Melt the ghee in a large skillet and add the mushrooms. Stir to coat and let them cook over high heat without touching them (!!!) for at least three or four minutes. Flip and repeat until golden on all sides. Add a touch more ghee, garlic, thyme leaves and to the pan. Cook for 1-2 minutes until fragrant, season with salt and pepper and a splash of balsamic vinegar, if desired. 5. The lentils are done when they are tender but not mushy. The consistency of the dish should be very much like a classic risotto: more solid than a soup, but thinner than a stew, so make sure that there is enough stock in the pot. Remove cheese rind. Divide between plates, garnish with cheese and black pepper, place mushrooms on top and garnish with a sprig of thyme and more black pepper.   Show me your risotto on Instagram! #MNRwhitelentilrisotto *   *   *   *   * Hey Danes! I’m doing three events this month and I would love to see you there. First, I will be the guest chef at the organic and hyper-local food restaurant Mad Mad Mad Bodega cooking and serving a total pumpkin orgy, giving a talk and signing books as well. Click the flyer for a link to learn more. Secondly, I am giving two lectures on Nutrition Fundamentals (way more rad than it sounds!) with a Q&A at Books & Company. You can come to one of the talks or both. Click the flyer for a link to learn more.

Tesss Blueberry Breakfast Tart + Mystical Mango Smoothies

August 13 2015 My New Roots 

Tesss Blueberry Breakfast Tart + Mystical Mango Smoothies Summer finally came to Denmark and I am one happy, happy person. Life just seems easier when the sun is shining and I dont need to wear a snowsuit. In August. I am also in the groove of cooking less, eating more simple, raw foods and whizzing stuff up in a blender. Tess Masterss book, The Blender Girl Smoothies could not have come out at a better time considering Im making smoothies round the clock and looking for some new inspiration. With over 100 gluten-free, vegan recipes her book is kind of like the bible of blended drinks. What I appreciate is that you can look up recipes according to what effects you are after (to detoxify, alkalize, boost immunity, reduce inflammation etc.) and the chapters are divided into types of recipes (clean and green, light and fruity, dessert...). There are tips and tricks, a thorough pantry section and a good resource list for those of us who are new to this blending world. Because Im such a wild cat, I chose to make two recipes from the book and combine them. Oh yea. The Blueberry Breakfast Tart and Mystical Mango both sounded like heaven-in-a-glass to me and the combo, I must say, is over the top. I know it may seem a tad excessive to make two smoothies, but if youre serving these at a brunch or something, its really fun (and beautiful!) to see them swirled together in a glass. The blueberry one is really what it claims to be: liquid breakfast. With cashews, oats and maple syrup (which I didnt use actually) it will wake you up and fuel you through a long morning of summer-ness. The mango smoothie is bright and tropical tasting - I loved the lime, orange and cardamom flavours in there! Whooo-hooo! All I can say is, way to go, Tess! Whether or not youre a smoothie pro or just getting started, this is the book to get your fruit-sticky hands on.     Print recipe     Blueberry Breakfast Tart This tastes like a Pop-Tart, and is great for digestive health. Oats are a wonderful source of fiber, to combat carcinogens in the gastrointestinal tract. And both oats and blueberries become gelatinous in the colon, helping to expel toxins and lower blood pressure and cholesterol. 2 1/­­4 cups (540ml) unsweetened almond milk, hemp milk, or rice milk (strained if homemade) 1/­­3 cup (45g) raw unsalted cashews, soaked 1/­­3 cup (30g) rolled oats, soaked 2 tablespoons pure maple syrup, plus more to taste 1 tablespoon chia seeds 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 2 cups (320g) frozen blueberries Throw the milk, cashews, and oats into your blender and blast on high for 30 to 60 seconds, until creamy. Add the remaining ingredients and blast again on high for about 20 seconds, until smooth. Tweak the maple syrup to taste. Boosters 1 tablespoon maqui powder 1 tablespoon ground flaxseeds 1 teaspoon coconut oil Mystical Mango With a creamy texture and exquisite flavour, this immunity blend is fabulous for collagen formation and glowing skin, hair, and nails. Mangos enzymes and vitamins A, C, and E cleanse the liver and aid digestion, and its potassium and fiber help regulate blood pressure and cholesterol. This one will make your heart happy. 1 1/­­2 cups (360ml) freshly squeezed orange juice 1/­­2 cup (120ml) water, plus more as needed 1/­­2 medium avocado, pitted and peeled 1/­­2 teaspoon finely grated lime zest 1/­­8 teaspoon ground cardamom 2 cups (320g) frozen mango 1/­­2 cup (62g) ice cubes Throw all of the ingredients into your blender and blast on high for 30 to 60 seconds, until smooth and creamy. Add more water as needed to blend. Boosters 1/­­2 teaspoon wheatgrass powder 1 teaspoon chia seeds 1 teaspoon flaxseed oil I hope you guys are having a rad summer. Much love to all! xo, Sarah B  

Matcha Green Granola Bars

July 1 2015 My New Roots 

Matcha Green Granola Bars I have to start off by saying THANK YOU. I just came back from my cookbook tour in London, which is the very last trip Im taking until the autumn. Now that I have some time to reflect, I have to say how deeply touched and grateful I am to all of you that have showed your support these past few months. Whether youve come out to an event, book signing, cooking class, reposted a recipe on your own blog, sent me a love note, or happy vibes through the ether, I have felt it all and will carry the collective experience with me always. I mean it. I am officially overwhelmed with love. Its been a very fulfilling time for me, but if Im being honest, its also been a very challenging one. Being on the road and away from my sweet little family has been hard, despite being surrounded by so much goodness. My workload has also been full-on at the same time, so there hasnt been much in the way of breaks, or breathing, or looking after myself at all. As someone who is perpetually beating the drum of balance, wellness, and self-love, I am beginning to feel like a hypocrite! And how can I expect to be the best I can be for everyone else if I cant take care of my precious self? So in the name of practicing what I preach, Im introducing My New Roots Summer Lights again - all new delicious, healthy recipes, just without the lengthy article. As it takes an average of 20 hours to create a single blog post, shaving a few off of that will give me some time to regain a little more sanity in my life. And maybe even inspire some of you to do the same. So. These granola bars. They are really, really yummy. Satisfying in all the ways that count; filling without making you feel full, and a salty-sweet flavor balance to make you feel like youve gotten everything you need. Maybe more. I have been relying heavily on these to fill the 11am /­­ 4pm gap, avoid late night bad food decisions, and Ive mowed down a couple (maybe more) for my personal favourite: breakfast-in-a-taxi/­­airplane/­­subway/­­train. Hey, at least I get to sit down. The matcha green tea powder is of course what makes the granola bars green. It has a lovely tea-like flavor (thank you, captain obvious), and a nice little bitter nuance that I dig. But because matcha is a bit of a specialty item that can be hard to find and so darn expensive, the you can of course omit it entirely. Maybe sprinkle in another kind of superfood powder if you have it (lucuma, maca, baobab, raw cacao), cocoa powder, or protein powder, or whatever else youre in the mood for. The point is, these are flexible and simple, and a great granola bar base recipe for you to play with. Party on. The brown rice syrup makes the granola bars ooey-gooey, but because it isnt overly sweet, I poured in a few tablespoons of maple syrup for good measure. If you are not vegan, you could replace the maple syrup with honey, but I wouldnt replace the rice syrup with honey because then these would be way too sweet. Just sayin. If your tahini is unsalted, add a little more salt to the dry ingredients - I promise that you want the salty-sweet thing going on here. And if you have an allergy to sesame, or feel like something different, use another kind of nut or seed butter instead - hazelnut butter would be divine, pumpkin seed butter too, or combo it up, wild cat!      Print recipe     Matcha Green Granola Bars Makes 14 bars Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 200g rolled oats, gluten-free if desired 1 cup /­­ 135g pumpkin seeds 1 1/­­2 cups unsweetened puffed rice cereal (rice, millet, quinoa etc.) 1/­­2 cup dried fruit (raisins, dates, figs, prunes, goji berries), roughly chopped 1/­­4 tsp. flaky sea salt 1 - 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. matcha green tea powder (to your taste) 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml brown rice syrup 3 Tbsp. /­­ 45 ml maple syrup 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml tahini 2 Tbsp. coconut oil 1 tsp. vanilla extract Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 325°F/­­160°C. Combine oats and pumpkin seeds on a baking sheet and bake for 10-15 minutes, stirring once or twice, until the oats are golden and have a nutty aroma. 2. In a small saucepan combine the brown rice syrup, maple syrup, tahini, coconut oil, vanilla. Whisk to combine. Do not overheat. 3. In a large bowl, combine the cooled oats and pumpkin seeds with the chopped dried fruit, rice puffs, salt, and matcha. Pour the wet ingredients over the dry ingredients and stir quickly to mix. 4. Pour the mix into a brownie pan lined with plastic wrap or baking paper. Press the mixture firmly, especially into the corners. Place in the fridge for a couple hours to firm up, then remove from fridge and slice into bars. Keep leftovers in the fridge for up two weeks. So dear friends, Im wishing you a very healthy, happy summer full of crazy adventures, (responsible) sun-worshipping, belly laughs, and of course, delicious food. I love you! xo, Sarah B

Revolutionary Pancakes

May 17 2015 My New Roots 

Revolutionary Pancakes When I was pregnant, you wouldnt believe how many people told me how much fun it would be cooking for a little person someday. Although this seemed like an obvious thing, I kind of shrugged it off, thinking that it wouldnt be that awesome. I think part of me feared the pressure, or the possibility of cooking becoming more of a chore than a pleasure. Although Ive had my fair share of noggin scratchin, I have to say that cooking is now more than a pleasure. Its moved into a greater creative place, I feel freer, and Ive discovered so many cool things through the challenges. Take this recipe for example. Seeing as happy accidents seem to be at the core of what I do, its no surprise that the recipe for Revolutionary Pancakes evolved from something other than what it was originally intended for. In July of last year I blogged about Raspberry Ripple Buckwheat Porridge. Around this time, I was beginning to give my little babe whole grains, but because we chose to let him feed himself, it was hard to actually get enough in him - the floor had all it could handle, thank you. One day after blending the porridge up, I looked at the still-hot skillet on the stove from my husbands eggs, and mused about pouring my own breakfast into the pan. So I did. And it made a pancake. A pretty perfect, tasty, sprouted pancake that my baby could actually pick up and eat himself without supplying the hardwood with yet another coat of whole grain goodness. For the win. This got me pretty excited. Not only did I have a new and very popular meal for my wee one, but a new a very popular meal for myself. Ive been experimenting a lot for the last 9 months with this one and Im thrilled to say we have a rather fool-proof recipe on our hands, dear friends. Pancakes for everyone! And what is so revolutionary about them? These pancakes contain two ingredients. They are flour-free, sugar-free, gluten-free, and vegan.  They use soaked whole buckwheat and any other grain you have in your pantry; brown rice, quinoa, millet and amaranth are my favourites. Add-ins are welcome and sneaking some fruits, veg or superfoods into these is totally possible. Lastly, and my favourite aspect, is that you dont even get a bowl or spoon dirty in the process since you can soak the grains right in your blender, then pour the batter straight into the pan. Flour Power? I am trying my best to live a flour-free life. Why? Because even if I buy whole grain flour at the store, I dont really know how whole grain it actually is, how long its been since it was processed, and just how that went. If you consider foods three mortal enemies: heat, light and oxygen, flour seems like it may be on the losing end of this battle. Grinding grain inevitably exposes its insides to the three foes, so keeping grains whole right up until youre going to consume them is no doubt the best practice to avoid losing vitamins, minerals, and gaining serious un-desirables, such as oxidized fats. To remedy all of this, we can grind our own grain and use them right away. Soaking the whole grains first, then using them in a recipe such as this one, is the easiest method for most of us. We can also make our own flour, either in a dedicated grain mill (which can be expensive) or with something as simple as a coffee grinder. I also really love buying rolled oats (not quick-cooking or instant) and grinding them in my food processor to make flour. This is a really easy and inexpensive way to ensure Im getting a whole product, ground fresh and full of nutrients. If you are going to buy flour, make sure it has an expiry date (as all food should go bad at some point, eh?) and surprise! Keep it in the fridge. Thats right, all sealed up tight in a cool, dark place. If you are someone who does a lot of baking and goes through flour very quickly, no need to worry about this too much, but if youre a sporadic baker like me, keep the enemies at bay. I must be upfront and inform you that these are not like the familiar, light-n-fluffy American-style pancakes, or whisper-thin Eurpoean cr?pes. Because they are not made with white flour, or flour at all for that matter, they are substantial in taste and texture. On the grounds of their potential density, I like to make mine on the thin side, and relatively small. You can thin the batter out quite a lot if you do like cr?pes, but they will inevitably be chewier - a quality I quite like. Ive always been an enthusiastic pancake eater because they are the prefect blank canvas for all manner of healthy, tasty toppings. I like to crown these particular ones with homemade nut butter, fresh seasonal fruit, hemp seeds, coconut, and of course maple syrup, honey, or jam. As a bonus, I’ve included a quick recipe for luscious Ginger-Vanilla Cashew Cream. Since I posted a picture of it on Instagram, it would be almost cruel not to provide you with the ingredients and method, however simple it all is to make. What’s groovy about pairing this with the pancakes is that you’re already soaking grains for breakfast, so giving the nuts a bath before bed seems like no extra effort at all.     Print recipe     Revolutionary Pancakes Ingredients: 1 part buckwheat groats 1 part other gluten-free grain (quinoa, millet and amaranth all work well) about 2 parts water, as needed Optional additions: citrus zest, such as lemon or orange vanilla coconut sugar or maple syrup spices, such as cinnamon, cardamom, ginger, nutmeg, etc. fresh or frozen fruit (bananas are delicious) unsweetened desiccated coconut organic eggs tender greens, such as spinach protein powder Directions: 1. Soak buckwheat and other grain overnight in pure water with an acidic medium (such as apple cider vinegar or lemon juice, read more about that here). In the morning, drain and rinse well. 2. Place grains in a blender with water equal to the volume of grains used (if you used 1/­­2 cup buckwheat and 1/­­2 cup quinoa, use 1 cup water). Blend on highest setting until smooth, and add more water if needed. The consistency should be like pancake batter: fluid and pour-able but not thin and watery. Add any other elements youd like, but try to maintain the consistency - add more water if necessary. 3. Heat a large skillet or griddle with just a little bit of coconut oil or ghee. When hot, pour desired amount of batter onto the skillet, wait until bubbles form on the top and the batter becomes almost opaque, then flip. I recommend starting the first batch off in a really hot pan, then lowering the heat slightly to cook the rest. No need to add fat to the pan after the first round – once the pan is hot enough the pancakes should cook without the need for any additional oil. 4. Serve hot with desired toppings. Store leftovers in the fridge for up to three days. Freeze extras and reheat in a toaster oven before enjoying. Ginger Cashew Cream Makes about 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 140g raw, unsalted cashews 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 Tbsp. minced ginger 1/­­2 Tbsp. lemon juice 6 Tbsp. water seeds from 1/­­2 vanilla bean (optional, but delish!) Directions: 1. Place cashews in water and soak for at least 4 hours, up to 12. Drain and rinse. 2. Combine cashews with all other ingredients in a blender and blend on high until completely smooth. Taste and adjust sweetness to your liking. Store leftovers in tightly sealed container in the fridge for up to five days.   *   *    *    *    *    * One more exciting thing to mention is The Guardian’s magazine, Observer Food Monthly has published a story about the wave of healthy eating washing over the globe and the women who are at the forefront of this movement. The cover features The Hemsley Sisters, Ella Woodward, Anna Jones, and yours truly (a very dolled-up version, I might add). Read the article and get one of the spring recipes from my cookbook, here.

Ramen Revisited + How to make Dashi

March 31 2015 My New Roots 

Ramen Revisited + How to make Dashi My parents made my lunch every day that I was in school from the time I was barely old enough to hold a brown paper bag, right up until my last days of high school. It was always exactly the same format, with slight variations: sandwich, juice box, granola bar, piece of fruit. Pretty standard fare for most of my peer group if I remember correctly, and I never complained about it. That is until the day I peered over my bologna-on-a-bun to see Alexis at the popular kids table in the junior high cafeteria slurping over what looked like a rather foreign and intriguing styrofoam cup of something hot and tasty. Oh, thats Mr. Noodles, my best friend Julie said, and went on to explain that all you had to do was pour boiling water into the cup and wait a few minutes before eating the noodle soup-like meal. I looked down at my cold, relatively flavourless, pedestrian food and felt left out. Not only was I totally un-cool, but suddenly my lunch was too. Could life get any worse?! I ran home and told my mom about the cup noodles and begged her to buy some at the store, promising her that this could not only save her time, but most importantly, my lunchroom reputation. Dont you want me to be popular?!, I wailed. Convinced this was my ticket to the promised land of spin-the-bottle and weekend shopping mall hang-outs, I persuaded her to invest the fifty cents on a couple trials and see what all the fuss was about. When she came home I had the kettle boiled and ready to get down to business. Folding back the paper lid, I spotted a magical little package of flavoured powder inside, which I read was meant to be emptied into the cup before adding the water. A couple shriveled, token peas fell out amongst the dust and my mom looked pleased to see green. The boiling water was added, I closed the lid again and waited - the longest four minutes of my life thus far. But oh, what ceremony! What rapture! The timer on my ironman wristwatch beeped, I stirred the cup, and dug in. It was salty. Very salty. Thats about all I can recall. The noodles, semi-cooked and crispy in parts were underwhelming and bland, while the broth, if I can all it that, was shockingly saline. But none of that mattered. I would have eaten cow dung if it meant sitting next to Alexis. I finally had the answer to the question of cafeteria coolness. Needless to say, eating ramen did not initiate me into the popular crowd, nor did it inspire a great love of this ubiquitous, cheap eat canonized by hung-over college kids everywhere. Until very recently this had been my only experience with ramen. But when yet another ramen recipe request landed in my inbox, I knew it was time to revisit this famous dish. It needs to be said that instant ramen is a far cry from its traditional roots of noodles in broth, which when prepared properly with care and intention, can be utterly delicious. I suppose its like most things that go from revered, regional dish to the freezer section of the gas stations grocery aisle, or worse. Shouldnt these things receive a different name or label in respect to the original recipe? Its somewhat maddening, but I surrender to the fact that there is only so much I can change in this world. The backbone of all ramen is the broth, or dashi. Dashi is a clear stock that is traditionally made using kombu, Japanese sea kelp, and katsoubushi or bonito, dried fish. Other dashi bases can include shiitake mushrooms, and because my recipes are plant based, Ill be showing you how to make this variety and the kombu one today. Once you have this base, you can spike your dashi with shallots, garlic, ginger, miso, etc. but today were keeping things simple and I leave the fun and improvisation to your ramen-hungry minds. Toppings vary widely, but vegetarian ingredients can include noodles (obviously), mushrooms, strips of nori or other tasty sea veggies, greens, spring onions, shredded cabbage, kimchi, garlic, and the ever-so-popular soft-boiled egg. If you are vegan, simply leave this ingredient out – it’s the only animal product in the recipe and still delicious without it. The one thing I love about ramen is its versatility and infinitely customizable combinations to suit every season, taste, and budget. On Salt, Sodium and Finding a Balance The big bad deal with packaged ramen and its accompanying powdered broth or flavour packet is the incredibly high sodium content, some brands containing an entire days worth in just one serving! On the flip side, making your own dashi allows you to control the sodium level and provide you with balanced saltiness for overall wellbeing. Sodium is not only important to us, our survival depends on it. Its role in the human body is to work in conjunction with potassium to maintain cellular fluid levels, acid/­­alkaline balance, and keep the nerves and muscles functioning properly. Sodium plays a role in hydrochloric acid production in the stomach, and is used during the transport of amino acids from the gut to the blood. Because sodium is needed to maintain blood fluid volume, excessive sodium can result in increased blood volume and elevated blood pressure, especially if the kidneys are compromised in any way and unable to clear it efficiently. Hypertension and premenstrual problems are more frequent in people who have a high salt intake, especially when there is a relatively low level of potassium in the diet to counteract it. Virtually all whole unprocessed plant foods contain more potassium than sodium. Grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables, especially leafy greens, offer ten to several hundred times more potassium, and yet the average American is said to be deficient in potassium. Although there is no standard ratio of sodium to potassium to recommend, eating a balanced, whole foods diet (surprise!) is the best way to achieve equilibrium. So how much sodium should be eating in a day? First it needs to be established that sodium and salt are two different things. The salt we consume is in fact a combination of two ions, sodium and chloride, in percentages of roughly 40% and 60%. Most nutrition experts agree that sodium intake on a daily basis should not exceed 2 grams per day. This amount is equal to 5 grams of salt, or 1 teaspoon. Yup. Thats it. Put into those terms, its easy to see how one could overdo it...by lunch hour. To avoid excess sodium intake, limit processed foods. As I mentioned above, a little recon revealed that some instant ramen brands cover the daily sodium base in just one serving. Yikes! Sodium lurks in some very unexpected places, so be savvy and read labels. To be extra cautious avoid high-salt foods such as commercially-prepared pickles, olives, and saurkraut, canned and instant soups, processed cheese, condiments like ketchup, barbeque sauce, gravy, alfredo sauce, salad dressings, mayonnaise, soy sauce, snacks foods like chips, salted peanuts and pretzels, crackers, and boxed breakfast cereal. Remember, cooking for yourself is the only way to know exactly what you are getting in your food. There are a few things that need to be mentioned about this recipe. First, you need to start the process the night before (or the morning of) by simply soaking the dashi ingredients in water and set in the fridge. This is how you make the broth. You can hurry the process by cooking the ingredients in hot water if youre in a rush, but the results are better if you follow this slower method (plus, your fridge does all the work). I will also say that traditional dashi is delicate and mild-flavoured, unlike the instant dashi that is saltier and stronger due to the addition of artificial, chemical flavour enhancers. When you try the dashi for the first time, try not to compare it to the ramen broth youve had in the past - this is the real deal. Appreciate its clean, pure taste and it subtlety, and add tamari or miso only as needed to enhance the natural flavour. Second, you can make and enjoy the dashi bases separately if you like, or combine the two for a more complex flavour. I really like the combination of the kombu and shiitake dashi together. They both contain good amounts of umami, so united they deliver a deep, multifaceted taste experience without the meat. Third, get organic ingredients if you can. Sea vegetables and mushrooms are both like little sponges in their respective environments so finding the cleanest and highest quality you can is a good idea. Finally, purchase the most high-vibe ramen noodles you can find. The other reason I was inspired to write this recipe and post was because of all the incredibly awesome ramen Ive seen at the health food store. Made with whole grains, some of them even gluten-free, I couldnt say no! Now, you could make your own noodles if you like (this is an art I greatly admire) but in the interest of saving a smidgen of time, buy yourself some noodles and get to the ramen even faster.     Print recipe     Ramen Revisited + How to make Dashi Serves 4 (each dashi recipe below serves 2) Dashi 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water : 60g dried shiitake mushrooms (do not use fresh) 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water : 20g kombu Directions: For the kombu dashi, place .7oz /­­ 20g of kombu in 4 cups /­­ 1 liter of water overnight in the fridge. In the morning, discard the kombu, strain the remaining liquid and warm it in a pot on the stove until just barely simmering. Serve. For the shiitake dashi, remove any dirt or debris from the dried mushrooms and place in 4 cups /­­ 1 liter of water. It is important to submerge the mushrooms, so place something on top of them, such as a smaller glass lid, and set them in the fridge overnight. In the morning, remove the mushrooms, squeezing out as much liquid from them as you can. Set the mushrooms aside, strain the remaining liquid and warm it in a pot on the stove until just barely simmering. Serve. Ramen 3-4 bunches baby bok choy, quickly stir-fried in a little shallot and garlic 2 carrots, julienned 2 spring onions, sliced 2 soft-boiled or medium eggs (to suit your taste) (optional) 1 pack whole grain ramen noodles (gluten-free, if desired) To serve dried or fresh chilies tamari or miso, to taste (use discretion!) Directions: 1. Prepare all the ingredients: stir-fry the bok choy or other greens, julienne the carrots, slice the spring onions, slice the rehydrated shiitake mushrooms, soft boil the eggs. 2. Bring a pot of water to the boil. Add the noodles and cook according to the package instructions. 3. While the noodles are cooking, ladle the broth into the bowls. Add the hot noodles and all other ingredients. Take a moment to arrange the food in a pleasing way, sit, and enjoy.   *   *   *   *   *   * Hey everyone! Mybook comes out today!!! I am so ridiculously excited to see this day arrive and the book arrive in your homes and kitchens. The reviews have been so positive so far and for that, I thank you. Please note that although most stores in North America that are carrying the book should have it in stock today, some may take a few days to longer. If you want to purchase the book online, there are many retailers listed here. I would like to take this time to acknowledge the couple of misprints in the book. During the editing process the following mistakes were made: on page 21, the ghee recipe is labeled vegan. On page 241-242 buckwheat and spelt switched places so that buckwheat is in the gluten-containing section of the grains chapter, while spelt is in the gluten-free section. In other news, my Vancouver tour dates and events have been confirmed! Here is where and when you can find me in Van city (this will be my first time there, can you believe it?!). Click the links for more details and ticket information. April 15: Burdock and Co. Collaborative Dinner + Book Signing April 16: Whole Foods Cambie Cooking Demo + Book Signing April 17: Interview + Afternoon Tea with CBCs Sheryl MacKay Barbara Jos Books to Cooks Dinner Event + Book Signing Looking forward to seeing you all there! Also, check out my most recent interview over at the gorgeous site, The Coveteur.

My Cookbook + a Bonus Pack of Recipes

March 4 2015 My New Roots 

My Cookbook + a Bonus Pack of Recipes Dear friends! Its hard to believe that in just a few short weeks my cookbook, My New Roots: Inspired Plant Based Recipes for Every Season will be landing in stores, your homes and hands. Bah! Pretty exciting stuff. I know the wait has been long, but were nearly there. Your support and unabashed enthusiasm for this project has filled me up and fueled me these past months while I waited with knots in my stomach just to see it, and I can say with great relief and pride that I am thrilled with how its turned out. Now I have my fingers crossed (and toes and arms and legs and eyes) that you feel the same way. Here is a trailer for the book – and clips from the year that I made it. So to tell you a little more without giving too much away... The book opens with the techniques and processes I use in my kitchen every day, which form the foundation of all plant-based cooking: how to cook beans and grains and how to make nut and seed butters are just a few examples. With detailed yet easy to follow, step-by-step instructions, youll master these simple methods in no time and be well-equipped to cook the recipes from the book as well as have the confidence to be creative on your own. The recipes follow, with 100 all-new, never-before-seen recipes with a couple of your favourites from the blog, just because I thought youd appreciate them in print. Some of my favourite recipes are Savoury Spring Hand Pies, Raw Cashew Yogurt with Maple and Blackberry, Grain-Free Hemp Tabbouleh, Sparkling Mint Melonade, Apricot Rhubarb Clafoutis, Sunflower Sesame Seed Brittle, Trippy Tie-Dye Soup, Vanilla Rose Apple Cider, Chunky Banana Bread Granola, and Raw Mint Chip Ice Cream Sandwiches. All of the recipes are vegetarian, most of them vegan, and many of them gluten-free. I have some stellar raw recipes that go beyond just salad, hearty breakfasts, meals to take to school, the office, and road trips. Beautiful drinks to quench your thirst, soups and dips and sandwiches. Simple family fare, and meals to impress your best guests. The book is laid out in seasons, five in fact, which you will learn more about once you read it. I wrote the recipes and photographed in real time, as the weeks rolled through the year, inspired by what was around me, growing in the garden, available at the market, and the dishes reflect this. When I look through the pages, the photographs pull me back to the places I was, the slant of daylight, temperature of the air, who I was with in the kitchen. It is, very much like the blog, a diary of sorts: a collection of more than just food, but moods and memories. As we are counting down to the books launch, Ive put together a bonus pack of six exclusive recipes not in the cookbook (plus two that are, for fun) for all of you who want to preorder to the book, and also for those that already have. Its easy: pre-order the book from your retailer of choice, here, and then go to this page, insert your purchase order (PO number), personal information and you can download the Bonus Pack PDF immediately. No matter where you live in the world or where you are buying /­ have bought the book, you can get the bonus pack! This book represents so many things for me. After eight and half years (!!!) of blogging, it seems like the natural next step to become three-dimensional, to enter the world as a published author. I am very proud of my journey, and this book is a culmination of that. I truly never imagined that I would be sitting here, cradling this collection of recipes from my heart, holding it out for you to take. But it feels right. And now is the time. Thank you for making this possible and for taking this journey with me. Now lets go cook. In love and gratitude, Sarah B.  #MNRcookbook

Chocolate Chunk Nut Butter Blondies

February 8 2015 My New Roots 

Chocolate Chunk Nut Butter Blondies My friend Adam is a serious health-foodie. He teaches sprouting workshops, is part of a vegetarian soup club, and appreciates a good sourdough as much as I do. Hes also quite fearless in the kitchen, combining tastes and textures I would never dream of, most often successfully. There was that one time however he put peppermint oil in a batch of his granola, and it tasted like breakfast and toothpaste all at the same time. I admire his gumption, but he will never live that one down. One day while I was over at his place, I was really craving a cookie. He lives near a very high-vibe bakery so I was nearly out the door when he said, wait! I have something you should try. He proceeded to tell me that his experimental cookies were flour-free, grain-free in fact, and contained only had six ingredients. I was scared - this sounded like a treat from wrong town. But when I took my first skeptical nibble, I was shocked. This cookie was everything I had ever wanted: rich, moist, not-too-sweet and deeply satisfying. Then he told me that it was just almond butter, eggs, maple syrup, chocolate, baking soda and sea salt. Um, what?! No flour? How was this even possible? Inexplicable, culinary wizardry at its best, thats for darn sure, and an experiment gone absolutely right. After googling almond butter cookies, I discovered that this kind of recipe had been floating around the interwebs unbeknownst to me. Anyway, I got Adam to make them for me again this past summer at his cottage, posted them on Instagram, and many of you asked for the recipe. I tinkered with them a lot to make sure they were just right, changing up the nut butters, using different sweeteners, various add-ins etc. (its a tough job, I tell ya). Then it dawned on me: what if I put the dough into a pan and made blondies?! For the win. Now I dont know about you, but I take my indulgences seriously. When I crave something sweet, I definitely dont mess around with mousses, flaky pastries or light-n-airy items. Heck no. I want to sink my teeth into something substantial, for it to announce its presence to my stomach with a fulfilling thud, and feel like I actually ate something. These blondies are just that. Aside from their incredibly rich, satisfying flavour, the texture of them is ultra chewy and have that dense brownie quality I love so much. It still baffles me that there isnt any flour in the recipe, since it just feels like there is, from a “this-must-be-really-bad-for-me perspective. Like I said, there is some serious alchemical conjuring taking place, proving that the universe loves us, so don’t ask any questions. Being choosey about your Chocolate Yes, yes, were talking about blondies here, but dont all blondies have chocolate in them? Im no expert, but I do believe this is a necessary addition. How do we go about choosing our chocolate though? Is there really a difference between cocoa mass percentages? Does organic really matter? Does milk chocolate count? Here are my top four tips for making sure your chocolate isn’t total junk food. 4 Tips for Choosing the Healthiest Chocolate Choose dark chocolate varieties. The darker the bar, the higher the cocoa mass percentage will be. When a bar says it is 70% cocoa that means it has a relatively high concentration of health-promoting compounds, like polyphenols and antioxidants. It also means that there is less room for schwaggy stuff like refined sugar, processed oils, and flavourings. Always choose a bar with a minimum of 70% cocoa solids for maximum benefits. If the chocolate bar does not list a cocoa percentage, dont buy it. Read the ingredients. High quality chocolate should only contain three to four ingredients: chocolate, cocoa butter/­­ cocoa mass, and/­­or cocoa liquor, plus sugar. If the bar contains any oil, milk or milk products, soya lecithin, emulsifiers, natural flavour, or preservatives dont buy it. Buy Organic whenever possible. Cacao plants are some of the most heavily sprayed crops in the world. As pesticide residues can end up in the final product, choose chocolate that has been made from organically grown beans. Learn about the process. Although it will require a little reconnaissance work, finding out how your chocolate was manufactured is important in determining how healthy it is. Drying cacao beans in the sun instead of roasting them preserves many of the chocolates delicate nutrients. Make sure that their processing temperature is not over 110°F. Avoid chocolate whose processing includes Dutching, an alkalization method that actually removes the polyphenols, as they lend characteristic bitter flavour to the finished product. I also encourage you to purchase Fair Trade Certified chocolate whenever possible, as it makes a huge difference to the lives of cacao farmers and their families. Fair Trade is an international certification that ensures that farmers are guaranteed a minimum price for their product, decent working conditions, and that the processes they use protect the natural environment. The blondies are not overly sweet, which I appreciate. If you like your desserts on the more saccharine side, I believe that swapping out 1/­­4 cup of coconut sugar and replacing it with maple syrup would work very well. This would also help keep the blondies moist on the second and third day (although they wont last that long. Trust.). You could also choose a chocolate with a lower cocoa mass, such as 70%, but dont go lower than that, as the sugar in it will outweigh the health benefits of the chocolate itself. I chose a bar at 85%, which tends to be a little bitter, but I find it pairs well in this dessert. As far as nut butter goes, anything goes.  I used a homemade almond and hazelnut butter blend in these, which was unreasonably delicious (for a blended nut butter recipe, check out my post here). Because my nut butter was a deep caramel brown, my blondies turned out more like brunettes (tee hee), so the colour of your finished product depends on the nut butter you use. I tried a homemade sunflower butter in my experiments and it worked really well. I would also like to try tahini and pumpkin seed butter, although I know the colour in that case may be a little weird! I have a feeling cashew butter would taste out of this world, and pecan or walnut as well. And I definitely recommend roasted nut butter over raw for depth of flavour, and because youll be baking these anyway. I will say that I really tried making these darn things vegan, but guys, it just didnt work! Eggs in this case are crucial because they not only bind the ingredients, but they give the blondies air and volume. Using chia and flax works to bind, but youll end up with a tasty puddle. If thats okay with you, go for it! I obviously ate all of my experiments, and quite happily indulged in many yummy, almond butter pancakes. I did not try vegan egg replacers though, and that may work better. If you have success in this arena, let me know. And can we take a minute to talk about my favourite part of all? The corner pieces. If you actually own one of those funky all-corners brownie pans, you get where I’m coming from friend, and this is the time to use it. The edges are extra dense and chewy, slightly crisp and oooohhhhh my goodness I cant even write about this anymore. On to the recipe.     Print recipe     Grain-free Chocolate Chunk Nut Butter Blondies Makes 20 blondies Ingredients: 2 large, organic eggs 2 tsp. vanilla extract 1 cup unsalted nut butter (I used almond-hazelnut) 3/­­4 cup /­­ 100g coconut sugar 2 tsp. baking soda 1/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 3.5oz /­­ 100g dark chocolate (70% or higher), roughly chopped a pinch flaky sea salt (such as Maldon), optional Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 325°F /­­ 160°C. 2. In a small bowl whisk eggs and vanilla extract together. Set aside. In a measuring cup, combine coconut sugar, 1/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt, and baking soda. 3. Measure out the nut butter and place in a large bowl. Add the egg mixture, stir thoroughly to combine. Add the coconut sugar mixture and fold together. The dough will be very thick. Add about half of the chopped chocolate, using your hands if necessary to incorporate. 4. Press the dough into a parchment-lined 8×8″ (20x20cm) brownie pan. Sprinkle the remaining chocolate over the top and press each piece slightly into the dough. Sprinkle with a pinch of flaky sea salt and place in the oven. 5. Bake for 25-30 minutes until the blondies are golden brown. Remove from the oven and let cool in the pan completely before cutting. Seeing as it’s February and we’ve been so very behaved since the first of January (right…?) I thought it was time to pull out the big guns and celebrate with these ladies. I hope you drop everything you are doing right now and go make them. It’s true, blondies have more fun! xo, Sarah B Show me your Blondies on Instagram: #MNRblondies

A Winter Weekend Cleanse

January 9 2015 My New Roots 

A Winter Weekend Cleanse Happy 2015, dear friends! I wasnt sure about doing a detox post this year simply because it seemed predictable, but over the past couple weeks, my body told my brain to stop thinking so much and just do what I feel. Smart body. There are many reasons people feel the need to press the reset button this time of year. Overindulgence, chronic stress, feelings of fatigue or sluggishness are the usual suspects, but there are also positive grounds for clearing out the cobwebs such as wanting to gain more energy and increase vitality, achieve higher levels of clarity, and realign with our internal guidance systems. I know the telltale signs for myself, and they usually involve a slight disinterest in eating (sounds crazy, I know), along with the desire to examine my food-body-mind relationship. Since I am often cooking everyday for a living, I can sometimes lose sight of the total magic that food is. If I slice open a head of red cabbage and fail to swoon, or that pomegranate doesnt bring me to my knees in awe, I know its time to take a break, simplify, and make space for those feelings again. But how can we make this really easy? Ive gotten so much positive feedback from my past cleanses and detox programs for Oprah magazine and Whole Living magazine, (all of which are still online here, here and here), but one thing that people mention is how much food there is! Taking that into consideration, I thought I would design a super-simple plan this year with only two recipes and you can make the decision how long you want to go for. One smoothie. One soup. Both are alkalizing, filling yet detoxifying, mega green but super tasty. In fact, Ill wager that youll love both of these recipes so much that youll be enjoying them long after the cleanse is over! The Ginger-Mint Pear Smoothie is luscious, sweet-and-spicy with cooling mint and creamy avocado. The Cilantro Spinach Sweet Potato Soup is like eating a crazy-delicious hug. Detoxifying Habits Its true that certain foods and herbs can aid in the detoxification process, but what else can we do to boost our cleansing process on a daily basis? Exercise: Moving our bodies is essential for balance and overall health because it creates the conditions to breathe deeply, stretch, circulate the blood and lymph, and sweat. The more we move, the more efficient our body becomes at circulating and flushing out toxins. Gentle, low-intensity exercise such as yoga, stretching, or walking is best during a juice fast or reduced-calorie diet (such as this weekend cleanse), while high-impact exercise is recommended at least 3 times a week once you are back to eating a regular, healthy diet. Dry skin brushing: Dry skin brushing helps stimulate your lymphatic system, which is responsible for ridding the body of toxins. Skin brushing improves the surface circulation on the skin and keeps the pores of the skin open, encouraging your bodys discharge of metabolic wastes, and resulting in an improved ability to combat bacteria, plus helping your skin to look and feel healthier and more resilient! Skin brushing also strengthens the immune system and helps aid the digestion system, both of which are greatly involved in the detoxification process. Take a sauna: Although it is a major eliminative organ, most people’s skin is very inactive. Sweat is a most important elimination route for toxins. Repeated use of the sauna can help slowly restore skin elimination. Viruses, toxin-burdened cells, and tumours are weaker than normal cells and tolerate heat poorly. The heating of the tissues, which takes place in a sauna helps the body heal from infections and disease more quickly. I make it a habit to go to the sauna once a week for a deep, cleansing sweat. It feels amazing and does a body good! Below is a sample plan for the Winter Weekend Cleanse. You can do the program for just one day, but I would recommend at least two to really feel the benefits. You can also go longer if you like, and include one or more of the recipes from my previous programs to compliment the new one, just so those taste buds of yours stay excited! Drink as much water as you feel like /­­ need, but consume at least 1 1/­­2 liters throughout the day. Always begin the day with warm water with lemon, as this will assist in flushing your digestive system, preparing your tummy for food by increasing stomach acid, and alkalizing your entire system. Herbal teas are acceptable, but choose ones that are particularly detoxifying. Burdock, cleavers, chickweed, yarrow, nettle and plantain are some of my favourites. I also have a wonderful Detox Tea Blend recipe here. You can eat your smoothie for breakfast and afternoon snack, but it also fills in for a lunch if that is all you feel like. You can make up the entire batch for a day (the recipe makes about 3 cups /­­ 700ml) if you know youll be on the go and sip on it when you need a pick-me-up. Or you can divide the ingredients in half and make it fresh if youll be near a blender. Since we are in the colder months of the year here, Id encourage you not to use frozen fruit, as its important to keep warm when the weather is not! I like to enjoy this smoothie at room temperature, and I promise its just as delicious as its cold counterpart. The soup can be eaten for lunch and dinner or as a snack too. I really like it blended, but feel free to keep it chunky too! Winter Weekend Cleanse Plan Upon rising: warm water with lemon Breakfast: Ginger-Mint Pear Smoothie Throughout the day: water! Aim for 1 1/­­2 – 2 1/­­2 liters a day (about 6-10 cups), depending on your activity level Lunch: Cilantro Spinach Sweet Potato Soup Snack: Ginger-Mint Pear Smoothie Dinner: Cilantro Spinach Sweet Potato Soup Repeat on the following day, for as many days as you like. Things to Avoid: caffeine, sugar, alcohol, tobacco, computer time, television, stressful situations. Things to Embrace: sleep and rest, time outdoors, yoga, meditation, deep breathing, sauna, dry skin brushing.     Print recipe     Winter Weekend Cleanse Recipes Ginger-Mint Pear Smoothie Makes 3 cups /­­ 700ml Ingredients (all organic if possible): 2 pears 1 avocado, flesh scooped out 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 35g firmly packed baby spinach 1 cup /­­ 250 ml water 2 tsp. minced ginger 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. freshly-squeezed lemon juice 10-20 mint leaves (to your taste) Directions: 1. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Enjoy. Cilantro Spinach Sweet Potato Soup Makes 6.5 cups /­­ 1.5 liters Ingredients (all organic if possible): 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 medium onions, chopped 5 cloves garlic, minced 1 tsp. sea salt 3 cups /­­ 700ml water 2 medium-large sweet potato, scrubbed and cut into 1 cubes 1 Tbsp. freshly-squeezed lemon juice pinch – 1/­­4 tsp. cayenne pepper (to your taste) 2 cups /­­ 60g cilantro (leaves and tender stems) 2 cups /­­ 50g firmly packed baby spinach Directions: 1. Heat coconut oil in a large stockpot. Add onions and salt, stir to coat and let cook until onions have softened, about 5-7 minutes. Add garlic, stir, cook 1 minute. Add sweet potato and water. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer and cook until the sweet potatoes are tender, about 12-15 minutes. 2. Place soup contents in a blender. Blend on high until smooth, then add spinach, cilantro, lemon and cayenne. Season to taste. Serve and enjoy. Store cooled leftovers in the fridge.   I hope you all find your own reasons for trying out this simple cleanse, and that it proves to be as helpful as it is delicious! Remember to take things slow, set realistic goals for yourself and be celebrate each small victory! I truly wish you all the best for 2015 - this year is going to be the cleanest, greenest yet. Love and light, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * Check out my interview with the gorgeous McKel over at Nutrition Stripped!

From my Cookbook: Raw Vegan Eggnog

December 5 2014 My New Roots 

From my Cookbook: Raw Vegan Eggnog   I always know that Christmas is right around the corner when eggnog suddenly appears in my parents fridge. My father just loves the stuff and hell guzzle through umpteen vintage-deckled cartons over the course of the holidays, especially if guests pop by. Me? Im not so much into it. Although I can totally dig on the warming spicy scent that wafts from the punch bowl, knowing what it’s made of, kind of makes my tummy flip. Once I realized that it was the sweetness and smell of freshly grated nutmeg that was charming me, I set out to make a raw vegan version that would satisfy even my dads discriminating eggnog palette (well, in theory anyway). Its super rich, so thick and creamy - an amazing breakfast in fact - but decadent enough for dessert. The secret is in the sesame seeds: an unusual addition to a blended drink, but give them a try! They add tons of protein, fiber, healthy fats, calcium and help make this smoothie a veritable meal. I am also excited to post this recipe because it is the first one I am sharing from the cookbook! Its a simple one, but a sure favourite. Plus, it seems like the time of year when many of you will be dusting off your reindeer-shaped eggnog cups, so I thought it appropriate to swoop in and present you with a possible alternative.   Smooth Move, Sesame Seeds If youve been reading My New Roots for a while, you are already well aware of my sesame seed obsession. I love their versatility, nutty flavour, nourishing minerals and healthy fats. I love how inexpensive and readily available they are, and how long they stay fresh (storing them in the fridge is always best!). I buy them in bulk and use them for so many things, from dressing up salads to throwing them in my smoothies. Thats right! You can drink sesame seeds. For real. I first discovered this upon running out of protein powder, and searching the cupboards for an alternative, my curiosity fell upon the holy seed. I soaked them overnight, and the next morning whirred them up with some fruit and greens to reveal a most satisfying meal-in-a-glass. Since then, I havent looked back! Now I often add sesame seeds to my smoothies, and even blended soups, as I find they add incredible body and richness to just about anything. If you are the kind of person that loves drinking smoothies, but finds that you are hungry an hour later (me), sesame seeds will really help with the stick-to-your-ribs satiety factor. It may surprise to find out that sesame seeds are an excellent source of essential minerals. Calcium for the prevention of osteoporosis and migraines, magnesium for supporting our vascular system, zinc for bone health, selenium for antioxidant protection, and copper for reducing inflammation are just a handful of the incredibly important roles these minerals play for us. The biggest surprise of all? By weight, sesame seeds have a higher iron content than liver!   If you have a high-powered blender the sesame seeds will blend up very quickly. If you have a regular blender, remember that it make take a little longer to achieve a perfectly smooth consistency. Just keep the motor running and be patient. The level of spiciness in this drink, I leave up to you. I like mine super nutmeg-y, but thats not everyones taste, so start with just a little, blend, and add more if youd like. The same goes for the figs: I usually make my milkshake with just one, but others might enjoy it a little sweeter. If you find that your figs are very dry, soak them the night before beside the sesame seeds, and use the soak water in the eggnog. The turmeric is really just to add a slightly creamy yellow, so its optional.       Print recipe     Raw Vegan Eggnog Milkshake Serves 1 Ingredients: 1 frozen banana 1-2 dried figs (depending on how sweet you like it) 3 Tbsp. sesame seeds, soaked for 8 hours, or overnight 2 Tbsp. hemp seeds 1 cup milk of choice or water 1/­­2 tsp. ground cinnamon pinch of freshly grated nutmeg pinch of ground clove pinch of turmeric (for colour) a little squeeze of lemon juice Directions: 1. Place sesame seeds in a glass with 1/­­2 tsp. of sea salt, cover with water and soak up to 8 hours. Drain and rinse well. 2. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend on high until completely smooth. Spice to taste. Enjoy. If you are looking for Christmas gifts this year, dont forget that a pre-ordered My New Roots cookbook is probably on everyones list, amiright? Not only that, but it comes with the added bonus of arriving in spring, when most people have long forgotten about the holidays and are in serious need of presents! Wow, didnt I time that perfectly? I am always thinking ahead here, friends. You can preorder the My New Roots cookbook on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Indiebound and Indigo. In all seriousness, I have been so overwhelmed with the outpouring of love and support from all of you about the book. I know that you are just as excited as I am to hold this collection of from-the-heart recipes in your hands. Only a few more months to go now! And most thrilling of all, is that my cookbook is going to be published translated into Danish and Dutch! The UK and Australia are publishing it too. Here are the release dates: US: March 31, 2015 Canada: March 31, 2015 UK: April 9, 2015 Australia: April 9, 2015 Netherlands: June, 2015 Denmark: pending In the meantime, have a look at the gorgeous quotes below from my friends and peers who have been fortunate enough to have a sneak peak of the book. Thank you to all of them for being so incredibly generous and encouraging with their words.   My New Roots is beautiful proof that eating with nutrition in mind need not be a compromise. This is an unabashedly enthusiastic riff on the food-as-medicine approach to cooking and eating. Sarahs playful and encouraging voice is infectious; you get the sense that she is waiting on the other side of each recipe to give you a high five. --Heidi Swanson, author of Super Natural Every Day My New Roots is filled with good ideas for fresh new ways of using plant foods. Sarah Britton shows that truly alive ingredients can result in more interesting and better-tasting recipes and are always worth seeking out. --Deborah Madison, author of Vegetable Literacy and The New Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone Sarah is a veggie-lovin culinary goddess! Her unique and seasonal plant-based creations will inspire you to fall head over heels in love with vegetables. There are so many beautiful recipes I cant wait to make! --Angela Liddon, author of The Oh She Glows Cookbook I have been waiting for this book since I first started reading Sarahs blog years ago. She has a gift for writing truly wonderful recipes, vibrant with produce, and has the knowledge to explain why these plant-based foods are good for us. Her sweet spirit shines through every page. So thrilled to have this keeper in my kitchen! --Sara Forte, author of The Sprouted Kitchen Sarahs creativity always inspires. With its vibrant recipes, evocative visuals, witty combinations, and approachable ways to live better, this book is a must for anyone interested in optimal, delicious health. --Laura Wright, thefirstmess.com Sarah always treads the beautiful line between making whole foods practical and also appealing, leading the way in this new real food movement. --Sarah Wilson, author of I Quit Sugar Being healthy and happy is so easy when youre cooking with Sarah. Her gentle approach, love and passion for whole foods, and flair for pairing mind-blowing flavors create fabulous and fresh food that looks stunning and is bursting with personality and life-affirming goodness. With unbelievable tastes and textures, My New Roots takes you on an exquisite journey that seduces you with every lift of the fork, leaving you voracious for vegetables. --Tess Masters, author of The Blender Girl Its a rare book that delivers inspiration through its every page, yet each one of Sarahs recipes sings with flavor and originality. The entire collection is a seductive introduction to a more wholesome way of eating and an irresistible call to the kitchen. --Clotilde Dusoulier, author of The French Market Cookbook and Edible French  

Grilled Pumpkin Bread with Honeycomb

November 5 2014 My New Roots 

Grilled Pumpkin Bread with Honeycomb   There are so many unexpected things Ive gotten from blogging. Big and small things. A cookbook. A reason to use designer muffin cups. A community. A career. New friends. Offers to try a new line of microalgae. But my favourite things however, are those that involve super passionate people wanting to share their awesome, healthy, and often geeky fervor with me. Im all in! Recently, I received an email from Oliver Maxwell, the founder of Bybi (translation: City Bee), which is an urban beekeeping collective here in Copenhagen. As a blog reader, Oliver was keenly aware of just how much I love bees and the things that they make, so he was kind enough to invite me out to his operation to see how this incredible grassroots company works. And meet the bees, of course. After a full tour, thorough honey tasting and hive visit, Oliver offered me what I can only describe as the holy grail of all bee things: honeycomb. And not just a chunk of the stuff, but an entire hive frame of it! Um, okay, really? I almost kissed him. But my husband was there too and that would have been awkward. I carried the frame of honeycomb home cradling it like a baby. I could see the paper bag that Oliver had put it into beginning to darken in spots where the honey was oozing and pooling. My heart raced. These are the things I live for.   Bursting with excitement and trepidation as to how I would put this delicacy to due use, I scurried home, took the honeycomb out of the bag and stared at it, praying it would reveal a grand plan for itself. But nothing came. Nothing. And all I wanted to do was dive face first into the thing, devouring it all in an animal-like frenzy just because I could, but instead I gently put it down and walked away. A few weeks went by. Still nothing. And I remembered asking Oliver before I left how long the honeycomb would keep. He looked at me quite seriously and replied not forever. What does that even mean?! I could hear his words echoing in my head like a cautionary character in a horror film. The pressure continued to build to an almost crushing weight. I had to do something. And then, as if by magic, Yotam Ottolenghis newest book, Plenty More, arrived on my doorstep, a gift from my publisher. Gleefully absorbed in the rapturous inspiration of pure genius, all thoughts of my self-imposed assignment drifted away. Until I hit page 319. There it was, like a beacon in the blackest of nights, the recipe title: Grilled Banana Bread with Tahini and Honeycomb. HONEYCOMB. I was saved. Thoughts turned to alternative loaves (I couldnt flat-out copy Ottolenghi!) and pumpkin was the seasonal flavour I excitedly committed to. I took my classic banana bread recipe, tweaked it ever-so-slightly and came up with what you have in front of you today. The loaf itself is moist, flavourful, and so very pumpkin-y, punctuated with warming spices, crunchy walnuts and dark chocolate. It is not overly sweet like so many other recipes and commercial versions of pumpkin bread Ive tried, and I did this on purpose: if you do serve it with honeycomb, its important to have a little contrast, you know? The pumpkin loaf recipe is vegan, but of course the honeycomb is not. If you are vegan, or honey just isnt your thing, the bread is delicious with date syrup, jam, or apple butter. You can grill it (highly recommended) or choose to eat it fresh - both are fantastic! But when using honeycomb, its a treat to have the wax melt just a little bit on the warm bread, and the honey sink into the cozy nooks and crannies of the loaf. Guh. Then you sprinkle the whole thing with flaky sea salt and devour. It’s a serious, loss-for-words kind of situation (which is convenient because your mouth will be very, very full).   Bee Mine, Sweet Honeycomb Honey is made by female honeybees that collect nectar from flowers, mix it with enzymes and regurgitate it (yum!) into honeycomb cells. Once the water content of this concoction reduces to less than 20% (the bees beat their wings in the hive to help evaporation, wowzers!) it is considered honey. The bees then put a seal on each cell and it is stored for times when they need food, like the winter. Kept this way, honey, will in essence, last forever - this is why it is considered the only food on planet earth that never spoils. Honeycomb is altogether miraculous. To behold its sheer geometrical perfection is like a religious experience, and to see evidence of the deep, clear intelligence that built such a structure is humbling. It is altogether delicate and strong, housing the clear, liquid gold inside each of its cells so perfectly. Made of natural wax that the female bees excrete, it is built into the ingenious, space-saving, hexagonal cells that contain their larvae, store pollen and honey. The wax itself is totally edible, but some folks like to chew it up and spit it out after theyve gotten all the honey out of it. The flavour of the wax depends greatly on the flowers the bees were collecting nectar from, but for the most part it is mildly sweet and mellow-tasting.   The wonderful thing about purchasing honeycomb is that you know the honey is raw, unpasteurized, unclarified, unfiltered, and real. Nothing has been done to it. It is loaded with all the things that make honey good for us, like enzymes, propolis, and all of its antimicrobial, antiviral and antifungal properties. It may surprise you to learn that most of the commercial honey available in the grocery store has been pasteurized and ultra-filtered, rendering it rather ineffectual. It is also important to check the label on your honey, as some brands cut their product with less expensive high-fructose corn syrup and other processed sweeteners. Like with so many foods these days, purchasing locally from a reliable source is the only way to ensure a clean and totally natural product. Look for honeycomb at farmers markets and natural food stores. Late summer and autumn are usually when farmers harvest their honey so it will be freshest at this time of year. If you purchase fresh honeycomb in plastic, transfer it to a sealable glass container when you get home. Store in a dark place at room temperature.       Print recipe     Grilled Pumpkin Bread with Honeycomb Serves 10-12 Ingredients: 1/­4 cup milk of your choice (nut, seed, goat, rice...) 6 Tbsp. coconut oil, melted 6 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 tsp. pure vanilla extract 2 cups pumpkin puree (I used 1 small Hokkaido pumpkin of 2 lbs /­ 1kg) 2 cups /­ 350g wholegrain spelt flour 1 tsp. baking soda 1 tsp. baking powder 1/­2 tsp. fine grain sea salt 2 tsp. ground cinnamon 1 tsp. ground cardamom 1/­2 tsp. freshly grated nutmeg 1/­8 tsp. ground clove 1 cup /­ 100g walnuts, roughly chopped (substitute with any other nut or seed, if desired) 1/­2 cup /­ 50g chopped dark chocolate (optional, but delicious) Fresh honeycomb (from an organic source, if possible) Flaky sea salt to garnish Directions: 1. If making your own pumpkin puree, preheat oven to 400°F /­ 200°C. Slice the pumpkin in half, scoop out the seeds and place on a baking sheet, cut sides down and roast until soft, about 30 minutes (time varies depending on the size of your pumpkin). When cool enough to handle, place both halves in a food processor and blend on high until as smooth as possible (for extra nutrients and ease, try and find a pumpkin with edible skin, such as Hokkaido). 2. Reduce oven to 350°F /­ 175°C. 3. Line a standard loaf pan with baking paper, or lightly oil and dust with flour, shaking out excess (a silicon loaf pan works well too). 4. Put the milk, oil, maple syrup, vanilla, and pumpkin puree in a blender and blend until smooth. 5. In a large bowl combine dry ingredients. Add pumpkin mixture and combine using as few stroked as possible. Fold in nuts and chocolate. 6. Pour batter into a loaf pan and smooth the top. Bake until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, about 60 minutes. Remove from loaf pan and let cool on a wire rack. 7. To serve, toast or grill slices of the pumpkin loaf until warm and crusty. Slice a portion of honeycomb, let sit on the warm bread until very soft, then smash with a knife, sprinkle with good, flaky sea salt and enjoy.   * * * * * * Hey friends! Check out the article I wrote about Copenhagen’s greenest hot spots on Melting Butter and Forbes. There are also some albums from the Amsterdam events up on my Facebook page. Thank you again to everyone who came out!

Blackberry Hazelnut Crumble Bars

September 26 2014 My New Roots 

Blackberry Hazelnut Crumble Bars   I am writing this on the very first day of autumn. Copenhagen has welcomed this season with classically crisp air and blindingly bright sun. People are stretched out along the banks of the harbour in the afternoon light, soaking in what will be the last blows of summers fight. Ugh. Can you feel it? Last week my family and I were out at our garden. On the cycle back home we stopped by the blackberry bramble that has overtaken a major section of the vacant land nearby. It towers over me, and extends along the bike path for half a block or more, an impenetrable wall of thorns and fruit. Happily there were a few berries left, just enough to pick for a dessert and a handful to snack on with my boys. Languishing in the last morsels of hot sun we felt the seasons shifting ever-so-slightly and celebrated with the ripest and blackest of berries, like summer captured in edible jewels.   But I got the berries home and suddenly I felt a lot of pressure. Kind of like when you impulse-buy those crazy-looking mushrooms at the farmers market and worry that whatever youre going to be making isnt special enough so you let them sit in your fridge too long until they go bad. Forehead slap. That was not going to happen to my berries. No way. Here was my thought process: Sarah B, relax. You like blackberries. You like crumble. You make too many crumbles. You dont make too many bars. Crumble bars. Whats a crumble bar? Stop asking questions. Lets do this.   I proceeded in the best way I knew how, by browsing the internet for ideas. It turns out crumble bars do exist, but I couldnt find any versions that were all that virtuous. Subbing this for that while keeping things as simple as possible, I came up with an edition that is made with whole foods, totally vegan, and easily made gluten-free. The crust is light and flaky, the filling is rich and bursting with juicy flavours and the crumble topping is crunchy and satisfying. Although I use hazelnuts in mine, you could substitute those with almonds - just leave a few of them really big because biting into a large toasted nut is delicious, especially combined with the oozy and sweet fruit center. Heavenly. Next year I am definitely going to try these bars with black currants in the early summer months, and maybe raspberries later on.   Freezing and Cooking: How do they affect nutrients? Pssst. I have a secret. Sometimes in the off-season, I do something totally crazy. I buy frozen berries. What is a nutritionist such as myself doing purchasing and even recommending frozen foods to people? For one, I live in Denmark where the availability of fresh food is pretty sad in the winter, obviously. And second Im a person that does things like everyone else, such as relying on conveniences when need be. Im okay with that. But what kind of affect does freezing have on foods, say blackberries for instance? Youd be surprised, and likely thrilled to learn, that freezing does not completely spoil the vitamins and minerals in food. In fact, youre looking at a mere 10-15% nutrient loss across the board. Vitamin C is the one vitamin that is most likely to dissipate, as once the fruit or veggie has been plucked from its source, vitamin C levels start to decline almost immediately. Luckily, vitamin C is the single more common and easily obtained vitamin in nature, and you can make up for that loss somewhere else in your day.   And what about cooking? This is a little more complicated, as it varies according to the specific nutrient in question and the type of cooking method. Fat soluble vitamins (D, E, K) are not destroyed by heat alone, and vitamin A is relatively stable. The B-vitamins are also heat stable, except for panthotenic acid (B5). Folate breaks down at very high temperatures. Vitamin C is the nutrient that takes the biggest hit by far, as it is one of the most delicate vitamins in nature. It is not only destroyed by heat, but also exposure to air and light. It is also water-soluble, meaning that steaming something containing vitamin C will be surely destroy it. As a general rule, minerals are very heat stable, especially when using cooking methods that do not employ water, like roasting or baking - there is almost no loss whatsoever. If you are steaming, boiling, braising, or blanching foods, both vitamins and minerals will leach out into the water. To preserve these precious nutrients, save the broth to drink, or freeze it for later use in a soup or stew. I use it to puree my babys food. Hell never know his millet porridge was cooked with broccoli water! Since this blog is read the world over, there will of course be a few of you out there who cant get themselves to a blackberry bramble, simply because it isnt the right season. No worries. Find a grocer with organic frozen blackberries and go to town. You should not wait to make these. Seriously.       Print recipe     Blackberry Hazelnut Crumble Bars Makes 12-16 bars Crust: 2 1/­­2 cups /­­ 250g rolled oats, divided (gluten-free if desired) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml applesauce 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml pure maple syrup 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50g whole rolled oats 3/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 tsp. baking powder Filling: 4 cups /­­ 400g blackberries (fresh or frozen) 1/­­2 Tbsp. ground cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp. ground nutmeg 1/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt zest of 1 organic lemon 1/­­2 Tbsp. arrowroot powder (or organic, non-GMO cornstarch) 1 Tbsp. maple syrup Crumble Topping: 1 cup /­­ 100g rolled oats 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 2 Tbsp. coconut oil (or ghee) 2/­­3 cup /­­ 75g hazelnuts 1/­­2 tsp. ground cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp. sea salt 2 Tbsp. flour, gluten-free if desired (I used brown rice flour) Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350°F/­­175°C. 2. In a food processor blend 2 cups /­­ 200g oats on high until you have a rough flour. Add applesauce, maple syrup, coconut oil, and vanilla. Pulse until moist. 3. In a separate bowl combine the remaining 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50g rolled oats, salt, and baking powder. Add food processor contents and fold to combine, using your hands to mix - the dough will be quite firm. 4. Place the dough into a lightly greased 8x8 brownie pan and press firmly, especially around the edges - it helps to wet your hands so that the dough doesnt stick. 5. Without cleaning the food processor, add the all the ingredients for the crumble topping, and pulse a few times to mix. You can chop the ingredients as finely as you like, but I left mine very chunky - its your call. 6. To make the filling, place all ingredients in a medium bowl and toss to combine. Put them on top of the uncooked crust and spread evenly - the berries should just cover the crust in one layer. 7. Sprinkle the crumble topping over the blackberry layer. Place in the oven for 30-35 minutes, until slightly golden on top. Let cool completely before cutting into bars. Store in the fridge for up to five days.

The My New Roots Cookbook

September 5 2014 My New Roots 

The My New Roots Cookbook   Its here. Well, almost. And I am too excited to wait another day (by the sounds of it, you are too) so Im making it possible for you to reserve your copy this minute! My New Roots - Inspired Plant-Based Recipes for Every Season (Clarkson Potter, NY-2015) will officially be released March 31, 2015, but you can purchase it now (like, right now right now), have a *few* sleeps and it will be on your doorstep. Ka-BAM! So what is this thing all about? The book includes over 100 plant-based and seasonal recipes, almost all of which are entirely new (I had a to keep a few blog classics in there for good measure, you know?). Most of the recipes are also vegan, many are gluten-free and some are 100% raw. I tried to include a range of dishes from the very easy, to those that are more fun food projects that require fermentation and such. There are fancy things to impress your best guests, and tasty basics for weeknight family-style meals. I also created a lot of make-ahead dishes and snacks because, lets face it: even I dont have time to cook every single day! There is an entire section of the book dedicated solely to essential techniques - the kitchen processes I use on a daily basis and that form the foundation of so many recipes here on the blog and in the book. I thought it was important to clearly explain and really emphasize that knowing exactly how to cook beans, make nut butter, grow sprouts etc, can open up your culinary world and make a confident cook out of just about anyone who can boil water. There is a pantry section, listing the most important things to always have on hand to make healthy staples, and a little info on why I dig them. All the photographs were taken by me (!!!) which everyone thought would be downright insane /­­ impossible, but I did it anyway. Cause Im a nutcase. And I didnt want to have to share all that amazing food with a photographer (sort of kidding?). Most importantly, the book emphasizes deliciousness. Foods that inspire you to jump out of bed in the morning so you can enjoy a breakfast that tastes incredible and is also good for you. Meals so yummy, your friends and family will be begging for more. And desserts so deceptively indulgent, that will keep you on track towards a more balanced, energized life, always. I am so darn proud to share this book with the world. My heart on paper, all bound together for you to cook from for many years to come. I could not have done this without you, your support and enthusiasm for My New Roots over all of these years. YOU made this possible! Thank you for encouraging me to tackle this dream of mine, and help it come true. Really, thank you. Can’t wait to see the unfolding of this project from here on out! I promise to keep you in the loop as it moves forward. And did I mention you can pre-order it NOW?!? Huge gratitude, Sarah B. My New Roots – Inspired Plant-Based Recipes for Every Season is available for pre-order at the following online locations: Amazon Barnes & Noble Indie Bound

post4

August 5 2014 My New Roots 

Post 4 content Does anyone out there latch onto a food and become totally obsessed with it? Do you find it making its way into almost everything you make? Lately, Ive been riding the buckwheat wagon hard. And although I am not so much into food trends, I predict that buckwheat is going to be the new hotness. You heard it here first.

post2

August 5 2014 My New Roots 

Post 2 content Does anyone out there latch onto a food and become totally obsessed with it? Do you find it making its way into almost everything you make? Lately, Ive been riding the buckwheat wagon hard. And although I am not so much into food trends, I predict that buckwheat is going to be the new hotness. You heard it here first.

The Life Changing Crackers

July 31 2014 My New Roots 

The Life Changing Crackers The funny thing about writing a blog, is that I never know how popular my recipes will be. Often, I think I have a real zinger and no one really seems to appreciate it on the same level as I do. Then I post something rather simple and everyone goes nuts about it. Curious. You can imagine then, that when I posted The Life Changing Loaf of Bread, how incredibly shocked I was at the response. Although I was pretty confident that I had a winning recipe, I never expected the explosive reaction that it got. After checking up on it today, the post has over 1,200 comments. WHAT?! That is insane. And thank you. Im so glad it changed your life too. In the spirit of recipes that shake up our routine, I thought I would introduce you to the very same one all over again. Thats right. The same recipe with a new method to make the most life-changing crackers you have ever tasted. The story goes like this: it was the night before a long trip, and I knew that I needed to make some food to take with me on the journey. I didnt have a lot on hand, nor did I have a lot of time. Searching through the cupboards I realized I had almost everything to make The Life Changing Loaf of Bread, but because I was traveling with it, I wanted it to be a little more transportation-friendly (nothing like biting into an entire loaf of bread on an airplane to make you look like a total kook). A light bulb moment: what if I made the dough and just flattened it out like a cracker? It was just crazy enough to work! Crispy, crunchy, flaky, seedy, and so tasty, this crispbread that is my new go-to for every meal of the day, and snacking in between. The wonderful thing about the Life Changing Cracker recipe is that you can customize the flavours by adding different gourmet ingredients. You can take them to sweet or savoury town. You can throw in some superfoods if you like, or just stick to the plain, yet delicious base recipe. I love dividing up the dough and creating multiple kinds of crackers all in the same batch. I made two different versions last time: Rosemary, GarlicSmoked Sea Salt, and Fig, Anise & Black Pepper. Both were totally delicious and worked well with dips, spreads, and cheese. I also really enjoyed them on their own, totally unadorned. Because I loved these combos so much, I’ll give you the recipes for them below – just remember that they are for half a batch of dough respectively. The Life Changing Crackers can be made into any shape you like too, so get creative. Use cookie cutters, biscuit cutters, pasta or pastry cutters if you have them. A simple knife works too. And if you like things rustic bake the whole tray until crisp, then break them up in free form pieces before storing them. And to remind you of why this recipe is so awesome and life changing, I repeat: The Life-Changing Crackers are made with whole grain oats (choose gluten-free if necessary), and seeds. They are high in protein and high in fiber. They are completely vegan. Everything gets soaked for optimal nutrition and digestion. They are easy to make, require no special equipment and are pretty darn hard to mess up. Even if you have never made the Life Changing Loaf of Bread before, youll be a pro at making these crackers.        Print recipe     The Life-Changing Crackers Makes 2 baking sheets of crispbread Ingredients: 1 cup /­ 135g sunflower seeds 1/­2 cup /­ 90g flax seeds 1/­3 cup /­ 50g pumpkin seeds 1/­4 cup /­40g sesame seeds 1 1/­2 cups /­ 150g rolled oats 2 Tbsp. chia seeds 4 Tbsp. psyllium seed husks (3 Tbsp. if using psyllium husk powder) 1 1/­2 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 Tbsp. maple syrup (for sugar-free diets, use a pinch of stevia) 3 Tbsp. melted coconut oil or ghee 1 1/­2 cups /­ 350ml water Rosemary, Garlic and Smoked Salt Half batch: 2 Tbsp. chopped fresh rosemary 1/­4 – 1/­2 tsp. garlic powder (depending on how strong you like it) smoked sea salt, to taste Fig, Anise and Black Pepper Half batch: 3 large dried figs (approx. 70g) 1 tsp. anise seed 1 tsp. cracked black pepper Directions: 1. In a large bowl combine all dry ingredients, stirring well. Whisk maple syrup, oil and water together in a measuring cup. Add this to the dry ingredients and mix very well until everything is completely soaked and dough becomes very thick (if the dough is too thick to stir, add one or two teaspoons of water until the dough is manageable). Divide the dough roughly in half, and set aside one half. 2. Place one half of the dough back into the bowl and add any flavouring you like. Gather into a ball and place it between two sheets of baking paper. Using a rolling pin, firmly roll out into a thin sheet. Remove top layer of baking paper and using the tip of a knife, score the dough into shapes you like (I chose large rectangles but its up to you). Repeat with remaining half of dough. Let sit out on the counter for at least 2 hours, or all day or overnight. 3. Preheat oven to 350°F /­ 175°C. Using the baking paper, slide the dough onto a cookie sheet and bake for 20 minutes. Remove cookie sheet from oven, flip the whole cracker over (if it breaks a bit, dont worry!) and peel the baking paper off of the back. Return to oven to bake for another 10 minutes, until fully dry, crisp, and golden around the edges. 4. Let cool completely, then break crackers along their scored lines and store in an airtight container for up to 3 weeks.   Show me your crackers on Instagram: #lifechangingcrackers  

Early Summer Abundance Bowl

July 6 2014 My New Roots 

Early Summer Abundance Bowl Keep it simple. Use what you have. Make it work. Ive been staring at these three ideas for the past few hours. In between breastfeeding my baby, laundry, trying to make food for myself, emails, brushing my teeth and changing a couple diapers, Ive been back and forth to my computer unsuccessfully getting any further with this post. Then I read it again and realized that the advice that I was trying to give all of you out there was precisely what I needed to hear myself. My days are so different than they used to be. Instead of being able to play in the kitchen from dawn until way past dusk, Im playing with my sweet baby. Instead of making food for all of you to recreate Im making food for us. Unremarkable, perhaps, but there is a turning inwards, a quiet and simplicity that Im cultivating, or at least trying to. It isnt glamorous and most of it isnt worth blogging, but its real life. And I am very grateful for it. Needless to say, meals have been simple and Abundance Bowls have been abundant. Ive been cooking grains and beans in bulk to use for later, then tossing whatever fresh veggies I have on hand into the mix. If I can bend time and squeak out five or ten minutes worth of creativity, a sauce happens, or maybe a quick pickled condiment. All of a sudden, a pretty boss bowl of tasty, healthy food sits before me and I feel like the luckiest person in the world, living in true abundance. That is what the Abundance Bowl is all about. Keeping it simple. Using what you have. Making it work. And I guess feeling that kind of overwhelming gratitude doesnt hurt either. Here we are in the first breaths of true summer. My little family and I are back in Canada for the next little while and it feels amazing to be home. The sun is bright and the river is crisp, gardens everywhere are bursting with fresh food. The Early Summer Abundance bowl celebrates all of it, along with the feeling of luckiness that always pervades my thinking this time of year, as we begin to reap the benefits of the season. I chose freekeh in this edition, a roasted, immature wheat that tastes deep and rich and is the perfect counterpoint to sweet, young beetroots, earthy radishes and vibrant sprouts. The grain is harvested while still young and soft, then roasted or sun-dried. The health bonus of harvesting immature wheat is that it retains more of its nutrients and proteins than its fully-grown counterparts. It even claims to have fewer carbohydrates than regular wheat because its young. It surprisingly has more dietary fiber content than brown rice, plus more calcium, iron, and potassium content. You can find freekeh at Middle Eastern grocery stores and increasingly at natural and gourmet food shops. Sometimes it is referred to and sold as Green Wheat. If you have never tried freekeh before, get ready to freak out. Its seriously amazing stuff! It cooks up like any other grain, keeps very well in the fridge and can be enjoyed hot or cold. I love it in salads, especially with lots of garlic, olive oil and lemon to balance the smoky flavour. As I was after a sort of Middle Eastern flavour profile, I chose to make a harissa-spiked chutney with spring onion and dates, which is altogether scrumptious. Leftovers of this are excellent smeared on toast with poached eggs for breakfast, accompanying roast veggies or in an avocado sandwich. The colour isnt very sexy, but the flavour is oh-my-goodness delicious. And to really take this Abundance Bowl to the next level, I may have put a little seared halloumi cheese in there. Maybe. Oh I totally did.     Print recipe     Early Summer Abundance Bowl Serves 3-4 Ingredients: 1 cup /­ 175g freekeh 1 tsp. sea salt 1/­2 block Halloumi cheese (about 125g /­ 4.5oz) 2 medium yellow beets (red beets will work too) 1 small bunch radishes a few handfuls of fresh sprouts (I used sprouted black lentil) juice of 1/­2 lemon handful fresh mint leaves cold-pressed olive oil for garnish 1 batch Spring Onion Harissa Chutney (recipe below) Directions: 1. Place the freekeh into a saucepan and cover with water. Swirl water and rub the grains together vigorously to wash them. Drain and repeat until the water is clear. Add 2 cups water and a couple pinches sea salt. Bring to a boil, cover, and simmer until the water is completely absorbed (about 15 minutes for cracked grain and 45 minutes for whole grain). Remove from heat and drizzle with a little olive oil, stir to combine. Set aside. 2. While the freekeh is cooking, prepare the vegetables. Peel the beets and slice very thinly with a mandoline or your excellent knife skills. Place in a bowl with a drizzle of olive oil, lemon juice, and a few pinches of salt. Roughly chop mint and fold to combine. Slice radishes. 3. Slice the halloumi and place on a grill pan or dry skillet over high heat. Cook until golden on the underside, then flip. 4. To assemble, place about 1/­4 of the cooked freekeh in each of the bowls. Add a few slices of grilled halloumi, a handful of sliced beets, a couple radishes, a large handful of sprouts, and a generous dollop of the Spring Onion Harissa Chutney. Serve immediately and enjoy. Spring Onion Harissa Chutney Makes about 2 cups Ingredients: 2 large bunches /­ 400g /­ scant 1 lb. spring onion (equals roughly 6 cups chopped) knob of coconut oil or ghee pinch of sea salt 1/­2 -1 Tbsp. harissa paste (depending on how hot you like it) 1-2 large dates, preferably Medjool, pitted 3 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 3 Tbsp. lemon juice Directions: 1. Wash and roughly chop spring onions, including the green tops. Melt a knob of coconut oil or ghee in a skillet over medium heat. Add spring onions and a pinch of salt. Stir to coat and cook until the onions are softened and sweet, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat. 2. In a food processor, roughly chop pitted dates. Add the spring onions, harissa, olive oil and lemon juice. Blend on high until the mixture is creamy, but still a little chunky. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. Store leftovers in a tightly sealed glass container in the fridge for up to five days. As for those of you asking about the Potluck Picnic in Toronto, I have made the difficult decision to skip it this year. There are so many things going on in my life (all positive!) but in the name of keeping things simple and quiet, I am honoring the commitment I made to myself to focus my energy on my family at this time. I so much appreciate your enthusiasm, and also your understanding. And of course I look forward to resuming the event next summer! Show me your Abundance Bowls on Instagram: #earlysummerabundancebowl

Raw Bounty Bars

June 11 2014 My New Roots 

Raw Bounty Bars Oh how times change. If you were to hand me a Bounty Bar 20 years ago, I would have looked at you like you had gone coconuts (ahem, sorry). Bounty Bars were sick-a-tating, and most certainly on the bottom rung of the candy ladder because coconut was a vegetable in my mind and therefore decidedly not edible even when smothered in chocolate. I dont know when I came to my senses, discovered that coconut was in fact a not vegetable, and also totally delicious. These days, Ill go so far to say that I dont know what my life would be like without dear coconut around, as I likely employ one or more of its products on a daily basis. You can imagine then, that being in Bali was quite a gas for me, as its dripping with coconuts, quite literally. I loved being able to get fresh coconut water every morning; mammoth orbs heavy with well over a liter of liquid gold, for under a dollar. Freshly shredded coconut at the market, coconut palm sugar by the bagful, young coconut flesh blended in smoothies... it was the business! One of the highlights of the trip was visiting Big Tree Farms -  a place where they make incredible coconut  products among other things, such as raw cacao and sea salt. As Ive been using their delicious coconut palm sugar for a while now, it was pretty amazing to see where the magic happens and meet the sweet people behind the sweetness. I was also introduced to a new product: coconut nectar! A gorgeous, full-flavoured syrup that looks a lot like honey, but with a citric, smoky flavour that surprised and delighted me. Coconut Nectar of the Gods Coconut nectar, and the coconut palm sugar that is made from it, have been produced and enjoyed for over 6,000 years. In fact, the first documented sweeteners ever used are that from coconut palms (Coco Nucifera). Coconut nectar is made by harvesting the sap from the coconut palm blossom, which is collected twice daily by the farmers at Big Tree. They climb up each trunk in the morning, remove the vessel full of sap, slice the very tip off of each flower bundle and place an empty vessel underneath it to collect sap until the evening when they will repeat the process. The sap is then boiled down to remove all the water it naturally contains, leaving a thick, caramel-like syrup, which can then be cooled and bottled.  To make coconut sugar, that same syrup is cooled and then rubbed, creating granules of the delectable coconut sugar that I love so much. You can watch a very cool video about the whole tree to table process, here. Coconut nectar is high in minerals, such as potassium, magnesium, zinc and iron. It is happily low glycemic, ranking 35 on the GI scale, compared to agave at 42, honey at 55, cane sugar at 68. This is due to coconut sugars composition of long-chain saccharides, which are absorbed by the body at a slower rate than something like refined white sugar. Coconut sugar also contains amino acids, which are thought to slow down the rate at which the sugar is absorbed into the bloodstream, acting as a buffer of sorts. You can read more about Big Tree Farms Coconut Nectar and Palm Sugar nutrition here. After visiting Big Tree, I was feeling creative and hungry for chocolate. I decided to get my Willy Wonka on and recreate a favourite treat to pay homage to my coconut adventures, and also because, lets face it, Bounty Bars are delicious. This is my (nearly) raw version of the classic candy, a very easy and scrumptious translation using simple ingredients. They are totally rich and coconut-y, just like the real thing, but way better because they taste real – not like science. The chocolate is smooth, rich and decadent, and the filling is extra coconut-y due to the virgin coconut oil I use. If you have a good-quality virgin coconut oil, I suggest employing it here, as you want to emphasize the coconut flavour. This is one of the few times I use virgin coconut oil, as I usually dont want everything tasting of the tropics, but in this case I definitely do. If you dont have any, regular coconut oil is fine. And if you dont have any coconut nectar not to worry - substitute it with honey or maple syrup and the results should be almost the same. These should be stored in the freezer, especially in the height of summer when the chocolate can melt in the heat. Plus, biting into one of these is quite refreshing when the 4 oclock summer sun hits and you need something sweet to rouse you from your nap. These are also really fun to make - who doesnt love a good candy project? Get your kids involved, get your friends into it, and create some candy bars that you actually wont want to share with anyone who has helped you. Youve been warned.     Print recipe     Raw Bounty Bars Makes 12 candy bars Coconut Filling 2 cups /­­ 175g unsweetened desiccated coconut 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml coconut oil, melted (virgin coconut oil if you have it) 2 Tbsp. coconut nectar (substitute with honey or maple syrup) 1-2 Tbsp. raw honey or maple syrup (depending on how sweet you like it – you can also use coconut nectar) 1/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 vanilla bean, seeds scraped 1 Tbsp. water Raw Chocolate 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60 ml melted coconut oil 2 Tbsp. /­­ 30ml melted cacao butter 1/­­3 cup /­­ 30g raw cacao powder 1/­­4 cup raw honey a couple pinches salt, to taste Directions: - In a double boiler (or a glass bowl over a pot of simmering water) melt coconut oil. Remove from heat and add coconut nectar, honey, sea salt and vanilla seeds, whisk to combine. Set aside. - Place coconut in a large bowl and sprinkle the tablespoon of water over top, stir well. Pour the coconut oil mixture over and fold to combine, using your hands if necessary. Taste for sweetness and adjust if necessary. - Line a 7×7 (18x18cm) baking pan with plastic wrap, leaving plenty of extra to hang over the sides. Press the coconut mixture firmly into place, especially around the edges. (If you dont have a baking pan, just use the plastic wrap as an edge, pulling it up around the open ends, pressing firmly to ensure it is compact.) Wrap edges around coconut and place in the freezer to firm, at least 30 minutes, up while you make the chocolate. - In a double boiler (or a glass bowl over a pot of simmering water) melt coconut oil and cacao butter. Add honey and whisk to combine. When completely uniform, remove from heat and sift in cacao, and add sea salt. Taste for sweetness and saltiness, and adjust accordingly. - On an open work surface, place a piece of parchment paper underneath a cooling wrack (and oven wrack will work just fine, but it helps if whatever you choose fits into your freezer). Make space in your freezer for the wrack to fit. - Remove coconut from the freezer, unwrap and cut into 12 bars of equal size. Round off the ends by slicing off the corners if you like (this is just for aesthetic reasons, but its up to you!). One by one, place a coconut bar into the liquid chocolate and turn over a couple times to coat. Remove with a fork, allowing any excess chocolate to drip back into the bowl, then place on the cooling wrack. Repeat with remaining bars. Once all the bars have been done and they  re no longer dripping, place wrack in the freezer for the chocolate to harden, about 15 minutes. Remove from freezer and repeat the process, giving each bar with one more coat of chocolate. Return bars to the freezer. -  If you have any chocolate remaining, remove chocolate bars from the freezer and drizzle it over top in a design that you like (its fun to do with a plastic sandwich bag – simply slice a teeny corner off of one end and pipe chocolate onto the bars). Return to the freezer to firm up completely, at least one hour. Then remove bars from wrack and store in an airtight container in the freezer for up to two months.

Bali Bliss Papaya Salad

May 6 2014 My New Roots 

Bali Bliss Papaya Salad Bali is bliss. Its not hard to believe weve already been here for a couple weeks, as Ive clearly sunken into a new, slower rhythm and just allowing the days to unfold at their languid pace. I havent been this relaxed in...well, I cant even remember when to be honest. It feels amazing to not have a schedule to follow, to not have any major deadlines looming, no calls to answer. Ive had to travel halfway across planet earth to find this solace, but I also dont mind being surrounded by tropical jungle, dazzling green rice fields, rivers, and volcanoes, and sparkling starry skies. Bali has a kind of beauty to it, unlike anything Ive ever experienced before. It is rich, mesmeric, mysterious. Everywhere you go, you are greeted with wafts of burning incense, floral offerings, and the sounds of flowing water. Spirituality and everyday life are intertwined, and god seems to be truly in the details. The food? As wonderful as it is to eat at restaurants (dont do much of that in Copenhagen), Ive actually been cooking a lot. Surprise! Weve rented a house with a rather makeshift, but functioning kitchen, and the one-burner hot plate and I have become well acquainted during my experiments with all of the local produce. My family and I head out around 7am to the morning market, and for pennies fill our bags with all sorts of unusual fruits and veggies, then head home to play with it all. The other groovy thing about where we are staying is the front yard full of fruit trees and coconut palms. There are papaya growing - no, bulging - off of their trunks. Fruit larger then my six-month-old baby (and hes a big boy). The housekeeper picked one for me upon my request and it sat ripening on my counter for a couple days until I knew it was time. Total. Bliss-fest. You couldnt take me to the fanciest restaurant and see me more excited than eating that silly, homegrown papaya. Truly. As much as papaya is perfect all on its own, the flavours around me beg to be enjoyed. This was a simple breakfast I tossed together with fresh ingredients I had just picked up at the market: kaffir lime, ginger, and freshly grated coconut (wow, nothing like it!). It is all together sweet, citric, spicy and rich - a delicious combination for starting your day on the right foot, or maybe an afternoon pick-me-up. Papaya Paradise Party Papaya are buttery, rich, satisfying, and a delicious taste of the tropics, but are available in most grocery stores throughout the year. Papayas contain a cornucopia of nutrients, its most unique being papain. Papain is a digestive enzyme that helps digest proteins, similar to the bromelain found in pineapple. If you take digestive supplements, yours will likely contain papain. Papaya is rich in antioxdants, such as carotenes, vitamin C and flavanoids, folic and pantothenic acid, as well as the minerals copper, potassium and magnesium. These nutrients all add up to major cardiovascular protection, due to their ability to prevent the oxidation of cholesterol. Papayas vitamins, minerals and antioxidants also provide immune support, promote digestive health, and protect against macular degeneration and rheumatoid arthritis. Much like bananas, papaya contains a substance called chitinase, which is associated with the latex-fruit allergy syndrome. If you have a latex allergy, you should avoid eating papaya (and banana too). If you cannot find kaffir limes, regular lime would be fine of course. Kaffir limes tend to be smaller, so if you are using regular lime, just one would likely be enough for the recipe below. And if you cant get yourself to a Balinese market and have someone grind your coconut for you this morning, no worries, just use shredded desiccated coconut in its place. You can even lightly toast it if your heart desires. The recipe for this salad is rather loose. Ive added some rough measurements, but the dressing here depends greatly on the size of your papaya, so just use the ingredients below as a guideline and make the dish to suit your taste. If you like a more citric flavour, go heavy on the limejuice; if you like it spicy, add more ginger, etc. I also drizzled in some local virgin coconut oil, which had the most incredible coconut taste, but this is entirely up to you. Keep in mind that the fat in the coconut and coconut oil will only help in absorbing the carotenes in the papaya.       Print recipe     Bali Bliss Papaya Salad Serves 2-4 Ingredients: 1 large papaya (mine was approx. 2lbs /­­ 1kg) 1/­­2 cup freshly grated or unsweetened desiccated coconut 1-2 organic limes 2-3 tsp. finely minced ginger, to taste pinch sea salt 2 tsp. honey, to taste (or any liquid sweetener) 1 Tbsp. virgin coconut oil, melted (optional) Directions: 1. Rinse the papaya well. Slice through the entire fruit lengthwise, the scoop out the seeds. Cut off both ends from each half. Stand one of the halves on its flat end and slice off the skin starting at the top and running down to the base. Repeat with other half. Next slice the papaya across into 1-inch sections, and then into 1-inch cubes. Place in a large bowl. 2. Rinse the lime and zest it with a microplane or box grater on the finest setting. Whisk together the ginger, lime zest, lime juice, honey, and salt. Add the coconut oil, if desired. Pour dressing over the papaya just before serving, add desiccated coconut, and fold gently to combine. Enjoy immediately. I served the salad with some sliced bananas on the side, and garnished with lime halves.  This salad is just a little warm-up here - I thought a slow work up to the more complicated and technique-intensive dishes I plan on making would be best. For now, its time to just relax and enjoy the simple and blissful flavours of Bali, unwind, breathe. Find a corner of your home to curl up with this dish, light a stick of incense and drift away on a papaya cloud...Ill meet you in paradise.

The Spring Abundance Bowl

April 11 2014 My New Roots 

The Spring Abundance Bowl Hey guys, its spring. I go for a walk in the forest everyday with my little babe. Even though hes too young to even know he has feet, I still take time to point out the buds growing on branches, cherry blossoms opening, and explain how the earth is waking up from its wintry slumber. I think that this year, more than ever, Ive relished the unfolding of this season because I am seeing it for the first time in so many ways. Its pretty cool stuff. Ive been looking forward to this post for a very long time now. Since I wrote about eating simply and not trying to impress everyone all the time, the idea of Abundance Bowls has really got me jazzed. And you too, as I take it. It seems like we are all hungry for realistic eating these days, and to me that means fast, fresh, and flexible. This Abundance Bowl, like the last one I posted, is just that, taking advantage of seasonal produce and the fresh flavours of now. Living in the moment, and eating in the moment go hand in hand after all. Pretty Peas I think peas are a rather underestimated vegetable, considering they are veritable storehouses of essential vitamins and minerals. Thats right. A measly 1/­­2 -cup serving provides more than 20 percent of the RDA for vitamin C, vitamin K and manganese! True! Peas are a also good source of iron, folate, vitamin B1, phosphorous, magnesium, potassium, and copper. Youll be getting a serious dose of soluble fiber too, which helps lower cholesterol and control blood sugar. Peas offer up some heart-healthy vegetarian protein, providing a whopping 9 grams per cup. They are not a complete protein however, so make sure to combine them with a whole grain, like quinoa as Ive done here, to ensure you are getting the complete essential amino acid profile. If I can find fresh peas in their pods, I like to shell them and eat them raw. If you prefer to steam them, do so right in the pot of quinoa. Simply place them on top of the quinoa about 3-4 minutes before it’s finished steaming, cover again with the lid until they are tender. So easy! If you can only find frozen peas, place them in the pot of quinoa about halfway through cooking the quinoa so that they thaw and cook – this shouldn’t take more than 8-10 minutes. Frozen peas contain about 10-15% fewer vitamins than their fresh counterparts, which isn’t too bad for such a convenient food! If frozen peas are all that is available to you, use them anyway – they are still super good for you. If the last Abundance Bowl proved anything to me, its that you people really love sauce. For reals. Well, heres a simple one Ive been digging lately: a garlicky-dilly-creamy yogurt sauce that compliments peas and asparagus like nobodys business. Ive also been drizzling it over crisp greens, sprouts, various grains and open-faced sandwiches. If youre not into dairy yogurt, soak some cashews and blend them up instead, the results will still be delectable. The other accoutrement in this sublime springtime bowl of mine, is Quick Pickled Radishes. I think its essential to have an acidic hit in all recipes, whether its a squeeze of fresh lemon juice or a handful of brine-y capers, so these zesty pink medallions definitely fit the bill. I love the spiciness of radishes, but find that they can be slightly overwhelming raw. When pickled, they still have bite, but its more vinegar-y than earthy. These are delicious on sandwiches with creamy avocado, with eggs in the morning, tucked into tacos and folded into salads. I like to pile them up on the side of whatever Im eating and ceremoniously add them to each bite. The very easy recipe below makes more than youll need for four servings of The Spring Abundance Bowl, so enjoy discovering the yumminess they bring to all sorts of meals. And if you dont have a particular ingredient on hand, or if youre just not into one of them, improvise! Think of the recipe here as a guideline and put your own spin on it.     Print recipe     Spring Abundance Bowl Serves 4 1 cup quinoa, soaked if possible 1 tsp. sea salt 1 bunch asparagus (approx. 20 spears) 2 cups shelled peas (frozen are fine if it’s what is available to you) 2 spring onion 1-2 ripe avocado(s) sprouts of your choice (I chose pea sprouts, but any kind will work) 1 organic lemon 1 batch Yogurt-Dill Dressing (recipe below) 1 batch Quick-pickled Radish (recipe below) Directions: 1. Rinse quinoa well, drain and add to a pot with 1 3/­­4 cup water (2 cups if not soaked) and salt. Bring to a boil, cover and reduce to simmer until water is absorbed, 15-20 minutes. Zest 1 lemon into the pot, fluff with a fork and set aside. 2. While the quinoa is cooking, prep the vegetables. Grill or steam the asparagus. Shell the peas (if you want to steam them, add them to the pot of quinoa 3-4 minutes before cooking time is up). Slice avocado and spring onion. Make dressing. 3. To serve, place 1/­­4 of the cooked quinoa in a large bowl, add all veggies as desired, including the pickled radish, drizzle with dressing and a squeeze lemon juice. Season to taste. Enjoy. Not sure how to cook quinoa? Check out my video, here. Yogurt-Dill Dressing Makes about 1 cup Ingredients: 2/­­3 cup /­­ 150ml goat or sheep yogurt 1 clove garlic, finely minced (use a microplane for best results) 3 Tbsp. chopped fresh dill (or 1 Tbsp. dried) 1 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1 tsp. liquid honey or maple syrup a few pinches sea salt water to thin as necessary Directions: 1. Whisk all ingredients together and add water to thin to desired consistency. Season to taste. Store leftovers in the fridge for 3 days. Quick Pickled Radishes Makes a full 1-liter jar Ingredients: 1 lb. /­­ 500g radishes 1 cup apple cider vinegar 1 cup water 3 cloves garlic 2 tsp. maple syrup or liquid honey 2 tsp. sea salt 1 tsp. black peppercorns 1 liter (4-cup) jar with tight fitting lid Directions: 1. Remove the stem end of radishes, and slice them into very thin pieces. Set aside. 2. In a measuring cup, combine vinegar, water, maple syrup, and salt. Stir well to dissolve salt. 3. Place a handful of radish at the bottom of the jar and add a few peppercorns and one clove of garlic. Continue to stack the radishes, peppercorns and garlic until youve reached the top of the jar. Pour the liquid over, completely covering the contents of the jar, discarding any leftovers. Place an airtight lid on the jar, and place in the fridge. Can be enjoyed 24 hours later, for up to three weeks. I hope youre all enjoying the warmer weather, longer days and brighter light as much as I am. Gosh, its good to see green all around again, in the forest, in the field and on the table. Lets celebrate the abundance of spring and be grateful for everything that lies ahead! We made it! Wahoooooo! *   *   *   *   *   * Show me your bowls on Instagram: #springabundancebowl

Chilled Chocolate Espresso Torte with Toasted Hazelnut Crust, from Oh She Glows

March 18 2014 My New Roots 

Chilled Chocolate Espresso Torte with Toasted Hazelnut Crust, from Oh She Glows Yes, more chocolate. “Oops”. Ill explain. I recently received an email from the lovely Angela Liddon of Oh She Glows genius, asking me if Id like to take a look at her just-released cookbook. It was not surprising to discover a world of truly spectacular and inspiring vegan recipes, just like on her blog, so when she asked me if I would like to post a recipe from the book here on My New Roots, of course I jumped at the chance. Although there were countless delicious-looking dishes to choose from, one dessert really stood out to me: the Chocolate Torte with Toasted Hazelnut Crust. Guh. Hold me back. I am a tired mummy with a very apparent chocolate predilection, so please find it in your heart to forgive me, please? I know, that was a hard one. Angelas creativity and culinary prowess really comes through in this dessert. Instead of dairy products, the luxuriously smooth and rich chocolate torte uses cashews to mimic cream, and geniusly doubles as freezer fudge if you are not in the mood to make crust, as she puts it. It is incredibly chocolaty and decadent, using only maple syrup as a sweetener. And although I have never been a coffee drinker, I do appreciate the taste of coffee, and the flavour of it in this dessert is actually very subtle, functioning more as an enhancer of the chocolate. Im all for that. If you do not want to use espresso, its fine to leave it out. Just a plain chocolate version of this would be divine. This dessert is fantastic. Like, seriously. If you make it for a group of people, you will have friends for life, and if you make it for yourself you will be enjoying slivers of silky smooth chocolate bliss for a days on end. Because you store the torte in the freezer and take it out just before serving, you can keep it for a very long time, providing you can exercise some serious restraint. I was able to ration this thing out over a couple weeks (see friends, I do have some self-control). If you dont have a high-speed blender, this recipe will still work and be delicious, but the filling will not be as smooth as if you use something like a Vitamix or Blendtec.     Print recipe     Chilled Chocolate Espresso Torte with Toasted Hazelnut Crust Makes 1 (9-inch /­­ 23-cm) torte; serves 8-14 For the crust: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 100g hazelnuts 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml coconut oil 3 Tbsp. maple syrup 1/­­4 tsp. fine-grain sea salt 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 150g rolled oats, divided, gluten-free if necessary For the filling: 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 200g cashews, soaked for at least 4 hours 3/­­4  cup /­­ 175 ml pure maple syrup 1/­­2  cup /­­ 125 ml coconut oil 1/­­3 cup /­­ 30g cocoa powder (I used raw cacao powder) 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75 ml dark chocolate chips, melted (I used chopped dark chocolate) 2 tsp. pure vanilla extract  (I used seeds of 1/­­2 vanilla bean) 1/­­2 tsp. fine-grain sea salt 1/­­2 tsp. espresso powder (optional) shaved dark chocolate, for garnish (optional) coconut flakes, for garnish (optional) Directions: 1. Make the Crust: Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). Lightly grease a 9-inch (23 cm) pie dish with coconut oil. 2. In a food processor, blend 1/­­2 cup of the rolled oats on high until you have a rough flour, place a small bowl and set aside. Without cleaning the machine, process the hazelnuts into a fine crumb with the texture of sand. Add the coconut oil, maple syrup, salt, and oat flour and process again until the dough comes together. Finally, add the remaining 1 cup of rolled oats and pulse until the oats are chopped, but still have some texture to them. The dough should stick together slightly when pressed between your fingers. If it doesnt, try adding a bit more maple syrup or processing a bit longer. 3. With your fingers, crumble the dough evenly over the base of the pie dish. Starting from the middle, press the mixture firmly and evenly into the dish, moving outward and upward along the side of the pie dish. The harder you press the crumbs into the dish, the better the crust will hold together. Poke a few fork holes into the bottom to let steam escape. 4. Bake the crust, uncovered, for 10 to 13 minutes, until lightly golden. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool on a rack for 15 to 20 minutes. 5. Make the filling: Drain and rinse the cashews. In a high-speed blender, combine the soaked cashews, maple syrup, oil, cocoa powder, melted chocolate, vanilla, salt, and espresso powder (if using) and blend on high until the filling is completely smooth. It can take a few minutes of blending to get it smooth, depending on your blender. If the blender needs more liquid to get it going, add a tablespoon (15 mL) of almond milk (or a bit more) to help it along. 6. Pour the filling into the prepared crust, smoothing out the top evenly. Garnish with shaved chocolate and/­­or coconut flakes, if desired. 7. Place the pie dish on an even surface in the freezer, uncovered. Freeze for a couple of hours, and then cover the dish with foil and freeze overnight, or for a minimum of 4 to 6 hours, until the pie sets. 8. Remove the pie from the freezer and let it sit on the counter for 10 minutes before slicing. This pie is meant to be served frozen. Serve with Sarahs Simple Cashew Cream (recipe below) and finely chopped chocolate, if desired, but its fantastic all on its own, too. Wrap leftover slices individually in foil and store them in an airtight container in the freezer for 1 to 1 1/­­2 weeks. Tip: Not in the mood to make a crust? Turn this dessert into freezer fudge by preparing only the chocolate filling. Pour the filling into an 8-inch (20-cm) square pan lined with plastic wrap; top with 1/­­2 cup /­­ 65g toasted hazelnuts or walnuts, and freeze until solid (about 2 hours). Slice into squares and enjoy straight from the freezer. Sarahs Simple Cashew Cream Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup cashews, soaked for at least 4 hours 3 Tbsp. maple syrup 4 Tbsp. water a couple pinches sea salt Directions: 1. Soak cashews. Drain and rinse. 2. Place all ingredients in a high-speed blender (like a Vitamix) and blend on high until completely smooth. Salt and/­­or sweeten to taste. Store in the fridge. Huge thanks to Angela for blessing us with not only this incredible recipe, but an entire book filled with vegan delights that will inspire anyone who picks up a copy. Her warmth, wisdom and kitchen creativity shines through on every page, showing us all that healthy food can be astoundingly delicious! Get your copy of the Oh She Glows cookbook here.

Sweet Pea & Pearl Onion Pesto Smothered Zucchini Noodles

February 19 2014 My New Roots 

Sweet Pea & Pearl Onion Pesto Smothered Zucchini Noodles I have such a special treat for you today. Since I am in the final stretch of writing my manuscript (!!!), Ive asked Julie from the Alkaline Sisters to take over this week. Shes created a gorgeous spring recipe for all of you who really need a bite of brightness (I figure that is anyone who has survived the polar vortex, am I right?). I’ve been a fan of Julie’s site for a long time now, but we met in person for the first time last summer and the serendipitous sparks flew! We’ve been online pals ever since. She is an expert on achieving alkalinity, and Ive asked her to give us the low-down on this very topic. After curing her own health issues with an alkaline diet, she is sharing her inspiring journey and culinary creations on her beautiful blog. She also has a book in the works and I know it is going to be absolutely amazing! Can’t wait. I will be back very soon, but in the meantime lets all sit back and learn something from this very wise woman. Thank you Julie, for sharing your knowledge with us! What a blessing. *   *   *   *   *   * I’m so pleased that I could support Sarah by sharing a recipe with you today as she nears completion of her book.  I can only imagine the juggling that is happening as she cares for her wee babe in between wielding her heavy camera and cooking up some tasty business to style and photograph, not to mention the writing required to explain the recipe.  Lord knows I understand the process since I just recently handed my cook book manuscript in to my publisher, phew! When we had lunch last summer we realized that we were both working with the same publisher, what are the chances of that?  We’ve both been feverishly working away on our cook books but I certainly didn’t give birth to a newborn baby as I worked thru the chapters of my book!  I swear Sarah has somehow acquired super powers as she’s hardly missed a beat here on the blog!  She’s managed to continually inspire you and I with a fabulous new recipe pretty much every week since she started the book, save for popping out a beautiful baby boy!  That’s more than I can attribute to since I took a bit of a hiatus from my blog to work on my book while caring for my family of 4, trying to stay sane and enjoy the journey. So here I am, happily giving her a bit of relief so she can wrap up the final details of her book. Now she can focus, take good care of her precious family, knowing that you are inspired for yet another week. So lets do this:) With Spring making it’s way here I can’t wait to begin tasting the seasonal flavours that I have missed since last year.  Sweet green peas always make me think of brighter sunnier days and the bursting greens of budding trees.  I may be jumping the gun on the spring pea season here, just a little, hehe but you’ll be glad I did if you are a fan of sweet peas!  I’m cheating with frozen peas so please forgive me for my enthusiasm with the lead up to my favourite time of year.  Because my horoscope is Aries, I come by it honestly:) This tasty dish is a little bit raw and a little bit cooked, keeping as many nutrients in tact as possible. It’s kind of a nice combo for this in between time of year. And guess what? It’s alkalizing too....well of course!   This Alkaline Sister here is happy to inspire you with a recipe that will help you balance your alkalinity.  (If you are keen for a wee bit more information about the alkaline lifestyle read on below the recipe.) This is a quick and easy recipe to pull together, even for lunch. The pea pesto is made with a generous portion of peas that are action packed with phytonutrients that provide us with key antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits. Peas also contain an impressive amount of health promoting omega-3 fats in the form of alpha-linolenic acid or ALA as well as omega-6 fats called linolenic acids.  One cup has about 30 milligrams of omega-3 and 130 milligrams of omega-6.  As for protein and fibre, green peas pack about 8-10 grams per cup.  These two macronutrients keep your blood sugar levels well regulated since they support the break down of the natural sugars and carbohydrates as they pass through your digestive track. Once thought of as being a starchy vegetable peas are proving to be much more than that. They are effective in lowering our risk of chronic health issues related to inflammation.  And studies show that inflammation is at the root of most health issues, so eat your peas!  While you’re at it, eat your zucchini and some onions too!  All of these alkalizing vegetables in this recipe provide the body with beneficial cancer-preventive nutrients.  You can’t go wrong here so give this recipe a whirl and see how you like it.     Print recipe     Sweet Pea & Pearl Onion Pesto smothered Zucchini Noodles Makes 1 large serving or 2 servings as a light lunch or as a side dish Ingredients: 2  6″ zucchinis, julienned or spiral cut, preferably organic 24 fresh pearl onions, peeled (substitute frozen if need be) 2 cups organic frozen peas 3 tbsp fresh mint, roughly chopped 1/­­4 cup extra virgin olive oil 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice 1/­­2 tsp maple syrup or 3 drops liquid stevia pinch himalayan salt or good sea salt freshly ground black pepper Directions: 1. Using a spiral noodle slicer or a julienne peeler make your noodles from the zucchinis.  Place in a medium sized bowl and set aside. 2. Place the pearl onions in a covered steamer basket over boiling water and steam for 8-10 mins till layers just begin to separate and they appear translucent. (If using frozen pearl onions your steam time will be a little less). Add frozen peas and steam for 2 minutes longer, stirring at the one minute mark to ensure even cooking. 3. Remove from heat and pour half the mixture into a small bowl and the other half into your food processor–be sure to divide the onions evenly. 4. To the food processor, add the olive oil, lemon juice, mint, salt, pepper and maple syrup. Process until creamy but not completely smooth, leaving a little texture. 5. Now lets put it altogether.  Pour the creamy pea and onion pesto over the noodles, scraping the bowl clean with a spatula.  Using two forks toss the noodles well to coat. Transfer to serving dish or divide into two bowls.  Top with remaining steamed peas and pearl onions. Garnish your bowl(s) with fresh mint and freshly ground pepper. Enjoy:) Note: This is yummy as is, with the mildly warm pea and onion pesto but it’s also delish at room temperature.  If this dish stands for more than two hours the zucchini will release some of it’s juices and become a little more tender. It’s still quite tasty this way but is best if eaten within one hour.  Store the pesto separate from the noodles if you are making it ahead. And...if you share this dish between 2 servings maybe top it with some sliced avocado to round it out a little more. Enjoy:) Thank you kindly Sarah, for trusting me to share a nourishing alkaline recipe with your treasured readers that you take such good care of.  It’s been an honour and I am grateful for the opportunity to share my alkaline message with your loyal followers. Here’s an extra special mini lesson on alkalinity and how it can be of benefit to your healthy lifestyle: The most alkaline foods are green and of high water content as in cucumber, celery, broccoli, and greens like kale, chard, romaine etc. Lemons & limes are also highly alkaline once metabolized even though they are acidic outside the body before you ingest them.  This chart shows the degree of alkalinity of many foods to give you a better idea.  On this chart you’ll also notice the list of foods that are acidic and their scores that you can pay attention to with regard to the ratio that you include in your daily meals. Pretty much any food that is a concentrated food with low water content, is highly processed or contains sugar–including fruit, is acidic to the body and should be consumed in approximately a 20-30% daily proportion.  If you are seriously ill this ratio will be more like 0-5%.  Please remember to always consult a medical professional when considering a drastic lifestyle change. Choosing alkaline foods in a  70 to 80% ratio with the balance of acidic foods allows you to  still enjoy some of the wholesome foods you are accustomed to. A visual measurement for each meal or over the period of the day is all that is necessary to maintain a balanced intake of alkaline foods.  No weighing or counting of calories is necessary. And guess what?  By following a highly alkaline lifestyle you’ll discover that a bonus side effect is weight loss or a return to your natural body weight. You may already be very conscientious with your healthy lifestyle but with a bit of tweaking in the alkaline department you might find you have even more energy, fewer colds and any nagging symptoms slowly dissipate. To increase your alkaline foods intake it’s as easy as 1, 2, 3...a,b,c… 1. add a green smoothie to your morning or a green juice 2. add a big salad to your lunch or make it your lunch 3. add a salad and steamed veggies to your dinner And we all know that we need to.... a. drink more water— 3-4 litres of filtered, hopefully alkaline water each day- to flush acids and hydrate the body b. exercise to flush your lymph, blood and tissues of acidic matter c. stay on top of your stress levels and find ways to deal with negative thoughts- meditation, yoga etc. (stress causes acids to form within the body) By slowly adapting your lifestyle and following these basics along with doing a seasonal detox you will keep disease at bay and the cold and flu bugs will leave you for good! Six years ago, with a dramatic shift to this alkaline lifestyle, I resolved the excruciating pain that I was experiencing from a seriously herniated disc that stopped me in my tracks from living my life. This lifestyle shift resulted in a welcome side effect of easily and quickly dropping 40lbs of post baby excess weight that I was struggling with. Our modern diet is often overly acidic even if we consider it to be healthy thus many of us suffer from a myriad of illnesses that are directly related to an overly acidic body.  But the good news is..... that you can turn your health around by flooding the body with alkalinity. A green smoothie cheers to your good, alkaline health Julie the Alkaline Sister

Big Comfy Sweet Potato

January 31 2014 My New Roots 

Big Comfy Sweet Potato Comfort food is different for all of us. For some, its a big bowl of macaroni and cheese, for others, its ice cream and chocolate sauce. Me? Sweet potatoes. For real. There is something so soothing and grounding about digging into one fresh out of the oven, loading it up with ghee, salt and cracked black pepper. Its a simple dinner that saw me through my student years when I was living on a budget, held my hand when I dropped everything and moved across the world to Copenhagen, and continues to show me the love even now. Sweet potatoes are kind of like that favourite, threadbare white t-shirt, or the song I could listen to a thousand times without ever getting sick of it. Total comfort. Well, this time I dressed up that white t-shirt with a cornucopia of yumminess: black beans, avocado, sprouts and my Red Blanket Sauce that will knock your woolen socks off. Its the Big Comfy Sweet Potato and its simple, delicious and I reckon just the kind of thing that will make you feel pretty comfy too. The toppings for the Big Comfy Sweet Potato are up to you. I was digging the cilantro, sprouts and green onion, but you could put all manner of delights into this one, depending on the season and what is available to you. Cherry tomatoes would be great, freshly shucked corn, bell peppers too. These are the perfect clean-out-the-fridge kind of dinner, because as long as you got your sweet potato, you have a blank canvas that will only get better with a little help from some other veggies buddies.     But if you really dont have anything else on hand, the Red Blanket Sauce is killer. Just a plain sweet potato swaddled in this stuff is a proper meal. Super creamy and rich, and delicious draped across so many things - rice, lentils, roast veg - you name it. I tried to do a riff off of mole sauce, but I cant claim to know anything about authentic Mexican cooking, so Im going to avoid the comparison. What I do know, is that it tastes like a thousand layers of spice, herbs, sweet, savoury, tangy, bold, and chocolate-y without being chocolate-y...know what I mean? Guh. I want more. Comfy Digestion with the Sweetest of Potatoes Many people think that sweet potatoes are just regular potatoes that are orange, but they are in fact a completely different vegetable. Compared to regular potatoes, sweet potatoes have oodles more vitamin A (in the form of beta-carotene), vitamin C and even more fiber. This means that sweet potatoes are excellent for your digestion. Sweet potatoes are composed mainly of starch, which is very easy to break down and is soothing for the stomach and intestines too. This makes them an ideal healing choice for those suffering from the pain and inflammation associated with stomach ulcers and irritable bowel syndrome. The roughage of sweet potatoes even prevents constipation. Comfy stuff!     Print recipe     Big Comfy Sweet Potatoes Serves 4 Ingredients: 4 medium-large sweet potatoes (organic, if possible) 1 1/­­2 cups black beans (equivalent to 1 can) 1 ripe avocado Optional toppings: cilantro green onion sprouts lime wedges crumbled goats cheese crushed chili flakes Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F/­­200°C. Prick sweet potatoes a few times with a fork. Place on a baking sheet in the oven and roast for 30-45 minutes, depending on the size of the potato. You will know its done when a knife can easily pierce the skin and the center is soft. 2. Remove sweet potatoes from oven and slice each one down the center, almost through to the bottom. Open up to reveal its orange flesh. 3. Stuff the sweet potato with black beans and top it with avocado, and any other herbs, sprouts or veggies you like. Pour Red Blanket Sauce over the top. Serve and enjoy. To learn how to cook your own black beans, please see my instructions here. Red Blanket Sauce Makes 2 cups Ingredients: knob of coconut oil or ghee 1 medium onion /­­ 150g 3 cloves garlic 1 can whole, organic tomatoes 1 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp. ground cinnamon 1/­­2 tsp. dried thyme 1/­­4 tsp. ground chipotle pinch of cayenne, if desired 1-3 dates (depending on size and your taste) 2 Tbsp. raw cacao powder 1 Tbsp. nut butter or tahini 4 Tbsp. water, divided 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. lime juice Directions: 1. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, melt oil and add all spices. Cook, stirring frequently, until fragrant, about a minute. Add onions, a couple pinches of salt and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and cook another couple minutes. If the pot gets dry at any point, add a little of the tomato juice from the can. 2. Pour canned tomatoes into the pot and cook for 5 minutes. Season to taste. 3. Carefully transfer the tomato mixture to a blender. Add pitted dates, cacao powder, nut butter, lime juice and a couple tablespoons of the water. Blend on high, adding water to thin as needed, until desired consistency is reached. Season to taste. 4. Serve. Store leftovers in the fridge for up to one week. *   *   *   *   *   * Speaking of easy and delicious, if any of you are still in the mood for a simple cleanse, check out my article in the February issue Oprah magazine! I wrote a 4-day detox plan with tasty recipes that are all really easy to make using basic ingredients . If January has passed you by without a little clean-up, now is your chance. The program is also available online, here. I hope you enjoy!  

Found an error?
Help to fix it! Tell it us!



Our sites missing something? Suggest new content or features!



Have you any comments?
Send it us!