Green Kitchen Stories - vegetarian recipes

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Vegetable Hakka Noodles – 1 Pot Indo Chinese Noodles










Green Kitchen Stories vegetarian recipes

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London

June 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London We love yogurt in our family*. The unsweetened, thick, creamy and tangy kind. We enjoy yogurt for breakfast (with fruit) and sometimes dessert (with dates + chocolate + nuts). We top our soups with yogurt, we add it to smoothies and ice pops and we also dress our salads with it (Isac likes to dress himself with it as well). Yogurt works remarkably well both with sweet and savory flavors. And yet, the thought of making a yogurt bowl with savory toppings instead of sweet, had never struck us before. But as we were playing around with this crunchy cucumber and melon salad with spiced chickpeas, we (and with we, I humbly mean ME, MYSELF and I - as in, not David) had the simple idea to put them on a bed of yogurt instead of doing the usual yogurt dressing. In theory, it’s more or less the same thing but in reality it’s so much better. The warm, rich and spicy chickpeas on a bed of cold, thick and tangy yogurt, with the addition of a fresh salad with lots of crunch. It’s simple but yet so very good. And quick too. I’m sure there are plenty of savory yogurt bowls all over internet, but now they are also in our kitchen. *David and Isac are actually intolerant to dairy but yogurt is their weak spot. We buy oat yogurt for them but David often chooses a day of stomach ache just to enjoy a bowl of plain yogurt. And Isac has literally been caught with his hand in the yogurt jar more than once. Coconut yogurt has a fantastic taste and consistency but is simply too expensive to enjoy more than as an occasional treat (very keen on giving Ashley’s versions a try though!). Hey hey hey, wait a sec. This is David acting as proofreader today and I just noted Luise’s attempt at hijacking my idea. This recipe = my idea. Just wanted to make that clear. I’ll give the word back to her now. The salad is super quick as you just need to chop everything up. We found that crunchy vegetables like cucumber, celery, sturdy roman lettuce and radishes work really well here, with the avocado and melon adding softness and sweetness. The yogurt is, well, just yogurt. It needs to be quite thick to hold up the topping - our preference is Greek yogurt but choose whatever you prefer. The only thing that needs a little more preparation and heat are the spiced chickpeas. Even if the ingredient list looks long, it’s simply spices, oil and chickpeas and the result tastes way better than just using plain chickpeas. They have a rich, spicy and slightly nutty flavor which works so well with the freshness from the yogurt and the crunchy and sweet salad. VARIATIONS There are plenty of ways to vary this recipe and we’re going to leave you with a few ideas. - Whisk some creamy goat’s cheese into the yogurt. It will dissolve, become smooth and give the yogurt a more mature flavor. - If you don’t have all the spices at home for the chickpeas, use what you find. A bread spice mix works great along with a little cayenne. A turmeric or curry version would be interesting too. - You can skip the salad and pour the yogurt into small sealable jars with spiced chickpeas on top. Store them in the fridge for a quick snack. - Vegans can of course use a vegan yogurt option or simply settle for the salad with warm chickpeas stirred through. - Roasting the chickpeas in the oven together with eggplant or pumpkin could be amazing on top of the yogurt as well. Let us know if you have any other favorite variations on savory yogurt bowls and we can include them in this list. Savory Yogurt Bowl with Spicy Chickpeas & Cucumber Salad Serves 4, or 2 very hungry persons Cucumber & Melon Salad 1 cucumber 1 small (or 1/­­2 regular) melon (we used Piel de Sapo but honeydew would also work) 1 spring onion 2 celery stalks 10-15 fresh mint leaves 1 avocado 6 radishes 1/­­2 roman lettuce 1/­­2 lemon, juice 1 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil Spiced warm chickpeas 2 tbsp sunflower seeds 1 tbsp sesame seeds 2 tsp fennel seeds  1 tsp coriander seeds 1 tsp cardamom seeds 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1/­­2 tsp ground cayenne 1/­­2 tsp ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp ground paprika powder 1/­­4 cup – 1/­­2 cup cold-pressed olive oil 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g can cooked chickpeas, drained and rinsed For serving 2 cups plain full-fat Greek yogurt  For the cucumber & melon salad:  Wash all produce. Cut cucumber and melon in large bite-size pieces. Trim and finely slice spring onion, celery and mint leaves. Cut the avocado in half and remove the stone, then cut into cubes. Trim the radishes and thinly slice them. And chop the roman lettuce. Place all prepared ingredients in a mixing bowl, squeeze over lemon juice, drizzle with olive oil and a little salt, give it a good toss and set aside. For the spiced warm chickpeas:  Add all seeds and spices (except for the ground spices) to a dry skillet, heat gently for a couple of minutes while stirring. When the spices starts to pop and smell fragrant, they’re done. Pour into a mortar and give them a few bashes with the pestle (alternatively on a cutting board and use the back of a chef’s knife). Transfer the seeds and spices back to the skillet. Now add oil (start with the lesser amount and add more later on if it looks dry), ground spices  and chickpeas and heat on low temperature for 2-3 minutes. Stir to combine. When the chickpeas are warm and covered in spices and seeds, remove from the heat. Dollop the yogurt into four bowls. Use the back of a spoon to smooth it out. Arrange the salad on one side of the yogurt and the spiced warm chickpea on the other side. Drizzle a little extra oil on top. Enjoy immediately while the chickpeas are still warm. ********* LONDON + BATH In all my excitement over a simple bowl of yogurt, I almost forgot to mention that we are coming to London and Bath next week for a couple of book events. We’re very excited and can’t wait to meet some of you! We’re having a supper club at Grace Belgravia on Monday 5 June, 7-10 pm. More info here. We’ll do talk and Q&A at Whole Foods Market in Kensington on Wednesday 7 June, 6.30 pm. More info and tickets here. We’ll also do a talk and cooking demo at Topping & Company Booksellers in Bath on Friday 9 June, 7.30 pm. More info and tickets here. Finally, we’re having a hands on cooking class at Bertinet Kitchen in Bath on Saturday 10 June, 10 am. Tickets here (only one left). Big love!

Rhubarb Ice Cream Sandwiches + Video

May 20 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Rhubarb Ice Cream Sandwiches + Video Luise asked me to write something short and quick today. And to stick to the subject (which I assume is ice cream). That was 12 hours ago. To be fair, I’ve also been carrying a baby (with a new name) and a feverish Isac for a huge chunk of those hours. Excuses aside, I’m not good at quick. I’m not slow. But I’m definitely not quick. I like to let things take time. Explore all possibilities. Thorough. I’m thorough. Not slow. Well maybe a little bit slow. In a good way. Except when facing meaningless everyday decisions (like picking clothes for the kids), then I’m slow in a bad way. I’m apparently not good at sticking to subjects either. Ice cream, here we go. Making homemade ice cream sandwiches is a fun little weekend project. It doesn’t take too much active time but they do need a couple of hours to firm up in the freezer. Unlike normal sandwich bars, ours are made with raw wafers and a rhubarb swirled no-churn ice cream. The raw wafer is simple to make and the rich chocolate hazelnut flavor balances the tanginess from the rhubarb nicely. We are showing how to get the wafer thin and perfectly sized in the video further down. We have tried two different versions of the ice cream and are sharing both here. One is made with mascarpone and quark cheese (so it’s technically a frozen cheesecake) and is super simple and delicious. The other version is vegan and made with coconut milk and soaked cashew nuts. You can use an ice cream maker to get it even creamier but we simply skipped that extra step this time. Unless you’re an ice cream purist, you’ll see that the no-churning method works well for a sandwich bar,  just let them soften a few minutes before digging in. They are super tasty and a real treat to have ready in the freezer. We’ve cut them pretty big here but you could cut them in squares instead and end up with twice as many. You can of course use the wafer recipe with any type of ice cream in between, just make sure the bottom wafer layer is slightly frozen before filling up with ice cream. We fantasized about also dipping these in dark, melted chocolate but decided that we had to draw the line somewhere. But I’m throwing it out there in case anyone is up for it ... We created this little youtube video for a more visual demonstration on how we make these. It takes a little extra time to make these videos but it’s lots of fun and we feel that they really help understanding the cooking process. Please leave a comment letting us know if you like us to continue making more videos. Rhubarb Ice Cream Sandwiches Makes 10 Note: We use the Rhubarb & Strawberry Jam on everything from sandwiches to breakfast yogurt and porridge. So make a double batch while you are at it. The sweetness depends on the quality of the fruit so taste and adjust accordingly. Rhubarb & Strawberry Jam 2 cups /­­ 200 g rhubarb, washed and trimmed 1 cup /­­ 150 g strawberries, washed and trimmed 3 tbsp maple syrup 1 tsp freshly grated ginger a pinch vanilla powder Raw Hazelnut Wafer 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 200 g hazelnuts 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50 g rolled oats or oat flour 3 tbsp cacao powder a pinch sea salt 3 tbsp coconut oil 16 soft dates (7 oz /­­ 200 g), pitted Rhubarb Ice Cream (scroll down for vegan version) 1 cup /­­ 250 g quark cheese (or strained greek yogurt) 1 cup /­­ 250 g mascarpone (or more quark cheese) 2-3 tbsp maple syrup 1 cup /­­ 250 ml Rhubarb & Strawberry Jam (see recipe above) Start by making the jam. Slice rhubarb and strawberries thinly and add them to a sauce pan together with the rest of the jam ingredients. Cook on low heat for approx. 20 minutes until soft. Use a hand blender to mix it if you prefer it smooth, or leave it chunky. Let cool entirely. Meanwhile, prepare the raw hazelnut wafer. Add hazelnuts, rolled oats, cacao powder and salt to a food processor and mix thoroughly until the texture resembles sand. Pour into a separate bowl. Add dates and coconut oil to the food processor and mix into a paste. Pour the mixed nuts back and pulse everything until it’s combined into a dough. Roll it into a log and divide into two equal halves. Use a pen to copy the exact size of the baking dish onto a baking paper, then roll out one of the wafer dough halves on the baking sheet until it has the right shape, use a second baking sheet on top to prevent the rolling pin from sticking. Transfer the baking paper with the wafer to the baking dish and place in the freezer while preparing the ice cream (or vegan version further down). Combine quark cheese, mascarpone and 2-3 tbsp maple syrup (depending on how sweet you prefer it) in a mixing bowl. Add 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml of the cooled rhubarb & strawberry jam. Stir until combined. Take out the baking dish from the freezer and pour the ice cream mixture on top. Spoon more jam on top (roughly 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100-150 ml) and use a spoon to swirl it evenly. Put back in the freezer for 1-2 hours to firm up. Roll out the second half of the wafer dough using the same method as the first. Use a fork to make hole patterns and then turn it upside-down on to a second baking sheet. Remove the ice cream from the freezer and carefully transfer the wafer on top of the ice cream. Put it back in the freezer for 3-4 hours until completely firm. Then take it out, cut into 10 rectangles or 20 squares using a sharp knife dipped in hot water, wrap with baking paper and store in the freezer. *** Vegan Rhubarb Ice Cream  1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 200 g cashew nuts (pre-soaked for 4-6 hours) 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 ml can coconut milk 4 tbsp maple syrup juice of 1 lemon 1 cup /­­ 250 ml Rhubarb & Strawberry Jam (see recipe above) Drain the soaked cashew nuts and add them to a high-speed blender together with maple syrup and lemon juice. Mix on high speed until smooth. Add 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100-150 ml of the cooled rhubarb & strawberry jam and pulse until combined. Take out the baking dish from the freezer and pour the ice cream mixture on top. Spoon more jam on top (roughly 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100-150 ml) and use a spoon to swirl it evenly. Put back in the freezer for 1-2 hours to firm up. Follow the remaining instructions in the main recipe. Here’s another rhubarb treat I did the other day. I didn’t follow an exact recipe but I kind of based it on this recipe from our archive and replaced the grated apple with lots of rhubarb jam and the apple slices on top with rhubarb and strawberry bits. Skip the cinnamon on top and just add a little cardamom to the batter, in case you feel like trying it.

Rhubarb Ice Cream Sandwiches

May 20 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Rhubarb Ice Cream Sandwiches Luise asked me to write something short and quick today. And to stick to the subject. She never specified which subject I should stick to but I’m guessing it’s ice cream. That was 12 hours ago. To be fair, I’ve also been carrying around on a baby (with a new name) and a feverish Isac for a huge chunk of those hours. Excuses aside, I’m not good at quick. I’m not slow. But I’m definitely not quick. I like to let things take time. Reading everything through. Testing it one more time. Seeing if there are other possibilities that I haven’t considered yet. Thorough. I’m thorough. Not slow. Well maybe a little bit slow. But in a good way. Except when facing meaningless everyday decisions (like picking clothes for the kids), then I’m slow in a bad way. I’m apparently not good at sticking to subjects either. Ice cream, here we go. Making homemade ice cream sandwiches is a fun little weekend project. It doesn’t take too much active time but they do need a couple of hours to firm up in the freezer. Unlike normal sandwich bars, ours are made with raw wafers and a rhubarb swirled no-churn ice cream. The raw wafer is simple to make and the rich chocolate hazelnut flavor balances the tanginess from the rhubarb nicely. We are showing how to get the wafer thin and even in the video further down. We have tried two different versions of the ice cream and are sharing both here. One is made with mascarpone and quark cheese (so it’s technically a frozen cheesecake) and is super simple and delicious. The other version is vegan and made with coconut milk and soaked cashew nuts. You can use an ice cream maker to get it perfectly creamy but we simply skipped that extra step. Unless you’re an ice cream purist, you’ll see that the no-churning method works perfectly for a sandwich bar,  just let them soften a few minutes before digging in. They are super tasty and a real treat to have ready in the freezer. We’ve cut them pretty big here but you could cut them in squares instead and end up with twice as many. You can of course use the wafer recipe with any type of ice cream in between, just make sure the bottom wafer layer is slightly frozen before filling up with ice cream. We fantasized about also dipping these in dark, melted chocolate but decided that we had to draw the line somewhere. But I’m throwing it out there in case anyone is up for it ... We created this little youtube video for a more visual demonstration on how we make these. It takes a little extra time to make these videos but it’s lots of fun and we feel that they really help understanding the cooking process. Please leave a comment letting us know if you like us to continue making more videos. Rhubarb Ice Cream Sandwiches Makes 10 Note: We use the Rhubarb & Strawberry Jam on everything from sandwiches to breakfast yogurt and porridge. So make a double batch while you are at it. The sweetness depends on the quality of the fruit so taste and adjust accordingly. Rhubarb & Strawberry Jam 2 cups /­­ 200 g rhubarb, washed and trimmed 1 cup /­­ 150 g strawberries, washed and trimmed 3 tbsp maple syrup 1 tsp freshly grated ginger a pinch vanilla powder Raw Hazelnut Wafer 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 200 g hazelnuts 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50 g rolled oats or oat flour 3 tbsp cacao powder a pinch sea salt 3 tbsp coconut oil 16 soft dates (7 oz /­­ 200 g), pitted Rhubarb Ice Cream (scroll down for vegan version) 1 cup /­­ 250 g quark cheese (or strained greek yogurt) 1 cup /­­ 250 g mascarpone (or more quark cheese) 2-3 tbsp maple syrup 1 cup /­­ 250 ml Rhubarb & Strawberry Jam (see recipe above) Start by making the jam. Slice rhubarb and strawberries thinly and add them to a sauce pan together with the rest of the jam ingredients. Cook on low heat for approx. 20 minutes until soft. Use a hand blender to mix it if you prefer it smooth, or leave it chunky. Let cool entirely. Meanwhile, prepare the raw hazelnut wafer. Add hazelnuts, rolled oats, cacao powder and salt to a food processor and mix thoroughly until the texture resembles sand. Pour into a separate bowl. Add dates and coconut oil to the food processor and mix into a paste. Pour the mixed nuts back and pulse everything until it’s combined into a dough. Roll it into a log and divide into two equal halves. Use a pen to copy the exact size of the baking dish onto a baking paper, then roll out one of the wafer dough halves on the baking sheet until it has the right shape, use a second baking sheet on top to prevent the rolling pin from sticking. Transfer the baking paper with the wafer to the baking dish and place in the freezer while preparing the ice cream (or vegan version further down). Combine quark cheese, mascarpone and 2-3 tbsp maple syrup (depending on how sweet you prefer it) in a mixing bowl. Add 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml of the cooled rhubarb & strawberry jam. Stir until combined. Take out the baking dish from the freezer and pour the ice cream mixture on top. Spoon more jam on top (roughly 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100-150 ml) and use a spoon to swirl it evenly. Put back in the freezer for 1-2 hours to firm up. Roll out the second half of the wafer dough using the same method as the first. Use a fork to make hole patterns and then turn it upside-down on to a second baking sheet. Remove the ice cream from the freezer and carefully transfer the wafer on top of the ice cream. Put it back in the freezer for 3-4 hours until completely firm. Then take it out, cut into 10 rectangles or 20 squares using a sharp knife dipped in hot water, wrap with baking paper and store in the freezer. *** Vegan Rhubarb Ice Cream  1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 200 g cashew nuts (pre-soaked for 4-6 hours) 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 ml can coconut milk 4 tbsp maple syrup juice of 1 lemon 1 cup /­­ 250 ml Rhubarb & Strawberry Jam (see recipe above) Drain the soaked cashew nuts and add them to a high-speed blender together with maple syrup and lemon juice. Mix on high speed until smooth. Add 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100-150 ml of the cooled rhubarb & strawberry jam and pulse until combined. Take out the baking dish from the freezer and pour the ice cream mixture on top. Spoon more jam on top (roughly 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100-150 ml) and use a spoon to swirl it evenly. Put back in the freezer for 1-2 hours to firm up. Follow the remaining instructions in the main recipe. Here’s another rhubarb treat I did the other day. I didn’t follow an exact recipe but I kind of based it on this recipe from our archive and replaced the grated apple with lots of rhubarb jam and the apple slices on top with rhubarb and strawberry bits. Skip the cinnamon on top and just add a little cardamom to the batter, in case you feel like trying it.

Green Pea Falafel Bowl

April 26 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Pea Falafel Bowl One of the first recipes we posted on the blog was baked herb & pistachio falafels. That was back in the days when we didn’t have three monsters tearing down the house. When I still had an old-fashioned job. And when baking a falafel instead of deep-frying it felt like a fresh new idea. Elsa once asked me if grandma’s older sister was alive when the dinosaurs lived on earth. I told her no (while simultaneously typing a message with a ton of dinosaur emojis to my mom). That is roughly how long ago that falafel recipe feels like. Dinosaur age. So much has happened since then. I still think it’s a good recipe and today’s falafel recipe has much of the same qualities. They are simple, baked, packed with fresh herbs and hold together excellently. If you don’t serve it with the mint yogurt, it is also vegan. We subbed the pistachios with some pumpkin seeds/­­pepitas this time and replaced half of the chickpeas with green peas to make them more suited for spring. It also gives them a slightly sweet tone and less dry than your average falafel (which is one of our favorite features with this recipe). We serve them in a bowl with roasted carrots, cinnamon spiked quinoa, beetroot hummus and a splash of mint yogurt instead of wrapping them up in lettuce or bread. We think of it as a spring-y Moroccan falafel bowl. I won’t claim that this is a dead-simple recipe (as it involves cooking, mixing and baking), but I at least find it comforting that the carrots, beetroot and falafels all are baked simultaneously in the oven. Before we jump to the recipe, we wanted to share the updated schedule for our little Green Kitchen At Home US book tour. And also this short video about the book that we did the other day. As we mentioned in our last post, we are coming to the US next week for some press activities. Both Luise and I will be in New York and then I’ll continue on my own to SF and LA. We are only doing a few public events and are very much hoping to see some of you there. New York > 1 May Our cooking class at Sur La Table is sold out but we will have a mingle, book signing and Q&A at CAP Beauty on 1 May, 7 pm. Entrance is free, you get to try some tasters from the book and we’ll both be there to chat. All you need to do is RSVP here.  San Francisco & Los Angeles > 3-5 May I’ll be at Credo Beauty in San Francisco on 3 May, 2-4 pm, signing books and chatting with you all about food, photography, kids and whatnot. I will also be doing the same in their Los Angeles store on 4 May, 5-7 pm. Free entrance, just RSVP to both events here. I’ll also be teaching a hands-on cooking class at Sur La Table in Los Angeles. There are still a few tickets available - so go get them here! For those of you who’s been asking, we will also be coming to London in June and Amsterdam after the summer. Enough about that. Let’s start cooking! Recipe notes o Falafel purists use soaked chickpeas instead of cooked. Cooked is however much quicker and works just fine. We also find that it’s easier on our digestion. o You don’t have to roast the beetroot for the hummus but can simply grate raw beetroot before mixing it. But since we’re using the oven anyway for the other parts of the bowl, we roast them to give the hummus a rounder flavor. Green Pea Falafel Bowl Serves 4 Falafels 1 cup /­­ 150 g green peas, fresh or frozen (thawed) 1 cup /­­ 150 g cooked chickpeas 2 small shallots, peeled and coarsely chopped 1-2 cloves garlic, peeled 2 tbsp buckwheat flour or potato starch 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 3 stalks fresh mint, leaves picked 3 stalks parsley, stems discarded 1 tbsp lemon juice 1 tsp ground cumin 1 tsp flaky sea salt 1-2 tbsp olive oil Beetroot Hummus 200 g raw beetroots 1 cup /­­ 150 g cooked white beans  3 tbsp light tahini (sesame paste) 4 tbsp lemon juice 3 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil 1 tsp ground cumin 1 clove garlic, peeled 1 tsp flaky sea salt Cinnamon Quinoa 1 cup uncooked Quinoa pinch flaky sea salt 1/­­2 tsp ground cinnamon 1 small handfull raisins (we used green raisins with a smoky flavor) To serve 4 carrots, peeled and cut into thick sticks (bake together with the beetroot) 2 avocados, sliced 4 handfuls mache lettuce 1/­­2 cucumber, sliced 12 radishes, sliced 1 cup plain yogurt a bunch fresh mint leaves, chopped a handful toasted almonds, chopped sesame seeds Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F fan mode (this is because we’re doing two plates simultaneously). Add all falafel ingredients (except the oil) to a food processor and pulse until mixed but not pureed. With moist hands, shape 16 mini falafel patties (roughly 1 generous tablespoon per falafel). Pour a little olive oil into the palm of your hand and then place each falafel in it, smoothing out the falafel and at the same time coating it in oil. Refill with oil for every fourth falafel. Place them on a baking tray covered with baking paper. Bake in the oven for 20 minutes, turning them after half the time. Peel the beets and cut in quarters. Place on a baking tray together with the prepared carrots (from the To serve list) and place in the oven (this can be done simultaneously as the falafel tray) for about 20 minutes or until baked through and soft. Let cool slightly and then place the beets (set the the carrots aside for serving) in a food processor (or bowl if using a stick blender) with the rest of the ingredients and mix for at least 2 minutes until very smooth. Taste and adjust the flavors to you liking. Prepare the quinoa while the vegetables are in the oven: Place rinsed quinoa in a saucepan, add 2 cups water, salt and cinnamon and bring to a boil. Lower the heat immediately and simmer for about 12-15 minutes. Stir in raisins and set aside. Stir together yogurt and a handful chopped mint leaves, set aside. Arrange all serving ingredients in bowls and top with beetroot hummus, quinoa and pea falafels. Sprinkle with almonds, sesame seeds and mint. Enjoy! PS! If you have already received our new book through online orders, we’d be super grateful if you could leave a short review of it on Amazon. Thank you! 

Roasted Rainbow Root Tangles

April 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Rainbow Root Tangles Apart from discussing important topics like if it’s worth climbing a mountain of bureaucracy to change baby Gabriel’s name (long story…), if we would be much happier running a smoothie bar on a small tropical island than living in a cold and dark Stockholm (obviously that is a yes), and how ALL of Elsa’s leggings suddenly have huge tears around the knees (she swears that she is innocent), we have also spent the past week playing around with this super simple recipe based on root shoestrings. It turns out that if you spiralize (check notes below if you don’t have a spiralizer) root vegetables, toss them in a little bit of oil and salt, arrange into tangled nests and roast for 25 minutes, you get something similar to rösti or hash browns. These little root tangles are quick, cheap and easy, they are crispy towards the edges and soft in the middle, contain a lot more nutrients than just potatoes and since they are baked instead of pan-fried, they don’t cause a smoke alarm situation in the kitchen. Not to mention how pretty they look with the different colors combined. Our kids devour them straight from the plate (they call them root fries) and we have been using these root tangles as a base for a bunch of meals lately. In this recipe we’ve topped them with yogurt and a herby chickpea salad, which is perfect as you get something creamy, a few greens and proteins along with the roots. But they also work well paired with avocado mash, hummus or with a poached egg, asparagus and spinach on top, for an Easter twist. Instead of trying to convince you with words, we did a little recipe video for our youtube channel that shows how it’s done. Press play! We always have so much fun making these videos, can’t believe it’s been seven months since we last did one - that needs to change. You can basically use any roots or hard vegetable of preference to make these - beetroot, potato, sweet potato, carrot, parsnip, turnip and even butternut squash. If you choose organic, you don’t have to bother peeling them. It actually tastes better with the peel left on, just like sweet potato fries. You can obviously flavor these root tangles in lots of ways. Try tossing them with cinnamon or sumac, or add vinegar for an acidic twist. If you prefer them crisp all the way through, you can spread them out on the trays instead of arranging them like nests. If you don’t have a spiralizer, you can use a julienne peeler or the coarse side of a box grater instead (you can place the grated roots in muffin tins if you like them to hold together better). Although a spiralizer is pretty fun tool to have at home. It doesn’t cost much and it’s great for making vegetable noodles and slices that can be used in pasta dishes, salads or thai noodle dishes. Roasted Root Tangles with Yogurt and Chickpea Salad Serves 4 1 1/­­2 lb /­­ 750 g mixed roots (we used 1 sweet potato, 3 beetroots, 1 parsnip) 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tsp salt Herby Chickpea Salad 2 cups mixed baby leaf lettuce 4 sprigs cilantro /­­ coriander 4 sprigs fresh mint 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g can chickpeas /­­ garbanzo beans 2 tbsp toasted sesame oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice To serve 1 cup Turkish yogurt or coconut yogurt 1 avocado 2 tbsp mixed sesame seeds sauerkraut (fermented cabbage), store-bought or homemade (we are sharing three varieties in our new book) Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F and grease or place baking paper on two baking trays. Rinse the roots and scrub off any dirt. Trim off the edges, attach to a spiralizer and make noodles/­­ribbons/­­shoestrings (or use a julienne peeler or box grater). Drizzle with olive oil and salt and toss and mix so all root ribbons are combined. If you have very long ribbons, you can cut them with a scissor to make it easier to mix. Arrange the tangled ribbons into nests and place on the baking tray, make sure that there aren’t too many loose ribbons on the sheet or they will burn quicker. Roast for 25-30 minutes or until crispy on the outside but not yet burnt. While the roots are roasting, prepare the salad. Chop the herbs and mix with the lettuce. Rinse the chickpeas thoroughly and add them to the lettuce. Drizzle with toasted sesame oil, lemon juice and sea salt. Toss and mix. Divide the avocado into quarters, remove the stone and use a sharp knife to slice each quarter thinly. Remove the roots from the oven. Arrange 2-3 root tangles on each plate. Add a dollop of yogurt on each root tangle, top with salad, sliced avocado, sesame seeds and a spoonful of sauerkraut. Enjoy! *********** PS! Today Green Kitchen At Home is released in Australia! And in just three weeks it will launch in the UK and next month in the US. Exciting! Here are some links in case you would like to order or pre-order it: Amazon.co.uk (UK). Amazon.com (USA). Booktopia.com (Australia & NZ).

3 Favorite Quick Treats

February 21 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

3 Favorite Quick Treats Our daughter’s school teacher sent along a pale blue little text book for her to draw and write in during our recent trip to Cape Town. Considering that Elsa’s previous writing experiences mostly consisted of scribbling random letters from the alphabet and signing her drawings (often reversed), we honestly didn’t expect this journal to be anything more than a sketch book. But to our surprise, she filled the pages with both drawings and sentences about her days. She is no Donna Tartt just yet. Her letters look a little wonky, she spells words exactly as they sound and writes without space between (so it all looks like a long hashtag): weesaasharkindeseetodey. But regardless of how much or little that happened each day, she found something to write about, she tried her best to get the spelling right and she filled that book with memories. The connection I am trying to make here is that this blog is Luise’s and my journal. And we have been bad at filling it lately - with memories and recipes. Ever since the children outnumbered us, it has been difficult to write. Not only due to lack of time and sleep, but we’ve also been looking for meaning, relevance and motivation. We have been doing this for more than seven years now and I have personally come to a point where I want everything to be so damn perfect every time that I often get stuck in this circle of “this is not good enough”. But seeing Elsa’s journal made me realise that we don’t always need the grandest of recipes or ideas. Sometimes a simple 5-minute snack or treat can be good enough. Okay, I don’t really think one snack is good enough. So we are actually sharing three today! These recipes are all great options when you need a late afternoon pick-me-up, a post workout treat or simple Tuesday dessert. Although different in their execution, they can all be made in a breeze and all of them also happen to include tahini. If you haven’t tried tahini with sweet flavours before, consider this your lucky day. It’s the bombest flavour combo! First up, easy but epic stuffed dates. I shared these stuffed dates on instagram a few weeks ago, calling them ugly delicious. Although a lot of people seemed to think that they weren’t ugly, I still argue that this isn’t a very glamorous dish. Frozen raspberries, grated ginger and tahini, mashed into soft dates is preferably something that is enjoyed under dim light in front of a tv series. Unhulled tahini is excellent for this dish because of it’s richer tones. And if you’ve got a dark chocolate bar (70-80%) lying around, you can break it up and cram small pieces of chocolate into the date along with the other ingredients. It’s probably the quickest and easiest sweet firework your mouth will ever experience. Tahini & Raspberry Stuffed Dates Makes 10 10 soft dates 1 tsp fresh ginger 3 tbsp tahini (preferably unhulled), almond butter or nut butter of choice 20 fresh or frozen raspberries a handful desiccated coconut dark chocolate (optional) Open up all the dates, discard the stones and place the dates on a plate. Grate the ginger over the dates and then fill them with approx 1/­­2-1 tsp tahini per date and two slightly mashed raspberries (and a small piece of chocolate, if using). Top with a scattering of desiccated coconut. Indulge. We obviously think smoothies are the ultimate quick treat, having written a whole book about them. They are easy to make, easy to improvise and easy to like. This recipe is not from the book but it combines many of our favorite smoothie ingredients mentioned in the book into one master smoothie which we often make in family size and portion out in mini bottles. Berries are always great in smoothies being low on sugar and high on freshness. Avocado and banana makes it exceptionally creamy. Dates add a caramel tone and cardamom, ginger and tahini blasts the flavours. Depending on the tartness of your berries, a squeeze of lime or lemon can also be good in this. Berry & Tahini Smoothie 2 large glasses 1 banana 1/­­2 avocado 2-3 soft dates 1 tsp freshly ground cardamom 1 tsp fresh ginger 1 tbsp tahini 1 cup /­­ 150 g frozen raspberries and blackberries 1 cup oat milk or other plant milk Add all ingredients to a blender and mix on high speed until smooth. Taste and adjust the flavour, add more ginger, tahini or cardamom if needed. Add more milk if it feels too thick. Pour into two large glasses or bottles and enjoy right away or store in the fridge with a lid on. On a recent car ride from Copenhagen to Stockholm, Luise picked up a snack pack of cottage cheese with topping. It is not something we often buy but it tasted pretty good and we started talking about making our own version of it, adding lots of crunch and more freshness along with the sweetness. We have combined cottage cheese with yogurt here to make it more creamy, fluffy, tangy and rich in protein  and this has become one of our favorite post workout meals lately. We serve it with chopped apples, an easy crunchy topping of toasted buckwheat groats and nuts and top it all with a delicious syrup made of honey, fresh ginger, cardamom and tahini. The syrup should taste quite strong of ginger to contrast the cheese and it’s really what makes this dish special, but if you are not a fan of ginger, use the lesser amount. If you’ve got a jar of our Ginger & Turmeric Honey Bomb at home, that can be used instead.   Cottage Cheese with Apple, Ginger Honey and Crunch Serves 2 (hungry people) or 4 (as a snack) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 50 g buckwheat groats 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35 g hazelnuts, roughly chopped 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1 cup /­­ 250 g cottage cheese 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml plain thick yogurt (turkish or greek style yogurt) 1 large apple 1 1/­­2-2 tbsp honey 1 tbsp tahini 1/­­2-1 tsp freshly grated ginger 1/­­2 tsp ground cardamom Dry toast buckwheat groats, hazelnuts and salt in a skillet or sauce pan on medium heat for approx 10 minutes, stir every now and then. While its toasting, divide the cottage cheese on two plates or four bowls. Discard the core from the apple and chop it in roughly 1/­­2 inch /­­ 1 cm pieces. Scatter the apple pieces over the cottage cheese. When the buckwheat and nuts smell fragrant and look golden, turn off the heat and scatter it over the cottage cheese and apple. Without rinsing the skillet/­­saucepan, use the after-heat in the pan to stir together tahini, honey, ginger and cardamom - it only need a little heat to combine easily. Drizzle generously over the two plates and finish with a sprinkle of cinnamon. Dive in!

Mint Chocolate Power Bars

January 3 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Mint Chocolate Power Bars By placing two pillows under my left elbow, I can hold sleeping baby Gabriel with one arm and type this text on the laptop that is balancing on my right leg with the other hand. It’s brilliant! I can even reach that bowl of soaked oats with raisins, apple and crunchy peanut butter that stands there on the sofa table. Okay, maybe not brilliant. This balancing act is pretty tricky actually. And I suspect that my left arm will starting to go numb soon. I should probably focus on my son and just wait for Luise to get back from the shower. But I did promise 192 people on instagram that I would post this recipe today and I’ve already spent an hour tucking the other two kids to bed so I feel like I really need to do this now or I’ll be starting the year by breaking a promise. Therefore I am currently writing this post one-handed - sitting in a patchwork plaided sofa in a cute little airbnb apartment in Copenhagen that we’re renting for a few days - chewing on a peanut butter covered apple with a chubby little cherub snoring in my other hand. And Luise thinks I’m bad at multi tasking. Ha! Before we left, I prepared a batch of power bars for the car-ride down. When they don’t serve as car snacks, we use them as quick energy fuel at home whenever we or the kids are in need of a treat. A chocolate bar (or two) in my gym bag also makes a pretty compelling argument for dragging my tired daddy-of-three body to the gym. The bars rarely last long in our freezer. Lately, I have been completely hooked on this chocolate and mint combo. Combining fresh mint flavour with rich chocolate always seemed weird to me, but all of a sudden I have changed my mind. It’s brilliant and for some reason extra perfect as workout fuel. This recipe is based on the Hemp Bars in our first book but a little simpler and fresher in flavour. We top them with cacao nibs which not only make them look great but also adds a nice crunch to their texture. I asked Isac to assist me when I made these but he was pretty useless. When asked to pit the dates, he placed the dates in his mouth and the stones in the food processor (which nearly ruined the food processor). He also kept insisting that the cacao nibs were bombs that exploded into the bars, leaving giant craters after them. So if you think the bars look uneven, this little hooligan is to blame. By the way, I’m not writing one-handed anymore. Halfway along this post, I spilled some oats on Gabriel’s head so he woke up. Luise is nursing him now (and most probably also piercing an imaginary voodoo doll with my face on it with a thousand needles). I am not saying that I spilled on him on purpose, but it did make it a whole lot easier to write this text. Yup that was it. First post of the year. Giant craters, crying babies, voodoo dolls and eating chocolate at the gym. And I’m only 44 minutes late for my deadline. Not a bad start. Mint Chocolate Power Bars Makes approx. 18 bars  You can add a few tablespoons protein powder of choice (instead of the desiccated coconut) if you are making them as workout bars. Nuts can of course also be used instead of the seeds, if preferred. 150 g /­­ 1 cup mixed pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds, toasted if preferred 50 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup desiccated coconut, unsweetened 4 tbsp chia seeds 3 tbsp cacao powder 50 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup rolled oats 2 pinches sea salt 4 tbsp virgin coconut oil 200 g soft fresh dates (roughly 16 dates /­­ 1 packed cup), pitted 5 tbsp nut butter of choice (we love using a combination of tahini and cashew butter but peanut butter also works great) a few drops peppermint oil (or 2-3 tsp dried mint leaves, crushed) Topping 60 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup raw cacao nibs Line a 16 x 22 cm baking tin with parchment paper. Add the seeds, coconut, chia seeds, cacao powder, oats and salt to a food processor and pulse on high speed until coarsely crumbly. Pour into a bowl and add coconut oil, dates, nut butter, mint (oil or dried leaves) to the food processor. Run on high speed until entirely smooth and sticky. Add the seed and cacao crumbles and pulse quickly until mixed together. Help out with a spatula in case the mixture isnt combined. Taste and add more mint flavour or salt if needed, then pulse a few more times. Transfer to the baking tin and, using the palm of your hand or the back of a spoon (coated in coconut oil), press the mixture down very firmly to create an even and compact bar (roughly 2 cm high). Scatter the cacao nibs on top and use a spatula to press them down slightly into the mixture. Let set in the freezer for approx. 15-30 minutes before cutting into approx. 18 bars. Store the bars in an airtight container in the freezer and they will keep for a few months. You can wrap them in baking paper to make them more portable. Thaw them ever so slightly before serving. NB: For a nut-free alternative, replace the nut butter with a seed butter of choice.

Moroccan Aubergine & Chickpea Stew

November 25 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Moroccan Aubergine & Chickpea Stew Here is a dinner suggestion in case you are looking for a new recipe to try over the weekend. We first made this stew for lunch a few days ago. I’ll admit that it was slightly over-ambitious as a lunch project, but it did tick all the right boxes for a late november meal and we are pretty sure it is something you will appreciate as well. Both Luise and I are obsessed with Moroccan flavors. Our approach is rarely strictly traditional, we usually just throw a whole bunch of Moroccan-ish ingredients, like mint + cinnamon + cumin + raisins + pomegranate seeds + lemon + almonds into the same dish and then blindly call it Moroccan. That is also what we have done with this Aubergine & Chickpea Stew. It is a little bit like a winter version of our (favorite) Moroccan salad recipe from Green Kitchen Travels. It’s warm and comfy with large chunks of slow-cooked aubergine, super flavorful with sweetness from cinnamon, saffron and raisins, has crunchy toasted almonds on top and freshness from mint, yogurt and pomegranate seeds. If you skip the yogurt on top, it’s also entirely vegan. We have had it for lunch and dinner three times this week and we are still not tired of it. Ok, maybe just a tiny bit. Especially Elsa. She always tells us that “we are the worst parents ever” whenever we serve repeat-meals and photo shoot leftovers for dinner. Saffron is actually used as a Christmas spice in Sweden, so in case you are looking for an untraditional Christmas dinner, I think this would be a pretty great option. Especially with those pretty jewel-like pomegranate seeds on top. Our recipe is perfect for 4 persons but it can easily be doubled if you are cooking for a crowd, just use a large saucepan. In case you haven’t cooked with millet before, it is time to add it to your repertoire. It is a gluten free seed that is soft and flavourful and works perfectly as an alternative to couscous or bulgur. It also has a comfortably short cooking time. Moroccan Aubergine & Chickpea Stew Serves 4  2 tbsp coconut oil or olive oil 2 onions, peeled 3 garlic cloves, peeled 1 large chunk fresh ginger 1 aubergine 2 tsp ground cinnamon 1 tsp ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp ground paprika 1 tsp sea salt 3 tbsp tomato paste 1  x 14 oz /­­ 400 g tin crushed tomatoes 3 cups vegetable stock 1/­­4 tsp /­­ 0,5 g crushed saffron or approx. 6 saffron threads 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g tin chickpeas /­­ garbanzo beans (or 200 g cooked chickpeas) 3/­­4 cup /­­ 100 g yellow or brown raisins 1 lemon, zest (save the rest of the lemon for the saladCooked Millet 1 cup /­­ 200 g uncooked millet 2 cups /­­ 500 ml water 1/­­2 tsp sea salt Lemon, Avocado & Herb Salad 2 large ripe avocados, cut in half, destoned and flesh scooped out 1 large handful flat-leaf parsley (or coriander/­­cilantro), coarsely chopped 1 large handful mint leaves, coarsely chopped 1 lemon, juice 2 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil sea salt & ground pepper To Serve 1/­­2 cup /­­ 75 g toasted almonds*, coarsely chopped 1/­­2 pomegranate, seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 120 ml Turkish yogurt (optional) Add oil to a large saucepan on medium heat. Cut the first onion in large chunks and the second one finely along with the garlic and ginger. Add them all to the saucepan and let sauté for about 10 minutes or until soft. Meanwhile cut the aubergine into bite-size chunks. Add it to the pan along with all the spices and tomato paste. Let fry for 5-6 minutes, stirring frequently. Add a splash of water or oil in case the spices begin to burn against the bottom of the pan. Then add the crushed tomatoes, 2 cups of the vegetable stock and the saffron, stir around until it boils and then lower the heat. Put a lid on the sauce pan and let slowly simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the chickpeas, 1/­­2 cup of the raisins and the last of the stock (if it looks like it’s needed) and let simmer for 15 minutes more or until the aubergines are soft and tender, stir in the lemon zest right at the end of the cooking. Meanwhile, add the millet to a medium-sized sauce pan and dry-toast on low heat for 2-3 minutes, then add water and salt, increase the heat and bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and let simmer for about 8-9 minutes. Take it off the heat and let sit for a few minutes to absorb all the water. Add the remaining raisins and use a fork to integrate the raisins and fluff the millet. Prepare the salad by cutting the avocado into chunks, coarsely chopping the herbs and placing them in a bowl along with the pomegranate seeds. Whisk together lemon juice, oil, salt and pepper, add it to the bowl and toss. Serve in bowls with the stew scooped on top of the millet, the salad on the side and almonds, pomegranate seeds and yogurt on top. Enjoy! * We toast almonds by soaking raw almonds in heavily salted water for 20 minutes and then draining the water and roasting/­­toasting them in the oven on 300°F /­­ 150°C for 20 minutes. But you can also toast them in a pan. Or simply use store-bought dry-roasted almonds.

Vegan Meatballs

November 4 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Vegan Meatballs Hey friends! We’re happy to be back with a new post after some away-time. The reason for our absence is that we have been busy cuddling with our new family member. We are calling him Little Brother until we have decided on his real name (so difficult this time!). We are all feeling well and are mighty happy (even though our mornings have become a tad more chaotic) .  He’s a sleepy little fella. For today’s recipe we decided to revive a section on the blog that we started last year and then forgot all about. We call it Homemade Whole Food Staples and today’s recipe fits right in. In our preparations for little brother’s arrival we have been filling our freezer with food and these vegetarian meatballs/­ vegan polpette have proved themselves really useful. They are quick to make, freeze well and are easily heated. We use them as a protein rich supplement to many dishes (see a few examples below) or as a simple main dish with pasta and a sauce.  Since we have so many egg-based patties in the archive, we made these vegan, using chickpeas as the protein source and binder. They are literally filled with vegetables and have almond flour and potato starch as thickener. Kind of like a vegetable packed baked falafel. Not only are they really healthy but they are absolutely delicious too, with sweetness from the carrots and peas a savouriness from the spices.  Just like with our apple cake recipe, we have been experimenting quite a bit to get the amounts right as we wanted to have the option to both cook them in a frying pan (for times when you just want to fry up a few) or in the oven (for larger batches). They get smoother texture in the frying pan but it is a bit more fiddly to get them evenly fried. My favorite method is however to make a huge batch (double batch if you can fit it into your blender), roll them and place on two trays. I then under bake them slightly and let them cool entirely before filling the freezer with them. Because they are slightly under baked, I can reheat them without risking that they get dry and boring. They can be reheated either in a pan or in the oven. Here we have served them with some quinoa and a vegetarian lentil bolognese. They work really well with a pesto sauce as well. Here they appear in one of our #gksbowls with, golden krauts, garlic-fried kale, carrot ribbons, mushrooms, tomatoes, avocado, a sunny egg, za’atar and a drizzle of tahini. Insanely good! And here we’re about to roll them inside a wrap. There are lots of other possibilities. Isac prefers munching on them as a hand-held snack (although he is pretty tired of them at this point as we have served them with almost every meal for the past couple of weeks ...). Vegan Polpette Makes 30 We use nutritional yeast to add extra depth to the flavour. It can be found in health food stores or online. If you are not vegan, it can be replaced with some grated cheese. Or simply leave it out. We kept the spices quite simple but you can try adding cayenne, sumac or curry to them for different flavour variations. 1 onion, peeled 2 garlic cloves, peeled 1 inch /­ 2,5 cm fresh ginger, peeled 2 medium carrots or 3-4 smaller (200 g /­ 7 oz), peeled 1 cup /­ 130 g frozen sweet peas, slightly thawed 1 x 400 g /­ 14 oz tin chickpeas OR 1 1/­2 cup /­ 230 g cooked chickpeas, rinsed a handful kale, coarsely chopped and thick stems discarded  1/­2 cup /­ 50 g almond flour (can be replaced with breadcrumbs) 4 tbsp potato starch 1 tbsp nutritional yeast (optional) 1 1/­2 tsp salt 1/­2 tsp cumin 1/­2 tsp allspice black pepper Set the oven to 360°F /­ 180°C (if you are baking them) and cover a baking sheet with baking paper. Grate onion, ginger and carrots on a box grater or using the grating attachment on a food processor. Switch to the regular knife attachment on the food processor. Add the rest of the ingredients and mix until the chickpeas have been mashed, with small bits and pieces of the peas and carrots still intact. With moist hands, roll the  into balls using roughly 1 tbsp of batter for each ball and place on the baking sheet. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until golden. You can flip them a few times if you like them rounder but I usually skip this and settle for one slightly flatter side. It’s easier. If you are freezing them right away, let them bake for a few minutes shorter, then let cool completely (they firm up as they cool down), transfer to freezer containers or bags and place in the fridge or freezer. To make them in a frying pan, simply fry with a little oil on low/­medium heat (they melt and get flat on too high heat) for about 10-15 minutes. Flip/­roll them often to get them evenly fried. PS! Make sure to check back next week as we have an exciting give-away coming up together with Vitamix!

Apple & Cinnamon Tray Cake

October 8 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Apple & Cinnamon Tray Cake It’s not like I don’t appreciate a good apple cake. And I still think David is an okay guy. But paired together, they have simply been too much this past week. Sometimes I really wish David would just settle for good. He has literally baked and photographed this cake e-v-e-r-y damn day of the week. I know, apple cake every day sounds like an October dream. But when it is served along with constant whining that: “It’s under baked”, “The apples don’t look nice on this” or “It’s way too much cinnamon on top”, it kind of takes the pleasure out of eating it. And with 57+ other things on our to-do-before-the-baby-arrives list, I just couldn’t believe my eyes when he started baking one more cake last night. But now he is finally pleased with it, and the photos. So here it is: A Simple Apple Cake (overly tested like it was an advanced science project). Seriously though, it is a really good cake. I can’t really tell the difference from the one he did in the beginning of the week but I’m just happy that we can finally move on to more pressing issues. I’ll leave it to David to talk about the flavours. /­­Luise Okay ... obviously Luise has no idea what she is talking about. The first cake had way too much cinnamon on it and I hadn’t separated the eggs in the batter so it didn’t rise properly. The photos looked terrible too. So that’s that. What she also forgot to mention is that - thanks to me - we have plenty of cakes in the freezer now, which actually is one of the things on that to-do list of hers. Ha! Back to the cake. I have a long history of not liking apple cake. I have learned to love it now but I do still think that many cakes are too sweet, some are too dry and other have too much apple pieces mixed with the batter. This one is inspired by a slice of apple cake that we tried at the farmer’s market earlier this autumn. It was perfect. Moist, flavourful and with lots of cinnamon and large apple slices on top and a hint of grated apples in the batter. Ever since we tried it, I have been experimenting with my own versions of it. And as Luise so lovingly pointed out, it has taken a few attempts to get it right. We are using one of our favourite flour mixtures to get a good texture. Oat and almond flour adds nuttiness and richness and rice flour keeps it light. I like to bake it in a small tray to get the right height (roughly 2,5 cm /­­ 1 inch), but it works well as a thick cake in a traditional round cake tin as well  (just increase the baking time 5-10 min). Instead of serving it with the traditional vanilla custard, we prefer a ginger-spicegreek yogurt which adds a nice tartness to balance the sweetness in the cake. /­­David AppleCinnamon & Buttermilk Tray Cake Serves 12 Dry Ingredients 100 g /­­ 1 cup rolled oats 100 g /­­ 1 cup almond flour 100 g /­­ 3/­­4 cup rice flour (or buckwheat flour or spelt flour) 1 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 1 tsp ground cinnamon 1/­­2 tsp ground ginger 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1/­­4 tsp ground vanilla or 1/­­2 tsp vanilla extract Wet Ingredients 100 g /­­ 3.5 oz butter or coconut oil, at room temperature 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup maple syrup ?or runny honey 1 apple, rinsed 180 ml /­­ 3/­­4 cup cultured buttermilk (or yogurt) 3 free-range eggs, separated Topping 2 apples, rinsed 2 tbsp melted butter 1-2 tsp cinnamon Ginger-Spiced Yogurt 250 g /­­ 1 cup unsweetened yogurt 1 knob (roughly 2,5 cm /­­ 1 inch) fresh ginger 1 tbsp maple syrup 1 tbsp lemon Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 350°F bake mode, grease a 30 x 22 cm /­­ 12 x 9 inch tray or springform cake tin and line it with parchment paper. Place the oats in a food processor and blend until the texture resembles coarse flour. Transfer to a large mixing bowl, add the rest of the dry ingredients and stir until combined. Make a well in the centre and set aside while preparing the wet ingredients. Cut the butter into cubes and add it to the bowl of a stand mixer along with the maple syrup and mix until well combined and creamy. Add the buttermilk and egg yolks and mix until smooth. Grate the apple coarsely (with peel), add to the stand mixer and mix until just combined, set aside. Place the egg whites in a separate bowl and beat until soft peaks form. Using a spatula, gently fold the wet ingredients, followed by the egg whites, into the dry ingredients until just combined, making sure not to over mix as the cake will be compact otherwise. Pour the cake batter into the tray. Cut the two apples in thin slices and place them on top of the batter, pushing them down just slightly. Brush the slices with melted butter and the dust the cake with cinnamon. Bake for approx. 45-55 minutes or until golden and a skewer inserted in the centre of the cake comes out clean. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly in the tin before transferring to a wire wrack to cool completely. Store the cake at room temperature in an airtight container and it will keep for a few days. To make the yogurt, simply scoop it into a bowl, grate the fresh ginger into it, add maple syrup and lemon and stir until combined. Taste and adjust the flavours after preference. Enjoy! PS! I sprinkled the cake with some powdered sugar because it looks pretty on the photos but it’s really not necessary for the flavor.

Purple Kale, Aubergine & Blackberry Salad

September 7 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Purple Kale, Aubergine & Blackberry Salad At first, it was a coincidence. When we looked at the vegetables we had brought home from the market this weekend, many of them just happened to have purple, violet and dark lavender tones. We talked about how that huge bunch of purple kale could make a beautiful salad base together with the rainbow chard, mint flowers and purple sugar snaps. It was at that point my obsessive side took over. “Let’s ONLY DO purple ingredients!” I shouted into Luise’s ear. She turned her head towards me with that hesitant look she always has when I get one of my “brilliant” ideas: “Ok, slow down now, let’s talk about the flavours first”. Of course I didn’t hear her as I was already writing a list with all the purplish ingredients I could think of: “aubergine, purple cauliflower, plums, figs, olives, blackberries, grapes, beetroot, red onion, …”. Some recipes are born out of genius flavour combinations or new preparation methods, this one simply started out as a colour. Luise did however quickly gain back control and started shifting focus to the flavour and combination of vegetables as well. In the end, I think we managed to combine both flavour, colour and texture in a great way. We roasted aubergine and purple spring onion in warm spices until soft and sweet. Massaged the kale with a flavourful dill, mint, lemon and honey dressing to round off its flavour and make it less sturdy. Cooked black lentils were added as a filler, along with rich and creamy avocado (even though it’s more black than purple - and green inside!). Hazelnuts are not purple at all but they added a nice crunch to the texture. Juicy blackberries made a perfect topping. The result was beautiful, a true harvest salad. Maybe not as purple as I originally imagined it (basically because most vegetables loose their colour when they are cut/­­baked/­­cooked), but still with lovely deep hues and so many interesting flavours - a mix of herby, sweet and tangy. When the salad was assembled it still felt like we missed a creamy element, so we tried the honey roasted feta that we had seen on New York Times Cooking last week. It was perfect. Burnt and caramelised on the outside and almost melted on the inside. It completely ruined the dark purple theme but flavour- and texture wise, it was worth the sacrifice. You’ll notice that I smudged it in mashed blackberries as a poor attempt to camouflage it.   We should perhaps add that this wasn’t our kids favourite dish. They picked out the blackberries, avocado and feta cheese from the salad, leaving the raw kale to us. I guess purple isn’t their colour… Purple Kale & Blackberry Salad with Roasted Honey Feta Vegans can just skip the feta cheese or replace it with hummus. And replace honey with maple syrup. Baked vegetables 1 aubergine /­­ eggplant 4 spring onions or 2 red onions 2-4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 1/­­2 tsp ground cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp ground cumin 1 pinch ground cayenne 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1 handful hazelnuts Cooked lentils 1/­­2 cup uncooked lentils (we used black lentils) 1 1/­­2 cup water 1 pinch sea salt Dressing 1/­­3 cup extra virgin olive oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice 2 tsp honey or more to taste sea salt & pepper 1 large handful mixed fresh dill, parsley and mint Other salad ingredients 4 stalks curly kale, green or purple 4 stalks rainbow chard or spinach 2 avocadoes 1 small handful snap peas 1 punnet fresh blackberries, halved Roasted feta with honey (from NYT) 1 block feta cheese, patted dry 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tbsp honey Start by preparing the baked vegetables. Preheat the oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Wash and cut the aubergine into large cubes and trim and slice the onions, then place in a mixing bowl. Stir together oil and spices in a small bowl, pour the oil mixture over the aubergine and onions and toss to combine. Transfer to a baking tray covered with baking paper. Bake in the oven for about 20 minutes or until very soft and golden, check every now and then to prevent from burning, the baking time depends on the size of the vegetables. Add the hazelnuts halfway through. Meanwhile, cook the lentils in a saucepan with the water for 15 minutes or until tender and can be mashed easily between two fingers. Add sea salt towards the end of the cooking time. Drain any excess water and leave to cool. Prepare the dressing by mixing oil, lemon juice, honey, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Chop the herbs finely and add to the oil mixture. Taste and adjust to your liking. Remove the stems from the kale and coarsely chop the leaves. Finely slice the chard. Place all in a large mixing bowl, add 2 tbsp of the dressing and massage for a couple of minutes until soft. Transfer to a large serving bowl. Mix the lentils with the remaining dressing and pour them over the kale and chard mixture. Cut the avocado into cubes, slice the snap peas and roughly chop the hazelnuts. Add to the salad bowl together with the roasted  aubergine, onions and hazelnuts. Toss slightly to combine and then scatter blackberries on top. If you like to serve the salad with the baked feta cheese, follow the instructions below. Keep the oven at 400°F /­­ 200°C. Place the feta cheese in a small ovenproof dish covered with baking paper and cover with oil. Bake in the oven for about 8 minutes, until soft but not melted. Melt the honey. Remove the cheese from the oven and turn the heat to broiler. With a baking brush, paint the cheese with the melted honey. Place back in the oven and broil until the top starts to brown. Use a spatula to immediately and carefully transfer the cheese to the salad, or serve it on the side.

Penne Pomodoro with Vegan “Tuna”

August 3 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Penne Pomodoro with Vegan “Tuna” I have crawled up in a rusty canopy swing with the computer in my lap, spiderweb from the canopy tangled up in my hair, Mr Bojangles on repeat (I always write with a single song on repeat in my ears) and Elsa balancing on my legs. We are spending a few days at my dad’s summerhouse and while Luise is drawing with Isac, I wanted to tell you about this pasta dish that we cooked and photographed the other day. I’m trying to formulate my thoughts into words. How soaked sunflower seeds almost magically get the texture of canned tuna when mixed in a food processor. But it’s not easy. Elsa is using every muscle in her body to steal my attention from the computer screen. Her mouth is forming words (that I can’t hear because of the earplugs), her head is jumping from side to side while her eyes are actively seeking mine. She is smacking her hands together right in front of my face and she grins when I finally look up from the computer and pull out the earplugs. - Do you know what this means on sign language? She asks me with giggle in her voice while she keeps smacking her hands together and then pointing at herself. - No, tell me. - I want a saaaaandwich! - Are you hungry? - No, I’m just teaching you sign language. - Ok, nice. But I’m working right now. Maybe you can teach me more later? - Ok. Just one more. Do you know what this is? [Taps her forehead with her hand and pulls it away in a half circle.] - Ehm, maybe a unicorn? - Nooo stupid, it means thank you. Actually, I think I want a sandwich. - Maybe you can ask mom to help you? - Okaaaaaaay. She jumps down and runs into the house. Earplugs back in. I’m guessing that I have approx 5 mins to write this. Here we go. It’s not often that we create dishes that mimics meat. In fact, we often do the opposite by letting the vegetables shine in all their glory. I don’t remember eating tuna a lot before I became a vegetarian, but after having seen a few vegan sunflower seed “tuna” recipes on the web (especially this beautiful Tuna Tartine from Faring-Well) I suddenly got this weird craving for it. So we decided to give fake-tuna a try. By pulsing soaked sunflower seeds in a food processor together with salty capers, shallots, oil, apple cider vinegar, lemon and nori sheet, you actually get something that looks weirdly similar to canned tuna with a crumbly, moist texture and a flavour that reminds me of salty seas and umami. Most recipes we’ve seen use this sunflower seed tuna as a spread or as a tuna salad (often with the addition of celery and herbs) but we instead added it to a tomato sauce and served it with penne, creating a classic Italian poor mans dish. The vegan “tuna” adds a nice texture to the sauce and it improves the flavour as well. The kids loved it! It is a simple recipe if you are on a budget and it is a tad more special than your basic pasta pomodoro. So go put your sunflower seeds in water and pretend they are a fish. I can see Elsa eyeballing me from the window now so I better round this up. I have got a class in imaginative sign language up ahead with my favourite teacher. Penne Comodoro with Vegan “Tuna” Serves 4 It’s important to soak the sunflower seeds to achieve the right texture so don’t skip that step. If you’ve got some white wine opened in the fridge, you can add a glug of that for extra depth and flavour. Vegan Tuna 1 cup raw sunflower seeds, soaked in water for 6 hours or overnight 1 small shallot or red onion, minced 3 tbsp capers + brine 1 tbsp lemon juice 1 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil (coconut oil, ghee or butter) 1 tsp apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1/­­2 sheet of nori (the seaweed you use for sushi), cut into tiny pieces (optional) Pomodoro Sauce 1 onion 2 cloves of garlic 2 tbsp olive oil 3 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz cans of chopped tomatoes 1 handful fresh basil or 2 tsp dried sea salt freshly ground black pepper Serve with Pasta of choice (we use wholegrain penne or a gluten free version made from dried beans) 1/­­2 cup large capers fresh parsley, finely chopped ruccola To prepare the “tuna”, simply add all ingredients to a food processor. Pulse a few times until it you have a coarsely textured mixture. Taste and add more salt, lemon juice or vinegar. Pulse again and scoop the mixture into a bowl. Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic. Place a large sauce pan on medium heat and add olive oil. Sauté the onion and garlic for a few minutes until fragrant. Add tomatoes, basil, salt and pepper. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and simmer for about 30 minutes. Taste and adjust the flavours throughout. Add a splash of water or white wine if it starts looking dry. Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to the instructions on the package. When the tomato sauce is ready, stir in 2/­­3 of the “tuna”, saving the rest for serving. Divide the pasta in 4 bowls, top with tomato sauce, capers, fresh parsley and a drizzle of olive oil.

Roasted Carrots & Dukkah + Meaning

July 8 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Carrots & Dukkah + Meaning I started writing a text about summer food. About being offline and trying to unwind. A happy text about nothing of importance, really. With too many sad reports on the news recently, finding meaning in these short texts can sometimes be difficult. Millions of refugees keep filling up camps in countries around Syria. Or climb onto small boats in Libya hoping that they will make it across the Mediterranean sea. Meanwhile, prejudices, hate and racism are on the rise both in the US and here in Europe. So how can we make a blog post about summer food feeling meaningful at all? Luise and I often talk about this. I am sure everyone does. This feeling of wanting to do more but not being sure what, or how to do it. A recipe can seem so irrelevant in the midst of it all. It looks like we might get involved in some voluntary work in relation the refugee situation in Syria within the next couple of months. But until then, we are trying to see meaningfulness around us. The truth is of course that food does matter. It is important, in many more ways than just for our physical survival. Food is memories, heritage, happiness, family and food is love. Food gathers people around a table and makes us talk. Many of our best memories are connected with food. We solve problems over food. We celebrate. We become friends. So maybe a food blog isn’t that meaningless. Food is after all more than just a recipe. And talking about meaning. Another truth that Luise and I try to live by, is that the most responsible thing we can do at the moment is infusing our children with kindness. Talking to them about how it never will matter how much money you have, the colour of your skin, if you are a man or a woman, where you are born or who you choose to love. We are all humans. And we are all equal. If we can all just pass that on to our children, they will hopefully grow old in a world with less hate and fear and more love than the one we are currently living in. By writing this text, I have also passed that simple message on to you. Prepare the recipe in today’s blog post, share the meal with your friends or family and talk about the importance of kindness. It might be a cliche, but we believe it is one worth sharing. This is a simple summer dinner that we did the other day after we had prepared a large batch of the Egyptian spice blend Dukkah. Calling the meal simple might be a slight exaggeration as you actually have to prepare the spice blend as well as making the rest of the dinner. But it will be worth it. You will find that Dukkah can be added to an infinite amount of meals this summer. It carries a lot of flavour and adds both richness and crunch to whatever you pair it with. There are lots of Dukkah recipes to be found online so instead of adding yet another to the mix, we are simply sharing a slightly adapted version of Yotam and Sami’s brilliant Dukkah from their Jerusalem book. In this recipe the Dukkah is generously sprinkled over roasted summer carrots and onions that rest on a bed of herby quinoa with a creamy feta cheese and yogurt spread on the side. Any roasted vegetables can of course be added to this meal and they can just as well be grilled on a bbq. It’s a summery, creamy, very flavourful and absolutely delicious dish. And hopefully more than that. Enjoy! Much love and happy summer! David, Luise, Elsa & Isac Roasted Carrots with Dukkah, Quinoa & Feta Yogurt Cream Serves 4 Oven roasted summer carrots & onions 1 lb /­­ 500 g (approx. 8 large) carrots 4 onions, shallots or red onions 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tbsp maple syrup sea salt and black pepper Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Scrub the carrots under water and trim off the top greens. Cut the carrots lengthwise if they are thick (and keep thin carrots whole). Place on a baking tray. Peel off the outer layer of the onion and trim the top off. Cut into large chunks. Place on the baking tray next to the carrots. Stir together oil, maple, salt and pepper and drizzle over the vegetables, toss to cover. Bake in the oven for 15-20 minutes or until tender. Herby Quinoa 1 cup /­­ 170 g uncooked quinoa (or 2 1/­­2 cups pre-cooked) 1 large handful flat leave parsley a generous drizzle of olive oil 2 tbsp lemon juice sea salt & black pepper Place rinsed quinoa in a saucepan, add water and salt and bring to a boil. Lower the heat immediately and let simmer for about 10-15 minutes, set aside and let cool. Chop parsley and stir through the quinoa together with olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Feta & Yogurt Cream 5 oz /­­ 150 g feta cheese 1 cup /­­ 250 ml plain yogurt sea salt & black pepper Place feta cheese in a mixing bowl and mash with a fork, add yogurt and combine until creamy. Add salt and pepper to taste, set aside. Dukkah spice blend (adapted from Jerusalem by Yotam Ottolenghi & Sami Tamimi) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70 g hazelnuts 2 tbsp sunflower seeds 3 tbsp coriander seeds 1 tbsp fennel seeds 1 tbsp cumin seeds 2 tbsp sesame seeds 1 tsp nigella seeds 1/­­2 tsp sea salt Preheat the oven to 160°C /­­ 320°F. Spread the hazelnuts on a baking tray and place in the oven for 15-20 minutes or until cracked and golden. Meanwhile heat a skillet or frying pan to medium heat. Add sunflower seeds, coriander seeds, fennel seeds and cumin and dry roast for no more than a minutes while stirring. Now add sesame seeds and nigella seeds and keep stirring until the sesame seeds turns light brown, it takes about 30 seconds. Set aside and add salt. Rub the hazelnuts between the palms of your hands (or a towel) to remove and discard some of the skin. Place all ingredients in a pestle and mortar and coarsely crush the spice blend. Store in an airtight container for up to a month. Assembling: Spread the quinoa in a serving dish or on a large platter. Arrange the oven roasted carrots and onions on top. Spoon the feta and yogurt cream into a small bowl and place in the dish. Sprinkle the vegetables with a generous amount of Dukkah. Serve.

Epic Summer Salad

June 15 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Epic Summer Salad Ever since Isac learnt how to walk and talk, he and his sister have become like two asteroids, constantly spinning around each other with a kind of magnetic force keeping them both together and apart. If one of them goes in a new direction or another room or starts playing with new toys, the other one follows. It’s a special kind of bond between siblings that often,  though not always is wonderful to watch . Whenever they get too close, friction starts to build between them and within seconds the happiest of laughs has turned into the saddest of cries. My sister and I were the same, although, truth be told, we were more like two meteorites on a colliding course every day. I look at Elsa and Isac playing together, try to mediate when they fight and comfort them when they cry. And then I try envisioning what it will be like when another, smaller asteroid enters their orbits and takes part in that spinning dance around each other. I imagine more cries. More fights. And more laughter. To be honest, all change frightens me. It’s in my nature - in love with what we have now and scared of how the future will be. Although for some weird reason, Luise’s and my life tend to always be in a constant state of change, with our work, our family, our travels and our home. At this point, I have almost gotten used to it. I try to swallow my fear, telling myself that change makes life more interesting. I am quite certain it’s going to be challenging with a new baby, but as long as we get laughter along with the cries, I think we are going to be alright. I won’t be able to make a clever connection between todays recipe and my ramblings about siblings and change. What is on our minds and on our plates sometimes simply don’t match, so let’s just move on to the recipe. We have been working on and off with Stockholm based food store Urban Deli during the last two years, turning some of our recipes into healthy takeaway boxes. This summer salad is our latest edition and it turned out so epic that we wanted to share the recipe here on the blog as well. We have built the salad on a delicious base of mixed cauliflower, quinoa, sweet peas and a herb vinaigrette, which makes it both light and nourishing at the same time. It’s then topped with our favourite produce of the season - asparagus, strawberries, radishes, mixed lettuce and avocado. The salad is finished off with labneh balls, which is a strained yogurt based cheese that adds a tangy creaminess to the mix, as well as pumpkin seeds for some crunch. It’s a real treat and it looks really summery too. Quinoa & Cauliflower Salad with Labneh, Asparagus & Strawberries Serves 4 Labneh can be found in delis or Middle-Eastern food stores. We have provided instructions on how to make labneh at home. It takes at least 24h, but if you want to make this salad today you can also replace the labneh with feta cheese or dollops of thick yogurt. Or simply leave it out. 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked white quinoa 250 ml /­­ 1 cup water + a pinch sea salt 1/­­2 cauliflower head + boiling water 1 cup /­­ 150 g sweet green peas (thawed frozen works fine too) 1 bunch asparagus, trimmed and cut in 3 pieces 5 radishes 2 avocados 4 tbsp pumpkin seeds 250 g /­­ 1 1/­­2 cups strawberries 70-100 g /­­ 3 cups loosely packed mixed baby lettuce, rinsed 12-16 mini labneh balls (see instructions below) Herb vinaigrette: 10 sprigs flat-leaf parsley, leaves picked 10 sprigs mint, leaves picked 60 ml /­­ 1/­­4 cup olive oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice 1 tbsp applecider vinegar sea salt & pepper Preparing the quinoa and cauliflower: Place rinsed quinoa in a saucepan, add water and salt and bring to a boil. Lower the heat immediately and simmer for about 10-15 minutes, set aside and let cool. Coarsely chop the cauliflower and place the florets and stem in a food processor or blender and process until fine rice-like texture. Do it in batches if you have a small food processor. Place the ‘rice’ in a fine mesh strainer and pour over boiling water (use an electric kettle), let drain and cool. Meanwhile make the herb vinaigrette. Finely chop parsley and mint and place in a glass jar. Add the rest of the ingredients and stir to mix. Season to taste. When both quinoa and cauliflowerrice’ are completely cold, combine them with peas and half of the herb vinaigrette in a large mixing bowl. Then prepare the rest of the salad ingredients. Assembling the salad: Steam or cook the asparagus for 1-2 minutes. Thinly shave the radishes and cube the avocados. Heat a dry frying pan and lightly toast the pumpkin seeds for a couple of minutes on medium heat. Slice the strawberries. Assemble the salad by arranging the quinoa cauliflower mixture on a large serving platter. Scatter with asparagus, radishes, avocados, pumpkin seeds, strawberries and lettuce. Arrange labneh balls over the top and place a small jar of the leftover herb vinaigrette. Labneh 2 cups Greek yogurt 1 tsp salt 2 tbsp olive oil Place a large sieve or a colander over a bowl and line it with a cheese cloth, muslin or any thin cloth. Add salt to the yogurt and stir around so its evenly distributed. Scoop the yogurt into the middle of the cheesecloth. Gather the edges so the yogurt is covered and tie a string around the cloth. Leave it in the sieve and place in the fridge for 24 hours up to 3 days. The longer it stands, the firmer the labneh will become. If you are using it as a spread, 24 hours is usually enough. Let it sit in the sieve for another day if you are making labneh balls. Gently squeeze out any excess liquid into the bowl. Shape balls or serve it in a jar on the side with a drizzle of olive oil and some black pepper or dukkah on top. In case you live in Stockholm or are visiting this summer and feel too summer-lazy to cook this yourself, you can pick up this salad at any of Urban Deli’s stores. Radishes are swapped for pickled red onion for storage reasons but apart from that it’s pretty damn close to our original recipe. ************ PS! One last thing. We just wanted to mention that TODAY is official UK publication day for Green Kitchen Smoothies! We have posted a bunch of short videos on our youtube channel, showcasing how to do some of the smoothies. And more is on the way. If you haven’t ordered our book already here is a link to it on Amazon!

Summer Aubergine Rolls

May 24 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Summer Aubergine Rolls Hi friends, today we are sharing a dinner recipe that we prepared over the weekend. Some of you might recognize these aubergine rolls as they are a summery version of our Involtini di Melanzane recipe. It has always been one of our favorites and there is also a winter version of it in our Green Kitchen Travels cookbook. This one has a brighter and tangier filling than the original and is baked without the tomato sauce. The filling is made with a mix of asparagus, rhubarb, pesto, pistachios, feta cheese, raisins and cooked quinoa. It is a really delicious filling that could also be served on its own (but it looks so much more impressive tucked inside the aubergine rolls). We served the rolls with a green salad drizzled with a little yogurt dressing. It was totally delicious and would be quite an impressive dish to do if you have friends coming over for dinner. I know we always say this, but do save some time (and effort) and let everybody get involved and help roll. Cooking and eating is so much more fun when the experience is shared. We also have some news about upcoming events. - First of all, we are going to Lisbon this coming Sunday (29 May) to promote the Portuguese edition of our first book. We will be doing some interviews and a talk and book signing in the Praça Leya at the Lisbon book fair. The talk is at 7 pm. Wed love to meet some of our Portuguese readers there, so please come by and chat with us! - We also wanted to share some more dates for our exciting launch of Green Kitchen Smoothies in London. We will be doing a supper club and Q&A with Mae Deli x Deliciously Ella on Tuesday 7th June and tickets can be booked here (only a few left!). We will also be talking at the Good Roots Festival on Saturday 11th June but unfortunately that is already sold out. There will be one or two more opportunities to get your books signed and have a chat and we will announce those as soon as we have more info. Summer Aubergine Rolls stuffed with Quinoa, Rhubarb & Asparagus 2 large aubergines, thinly sliced (approx. 24 slices in total) olive oil, to brush sea salt 2 rhubarb stalks, thinly sliced 10 asparagus spears, thinly sliced 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100 g uncooked quinoa or 2 cups cooked quinoa (any color) 1 cup /­­ 250 ml water 1 large pinch sea salt 1 cup pesto dressing (see end note) 50 g shelled unsalted pistachio nuts, coarsely chopped 150 g feta cheese, crumbled 1 handful raisins Preheat the oven to 200°C/­­400°F. Arrange the aubergine slices (not overlapping) on two baking trays lined with baking paper. Use a pastry brush to brush each slice with a thin layer of olive oil on both sides. Sprinkle with sea salt and bake in the oven for 13-15 minutes or until very soft and golden. Thinly slice the rhubarb and asparagus and spread out on another baking tray lined with baking paper, drizzle with a little olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt. Place in the oven and bake for 5-8-minutes, or until soft and juicy. Meanwhile cook the quinoa. Place rinsed quinoa in a saucepan, add water and bring to a boil. Lower the heat immediately and simmer for about 15 minutes, set aside. When slightly cooled, stir through 3/­­4 of the pesto dressing, 3/­­4 of the chopped pistachios nuts, 1/­­2 of the feta cheese and raisins. Then carefully fold in the baked rhubarb and asparagus. Roll the aubergine: Place the grilled aubergine, one by one, in front of you. Add a large spoonful of the quinoa mixture at the bottom of it and roll up lengthwise away from you. Place the rolls on a baking tray with baking paper. Scatter over the remaining feta cheese, a drizzle of the pesto dressing and sprinkle with the chopped pistachio nuts. Bake for 10 minutes at 200°C/­­400°F. Ready to serve. Serve with a simple green salad of choice and drizzle with yogurt. Enjoy! Note about the pesto dressing: If you make a batch of homemade pesto, simply add more olive oil and lemon juice to make it thinner. Alternatively buy a store-bought pesto and thin it out with more olive oil and lemon juice.

Savoury Buckwheat Granola

May 5 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Savoury Buckwheat Granola Say hello to your salad’s new best friend. This jar of mustardy granola has become a total game-changer in our kitchen. And if you are like us and often mix leftovers into quick salad bowls, you are soon going to realize its potential. The granola has the most delicious flavour and adds a superb crunch to all types of salads. We dont see this as a salad topping but instead a filler that you can use instead of cooking a batch of rice, quinoa or millet or whatever you normally use to make something simple and green into a more substantial meal. The granola is also great with soups (perfect for gazpacho!) and on top of grilled feta cheese or on a savory yogurt bowl. There are doubtless lots of other uses that we havent tried yet, but we surely will during the summer. Savory granola might not be an entirely new concept, but it is a great one. And this recipe is a real winner with tones of mustard, orange zest, thyme and rosemary. It also has an incredible crunch from buckwheat groats, nuts, seeds, rolled rye and oats. So give yourself 10 minutes to mix the ingredients together, shove it in the oven and then use it on almost anything. You can thank us later To help you get started, we are also sharing a quick little baked feta cheese recipe and a crunchy green salad which both are optimal paired with the granola. The feta cheese is almost too simple. Bake a block of feta cheese for 10 minutes on 200°C /­­ 400°F, then switch up the temperature to max and turn on the broiler for just a few minutes. Drizzle with olive oil, fresh herbs and a generous sprinkle of savoury granola. We usually serve the cheese as a side dish to share on the table. An extra drizzle of honey will make it even more special. The salad is a bit of a mash-up between a salad and a slaw. Thinly sliced vegetables and pears are mixed with lettuce, drizzled with a yogurt dressing and then covered in granola. Win! Savoury Granola - Salads Best Friend Makes 4 cups /­­ 1 litre You can of course add or replace any of the seeds, nuts or flakes with what you have in your pantry. If you are looking for a slightly lighter granola you can replace some of the oil with water. Dry spices could also be added instead of the fresh herbs. Dressing:   1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml olive oil 2 tbsp grainmustard 1 tbsp honey (or maple syrup) zest from 1 orange  1-2 tbsp finely chopped fresh thyme (leaves only) 1-2 tbsp finely chopped fresh rosemary (leaves only)  salt and pepper  Dry ingredients:   1 cup /­­ 100 g rolled rye flakes (or just oats, if you are sensitive to gluten) 1 cup /­­ 100 g rolled oats 1/­­2 cup buckwheat groats  1/­­2 cup pumpkin seeds  1/­­2 cup sunflower seeds  1/­­2 cup hazelnuts Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 360°F. Combine all of the dressing ingredients in a large bowl and whisk until smooth. Add all of the dry ingredients to the bowl. Use you hands or a spatula to toss the dry ingredients in the dressing until all is coated. Bake for about 20 minutes or until crunchy and golden, stirring the granola halfway through to prevent it from burning. We usually add some extra herbs after it is baked but this is of course optional. Store in an air-tight jar in room temperature for up to 4 weeks. Fennel and Pear Salad with yogurt dressing Serves 4 1 butter lettuce, leaves gently torn 1 cucumber, sliced into rounds 1 fennel bulb, halved and thinly sliced  1 bunch radishes, thinly sliced 1/­­2 romanesco or broccoli, thinly sliced 2 pears, thinly sliced  2 tbsp olive oil  Yogurt dressing 3/­­4 cup /­­ 20o ml yogurt 10 basil leaves, finely chopped 1/­­2 lemon, juice a pinch of salt and a generous grind of black pepper Prepare all the salad ingredients and place them in a large salad bowl. It’s easiest to use a mandolin to get thin slices. Drizzle with olive oil and toss to combine. Stir together the yogurt dressing in a small bowl. Serve the salad on 4 plates, drizzle with yogurt and top with a generous scoop of granola. PS. In case anyone is wondering, the salad plate was a real bargain from a local ceramicist . Apparently it’s a bit uneven so we almost got it for free. A tip is to always ask for their “damaged goods” if you want unique pieces and are on a budget. The apron is from Stone Cold Fox. 

Green Pea, Millet & Mint Fritters

April 19 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Pea, Millet & Mint Fritters Elsa planted a few pea seeds in pots that we placed in our kitchen window a couple of weeks ago. It has turned out to be a fun little project as they have been growing rapidly and she has been measuring them every morning. Isac was very intrigued by the part where you water the seeds and has been a keen helper in that area. He has also started experimenting with watering a few other things in our apartment, like the pestle and mortar, my shoes and our living room sofa. We’re still waiting to see if any of them will start growing. It would be a great story if I could tell you that we’ve been harvesting the peas from Elsa’s plants and used in this pea fritter recipe but her little hobby project will probably only leave us with a handful of tiny peas. So the peas in this recipe came from a different source. I am not sure if fritters actually is the correct word as we don’t use any flour in this recipe and they are aren’t deep-fried either. Perhaps pea pancakes would describe them better? We however rarely get the chance to use the word fritters so that’s what we’re sticking with. These are fresh and light with distinct tones of mint and spring. We enjoyed them for lunch but they could make for a nice breakfast as well. Apart from peas and herbs, we use cooked milleteggs and ricotta cheese in the batter. They are quite delicate and need a gentle hand when flipped, but the easiest trick is to keep them quite small in size. You could of course serve this with a number of different options but here we have simply wilted spinach with chili flakes for a bit of a punch, added a soft boiled egg and topped it with a dollop of yogurt, sprouts, radishes and lemon zest. Pea, Millet & Mint Pancakes Serves 4 We have listed the amount of uncooked millet that you need for this recipe but we recommend cooking a larger batch while you are at it. We always keep cooked millet or quinoa in the fridge so we easily can create patties like these or to make our soups more filling. 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 225 g fresh green peas (or frozen and thawed) 1 packed cup /­­ 160 g cooked millet (1/­­3 cup /­­ 70 g uncooked) (cooked quinoa or rice should work too) 1 spring onion, chopped 2 eggs 1 handful fresh mint and parsley leaves (6 sprigs, picked) 4 tbsp ricotta cheese (or cottage cheese) salt and pepper coconut oil, for frying Wilted spinach coconut oil a few handfuls wild spinach 1-2 tsp chili flakes salt and pepper Serve with Yogurt Soft or medium boiled egg (ours were cooked for 7 minutes) Beetroot sprouts Radishes Lemon zest Add 1 cup /­­ 150 g of the peas to a food processor along with millet, spring onion, eggs, herbs, ricotta cheese, salt and pepper. Pulse a few times on high speed until mixed but still slightly chunky. Mash the remaining peas roughly with a fork and stir into the batter. Let sit for 20 minutes to let the ingredients come together (which will make them easier to fry). Add a teaspoon of coconut oil to a non-stick frying pan on medium heat, wait until it’s hot and then use a large spoon to dollop the fritters into the pan and flat them out into rounds (depending on the size of the pan, you should be able to fit between three and five of them each time). Cook until they begin to set, roughly about 3 minutes and then carefully flip them with a spatula. If the batter feels too soft and runny, you can add some extra millet to it. Fry all the fritters and place on a tray to cool off just slightly while wilting the spinach. Using the same frying pan, simply add the spinach to a little oil and chili flakes on a medium heat and let sauté for a few minutes until it has wilted down. Place the spinach on plates, top with a few sweet pea fritters, yogurt, sprouts, radishes and a generous amount of lemon zest and soft boiled eggs on the side. Enjoy! ****************** PS! We have released an update for our Green Kitchen app which includes a search bar (finally, right!?) where you can search on recipe names and ingredients. We have also added more recipes, Quick Actions with 3D Touch and a whole lot of backend fixes that will make it run even smoother. All the recipes in the app are available in English, German, Spanish, Italian and French, with more languages coming. All this comes for free if you already have the app, just hit update in App Store!

Spring Celebration Salad

March 31 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Spring Celebration Salad There is one thing you have to understand about living in the northern regions of Europe. The darkness during the winter is really, really harsh. Short, cold and grey days with a minimal amount of sunlight. And if you, like me, believe that you were meant to be born in either Italy, Hawaii or India, the darkness feels twice as draining. However on the upside, the Nordics are probably the most sun-appreciating people on this planet. Come the first rays of sunshine and a little bit of warm air and we throw off our clothes and spend hours standing like suricates, gazing at the sun. Well almost anyway. That first day of spring happened earlier this weekend when we visited friends outside the city. We threw together two simple salads in celebration of all the early produce and enjoyed them as a lunch around a table in the garden, with sunshades on! Afterwards we strolled over to the neighbour farm to pet the newly born lambs and calves (Isac was first terrified and then almost impossible to get out of there). It felt like the perfect day and well-worth getting through all those dark months for. Even for an Italian/­­Hawaiian/­­Indian guy like myself. This salad is a version of the one our friends made that day. We have shared a couple of spring salads on this blog throughout the years (asparagus & buckwheat salad - rhubarb & puy lentil salad - egg salad - green bean salad), but what makes this one stand out is the very simple and rich butter vinaigrette that is poured over the cooked new potatoes and steamed asparagus. So delicious. We have added some lentils (you can use ready-cooked if you want to save some time and effort) and sugar peas for extra protein but any type of green beans or string beans could also be delicious. With the lentil addition, this is great as a lunch or light dinner, but it would also be a perfect side salad for a weekend bbq. For our vegan friends, we have also tried this with a few alternative dressings with great results. Either just replace the butter with olive oil. Or try a delicious Dijon dressing by stirring together equal parts Dijon mustard and maple syrup (or honey if you prefer) with a bit of lemon juice and a good glug olive oil. Asparagus & Potato Salad with Butter Vinaigrette Serves 4 The butter dressing makes this salad ideal served straight away, when the vegetables are still slightly warm. 1 1/­­2 lb /­­ 800 g new potatoes 2 bunches (1 lb /­­ 500 g) asparagus 1 cup /­­ 100 g sugar peas 1 cup /­­ 175 g cooked whole lentils, rinsed (we used green/­­brown but any color is fine) 1 small handful chives 5 radishes, very thinly sliced Butter vinaigrette 2 oz /­­ 60 g organic butter or ghee (use olive oil for a vegan option and skip the heating part) 2 tbsp organic unfiltered apple cider vinegar 1 spring onion, very finely chopped salt & black pepper Rinse and scrub the potatoes and place them whole in a large saucepan, cover with water and add sea salt. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat and let simmer until tender, about 10-15 minutes. Rinse and trim the asparagus by snapping off the dry ends. Place the asparagus in a steaming basket (or use a sieve with a lid) and cover. Remove the lid from the saucepan with the boiling potatoes and place the basket on top, the steam from the boiling potato water is used to steam the asparagus. Steam until the asparagus are tender, 5-10 minutes depending on their thickness. Finely slice the sugar peas and radishes and rinse the cooked lentils. Melt the butter on low heat for the vinaigrette. Finely chop the spring onion and add to the melted butter and stir in apple cider vinegar. Season with salt and pepper. Place all salad ingredients in a bowl. Right before serving, add the butter vinaigrette and use your hands to toss until everything is coated in the vinaigrette. Serve immediately.

Chocolate Chia & Raspberry Parfait

March 4 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Chocolate Chia & Raspberry Parfait I realize that we have shared a couple of quick parfaits here before but it is quite nice to have a few different desserts to choose between when late nights cravings set in. Our Apple Crunch Parfait seems to have become quite popular (not only in our house) and this new parfait is just as good. Easily explained, it’s a chai spiced chocolate chia pudding topped with a lush and creamy raspberry mousse made from only 3 ingredients! It’s one of those happy coincidences when a really simple recipe also turns out to be deliciously addictive. I could eat the mousse with a spoon straight from the food processor (and I do when David isn’t watching) but turning it into a parfait feels a little classier. This is usually served a sweet snack or simple dessert in our family but I guess it could be a pretty awesome breakfast as well. We claim that this is an easy one to make. As a matter of fact, it is so simple that even Isac, our 18-months old toddler, can make it (well kind of). Just press play on this little video below and you’ll see for yourselves! Chia pudding is one of Isac’s newest obsessions. I can’t believe his shirt looks so clean on these photos as he normally pour those belly seeds all over himself in an attempt to gobble a full glass in less than five seconds. He’s a real speed eating little monkey. Chai & Chocolate Chia & Raspberry Parfait Serves 2 Chai & Chocolate Chia Pudding 3 tbsp chia seeds 250 ml /­­ 1 cup plant milk of choice (oat milk, almond milk, rice milk or coconut milk)  1/­­4 tsp ground cardamom 1/­­4 tsp ground cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp ground ginger 1/­­8 tsp grund clove 1-2 tsp cacao powder 1 pinch sea salt Raspberry Mousse 1 ripe avocado, stoned 200 g /­­ 1 1/­­2 cups frozen raspberries (thawed) or fresh 4-5 soft dates, pitted Topping 8 fresh raspberries 2 tsp nut butter (we used cashew nut butter) 1 tbsp desiccated coconut (unsweetened) Whisk together chia seeds and plant milk in a bowl. Measure the spices into a small bowl, stir and then add them to the chia mixture along with cacao powder and salt. Whisk until all is mixed and there are no lumps. Leave to soak for 30 minutes, whisk one or two times in between to make sure it stays smooth. Prepare the raspberry mousse while the chia pudding is becoming thicker. Add raspberriesavocado and dates to a food processor. Run on high speed until smooth. Layer the chocolate & chai chia pudding with the raspberry mousse into two glasses or jars. Keeps in the fridge for 2-3 days in sealed jars without the topping.

Fifty Shades of Greens

February 17 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Fifty Shades of Greens Many of our recipes are well talked through and planned between the two of us. We write shopping lists, buy enough groceries so we can test cook them properly a few times and make sure to take down notes during the process. I always use the laptop but Luise insists on scribbling on small pieces of paper that often end up in the hands of the kids and their crayons (can somebody please tell that woman to put her fancy new Macbook to use!). We always feel quite content after having published one of those type of recipes. But it actually seems like the recipes from simple fridge and freezer findings that are whipped together quickly without a moment of planning, seem to spark just as much interest, even though they are very basic. This quick pasta dish with fifty shades of greens started out like that, with two hungry kids, half a package of pasta (made from legumes) and some leftover green vegetables (the ones on the photo obviously look a little less sad than the first time we made it). It ticks all the right boxes for a February recipe. Simple. Comforting. Nutritious. Vegan. Tasty! It reminds me of a pasta dish I used to cook back when I was living in Rome. One of my favourite things to buy from the local farm stands were cute baby zucchinis (and they were so cheap!) that I sliced and fried with onion, garlic, thyme, capers, fresh herbs and spinach. Then I poured over a dash of cream and white wine before tossing in the cooked pasta. It was my go-to dinner for one, ready in 12 minutes. Here we have added even more greens. We are using frozen peas and one whole broccoli, shaving the stem thinly and breaking the rest into small florets. The vegetables are cooked in coconut cream which also adds a little sweetness. When making green vegetable dishes like this, remember not to cook it too long. You just want to soften the vegetables up, not kill them. If you are a quick chopper, you can have dinner ready in less than 20 minutes. And if you are cooking for kids and are afraid that they will dream horrible nightmares from being fed too many vegetables, Elsa’s recommendation is skipping the spinach and add more peas. Because cooked spinach is: “The most horrible thing I have ever tasted in my entire life”. Our pasta of choice here is a green pea fusilli pasta which is gluten free but also adds protein. Not to mention, it is green and bring yet another shade to this dish! More and more alternative pasta/­­noodle products made entirely from legumes (beans, lentils and peas) are popping up in stores. Not only health food stores but also many supermarkets. We like them because they are nutritious alternatives to regular refined wheat pasta. They are also rich in fiber, made from complex carbohydrates, naturally gluten free and they come in many colours and shapes, which make it more fun for the kids to eat. Pea, Spinach & Broccoli Pasta (aka fifty shades of greens) Serves 4 If you don’t have all the vegetables at home, no worries, just use what you’ve got. You can use frozen broccoli and spinach instead of fresh. If you’ve got some leftover white wine in the house, try adding a splash together with the garlic and onion. And if you don’t fancy coconut milk/­­cream, you can use ordinary cream, Greek yogurt or a vegan alternative. 2 tbsp olive oil or coconut oil 4 cloves of garlic 1 yellow onion 4 sprigs of fresh thyme 3 tbsp pickled capers (use the brine as well) 1/­­2 large zucchini or 1 small, sliced into thin half moons 1 small broccoli, broken into small florets and stem sliced thinly 2 handfuls whole spinach leaves, rinsed 1 small can coconut cream or the solid top layer of a coconut milk (more info here) 1 1/­­2 cup frozen peas 1-2 tbsp lemon juice and a little zest sea salt and pepper chopped fresh parsley, for serving Pasta for 4 servings, choose the sort you prefer (read about our pasta of choice above). Bring a saucepan filled with water to boil. Add pasta and let cook until ready (as instructed on the package), then drain and set aside. Heat oil in a large skillet on medium heat. Finely chop garlic and onion and add to the skillet. Let sauté until fragrant and then add thyme, capers (and white wine, if using) and cook for another minute. Add zucchini and broccoli and cook until almost tender. Now add peas, spinach, coconut cream, lemon, salt and pepper and cook until the spinach is just wilted. Taste and adjust the flavors to your liking. Add the cooked pasta to the skillet and mix to combine. Scatter over fresh parsley and serve. Non-vegans can of course add some grated cheese if they wish.

Vegetable flatbreads + video

February 4 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Vegetable flatbreads + video These colorful flatbreads are quick to make, have only 3 ingredients (well kind of, if you are not counting salt or pepper) with the main one being a vegetable (which is why they have such awesome colors). Sounds interesting? We created this recipe for our youtube channel so make sure to watch the video to see what a simple, savoury snack this is. Our plan was to make a really instructional video but Elsa came crashing our shoot with all her crazy monkey faces and dances and we just couldn’t leave those parts out when editing. Hopefully you will still find some helpful cooking instructions in there. Press play! We really enjoy shooting these videos and will try making them more frequently. We are thinking about adding some Q&A videos as well, so subscribe to our youtube channel for the latest updates and to ask us questions. Our flatbreads are simply made with mixed vegetables, ground almonds and eggs. The recipe is based on the quite popular cauliflower pizza crust recipe from our first cookbook The Green Kitchen. We found these to be a fun variation and quite useful to have at home. We have broccoli in the green ones, and mix cauliflower with carrots or beetroot for the orange and purple/­­red flatbreads. You can also add spinach or kale to the broccoli or cauliflower mix. A handy and a bit unusual way to eat your veggies. The almond flour add a sweet roundness to the flavor but if you are allergic to nuts you could try using chickpea flour and a splash of olive oil instead. We should perhaps add that raw mixed broccoli smells a lot like fart, so you should perhaps not make these right before you are having a romantic date (the smell disappears when they are baked though). With a stack of these in the fridge, you’ve got a number of quick meal options. Most commonly, we eat them as sandwiches filled with mashed avocado, vegetables, hummus or cheese (you can of course add whatever you prefer). Or we make super quick mini pizzas by spreading a single layer pesto or tomato puree on each, then add topping of choice and bake for 7-8 minutes on high heat. You can also make larger pieces and roll them into thick wraps. Thank you Angela for leaving a comment suggesting these would be great canapés, stamped out with cookie cutters, excellent idea! Broccoli Flatbread Makes about 12 slices 1 large head of raw broccoli 100 g /­­ 1 cup almond flour /­­ ground almonds 4 eggs 1 tsp dried herbs of choice (oregano, thyme, lemon pepper), optional sea salt and black pepper to taste Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F and line a baking tray with baking paper. Coarsely chop the broccoli (use the brighter part of the stem too), place in food processor and blend until you have got a fine rice-like texture. Measure 4 cups /­­ 1 liter of the vegetable rice and place in a mixing bowl. Add ground almonds, salt and pepper (plus herbs, if using) and mix with your hands. Make a well in the centre and add the eggs. Whisk the eggs with a fork. Use your hands to pull the dry ingredients towards the middle until everything is combined and you can shape it into a ball. It should be more loose and wet than a traditional bread dough. Transfer to the baking paper and form into a rectangular base by flattening the dough with your hands. Bake on the middle rack in the oven for 23-25 minutes or until slightly golden and firm. Remove from the oven and let cool completely. Turn it upside-down and carefully remove the baking paper. Cut into bread-sized slices and store in the fridge. Beet flatbread 1 small head of raw cauliflower, including the stem 2 medium raw beetroots, peeled 100 g /­­ 1 cup almond flour /­­ ground almonds 4 eggs 1/­­2 tsp sea salt and black pepper Use the same instruction and measurements as above. The dough is slightly more moist than when using broccoli but dries up when baked. Carrot flatbread 1 small head of raw cauliflower 1 large raw carrot, peeled 100 g /­­ 1 cup almond flour /­­ ground almonds 4 eggs 1/­­2 tsp sea salt and black pepper Use the same instruction and measurements as above. The dough is slightly more moist than when using broccoli but dries up when baked. Note for vegans: We have tried a vegan version of this recipe but weren’t entirely satisfied with it. We used 3 chia ‘eggs’ (3 tbsp chia + 9 tbsp water, set a side for 15 minutes) instead of eggs, but it didn’t hold together well enough once baked. Next time we will try replacing the almond flour with a more starchy flour (rice flour or chickpea flour) or replacing chia seeds with psyllium seeds for the bread to hold together better.

The Mother of all Veggie Bowls

January 14 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

For a long time, it felt like we could just follow our own path on this blog and in our kitchen. But it’s becoming more and more obvious that with a 1,5-year old and a soon 6-year old in the family, their food preferences matter too. And we should talk about that more. Isac is actually quite the happy eater. He is stuffing his face full with most food that we put in front of him. Just like Elsa did when she was younger. Now however, she has become rather selective with her food. A lot of dinners are spent listening to our daughter explaining how she loves this (pointing at oven roasted broccoli) and hates that (holds up a mushroom while shaking her hand like she was holding poison), loves this (places three raw carrots in her mouth at the same time) and hates that (scoops the lettuce off her plate and on to her little brother’s). We try to be cool about it, listen to her and sometime adapt or just try again next time. You see, she can be quite random; devour on an avocado toast one day and then completely despise it the next. She is not a fan of kale in salads but loves them as chips. One method that always seem to work is when we place a mix of vegetables, grains, seeds, fruit and legumes on separate plates on the table and have a little Build-Your-Own-Dinner party. Then we can all pick our favourites. Except Isac, who prefers a more chaotic take on dinner and therefore get served a ready-made bowl. Last Friday we came up with a new version of that dinner. We gathered a rainbow selection of warm and cold vegetables, brown rice and creamy spreads in one huge bowl and then let everyone grab a fork and eat straight from the bowl - family style! We placed blankets on the living room floor, put the bowl in between us and had a movie night/­­indoor picnic while the snow was coming down outside. It was perfect. Until Isac sat down in the bowl. But we weren’t that hungry anyway … We have made many #gksbowls during the last years but I think this one takes the cake. It’s the mother of all veggie bowls. And she has got something for everyone. We created three spreads/­­dips/­­sauces for this bowl. The first one is a Sun-dried Tomato & Red Lentil Spread which is great mixed with rice or smothered on top of a sandwich. We also made a Green Pesto inspired by this old recipe of ours. But you can also just go for a store bought. Lastly, we made a Vegan White Bean & Sunflower Sauce that was inspired by Laura’s Special Sauce. Her sauce has a whole array of spices to boost flavour but since we made this for the kid we went a little lighter with the spices and added some white beans for extra protein. It tastes amazing and the nutritional yeast give it a kind of cheesy flavour even though it’s vegan. You can choose how thick you want it by the amount of water added. Use more water if you prefer it as a runny sauce and less if you want it more as a spread. The Mother of All Veggie Bowls We want you to use this recipe as inspiration and have therefore not specified exact measurements for the vegetables. Choose your favorites and adapt the amount to how many people you are serving. It is not very expensive food either and is perfect if you are on a budget. Any leftovers can be used to create similar bowls or make awesome warm sandwiches/­­toasts the following days. 1 batch cooked brown rice (or millet, quinoa or buckwheat) Oven Roasted (or steamed) Vegetables (see instructions below) Raw Vegetables (see instructions below) Kale chips Sauerkraut, store bought or homemade Pumpkin Seeds, whole or roughly chopped  Green pesto White Vegan Sauce (see recipe below) Sundried Tomato & Lentil Spread (see recipe below) In a very large and wide serving bowl: Arrange the lettuce to cover the bottom of the bowl. Then spoon up the rice in the center. Place the roasted and raw vegetables and sauerkraut in a circle around the rice. Then arrange small jars with the dipping sauces in the serving bowl or on the side and sprinkle over pumpkin seeds. Dig in! (Alternatively, let everyone pick their favourite veggies and place them in smaller bowls.) Oven roasted or steamed veggies Broccoli, torn into florets Sweet potato, rinsed and cut in 1/­­3 inch /­­ 1 cm slices Parsnip, peeled and cut into thick sticks Carrots, rinsed and cut into thick sticks Cauliflower, rinsed and cut into florets Beets, peeled and cut into 1 inch pieces For oven roasting: Preheat the oven to 200°C/­­400°F. Place the prepared vegetables on a baking papper, drizzle with olive oil or melted coconut oil and sea salt and pepper. Toss to cover. Place in the oven and roast for 25-40 minutes until tender and golden with crispy edges. For steaming: Pour an inch of water into a pot, place a metal strainer (or a steaming basket if you have one) over, resting on the rim of the pot, not touching the boiling water. Place the veggies in a single layer in the strainer. Bring the water to a boil, the lower the heat to a bare simmer, cover with a lid. Check the veggies often to prevent over cooked veggies, steaming time will vary depending on the type and size of veggies, but usually between 8 and 20 minutes. Raw veggies cut in bite-size pieces Carrots, cut into sticks Avocado, stone removed and flesh scooped out and sliced Cucumber, shaved with a julienne peeler or cut into sticks (with peel on) Bell pepper, rinsed and cut into sticks Lettuce, rinsed and patted dry Cherry tomatoes, divided in halves White vegan sauce 1 cup raw sunflower seeds, soaked for 20 mins 1 1/­­2 -2 cups (350 ml – 500 ml) filtered water 1/­­2 cup  /­­ 125 ml cold-pressed olive oil 1/­­2 cup (80 g) cooked large white (navy) beans (we use pre-cooked store bought) 3 tbsp nutritional yeast (buy at the health food store) 2 garlic cloves, peeled 1-inch piece of fresh turmeric (or 1/­­2 tsp ground turmeric) 1 tsp raw unfiltered apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 tsp ground nutmeg 1/­­4 cup fresh lemon juice fine sea salt and ground black pepper, to taste Add all ingredients to a high-speed blender and blend until completely smooth. Taste and adjust the flavors to your liking, add more lemon juice, nutritional yeast or spices if needed. Add more water or oil if you prefer a more liquid sauce. Store in an air-tight container in the fridge. Sun-dried tomato & red lentil spread 1/­­2 cup uncooked red lentils 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 100 g /­­ approx. 10 large sun-dried tomato, soaked in water for 20 minutes and then rinsed and chopped 1 small clove garlic 1/­­2 lemon, juice 1 tsp flaky sea salt 1/­­4 cup water Rinse and drain the lentils. Place lentils, 1 cup water and sea salt in a saucepan, cover and bring to a boil. Immediately lower the heat and let gently simmer for 20 minutes or until tender and can be mashed easily between two fingers. Drain any excess water, let cool slightly. Place in food processor with the rest of the ingredients and process until a smooth and creamy texture is reached. Add more water if you prefer it thinner. Taste the spread and adjust the flavors by adding more lemon juice or salt. Store in an air-tight container in the fridge. Ps! Thank you all of  that has emailed reminders that we should change our blog header to also include Isac’s name. Unfortunately we have lost the original file for the logo so we will change it as soon we have a new logo ready. Even if he is not visual on the blog yet, he is very present in our kitchen (making a mess!).

Green Christmas 2015

December 19 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Answering questions about vegetarian Christmas food has almost become a December tradition for us. It seems like a lot of people are looking for more plant based options for their holiday celebrations, regardless if they are vegetarians or not. I wish we had an awesome vegetarian version of Swedish meatballs or a brilliant vegetarian Christmas sausage recipe to send over, whenever we are asked. But truth be told, we usually keep things simpler in our family. One of our favourite things to bring to a Christmas table is a flavourful salad with some cooked quinoa, buckwheat or millet, a selection of roasted vegetables, greens, nuts and fruit. It might sound boring with a salad but it always look very colourful and festive and really stand out from all the bread, gravy and sauces. When Norwegian newspaper DN asked us to create a couple of vegetarian Christmas recipes for their weekend magazine D2, a holiday salad was of course on the menu. But we also included an updated version of our old mushroom loaf recipe with spinach, brown rice and hazelnuts, as a delicious green main dish. Along with our gluten free beet buns, a red cabbage and grape salad and a Christmas spiced chocolate mousse that is dead-easy to make. And now, with Christmas just around the corner, we are also sharing all those recipes here, for all of you that don’t speak Norwegian. Choose one dish or make the entire menu. And if you are looking for more Christmas recipes, you can have a look through our archive. Happy holidays! Millet, Persimmon & Brussels Sprout Salad Serves 4 As I mentioned above, we love hearty salads that balances warm and cold ingredients, have a variety of textures and a touch of sweetness. This Christmas salad with oven roasted Brussels sprouts, kale and persimmons has all that. The millet makes it into more of a main dish than just a salad and the honey Dijon dressing adds delicious Christmassy flavours. If you are not cooking for vegans, some feta cheese or goat’s cheese would also be delicious in this. Salad ingredients 300 g oven roasted brussels sprout 1 tbsp olive oil 1/­­4 tsp sea salt 1 cup /­­ 200 g uncooked millet (or quinoa) 2 large leaves kale, stems removed 1 persimmon or orange, sliced 1 cup /­­ 125 g roasted walnuts or pecan nuts 1 handful pomegranate seeds Mustard dressing 4 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil 1 tbsp Dijon mustard 1 tbsp quality honey 2-3 tbsp lemon juice, to taste a pinch sea salt and pepper Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Rinse the Brussels sprouts, remove the outer leaf, cut off the end and slice them in halves. Place in an ovenproof dish, drizzle with olive oil and salt and toss with your hands. Place in the oven and bake for about 20 minutes or until soft and with golden and crispy edges. Rinse the millet in hot water and then cook it according to the packaging. Prepare the dressing by whisking all ingredients in a small bowl. Chop the kale coarsely and place in a salad bowl, pour over the dressing and use your hands to massage the leaves, making sure every single kale leaf is covered in dressing. Add the cooked millet and toss to combine. Then add persimmon, walnuts and a sprinkle of pomegranate seeds on top.   Mushroom, Rice & Hazelnut Loaf Makes 1 loaf This delicious Christmas loaf is filled with flavour from mushrooms, spinach and hazelnuts and a very satisfying thanks to the rice. Its perfect to make for Christmas as a vegetarian main dish. We love the look of the whole hazelnuts inside the loaf but you can chop them coarsely to make it even easier to cut the slices. 1/­­2 cup /­­ 150 ml whole grain rice, any colour (we used red) 1 cup /­­ 300 ml water a pinch sea salt 2 tbsp cold-pressed coconut oil, butter or olive oil 1 large onion 2 garlic cloves 10 oz /­­ 300 g mushrooms 1 sprig rosemary 2 sprigs thyme sea salt and black pepper 7 oz /­­ 200 g spinach (fresh or frozen, thawed) 4 eggs 1/­­3 cup /­­ 100 ml unsweetened plant milk or regular milk sea salt and black pepper 1/­­4 tsp ground nutmeg 3.5 oz /­­ 100 g hazelnuts (if allergic to nuts, use sunflower seeds or simply skip them), whole or coarsely chopped Preheat the oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Place the rice in a sieve and rinse with water. Then place in a saucepan with water and salt. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a bare simmer and let cook for 30-40 minutes (check the specific cooking time on the package). Clean the mushrooms with a soft brush, if they are very dirty you can wash them with a little water and dry well. Slice the stem and the cap lengthwise into large slices. Heat oil in a skillet on medium-high heat, add garlic and onion and fry until fragrant. Then add mushrooms, rosemary, thyme salt and pepper and let fry for 2-3 minutes until browned on one side, then stir to flip side. Fry for a couple more minutes and then add spinach, stir around until wilted and pour into a bowl. In a separate bowl whisk the eggs with milk, nutmeg, salt and pepper. Add hazelnuts, cooked rice and the mushroom and spinach mixture and combine. Grease a loaf pan or cover it in baking paper. Pour the loaf mixture into the pan, place in the oven and bake for 45 minutes. Let cool slightly to allow the loaf to set. Carefully flip the loaf out of the pan. Use a sharp knife when slicing it, we usually do 1-2 cm slices. Enjoy!   Crispy Red Cabbage & Grape Salad Serves 4-6 We make this crunchy salad as a fresh and simple side to all the richer dishes. It has a stunning colour and is very quick and easy. We add grapes for sweetness but orange slices would also be delicious. You could also add a tablespoon of maple syrup if you prefer it a little sweeter. 1 small or 1/­­2 large red cabbage (1 lb /­­ 450 g) 20 red grapes 1/­­4 red onion 1 large handful parsley  Dressing: juice from 1/­­2 lemon 2 tbsp olive oil sea salt and pepper Use a mandolin or a sharp knife to slice red cabbage and onion thinly. Cut the grapes in half and remove the seeds. Chop the parsley coarsely. Toss everything in a bowl. Mix the dressing and pour over the salad. Serve in a bowl or in a wide jar.   Gluten-Free Beet Buns These delicious mini bread are so ideal on a Christmas table with their cute colour and slightly sweet flavour. Even if you are not gluten intolerant you will love these for their simplicity. Plus, it’s a nice gesture if you have guests with intolerances coming over. We posted the recipe for these buns here a while back. We added in a 1 tsp caraway seeds for extra flavour in this batch. Dark Chocolate Christmas Mousse Serves 4 The technique for this chocolate mousse was invented by the french scientist Hervé. The remarkable thing is that you only need dark chocolate and a liquid - it even works with water! The secret is to simply whisk air into the melted chocolate and the result is a creamy mousse with an intense chocolate flavour. Here, we are however making it with milk and gingerbread spices for a Christmas twist. Since chocolate is the main ingredient, make sure to choose good quality. 3/­­4 cup /­­ 200 ml plant milk of choice 1 pinch clove 1/­­4 tsp ginger 1/­­4 tsp cardamom 1/­­2 tsp cinnamon 7 oz /­­ 200 g dark chocolate (70%) Topping 4 tbsp greek yogurt or whipped cream pomegranate seeds 1 tsp powdered sugar, optional Create a water-bath by filling a sauce pan with 5 cm water and placing it on the stove on medium heat with a heatproof bowl on top (steel or glass bowl works best). Add milk and spices to the bowl. Chop the chocolate coarsely then add it to the milk. Stir a few times with a spatula while the chocolate is melting in the milk, then fill a large mixing bowl halfway with ice. Move the bowl of melted chocolate from the heat to the ice bath and start beating it vigorously with a hand whisk for about 3-4 minutes. At first it will look very loose and bubbly but after a while it will start to feel more like when you are whipping cream, fine lines will appear as you run the whisk through the chocolate and it starts looking like a mousse. Use a spoon to carefully pour or divide the mousse into 4 desert glasses that you store in the fridge. Its easily happened to overmix the chocolate the first time - only 30 seconds too much and it firms up so you cant pour it and eventually becomes grainy. In that case, simply bring it back to the heat, let it melt entirely and then place it back on the ice and start whisking again. Serve with a dollop of yogurt or cream and a sprinkle of pomegranate seeds. You can dust a little powdered sugar on top just for the look of it. ******** PS! We are actually not having any of these dishes for Christmas as we are currently in Thailand on a no-work holiday. The only time we have been reminded of Christmas here was when a bunch of monkeys broke into our house and stole some of the Christmas gifts that we had brought for Elsa! So now we are looking for a monkey wearing a striped dress and some glitter nail polish.

Chamomile & Turmeric Evening Tea

November 25 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

It was soon a year ago that we crammed Elsa, baby Isac, ourselves, our backpacks and a pram into a tiny campervan and drove around New Zealand. Our memories of green mountains, turquoise volcano lakes, enchanted forests, star-filled nights and sheep-covered fields are still vivid. Campervan life wasn’t super comfortable and our cooking wasn’t extravagant but it was the trip of a life time. We made this tea part of our evening routine while we were driving around the chillier south island of New Zealand. It was the perfect way to end the day after having driven for hours, taken mountain hikes and played on the windy sand beaches. Sitting on wobbly plastic chairs next to the car, watching the sunset and drinking this warm and soothing evening tea before going to bed. Oh happy memories! And with the first snow starting to fall here in Scandinavia, we have now begun making that tea again. Unfortunately our view isn’t that amazing here in our Stockholm apartment, but we close our eyes, take a sip and pretend that we have lush mountains behind our backs and a wild ocean dancing in front of us. Warm chamomile tea with honey is indeed a good sleep-aid. Chamomile is calming and honey is anti-bacterial. We kept a huge jar New Zealand Manuka with us in the van and it felt like such a luxury. Active Manuka honey is known for its medicinal properties. If you can’t find it or afford it, choose another unheated quality honey. Coconut oil is a true super food with a long list of health benefits, add it to your daily routine and always choose a cold pressed quality oil. It gives tea a round and rich consistency and leaves you more satisfied. It can however feel a little oily and unusual if you are not used to it, so I recommend starting with a little less. Turmeric, ginger and cinnamon add great flavour as well as immune-boosting and anti-inflammatory properties. Chamomile & Turmeric Evening Tea Serves 4 2 cups drinking water 2 tbsp dried chamomile in a tea bag or 2 chamomile tea sachets (organic if possible) 1 tbsp raw honey (Manuka honey if possible) or more to taste 1-3 tsp cold-pressed coconut oil 1/­­2 tsp ground turmeric 1/­­4 tsp ground ginger 1/­­4 tsp ground cinnamon 1 1/­­2 cup unsweetened plant milk of choice Bring water to a boil in a sauce pan. Turn off the heat, then add chamomile and let steep for 3-5 minutes. Discard the chamomile. Now stir in honey, coconut oil, turmeric, ginger, cinnamon and milk. Taste and add more honey, coconut oil or spices if you prefer. Re-heat on low heat if needed. Enjoy!

The right thing to do

November 8 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

UPDATE: Two days ago we posted the recipe for these Lentil & Rice Patties wrapped in lettuce leaves and topped with pomegranate seeds, dates, feta cheese, herbs, yogurt and pistachios. For various reasons we had only tested the recipe once (usually we try new recipes at least three times) but we still felt pretty good about it. That was until couple of readers reached out and mentioned that the recipe didn’t turn out as they were expecting. To be honest, I think it was just a matter of explaining our methods better (the size of the patties, cooking time etc). Regardless, we slapped ourselves for not trying the recipe more thoroughly before posting and decided to get back into the kitchen to test it again just to be sure. We started tweaking the recipe slightly here and there, trying to make it completely foolproof and at the same time improving the flavours a bit. Some readers were asking for a vegan version so we wanted to try achieving that as well while we had the chance and came up with a recipe that we thought was spot on, but a few hours later they tasted dry and dull. So we kept on testing, a little more of this and a little less of that. It felt like a balancing act between texture, flavour and how well the patties were holding together. We abandoned the vegan version and went back to using eggs, but all of a sudden that didn’t feel right either. What started out as a little tweaking had led us deep into the science of veggie patties. I have lost count of how many patties we have fried and even though we might actually have nailed this recipe somewhere along patty no.49, we simply don’t want to have anything to do with it anymore. They all taste like rubber tire to us at this point. I guess that we, in the midst of finding a recipe that everyone would love, lost our own lust for it. Cooking and sharing recipes should always be fun and this one just isn’t anymore. So we are letting it go. Deleting and moving on. If you want to try a genuinely tasty patty, we suggest that you hop over to our Spinach & Quinoa Patties instead. Or these Grilled Beet Burgers. And perhaps try them with the toppings from this post. Because those are still spot on! Sorry if we disappoint anyone that was looking for this recipe. We’ll be back again soon with a delicious new recipe. Now we are off to feed patties to the rats. PS! A couple of weeks ago, Food52 came by for lunch, an interview and to shoot a few photos of our kitchen. And it’s now up on their site, if you want to have a peek.

Chia Parfait & Apple Crunch

October 23 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

After both kids are put to bed, Luise and I have this evening habit of pouring ourselves a glass of yogurt or chia pudding (or both) and then diving deep into our pantry drawers for whatever nuts, seeds, nut butters, oats, honeyfruit and berries that we can find to cover the yogurt with. Some nights we even treasure a piece of dark chocolate that we chop finely and dust over. Its a fresh and quick weeknight snack/­­dessert that never looks the same and quite honestly is one of the best things we know. During the summer months, we add heaps of fresh berries but lately we have been all about apples. Usually we just add them cold, but a while back we instead tried to heat up apples, seeds and nuts in a frying pan with butter, honey, ginger and cinnamon. The soft and warm apples + crunch mixed with fresh apple pieces, cold yogurt and a drizzle of hazelnut butter in between was absolutely terrific. We often make a double batch of chia pudding and store in the fridge as it always come handy when the kids need a quick snack. You could prepare a quinoa or oat bircher and use as base in this recipe if you can’t find chia seeds. Even though this is a weeknight dessert in our house, it would also work really well as a lighter dessert for fancier occasions. When layered in high glasses with a drizzle of maple or honey on top it sure looks impressive enough. Not to mention, the leftovers make a pretty bad-ass breakfast! Chia Parfait & Autumn Apple Crunch As always, adapt this recipe with seasonal ingredients of your choice; plums, peaches, pineapple, berries or pears could be great instead of apples. It’s easily made vegan by leaving out the yogurt or using coconut yogurt. Quick Chia Pudding 1 cup milk of choice (we usually use oat milkalmond milk or coconut milk) 5 tbsp chia seeds zest from 1/­­2 lemon Warm Apple Crunch 1-2 tbsp butter, ghee or coconut oil 1-2 tbsp honey, maple syrup or brown rice syrup 1 large apple 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60 ml sunflower seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60 ml pumpkin seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60 ml hazelnuts 1/­­2 tsp ground cinnamon 1 pinch ground ginger 1 pinch sea salt Elements for layering 6 small glasses full-fat plain yogurt or coconut yogurt nut butter chopped fresh apples bee pollen, optional Preparing the chia pudding: Combine all ingredients in a bowl, set aside for 15-30 minutes and stir every now and then. You can add a few teaspoons honey or maple syrup if you prefer it a little sweet. Note: This is a quick version of chia pudding. If you are instead letting it soak overnight, you can use almost twice the amount of liquid and get the same consistency.  Preparing the warm apple crunch: Chop the apples into small dices. Heat butter and honey in a skillet. Add apples, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds and hazelnut and spices and cook for about 7-8 minutes, stirring every now and then until the apples are golden and soft and the seeds and nuts are crispy. Layering: Place a few spoonfuls of chia pudding in the bottom of 6 small glasses. Then add a dollop of nut butter, followed by a few spoonfuls of yogurt. Finally top with the warm apple crunch mixed with a few fresh apple slices and a sprinkle of bee pollen. Drizzle over some extra honey or maple syrup if preferred. Enjoy!

Apple, Almond & Buckwheat Muffins

September 29 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

If the warm apple and cinnamon fragrance from our kitchen found a way to fly into my laptop, on to the internet and out through whatever device you are reading this on, then I could stop writing this text right here. You would already be deep into your pantry drawers looking for the ingredients to start baking these muffins. Instead, I guess I have to convince you the old-fashioned way, with words and images. And since we truly want you to understand how thrilled we are about this recipe, we also filmed a video for our youtube channel. Let’s start with that! Apple trees heavy with fruit, small rubber boots tumbling around in the leaves, warm porridge in the morning, furry sweaters, cinnamon sticks, pitch dark nights and rainy afternoons. Autumn is already over us and it always seems to come with a profound desire for baking. In our apartment, switching on the oven is also a necessary trick to keep warm, since our radiators have a mind of their own. If anyone remember my previous aversion to warm apples, this recipe must be the ultimate proof that I’m passed it. Not only does our muffins have shredded apples in the batter and sliced apples on top of them, but they also hold small golden pockets of apple sauce in the middle. It’s a serenade of apple flavours and textures paired with warm spices and they sing happy songs together. I guess this is an Autumnal edition of our Blueberry & Turmeric Breakfast Muffins. These are only sweetened with apples and dates, they are gluten-free and we have included a well-tested vegan option. The vegan version come out just slightly denser, but they taste almost identical. The combination of apple, oats, almond and buckwheat is perfect in an earthy, wholesome but still light kind of way. So if you are also feeling the autumn mood or are just freezing and need another excuse to switch on the oven, we have got just the right recipe for you.   Apple, Almond & Buckwheat Muffins Makes 12 muffins These muffins are only sweetened with apples and dates. We make our own apple sauce and even though it is unsweetened, it has a naturally sweet flavour that works perfect in this recipe. Since the muffins are not overly decadent, we enjoy them both as weekend breakfast and weekday dessert. However, if you know that you like your muffins more on the sweeter side, you can replace have of the apple sauce with maple syrup. Dry ingredients 1 cup /­­ 100 g almond flour 1 cup /­­ 100 g rolled oats (use cert. gluten free if intolerant) 2/­­3 cup /­­ 75 g buckwheat flour 2 tbsp arrowroot (or potato starch) 1 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 1/­­2 tsp baking soda 1 tsp ground cinnamon 1 tsp ground cardamom 1/­­2 tsp ground ginger 1/­­2 tsp sea salt Wet ingredients 160 ml /­­ 2/­­3 cup plain unsweetened yogurt or plant yogurt 80 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup coconut oil, butter or olive oil 10 fresh soft dates, pitted and mashed 3 large eggs (or 3 tbsp chia seeds mixed with 9 tbsp water) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 120 ml apple sauce, unsweetened (see below for instructions hot to make your own) 3 organic apples Preheat the oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Grease a muffin pan with oil or butter or line it with muffin tins. Add all the dry ingredients to a food processor or blender and process on high speed so the oats turn into coarse flour and all ingredients are mixed. Transfer to a large mixing bowl. Add eggs, yogurt, coconut oil, dates and 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80 ml of the apple sauce (save the rest for later) to the food processor or blender and mix until smooth, and then transfer to the mixing bowl with the dry ingredients. Grate two of the apples and add them to the batter. Divide the batter into the muffin tins, filling them only half way up. Drop a heaping teaspoon of apple sauce in the middle of each muffin and then cover with the remaining batter. Slice the last apple thinly, brush the slices with oil and place one or a few slices on top of each muffin, pressing them down slightly. Dust with cinnamon. Bake for about 18-20 minutes. Let cool for a bit before taking them out of their tins and they will release easier. Enjoy!   Apple Sauce Apple sauce is one of the simplest things to make and if you choose a sweet variety of apples, no other sweetener is needed. This makes more than you need for the Apple Muffin recipe, which is good as you can add large spoonfuls of the leftovers on top of yogurt or cultured buttermilk in the morning. 1 lb /­­ 1/­­2 kg organic apples 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60 ml water 1 tsp lemon juice Core the apples, cut them in 1/­­2 inch /­­ 1 cm dices and add to a large sauce pan on medium heat together with the water. Bring to a boil and then turn down the heat slightly. Let simmer for 20-25 minutes. Use a hand blender to mix it smoothly. Add lemon juice and stir around to prevent the color from going brown. Store in air-tight glass jars the fridge for up to about a week or in plastic containers in the freezer for-like-ever.

Dal Stuffed Sweet Potatoes

September 9 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Dal Stuffed Sweet Potatoes One of the first recipes we posted on this blog, soon six years ago(!), was an Indian lentil soup. Looking back on that photo and the short text that came with it, I definitely feel that we have learned a whole bit about food photography, recipe writing and blogging during these years. But one thing that stands strong from that old post is the actual recipe. We still make that lentil soup often, most regularly during the cold months (which in Scandinavia translates to 9 out of 12 months). Everyone in our family likes it and its a very quick and hassle-free recipe to cook when you also have to keep an eye on two kids running laps around the apartment (or one of them is running and the other one is toddling and wobbling after her). My point is that lentil stew or dal, as it is called in India, has always been one of our favourite comfort food and we just haven’t posted it enough here on the blog. So when we were approached by Swedish spice company Santa Maria, asking us to create a few recipes for their new range of organic and fair-trade spices, we immediately realised that this was the perfect opportunity to make another dal. Anyone that has cooked a dal knows that the spices play a really central role in the recipe. We updated our old recipe a bit and decided on a new way of serving it - stuffed inside baked sweet potatoes. This is extraordinary comfort food with warm, sweet flavours that contrast the tangy yogurt and fresh pomegranate seeds on top. Santa Maria actually had a film crew in our house while we shot this recipe and have released a little video and some additional photos along with the recipes on their site. Stuffed Sweet Potato with Dal Serves 4 It’s a quite generous serving of dal so you will probably (hopefully) end up with some leftovers. You will thank us the day after, it tastes even better then. 4 medium sized sweet potatoes 3 tbsp butter, ghee or coconut oil 3 cloves garlicpeeled and minced 1 yellow onionpeeled and finely chopped 4 dried apricots, roughly chopped 1 tbsp fresh ginger, grated 1 tbsp organic turmeric 2 tsp organic cardamom 1/­­2 tsp organic chili flakes 2 carrots, sliced 1 2/­­3 cups /­­ 400 ml /­­  red lentils 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water 1 tsp sea salt flakes 2 fresh tomatoes, cut in boats 70 g spinach or baby spinach Topping 1/­­2 cup natural yogurt 1/­­2 cup toasted pumpkin seeds or sprouted green lentils 1 pomegranate, seeds fresh coriander/­­cilantro Preheat the oven at 400°F/­­200°C. Give each sweet potato a tiny slit at the top and place them on a baking pan. Bake for about 45-60 minutes or until the skin is crisp and the flesh is soft. Prepare the dal while the potatoes are in the oven. Place a large pot on medium heat. Add butter, onion, garlic, apricots, ginger, turmeric, cardamom and chili flakes. Saute for a few minutes, until the onion is soft and the kitchen has a lovely scent from all the spices. You can add a splash of water if they start to get burned.  Add carrots and lentils and let cook for two more minutes, then add water and salt and give it a good stir. Decrease the heat when it starts to boil, put the lid on and let simmer for 15-20 minutes (depending on the lentils). Stir occasionally to make sure the lentils aren’t getting burned. Add more water if needed. Remove from the heat when the lentils almost have dissolved, add tomatoes and spinach. Taste and add more salt or spices if needed. Place each sweet potato on a plate. Make a cut at the top and squeeze the ends together to open. Add a couple of spoonfuls lentil stew in the potato (you can carve out some flesh if you prefer more filling but we just fill it with as much as we can fit, messy is good). Top with yogurt, pumpkin seeds, pomegranate seeds, fresh cilantro and some black pepper. Serve while hot.

Gluten Free Vegetable Buns + Amsterdam

August 24 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Gluten Free Vegetable Buns + Amsterdam As you can see from the photo above, we have been quite busy baking bread this weekend. These vegan and gluten free mini buns have been a family favourite for a while now. Some of you might remember seeing two photos (uno | due) on instagram at the start of the summer. These buns are perfectly tiny in size, very easy to prepare and contain no egg, butter or nuts nor any yeast or baking powder. Miracle bread, really. They don’t even need any kneading or leavening time. When baked right, they get a nice crust and a softly textured crumb without being gooey or dense. Since we always try to sneak in vegetables in every dish, we have done three different versions here: carrot & parsnip, spinach & banana and beet & date. And that is just the start, you can easily add whatever vegetables you have at home. We are not dedicated gluten free in our family, but this recipe is great as a lighter bread to mix up with rye bread, crisp bread and whatever else that makes it into our kitchen. The psyllium seed husks are very good for your gut, containing loads of fiber and the gluten free flours are also more easily digested than regular wheat flours. The buns have a touch of sweetness and are so great on a brunch or breakfast table with a slab of butter or some avocado slices. And they’re perfect in kids lunch boxes too. Even babies can enjoy them as there are no allergens in this recipe, just leave out the salt. A few notes about this recipe - Don’t skip the psyllium! Not only is it really good for your gut, but psyllium is also the magic glue that holds the bread together, making it soft and not crumbly at all. There are lots of gluten free recipes using xantham gum or chia seeds but we encourage you to stick with psyllium on this one. Depending on where you live, it can usually be found in larger supermarkets, health food stores or online. It is also a lot cheaper than chia seeds. - First time? If you’ve never baked or tasted gluten free bread before, don’t expect that it will taste exactly the same as when you use wheat flour. The texture is slightly different and so is the flavor. Not in a bad way, just a bit different. However, this recipe is truly one of the easiest and tastiest that we have tried. - Gooey? Sometimes the inside texture of the bun can end up a bit gooey. The most common reason for this is if you slice them open too early, you should always let the bread cool off a bit first so the inside will set properly. If they are still gooey, then either you have used too much liquid in the dough or the buns need longer baking time. If you have a baking thermometer you can stick it inside one of the buns, they should reach approx. 210°F /­­ 100°C when they are done inside. We have experienced that the baking time can vary between 35 minutes and up to 60 minutes, depending on the oven, the size of the buns and how many sheets you are baking at the same time. If your bread ends up gooey, a last minute solution is always to put the slices in the toaster :) Gluten Free Vegetable Buns Makes 12-14 buns The recipe is inspired by the gluten free buns in this book by Anette Harbech Olesen 3 tbsp psyllium seed husks 2 cups /­­ 1/­­2 liter lukewarm water or plant milk (plant milk is optional but gives the bread a slightly richer flavour) 150 g vegetables of choice, see note below 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tsp flaky sea salt 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 150 g rolled oats, choose cert, gluten free if intolerant 1 1/­­4 cup /­­ 150 g buckwheat flour 1 1/­­4 cup /­­ 150 g rice flour Vegetable add-ins, choose one of these flavourings: EITHER 1 carrot + 1 parsnip, grated (150 g) OR 1 packed cup /­­ 70 g fresh spinach, chopped + 1 banana, peeled and mashed OR 1-2 beetroots, grated (130 g) + 6 dates, mashed and stones removed Topping 1/­­4 cup /­­ 30 g seeds of choice (sesame seeds, poppy seeds, chopped sunflower seeds or pumpkin seeds) Set the oven to 375°F /­­ 190°C. Mix psyllium and water in a large bowl, stir to combine and leave for 15 minutes to thicken. Then beat the psyllium gel vigorously with a hand whisk for a few minutes to get as much air as possible into the gel. Add vegetables, salt and oil and whisk for another minute or until all is combined. Fold in the oat and flours. You can use your hands to work the flours into the dough. Roll the dough into a log (it might be a bit sticky) and divide into 12 equal pieces. Use the palms of your hands to form them into small buns, dip your hands in warm water to avoid the dough to stick to them. Brush with olive oil, sprinkle some seeds on top and bake for about 45-60 minutes (depending on the size of the buns and oven), they are ready when the crust is golden and firm and the inside sounds hollow when you knock on the bread. If they have a soft crust, they need more time. Let cool before slicing them open. Enjoy with a slab of butter, nut butter or some avocado slices. Store in a bread jar or paper bag in room temperature. Or freeze, if you make larger batches. ******************** UPDATE: OMG, all tickets sold out in the first hour! We’re looking into adding an extra session. Send an email to promotie@gottmer.nl with the subject: “Green Kitchen waiting list and youll be the first to get more information if we add an extra event. Meanwhile, you can also enter the competition on Jamie Magazine website for a chance to win 1 of their 10 tickets.  Thank you for your enthusiasm! *** And while we are on the subject of brunch recipes. We are really happy to announce that we are coming to Amsterdam next month and will teach two brunch workshops at the beautiful SLA Zuidas. The first session is between 10-12 and the second session between 14-16. The events are arranged by our Dutch publisher Becht and they have set an amazing price to make sure that everyone can afford this - only 45EUR! We will talk about our approach to food and demonstrate six delicious new brunch recipes. There will be lots of tasting, handouts, Q&A time and information about the ingredients. We will also be selling and signing our books and take some time to chat with you. So, if you are in Amsterdam next month, we’d really love to meet you. Click here to get your tickets!

Shattered Blueberry Yogurt Cake

August 7 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Shattered Blueberry Yogurt Cake August will always and forever be the month when we wash blue stains off our clothes. Its still early in the month and we have already spent many days on our knees, picking blueberries in the Swedish forests. At the moment, the forests are literally covered with gorgeous blue gems, so sitting down inevitably means staining your clothes. We add blueberries to every breakfast dish, add them to our lunch salads and in our desserts. We seem to get hooked on new blueberry recipes every year. Last year this wonderful crumble was going on repeat and a few years earlier, this blueberry smoothie. This year we have been making batch after batch of this Sunken Blueberry & Yogurt Cake. It is similar to some of our other almond flour cakes but we have adjusted the recipe to make it easier to bake without burning. It is light and moist, has a balanced sweetness and a fresh accent from yogurt and lemon zest. The cake is gluten free too (choose certified gluten free oats if intolerant). The beaten egg whites give this cake a very light and airy feeling so I imagine that its hard to create a vegan version of it. For vegans, I instead recommend making a cake version of our blueberry turmeric muffins with chia seeds. They are one of our favourite vegan treats and we imagine that they would be excellent as a cake. Just give it a little extra baking time. The randomly scattered blueberries and the golden crust on this cake makes it beautiful as it is, served straight up, perhaps with just a dollop of yogurt on the side. But after a visit at the amazing rooftop restaurant Stedsans on ?stergro in Copenhagen, we got hooked on a new way to serve cake. They made a chocolate cake that they smashed up/­­shattered into randomly sized pieces that they mixed with dollops of whipped cream, yogurt and berries. Its a really friendly way to serve a cake as all pieces have different sizes and different amount of topping and it makes picking pieces to a bit of a lottery. Swedes are also very rigid when it comes to fairness and size of cake pieces so this is perfectly provoking. And most importantly, we also think it looks gorgeously decadent and chaotic served like this. Elsa however wants us to add that she think it looks ugly like this and can’t understand why we want to destroy a perfectly pretty cake! What do you think? Do you feel like shattering your next cake into a decadent dessert chaos or do you prefer it nice, tidy and pretty, like Elsa does? Shattered Blueberry & Yogurt Cake Serves 8-10 You can of course replace the blueberries with other berries in season. 1 cup /­­ 250 ml /­­ 90 g rolled oats (choose cert. gluten free if intolerant) 1 cup /­­ 250 ml /­­ 100 g almond flour/­­meal 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml /­­ 80 g rice flour 1 tsp baking powder 1/­­2 tsp ground vanilla 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 3.5 oz /­­ 100 g butter, room tempered 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml maple syrup? or honey 1 organic lemon, zest 3 eggs, separated 1 cup /­­ 250 ml full-fat plain yogurt (we use Greek or Turkish yogurt) 2 cups /­­ 1/­­2 liter /­­ 200 g blueberries To serve 2 cups whipped cream 1 cup full-fat plain yogurt 2 cups mixed summer berries Heat the oven to 350°F /­­ 180°C. Place the oats in a food processor and mix them into flour. Pour into a large mixing bowl and mix together with almond flour, rice flour, baking powder, vanilla and sea salt. Place butter, maple syrup and lemon zest in the food processor and mix until creamy. Add egg yolks and yogurt and continue to beat for another minute. Pour the liquid into the mixing bowl with flour and fold everything together. Beat egg whites in a separate bowl with an electric mixer until soft peaks form. Slowly fold the egg whites and half of the blueberries into the cake mixture. Put a baking sheet inside an 8 inch /­­ 22 cm spring form cake pan and pour the batter into it. Sprinkle the remaining blueberries on top. Bake for about 50-60 minutes, or until dark and golden on the top and baked all way through. Remove from oven and let cool for a while before removing the sides. To create the shattered look: Wait until the cake cools completely then place the cake on a large serving platter. Carefully break the cake into variously sized pieces. Keep the same round shape, but only bigger. Twist and turn the broken cake pieces a bit and arrange with random dollops of whipped cream, yogurt and mixed berries on top and in between them. Scatter any remaining berries on top and serve immediately.

Summer Pasta with Smashed Tomatoes, Peaches & Mozzarella

July 23 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Summer Pasta with Smashed Tomatoes, Peaches & Mozzarella We have been cooking this quick little dinner recipe rather frequently during the summer. At a first glance, it might seem like it’s just a classic/­­boring fresh tomato pasta. But when you consider the context: hot summer days, family time, ripe tomatoes in season, everyone is hungry but no one feels like cooking … you’ll realise that it’s exactly the kind of simple dinner that we all need more of. We have of course given this dish our own schwung. Instead of just serving tomatoes fresh, we squeeze/­­punch/­­smash them up a bit so they get softer and release some of that lovely juice that gets mixed with olive oil, a splash of the hot pasta water, fresh basil, garlic and pickled capers. Already there, you got yourself a pretty great flavor combo. But then we throw in a handful of peach slices for extra sweetness, delicious toasted pine nuts and some large chunks of creamy buffel mozzarella, which makes it Italian-grandmother-kind-of-awesome. You can serve this with any type of pasta. In our home we usually use various sorts of gluten free (buckwheat is a favourite) or whole grain pasta or spiralized/­­shredded zucchini (also known as zoodles), but here we are using bean linguine, made entirely from dried beans and therefore naturally vegan, gluten free and high in protein. This pasta has a delicious flavour and a nice chewy texture. We have seen various sorts of bean pastas starting to pop up in supermarkets and health food stores - soybean pasta, chickpea pasta and black bean pasta - so keep an eye out for those next time you are out shopping for pasta. In this dish the quality of the ingredients is everything. Use only fresh, ripe tomatoes and peaches and make sure to choose your favourite olive oil. If you want a creamier sauce, you can sub the mozzarella for ricotta cheese + some lemon juice, which also is really awesome. You can of course also add parmesan cheese if you prefer. For a vegan option, I think it’d be interesting to work with a softer type tofu instead of the cheese. Perhaps pre-marinate it for a while in olive oil and fresh Italian herbs. Pasta with smashed raw tomatoes, peach & mozzarella Serves 4 1 clove garlic 2 tbsp pickled capers 500 g /­­ 1 lb ripe tomatoes 3-4 sprigs fresh basil, leaves picked and chopped, save some for garnish a few glugs of cold-pressed olive oil a pinch sea salt and black pepper 200 g  /­­ 7 oz bean pasta or other gluten free pasta alternative or zucchini noodles 1 handful pine nuts 2 peaches or nectarines 200 g /­­ 7 oz mozzarella cheese 1 handful rucola/­­aragula/­­rocket salad Mince the garlic very finely. Mash the capers with the back of a knife. Divide the tomatoes in half. Chop the basil. Place everything in a large serving bowl and add a few glugs of olive oil, salt and pepper. With your hands, squeeze or punch the tomatoes until soft and juicy. Cook the pasta in lightly salted boiling water according to the instructions on package. Meanwhile, lightly toast the pine nuts in a skillet on medium heat. Slice the nectarines and tear the mozzarella in smaller pieces. When that pasta is done, reserve about 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100 ml of cooking water and drain the rest. Add the pasta immediately to the serving bowl while it’s still hot, toss with the tomato ‘sauce’ and rucola until well mixed, add some of the cooking water if you want to make it a little juicier. Decorate with peaces, mozzarella cheese, pine nuts, arugula, a few whole basil leaves and an extra drizzle of olive oil. Ready to serve.

Sarah B’s Breakfast (Cookie) Bars

July 5 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Sarah B’s Breakfast (Cookie) Bars I am guessing that Sarah B from My New Roots hardly needs any introduction? She is one of the most inspiring voices on the plant-based recipe scene, always with a smile and a smoothie on hand. Her way of reinventing traditional dishes into healthier versions of themselves is downright amazing. And if that wasn’t enough, she is one of the nicest and most positive persons we have met. Her long awaited cookbook has the same concept as the blog, but is printed on beautiful paper and with the recipes divided into seasons (five of them!). There are plenty of inspiration for all flavours here and we have lots of dog-eared recipes yet to try. If you enjoy our type of cooking, you are going to love this book. It’s a gem. I am not sure why we chose to feature this exact recipe, a more colourful one would probably be more representative for the book. I guess we were intrigued by the thought of eating giant shaped cookies for breakfast. The fact that they are vegan and had a can of white beans in them, probably also sparked our curiosity. Sarah writes that its time to ditch the plastic packaged breakfast bars as they are filled with too much stuff that doesn’t do us any favours. Her bars (or cookies) are loaded with whole-food fiber, protein, healthy fats, real fruit, and as we mentioned above, even beans. We have already made these quite a few times. They have a mild orange flavour and a really good and satisfying taste. They seemed a little crumbly to us at first but turned out to hold together very well when baked. We find them perfect to make for a pantry cleaning, as almost any kind of nuts, seeds and dried fruit can be added. We also made one version where we subbed the maple syrup with a ripe banana and two dates. Baby Isac loves them too, and since they are filled with so much good stuff, we love making them for him. Fully Loaded Breakfast Bars (Recipe from My New Roots: Inspired Plant-Based Recipes for Every Season) Makes 10 large bars (although we make our bars slightly smaller than Sarah and get 12 bars from one batch.) 1 tablespoon chia seeds 3 1/­­4 cups /­­ 325 g gluten-free rolled oats 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon fine sea salt 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 250 g cooked white beans, such as navy, white kidney, or Great Northern (about one 15-ounce /­­ 250 g can) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60 ml coconut oil, melted 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60 ml pure maple syrup or raw honey Grated zest of 1 organic orange 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60 ml unsweetened applesauce 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/­­3 cup /­­ 60 g chopped unsulphured dried apricots 1/­­4 cup /­­ 30 g  raisins 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35 g pumpkin seeds 2 cups /­­ 60 g organic, non-GMO cornflakes (optional) Preheat the oven to 350°F /­­ 180°C. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and set it aside. Combine the chia seeds with 3 tablespoons water in a small bowl, and set aside for 15 minutes to gel. Pulse 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 125 g of the oats in a food processor until they resemble a very rough flour. Transfer the flour to a large mixing bowl and whisk in the remaining 2 cups /­­ 200 g oats, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Pulse the beans with the coconut oil in the food processor until the mixture is creamy. Add the maple syrup, orange zest, chia gel, applesauce, and vanilla extract, and pulse until smooth. Pour the bean puree over the oats mixture and stir until everything starts to come together. Add the apricots, raisins, pumpkin seeds, and cornflakes and stir to combine--you may need to use your hands at this point. Shape the dough into 10 equal balls, and then flatten each one into a patty shape. Transfer them to the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 15 to 18 minutes, until the bars are golden. Let cool completely before enjoying. The bars can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for 1 week, or in the freezer for up to 1 month. ************* PS! We are coming to London last weekend of September for two different events. We will be talking at the Food Blogger Connect conference at Chiswick House on Friday 25th and Saturday 26th September. We are also excited to be talking and cooking at the Fare Healthy festival at Borough Market on Sunday 27th September. Check out their websites for tickets and more info.

Smoothie Bonanza - 14 new recipes

June 24 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Smoothie Bonanza - 14 new recipes Woot woot! We are so thrilled to present this little project that we have been working on lately! We have been turning fruit, berries, vegetables and liquids into smoothies practically every day for the past couple of years. Sometimes we make them for breakfast, other times for dessert, and always after a workout! We cant think of a fresher, quicker and more delicious way to boost our bodies with energy. Since smoothies have become such a common meal for us, we have picked up some tricks and ideas on how to make them more interesting. Nowadays, we often add extra berries, fruit, nuts or grains to the glass to create a contrast in flavour and texture. We also tend to pour them in layers for a more interesting and beautiful drinking experience. We have gathered 14 lip-smacking smoothie recipes into a recipe bundle that we just have released as an in-app purchase for our Green Kitchen app. It’s available for $1.99 and the difference from the normal (free) recipe updates in the app is that all these recipes are entirely new and previously unpublished. Make sure you have the latest update of the app and there should be a new box with more info at the top of the grid. You need to have iOS 8 installed to be able to install the update. These recipes are available in English (imperial and metric), German, Italian, Spanish and French inside the app. We are of course bias but we feel pretty damn proud of these smoothies and hope they will give you new ideas and inspiration next time you are starting up the blender. Here is a preview of all the recipes. Just like with our Green & Clean recipe pack, 6 months ago, we have also gathered these smoothies in a mini e-book. This is to accomodate those of you that don’t have an iphone or ipad but still want to try the recipes. It’s available for $2.99 and can be ordered and downloaded here. We are really hoping you will enjoy these! To give you a preview, we are also sharing one of the recipes here today. It is a fun little method of ours where the topping (muesli, granola, rolled oats, puffed grains or nuts) is placed at the bottom of the glass and then covered with a few spoonfuls of yogurt and filled up with the smoothie. A quick, delicious and slightly unusual way to have breakfast and it also looks spectacular with the different layers. In this recipe we use muesli and thick yoghurt for the bottom two layers and a simple but delicious blueberry smoothie recipe on top, but we encourage you to use this as a starting points and try the technique with some of the other smoothies in the bundle or any smoothie of your own. Upside-Down Breakfast Smoothie Smoothie Ingredients 1 cup /­­ 120 g frozen blueberries 1 blood orange or a regular orange, peeled and roughly chopped 1 banana, peeled and roughly chopped 1 cup /­­ 250 ml plant milk of choice 1 tsp ground cardamom Layers 1 cup /­­ 125 g muesli, granola, puffed grains or just rolled oats 1 cup /­­ 250 ml full-fat plain unsweetened Greek or Turkish yogurt (for a vegan alternative, use coconut yogurt or organic GMO-free soy yogurt) Add all smoothie ingredients to a blender and blend on a high-speed until smooth. Divide the muesli between two glasses. Spoon the yogurt over the muesli in each glass. Pour the smoothie on top and serve with a spoon.

Warm Summer Fruit Salad

June 14 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Warm Summer Fruit Salad If my 15 year younger self would see me know. I am sitting here writing a text that is trying to sell the idea of a warm fruit salad. Young David would have told me  that I was an idiot: “Why heat fruit when you can have it chilled?!” You see, young David hated warm fruit. And I mean. Truly. Hated.  Back then, I could binge eat platters of fresh fruit, but cook or bake it and I wouldn’t touch it. Even apple pie, the one dish that every normal person loves, made my stomach turn upside down. I sometimes allowed myself to eat the part of the crust that hadn’t been touched by the fruit, but my tongue cringed from the bare thought of warm apple in my mouth. And now I’m all of a sudden very excited about this fruit salad that has taken a quick detour through the oven. What happened? I would love to say that this recipe was the game changer. But truth be told, I think I just slowly learned to appreciate warm fruit, recipe by recipe. Anyway, apart from the fact that I used to hate warm fruit and now swear by this dessert. Apart from the fact that this recipe is dead-simple. Apart from the fact that it includes some of the best bounty of the season and tastes like summer in your mouth. Yes, apart from all that, this fruit salad is also covered in grated dark chocolate (that melts!), coconut flakes and salted almonds (that pairs oh so well with dark chocolate). And if you are still not  convinced to try it out, we created this little video as a final selling point:  This is originally a Swedish dessert called Gino served with strawberries, kiwis and bananas with white chocolate on top. Our version is quite different, but t he choice of fruit and measurements are really just suggestions here, add or subtract fruit to your liking. Peaches or pineapple would also be good baked. Or raspberries? We use fruit in season here, but baking fruit is also a great way to increase the flavours during the winter season. Luise and I haven’t entirely agreed on the baking time. Personally I think the fruit only should be heated quickly, so it’s still quite firm. Just 5-6 minutes or enough time for the chocolate to melt. Luise however prefers the fruit to be more baked and a bit softer so the juices and flavours come together more. That’s about 10-12 minutes. But we’ll leave that decision to you (in the photos and video it’s baked after Luise’s preference). Warm Summer Fruit Salad Serves 4 1 cup almonds + 1 tbsp boiled water mixed with 1 tsp salt (or store-bought salted almonds) 3 kiwi fruits 3 apricots 2 bananas, peel 10 strawberries 10 cherries, pitted 2 plums, remove stones 1 lime, juice 1 oz /­ 30 g dark chocolate (70% or darker) 1/­3 cup dried unsweetened coconut flakes Preheat the oven to 200°C /­ 400°F. Prepare the almonds by placing them in a mixing bowl, pour the hot salted water over the almonds and combine until all almonds are covered. Place the almonds in a baking tray and roast in the oven for 10-15 minutes or until slightly golden and crunchy. Set aside. Prepare the fruit by cutting them into bitesize pieces. Place the fruit in a baking dish and add the lime juice, toss to mix. Chop the almonds and sprinkle over the fruit salad. Grate the chocolate, it should almost cover the fruit salad. Sprinkle with coconut flakes and place the dish in the oven. Bake for 5-10 minutes, until the chocolate has melted and the fruit is warm and juicy (not mushy). Serve in bowls with plain yogurt or a dollop of ice cream.

Mocha & Black Bean Mousse Cake

May 27 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Mocha & Black Bean Mousse Cake It’s Wednesday lunch as I’m writing this and I am fully aware that this might be exceptionally bad timing for you. Being right in the middle of the week, you probably have your work jive going strong and a chocolate cake in your web browser might mess all that up. So, i nstead of scrolling down to see the rest of the images and read this interesting little recipe, we simply suggest that you stop reading right away and close this window. Because if you continue, we plan to tell you that the filling is made from black beans and that might really get you out of focus. There is a risk that you will start thinking about what the beans does to the texture and how they affects the flavour.  Well, since you are already thinking about it,the texture is very smooth creamy. And you can’t really taste the beans at all. Instead it tastes of coffee. As it turns out, coffee, black beans and chocolate is an unexpectedly terrific combo. The cake can be served frozen, as a type of ice cream cake. Or thawed, as a creamy mousse cake. It must be one of the easiest cakes in our repertoire. It’s entirely vegan and gluten free, the ingredient list is conveniently short and you can throw everything together in more or less 15 minutes. Although it needs about two hours in the freezer before it can be devoured. I prefer eating it while it’s quite firm but Luise likes it to be more creamy and have that lush mousse consistency. Normally, I am the one making most of our desserts but this cake is entirely Luise’s creation. She didn’t even tell me about it at first, just went: “I’ve got a little cake in the freezer in case you want to take some photos of it”. So I did. And then we ate it. We got the inspiration for the drizzled chocolate decoration from one of Linda Lomelino’s beautiful cakes. We have made this cake twice since that first time and I suspect that we will be making it a few times more this summer. You should really try it. It’s different and it’s damn delicious. Mocha & Black Bean Mousse Cake Serves 8 If you don’t like coffee, you can substitute it with 1/­­4 cup of plant milk. Nut butter could also be an interesting alternative flavouring idea for the filling, it should work great with chocolate and black beans. Crust 1 cup /­­ 125 g hazelnut 10 fresh and soft dates (100 g /­­ 3,5 oz), pitted 3 tbsp cacao powder 1 tbsp coconut oil 1 pinch sea salt Filling 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 200 g cooked black beans (equivalent to 1 can drained and rinsed beans) 5 dates, pitted 1 tbsp coconut oil 2 shots /­­ 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60 ml strong coffee 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80 ml plant milk of choice (like rice, oat, soy or almond milk) 3,5 oz/­­ 100 g dark chocolate Toppings 1/­­2 cup /­­ 65 g toasted hazelnuts 50 g /­­ 2 oz melted dark chocolate Start by making the crust. Place hazelnuts in a food processor and pulse a few times until they have a pebbled texture. Add the rest of the ingredients and mix until everything is combined. Line the bottom of a 8 inch /­­ 20 cm spring pan with parchment paper and pour the date and hazlenut mixture into it. Use your hands to firmly press down the mixture evenly. Place the spring pan in the freezer and continue on with the filling. Add beans, dates, coconut oil and coffee to the food processor an pulse on high speed for about a minute. Place a small sauce pan on low/­­medium heat. Add the milk. Break up the chocolate into smaller pieces and add to the milk. Use a spatula to stir around and take the sauce pan off the heat just as the chocolate starts melting. Keep on stirring until you have a smooth and thick chocolate mixture. Add the melted chocolate to the food processor and mix until you have a smooth chocolate filling. Pour the filling into the spring pan on top of the crust and place it back in the freezer for 2-3 hours. You can leave it in the freezer for weeks, just make sure to thaw the cake for at least 30 mins if it is deep frozen. Decorate the cake before serving. You can either just use a lot of berries, or as we have done here, drizzle with melted chocolate and toasted hazelnuts.

Beet & Greens Tart

May 16 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Beet & Greens Tart I’m tired of writing about food today, so Im going to write a random thing about myself instead. Hope I don’t bore you. When I tell my friends that I like to watch tv-series on my phone and movies on my computer - simultaneously - they often give me that you-are-weird look. It doesnt matter that I try to explain that it can be very stressful to be the father of two kids, run a family business and have a blog, so watching tv-series and movies is my way to de-stress. And since I dont have much time to myself, I try to make the most of it. It makes sense to me. For many years, I just fast-forwarded through movies but I have realised that this is a much better way (when I fast-forwarded I often missed essential parts of the plot so I had to rewind several times, and that kind of defeated the purpose). Luise isnt very understanding either, Ive explained to her that Sherlock Holmes (the one living in New York with Lucy Liu as an assistant) can watch like 10 different TVs at the same time, but she told me that I was being ridiculous (I still dont understand if she means that I’m ridiculous for making Sherlock Holmes references or because Sherlock Holmes is awesome and Im ridiculous for comparing myself with him?). Anyway, in order to not loose your interest completely I think I need to start introducing today’s recipe. It’s a beet tart. Its not very complicated to make and its really delicious. You can probably make it while watching Sherlock Holmes, but I wouldnt recommend to simultaneously watch another movie. Its a one-screen kind of recipe. Mostly because you need to grate beets and I have had enough accidents with the box grater to know that two screens and a box grater is more than even I can handle. I am sure Sherlock could pull it off though. The tart crust is gluten free and really easy to handle, in fact, it might be our best tart crust ever. I usually just press the dough into a case without using a rolling pin, but this time I rolled it out between two sheets of baking paper and it came out real pretty and easy to handle. However, you need 3 different types of flour and if you think that’s too much, feel free to replace it with your own favourite tart crust recipe. Given that I’ve been talking about beets and Sherlock Holmes, I could easily make some references to blood stains in our kitchen, but I’m going to talk about the flavour and method instead. We went classic with the beet pairings. The idea is to fill up the bottom of the tart with raw grated beetroots, then we top it with sautéed onion and beet greens that are mixed with beaten egg, plant milk, crumbled goat’s cheese and mint. And right before we eat it, we usually drizzle some raw honey on top because the sweetness is really nice together with the goat’s cheese. Sherlock has bee hives on his roof so I’m sure he would appreciate the use of honey. All in all it’s a great recipe for a lunch or a picnic. That was it. Thank you for listening. Let’s bake tarts now. Beet, Goat’s Cheese & Walnut Tart 8 servings If you find beetroots with fresh and good looking greens, go ahead and use them. They are usually pretty easy to find during the spring and summer. If not, just use the beetroots and replace the beet greens with spinach, chard or kale instead. Tart crust 1 cup /­ 100 g /­ 3.5 oz rolled oats (or 3/­4 cup /­ 200 ml oat flour), choose certified gluten free if you are intolerant 1/­3-1/­2 cup /­ 50 g rice flour 1/­3-1/­2 cup/­ 50 g almond flour 2 tbsp linseeds (optional) 1/­2 tsp salt g /­ 5 tbsp cold butter or coconut oil, cut into dices 4 tbsp ice-cold water Filling 2-3 beetroots (approx 1 lb/­500 g),  1 red onion, peeled 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 tsp fresh or dried thyme salt & pepper 2 large bunches beet greens (or spinach) 1-2 tbsp apple cider vinegar 3 large eggs 100 ml milk of choice, we used rice 100 g /­ 3.5 oz goats cheese /­ ch?vre 10 fresh mint leaves 10 walnuts, lightly crushed 2 tbsp honey Preheat the oven to 350°F /­ 180°C. Add rolled oats, almond flour, rice flour, linseeds and sea salt to a food processor and pulse until the oats have been mixed into flour. Add the diced butter and pulse a few times until you get really small pieces of butter evenly distributed in the flour. (These steps can also be made by hand.) Add the water,  pulse until everything comes together. Try to form a ball with your hands. If it feels crumbly, add 1-2 tbsp extra water. Gather the dough into a ball, wrap in clingfilm and chill for about 30 minutes. When done, place the dough between two baking papers and use a rolling pin to roll out the dough until you got a rough circle, about 1/­8 inch /­ 5 mm thick. Carefully transfer it to a 10 inch /­ 27 cm tart pan. Trim off any excess dough then use a fork to prick it a few times. Blind-bake for 10 minutes to prevent the crust from getting soggy. Peel the beetroots and grate them coarsely on a box grater or in a food processor. Cut the onion thinly. Place a large frying pan on medium heat. Add a slab of coconut oil or butter and, when melted, spread out the onion slices evenly in the pan. Fry for 4-5 minutes and then shake the pan and fry them on the other side. Add garlic and thyme and fry for about 30 seconds before adding half of the beet greens (or spinach) together with apple cider vinegar, salt and pepper. When the greens have wilted down, add the rest, stir around and then take the pan off the heat. Beat the eggs together with the milk and then crumble in the goat’s cheese. Add sautéed vegetables and mint leaves. Place the grated beets at the bottom of the tart, reserve some for the top. Pour the egg and greens mixture over the center, make sure that the cheese is somewhat evenly distributed. We usually leave about an inch /­ 2 cm of beetroot untouched towards the edges (just because it’s pretty). Tuck in walnut pieces here and there at the top and the remaining beetroot. You can drizzle some honey on top before baking if you prefer a bit of caramelised top, or just save it for after it’s baked. Bake for 30-35 minutes or until golden and firm. Serve with a dollop of Turkish yogurt and some drizzled honey on top. Oh, one other thing, completely unrelated to Sherlock Holmes and Beet Tarts. We’re going to Milan next week to talk about the Italian edition of our (first) book. We will be talking, cooking a recipe and have a book signing at Corriere della Sera’s food event Cibo a regola d’arte on Thursday 21st May at 5.30pm. The event is free and will take place in Triennale – salone dOnore. Hope to see some of you there!

Asparagus, Fennel & Spinach Soup + Topping!

April 22 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Asparagus, Fennel & Spinach Soup + Topping! In our house, soup is rarely served without some kind of topping. It’s almost like a yin and yang thing, we start talking about soup and the conversation directly leads on to toppings. I guess it’s a pretty natural thing since we eat a lot of soup and prefer it to be a more complete meal, instead of just a starter. The toppings does not only add a different texture and flavor to the soup, but also some more stomach filling proteins. To be honest, many times I think we spend more time working on the toppings then on the actual soup. It’s the same principle as we have with oatmeal toppings. Here are a few of our favorite soup + topping combinations from earlier blog posts: Sweet potato and red lentil soup with aubergine and kale topping, Carrot and tomato soup with corn ceviche topping, Spinach and kale soup with tahini dressed chickpea topping. We found a huge bunch of over-priced asparagus in the market the other day and for some reason decided that it was a good idea to spend our last money this month on asparagus instead of a new set of clothes for Isac. So we walked home and made soup. We went for a smooth and quite mildly flavored soup and allowed the toppings to have more punch in flavor and texture. We only chose green-ish ingredients for the topping. Yup, there we go again, choosing ingredients by color. But it actually turned out fantastic. It’s got a lot of crunch from the pumpkin seeds, flavor from parsley and the asparagus tips, richness from the lentils and sting from the chili. I ate the leftovers without the soup straight from the fridge. Now I”ve spent most of this post talking about the topping, but the soup is pretty good too. Quick, simple, delicious and with a clear taste of spring. If you don’t have any fennel at home, you could add a few potatoes instead, or other green spring vegetables. We also made a quick cashew cream to go with the soup. We often just add a few dollops yogurt into our soup but cashew cream is a nice and rich vegan alternative. If you just remember to pre-soak the cashew nuts, the cream is done in no-time. As a side note, I just tried adding some cashew cream on top of my latest smoothie and it wasn’t bad at all. So, go make your vegetable market guy happy and buy a bunch of asparagus. Make soup, whip up a cashew cream. And for goodness sake, don’t forget about the topping! Asparagus, Fennel & Spinach Soup Serves 4 We keep a jar of toasted pumpkin seeds in our kitchen and almost always have some cooked lentils ready in our fridge. It’s a good advice as it makes it a lot easier to create small quick meals. 1 pound /­­ 450 g green asparagus 2 tbsp coconut oil or butter 6 thin spring onions or 1 yellow onion 2 cloves garlic 1 small fennel bulb (or 1/­­2 large) 1 large handful spinach 2 cups water or vegetable stock 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar or lemon salt & black pepper Lentil & Pepita Topping The reserved raw tips from the asparagus 1 cup cooked puy lentils (1/­­2 cup uncooked, boiled in water for 18 minutes) 1/­­2 cup dry-toasted and salted pumpkin seeds /­­ pepitas 1 large bunch flat leaf parsley 1/­­2 green chili, finely chopped (optional) 1 tbsp olive oil Cashew Cream 1/­­2 cup cashew nuts 1/­­2 cup filtered water 1 tbsp lemon juice 1/­­2 tsp sea salt Trim the tough end off the asparagus. Cut in diagonal pieces, 1/­­2 inch /­­ 1 cm thick. Save the asparagus tips for the topping. Heat oil in a large saucepan. Finely chop onion, garlic and fennel and add to the the pan and sauté for about 5 minutes or until soft. Add the asparagus, stir around and let fry on low/­­medium heat for a minute, then add spinach, water/­­stock, apple cider vinegar, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and let simmer for 10 minutes. Meanwhile prepare the topping. Carefully pour the soup into a blender or use a hand blender to mix until smooth. Taste the soup, add more water or salt if needed. Preparing the topping: Finely chop the asparagus tips and the parsley and place in a bowl together with the boiled lentils and the toasted pumpkin seeds. Add chili if your prefer it a little spicy. Pour over some olive oil and stir around so it’s all mixed well. Preparing the cashew cream: Cover the cashew nuts in water and let soak for at least 3 hours. Drain and rinse and place in a blender. Add the filtered water, lemon juice and salt and mix until completely smooth. Taste and add more salt or lemon if needed.

Homemade Nut & Seed Butter

March 29 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Homemade Nut & Seed Butter For the past couple of years, nut butter has been the answer to most quick snacking situations in our home. Need a pick-me up? Dip some apple slices in peanut butter. Feel like having something a bit more substantial? Slab some hazelnut butter on a piece of rye and top with strawberry slices. Got a sweet tooth? Make vegan cookies using almond butter. Want dessert in 3 seconds? Fill a fresh pitted date with hazelnut butter. The combinations are endless and the result is always utterly satisfying. I guess the rich flavour and smooth and fatty creaminess balances many of the light and vegetable packed dishes in our kitchen pretty good. Our bodies need that fat and protein so we have made sure to always keep our pantry stocked up on at least one jar of nut butter. Unfortunately, buying good quality organic brands is out of this world expensive. Also, after having tried some pretty cool mixed nut butters in Australia (Hello Macadamia, Cashew & Maple Butter!), the selection here in Sweden started to feel a bit limiting. Which brings me to today’s post. We have tried making our own nut butter a few times in the past years, but it wasn’t until a couple of weeks ago that we really got the hang of it. And since then, we haven’t been giving our food processor any rest. So after quite a few batches of homemade nut butter, we have learned some simple tricks that we wanted to share. Along with our favourite flavouring combination. Here we go!  Ingredients First of all, you only need ONE ingredient to make nut butter. Nuts. All kinds work, either on their own or mixed. You probably want to add some salt as well, but resist the urge to add water, other oils or any other liquid. By sticking to one ingredient you will get the creamiest result. You can add oil but it really isn’t needed as the point is to get the nuts to release their own oil. Water or other liquids will react with the natural oil and turn the butter more into a sticky paste. If you are allergic to nuts, you can use sunflower seeds or pumpkin seeds/­pepitas instead. Both have beautiful flavours. We usually mix nuts with seeds as a way to keep the bulk cost down, seeds are much cheaper than nuts in our part of the world. Preparation The easiest and most delicious nut butter is achieved by roasting the nuts slightly. You will get a creamier result and a nice, toasted flavour. We find 10-15 minutes on 150°C/­300°F to be perfect. You can roast them longer but the longer you roast them, the more the nuts will oxidise (meaning, less healthy). You can activate the nuts instead by soaking and dehydrating them (this is the healthiest option), but it will be more difficult to get them to release their oils and achieve that creamy result (adding a bit of oil usually helps in this case). Kitchen tool To succeed in making nut butter you need to have a decent food processor. You are going to mix the nuts for at least 10 minutes and the nuts will get pretty sticky after a while, so your food processor will get hot. If it starts to smell a bit burnt, switch it off and let it cool down for a while before continuing. If you know that your machine isn’t all that powerful, it helps roasting the nuts a bit extra and adding them warm to the machine. We use a Magimix 3200 and it works really well for us. Regardless of the brand, it is worth investing in quality kitchen tools if you plan to use them a lot. A few readers have told us that they use their Vitamix blender. We haven’t tried it but trust them that it works. The reason we prefer a food processor is that it has a wider base which allows the whole batch to be mixed at once, not just the nuts at the bottom. The mixing time will vary depending on the machine, the type, amount and temperature of the nuts. It takes around 10-12 minutes before it’s completely smooth and creamy in our machine but it can take up to 20 minutes in some. Our standard Nut & Seed Butter Makes 2 cups 4 cups of any nuts and/­or seeds, either one sort or mixed (for example 1 cup /­ 135 g cashew nuts, 1 cup /­ 135 g almonds, 1 cup /­ 135 g brazil nuts, 1 cup /­ 135 g sunflower seeds) 2-3 large pinches sea salt Roast the nuts together with the salt at 150°C/­300°F for about 10-12 minutes. Transfer the roasted nuts/­seeds to a food processor. Run it on high speed for 10-20 minutes (depending on the strength of the food processor). Stop and scrape down the sides a few times. It will have a fine powder texture at first but just be patient and let the food processor do its magic. The nut butter is ready when it is all smooth, creamy and runny. Taste and add more salt if needed. If you prefer it a bit crunchy, you can add some chopped nuts at this point. Transfer to clean glass jars. Lasts for a few weeks in the fridge. Cashew, Maple & Turmeric Butter Makes 1 cup This is amazingly tasting flavored nut butter is  probably our favorite thing ever to put on top of a sandwich or as a sweet dip for crunchy vegetables. 1 cup standard nut butter (preferably using half cashew nuts, half sunflower seeds) 2 tsp ground turmeric 1 tsp ground cinnamon 1 tsp ground ginger 2 tbsp maple syrup Follow the instructions above for making the nut butter, or use store bought. Add the rest of the ingredients towards the end of the mixing process, when the nut butter is completely smooth. Stir everything together by hand or give it a quick mix in the food processor. The spices and maple syrup will react with the nut butter making it slightly less creamy which is why you don’t want to stir it around too much. Store in a glass jar in the fridge. Other uses for nut butter Here are a few other ways you can use nut butter: o Add a spoonful on top of your breakfast porridge or yogurt. o Add a dollop in smoothies for extra richness. o Use it in salad dressings (like in the No-Noodle Pad Thai in Green Kitchen Travels) o As a filling in croissants or cinnamon buns. o Use them in bars (we’ve got a beautiful new recipe that we plan to post in just a few days!) PS! We have just released a brand new update of our Green Kitchen App. Not only have we included smart timers with full support for the Apple Watch, but we have also translated all the 124 recipes in the app to three new languages - Spanish, French and Italian. You can find the language switcher inside the settings menu of the app. This update is available without any extra cost.

Coconut & Quinoa Pancakes

February 28 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Coconut & Quinoa Pancakes She had folded up her dress into an impromptu bag and filled it with sea shells in all sorts and sizes. “I’m taking these home” Elsa said while looking at me with a wrinkled nose and sharp mouth. I think she was waiting for me to tell her that we couldn’t fit anything more into our bags, but this time I gave in: “Sure, you can keep them in your room when we are back home.” We have reached the last leg of our trip and in just a few days we are flying back to Sweden. It’s a bit sad but at the same time exciting to get back into our home and kitchen.  Eeeh, who am I fooling? We are devastated and are constantly trying to think of different excuses to stay here: “What if we got infected with a virus so we weren’t allowed on the airplane…” or “What would happen if our passports got stolen?” . Seriously, this trip has been unreal. We have connected with so many friendly souls across Australia and New Zealand. Been invited to breakfasts, lunches and dinners with people we have never met before and also met a bunch of readers on picnics, signings and events. We are spending our last days revisiting our favourite spots, soaking up the sun and filling our bags with Elsa’s sea shells. We have a chapter about traveling with kids in our latest book, but considering how many questions we have received on the subject while we have been here, I think we might write something more about it in a later post. We tested and photographed this pancake recipe before we left Sweden, with the intention to post it while we were away. But somehow we completely forgot about it, until now. This is a recipe from our absolute favourite cookbook from 2014, Amy Chaplin’s At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen. What made us choose this recipe among the many great ones in the book, was that this was a gluten-free recipe with only one egg and a suggestion on how to make it vegan (with a chia egg). We love pancakes but always seem to make ours quite heavy on eggs, so we have been on the look-out for good vegan breakfast pancakes. And these deliver! They have plenty of texture and body. And apart from the quinoa soaking overnight, they can be done in no-time (or as Amy puts it: “theyre the fastest pancakes youve ever made”) We can’t recommend her book enough. If you  like our food, you are going to love Amy’s. Her book was released in the US last year and will be out in Australia and the UK in June.  We served these with our own Clementine Jam. We have been experimenting with different citrus jam and marmalade recipes all winter. The photos show a cooked version, but since then we have grown much fonder of a simpler uncooked version using chia seeds. What we like about it is that it keeps the fresh flavours from the citrus whereas cooked jams and marmalades become a tad bitter and overly sweet. This Citrus Chia Jam is very easy to make and taste just like sun-ripe citrus fruits. Coconut & Quinoa Pancakes (recipe from At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen by Amy Chaplin) Makes ten 4-inch /­­ 10 cm pancakes 1/­­2 cup uncooked quinoa, soaked for 12 to 24 hours in 1 cup filtered water 1/­­2 cup rolled oats 3/­­4 cup unsweetened desiccated coconut 1 cup unsweetened almond milk 1 egg or 1 tsp chia seeds soaked in 1/­­4 cup filtered water for 15 minutes 2 tbsp melted extra virgin coconut oil (more for cooking) 2 tsp ground vanilla 1 tsp baking powder 1/­­2 tsp ground vanilla 1/­­2 tsp cinnamon zest of 1 lemon Drain and rinse quinoa, and place it in an upright blender. Add oats, 1/­­4 cup coconut, almond milk, egg, coconut oil, vanilla, baking powder, and cinnamon. Blend on high speed for about 40 seconds or until completely smooth, scraping down sides as necessary. Add remaining coconut and lemon zest and stir with a rubber spatula to combine. Warm a wide cast iron skillet over medium heat; add about 1 teaspoon coconut oil and spoon in 1/­­4 cup batter for each pancake. Spread the batter out a little with the back of a spoon to make a 4-inch pancake. Cook for about 3 minutes or until surface is covered with bubbles and bottom is golden and beginning to brown. Flip and cook for another 2 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from skillet and repeat with remaining batter. These pancakes are best hot off the pan, but they can also be kept warm in a 200?F oven as you cook the whole batch. Quick Citrus Chia Jam 5 mandarins or citrus fruits of choice, peeled and most of the white rim discarded 2 tbsp honey (more or less depending on the sweetness of the citrus fruits) 2 tbsp chia seeds Peel two of the mandarins and chop the slices into small pieces that you place in a small bowl. Cut the remaining mandarins in half and squeeze out all the juice into the bowl. Add honey and chia seeds. Use a fork to whisk until all is combined. Leave in the fridge for a few hours or overnight. The chia seeds will bind the juice into a jam-like consistency. Store in a sealed jar in the fridge for up to 3-5 days.       PS. Green Kitchen Travels is being released in German, Dutch, Swedish and Danish during these next couple of weeks. Check out our book page for more info!

Vegan Passionfruit & Coconut Macaroons

February 18 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Vegan Passionfruit & Coconut Macaroons I made these for Luise and Elsa on Valentine’s day with the intention of sharing the recipe here on the same day. I would have called them Passionate Macaroons. But then I realised that I didn’t want to spend Valentine’s evening in front of a computer. So here they are, a few days late but just as good. Me and coconut macaroons go way back. Along with sticky chocolate cake, this was a treat that was easy enough for me to bake as a kid. So I did. Many times. And since then, I have been following more or less the same recipe, it’s so simple, quick, and delicious that I never found a reason to divert from it. That was until a few weeks ago. We were preparing our breakfast event at Little Bird Organics in Auckland when they handed us a bag of their passionfruit & macadamia macaroons and they kind of blew my mind. Pairing passionfruit with coconut is just brilliant and it adds a new dimension to a classic cookie. I have borrowed their idea in my own version. The result is a very tropical, sweet and just slightly tart flavour mixed with all the richness that comes from the coconut. This was also my first successful attempt at making them vegan without using an egg white as binder. Instead I use coconut milk, honey (or yacon syrup or maple syrup) and almond flour. They hold together well once they have cooled down but might be a little crumbly straight from the oven. Just pop them in the fridge if you want them firmer. You can replace the almond flour with almost any flour of choice, or cacao powder for a tropical chocolate version. Passionfruit & Coconut Macaroons (vegan + gluten-free) Makes 12 Depending on your preference and the sweetness of the passion fruits you might want adjust the honey accordingly before baking. We find this ratio to be just perfect for us. 2 tbsp cold-pressed coconut oil (or just extra coconut milk) 1/­­2 cup full-fat coconut milk 1/­­3 cup raw honey (or maple or yacon syrup) 1/­­2 vanilla pod, seeds scraped or 1/­­2 tsp ground vanilla powder 2 cups desiccated coconut, unsweetened 3 tbsp almond meal/­­flour (or other flour if nut allergic) 1/­­3 tsp sea salt 3 passion fruits 1 lime, juice 50 g /­­ 2 oz dark 70% chocolate, for drizzling (optional) Preheat your oven to 350°F /­­ 180°C. Add coconut oil, coconut milk, honey and vanilla to a saucepan on medium heat and bring to a slow simmer. Add the desiccated coconut, almond flour and salt, stir and let it all come together into a sticky mess. Remove the pan from the heat, add passionfruit and lime juice and give it a good stir. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Use a large tablespoon, ice cream scoop or your hands to form the mixture into balls (about the size of a golf ball) with a flat bottom. Place them on the baking paper and bake for about 12 minutes in the oven. Let cool slightly before serving or start making the chocolate drizzle: Pop them in the fridge while melting the chocolate in a water bath. Take out the tray form the fridge, dip a teaspoon in the melted chocolate and drizzle back and forth over the macaroons. Repeat until you are happy with the amount of chocolate. Store in fridge, lasts for at least 5 days but will probably be gone within 24 hours.

Roasted Pumpkin & Peach Salad + Sydney

January 12 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Pumpkin & Peach Salad + Sydney In the introduction of our latest book, we have written a sentence about our family feeling most at home when we are not. And as I sit here in our tiny airbnb apartment a bit away from Bondi beach, with Elsa sleeping on the couch next to me and Luise and Isac in a bed that is too small for the three of us, I feel this stronger than ever. With a few belongings packed in a bag, our apartment in Stockholm rented out and all of us tucked into in a room in a country far far away, we always have our closest and happiest family moments. It’s almost ironic how you become so much more present when you remove all the clutter that you worked half your life to get. We have had just as joyful cooking experiences in this 1 square meter kitchen as we have had in our newly renovated kitchen at home. I am trying to grip all these moments that we have together. The hugs, the laughter, the rustic home cooked meals. I want to physically hold on and not letting them slip away. But it doesn’t work. 5 weeks have already passed here in Sydney even though I have done my best to slow time down. And today we are off to New Zealand for new adventures. We are packing ourselves into a  camper van so our space is going to be even tighter. We are also having two cooking events at Little Bird Organics in Auckland. Unfortunately all the tickets sold out on the first day, so we didn’t have time to put it up here (we are planning to do a similar event in Melbourne in February, keep your eye out here for more info).  I haven’t used my dslr camera much since we got here, so here are instead a few snaps from our instagram feeds. We followed all the Sydney cafe and restaurant recommendations that we got from you guys earlier and wanted to return the favour by listing some of our favorites. We have been living in the Eastern and Southern suburbs so most our tips are from there. For all of you living in Sydney, these places are probably old news. But they might hopefully come handy for anyone planning a visit. We are coming back for a week in March before we fly back to Sweden, so in case we have missed anything, do let us know and we’ll try to plan in a visit. Kitchen By Mike. 1/­­85 Dunning Avenue, Roseberry. We have had a bunch of people recommending us to visit this place and we can easily understand why. It was such a cool place and the food was rustic and very tasty. The salad recipe we serve below was vaguely inspired by our lunch there. Sadhana Kitchen. 147 Enmore Road. A small raw food restaurant that serves a whole lot of different raw food dishes with a new twist, not just salads but also lasagna, tacos and vegan BLT. Earth to Table. 85 Bronte Rd, Bondi Junction. Another creative raw food restaurant. The cakes here are spectacular. Eveleigh Farmers Market. 245 Wilson St, Eveleigh. A nice farmer’s market situated inside a huge open warehouse building. Porch and Parlour. 17/­­110 Ramsgate Avenue, Bondi Beach. One of the hippest places in Bondi. Combines cosmic salads topped with fermented vegetables with good coffee and amazing smoothies and transforms into a wine parlour during the night. Bread & Circus. 21 Fountain Street, Alexandria. Colourful cafe and a great brunch place with salads, small sides and DIY bread boxes filled with all kind of good stuff. Orchard Street Cafe. 2 Brighton Boulevard, North Bondi. What we love most about raw food cafe is the nice vibe from the huge open windows and kelim covered outdoor bench. They also have very delicious and investing earthy juices and smoothies based on healing herbs that are worth checking out. Bondi Harvest. Level 4, Westfield, Bondi Junction. We are fans of the Bondi Harvest youtube channel and was excited to hear about their newly opened restaurant. You wish this surfer inspired place would be located right on the beach, but instead they have opened inside the not-so-charming Westfield mall. The food was however really good. Epic salads and tasty sandwiches. Seasonal and good quality produce. Pressed Juices. 85 Gould Street, Bondi Beach, New South Wales. There are plenty of cold-pressed juice stores in Sydney but we got most our juices and almond mylks from here. So many great combination of flavours. Elsa’s favourite was the Strawberry Mylk. About Life. 1 Kiaora Ln, Double Bay (and 4 other locations). An all organic supermarket with everything you might be looking for. They also have a huge take-away lunch buffet with everything from hot dishes to raw food. Earth Food Store. 81a Gould Street, Bondi Beach. The most spectacular thing about this food store is how beautiful the vegetables are displayed and the cozy atmosphere. They also have a cafe with smoothies, salads, frittata and sweet potato patties. Health Emporium. 263 - 265 Bondi Road, Bondi. This cute health food store sells smoothies, homemade almond butter and organic vegetables. They also had both our books on display, which adds a lot of bonus points! Gertrude & Alice. 46 Hall st, Bondi Beach. There is always a special vibe at book cafes. We spent a few hours here, reading to Elsa and flipping through Australian cookbooks while having tea and snacks. M Deli. This was our local cafe while living in Bondi. We lived very close and went here for coffee and muffins from the always smiling staff in the mornings. They also serve an array of great tasting salad bowls and tarts for lunch. Roasted Pumpkin, Fennel & Peach Salad We made this salad for a picnic that we had with readers in Sydney. The picnic was so wonderful and the salad was simple but great! You want to roast the pumpkins until they are almost a bit burnt on the edges. Keep the pumpkin seeds hanging for the genuine rustic look (like the ones we got at Kitchen By Mike). We bought an organic nap pumpkin at Eveleigh Farmer’s market, but hokkaido or butternut will work too. 1 whole blue/­­jap pumpkin (keep skin and seeds) 2 + 4 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil 4 tbsp honey 2 limes, juice sea salt and black pepper Salad ingrediens 2 handfuls almonds 4 peaches, stone removed and cut into wedges 2 fennels, finely sliced, fronds reserved 1 large head of lettuce, leaves separated and torn into bite-size pieces Preheat the oven to 220°C. Cut the pumpkin into large squares, leaving the skin on and seeds intact. Place skin side down, on a baking tray. Drizzle with 2 tbsp oil, cover evenly and sprinkle with sea salt. Roast the pumpkin in the oven for 30-45 minutes, until the pieces are very soft and the tips  are slightly burned. Combine 4 tbsp oil, honey, lime juice, then season to taste with sea salt and pepper. Taste the dressing and adjust the flavours to your preference. Transfer the roasted pumpkin pieces to a bowl and pour over half of the dressing (save the other half for the salad) and toss gently. While the oven is still warm, toast the almonds on a baking  tray until golden, about 10 minutes. Prepare the salad ingredients. In a large bowl, gently toss peaches, fennels and lettuce. Add the remaining half of the dressing and combine. Arrange everything on a platter. Then tuck in the roasted pumpkin pieces, scatter with almonds and sprinkle with fennel fronds. Serve.

Green & Clean 2015

January 1 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green & Clean 2015 Hey, happy new year everyone! Today we are excited to share this little project that we have been working on. It’s a whole bunch of new recipes including the delicious salad on the photo above. Before we tell you more about the recipes, let us just quickly share some thoughts behind them. Most people want to start the year by eating fresh, right. But getting a healthy start of the year doesnt mean that you have to go through a full body detox. Sure, it can be great if you really feel like you need a complete cleanse, but we believe that it is even more important to focus on eating balanced throughout the year and then just increasing your intake of health boosting ingredients after the holiday season. When you live up in the northern parts of the world, the thought of restricting yourself to only drinking juices and eating raw meals during the coldest season of the year can seem quite difficult. So we have created a recipe pack for our Green Kitchen app with 14 new and exclusive recipes that focuses on health and getting a fresh start of the year without having to feel like you are on a strict diet. We have worked with nourishing combinations of ingredients that are good for your body and taste delicious. Our recipes are not focused on being low fat or counting calories, we instead encourage healthy fats, complex carbohydrates and plant based proteins that your body needs. There are juices, smoothies, sides and salads in there, but also some warm meals and a soup. All recipes are gluten free and vegetarian and most of them are vegan or have vegan options. Here is a little preview of all the recipes. We have put a lot of love, time and effort into developing and testing these recipes, so we decided to sell them inside the app. If you have the app, there should be a new box with more info at the top of the grid. The price is $1.99 but we are giving it away for only 99 cents now during the first 24 hours of the new year. We always get the question about creating an Android version and the answer is that we are planning on doing it, but it’s just a different world to Apple nerds like us us. So we keep pushing it forward. We are so sorry that it’s taking such time. We have however come up with a temporary solution for those of you that don’t have an ipad or iphone but still would like to try these particular recipes. We have gathered them in a mini recipe e-book that is available to purchase here in our temporary e-store.  To give you a preview, we are also sharing one of the recipes here today. It’s a beet, apple & quinoa salad that we have made perhaps a quadrillion times throughout the years, but for some strange reason it hasn’t made its appearance here until now. Beets and apples are shredded raw and they add both flavour, texture and sweetness to the quinoa. The beets also give the quinoa a beautiful red purple colour. It’s quick, simple and very easy to vary. You could add some tofu or roasted vegetables to the salad if you want it even more nourishing. Have a happy, healthy and delicious 2015! Beet, Apple, Quinoa & Sprout Salad Serves 4 1 cup /­­ 190 g /­­ 250 ml uncooked quinoa (preferably soaked) 2 cups /­­ 500 ml water 4 raw beetroots 2 apples 1 handful lettuce, rinsed 2 tbsp olive oil 2 tbsp lemon juice salt black pepper Serve with 1 handful mixed sprouts a few dollops labneh or CashewCheese” (both recipes are included in the bundle) 1 small handful almonds or sunflower seeds, coarsely chopped Cooking the quinoa: Place rinsed quinoa, water and a pinch of salt in a medium-size saucepan. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a bare simmer and let gently cook for about 15 minutes, or until you see small tails on the quinoa seeds. Set aside to cool in a large mixing bowl. Making the salad: Peel and grate the beetroots and the apples on the coarse side of a box grater. Combine lettuce, quinoa, beetroots and apples in a bowl. Drizzle with olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper and give it a good toss with your hands. Serve in bowls with sprouts and a dollop of labneh or cashew cheese.

Christmas Spiced Parsnip Cake

December 9 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Christmas Spiced Parsnip Cake The first time I heard about parsnip cake was only a month ago. I did a photo job for a Swedish bakery and they wanted a photo of a parsnip cake as it, apparently, is a classic Swedish dessert. I have lived in Sweden my entire life and baked countless amounts of cakes but never encountered it before, so I am not sure I would go as far as calling it a classic. It is however wildly delicious and a very pleasant way to incorporate more vegetables in your life, so perhaps we can make it a future classic. The parsnip cake is cousin with the carrot cake but the parsnips add some very unique mild root tones along with the traditionally sweet taste and moist consistency. And just like its cousin, it develops in flavour so it is even more flavourful after a day in the fridge. Since Christmas is coming up, we spiced the cake with warm tones like ginger, cinnamon and clove that go perfectly with the flavour from the roots. It might not be the most traditional Christmas cake on the table but I am quite certain that Santa won’t mind. It is topped with orange flavoured quark cheese or cream cheese, orange zest and roasted hazelnuts. If you can’t find quark, you can make a sweet quick version of labneh instead by mixing 2 cups greek yogurt with 1-2 tbsp maple syrup and some orange juice and strain it in cheese cloth for a few hours until it is firm enough to spread on a cake. This cake was included in the Christmas update of our Green Kitchen app that we released earlier this week. If you already have the app, you can just hit update to get the 8 Christmas recipes without any extra cost. And while we are talking about the app - it has once again been selected for the AppStore Best of 2014 in Scandinavia and Germany. So exciting! And we got loads of new and exciting stuff lined up for it next year! Spiced Parsnip Cake Serves 8 If you dont want to make the cake gluten free, you can replace the oat flour, rice flour and arrowroot with 1 3/­­4 cups /­­ 200 g spelt flour. 3/­­4 cup (120 g) rice flour 1 cup (90 g) oat flour 2 tbsp arrow root powder or potato starch 2 tsp baking powder 1 tsp cinnamon 1/­­2 tsp vanilla powder 1/­­2 tsp ground ginger 1 pinch clove 1 pinch salt 225 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb (3 small/­­medium) parsnips 1 orange, zest 4 eggs 3/­­4 cup /­­ 160 ml honey or maple syrup 3/­­4 cup /­­ 160 ml rapeseed oil Topping 7 oz /­­ 200 g quark/­­curd or cream cheese (or unsalted labneh) 1 tbsp maple syrup or honey 1 orange, juice and zest 1 cup /­­ 125 g roasted hazelnuts, roughly chopped Preheat the oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. Line the sides and base of a 20-22 cm /­­ 8-9 inches springform tin with parchment paper. Sift together the flours, arrowroot, baking powder and spices. Peel and grate the parsnips (you can keep the peel on if you use organic) and zest the orange. Beat the eggs in a large bowl until frothy. Add the oil and maple syrup and beat for another minute. Stir in the parsnip and orange zest and then fold in the flours. Pour the mixture into the prepared springform tin. Bake on the middle shelf of the oven for about 45 minutes, or until golden and an inserted skewer comes out clean. Leave to cool before before removing it from the springform tin. Make the icing by simply stirring together quark or cream cheese with maple syrup and orange juice. Spread the icing over the cake when it has cooled completely. Garnish with roasted hazelnuts and orange zest. If you are making it ahead; store the cake in the fridge and add icing and topping just before serving. PS! We are in Sydney now and just heard (through social media) that our book got a glowing review and was listed as one of the top cookbooks 2014 on BBC Radio 4. You can listen to the broadcast here (about 6.30 min into the show). It is still not too late to order Green Kitchen Travels as Christmas present *wink wink*. Here is a list of webshops that are selling it.

Dark Chocolate & Sea Salt Popcorn

November 30 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Dark Chocolate & Sea Salt Popcorn Our “To-do in November List” was four pages long. It was a list of highs and lows. Here are a few of the topics, to give you a small glimpse of our month: o Cooking on a morning-tv show [High] o Working on new recipes for an upcoming project (that we soon will share) [High!] o Getting permission to rent out our apartment while we are gone [low - because of all the boring paper work, but High because we finally got the approval] o Releasing a Christmas update for our app (it will be out any day now) [High] o Getting new passports [Low - we always manage to fill in something wrong on those damn forms] o Cleaning the bathroom drain [Ultra low] o Finding some home exchanges in Australia & NZ [High - we have found a few trades that will make it a bit less restraining on our budget]. o And about a 100 other things. And now we finally sit here in our half empty, well-cleaned apartment. All to-dos have been crossed off. Bags are packed. The kids are sleeping. And we are leaving for the airport in a few hours. We will be staying around Sydney in December and Melbourne in February. We’ll share more of our plans as they are shaping up. This is almost too simple to call a recipe. But since popcorn + dark chocolate + sea salt is a damn good combo, that’s what we’re sharing today. Check out the video, make some popcorn and next time we’ll be writing from Australia. xo D&L Sea Salt & Dark Chocolate Popcorn Cold-pressed coconut oil or organic butter corn kernels (organic and GMO-free) 100 g /­­ 3,5 oz dark chocolate (80%) sea salt Place a large pot on medium high heat with enough oil to cover the bottom, be sure to keep the lid on the pot (you can tilt it slightly to let the moisture out). Drop a couple of kernels in, once they pop, you’re ready to add the rest and lower the heat to medium low. Add just enough to barely cover the bottom of the pot, put the lid on and wait until they begin to pop. You’ll be able to tell when it’s done when it’s about 5 seconds between each pop. Place the popcorn in a large bowl and immediately scatter the chopped dark chocolate over the warm popcorn and sprinkle with sea salt. Stir to combine. Ready to serve.

Spinach & Quinoa Patties in a bowl

November 20 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Spinach & Quinoa Patties in a bowl You might have heard this little tip before but we encourage you to really try it. It will make it so much easier to eat well throughout the week, also when you have no time to spare. Always, always cook twice as much quinoa, millet, buckwheatbeans and lentils as you need for a recipe and store the leftovers in separate containers in the fridge. We can guarantee that they will prove themselves useful throughout the week. You will quickly realise how helpful it is to always have something readily available to add in salads, as a side to a stew or on top of soups. And if you run out of ideas, you can always make patties. We make these Spinach & Quinoa Patties quite often, using leftover vegetables from the fridge together with some seeds or grains. They are great in a burger bun, but most of the time we add them to a bowl like the one above. These bowls full of vegetables, beans or lentils, grains or seeds and some kind of fruit are very typical in our house. They are quick to make, easy to vary according to season (just like Sarah B does) and always delicious. We created this video for our youtube channel to show you how it looks when we make these patties. Hopefully you will find it helpful. If you look closely towards the end of the clip, you can see that Luise still was pregnant when we recorded it. In fact, it was only days before she gave birth to baby Isac. Spinach & Quinoa Patties makes 10-12 patties 1 cup /­­ 200 g uncooked quinoa OR 2 1/­­2 cups pre-cooked quinoa, (black, white or red) 3/­­4 cup /­­ 3 oz /­­ 80 g rolled oats 4 eggs 7 oz /­­ 200 g sheeps feta cheese 100 g /­­ 4 cups fresh spinach, chopped sea salt & pepper coconut oil, butter, olive oil or ghee for frying To serve: lettuce tomatoes red cabbage winter apple soft boiled egg cooked white beans sprouts or micro greens Cook the quinoa: Place 2 cups /­­ 500 ml water, rinsed quinoa and a pinch of salt in a medium-size saucepan. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a bare simmer and gently cook for about 15 minutes, or until you see small tails on the quinoa seeds. Set aside to cool. In a large mixing bowl, place cooked quinoa, oats, eggs, feta cheese, chopped spinach, salt and pepper and combine until all is mixed. Place in the fridge to set for 30 minutes. Take out the mixture and form 10 to 12 patties with your hands. Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium heat. Add the patties and fry for about 2-3 minutes on each side or until golden brown. Serve with lettuce, tomatoes, soft boiled eggs, beans and sprouts or micro greens. The patties keep for 3-5 days in the fridge and freezes well. PS! We have some exciting news. You can now pick up our Yoga Pot as a to-go box in any of the four Urban Deli stores in Stockholm. We have worked together with their chefs to make it taste perfectly and it truly turned out good. If you don’t know our Yoga Pot already, it’s a flavorful red lentil stew served with whole grain rice, some yogurt and two fresh dates on the side. So now you know where to go if you are in Stockholm and feel like eating a GKS meal but don’t want to cook it yourself. Yay!

Savoury Tomato & Parmesan Crumble

October 22 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Savoury Tomato & Parmesan Crumble Just needed to write this before we share today’s recipe: Damn! (or Holy F**k!, as TK probably would put it). We asked for some travel tips but never expected that you would be so incredibly helpful. We will compile all your recommendations into a document and it is going to be the perfect travel guide for us. Huge, huge thank you! After having read your comments we are now leaning towards dividing our time between Sydney and Melbourne. And do a month in NZ in between. We will keep you updated regarding our workshops as soon as we have more info. If you’ve been cooking with us this summer, you probably know that we love crumbles. They are imprecise and easy improvised - try quinoa flakes instead of oats, coconut oil instead of butter, a little less of this or a little more of that. Instead of doing yet another sweet crumble, this a savoury version. It’s a nice little autumn dinner that we recommend making with some heirloom tomatoes or flavourful cherry tomatoes. The sweet tanginess from the tomatoes goes perfectly with the rich and crunchy parmesan and oat topping. If you can’t find any good tomatoes, I imagine that diced eggplant/­­aubergine and zucchini would be great as well. Serve with a simple bean salad for some extra protein. Savoury Tomato Crumble Serves 4 You can read our thoughts on the use of rennet in cheese at the bottom of this post. 1,5 pounds /­­ 700 g ripe tomatoes 1 tsp coarse sea salt 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar 1,5 cups /­­ 140 g rolled oats (cert. gluten free if you prefer) 6 tbsp almond meal/­­flour 1/­­2 cup /­­ 25 g grated parmesan cheese (choose rennet-free cheese if you prefer) 4 sprigs oregano, leaves picked and chopped 1 pinch sea salt 100 g butter (or try coconut oil) Preheat the oven to 175°C /­­ 350°F. Grease a 22 cm /­­ 9 inch baking dish or pie tin with butter (or coconut oil). Rinse the tomatoes and cut in halves. Place in a baking dish and toss with sea salt and apple cider vinegar. Prepare the crumble in a separate bowl. Start by thoroughly mixing oats, almond meal/­­flour, grated parmesan, oregano and sea salt. Cut the butter into smaller pieces and add to the oat mixture. Use your hands to mix until large crumbs are formed. Pour the crumble filling evenly over the tomatoes. Bake in the oven for 40 minutes until the tomato juices are bubbling around the edges and the crumble is firm and browned. We served it with lettuce, pear and chickpeas on the side. Keeps for about a 5 days in the fridge. Freezes and reheats well. PS. Through these last weeks, some of our favourite food bloggers have cooked their own versions of recipes from Green Kitchen Travels. Their interpretations are honestly so beautiful so make sure to check them out: Vegetarian Pho by Kelsey from Happyolks. Crispy Eggplant Polenta Bites with Honey + Lime by Laura from The First Mess. No Noodle Pad Thai by Anya from Golubka. Lemongrass & Coconut Summer Rolls by Sara from Sprouted Kitchen. Halloumi Veggie Burgers by Brian from A Thought for Food. Ribollita (Tuscan Vegetable Stew) by A Couple Cooks. No Noodle Pad Thai by Kathryne from Cookie+Kate. Here are a few other press clips about the book: Red Online, British Vogue, Marie Claire & Epicurious. If you already have our book we’d be super grateful if you wanted to write a short review of it on Amazon. Thank you, Thank you! Next week I think it’s time to share the recipe for these.

Hummus + Shakshuka + Design*Sponge

October 4 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Hummus + Shakshuka + Design*Sponge We spent a week in Tel Aviv, Israel, only days after we had sent our book to print. The food scene was beyond incredible with lots of options for vegetarians. But it actually hurt to try all the amazing food there and realize that it was too late to fit some Israeli dishes into the book. So when Design*Sponge recently asked us for a travel recipe that didn’t make it into the book, we were more than happy to share this creamy hummus topped with shakshuka. In Israel, they often eat this for breakfast but in our home it serves much better as lunch. Or a light dinner. We asked an Israeli chef how he got his hummus so exceptionally creamy and have used his advice to create our own perfect hummus. Most people eat this with a few pita breads on the side, to scoop up all the deliciousness with. Here we have made the whole dish gluten-free and serve it with home baked sweet potato chips. I know that it’s common among food writers to claim that every recipe they produce is one of their favorites, but this truly is something that we have been eating two times a week for the past month. The combination of creamy hummus topped with sweet, flavorful and tangy shakshuka is something that I simply can’t get tired of. Elsa, on the other hand, thinks we are going crazy: “Dad. Hummus. Again?!?”. Whether it’s for a single lunch or eight times a month, I just can’t recommended this dish enough. So head on over to Design*Sponge to see more photos and check out the recipe!

Green Kitchen Travels + Ribollita

September 16 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Kitchen Travels + Ribollita Our new book has finally been released in the UK and Australia! And already next week it will be available throughout the US. We really hope that you will find it an inspiring and helpful tool in the kitchen and also something beautiful that you want to keep in your home. And who knows, it might even trigger you to save up some money (actually, most of our travels have been done on very low budget) and bring the family or friends on your own travel adventures. To celebrate the occasion, we have created this book video. We filmed one half of the video in Marrakesh last winter and the rest quite recently with a little baby boy dangling on David’s shoulder while he was filming. So if you find the video shaky, Isac is to blame. Enjoy! Apart from all the recipes (more than 90 of them), we are also quite fond of the personal stories behind many of the recipes. Just like on this blog, the stories give the recipes extra flavour. You will find insights in our escapades that we haven’t shared on the blog before. Like the time in Sicily when we spent a night in a car to save money after a few too hefty restaurant bills. Or the look on David’s face when we visited a Californian Avocado farm and were told to watch out for the rattle snakes… The chapter about traveling with kids is also not to be missed. You can order the book within the UK from Waterstones (at the moment they have a ?5 discount) or Amazon.co.uk. In Australia from Booktopia. And in the US from Amazon.com. Or just pick up a copy from your local book seller. If you already have received the book and like it, please leave a review on the book sellers site. Thank you!!! *********** The giveaway is closed. Big congrats to Sonja from Vancouver for winning a signed copy of the book!!! Thank you to ALL of you who entered the giveaway and shared your favorite cuisine. We loved reading through all of the 1047 comments! Mediterranean food seems to be a favorite among many of you. Big love!!! /­­David, Luise, Elsa & Isac Giveaway!  To make things extra fun, we are also giving away a signed copy of the book. The giveaway is open worldwide! Simply leave a comment with your name, where you are from and what your favorite cuisine from around the world is. We will pick one winner using random.org. The giveaway closes on Thursday at midnight and will be announced on Friday. *********** We are sharing one recipe from the book today. This rustic bread and bean soup sums up all the things I love about the italian way of cooking. Even if many italians themselves are very fashionable, with high heels, sunglasses and expensive clothes, their cooking is the opposite; simple, rustic and down to earth. They dont need any fancy accessories to cook up the most delicious and beautiful meals. A few good-quality vegetables, fresh herbs and beans are quickly turned into a warm and comforting soup. In Tuscany it is common to add some day-old bread and a few slices of Parmesan to it, but if you are vegan or gluten intolerant they can be left out. Zuppa di Ribollita 2 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil, plus extra for serving 1 onion, chopped 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 carrots, diced a pinch of dried chilli flakes 10 sage leaves a handful flat leaf parsley, leaves picked 1 tomato, diced 1 courgette (zucchini), halved lengthwise and sliced 300 g (101/­­2 oz) cavolo nero green kale or Savoy cabbage 100 g (3/­­1/­­2 oz/­­1/­­2 cup) dried cannellini beans, soaked and cooked (or a 400g/­­14 oz can, drained) about 1 litre (34 fl oz/­­4 cups) vegetable stock or water sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste To Serve 4 slices wholegrain sourdough bread, cubed or torn in pieces a piece of Parmesan cheese, shaved Heat the oil in a saucepan. Add the onion, garlic, carrots, chilli and sage and cook over a low heat for 20 minutes until softened but not browned. Add the parsley, tomato and courgette and cook for a couple of minutes. Add the cavolo nero and beans and cover with stock or water. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Season to taste. The soup should be the consistency of a thick stew with a little broth. Serve in bowls and arrange bread cubes, shaved Parmesan cheese and a drizzle of olive oil over each.

Autumn Kale Slaw + Movie Night

September 4 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Autumn Kale Slaw + Movie Night “Sorry to disturb you young lady, what kind of vegetable are you holding there?” I was waiting in line at our farmer’s market with curious baby Isac resting on my right arm and two large bunches of green and purple kale on my left and turned around to see the kind old woman that was talking to me. At first I looked down at our little pumpkin, staring at me with his big eyes and cute little hat. But then I realized that it was the kale she was asking about. I was a bit surprised by the question, as kale has been one of the most hyped ingredients these past couple of years and you can buy it in most food stores now during the autumn. But I quickly woke up from my pompous foodie bubble. I told her that it was called kale and explained some of the wonderful ways how you can prepare it. And while I was talking I noticed that the whole line was listening in on our conversation. Apparently we need to keep talking about kale. So, even though quite a few of you blog readers probably already are using kale in soups, smoothies, batters, bread, salads, pilafs, tomato sauce and as chips, I have realized that there also is a large bunch of people that still haven’t. If you are one of them, I truly encourage you to try it. The leaves might seem thick and sturdy at first, but that only makes them more versatile to use (as you also can use them in warm dishes). And when you massage the leaves with some oil, the sturdiness disappears and it becomes smooth as lettuce. I haven’t even mentioned how healthy it is! Kale is in fact one of the most nutrition packed vegetables on earth. So go grab some kale and start cooking! Today we are sharing two different ways to eat this superfood. In this first recipe, we have paired kale with two other ingredients that are in season at the moment, carrots and apples. This is a kind of a slaw with sweetness from apples and honey, creaminess from tahini, tang from lemon and crunch from carrots and roasted hazelnuts. It is a delicious lunch full of flavor and texture and if you add some black lentils, it also makes a filling dinner. I’m sure you can tell from David’s photos that this truly is an awesome recipe. The second recipe is this video where Elsa and I show how to make Kale Chips. It is a quick, easy and a fun way to eat your superfood. Warning to sensitive parents! The following clip contains images of a child stuffing her mouth full of healthy food. You can also read the full recipe over on our youtube channel. Autumn Kale Slaw 6 stems kale (we mixed purple and green), stemmed and shredded 6 carrots, very finely shredded 2 apples, very finely shredded 1 cup raw hazelnuts (or any nuts or seeds of choice) Tahini dressing 4 tbsp tahini (sesame paste) 2 tbsp honey, preferable unpasteurized 2 tbsp lemon juice water to thin Heat a skillet on medium-low heat. Toast the hazelnuts until the skin has cracked and golden in color. Coarsely chop the nuts. Combine the shredded kale and carrots in a large mixing bowl. Stir together tahini, honey and lemon juice in a small bowl, add water a little by little and stir until desired consistency. Pour the dressing over the kale slaw and combine. Use you hands to massage the leaves, make sure every single kale leaf is covered in dressing. Top with shredded apple and toasted hazelnuts. Ready to serve.   PS - Movie night! We also wanted to let you know that David, Isac and I we will be in London for some book related events in a couple of weeks. One event that is open for public is a food and film night on Tuesday 23 September at gorgeous Charlotte Street Hotel just north of Soho. We were asked to select a food movie that we both liked and since film is something we don’t often agree on, it took us about two weeks to finally decide on the food blog movie of all times, “Julie & Julia” with the awesome Meryl Streep as Julia Child. You might have seen this movie before, but probably not in a room full of other food bloggers. It should make for some interesting discussions afterwards. We will be selling and signing books and before the movie starts we will also do a Q&A with the audience, so make sure to bring any questions that you might have. After the film, the chefs at the hotel have prepared a 3-course dinner from our new book that we all will be having together. Isac and I might have to drop off a bit earlier but David has promised to be there all night to chat with all of you and answer any questions that you might have. You can read more about the event here. Book tickets by sending an email to oscar@firmdale.com. A ticket for the full night with dinner is ?49. Or ?20 if you only want to attend the book signing, watch the film and Q&A. There is a limited amount of tickets, so don’t book too late. We are hoping to see you there! /­Luise

Blueberry & Blackberry Crumble

August 13 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Blueberry & Blackberry Crumble This is a recipe that has been going on repeat all summer in our family. It is such a simple and tasty (vegan and gluten-free) dessert that even my dad asked for the recipe so he could bake it himself. And that says a lot, considering that my dad rarely serves any other desserts than ice cream when we are visiting. He has a summer house a bit outside Stockholm and the blueberries are literally flooding the forests around the house this time of the year. We picked the blueberries for this crumble there, which of course makes it taste extra good. If you are not lucky enough to have a forest filled with blueberries around your house, store-bought berries would work fine as well. You can even use frozen berries and use it as a winter recipe. Before the blueberries and blackberries were in season, we also did this recipe with red currants and raspberries - also great! It’s a vegan recipe but if you prefer, you can replace the coconut oil with butter. We have created this youtube video for the recipe that not only demonstrates how easy it is to prepare, but also gives you a hint of how gorgeous the forest blueberries are when we pick them. We recorded these new videos just a few weeks ago and Luise did an amazing job, considering the size of her pregnant belly. So make sure to check it out! Baked Blackberry & Blueberry Crumble Berry Filling: 2 cups /­­ 225 g blueberries 2 cups /­­ 225 g blackberries 1/­­2 tsp ground vanilla 2 tsp lemon juice 1 tbsp maple syrup or honey Crumble Topping: 2 1/­­2 cups /­­ 240 g rolled oats (cert. gluten free if you are allergic) 5 tbsp almond flour/­­meal (or ground almonds) a pinch sea salt 1/­­2 tsp ground vanilla 5 tbsp maple syrup or honey 5 tbsp cold-pressed coconut oil, room temperature Preheat the oven to 175°C /­­ 350°F. Rinse all berries. Place in a baking dish and toss with vanilla, lemon juice and maple syrup. Prepare the crumble in a separate bowl. Start by mixing oats, almond flour, salt and vanilla. Then add maple syrup and coconut oil. Use your hands to mix until combined. Pour the crumble filling evenly over the berries. Bake in the oven for 35-40 minutes until the fruit juices are bubbling around the edges and the crumble is firm and lightly browned. Serve as it is or with a dollop of yogurt or vegan ice cream on top. Keeps for 3-5 days in the fridge. Freezes and reheats well. ************************* PS! We are coming to London for some book related events in September. I will be teaching a Guardian Masterclass in Food Photography & Styling, the 24 September. It’s a half-day course that ends with a short workshop and photo shoot. There are only 20 spots available so hurry if you want to join. Click here to read more about it and to book tickets! We will let you know about any other events in London as soon as possible. /­­David PS2! If anyone was wondering. Still no baby.

Chia & Açai Fresca

July 30 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Chia & Açai Fresca I hear a soft bounce and walk into Elsa’s room. She lies on the floor right beside her bed, sleeping with the teddy bear as a pillow. I’m not sure why she does this, but it’s not the first time she has crawled down from the bed in the middle of the night. It looks so uncomfortable, but somehow she looks surprisingly harmful. With only hours, days or weeks (hopefully not) left until Elsa’s little brother arrives, I have come to think a lot about her and how our family of three soon will have a new dynamic. I sneak down next to her on the floor (it is uncomfortable!), hug her closely and whisper in her ear that her mom and I won’t love her a second less when little brother arrives. But we just might be a little busier. And the same goes to you lovely readers. We have so many recipes that we are dying to share with you. But at this very moment we are a little busy nesting at home. Hugging each other and waiting for this grumpy, vegetable hating little monster that he just might turn out to be (but hopefully the opposite!). We are also still living without a working kitchen, so instead of sharing the recipe that we had intended, we have this simple Chia & Açai Fresca that we recorded a while back and just published on our YouTube channel. It’s a cooling drink that couldn’t be more perfect for these warm summer days. If you can’t find açai powder, you can use dried blueberry powder or any dried superfood powder of choice. Chia Fresca Makes 3 cups /­­ 750 ml 6 tbsp chia seeds 3 tsp dried acai powder or pomegranate, blueberry, wheatgrass, chlorella etc. 3 tsp lemon juice 3 tsp maple syrup or raw honey 3 cups /­­ 750 ml (filtered) water Measure out 3 cups of water, preferable filtered. Add chia seeds, acai powder, lemon juice and maple syrup and stir to combine. Pour into a bottle. Place in the fridge and let sit for a couple of hours or overnight. The chia seeds will expand with the liquid and turn gel-like. Shake before drinking. And serve with lots of ice. Keeps for 3-5 days in the fridge.

3 x Breakfast Oatmeals & Copenhagen

July 9 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

3 x Breakfast Oatmeals & Copenhagen Even though we have posted countless porridge recipes on this blog - baked, soaked and cooked - we recently realized that we never have posted one of our standard breakfast oatmeals. Oatmeal is one of the most common breakfasts for us on early weekday mornings. It’s quick to make and you only need one ingredient for the most basic recipe. But it can also be prepared in endless varieties depending on season and preference. You can cook oats with water, fruit- or vegetable juice or any kind of milk. And you can either stick to just rolled oats or mix them with quinoa flakes, rye flakes, chia seeds, linseeds or any other kind of seed. We have shared three different set-ups here. One with oat and rye flakes cooked on carrot juice, one standard oatmeal cooked with coconut milk and the last one has egg added to the oatmeal for a protein boost. We have also used different toppings on them. Berries, dried fruit, seeds, nibs, compotes, nut butters and even vegetables are often added to our oatmeals. Remember that the actual oatmeal is only 45 percent of the experience. The most important part are the toppings. So don’t be shy, build mountains of different toppings. We’d love to see your oatmeal creations on Instagram. Hashtag it  #gksbreakfast so we wont miss out on anything. To be on the safe side you could also tag either David:  @gkstories or Luise:  @luisegreenkitchenstories.  Were looking forward to see what you come up with! We were inspired to do this post about oatmeals after our recent visit to the Copenhagen porridge restaurant Gr?d. They serve both sweet and savory porridges and going there feels just like coming home, as they share our love for these warm grainy bowls. The carrot oatmeal further down is similar to something we had there. We have also put together a list of our other favorite places in Copenhagen, in case some of you plan a visit during the summer. Copenhagen Eating Guide The A la Menthe - Morroccan cafe with amazing vegetarian lunch or dinner platters and of course fresh mint tea. R?dhusstraede 5 (near Str?get) 1466 Copenhagen K Bang & Jensen - Cool cafe with traditional danish food with a trendy twist. Istedgade 130, 1350 Vesterbro Höst - Beautiful restaurant with a modern nordic cooking style - N?rre Farimagsgade 41, 1364 Copenhagen K 42 Raw - Our favorite Raw food cafe in Copenhagen with great food, breakfast, desserts, smoothies and juices. Pilestraede 32, 1112 Copenhagen K Simple Raw - Cute little Raw food cafe with delicious food. Try their brunch or lentil burger. Oehlenschlaegergade 12, 1663 Vesterbro Morgenstedet - Organic cafe at Christiania, great homemade food! Christania, 1440 Copenhagen K Parterre - Cute little cafe with danish and french pastries, lunches and cakes, beautiful location by the water. Ovengaden Oven Vandet 90, 1415 Christianshavn Gr?d - A cafe that only serves porridges, sweet and savory. Very delicious and top quality. Jaegerborgsgade 50, 2200 N?rrebro or Torvehallerne, Linnésgade 17, 1362 Copenhagen K Atelier September - Old antique store turned into a cafe. The food is simple tasty danish/­french food. Freshly squeezed juices and good coffee. Gothersgade 30, 1123 Copenhagen K Rist Kaffebar - A coffee shop with a great atmosphere and nice food. Vaernedamsvej 4b, 1619 Vesterbro Café Granola - Charming cafe in the most charming street in Vesterbro. Try their brunch. Vaernedamsvej 5, 1619 Vesterbro Isvaerket - Organic ice cream bar. Stefansgade 15, 2200 N?rrebro Laundromat - A cafe where you can also bring your dirty laundry. They also have a large play corner for kids. Elmegade 15, N?rrebro or ?rhusgade 38, ?sterbro or Gammel Kongevej 96, Frederiksberg C Anne’s Gademad – Homemade take away dinner. Vegetarian option every day. Enghavevej 3, Vesterbro L?L? – Vietnamese restaurant with great vietnamese food with a modern twist. Vesterbrogade 40, 1620 Vesterbro   Oatmeal – 3 ways Protein Boosted Oatmeal Serves 2 1 cup rolled oats (certified gluten-free if you prefer) 2,5 cups water 2 eggs 1/­2 tsp ground vanilla 1 pinch sea salt Topping: avocado, sliced raspberries, fresh or thawed frozen hemp seeds chia seeds quark yogurt Place oats, water, eggs, vanilla and salt in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer on medium to low heat. Stir to combine. Let simmer until the water is just absorbed and the porridge has thickened, about 3-4 minutes. Serve in bowls with with plant milk and toppings. Carrot & Rye Oatmeal Serves 2 1/­2 cup old-fashioned rolled oats 1/­2 cup old-fashioned rolled rye 1,5 cup carrot juice 1 cup water 1 pinch sea salt Topping: raisins flax seeds unsweetened apple sauce with grated fresh ginger (cook chopped apples, a little water and grated ginger until tender) cacao nibs Place oats, rye, carrot juice, water and salt in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer on medium to low heat. Stir until the water is just absorbed and the porridge has thickened, about 3-4 minutes. Serve in bowls with with plant milk and toppings. Sweet Coconut Oatmeal Serves 2 1 cup rolled oats (certified gluten-free if you prefer) 1,5 cup coconut milk 1 cup water 1 pinch sea salt Topping: almond & cacao nut butter (mix nut bitter and cacao powder) toasted desicated coconut toasted pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds strawberries, fresh or thawed frozen raw hazelnuts, chopped goji berries Place oats, coconut milk, water and salt in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer on medium to low heat. Stir until the water is just absorbed and the porridge has thickened, about 3-4 minutes. Serve in bowls with with plant milk and toppings. Tip: For grain free options use rolled flakes of whole buckwheat, millet or quinoa.

Banana, Almond & Chocolate Cake

June 23 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Banana, Almond & Chocolate Cake We are in Copenhagen this week. Although we haven’t talked much about it on the blog, it was a big decision for Luise to move up from Copenhagen to Stockholm for our relationship. I might have promised her mom that I would bring her back after a year, but it has now been more than, ehm, six years… Anyone that has moved abroad knows what a challenge it can be. Luise still has many of her closest friends and family in Denmark and she lights up like fireworks every time we are here. It literally took her 2 minutes to start talking with a complete stranger on the train from the airport. So this week we are pretending that we are a Copenhagen family. If all goes well, we plan to move here by the time Elsa starts school. We are staying in a cute little apartment on the 5th floor on Vesterbro and Luise drags her 8 months pregnant body up all the stairs with the biggest smile on her lips. First time I baked this cake was a few weeks back when Luise craved a chocolate cake on a regular Tuesday. Her biggest craving during this pregnancy has been watermelon, so when she finally wanted something else, I was happy to bake something for her (and Elsa and myself!). We shot this before we left, but to make sure that I had the measurements right, I baked it again just last night. I couldn’t find any baking pans in this apartment’s small pantry kitchen and had to bake it in a sauce pan, but it also turned out just great. So this recipe truly has been tried and tested. It can best be described as a chocolate and almond version of a banana bread/­­cake. The ingredient list is short and the method very uncomplicated and will therefore suit all type of bakers. The cake has a rich bitterness to it from all the cacao and works especially well with some fresh strawberries and a dollop of yogurt. It holds up well in the fridge and actually tastes even better on the second day. For the photos, I covered it in a cappuccino ganache, but it’s entirely optional. The cake is naturally gluten free and dairy free. I haven’t tried to make it vegan this time, but if anyone tries and succeeds, please leave a comment and tell us your method for replacing the eggs. Banana, Almond & Chocolate Cake 10 servings This recipe calls for a lot of cacao, so make sure to choose a good tasting one. It’s a quite small cake but very rich, so 10 servings should still be enough. 200 g /­­ 2 cups /­­ 500 ml almond flour 25 g /­­ 1/­­3 cup /­­ 6 tbsp unsweetened cacao powder  1 tsp baking powder sea salt 2 eggs 2 bananas 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80 ml cold pressed rapeseed oil or olive oil 1/­­2 cup /­­ 120 ml maple syrup or honey Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 356°F. Add almond flour, cacao powder, baking powder and sea salt to a large mixing bowl and set aside. Crack the eggs into a medium size mixing bowl and beat for about a minute. Mash the bananas with a fork and add to the eggs together with oil and syrup. Beat until all is well combined. Add the wet ingrediens to the dry ingrediens and use a whisk to stir until everything is mixed. Grease a small/­­medium size baking pan with oil. Mix a little almond flour with cacao powder and coat the sides with the mixture to prevent the cake from sticking to the pan. Pour the batter into the greased form and bake for about 45 minutes. Remove the cake from the oven and allow to cool completely before carefully tilting it out of the pan and adding the ganache. Serve with fresh berries and a dollop of turkish yogurt. Cappuccino Ganache 80 g /­­ 3 oz dark chocolate (70%) 1 single shot (4 cl) hot espresso or strong brewed coffee 4 tbsp heated milk of choice (plant based or regular) Chop the chocolate into small pieces and place in a bowl. Pour the hot espresso and heated milk over the chocolate and leave for a minute to melt. Use a spoon to stir until completely smooth. Pour the ganache over the cake and watch as is firms up. If the ganache thickens before you have poured it over the cake, you can melt it again over a water bath. Ps. This is completely unrelated to chocolate, but we have posted a new recipe for a post-workout hemp shake on our youtube channel.  

Spinach Cr?pes with Apple & Chickpeas

June 1 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Spinach Cr?pes with Apple & Chickpeas If you put a word counter on Elsa, there would be a few ugly ones topping the most popular list. But if you continue down from “poop” and “pee”, you would eventually find the word “pancakes” on fifth or sixth place on the list. Our daughter talks about pancakes several times each day. It’s her robotic answer to the question “what would you like to have for dinner?”. Or breakfast. Even if we don’t eat pancakes every day, it is a pretty frequent dish in our home. So to make them more nutritious and interesting, we try to come up with different varieties. We do whole grain rye pancakes, banana pancakes, almond pancakes, kaniwa pancakes, Indian dosa with sweet potatoes, chocolate pancakes for dessert, baked pancakes and ... green hulk pancakes (or Spinach Cr?pes as we call them here). They are very simple to make, just mix the batter in a blender together with spinach (or kale) and some fresh herbs. You might want to start out with less spinach and add more as your kids get used to the flavor. The recipe is of course great for adults as well. If you add a bit more fresh herbs to the batter, the pancakes will taste like they are pesto infused. These pancakes are topped with a Chickpea, Apple & Tahini Filling that has a slightly sweet flavor that usually goes well with kids and grown-ups alike. Here is video from our YouTube channel, showing you how we make them. We use a hand blender in the video, but a stand blender is even easier to use. Spinach Cr?pes with Chickpea, Apple & Tahini Filling Serves 4 The buckwheat flour we use in Sweden is quite light in colour. If you use a dark buckwheat flour the pancakes will get a more earthy colour than ours. Crepe batter 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 225 g buckwheat flour 3 large eggs 2 cups /­­ 500 ml plant milk (we use oat milk) 1 cup /­­ 250 ml water 1 tbsp melted coconut oil or butter (more for frying) a pinch of sea salt 2 handfuls fresh spinach, rinsed (or thawed frozen) 10 leaves fresh basil (optional) Chickpea, Apple & Tahini Filling 3 tbsp tahini 3 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil 1 organic lemon, juice 2 small apples, grated on a box gratersea salt & freshly ground black pepper, to taste around 2 cups /­­ 600 g cooked chickpeas/­­garbanzo beans Place all the crepe ingredients in a large mixing bowl and mix with a hand (immersion) blender until smooth and green. This step can also be done in a regular blender. Refrigerate the batter for 30 minutes. Heat an 8 inch /­­ 20 cm frying pan on medium heat. Add a pinch of oil and when it is melted, about 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80 ml of the batter. Tilt the pan in circles until the batter is evenly distributed. Fry for about 1 minute on each side, until the pancakes are golden and can be turned easily. Fry all of the pancakes and put on a baking sheet to cool off. Preparing the filling: Whisk tahini, oil and lemon juice together in a mixing bowl. Add grated apple, salt and pepper and stir to combine. Add the chickpeas and mix it with your hands until the chickpeas are coated. Add a generous dollop of the filling in the centre of each crepe. Fold the crepe over the filling and serve.

Hello youtube!

May 14 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Hello youtube! Wiiiih, today we have started our own little video channel on youtube. We have been curious about food videos for quite a while. Some of you might remember a few early attempts that we have done (with a little help from our friends). It’s such a fun media because we can share a recipe and a story more visually than just describing it in text and stills. But since we are amateurs at this, it takes us forever to produce and edit even the shortest clip. So you can imagine that we were glad when FoodClub offered us some help to start our own youtube channel and produce a number of recipe videos. We have already shot a few recipes and will release them regularly on the channel. Apparently they will pop up in your feed if you hit the subscribe button, so you might want to do that. Most of the recipes will actually be completely new ones, so if you think we have been a bit slow with updating the blog, this should hopefully be a great complement for more recipes. Not to worry though, we will still run the blog as usual. Here is a short intro video that we did for the channel.  We have tried to keep the videos short because we get bored by too long ones. There are some instructions in the recipes, but we wanted to keep them inspirational and get away from the traditional cooking shows. This is a chance for us to experiment with the media, learn about the trade and find our own way of doing videos, so we’d love to hear feedback from you! Oh, we forgot to say that we actually talk in these videos, so you might want to switch on your speakers. We’re starting off with a Roasted Cauliflower Salad with Dates and Lentils. You’ll find the recipe and video here below. We have also done a video for the Turkish Yogurt & Blueberry Popsicles in the top picture. You can find that video on youtube.com/­­greenkitchenstories, with the full recipe below the video. Anything else? Elsa will also be popping up in a few of them. Not speaking though, even if her english soon is better than ours. Roasted Cauliflower Salad with Dates & Lentils Serves 4 1 head raw cauliflower 4 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil 1/­­4 tsp ground cumin 1/­­4 tsp ground cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp ground ginger 1 pinch ground cayenne or more to taste 1 cup /­­ 240 ml uncooked beluga lentils (or green lentils) 1 large handful (about 4 oz) raw almonds 10 fresh or dried dates, pitted 1 small red onion 4 cups /­­ 100 g loosely packed mache lettuce, rucola (rocket) or spinach leaves sprouts, for garnish Creamy Tahini Dressing 2 tbsp tahini 1 tsp honey 1 tbsp lemon juice 2 tbsp water to thin, or more to your desire Preheat oven to 220°C /­­ 420°F. Cut the cauliflower into smaller florets and chop the stem. Spread out in a roasting tin. Mix oil and spices in a glass, pour over the cauliflower and toss to cover all florets in the oil. Roast in the oven for about 20-25 minutes until the cauliflower is golden brown. Meanwhile place lentils and 2 cups /­­ 500 ml water in a saucepan. Bring to boil, then lower the heat and cook gently for about 20 minutes or until soft. Drain any excess water and set aside to cool. Remove the cauliflower from the oven. Place in a large mixing bowl and set aside to cool. Reduce the oven heat to 350°F /­­ 175°C and dry roast the almonds for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Prepare the dressing by whisking all ingredients in a small bowl. Mix gently with the cooled lentils. Chop the dates and slice the onion. Remove the almonds from the oven and coarsely chop. Add all ingredients to the mixing bowl and toss to combine. Garnish with sprouts and serve. Keeps for a couple of days in the fridge.

Warm Almond, Garlic & Parsnip Soup

April 23 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Warm Almond, Garlic & Parsnip Soup Hey friends, we are just checking in quickly from our chaotic life in an apartment filled with moving boxes to share a wonderful little soup recipe with you. It’s a savory, creamy and slightly sweet almond & garlic soup that we top with red grapes. It is kind of inspired by a Spanish White Almond Gazpacho, but our version is served warm and with roasted roots. We wanted it to feel like a thick warm almond milk with lots of flavor. It has quickly become one of our favorite recipes this spring, both as lunch and dinner. And the grapes on top truly adds a nice and fruity twist. If you are having guests over, it could also be really nice as a starter. We originally created this recipe for the Electrolux Now You’re Cooking Everyday event. You can find the video of our recipe here. A few posts ago we also asked for your best breakfast recipe. The winners were Silvia & Camille with their amazing and simple Rhubarb Parfait. Congratulations! The recipe will be cooked live on the same event tomorrow morning 9.00 CET. Yep, that was it. Short and sweet. Now we need to get back to unpacking boxes, assembling Ikea closets and putting shelves up on the wall (phew). Much love! Warm Almond Soup Serves 4 300 g parsnip (around 3) or parsley root 1 garlic bulb (10 cloves) 1 large yellow onion 1 tbsp olive oil, extra for serving 125 g /­ 1 cup almonds, blanched 4 cups boiling water, or more to taste 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar or white wine 2 sprigs fresh thyme or 1 tsp dried thyme, extra some for serving sea salt and freshly ground pepper 20 organic red grapes, divide and seeds removed Preheat the oven to 200°C /­ 400°F. Prepare the vegetables, peel parsnip or parsley root, garlic and onion. Cut into large bite-size pieces. Place in a bowl and lightly drizzle with olive oil, toss to cover. Cover a baking sheet with baking paper and arrange the vegetables on it. Place in the oven and bake for 15-20 minutes, until tender and lightly browned. Meanwhile blanch the almonds and heat the water in a water boiler. When the vegetables are done, remove from the oven and place in a heat proof blender. Add blanched almonds, hot water, apple cider vinegar, thyme, salt and pepper and blend until completely smooth. Taste and adjust the flavors to your preference. Serve immediately in serving bowls, garnish with a drizzle of olive, thyme and grapes. *************** PS! We almost forgot… we wanted to let you know that we will be having a Swedish book event at Urban Deli Nytorget on Södermalm in Stockholm, Monday 5th May between 17-19. They will serve a 3-course dinner from the book and we will talk a little bit about the book, ourselves and just hang out with you guys. They will sell the book for a discounted prize and we will of course sign it. If you have already bought the book, you can of course bring it if you want it signed. The dinner is 275 sek and you can book a spot by sending an email to greenkitchenstories@urbandeli.org. We hope to meet some of our Swedish readers there!

Swirled Mousse Jars + US book events

April 11 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Swirled Mousse Jars + US book events So, David and I had a full evening without the kids last weekend (we still had the baby to look after but that is basically like holiday for us). Our grand plan was to go out for dinner at a busy Swedish/­­Japanese restaurant which we haven’t been to for years. Then rent a proper Hollywood movie and watch it in the couch (instead of the usual watching-half-a-tv-series-on-the-phone-while-the-kids-are-sleeping-on-top-of-us-mode) while eating a yummy dessert. It turns out that the food at that restaurant wasn’t as good as we remembered it and the movie was the worst catastrophe movie we have ever seen. Dessert was however right on point. Our first intention was to buy ice cream but we both felt slightly nauseous after dinner so David said he would improvise and make something fresh instead. These jars took 10 minutes to prepare (which he since then has speeded up to 7), looked pretty, had very few ingredients and tasted super good - creamy and limey with dark chocolate, crunchy nuts and nut butter on top. It’s a dessert that is very nice to keep up your sleeve, so we thought we’d share it with you. Encouraged by last weeks video, we did a short one of this recipe as well. Press play! US book events! And on the subject of being kid-free. David and I (+baby) are coming to the US for the release of our new book there. Yippie! We will be in New York for a couple of days to do some PR and press stuff. We have teamed up with Sur La Table and we’ll be doing a hands-on cooking class there on Sunday 30 April. Get your tickets for the class here! Be aware that there are only a limited amount of seats. We will also have a little mingle, book signing and Q&A at CAP Beauty on Monday May 1st. We would LOVE to meet and chat with as many of you as possible there. We don’t have an RSVP-link for that yet but will let you know as soon as we do. David will then continue on to the West coast for some more events there. I would have loved to join him but I simply couldn’t handle too many days of work while also looking after the little one + jetlag. And I don’t want to be away from the other kids too long either. Sorry! David is the funny and talented one of us anyway so you should definitely go see him. Although he will probably tell a lot of lies about me - dont believe him ;) The schedule isn’t entirely ready yet. He will host another Sur La Table cooking class in Los Angeles May 5th. Get your tickets here! There will also be a mingle, book signing an Q&A at Credo Beauty in LA and we will post the link for that asap. We will update soon with more information about a possible event in San Francisco too. Lots of love! /­­Luise PS. Notice that the baby currently is back on a no-name status - aaargh! Okay, back to these jars. You might recognize that the base is similar to the Key Lime Mousse in Green Kitchen Travels. The smart thing here is that we use the same base for the top layer as well but with an additional flavor, which makes it really simple and quick. Enjoy! Super-Quick Swirled Mousse Jars Serves 2 Note: It’s optimal to use chilled avocados or chilled glasses as you don’t want the bottom layer to be lukewarm. Best advice is to keep ripe avocados in the fridge. Or look for frozen precut avocado, which is becoming increasingly popular in the supermarkets (and often cheaper than buying fresh). 2 avocados 3 lime 6 soft dates, stoned 1 cup /­­ 150 g frozen blackcurrants (or frozen blueberriesraspberries or blackberries)  1/­­2 tsp cardamom 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml yogurt Topping 1 oz /­­ 20 g dark chocolate 10 almonds 2 dollops nut butter of choice Cut the avocados in halves, remove the stone, scoop out the flesh and add it to a food processor or blender (a food processor is a little easier as it has a wider base and this is thicker than a smoothie but a blender works if you add a splash of water) along with the juice of 3 lime and 6 soft dates. Mix until creamy, adding a splash of water if needed. Taste and add more lime or dates if needed. Scoop out half of the mousse into 2 jars. Add berries and cardamom to the remaining avocado mousse in the blender and mix again until smooth. Add a few spoons of yogurt to the jars and then add the berry mousse. Use the backside of a spoon to swirl the layers a bit and then top with dark chocolate, almonds and a large dollop of nut butter. Enjoy!

Creamy Spinach Soup + Our New Book!

March 18 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Creamy Spinach Soup + Our New Book! Woot woot! Before we jump into today’s recipe, we can finally share more information about our next book! It’s called Green Kitchen At Home and it’s something we have been working on under wraps for the past year. And now we have finally received a pre-copy of it. As the title suggests, this book is a gathering of all the recipes we eat most often in our home - our familys favorite dishes really. The book focuses on simple and comforting dishes that are easy to like, adapt and cook. We have tried to minimize weird ingredients so your mom, brother or non-vegetarian best friend also will find it inspiring and useful. Many recipes in the book have naturally started off here on the blog, but we are also sharing loads of previously unpublished recipes that we have kept within our family until now. Youll find the golden millet porridge or the Spinach & Banana Pancakes that we often make in the mornings, the savoury broccoli muffins that travel well in a backpack, sheet pan dinners for stressful weeknights, our super simple rye bread waffle toast, a fun vegetarian version of fish & chips, wine-baked mushrooms for a weekend with friends, and our childrens favorite - our va-va-voom baked donuts that have been a success at many kids parties. And lots more. Its not a vegan book as we eat egg and cheese in our family, but just like our other books, many recipes have vegan suggestions. A lot of the recipes are based on our fridge staples and in the book we show how to vary these staples into a multitude of easy shortcut dinners. The book has about 100 recipes in total - and all of them have been tested by a separate tester. We will be sharing more info as we are closing in on the release. It feels crazy and completely unreal that we have actually written a fourth cookbook and we are immensely grateful for all your support along the way. We hope that you will love this book and find it useful at home. We are planning a small US book tour and will let you know more about that really soon. The book is released already on 1 April in Australia and NZ, 20 April in the UK and 2 May in the US. It will also be released in several European languages after the summer. Here are some pre-order links:   Amazon.co.uk (UK). Amazon.com (USA). Booktopia.com (Australia & NZ). To celebrate the book, we made soup. A very green soup. The soup itself is good and simple. Basically just leek, potatoes and spinach. But what gives it a delicious and pungent kick is the topping. Quick-cooked green beans are tossed in a spicy chermoula made from pickled jalape?os, herbs, oillemon and a dash of maple syrup and it works so well with the mild and creamy soup. We also add avocado, yogurt and a generous drizzle of hemp seeds on top which takes it up another notch. Sometimes when a recipe image looks too good, I find myself thinking “but it probably isn’t that good in real life”. This is. One great thing with this method is that our kids eat this soup with just a drizzle of yogurt instead of the spicy beans, while we (for once) get it exactly as spicy as we want it. Everyone’s happy! The inspiration for this soup actually came from a toast. One of our favorite Stockholm cafes, Pom & Flora, serve an avocado toast with pickled jalapeno chermoula, cream cheese and hemp seeds. That toast has such a lovely combination of sweet, creamy and spicy tones, and this soup picks up much of the same flavors. A visit to one of their cafes is mandatory if you are visiting Stockholm! Spinach & Potato Soup with Spicy Chermoula Beans Serves 4 This soup is spectacular paired with the beans, but if you decide to serve it without you can add some chili flakes to the recipe to make it a little more pungent. 1 tbsp cold-pressed coconut oil or olive oil 2 small leeks, rinsed and finely chopped 2 cloves garlic 1-2 tbsp fresh ginger 2 tbsp fresh thyme, chopped 600 g potatoes, peeled 4 cups/­­1 liter vegetable stock (or 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water + 1 tbsp dried vegetable stock powder) 1 large bunch /­­ 150 g large-leaf fresh spinach, rinsed and thick stems discarded sea salt, to taste Serve with 1 avocado, sliced yogurt or coconut yogurt Jalape?o Chermoula Beans (recipe below) hemp seeds drizzle of olive oil Heat oil in a large sauce pan on medium heat. Rinse and finely chop the leeks, peel and crush the garlic and grate the ginger. Add them to the saucepan along with the thyme and let sauté for a few minutes until soft and smells fragrant. Peel the potatoes, cut them into quarters and add them to the saucepan along with vegetable stock. Let cook for 10-15 minutes and then add spinach. Stir to let the spinach wilt down into the soup and let simmer for just a few minutes. Use a hand blender to mix the soup smooth. Add salt, taste and adjust the flavours. Serve the soup topped with a quartered and sliced avocado, a dollop of yogurtjalapeno chermoula beans (see recipe below), a scattering of hemp seeds and a drizzle of olive oil. Jalape?o Chermoula Beans 1 tbsp cumin seeds 1 large bunch fresh parsley 1/­­2 lemon, juice 10-12 slices pickled jalape?os (or 1 whole) 2 cloves garlic, peeled 1 tbsp maple syrup 4 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil sea salt 1 large handful /­­ 200 g green string beans Toast cumin seeds in a dry skillet on low-medium heat for a few minutes. Add them to a mortar (or food processor) along with the other ingredients (except the beans). Use the pestle to mash everything into coarse dressing (or pulse a few times if using a food processor). Taste and adjust the flavors. Bring water to a boil in a large sauce pan. Trim off the ends off the beans and cut them in half. Add the beans to the water and let them cook for no more than two minutes. Strain the water and add the chermoula to the sauce pan. Toss until all the beans are dressed with the sauce.

Black Lentil & Vegetable Bolognese

January 23 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Black Lentil & Vegetable Bolognese Pavarotti’s “Nessun Dorma” (none shall sleep) is blasting on repeat in my headphones. But it’s the opposite case over here. All the children are finally asleep and while Luise is taking care of the dishes, I’m trying to channel my inner Italian so we can publish this recipe before another year has passed. We wrote our last blog post in Copenhagen and this one is brought to you from a house we are borrowing, on the slope of the Table Mountains in Cape Town, South Africa. If we keep this trend of travelling south for every new blog post, we will be writing the next one from Antarctica. It feels a little weird writing about these comforting and wintery pasta bowls from here, but I’m trusting that Pavarotti will help me channelling my inner Italian and get me in the right mood. It’s summer in South Africa, we’ve got lemon trees growing in the garden, there is a small pool, a cute kitchen and Elsa and Isac are keeping occupied by throwing grapes at each other in some kind of never-ending grape war. In short, we are very happy and grateful to spend a month here. Apart from the children’s fights, the scene is vastly different from two weeks ago when we shot this recipe. Isac had pneumonia, Elsa and Gabriel were snoring with colds and we were all cozied up (or more like stuck) in our Stockholm apartment - pale, tired and gloomy, surrounded by cold winter. The only thing we craved then were simple and comforting pasta dishes like this. Vegetarian bolognese is perhaps not one of our most unique recipe ideas but it is January food at its best, so we thought it might be something you’d also be interested in maning. We often make a kids pasta sauce that contains tomatoes, grated carrot, grated zucchini and red lentils. As it simmers, the lentils dissolve into the tomato sauce and it all becomes quite sweet and smoothly textured. It’s a simple way to sneak extra nutrients in a meal that our kids always are happy to eat. This is a slightly more adult approach on that dish. The sauce has more texture and chunks and a deeper flavour from herbs and red wine. We use black lentils as they stay intact in the sauce. The lentils work as replacement for the meat in the classic bolognese ragu - they both add protein and have a nice and soft, chewy consistency. We combine chopped and grated carrots to get a mix of textures. You can of course add more veggies if you prefer. We kept it simple and used what we had at home because of sick kids and cold weather, but also because it is what Italians do. “Pochi ingredienti, tanto tempo” (few ingredients, long cooking time) is an Italian expression - that I just invented, but I’m pretty sure Pavarotti would agree. Simple cooking with great ingredients is key in the Italian kitchen. However, if you have some mushrooms or an eggplant/­­aubergine at home, either of them would work excellent in this recipe as well as they add meaty texture to the dish and make it even more vegetable packed. Enjoy! That’s it, blog post number two of the year. And no babies were neglected this time. I even managed to mention Pavarotti three times, talk about grape wars and make up my own Italian food expression. If that doesn’t qualify me as a full-blooded Italian, I don’t know what does. You can call me Davide from now on.  Vegetarian Bolognese Serves 4-6 2-3 tbsp olive oil 1 large onion, peeled and coarsely chopped 3 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed 2 large carrots, peeled 2 sticks celery, rinsed 4 tbsp green olives, stones removed and slightly bruised 1 tbsp fresh basil (or 1 tsp dried) 1 tbsp fresh oregano, rosemary or marjoram (or 1 tsp dried) 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup red wine 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked beluga lentils (or puy), rinsed 400 ml /­­ 1 1/­­2 cup vegetable stock (or water) 2 bay leaves 2 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tins crushed tomatoes sea salt and freshly ground black pepper To serve pasta of choice (we used a lentil flour spaghetti) vegetarian parmesan style cheese fresh parsley olive oil Heat the oil in a large saucepan on medium heat. Add onion and garlic and sauté for a few minutes. Meanwhile, chop one of the carrots and the celery into 1 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch chunks and add them to the pan along with olives and dried herbs (if using). Let soften for a couple of minutes, add the red wine and let cook until the alcohol evaporates. Add lentils, half of the vegetable stock, bay leaves, tinned tomatoes, fresh herbs (if using) salt and pepper. Grate the remaining carrot and add it as well. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and let simmer for 30 minutes or until the lentils are cooked, stirring from time to time as not to burn the base of the sauce. Add the remaining stock or water, little by little, to loosen the sauce whenever it is looking dry. Cook your pasta of choice. Serve the sauce stirred through the pasta, topped with a sprinkling of grated cheesefresh parsley or other herbs and a drizzle of oil. PS. We actually prepared one more blog post before we left and we will try to share it soon,  along with some photos and tips from Cape Town. Meanwhile you can see some snapshots from out trip on instagram.

Hasselback Potatoes with Kale & Pesto

December 21 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Hasselback Potatoes with Kale & Pesto I posted a photo of thinly sliced spuds on instagram a while back, mentioning that we would roast them, add kale, beans, red onion and cherry tomatoes, slather with pesto and call it dinner. The response was unusually loud for such a humble dinner that we decided to recreate and share this simple recipe here. I’m sure you have seen this potato technique before - slicing them thinly but not all the way through, drizzling with fat and baking them until the edges are crispy and the middle is creamy and soft. Hasselback potatoes were apparently invented at a restaurant here in Stockholm in the 1950’s, as a method to shorten the baking time. It was a very popular dish when I was around Elsa’s age (almost 30 years ago!!!). My mom made Hasselback potatoes almost as often as she did her famous baked giant sausage stuffed with pineapple and cheese - yup, that was what we ate back in 1989. I haven’t seen a lot of pineapple stuffed sausage since then, but Hasselback potatoes sure made a comeback and have been increasingly popular during the last couple of years. The original version uses butter and breadcrumbs but we’re simply using oil. I’m sure some almond flour could be tossed on top towards the end of the baking, if you like it with a little crust. We also stuff herbs into the slices to give the spuds more flavour and that also helps the fat to find its way inside the potato. A good trick is to place the potato in a large wooden spoon when you cut it, to prevent from cutting it all the way through. Or placing it between two chopsticks or chopping boards. On the photo above, Luise uses a metal spoon which actually makes it more difficult to slice because the potato isn’t flat and it can also be bad for the knife. So not the best example. What can I tell you, she’s Danish, very stubborn and she doesn’t like to follow my instructions. But she got the job done with that spoon as well. As I mentioned in the intro, we add kale, beans, tomatoes and onion towards the last 15 minutes of the roasting and then serve with pesto on the side. It’s an easy one-tray dinner. It is however also an awesome side dish on the Christmas table. It looks really nice and Christmassy on that bed of kale. While we were at it, we compiled a list of a few other great Christmas related recipes from the archives. Last year’s loaf would make an excellent companion to the potatoes. o Christmas Spiced Parsnip Cake o Shaved Brussels Sprouts Christmas Salad o Mushroom, Rice & Hazelnut Loaf o Pomegranate, Raspberry & Thyme Jam o Saffron Falafels o Quinoa, Kale & Apple Salad o Homemade Nutella Finally, can we just say a massive Merry Christmas /­­ Happy Hanukkah or whatever yo are celebrating! This has been an intense year for us with books, babies and lots more. We haven’t been posting recipes as often as we intended but we want to thank you for your constant support, kindness and cheering comments. We have a lot more planned in the near future so stay tuned. BIG LOVE! /­­David, Luise, Elsa, Isac and baby Gabriel Hasselback Potatoes with Kale, Beans & Pesto The baking time can vary depending on the potato size and variety. Smaller potatoes will need a little less time. Hasselback potatoes 2 kg /­­ 4 lbs (roughly 12) large baking potatoes 80 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup olive oil sea salt black pepper 1 bunch fresh thyme, leaves picked To serve 3 large handfuls kale, thick stalks removed and leaves roughly chopped 1 small red onion 170 g /­­ 1 cup cooked black beans (1/­­2 can), rinsed 12 cherry tomatoes 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup pesto (if you are vegan, choose a pesto without cheese) 1. Preheat the oven to 200°C/­­400°F. 2. Wash and scrub the potatoes. 3. Slice each potato thinly. Let each slice cut about two-thirds into the potato, leaving the bottom intact. This is easiest done by placing the potatoes inside a large spoon, the edges of the spoon will then stop the knife from cutting too deep. 4. Tuck some thyme leaves sporadically between the slices of each potato and place them on a baking tray. 5. Use a brush to drizzle the potatoes with about half of the oil and then sprinkle with salt and pepper. 6. Bake for 30 minutes and then brush the potatoes with the remaining olive oil. The potatoes should have started to fan out slightly which will make it easier to get some of the oil down in-between the slices as well. If the slices are still stuck together, you can let them roast a while longer before adding the last oil. 7. Bake for 30 minutes more. Meanwhile, cut the onion in thin slices and place it in a bowl along with the kale, beans and tomatoes. Drizzle with olive oil, salt and pepper and toss to combine. 8. When the potatoes have been in the oven for about 1 hour in total, arrange the onion, kale, beans and tomatoes on the tray, around the potatoes and bake for 15 minutes more, or until the potato edges are crispy and the centre feels soft when pierced with a toothpick. 9. Drizzle pesto over the potatoes and kale and serve immediately, while still hot. ******************** PS! We have also updated our Green Kitchen app with 6 Christmas recipes. Apart from this Hasselback Potato recipe and some favorites from last year, you’ll also find our simple Sesame & Gingerbread Truffles and this delicious Saffron Overnight Oats recipe there. Enjoy!

Hot Blender Chocolate + Vitamix Competition

November 13 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Hot Blender Chocolate + Vitamix Competition We’ve had intense snow falls and cold days here in Stockholm for the past week. A weather that calls for furry sweaters, warm soups, spicy stews and large cups of hot chocolate. Our favourite chocolate recipe is thick, rich, creamy, vegan and insanely delicious. And we are sharing it here today, along with a competition to win a Vitamix blender (further down in this post). We actually make our chocolate directly in the blender, which not only saves dishes but also makes it perfectly frothy. This recipe is based on one of the recipes from our smoothie book, but we have adapted it slightly for our current mood. We have also added a few mashed blackberries to each glass/­­cup before serving, for a bit of complexity and a hint of berry flavour (which work really well with chocolate). This is of course entirely optional in case you are a hot chocolate traditionalist. We use soaked cashews, soft dates and salt for a plant based creamy sweet milk. Cacao powder, cinnamon, ginger add chocolate flavour and tahini or coconut oil makes it richer. If you can only find dried dates, you can pre-soak them along with the cashew nuts to make them easier to blend. Our chocolate isn’t super dark, as our kids prefer it like this. But you can easily add some extra cacao to make it more intense. http:/­­/­­www.greenkitchenstories.com/­­wp-content/­­uploads/­­2016/­­11/­­Blender-Hot-Chocolate-Vid.mp4 Win a Vitamix! As a belated celebration of our Green Kitchen Smoothies book (which now is out in UK, US, Australia, German, Swedish, Danish and Polish), Vitamix has kindly agreed to give away one of their new Vitamix S30 blenders (the one we have used in this post) to one of our readers. It’s a smaller but strong model that we have been trying at home for the past month. To win it, you simply have to share a smoothie related photo on instagram (it can be either a smoothie you have made from our book, the cover of the book or one of our smoothie photos that you can find online) using the two hashtags #GKSVitamix and #GreenKitchenSmoothies (you need to have a public instagram account - not private - for us to see your hashtags). We will randomly draw a winner on 7 December so it will hopefully arrive before Christmas. The competition is open for everyone in the US and UK. Good luck! Hot Cashew Chocolate Serves 2-4 Important: Before you start, make sure your blender is approved for hot liquids. Otherwise, add cold water to the blender instead of hot and heat the chocolate on the stove after it has been blended. Hot chocolate ingredients 1/­­2 cup /­­ 65 g cashew nuts 2-3 cups /­­ 500-750 ml filtered water 4 fresh dates, pitted 3 tbsp cacao powder 2 tsp tahini (preferably unhulled) or coconut oil 1/­­2 tsp ginger 1/­­2 tsp cinnamon 1/­­2 tsp salt  To serve Blackberries, fresh or thawed frozen  Soak the cashew nuts in water for 3-6 hours. If you are in a hurry and have a strong blender, soaking them in hot water for 30 minutes is also possible. Drain and rinse the nuts and add them to the blender. Boil the water in a kettle. Meanwhile, add the rest of the ingredients to the blender. Add 2 cups of the hot water to the blender. Close the lid carefully. Start blending on low speed and then increase to max speed. It should be ready and smooth after about 30 seconds. Taste it and add more water if it’s too thick or more cacao, dates or salt to taste. Serve immediately. If you like, try mashing a few blackberries in the bottom of the glass before serving. It creates beautiful streaks of colour and adds a delicious berry tone to the the drink. We have received no compensation for this post. We simply asked Vitamix if they’d be willing to give away a blender to a reader because we think Vitamix is awesome and we think you readers are awesome!

Syrian Yogurt Soup + More Than Food

October 17 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Syrian Yogurt Soup + More Than Food The recipe for this soup is at the end of this post, but we hope that you will take the time to read this text as well. It is slightly longer but way more important than our usual posts. Let’s start from the beginning. The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and the European Commission asked if we would be interested in meeting Syrian refugees living in and outside of camps in Turkey to bring home some of their stories, learn how modern food aid is working and explore the different aspects of food. It was doubtless the most meaningful request we have ever received and something we really wanted to do. Timing wise it wasn’t perfect. I had to leave Luise alone with the kids while she was 36 weeks pregnant, but she gave her blessing. So a few weeks ago, I went on this mission. I flew to Istanbul, Turkey on an early flight and then on to a domestic flight to Hatay, a few miles from the Syrian border. During my days there, I visited a refugee camp to see how it works and talk to some of the people living there. I got to know the WFP staff and was amazed by their compassion. I was also invited home to a few Syrian families living outside of camps. Their situation is often a lot more difficult than inside the camps, as they have more costs and less support but the families were incredibly friendly and inviting. We talked, drank tea, cooked together and shared food. If you follow me on instagram, you might already have read the stories of some of the people I met. I have included the story from one of the families in this post, and I have also recreated one of the dishes that I learnt to cook together with them. It is very easy to look away from the horrible situation that is going on in Syria. But I hope that by reading these stories that do have bright moments in the midst of all the darkness, you will get a better understanding and openness towards the millions of Syrian people that have been forced from their homes and don’t wish anything more than being able to return to them one day. It was a very emotional trip and it affected me a lot deeper than I was prepared for. I am still trying to figure out what to comes next. Obviously, we want to continue working with recipe development and food photography as it is something we love doing. But it’s my hope and intention that we also will continue working more actively with human aid and support this cause any way we can in the future. Enough about this. Here is Suad. (1/­­5) I had everything before the war. My husband and I were the owners of a supermarket in Aleppo. We lived in a large and beautiful two-story house in a rural area. All my furniture was new - nothing was second hand - and we had many rooms. There was a big courtyard outside our house where the children played and rode their bicycles. ***** This is the story of Suad. She is Syrian and fled from her home together with her family when the conflict came to her town, 4 years ago. Suad is nine months pregnant and lives with her husband, their two sons Ahmed (10 years) and Muhammed (6 years) and their daughter Nurulhuda (12 years) in a small one-bedroom apartment in a rundown building in the old town of Antakya in Turkey, close to the Syrian border. Her parents and sisters live in an apartment one floor up. Her husband now works as a tailor so they can pay the rent. Even though they have lost everything, Suad is not broken. Her strength and pride really got to me. They cant afford decorating their home but have instead made paper and textile decorations and drawings that are covering the walls inside, making it less a lodging and more of a home. I had the honour to be welcomed into her home and I spent a day together with her and her family, listening to their story, drinking many cups of tea, going to the supermarket and preparing a dinner together. (2/­­5) Back in Aleppo, we renovated our kitchen entirely when we got married. It looked very nice. It was a big, bright kitchen with a large marble countertop. The kitchen was the colour of cappuccino and some of the cabinets had glass doors. I used to place some of my finest colourful vases and glasses there, so you could see them through the glass. ***** I was invited into Suads kitchen to assist her in dinner preparations. There were no marble countertops. And no glass doors. But she still placed her best looking glasses and plates on the shelf above the sink, hiding the rest behind a curtain her husband had sewn. Due to the small space, we did all chopping and preparations while sitting on the living room rug. The family laughed at my difficulties sitting with my legs crossed on the floor doing the chopping and they kept telling me that the tomatoes needed to be more finely chopped for the tabbouleh. Her mother also pointed out that I had very thorough knife skills (meaning slow). (3/­­5) My mother-in-law taught me most of these recipes in Aleppo, as she was living in our house. And cooking this reminds me of our life there. Now, my mother lives in the same house as us, so I am actually passing these recipes on to her and my daughter as well. Food means sharing to me - with my neighbours, friends and family. Before the conflict, we were a couple of families that took turns inviting each other over. We baked sweets, cooked food, ate and sang together. Now, the most important thing is to make sure my children arent hungry, but we still share food with our neighbours, even if it just is a small plate or the smell of our cooking. When we first arrived, we didnt have any money to buy ingredients and therefore we had to eat whatever food was provided for us. But after we were approved for the e-food card we were able to buy our own ingredients, so now I can cook food that reminds me of home. ***** We prepared a Syrian version of Tabbouleh with cucumber, tomatoes, lemon, lettuce, fresh parsley, fresh and dried mint, pomegranate syrup, tomato paste and a finely textured bulgur. We also did a delicious yogurt, rice and mint soup called Lebeniyye, a fried eggplant dish with tomato sauce called Mutabbaqa and a vegetarian version of Kepse, which is a flavorful long-grain rice dish topped with toasted almonds and walnuts instead of meat. (4/­­5) Me being a man, a stranger in their house and also a foreigner, I was aware that my visit would be an awkward situation and a difficult environment for everyone to be relaxed in. And the first hours of conversation were quite honestly very polite and trembling. But something happened when we started cooking. Once we gathered around the ingredients and Suad started explaining the dishes we were making, she suddenly began smiling. In the complete sadness of their situation, food definitely brings out a spark of joy. It connected us. In-between exchanging chopping boards and mincing vegetables, they suddenly started asking me questions about how we eat in my country, how my kitchen looks and how we take care of the elderly in our families in Europe (her father gave me a disapproving mutter, when hearing my response). We started sharing photos of our children and all of a sudden, we werent strangers anymore. We finished preparing the last recipe just as it got dark outside. Nurulhuda placed all the food on a large tray on the rug in the living room. Suad invited her children, parents, all her sisters and even the driver of our car to join. And with one spoon each, we all shared from the same plates. It is a very intimate way of eating, sitting on the floor, dipping our spoons into the same bowls of soup. They also ended the meal with a traditional Arabic saying: Now that we have shared bread and salt, we are like relatives. (5/­­5) My story is the story of every Syrian ***** The Syria conflict is the worlds largest humanitarian crisis since World War II. There are currently over 2,7 million Syrian refugees living in Turkey. Only about 10% are living in refugee camps and have guaranteed access to food, shelter and basic needs. The rest are living off-camps - in small apartments, basements, garages and even caves. If you found this story interesting, please also read Emira’s story. And the story of Semira, who works as a Field Monitor Assistant for WFP. I have also written about the E-cards that WFP have developed with help from the European Commission to support refugees and give them the ability to shop and choose food themselves. The trip was part of a initiative that WFP call More Than Food. Pauline and Rens will also be going on similar trips. Here is a short video that explains the project and the E-card a bit more. Thank you for following along! Lebaniyye - Syrian Yogurt Soup Serves 4  I was particularly intrigued by Suad’s Yogurt Soup as I had never tried anything similar before. I have now been cooking it a few times since I returned. Warm yogurt might sound awkward but I found its tanginess really tasty when combined with the mint and rice. Suad served it more as a starter (traditionally I believe it is served with meatballs) but I have taken the liberty to add a bit more topping to make it even more nourishing and flavourful. Suad also cooked the rice and yogurt together from the start but I found that if you dont stay focused and stir continuously, there is a risk that the yogurt will curdle. So I instead cook the rice until its almost done before slowly stirring in the yogurt mixture. Make sure to check the cooking time for the rice. Our rice cooks in 30-35 minutes, but some are pre-steamed which would half the cooking time for the soup. Yogurt Soup 1 cup /­­ 200 g wholegrain rice or brown rice 5 cups /­­ 1,25 liter vegetable stock (or water) 1 garlic clove, grated or finely chopped 4 cups /­­ 1 liter full fat yogurt (we use Turkish yogurt) 1 egg 1 tbsp cornstarch 1 tbsp dried mint 1 tsp salt black pepper   Garlic & Chili Oil 1/­­4 cup olive oil 2 garlic cloves 2 tsp chili flakes    To serve 2 cups /­­  500 ml cooked puy lentils (or chickpeas) 1 large handful fresh spinach 1 large handful fresh mint 1 large handful fresh parsley Rinse the rice and add it to a large, thick-bottomed sauce pan along with vegetable stock and garlic. Bring to a boil and then turn the heat down slightly until it simmers. Meanwhile, add yogurt and egg to a mixing bowl and whisk rapidly until combined and smooth. After the rice has cooked for about 20 minutes, add the cornstarch to the yogurt and then use a soup spoon to ladle some of the warm stock into the yogurt mixture while using your other hand to stir (this is to slowly heat the yogurt and prevent it from curdle when mixed with the rest of the stock and rice). Then pour the yogurt mixture slowly back into the large saucepan with rice and stock while stirring. Add mint, salt and black pepper. Keep the heat on low/­­medium, so it just barely simmers and keep stirring slowly but frequently. When the rice is cooked through and the soup has thickened slightly, it is ready. Taste and adjust the flavours to your liking (I find that it needs quite a bit of salt to balance the tanginess). Remove from the heat and prepare the Garlic & Chili Oil. Heat oil in a small sauce pan on low/­­medium heat. When warm, add garlic and chili flakes, let sauté for about 45 seconds and then remove from the heat. Let steep while you ladle the soup into bowls and chop the spinach and herbs. Top the soup with a generous scoop of lentils, chopped fresh spinach, mint, parsley and a drizzle of the Garlic & Chili Oil.

Gemista – A Rainbow of Stuffed Veggies

September 20 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Gemista – A Rainbow of Stuffed Veggies With less than a month left before the baby is due to arrive, a riot of feelings are bombarding me as I am trying to get mentally and physically prepared. The excitement that our small family (or perhaps not so small anymore) soon get to meet the tiny person that has been kicking my ribs out for the past months. The nervousness how this baby will affect our family’s dynamic. And the fear that we won’t have time to hug all our children and each other enough as we will be drowning under all the duties of everyday life. I don’t think I can be entirely mentally prepared for all the changes that are coming. But I am at least trying to solve a few practicalities. I have just started filling the freezer with soups, bread and vegetable patties. I have also picked up a small selection of new clothes for the baby and brought down the ones we saved from Isac from the attic. Isac has been sleeping in our room until now but will soon move in together with Elsa. Things are starting to fall into place, piece by piece. One bump in the preparations is that David actually is traveling to Turkey tomorrow and will be there for a few days for a mission with WFP, meeting Syrian refugees and documenting their stories (he will tell you more about it here on the blog soon). Even if I am not thrilled about the timing, we both felt like this was something we wanted to be involved in. I’m just crossing my fingers that the baby isn’t too eager to come out early (and that he will stay safe down there)! Lately, I have been making variations of the Greek dish Gemista (a.k.a stuffed vegetables). The kids are loving it and have been shoving there faces full with the stuffing even before it’s baked. The traditional way of preparing the rice is to let it cook together with the rest of the stuffing ingredients but since we are using red or black rice, we cook it separately and then add it, otherwise it stains the entire filling and it just doesn’t look pleasant. In Greece they usually also add some potato slices in between the vegetables on the tray and then pour a thin layer of tomato passata to cover the bottom of the tray. This slightly cleaner approach work well in our family as the kids love to hold the stuffed vegetables with their hands without getting messy. But feel free to add potatoes and tomato sauce for a more traditional take. We used a mix of green, yellow and red tomatoes and peppers and it came out so beautiful. If you only have red tomatoes, that of course works as well. It is easily made vegan by swapping the feta cheese with tofu. Gemista – Rice Stuffed Vegetables  Serves 4 200 g/­­ 1 cup red rice, rinsed 500 ml /­­ 2 cups water 1 tsp sea salt 1 kg /­­ 2 lb mixed tomatoes and/­­or bell peppers (approx 15 vegetables, less if they are large) 1-2 tbsp olive oil or coconut oil 1 red onion, peeled and finely chopped 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped 20 wrinkly black olives, pitted 2 tbsp pickled capers, drained 2 tbsp finely chopped fresh mint 2 tbsp finely chopped fresh parsley 1 handfull almonds, chopped 2 tbsp lemon juice 4 tbsp raisins or finely chopped dates 150 g /­­1 cup feta cheese (optional) Yogurt sauce 1 cup natural yogurt 1 tbsp olive oil 2 tbsp lemon juice 2 tbsp finely chopped mint leaves 1 small clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped salt and black pepper Preheat the oven to 175°C /­­ 350°F. Place rice and water in a saucepan, bring to a boil, lower the heat immediately and let simmer on low heat for as long as instructed on the packet (meanwhile prepare the other ingredients). Drain if needed and transfer the cooked rice to a large mixing bowl. Trim off the top of each tomato. Use a small spoon to scrape out the seeds and flesh from the tomatoes and into a bowl. Slice each bell pepper lengthwise and discard the seeds, alternatively trim off each top and discard the seeds (depending on the shape of the pepper). Heat oil in a skillet, add onion, olives and capers. Finely chop the tomato flesh and add it together with the seeds and liquid. Sauté for about 15 minutes until soft and fragrant, then transfer to the mixing bowl. Add the rest of the ingredients and stir to combine. Fill upp the tomatoes and bell peppers with the stuffing, pressing down very gently as you go. Place the caps back on top of the tomatoes and bell peppers. Place the vegetables in a greased ovenproof dish and bake in the oven for 30-35 minutes or until the tomatoes and bell peppers are soft, golden and have slightly burnt edges. Whisk together the ingredients for the yogurt sauce in a small bowl while the vegetables are in the oven. Serve the stuffed vegetables with a drizzle of yogurt sauce and a simple side salad of choice. ************************ PS! We are having a supper club at Urban Deli in Stockholm next Monday, 26th September at 17.00. We have created a dinner menu together with them and it includes a few smoothies from our new book, warm dishes from our other books and a dessert. We will be there all evening to talk about our books, food philosophy, answer questions and also try to sit down and chat with all of you. Hopefully we will all have a nice and cosy Monday evening. Tickets can be purchased here! We have also released a few new products together with Urban Deli - a curry, a salad, a smoothie and a delicious overnight oats - that are sold as take-away boxes on all their locations.

Butternut, Kale & Feta Quiche

August 20 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Butternut, Kale & Feta Quiche Last weekend we went to a crayfish potluck party in a friend’s garden. Vegetarians at a crayfish party might sound awkward but the crayfish are actually just an excuse to spend an evening with your friends, sitting outside until dark, drinking, eating, singing songs and wearing silly hats. Life in its very essence. Since we don’t eat crayfish, we made a couple of salads and baked a large, round version of this butternut quiche. We have been talking about making a butternut quiche ever since we first tried it, two years ago at a café in Bondi outside Sydney. Their version had large chunks of salty feta cheese and a slight tartness from vinegar that balanced the sweetness from the pumpkin perfectly, so we made ours the same way. We also used our favourite oat & almond pastry which added a nice nuttiness to the quiche. The addition of kale to the filling makes it a little greener and more substantial and the pieces on top crisps up into chips. I guess it’s not our most unique recipe but a really good one to keep up your sleeve for picnics and late-summer parties. When we recreated the quiche the other day, we also shot this video below. It all came together in a rather stressful hour between soccer practice and dinner time and we didn’t have much light to work with either, so please excuse the blurry quality here and there. You can probably veganize this by leaving out the eggs and replacing the feta cheese with tofu, a squeeze of lime and nutritional yeast. The pumpkin makes it very rich and creamy on its own, but since we wanted to recreate the butternut and feta quiche from our travels, we didn’t try a vegan version ourselves this time. Do let us know if you succeed with it! Butternut, Kale & Feta Quiche Pastry 3/­­4 cup /­­ 100 g oat flour (or 1 cup /­­ 100 g rolled oats mixed into flour in a food processor) 1/­­3 cup /­­ 50 g rice flour 1/­­2 cup/­­ 50 g almond flour 2 tbsp potato starch or arrowroot 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 100 g /­­ 3 1/­­2 oz chilled butter or solid coconut oil, cut into dices 3-4 tbsp ice-cold water Butternut & Kale Filling 1 small butternut squash/­­pumpkin a drizzle of olive oil or coconut oil 2 sprigs fresh rosemary or 1/­­2 tsp dried rosemary sea salt & black pepper 1 onion 2 cloves garlic 2 large handfuls (100 g /­­ 3 1/­­2 oz) tuscan kale /­­ black kale or regular kale, remove stems and chopped (if you can’t get kale use spinach instead) 2 tbsp unfiltered apple cider vinegar (or balsamico) sea salt & black pepper 1 cup milk of choice (we use oat milk or almond milk) 2 eggs 150 g /­­ 1 block feta cheese, crumbled Preheat the oven to 350°F /­­ 180°C. Prepare the pastry: Add oat flour, almond flour, rice flour, potato starch and sea salt to a bowl and toss until combined. Add the diced butter to the flour and use your fingers to mix the dough into a rough breadcrumb consistency. (These steps can also be made by pulsing the butter with the flour in a food processor.) Add the water, little by little, and work it together into a dough. Flip it out on a floured workspace and shape it into a thick disk. If it feels crumbly, add 1-2 tbsp extra water. Gather the dough into a disk, wrap in clingfilm and chill for about 30 minutes. Meanwhile prepare the filling. Prepare the filling: Line a baking tray with baking paper. Peel the butternut, discard the seeds and cut into 1 inch /­­ 2,5 cm dices and place on the tray. Drizzle with oil, add the spices and toss to combine. Roast in the oven for approx. 20 minutes or until it starts to brown and soften. Set aside. This step can easily be prepared ahead and stored in the fridge for up to a couple of days before baking the quiche. While the pumpkin is in the oven, heat oil in a skillet on medium heat and stir-fry the onion and garlic for 10 minutes until transparent and soft. Add the chopped kale, stir around and stir-fry for a few more minutes, add the apple cider vinegar and season with salt and pepper and leave for two more minutes. Set aside. Assembling the quiche:  Place the chilled dough between two baking papers and use a rolling pin to roll out the dough until you got a rough circle, about 1/­­8 inch /­­ 5 mm thick. Carefully transfer it to a 10 inch /­­ 27 cm tart pan (or rectangular as in the video). You can also press out the pastry dough directly into the pan. Trim off any excess dough then use a fork to prick it a few times. Blind-bake for 10 minutes to prevent the crust from getting soggy. In a large bowl, whisk together milk and eggs. Add onion and kale, crumbled feta cheese and half of the baked butternut to the egg mixture and gently combine. Pour into the blind-baked quiche crust. Press extra roasted butternut into the quiche if there is still space (any leftovers can easily be used in a delicious salad or inside a sandwich). Place in the oven and bake for 35-40 minutes until golden. Serve the quiche warm with a light salad on the side. PS. We have also been celebrating this little 2-year old smoothie maniac and kitchen helper throughout the week. Happy birthday Isac!

Beet & Berry Yoats + Big Love

July 25 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Beet & Berry Yoats + Big Love A few years ago we had a section on this blog called Big Love where we shared links and things that inspired us at the moment - high and low. We’re reviving it today as we have too many unanswered emails and comments asking about everything from our favorite places, books, ceramics and camera gear. We also added a couple of other things to the list, like Elsa’s favorite song. Of course we’re also sharing the recipe for these Yoat jars further down in this post. Big Love! o Our cookbook shelf is always overflowing, here are our two latest additions. My Darling Lemon Thyme (by Emma Galloway) is a truly great book with recipes right up our alley (all vegetarian and gluten free). Tasting Rome (by Katie Parla and Kristina Gill) brings back so many memories from the time I was living there. Beautiful photography both of the city and its food. o Luise is in love with the apron that Sara from Sprouted Kitchen made in collaboration with her sister from Stone Cold Fox. Luise is wearing it in this blog post and it can be found here. o The ceramics from this Danish family company will make any food look pretty. Here are two examples where we have used it {uno | due}. o If you are visiting Scandinavia, make sure to check out these links to some of our favourite places in Stockholm and Copenhagen. o Our smoothie book is coming out in the US next week and can be pre-ordered here! o For those of you asking about camera gear. I have a Canon EOS 5D mark iii with two different lenses. A 50 mm f/­­1.2 for all top shots and a 100 mm f/­­1.8 macro lens for all close-ups. I use the same equipment when I film videos for our youtube channel. When we travel I use this camera bag. o If you love kombucha you should check out this incredible guide by Sarah from My New Roots. o Even if it is our third time around, I will never get tired of seeing Luise’s tummy growing. o Elsa is constantly humming on this song by two 14-year old Norwegian twin brothers (gone are apparently the days when she just played with teddybears and sang Twinkle Twinkle…). o Isac’s new hair style - the boy-bun. We call this quick breakfast recipe Yoats. It is a mashup of yogurt and oats (and a few other simple ingredients) that we prepare in jars for a simple outside breakfast in the sun. In a way, this recipe is similar to a bircher muesli as you can leave it in the fridge overnight, but because the yogurt loosens up the oats real quickly, it can also be indulged right away. For flavour and extra va-va-voom, we layer it with a rather thick raspberry and beetroot smoothie (maybe puree is a more describing word?) and also add some of it to the oats for a beautiful pink hue. The layers are not only visually appealing but also more interesting as the flavours change as you work your way through the jar. Beetroot for breakfast might sound scary but the earthiness from the root is perfectly balanced with tanginess from the lemon, sweetness from dates and fruitiness from the raspberries. We’ve tried the yoats recipe with coconut yogurt (as a vegan option) and Greek yogurt and they both taste great. Obviously you can change the flavour by simply making a different smoothie/­­purée. Beetroot & Raspberry Yoats Serves 4 Yoats 2 cups /­­ 500 ml plain thick yogurt, Greek or Turkish (vegans can use Coconut Yogurt) 1 cup /­­ 90 g rolled oats 1/­­4 cup /­­35 g sunflower seeds 1 small apple, cored and roughly grated on a box grater 1 pinch ground vanilla or vanilla extract 1 tsp freshly grated ginger or ground ginger Beet & Raspberry Purée 1 cup /­­ 125 g raspberries (fresh or thawed frozen) 1 small raw beetroot (approx 65 g /­­ 2 oz), peeled and coarsely chopped or grated (depending on the strength of your blender) 1/­­2 lemon, juice 2 tbsp water 2 soft dates, pitted To serve raspberries fresh mint leaves, chopped bee pollen Place all ingredients for the yoats in a mixing bowl and gently stir to combine. Set aside. Meanwhile prepare the purée. Add all ingredients to a high speed blender and blend until smooth. Taste to see if more lemon juice, water or dates are needed. When done, mix  1/­­4 cup of the purée with the yoats. Then divide the rest of the purée into 4 glass jars. Spoon the pink yoats into each jar. Eat right away or store in the fridge for up to a couple of days. Ideally make the recipe in the evening and serve for breakfast the following morning. Top with fresh raspberries, chopped mint and bee pollen before serving.

Elsa’s Berry Cupcakes

June 24 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Elsa’s Berry Cupcakes After quite a few years of cooking and developing recipes, we have managed to build up a little bit of confidence and don’t panic over kitchen fails or people’s opinions as easily anymore. But whenever our daughter asks me to bake for a few of her friends, my palms get all sweaty and my heart starts pounding. Seriously, nothing makes me more nervous than having to bake for a bunch of five- and six-year-olds. Elsa is finishing preschool this summer and her favourite teacher is also retiring, so last week she wanted to bake a dessert for all the children and teachers at the preschool. She started out with grand plans for a big cake shaped like a princess but (luckily for me) we landed on mini cupcakes with a raspberry frosting. We had just bought a mini muffin pan and it was the perfect opportunity to try it out as we got a lot of muffins from one batch so it was enough for all the children and teachers. These muffins are really delicious and moist with hints of coconut, bananaalmonds and cardamom. It’s one of our go-to recipes that we change slightly every time. They are only sweetened with fruit and entirely gluten free (and we are aslo sharing a vegan version below). If you are allergic to nuts, you can blend (100 g /­­ 3 1/­­12 oz) sunflower seeds and use instead of the almond flour. Whenever Elsa initiates one of these baking sessions, she always starts with lots of enthusiasm only to loose interest after about 45 seconds, leaving us to do the actual work. This time she was much more persistent. She measured, blended, worked the batter and dropped it into the muffin tins. Halfway through the batch, we also started dropping a raspberry in the centre of each muffin and they turned out even better with that little berry pocket in the middle. Piping the frosting was the hardest bit. Elsa was utterly disappointed that hers didn’t turn out as pretty as the ones she had seen on our screens. But towards the end they at least started looking better than in the beginning. Since that first batch, we have made this recipe two more times. One time to check all the measurements and another time so we could try a vegan version. We are sharing both methods here below. You can of course also make normal size muffins and skip the frosting if you want to keep it simple. On another note, today we celebrate Midsummer in Sweden. We are going to be enjoying the last of these cupcakes and then we are off to find a maypole covered with flowers so we can jump like frogs around it! You think I am kidding? I am not. Banana & Coconut Cupcakes with Raspberry Pockets Makes 24 mini cupcakes or 12 regular Dry ingredients 100 g /­­ 1 cup almond flour 120 g /­­ 3/­­4 cup rice flour 45 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup desiccated coconut 2 tsp baking powder 1/­­2 tsp freshly ground cardamom 1/­­2 tsp vanilla powder 1 pinch salt Wet ingredients 14 soft dates (1 cup /­­ 150 g), stones removed (if using dried dates, soak them for an hour first) 1 ripe banana, peeled and cut into large chunks 4 tbsp coconut oil or butter, room tempered 180 ml /­­ 3/­­4 cup plain yogurt or plant based yogurt 3 eggs (for a vegan version soak 3 tbsp chia seeds in 9 tbsp water for 15 minutes, stir around and use instead of the eggs) 24 raspberries (fresh or frozen) Berry Frosting (recipe below) Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Grease a muffin tin (mini or regular size) or line it with paper or silicon cup liners. Place all of the dry ingredients in a bowl, stir together and set aside. Add the dates to a food processor and blend on high speed. When smooth, add the banana and coconut oil and blend again. Finally add yogurt and eggs and blend until smooth and entirely mixed. Pour the wet ingredients into the bowl with dry ingredients and stir together. Drop the batter into the muffin tins, place 1-2 raspberries in the centre of each muffin and cover it with batter. Bake for 10 minutes (17-20 minutes if you are using normal size muffins) or until golden and just set. Prepare the frosting while the muffins are in the oven. Leave the muffins to cool before piping the frosting on top. Serve immediately or store in the fridge. Berry Frosting 70 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup raspberries (or strawberries) 3-4 soft dates, stoned 200 g cream cheese (or vegan cream cheese) Mix raspberries and dates in a food processor or with a hand blender until completely smooth. Whisk the berry mixture together with the cream cheese in a medium size bowl until pink and smooth. Scoop the frosting into a piping bag. Place it in the fridge for 20 minutes (or longer) to firm up before piping the frosting on top of the cupcakes.

Wraps, Bumps & Videos

June 1 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Wraps, Bumps & Videos Before we get all summery with today’s little picnic recipe, we wanted to share a couple of things. #1. This not so small bump is about to give our lives a push into yet another direction - baby nr 3! We are overwhelmed with feelings, thoughts and confusedness (how will we even fit around the breakfast table?!) but I think we’ll save all that for another blog post. Luise is feeling well and is more than halfway through the pregnancy now. #2. Massive thanks to all of you that came to our event in Lisbon this past weekend. We were overwhelmed by your kind words, hugs (and presents!). #3. Check out this short little video that we created for our new book. More than anything else, we wanted to show how quick, simple and colorful smoothies can be. We will also be sharing instruction videos of all the drinks in this trailer on our youtube channel. The first one is coming up in just a few days. The book is actually available in stores in Australia today, 1 June! It will be launched in the UK on 16 June and in USA & Canada on 2 August. It will also be available in German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish and Polish in September. If you live in the UK you can pre-order it from Amazon.co.uk. Pre-order it from Amazon.com if you are in the US. And Booktopia.com.au in Australia and NZ. We will be in London next week to launch the book with a bunch of events and press meetings. Unfortunately all our public events are already sold out but we are thinking about adding an impromptu little book signing/­­meet-up towards the end of the week if there is an interest? Leave us a comment below, letting us know if you would like to join and we will try to make it happen. Since our world seems to be spinning around smoothies at the moment, we wanted to share a savory recipe that you can hold in the other hand. We couldn’t think of a more perfect smoothie companion than a summery wrap filled with a green hummus. When we make wraps, they tend to come out differently every time, but this vegan version is a real treat so I think it will be on repeat for our next couple of picnics. These are filled with large lettuce leaves, lots of herby mintparsley hummus (also delicious on it’s own!), a lentil, avocado and cucumber salad and topped with fresh strawberries for sweetness and toasted sunflower seeds for crunch. Picnic is ready! Summer Wraps Makes 8 wraps The wraps can also be rolled directly in the lettuce leaves, without the tortilla, for a lighter gluten-free version. It is a little fiddlier but the parchment paper helps holding it all together. 8 gluten-free or whole grain tortilla bread 16 lettuce leaves (cosmopolitan or romaine) Herby hummus (see recipe below) Green lentil salad (see recipe below) 1 large handful sunflower seeds, lightly toasted in a dry frying pan 1 cup /­­ 150 g strawberries, sliced Place 2 lettuce leaves on each tortilla, then place 2-3 tbsp herby hummus filling in the middle, a couple of spoonfuls green lentil salad and top with strawberry slices and a generous sprinkle of sunflower seeds. Fold the top and bottom edges over the filling. Roll the whole tortilla from left to right to wrap in the filling. Roll some parchment paper around them and tie with a string to hold them together while you transport them. Herby Hummus This makes more than you need for the wraps. Save the leftovers in a sealed jar and enjoy as a side throughout the week. 2 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g cans cooked chickpeas /­­ garbanzos 2 cloves garlic 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml lukewarm water 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml light tahini 4 tbsp lemon juice 4 sprigs parsley, rinsed and leaves picked 2 sprigs mint, rinsed and leaves picked 1 handful baby spinach, rinsed salt, according to taste Drain and rinse chickpeas and add to a high-speed food processor together with all other ingredients. Mix on high-speed for a few minutes, until smooth. Taste and feel the consistency. Add more salt or water if desired. At this point, you can also add a splash of olive oil for an extra rich hummus, if you prefer. Mix for two more minutes. Store in a sealed jar in the fridge. Green Lentil Salad 1 cup /­­ 250 ml cooked green lentils (any color works) 2 avocados 1/­­2 cucumber 10 sugar peas 1/­­4 red onion, peeled a few sprigs parsley, leaves picked a few sprigs mint, leaves picked a squeeze of lemon juice a tiny drizzle of olive oil salt Rinse the cooked lentils and place in a mixing bowl. Cut avocados, cucumber, snow peas and red onion into small cubes. Finely chop parsley and mint and place all ingredients in the mixing bowl. Add a squeeze of lemon juice, a drizzle of olive oil and a pinch of salt. Mix it all and season to taste.

Italian Cheesecake Jars

May 13 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Italian Cheesecake Jars I asked Luise if this was too simple? It’s almost not a recipe, just a quick thing we have been making when we crave dessert but don’t feel like busting out any mixers or even turning on the oven. “What, too simple? That’s my favorite kind of recipe. Nothing can ever be too simple!” she told me. So here it is. A simple Italian twist on cheesecake, served in small jars or glasses. It features two of our favourite summer fruits on a bed of creamy lemon & vanilla mascarpone and the simplest raw crumble you’ll ever make. Even though we sometimes make it on regular weeknights, this is the most perfect thing to serve on a summer buffet table. It’s quick and effortless and looks really pretty in small jars or shot glasses. It’s easy to quadruple the recipe too, so you could make 30 jars in no-time. The crumble is simply made from mashed dates, roughly chopped almonds and a pinch of salt. Simple and crunchy. It also keeps well without going soggy. The mascarpone filling is deliciously decadent. It can be replaced with thick Greek yogurt for a lighter twist. It can also be made vegan by replacing the mascarpone with coconut yogurt or by making the cashew filling from our flower power cake. We let the fruit macerate in a squeeze of lemon and honey. It makes it even more flavourful and it also helps the fruit release liquid that will sip down the sides of the jar like a natural fruit syrup. This simple fruit salad is also really good on its own or on top of any breakfast bowl. Italian Cheesecake Jars Makes 8 small jars or 4 larger ones If making this ahead, we’d recommend only filling the jars with crumble and mascarpone, and keeping the fruit salad in a separate jar until right before serving. Strawberries and peaches are often heavily sprayed so choose organic if possible. 15 strawberries, rinsed and hulled 3 peaches, rinsed 1 lemon, washed 2 tbsp (unheated) runny honey or maple syrup 80 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup raw almonds 8 soft dates, stones removed 1 pinch sea salt 250 g mascarpone 1/­­2 tsp ground vanilla or pure vanilla extract  a small handful lemon balm or mint leaves Cut the fruit in smaller pieces and place in a bowl. Squeeze over 1/­­2 lemon and 1 tbsp honey, toss and let sit for 15 minutes. Roughly chop the almonds and mash the dates with a fork. Stir together and divide on the bottom of 8 small glasses or jars. Stir together mascarpone and vanilla, add zest and juice from the rest of the lemon together with 1 tbsp honey, stir until combined and then dollop it into the glasses on top of the date crumble. Add the marinated fruit right before serving them on the buffet table, top with lemon balm and decorate with flower petals, lavender or elderflowers. We have developed this recipe for ?hléns campaign Alla Länders Land which focuses on welcoming more food cultures to the Swedish summer table. 

Green Kitchen Smoothies

April 29 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Kitchen Smoothies A pre-copy of our newest book, Green Kitchen Smoothies has landed in our kitchen and we are giddy as kids about it (and really proud)! Whilst we were working on the smoothie pack for our app, last summer, we realised how versatile smoothies can be and how much we loved both drinking and making them. We often enjoy smoothies for breakfast, as a healthier midday alternative to sweet snacks and drinks, as a dessert and always after a workout. So you can imagine how thrilled we where when our publisher asked us if we wanted to develop more blends and gather them all into a book that you could hold, read, flip through, give away, collect and hug (or maybe that’s just us?). Our hope is that both experienced smoothie enthusiasts and newbies will find drinks to love in this book. It’s loaded with new smoothies, juices and nut milks, along with our favourites from the app and blog - a mix of simple smoothies and real showstoppers (with layers and toppings). We have also included granola, muesli and nut butter recipes along with lots of really handy tips and tricks. Almost 60 recipes in total, 160 pages thick and a bit smaller in size than our first books and therefore sold at a slightly lower price point (so everyone can afford one or two or three…). Now we are obviously bias, but we think it’s the most gorgeous smoothie book out there. We have put a ridiculous amount of energy into creating unique photos for every smoothie and we have perfected all of the recipes meticulously. This time we even took in help from a separate tester on the other side of the globe, to make sure all the blends would taste good regardless of ingredients, season or location. It is released in the UK and Australia on June 16th and you can pre-order it from Amazon.co.uk (UK) or Booktopia.com.au (Aus) now! It will be released in the US on August 2 but it is already available for pre-orders on Amazon.com. The book is also being printed in German, Dutch, Swedish and Danish in September and we will add links for pre-ordering as soon as we have that info. We are coming to London! To celebrate the launch of the book, Luise and I will be in London during the second week of June for a bunch of talks, supper clubs, events and book signings. We will do a talk at the Good Roots Festival on June 11th together with Sarah Britton, Deliciously Ella, the Hemsley sisters and a bunch of other inspiring people. Tickets seem to already have sold out but I think you can sign up, in case they release extra tickets. We will post more info about our events really soon! The latest info will probably reach instagram first, so keep your eye out.

Roasted Cauliflower & Za’atar Salad

April 7 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Cauliflower & Za’atar Salad As the cauliflower was roasting in the oven and I was busy preparing the other vegetables, the smell of burnt plastic started oozing through the kitchen. I could hear our pyromanic son laughing as he ran from the crime scene into the next room. All the dials for the stove top were switched on to full heat and our poor old spatula was melting away on the stove. I had barely scraped it clean before I could hear him giggling again, this time from our bedroom. In less than a minute, he had managed to pull out every pair of clothing he could possibly reach from our wardrobe and was currently bathing in a sea of trousers. “No harm in that” I thought and left him for a minute to check on the cauliflower and continue preparing the vegetables and chickpeas. All of a sudden it went quiet in the bedroom and then ... “squeeeeak” the sound of pebbles scraping against glass, cut through the apartment. Isac had just figured out that he could use our iPad as a skateboard and was skating away in the hallway. He’s an awesome little guy but sometimes he is simply a hooligan with more energy than the sun. This cauliflower salad, however, turned out perfectly regardless of how much he tried to disrupt it. Anyone following us on instagram must have noticed our love for the Middle-Eastern spice blend Za’atar. We always keep it within reach and use it on avocado toasts, salads, soups and omelets. The slight tartness from the dried and ground sumac berries is well balanced with nuttiness from toasted sesame seeds and herbiness from thyme. We have been collaborating and creating recipes with spice company Santa Maria and when they asked what spice blend we thought was missing from their product range, the obvious answer was za’atar. So now we have created a Green Kitchen Stories special edition Za’atar blend for them and it’s available through this competition on their site (only in Sweden, sorry!). This recipe is however available for everyone, regardless if you are using our za’atar blend or another one (often available in spice shops, delis and Middle-Eastern food stores). You can also make your own by combining 4 tbsp sumac, 4 tbsp toasted sesame seeds, 2 tbsp dried thyme, 1 tbsp dried oregano and 2 tsp cumin. In this recipe, roasted cauliflower florets are sprinkled with za’atar and mixed into a fresh salad with avocado, spinach, parsley and cucumber slices and topped with small pomegranate jewels. It is served with creamy chickpeas drenched in yogurt and tahini and also sprinkled with za’atar. If pomegranate isn’t in season, it can be replaced with raisins (preferably yellow). Roasted Cauliflower with Za’atar & Yogurty Chickpeas Serves 2 very hungry persons or 4 normal 1 head of cauliflower 1 good drizzle of olive oil 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1/­­2 large cucumber, seeded 1 avocado 1 x 400 g /­­14 oz tin chickpeas (or 200 g cooked) 50 ml /­­ 1/­­4 cup natural yogurt 1 tbsp tahini 1-2 tbsp za’atar spice blend 1 handful parsley 1 handful spinach seeds from 1/­­2 pomegranate Preheat the oven to 220°C /­­ 450°F. Divide the cauliflower into florets and place on a baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and salt and toss until all is combined. Roast for 20-25 minutes, until soft and golden and with slightly crispy edges. Meanwhile, prepare the other vegetables. Divide the cucumber in half. Use a teaspoon to scrape out the seeds and cut into 1 cm /­­ 1/­­3 inch slices. Cut the avocado in half, remove the stone and use a spoon to scoop out the flesh. Cut into large chunks. Rinse the chickpeas thoroughly. Pour them into a bowl and mix with yogurt and tahini until all is mixed. Remove the cauliflower from the oven and sprinkle generously with za’atar. Add all salad ingredients to a large bowl and toss carefully to combine. Make space in the side and add the yogurt chickpeas. Top with pomegranate seeds and a sprinkle of za’atar. Enjoy! Thank you Santa Maria for the fun opportunity to create this spice blend and for sponsoring this post. All words and opinions are our own.

Mushroom Soup & Avocado Toast

March 17 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Mushroom Soup & Avocado Toast Congratulations! If you are reading this you must have managed to enter our site without running into any database errors. Our site has been pending between offline and hair-tearingly slow this past week, which is why this recipe is somewhat delayed. Our server is apparently tired of us and we are immensely tired of it, so we are planning some construction work to finally speed up this place (a new design is on its way as well!). Please be patient with weird error messages that might pop-up or slow loading times. Things will (hopefully) run much smoother in a very near future. Okay, enough complaining. Lets talk shrooms! I think our original plan was to share something bright and spring inspired. But faith intervened with a few cold days, a bag of portobello mushrooms showing up in our CSA box and a sudden calling for soup. So this happened. A warm and comforting vegan mushroom soup with tones of white wine, forest, rosemary and thyme. It’s an ideal dinner soup, especially when served with wholegrain rice and a few pieces roasted sourdough rye slathered with mashed avocado and chili flakes. Think of it like one final winter hug before spring is taking over the kitchen. Mushroom Soup with Red Rice & Avo Toast Serves 4 Rice 1 cup uncooked red rice 2 cups water  sea salt  Mushroom Soup 2 tbsp coconut oil, olive oil butter or ghee 2 garlic cloves 2 sprigs thyme 2 sprigs rosemary 4 (250 g) portobello mushroom, cleaned 8 (250 g) brown button mushroom or champignon, cleaned a large glug of white wine, optional 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water 1 tbsp (or 1 cube) vegetable bouillon sea salt and black pepper fresh parsley, for serving plain yogurt, for serving (optional) Cooking the rice: Rinse the rice well in water and drain. Place in a saucepan with the 2 cups of water. Bring to a boil, immediately lower the heat to a bare simmer, let simmer for 45 minutes or until tender. Add salt towards the end of the cooking time. Drain any excess water. Meanwhile make the soup. Making the soup: Finely chop garlic cloves and slice the mushrooms. Heat oil in a large saucepan and add garlic and cook until fragrant but not browned. Add mushrooms and herbs and cook for about 5-8 minutes until soft and slightly browned, stirring occasionally. Reserve some of the cooked mushroom slices for serving. Add a glug of wine to the saucepan and cook for a few minutes. Now add water, bouillon, salt and pepper. Cover with a lid and bring to a simmer. Use an immersion (hand) blender to mix the soup until completely smooth (or a stand-blender). Season to taste. Serve in bowls with a spoonful of cooked rice, some mushroom slices, fresh parsley, olive oil, a dollop of yogurt if using, and an avocado toast. Avocado Toast Makes 4 half-slices 2 slices sourdough rye 1 ripe avocado 1 tsp cold-pressed olive oil chili flakes flaky sea salt Toast the bread in a toaster, a frying pan or in the oven on high heat for a few minutes until golden and crispy. Cut the avocado in half, remove the stone and scoop out the flesh. Use a fork to mash the avocado and then slather it on top of the toast. Drizzle oil on top and sprinkle with chili flakes and salt. Cut in half and serve with the soup.

Mediterranean Five-Grain Rainbow Salad

February 26 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Mediterranean Five-Grain Rainbow Salad I recently read a text by Elisabeth Kirby about how our lives online sometimes can seem so perfectly edited. Luise and I have been talking a lot about that as well. In the world of blogs and instagram, it’s easy to believe that our photos are a perfect reflection of the lives we live. Please know that they are not. We are fortunate enough to work from home creating colourful vegetarian recipes that we also get to eat and take photos of. But if you zoom out from the photo there is often chaos outside the frame. Elsa and Isac building castles of sofa pillows while spilling smoothies on the white carpet, Thai take-away in front of a My Little Pony cartoon on the iPad, flour spilled all over the kitchen floor, failed recipe attempts and the inevitable fights that come from working closely together with the person you love. But also all those sweet moments of falling asleep together with the kids, cooking recipes for fun and not just for work and being silly with friends. Our photos and recipes reflect moments of creativity that balance our otherwise quite crazy and chaotic life as parents to two children. We aim to inspire, mostly by showing how gorgeous and delicious plant based food can be - like the salad above! We will also keep reminding ourselves to share personal stories and photos but many times those parts of life are best just lived. Okey, enough rambling, let’s move on to today’s recipe! We have created this salad in collaboration with Swedish/­­Italian family company Zeta (see our disclosure in the bottom of this post). They are launching a new range of organic whole grain mixes and asked for our help to develop a recipe for them. Since grains can be a little colourless, they asked for a delicious recipe that looked stunning (no pressure, right). Luise and I share a deep love for Italy and Italian flavours and we truly indulged in that while creating this salad. The grains add a nourishing base for this salad and they are tossed in pesto for extra flavour. We add sunchokes that are roasted until buttery soft centers and mix with thinly sliced raw, crunchy chioggia beets (aka candy cane or polka beets) and radishes. Of course we threw in some mozzarella and pine nuts (because, Italy!) and added red grapes for sweetness. All in all, it’s a real beauty of a salad, it is very nourishing and tastes just as good as it looks. The idea of mixing chioggia beets with radishes for a colourful kick is shamelessly inspired by some of the salads in Erin Irelands instagram feed (worth checking out btw!). Mediterranean 5-grain Salad with Sunchokes, Beets & Mozzarella Serves 4-6 The recipe is also available in Swedish here. 1 bag (250 g /­­ 1 1/­­2 cup) Zeta organic 5-grain mix (Farro, Barley, Kamut, Brown Rice and Oat Groats), or grains of choice 500 g /­­ 1 lb sunchoke/­­jerusalem artichoke 2 chunks mozzarella di bufalo 4 polka beets (chioggia) or yellow beets, peeled 1 bunch radishes, rinsed 200 g /­­ 7 oz  red grapes, halved 1 handful pine nuts, lightly toasted 2 handfuls rucola/­­arugula 1 bunch fresh basil Pesto dressing 5 tbsp green pesto 2 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil juice from 1/­­2 lemon Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Rinse and brush the sunchokes (don’t bother peeling them) and cut them in 5-10 mm (1/­­4-inch) slices. Place the slices in a bowl, drizzle over olive oil and toss them until everything is covered in oil. Spread out the slices on a baking sheet covered with baking paper. Roast for 30-40 minutes or until soft with crispy edges. Meanwhile, cook the grains in a large sauce pan filled with salted water, following the cooking time on the package. Drain any excess water and scoop the grains back into the sauce pan. Stir together the pesto dressing and pour over the grains in the sauce pan. Make sure they are all covered and then pour the grains out onto a wide plate or salad bowl. Layer with sunchoke slices and torn mozzarella chunks. Use a mandolin (or sharp knife) to shave the polka beets and radishes very thinly and spread on top of the salad together with pine nuts, grapes, rucola/­­arugula and basil. Disclosure: We wish to be as transparent as possible when it comes to sponsorships and collaborations. We have never had any ads on this site but in order to pay bills and continue doing this work that we love, we do on rare occasions accept collaborations with companies. We were compensated by Zeta for creating this recipe using some of their products. We would never work with products that we don’t believe in and their new range of whole grain-mixes felt like something that we would happily receive money to cook with, as they are all organic with short cooking times and all nutrients still intact. All words are our own and will always be. xx D&L

Swedish Pancake Cake

February 9 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Swedish Pancake Cake I started counting how many pancake recipes we have posted since we started the blog and it’s surprisingly few. At least if you divide that number with the number of times we have made pancakes since we started the blog, which is embarrassingly many. We like pancakes in our family and I think we need to blog more about it. We have pancakes for breakfast, lunch or dinner at least once a week. So with a few hours left on Shrove Tuesday aka Pancake Tuesday, we wanted to throw in a little collection with some of our favourite pancake recipes from the past years - both sweet and savoury. We are also sharing the ultimate way to eat pancakes, in the form of a cake! If not for tonight, it’s an unbeatable breakfast (or dessert) for your loved ones on Valentine’s Day. The recipe is from our first book, The Green Kitchen, which btw is coming out on Portuguese this Spring (the 11th language it is being translated to, crazy!). We love American style pancakes that are stacked up high and topped with a drizzle of syrup and fruit. These Flour-free Banana, Blueberry & Coconut Pancakes are made simply with egg, banana, blueberries and desiccated coconut and they are much lighter than common American pancakes. The recipe is from The Green Kitchen but can also be found on Cooked.com. All our book recipes are actually available on the Cooked website, it’s a subscription based site but they have a 30-day free trial. Spinach Crepes with Chickpea, Apple & Tahini Filling. We have been making green pancakes for years and it’s simply achieved by mixing pancake batter in a blender with the addition of spinach (or beetroot). We serve these with a savoury filling for dinner but they also taste great on their own. Click here for the full recipe. And here is a video with us making them. Masala Dosa filled with Sweet Potato & Peas, Mango & Raisin Chutney and Raita. We loved eating dosa for breakfast in India and all the different fillings add so much flavour with both sweet and savoury tones. The dosa batter is made without eggs so these are perfect for vegans. This recipe is from Green Kitchen Travels and is available on Cooked.com. Coconut & Quinoa Pancakes with Clementine Marmalade. These vegan pancakes are from Amy Chaplin’s brilliant book that we blogged about last year. Here is the recipe. Buckwheat cr?pes with passion and mango syrup. Our version of French dessert cr?pes are topped with an addictive Mango & Passionfruit Syrup and a dollop of mascarpone. The recipe is from Green Kitchen Travels and can also be found on Cooked.com. Summer Berry Pancake Cake I have made different versions of this cake since I was a child, and I never get tired of it. I think it is so beautiful with all those stacks of pancakes, and the berries and cream squishing out from the sides. Traditionally you put jam between the layers, but we stick to fresh fruit, nut butter and date syrup. The pancakes should be very thin, so we always use a non-stick frying pan when we make these. You can prepare the pancakes one day in advance and assemble the cake just before serving. If fresh berries aren’t in season, you can use frozen instead./­­David Pancake Batter 200 g /­­ 1 3/­­4 cup buckwheat flour 3 large eggs (or 4 medium) 500 ml /­­ 2 cups soy milk or milk of your choice 1 tbsp butter, plus extra for frying pinch sea salt Layers 3 ripe bananas, sliced thin 225 g /­­ 1 1/­­2 cup raspberries, mashed with a fork 225 g /­­ 1 1/­­2 cup blackberries, mashed with a fork 125 g nut butter 120 ml raw date syrup (soft dates mixed with a splash of water in a blender) 500 ml /­­ 2 cups thick cream, chilled Topping 150 g /­­ 1 cup raspberries 125 g /­­ 1 cup blackberries 2 tbsp pistachio nuts, chopped To make the batter, add all the ingredients, plus 250 ml /­­ 1 cup  water to a large mixing bowl and whisk vigorously until you have a smooth batter. Make sure that there are no lumps of flour left. Refrigerate for 20 minutes. Give it a good whisk after you have removed it from the fridge, as the flour tends to sink to the bottom. Heat a 20 cm /­­ 8, preferably non-stick, frying pan on medium-high heat. When the pan is hot, add a few drops of oil and about 75 ml of the batter. Tilt the pan until the batter is evenly distributed. Fry for 45-60 seconds on each side, until the pancakes are golden and can be flipped easily with a spatula. Fry all of the pancakes - the batter should make about 15 - and place on baking paper to cool off. You can layer with baking paper between the pancakes to stop them sticking together. To assemble, pour the cold cream into a large chilled bowl. Use an electric hand mixer or a whisk to whip it until soft peaks form. Set aside. Put the cold first pancake on a cake stand. Spread a layer of thin slices of banana evenly over the top. Add another pancake and top it with about a third of the mashed raspberries. Then continue with next pancake and a third of the mashed blackberries. Continue with another pancake and carefully spread a thin layer of nut butter and date syrup on it. Add another pancake and spread with a layer of whipped cream. Then start all over with the banana layer. Continue until all the pancakes are covered. Top with whipped cream, fresh fruit and finely chopped pistachios. All photos from our first book by Johanna Frenkel.

Vegetarian Bouillabaisse

January 28 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Vegetarian Bouillabaisse We did a little survey on instagram a few days ago where we asked what type of recipes you would like to see more of here on the blog. Lots of fun and creative suggestions popped up. The sum of it was pretty clear though. There seem to be a never-ending need for Quick Family Dinners, Budget Recipes, Healthy Breakfasts and more Vegan dishes. We will certainly take these topics in mind for future updates. If you have more suggestions, go ahead and leave a comment below. To kick things off we have looked at what we have done in the past years and have chosen 3 of our favourite recipes in each category. If you haven’t tried these recipes already, they might be a good starting point. Quick Family Dinners - Filled Spinach Crepes - Summer Pasta with Smashed Tomatoes   - Fresh Pea & Mint Soup Budget - Shakshuka - Mung Bean Stew - Carrot, Tomato & Coconut Soup Healthy Breakfasts - 3 x Breakfast Oatmeals - Chia Parfait & Apple Crunch - Raw Buckwheat Porridge De Luxe Vegan Dinners - Roasted Cauliflower Salad with Dates and Almonds - The No Recipe Curry - Sweet Potato, Carrot & Red Lentil Soup Savoury Snacks also seem to be a thing that we need to make more of so that will come up soon. Today’s recipe is a vegetarian version of the French fish stew Bouillabaisse and ironically it doesn’t seem to be even close to the topics that you are asking to see more of. It is not super quick, more like an hour or so. Saffron and white wine are on the ingredient list, so not a budget recipe (although all other ingredients are quite cheap). And to be honest, the kids didn’t like it very much. Elsa picked out the carrots, parsnip and the white beans and left the rest untouched! It is vegan though, if you skip the aioli. But if we look past the fact that this apparently is an entirely unwanted recipe from your side, we do have some good news: You are going to love it anyway! And so will the guests that you invite over for a vegetarian dinner this weekend. You see, this French stew is filled with flavour from white wine, fennel, garlic and saffron, sweetness from the slow cooked tomatoes, carrots and parsnips, and it gets a mild taste of the ocean from a sheet of nori algae (the ones you use for rolling sushi). We like to keep the vegetables chunky to replace the fish and seafood. We also roast fennel slices for a fancier presentation. Our idea was that they would look like two prawns in the middle of the plate, but, ehm, I don’t know, they just look like roasted fennel to me. They do taste good, almost crusty on the outside and soft and buttery on the inside. We serve it with homemade aioli but you can also use store-bought, to save time (or simply mix mayonnaise with garlic). If anyone is reading this from Marseille, we are sorry if we have insulted your traditional recipe. I am sure we have made a bunch of wrongdoings (for example excluding the main ingredient), but we did it with good intentions and love in our hearts. Vegetarian Bouillabaisse Serves 4-6 This takes around one hour to make. You can skip the roasted fennel on top if you are in a hurry and don’t care about fancy presentations. If you prepare it in the morning, it will taste even more flavourful when you serve it in the evening (or the day after). And if you are making it for kids, you can replace the wine with more vegetable stock. 2 tbsp butter, coconut oil or olive oil 2 tsp fennel seeds 1 tsp anise seeds 2 yellow onions, peeled, one finely chopped and the other coarsely 4 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped 3 large carrots, peeled and sliced in thick coins 2 parsnips, peeled and sliced in thick coins 1 fennel bulb, coarsely chopped 250 ml /­­ 1 cup dry white winepotatoes, peeled and cut in quarters 2 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tins whole tomatoes (or crushed) 2 cups vegetable stock 1 g saffron powder 1 sheet nori, crushed or finely chopped (optional) 1 tbsp fresh thyme 1 cup large white beans To serve 1 fennel bulb fresh thyme and dill zest from 1/­­2 orange (optional) 4 pieces of sourdough bread Aioli 2 egg yolks* 1 tbsp lemon juice or vinegar (+ more for seasoning) 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup cold-pressed olive oil (choose a quality oil, stored in glass bottles) 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup cold pressed rapeseed oil (choose a quality oil, stored in glass bottles) 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped or grated sea salt and pepper, to taste  Place a large sauce pan on medium heat. Melt butter or coconut oil and then add fennel seeds and anise seeds, onions and garlic. Sauté for a couple of minutes or until the onions have softened. Add carrots, parsnips and the chopped fennel and after a couple of minutes the white wine. Let simmer for five minutes and then add potatoes, tomatoes, vegetable stock, saffron, nori and thyme. Give it a good stir and then leave to simmer for 45 minutes. Meanwhile, set the oven to 435°F/­­225°C. Slice the remaining fennel in thick pieces lengthwise, drizzle with oil and salt and place on a baking sheet. Bake for 20 minutes or until soft and slightly burnt at the edges. When the cooked vegetables are soft and the stew tastes flavourful, add beans and let simmer for a few more minutes before serving. Making Aioli: Making Aioli: Whisk egg yolks* and lemon juice (or vinegar) in metal bowl to blend well. Whisking constantly (by hand with a balloon whisk) while drizzling in the oil very slowly, 1 teaspoonful at a time, until sauce is thickened. Stir in finely chopped garlic and season the aioli with lemon juice, salt and pepper. Serve the soup in wide bowls, top with roasted fennel, dill, a dollop of aioli, orange zest and a piece of sourdough bread. *Raw egg is not recommended for infants, elderly, pregnant women or people with weakened immune systems. Be sure to use pasteurized egg yolk instead.

Quinoa Bircher with Persimmons & Petals

December 28 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Would it be presuming of us to think that a few of you are reading this post in horizontal position? We are imagining you lying on the couch with a big bowl of Christmas food leftovers balancing on a pillow next to you and a pile of cookies on the sofa table? It’s how these days between Christmas and New Year usually are spent. And rightfully so, after all the holiday craziness it’s nice to just doze away for a while. But sometime soon you will probably start feeling for something fresh again. Regardless if it is tomorrow or next year, we’ve got the perfect recipe for you. It’s a true breakfast revelation, and such a pretty one as well. First time we tried quinoa bircher was at one of the many trendy Melbourne cafes, one year ago, and then again at Satan’s Coffee Corner (that name!) in Barcelona. We knew that we had stumbled over something great and have since then been experimenting with our own quinoa/­­buckwheat/­­oat bircher recipes. Simply explained, this bircher is made by mixing quick-cooked quinoa (making it more crunchy than mushy) with oats, yogurt (or coconut yogurt), vanilla and ginger. Then we top it with ripe persimmons, nut butter, bee pollen and these beautiful edible flower petals that we found at a local store. The result is a creamy and fresh breakfast that is super satisfying and really delicious. The petals actually taste surprisingly good - very flower-y - and suits this dish really well, but we mostly use them because they are pretty. If you can’t find any, feel free to make this dish without them. With this post, we also want to wish you all a happy end of the year and hope that you will get a great start of the next one! We are honestly so happy and grateful to have you reading our posts and trying our recipes. We have a bunch of special and exciting things (new book coming out!) for you in 2016, so stay with us. Big big LOVE! /­­David, Luise, Elsa & Isac! Quinoa & Oat Bircher with Persimmons & Petals Serves 2-4 1/­­2 cup uncooked quinoa + 1 cup water (or 1 cup leftover cooked quinoa/­­millet/­­buckwheat) 1 pinch sea salt 1 cup rolled oats or jumbo oats 2 cups unsweetened creamy greek yogurt or non-dairyyogurt’ 1/­­4 tsp ground vanilla or 1/­­2 tsp pure vanilla extract 1/­­2 tsp freshly grated ginger Optional toppings persimmon or other seasonal fruit nut butter bee pollen dried flower petals maple syrup Quick-cooked quinoa: Place 1/­­2 cup rinsed quinoa, 1 cup water and a pinch of salt in a medium-size saucepan. Bring to a boil, lower the heat immediately to a bare simmer and let gently cook for about 8 minutes. The texture should be soft with a crunchy feeling (think al dente). Drain the excess water and set aside to cool in a mixing bowl. Combine the quick-cooked quinoa with oats and stir in yogurt, vanilla and ginger. Serve in two large bowls or four smaller and top with thinly sliced persimmon, nut butter, bee pollen and petals. Drizzle over a teaspoon maple syrup if you prefer it a little sweeter. Store any leftovers in the fridge for up to 3 days. This recipe is ideal for preparing ahead stored in a sealed jar and then have the toppings added right before serving. PS! I’m suspecting that we’ll get some questions about the bowls. They are from Danish ceramics KH Würtz and they are just as gorgeous IRL.

Celeriac, Mushroom & Tomato Lasagna

December 9 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Lets take a moment to admire the ugly celeriac. Such an awesome root. Really affordable to buy, filled with flavour and so versatile to use. Plus, its thick, wrinkly, handle cold temperatures well and can therefor be harvested all through the winter. We had some celeriac left in the fridge after we had made this dish and used some of those leftovers to make thin and crispy celeriac chips and chopped the rest into a carrot & celeriac soup that, with a dash of white wine, was right on point. But we are not here for the leftovers, are we? We are here because of this little vegan lasagna made on thinly shaved celeriac and parsnipnoodles” that are layered with a tomato & lentil sauce, mushrooms and spinach and then covered with cherry tomatoes and baked until soft. For a long time we refused to call it lasagna, as we know that people can be a little cranky with words. The recipe is made entirely without lasagna noodles and béchamel sauce which probably is what technically makes a lasagna. But in the end we just thought lasagna sounded more appealing than casserole and it also gives a more visual description of how this dish is layered. Our little gif animation further down in this post, also helps with that. Regardless of its name, this is damn tasty and perfect winter food. The roots don’t soak up liquid like lasagna so it stays juicy without the need to add a creamy sauce. However, if you feel like throwing some dairy into it, we can recommend whisking a good ricotta with some lemon juice and spreading it out as an extra layer in the middle. Replacing lasagna noodles with thinly sliced celeriac is a great little trick that unfortunately was not invented by us. There are a bunch of recipes out there, from Gordon Ramsey’s double cream version to Sarah Britton’s with butternut squash. On another note, yesterday we put a major deadline behind us (which is why we have been so slow with new blog recipes). It feels great and we will tell you all about that project soon. Now we are actually off to Asia to sip coconuts, sleep for a hundred years and hug or kids, but we have prepared a whole array of Christmas recipes that we will post next week. And a really beautiful and tasty breakfast that we’ll post after Christmas - just when you are looking for something fresh again. So check back soon! Celeriac Lasagna AKA Shaved Roots & Mushroom Casserole Serves 6-8 Tomato & Lentil Sauce 1 tbsp coconut oil, butter, ghee or olive oil 1 oniongarlic cloves 1/­­4 tsp chili flakes 4 cans (6 cups /­­ 1560 g) chopped tomatoes 1/­­2 cup (125 ml) puy lentils (or lentils of choice), rinsed 1 cup (250 ml) water 2 sprigs thyme, chopped 20 leaves basil, chopped sea salt and pepper Shaved roots 1 small celeriac root 3 parsnip roots 1 tbsp coconut oil, butter, ghee or olive oil 2 clove garlic 20 brown mushrooms 250 g frozen spinach, thawed (fresh is fine too) 20 cherry tomatoes (or 4 regular tomatoes), sliced Preheat the oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. Preparing the tomato & lentil sauce: Heat oil in a large saucepan. Add onion, garlic and chili flakes and sauté for a couple of minutes. Add the rest of the ingredients and stir to combine. Cover with a lid and let simmer for about 45 minutes, until the lentils are soft and the sauce is quite ‘dry’. Preparing the celeriac and parsnip lasagna noodles: Rinse the roots well, then peel, you might want to use a knife instead of a peeler. Cut the roots in halves (or quarters if it’s large). Slice it in very thin slices, best and easiest done with a mandolin slicer (3 mm slices). Alternatively use a sharp knife, but be careful, and slice as thin as possible. Preparing the mushrooms: Clean the mushrooms with a soft brush (baking brush or toothbrush), if they are very dirty wash them with a little water and dry well. Slice the stem and the cap lengthwise into large pieces. Heat oil and garlic in a skillet on medium-high heat, add mushrooms and for a couple of minutes until browned on one side, then stir. Fry for a couple more minutes and pour into a bowl. Now add the thawed spinach to the same skillet with out rinsing. When heated, set aside. Assembling the lasagna: In an oven proof dish, start with a thin layer of oil, cover with a layer of root ‘noodles’. Add a layer of half of the tomato sauce and cover with a layer of root ‘noodles’. Add a layer of mushroomsspinach and a layer of root ‘noodles’. Add a layer of the remaining tomato sauce and arrange the sliced tomatoes on top to cover the tomato sauce. Place the dish in the oven and bake for 45-50 minutes.

Pumpkin Pie Caramel Bars

November 17 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

And we arrrrre back! If you have read the updated version of our latest post, you know that last week was an exhausting one for us. We are sorry about the decision to pull that recipe but it made us so happy to read your cheering comments on instagram regarding honesty and transparency. We promised you a new recipe soon, and this one surely delivers. It’s a two layer, pumpkin pie caramel bar covered in dark chocolate. It takes a little jiggling to cover the bar in chocolate and some waiting for the pumpkin layer to set, but apart from that, it is pretty straight forward. Instead of making a separate caramel layer, we chose to combine our favourite date caramel recipe with a simple pumpkin pie recipe and it just made the whole thing a lot easier. And of course mega-delicious. When eaten straight from the freezer it has proper ice cream texture, and when left an hour in room temperature the inside gets more caramel-like. Personally, I prefer it somewhere in between - when the pumpkin caramel is a little soft but still quite frozen. We are not big on Thanksgiving celebrations here in Sweden but if we would arrange a Thanksgiving dinner, I think these would be optimal as a cold, sweet and modernised version of a pumpkin pie in between or after all the warm, savoury dishes. I already mentioned that it can get a little messy when you cover the bars in chocolate. If chocolate-messy-fingers isn’t your thing, you can make Pumpkin Caramel Slices instead of bars by leaving the mixture in the tin and pouring the chocolate (3 oz /­ 80 g is enough) on top, so you get three visible layers instead of having the chocolate covering the sides. It’s a lot easier (but perhaps not as fun). Just remember to wait until the chocolate is firm before cutting up the slices. Pumpkin Pie Caramel Bars Makes 20 bars Coconut base 5 fresh dates, pitted 1 tbsp coconut oil 1 scant cup /­250 ml /­ 80 g desiccated coconut, unsweetened Salted Pumpkin Caramel 1/­2 cup /­ 70 g cashew nuts, pre-soaked for 3-5 hours 1 cup /­ 250 ml /­ 220 g canned pumpkin puree or homemade (see note how to make it) 4 tbsp tahini 4-6 tbsp drinking water 4 tbsp coconut oil 10 soft dates, pitted 1/­2 tsp cinnamon 1/­4 tsp ginger 1 pinch cloves 1/­2 tsp flaky sea salt 150 g /­ 5 oz dark chocolate, 70%. Add dates and coconut oil to a food processor and mix on high speed until you get a sticky paste. Add the coconut and mix again until all is combined. Line a 4 x 8 inch /­ 10 x 20 cm loaf tin with parchment paper and scoop the coconut mixture into it. Use your palm to flatten out coconut tightly into one thin base layer and then place the tin in the freezer while creating the pumpkin caramel. Add all the pumpkin caramel ingredients to a blender or food processor and mix on high speed until smooth. Start with 4 tbsp water and then add a splash more if the mixture is too thick to blend. When completely smooth, taste and add more salt or dates if needed. Take out the tin from the freezer and scoop the pumpkin caramel on top of the coconut base. Use a spatula to smooth out the surface or knock the tin against the table a few times to get it even. Place back into the freezer for at least three hours or until completely firm. Use a knife to carefully flip the frozen mixture out of the tin. Trim the sides for more even looking bars then use a sharp knife to cut 20 bite-sized pieces, about 1 x 2 inches /­ 2,5 x 5 cm, that you spread out on a parchment paper (or place back into the freezer while melting the chocolate). Melt chocolate in a water bath (here is a simple instruction video).Use a spoon to spread the chocolate evenly around each bar or simply pour the chocolate over them (or a combination of the both), leave the bottom uncovered. You can dip the bars straight into the chocolate but if you are not careful with the chocolate’s temperature, the cold bars will chill the chocolate which makes it harder to handle. Try to keep the bowl of chocolate over the water bath until the last bar is covered to ensure that the chocolate is evenly tempered and thus easier to handle. Store the bars in the freezer and eat chilled or slightly thawed. Homemade Pumpkin Puree Preheat the oven to 200°C /­ 400°F and line a baking tray with parchment paper. Cut one 1 small Hokkaido pumpkin or Butternut Squash into quarters, scoop out the seeds and fibrous strings and place cut-side down on the baking tray. Bake for approx. 25-45 minutes (depending on the size of the pumpkin) or until the skin is golden and bubbled and the flesh is tender. Set aside to cool. Spoon the flesh of the pumpkin into a food processor and process on a high speed until completely smooth. Store in the fridge in an airtight container for up to five days or in the freezer. Apart, from these bars, the puree can be used in Pumpkin Pie, Pumpkin Soup or the Pumpkin Waffles from Green Kitchen Travels.

Lentil & Rice Patties with Dates, Pomegranate & Feta

November 8 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

If I don’t post this recipe now, it might very well never be posted. So here we go. In between work trips, chickenpox, writing and photographing a new book (that we will tell you more about really soon!) and living a regular two-kids family life, these little patties happened. We made them for an impromptu lunch and they turned out really tasty so we snapped a few photos and planned to test them again (like we normally do) before posting the recipe. But after more than a week of postponing, I’m realising that the recipe will prove itself more useful in your kitchens than at the desktop of our computer. When Luise made these patties, she called them “a classical vegetarian dish”. I suspect she referred to the fact that all vegetarians always seem to be on the lookout for new takes on veggie patties. Our Spinach & Quinoa Patties have been on frequent rotation in our house, but I quite like the richness that the lentils and brown rice added to these. Exactly what we need during the winter. These patties also have some important nutritional aspects, so Luise is taking over the computer now to explain them: Lentils and rice are always a good combination as they make a complete protein source, which is important for vegetarians. Most plant sources of protein are in fact, incomplete, with the exception of soybeans and quinoa. Therefore, grains such as rice, oats, wheat, rye and corn, can act as complementary proteins for legumes such as lentils. Choose whole grains and if you have time I highly recommend to soak grains and legumes (lentils, peas, beans, nuts and seeds) before cooking. It helps to break down enzyme inhibitors (among many other benefits) and optimise the nutritional value, for example will the minerals be way easier absorbed in your body. /­Luise While the patties are quite mildly flavoured, we went a bit bolder with the presentation. We served them in lettuce leaves with dates, pistachios, herbs and pomegranate on top. Apart from looking stunning, those flavours are truly awesome together. Sweet dates, salty pistachios and creamy yogurt together with the fresh juices that splashes on your tongue as you bite into the pomegranate seeds. Divine! Lentil & Rice Patties with Dates, Pomegranate & Feta Makes 15 patties We have only made this recipe once so we haven’t had time to try a vegan version, but the mushy lentils should make it quite possible. Non-vegans could also choose to incorporate a piece of feta cheese in the patties for extra flavour. We cooked lentils and rice from scratch, but fridge leftovers are ideal in this recipe. 1 cup red split lentils (preferable pre-soaked, but not necessary) 2 cups water a pinch of sea salt 1 cup whole grain rice (preferable pre-soaked, but not necessary) 2 cups water a pinch of sea salt 1 small red onion, finely chopped 3 cloves garlic, minced 5 tbsp finely chopped mixed parsley, cilantro and mint (save some for serving) 1 carrot, grated 1 tsp sea salt and pepper 1/­2 tsp paprika 1/­2 tsp cumin 2 eggs 3 tsp potato starch zest from 1/­2 lemon coconut oil, ghee, butter or olive oil for frying for serving roman lettuce pomegranate seeds chopped herbs pistachios, finely chopped dates, pitted yogurt feta cheese Place the washed and rinsed rice, water and salt in a saucepan, bring to boil, lower the heat and cook for about 30-40 minutes. Check the package for the exact cooking time. Meanwhile, place the washed and rinsed lentils, water and salt in a saucepan and bring to boil, lower the heat and let simmer for 15-20 minutes, until well cooked and a bit mushy. Pour the cooked lentils in a large mixing bowl. Prepare the other ingredients and place everything in the mixing bowl together with the cooked lentils. Stir to combine. Drain the cooked rice, if necessary and then add it to the mixing bowl with the rest of the ingredients and stir again. Heat coconut oil in a skillet and form 15 patties with a spoon. Fry for just a couple of minutes on each side, until golden and crispy on the outside. Serve the patties warm or chilled in lettuce leaves with feta cheese, pomegranate, dates, yogurt, herbs and pistachios. ********* PS! A couple of weeks ago, Food52 came by for lunch, an interview and to shoot a few photos of our kitchen. And it’s now up on their site, if you want to have a peek.

One-Pot Butternut & Cabbage Stew

October 13 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Hi, this is David! Luise will soon tell you about this recipe of hers and we also have a little quick video of it, but I just wanted to mention one thing before we get all warm and cosy. If you are reading this on a Safari browser, our typography has probably turned all bold and ugly on you. I am so sorry about that! It really hurts my design eyes to see our site like this. During our six years of blogging, we have never changed the design of this blog. We have always loved the design and felt like it has become part of our blogs identity, but the theme that we built our site on has been outdated for a very long time and we have managed to keep it alive with band-aids and chewing gum. However, I am not sure if we can keep this design much longer; the typography is acting like a confused teenager, the site loads slowly, is not very mobile or printer friendly and my web skills can’t seem to fix all this. So bare with us while we are figuring out how this blog should transform into a more user friendly version. It will probably look ugly for a while but change is on its way! (PS! We are looking for a super-talented and design minded web wizard. Email me at: hello@greenkitchenstories.com). Over to you Luise! The first morning frost has arrived and Stockholm has turned into a beautiful multi coloured autumn city. It is cold and sunny but daylight hours are quickly slipping away. The shorter days mean more time inside with warming teas, candle lights and large batches of slow-cooking food with hearty flavors, nourishing ingredients and lots of herbs. This dish embraces autumn ingredients like butternut pumpkin, cabbage and apples, and the combination of rice and beans gives you a complete source of protein. If you live in a different climate or time-zone, you can combine any kind of grains and legumes with whatever vegetables the season is offering. Comforting one-pot meals are cheap, no fuss-family dinners that often last for a couple of days. Not to mention how easy they are. With only one-pot simmering on the stove, you both save dishes and don’t have to focus on keeping track of several pots with different cooking times. If you soak the grains and beans in the morning, youre set to cook everything for dinner. Apart from the general health aspects of pre-soaking grains, I have found that it’s extra important in one-pot meals, since the rice don’t dilute the colour of the stew as much when it is pre-soaked. We also created this little one-minute video to show how easily this dish is assembled. Hope you like it. Remember to subscribe to our youtube channel for more recipe videos. One-Pot Pumpkin, Cabbage & Rice Stew Serves 4-6 We have kept the flavours quite simple in this stew and instead add extra herbs and diced apple as a fresh twist right before serving it. I imagine mushrooms and tomatoes would be a delicious addition in this stew too. You can also try a bolder choice of spices or other type of grains and legumes. You can even throw in a piece of parmesan rind as it simmers to add a nice umami flavour to the stew (just remember to remove it before serving). 1 large onion 4 garlic cloves 1 tbsp coconut oil, ghee or olive oil 1 butternut squash/­­pumpkin or hokkaido pumpkin 3 sprigs rosemary, bash them a few times with the end of a knife 1 organic lemon, zest and juice 1 small head of cabbage 1 cup uncooked whole grain rice, pre-soaked 1 cup uncooked black eyed peas, pre-soaked water to cover, approx. 6 cups /­­ 1 1/­­2 liter 1 tbsp vegetable bouillon powder (with no added MSG) 3 dried bay leaves sea salt and pepper, to taste To serve plain yogurt of choice (optional) fresh parsley, chopped fresh apples, chopped grated parmesan, optional In the morning: Place whole grain rice and black eyed peas in two separate bowls, cover with (filtered) water and let soak for 8-12 hours. Then drain and rinse and they are ready to be used in the recipe. Peel and finely chop onion and garlic. Prepare the pumpkin; peel it, divide it in half and scoop out the seeds. Then chop it into cubes. Heat oil in a large pot, add onion, garlic and rosemary sprigs, let fry for a minute or so, stirring occasionally. Add the cubed pumpkin and lemon zest and stir to combine. Slice the cabbage, discard the stem. Add cabbage, soaked and rinsed whole grain rice and black eyed peas, water, bouillon, bay leaves, salt and pepper to the pot and stir around to combine everything. Cover with a lid and bring to the boil, then lower the heat and let cook for 45-60 minutes. Check every now and then to see if more water is needed and gently stir around. It is ready to serve when the rice and peas are very tender. Serve in bowls with a dollop of yogurt, fresh parsley and chopped apples.

Chanterelle, Quinoa & Tofu Stir-Fry

September 17 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Chanterelle, Quinoa & Tofu Stir-Fry This meal first happened a few days ago when Luise and I worked late and my mom had spent the afternoon with the kids. They had already eaten (this parsnip soup) so we had the rare opportunity to only cook something for ourselves. With no specific plan, we opened the fridge and pulled out some leftover vegetables. A half bag of chanterelles left from a dinner I had during the weekend, a pack of tofu, some greens and a corn cob that we had remaining from our csa box. We fried it up with onion and garlic, added some pre-cooked quinoa (a staple in our fridge), black pepper and lime. We also found a small piece of feta cheese that we crumbled over the stir-fry at the last minute. It was a 10-minute one-pan autumn dinner and it was exactly what we both wanted. Apparently it was also what Elsa wanted, cause she stole the tofu and chanterelles of my plate (even though she claims that she hate both mushrooms and tofu). A few notes: Vegans can easily just leave out the feta cheese (and perhaps add some more lime and salt for extra flavour). If you are not vegan, I imagine that a poached egg could be nice on top of this. Or just scrambled into the stir-fry, thai style. If you dont have any quinoa you can use rice or millet instead. And it goes without saying that you can add or subtract almost any vegetables to this, depending on season and availability. Funnel chanterelles are coming to season here in Sweden now, so next time well probably use those instead of the chanterelles. Chanterelle, Quinoa & Tofu Stir Fry Serves 4 1 large onion 2 cloves garlic 1 tbsp cold-pressed coconut oil or olive oil 1 zucchini 1 fennel bulb (with top greens if you can find it) 2 cups /­­ 400 g /­­ 14 oz organic GMO-free firm tofu 10 oz /­­ 300 g fresh chanterelle mushrooms or mushrooms of choice 1-2 tsp sea salt and black pepper, to your preference 2 1/­­2 cups /­­ 600 ml cooked quinoa, any color (1 cup /­­ 200 g uncooked) 2 large handfuls baby spinach For serving 4-5 sprigs chopped parsley or fennel top greens (or both!) 3 1/­­2 oz /­­ 100 g crumbled feta cheese, (optional) 1 corn cob, kernels cut off with a sharp knife. 2 limes, juice Chop onion and garlic very finely. Heat coconut oil in a skillet on medium to high heat. When hot, add the onions and garlic and let fry until fragrant. Meanwhile chop zucchini and fennel into coarse pieces and cut the tofu into small squares. Add everything to the skillet and stir to combine. Clean the chanterelles with a soft brush (baking brush or toothbrush), if they are very dirty wash them with a little water and dry well. Slice the stem and the cap lengthwise into large pieces and add them to the skillet along with salt and a generous amount of black pepper and sear for 5-10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until everything is tender, but still with a chewy texture. Add the cooked quinoa and spinach and combine everything, keep stirring until the spinach is wilted down. Season to taste. Serve in bowls and garnish with a generous amount of finely chopped parsley, feta cheese and corn kernels and squeeze over 1/­­2 lime per serving.

Herby Picnic Potato Salad

September 1 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Herby Picnic Potato Salad A couple of weeks ago we had a little picnic for our baby boy with family and a few close friends. It was kind of a combined (very delayed) Welcome-to-the-World-Isac and Happy-First-Birthday celebration and it turned out to be a real gem of a day. It has basically been raining in Sweden all summer, but this day was filled with sunshine, good food, laughter and lots of chubby babies. Despite having written two cookbooks, we actually rarely cook for our friends. Instead we prefer going the picnic route, having everyone bringing something to share. It just makes it a lot easier to plan these kind of things instead of having to do everything yourself. It also makes for a more fun and spontaneous event. We did actually end up cooking quite a lot anyway for this picnic. We made a few picnic pies, two monster versions of our Blueberry Cake (not shattered this time) and an adapted version of the potato salad from Sara Fortes latest book Bowl+Spoon. We got to read her book manuscript before it was published as we were asked to write a little quote for the back. Here is what we wrote: We love that Saras recipes are always focused on real ingredients, simple to prepare, and undoubtedly delicious. The bowl theme is brilliant and exactly how we prefer to eat our everyday meals. Apart from a few other favourites in the book, we have been making different versions of Saras potato salad at least five times this summer. Its incredibly flavourful with lots of fresh herbs and capers, and also has a tangy zing from white wine vinegar. The original recipe calls for hard-boiled eggs and its an excellent combo, but we have also been playing with other (vegan) sources of protein. One time we tried beluga lentils and here we are using chickpeas. We added kale and apple to make it less of a side dish and more of a complete meal. As the name implies, this is great to pack on a picnic but it is also a good indoor meal. And when your kids are tired of having potato salad for the fifth time, you can fry the leftovers in a pan into a quick and flavourful hash. Herby Picnic Potato Salad with Kale, Apple & Chickpeas Serves 6 Recipe adapted from Bowl+Spoon by Sara & Hugh Forte. We usually make an extra large (almost double) batch of the vinaigrette because it’s so good. If your white wine vinegar is very sweet, you can add some lemon juice for extra zing. 2 pounds/­­1 kg small new potatoes Coarse Herb Vinaigrette 3 tbsp pickled capers 2 spring onions or green onions 2 cups loosely packed herbs (a mix of chives, parsley, basil and top greens from the celery) 2 tbsp white wine vinegar or apple cider vinegar 1/­­3 cup cold pressed oil sea salt and black pepper, to taste 2 apples, diced 3 celery stalks (save the top greens for the vinaigrette), finely diced 2 leaves kale, chard or spinach, chopped 1 can (14 oz/­­400 g) cooked chickpeas, rinsed Put the potatoes in a large pot, cover them with water and bring the water to a boil. Boil for 12-15 minutes until they are cooked through but not falling apart - just until you can easily pierce a sharp knife through the center. Drain and set aside to cool. In a food processor, blitz capers and their brine, onions, basil, parsley, chives, celery greens, vinegar, lemon juice, oil, salt and pepper until you get a coarse vinaigrette. Quarter the potatoes and collect them in a larger mixing bowl. Pour the vinaigrette over the just-cooled potatoes and gently toss to coat. It will look like a lot of dressing, but the potatoes soak it up as they sit. Stir celery, apples, kale and chickpeas into the potatoes. Taste for salt and pepper. Serve at room temperature.

Marbled Birthday Popsicles for Isac

August 13 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Marbled Birthday Popsicles for Isac Today is Isac’s first birthday! We’ve celebrated with banana pancakes and popsicles flavoured with watermelon, his favourite thing in the world. More about the popsicle recipe at the bottom of this post. First this. About 4 1/­­2 years ago we wrote a letter to his sister on her first birthday and we wanted to do the same for him. Obviously he won’t be able to read this know, but we’re hoping that he might find this 15 or 20 years from now, when he’s curiously scrolling through old internet pages and discovers the weird food blogging phenomena that his parents were involved in. To Isac. You are sleeping right next to me in the bed so Im typing this as quietly as I can. A few minutes ago you were lying on my chest looking up at me with your clear blue eyes and I was singing Cat Stevens songs for you until your eye lids got heavy. It was one of those moments you pack into a little box and store inside your heart. You are only one year old and we have already had so many of these moments with you. Every time we tickle your tummy you start laughing this unfiltered, contagious laugh that makes your face all wrinkly. At least a hundred times a day, you put whatever you are holding in your hand to your ear and answer Hallo?, one time it was a cooked beetroot and you smudged it all over your chin and hair while pretending to be talking on the phone. It looked so hilarious and when we laughed, you started laughing even more. Whenever you see your sisters toes, you sneak up to her and bite them, like a little dog. Sometimes she gets angry at you for doing that, but you always just smile back at her (often with her toe still in your mouth). You are a funny dude. I remember feeling a bit worried, the days before you were born. We had been such a tight family of three for many years and I guess I wasn’t sure what would happen to our close bonds now that you were about to arrive. But then you came and immediately you changed our family. You changed our relationship with each other and you changed your sister. She really hoped that you would be a girl but has loved you wholeheartedly from the second she saw you. And you have loved her back. As soon as you hear her voice in the morning, you start shouting “Ella! Ella!”. So far, it’s the only word you can say, your sister’s name. Your mom and I really hope that you two will continue to have the same beautiful relationship when you grow up. Of course you can also scream and cry and be terribly unhappy. While learning how to walk, you have been falling a million times, banging your head into walls, floors and furniture. But even when you were bleeding from your eyebrow, you took the cloth I was holding against your cut, put it against your ear and answered… “Hallo?”, and then you started laughing again. We love you through laughter, cuts, scrapes, beetroot and blood. Happy birthday little man! /­­Mom & Dad And now, ice pops! Watermelon is doubtless Isac’s favourite fruit so we made these popsicles as a little treat for him. Just like with Elsa, we are trying to teach him to eat proper food before introducing cookies and real sweets. So these are perfect as it’s basically just frozen smoothies. Popsicles or paletas are super simple to make and can be varied in an infinite amount of ways. Here we have blended watermelon as one layer and bananas and yogurt as the other, mixed them a bit to create a marble effect and then added a little chocolate crumble for extra birthday glamour. Check out this Blueberry popsicle video recipe that we did last year if you want to get more visual instructions and popsicle inspiration. Marbled Watermelon Popsicles Makes 8-10 popsicles See this recipe more as a starting point. Almost any type of fruit, berries, sweetener or dairy products can be frozen into popsicles. Pure watermelon popsicles is a great one ingredient recipe. Or you can do something more advanced, like a cheesecake popsicle with ricotta cheese and honey instead of yogurt. Whatever is in season and to your liking. About a quarter medium size watermelon (2 pounds /­­ 1 kg) 1 cup /­­ 250 ml full-fat Turkish yogurt or vegan yogurt 2 ripe bananas (you can also add some honey if you want them to be extra sweet) 1 tsp ground vanilla or vanilla extract 10 fresh raspberries Chocolate crumble 1-2 tbsp coconut oil or butter 1-2 tbsp honey or maple syrup 1/­­2 cup rolled oats 1/­­2 cup sunflower seeds, roughly chopped 1 tbsp cacao powder 1/­­2 tsp ground dried ginger 1/­­2 tsp cinnamon Cut the watermelon flesh in chunks and add to a high speed blender. Mix until smooth and pour the watermelon juice into a jug. Rinse the blender and add yogurt, banana, honey and vanilla to a high-speed blender. Mix until smooth. Slowly pour some of the banana yogurt into the popsicle moulds, filling about 1/­­3 of the mould (or whatever height you think looks pretty). Then carefully pour the mixed watermelon on top (remember to leave some space for the crumble). Check so the layers more or less stay intact (if the consistency is too loose, you can pop the moulds in the freezer for 10-20 minutes before adding the second layer). To get the marbled effect, simply use a straw or the backside of a teaspoon and stir up and down one or two strokes. Tear the raspberries in half and drop two halves into each mould, use a straw to push them down. To create the chocolate crumble, simply melt coconut oil and honey in a frying pan on low heat. Add the rest of the ingredients and toast for a few minutes while stirring. Spoon the crumble into the moulds as a top layer, then carefully insert the popsicle sticks. Freeze for at least 3-4 hours. When you want to eat the popsicles, rinse the moulds quickly under water to get them out without any hassle. We bought our popsicle moulds on Amazon. These are similar to ours.

Summer Pasta with Smashed Tomatoes, Peaches & Mozzarella

July 23 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Summer Pasta with Smashed Tomatoes, Peaches & Mozzarella We have been cooking this quick little dinner recipe rather frequently during the summer. At a first glance, it might seem like it’s just a classic/­boring fresh tomato pasta. But when you consider the context: hot summer days, family time, ripe tomatoes in season, everyone is hungry but no one feels like cooking … you’ll realise that it’s exactly the kind of simple dinner that we all need more of. We have of course given this dish our own schwung. Instead of just serving tomatoes fresh, we squeeze/­punch/­smash them up a bit so they get softer and release some of that lovely juice that gets mixed with olive oil, a splash of the hot pasta water, fresh basil, garlic and pickled capers. Already there, you got yourself a pretty great flavor combo. But then we throw in a handful of peach slices for extra sweetness, delicious toasted pine nuts and some large chunks of creamy buffel mozzarella, which makes it Italian-grandmother-kind-of-awesome. You can serve this with any type of pasta. In our home we usually use various sorts of gluten free (buckwheat is a favourite) or whole grain pasta or spiralized/­shredded zucchini (also known as zoodles), but here we are using bean linguine, made entirely from dried beans and therefore naturally vegan, gluten free and high in protein. This pasta has a delicious flavour and a nice chewy texture. We have seen various sorts of bean pastas starting to pop up in supermarkets and health food stores - soybean pasta, chickpea pasta and black bean pasta - so keep an eye out for those next time you are out shopping for pasta. In this dish the quality of the ingredients is everything. Use only fresh, ripe tomatoes and peaches and make sure to choose your favourite olive oil. If you want a creamier sauce, you can sub the mozzarella for ricotta cheese + some lemon juice, which also is really awesome. You can of course also add parmesan cheese if you prefer. For a vegan option, I think it’d be interesting to work with a softer type tofu instead of the cheese. Perhaps pre-marinate it for a while in olive oil and fresh Italian herbs. Pasta with smashed raw tomatoes, peach & mozzarella Serves 4 1 clove garlic 2 tbsp pickled capers 500 g /­ 1 lb ripe tomatoes 3-4 sprigs fresh basil, leaves picked and chopped, save some for garnish a few glugs of cold-pressed olive oil a pinch sea salt and black pepper 200 g  /­ 7 oz bean pasta or other gluten free pasta alternative or zucchini noodles 1 handful pine nuts 2 peaches or nectarines 200 g /­ 7 oz mozzarella cheese 1 handful rucola/­aragula/­rocket salad Mince the garlic very finely. Mash the capers with the back of a knife. Divide the tomatoes in half. Chop the basil. Place everything in a large serving bowl and add a few glugs of olive oil, salt and pepper. With your hands, squeeze or punch the tomatoes until soft and juicy. Cook the pasta in lightly salted boiling water according to the instructions on package. Meanwhile, lightly toast the pine nuts in a skillet on medium heat. Slice the nectarines and tear the mozzarella in smaller pieces. When that pasta is done, reserve about 1/­2 cup /­ 100 ml of cooking water and drain the rest. Add the pasta immediately to the serving bowl while it’s still hot, toss with the tomato ‘sauce’ and rucola until well mixed, add some of the cooking water if you want to make it a little juicier. Decorate with peaces, mozzarella cheese, pine nuts, arugula, a few whole basil leaves and an extra drizzle of olive oil. Ready to serve.

Sm?rrebr?d - Open-Faced Sandwiches

July 12 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Sm?rrebr?d - Open-Faced Sandwiches Sm?rrebr?d - an open-faced rye sandwich that is piled high with toppings - is one of the most essential dishes in the Danish culture, most commonly eaten for lunch instead of a warm dish. Traditionally, many of the toppings involve poultry, fish and meat, but here we are showing a few of our vegetarian favourites along with some more contemporary versions. The recipes aren’t as specific as usual since sandwiches rarely call for detailed instructions. We merely hope to open your senses and get you inspired to try something else than just a regular butter and cheese sandwich. This is also a fun way to do a buffet. Bake or buy a good quality sourdough rye bread (or paleo bread for a flour free option). Then prepare a table with as many toppings as you can come up with and let every guest build their own open-faced sandwich. New potatoes & pickled onion sandwich We love a good ol’ potato sandwich with mâche lettuce, mayo, quick pickled red onions, chives and dill. Use new potatoes if they are in season and remember that you don’t need to peel them, just rinse to remove any dirt and place whole into a pan of lightly salted water, bring to the boil, simmer for about 10-15 minutes or until tender. Then drain and leave to cool. Here is how we make our own quick pickled red onion: Mix 1/­2 cup (120 ml) rice vinegar or white wine vinegar with 1 tsp honey and 1/­2 tsp salt and 1/­2 tsp fennel seeds or cumin seeds. Then we slice up 1 red onion thinly and pour boiling water over the slices before placing them in a jar with the vinegar. After 30 minutes it already tastes divine. Creamy curried egg salad sandwich This creamy curried egg salad is so typical Danish. We serve it on rye bread with small cherry tomatoes, chives and alfalfa sprouts. It can get a little messy when you eat it, but don’t let that intimidate you. Here is how you make the egg salad: Place 4 eggs in a pan and cover with water, bring to the boil and set the timer for 8 minutes, lower the heat and let simmer. After 8 minutes, remove from the heat and place under running cold water. When the eggs are cold, crack and peel. In a bowl, stir together 2 tbsp mayo, 2 tbsp yogurt (or more mayo instead), 1 tsp curry powder and a pinch of salt. Taste and adjust the flavours to your preference. Now chop the boiled eggs and gently fold them into the curry dressing. Avo & Za’atar The new queen of open-faced sandwiches and also one of the most popular subjects on instagram. Avocado is not a traditional Danish sm?rrebr?d toppings but always a welcome addition to our table. The key to this rye recipe is to use really ripe avocados. Cut the avocado in half, remove the stone, scoop out the avocado flesh with a spoon and slice very finely. Place each half on two slices of rye bread and give each avo a gentle mash with your hand. We have served this open-faced avo sandwich with thin slices of radishes and a sprinkle of our favourite spice Za’atar. Red bell pepper & Rosemary spread Lots of people have been asking us for a plant based spread to use on sandwiches. This popular recipe from our first book is one of our favourites. Apart from putting on a sandwich, it’s also great as a side to most dishes or together with pasta or zoodles. Here is how we make our spread: Preheat the oven to 200°C/­400°F. Cut 3 large red bell peppers in half, scoop out the seeds and place on a baking tray. Roast for 40 minutes until slightly charred. Remove from the oven and leave to cool. Add 2/­3 cup (75 g) sunflower seeds, a pinch of cayenne and a pinch of salt to a frying-pan and toast for a few minutes on medium heat. Peel the skin from the peppers, chop and put in a blender. Add the sunflower seeds, 2 tbsp lemon juice and 2 sprigs rosemary and purée on high speed. Put in an airtight glass jar. Will keep in the fridge for up to two weeks. Hazelnut butter & Strawberries Not all our sandwiches are savoury. This is a modernised version of the classic peanut butter & jam sandwich. Hazelnut butter, sliced strawberries, a drizzle of honey or maple syrup, a sprinkle of bee pollen and some fresh basil. Delish! Buy nut or seed butter in stores or make your own (try this recipe).

Smoothie Bonanza - The recipe bundle

June 24 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Smoothie Bonanza - The recipe bundle Woot woot! We are so thrilled to present this little project that we have been working on lately! We have been turning fruit, berries, vegetables and liquids into smoothies practically every day for the past couple of years. Sometimes we make them for breakfast, other times for dessert, and always after a workout! We cant think of a fresher, quicker and more delicious way to boost our bodies with energy. Since smoothies have become such a common meal for us, we have picked up some tricks and ideas on how to make them more interesting. Nowadays, we often add extra berries, fruit, nuts or grains to the glass to create a contrast in flavour and texture. We also tend to pour them in layers for a more interesting and beautiful drinking experience. We have gathered 14 lip-smacking smoothie recipes into a recipe bundle that we just have released as an in-app purchase for our Green Kitchen app. It’s available for $1.99 and the difference from the normal (free) recipe updates in the app is that all these recipes are entirely new and previously unpublished. Make sure you have the latest update of the app and there should be a new box with more info at the top of the grid. You need to have iOS 8 installed to be able to install the update. These recipes are available in English (imperial and metric), German, Italian, Spanish and French inside the app. We are of course bias but we feel pretty damn proud of these smoothies and hope they will give you new ideas and inspiration next time you are starting up the blender. Here is a preview of all the recipes. Just like with our Green & Clean recipe pack, 6 months ago, we have also gathered these smoothies in a mini e-book. This is to accomodate those of you that don’t have an iphone or ipad but still want to try the recipes. It’s available for $2.99 and can be ordered and downloaded here. We are really hoping you will enjoy these! To give you a preview, we are also sharing one of the recipes here today. It is a fun little method of ours where the topping (muesli, granola, rolled oats, puffed grains or nuts) is placed at the bottom of the glass and then covered with a few spoonfuls of yogurt and filled up with the smoothie. A quick, delicious and slightly unusual way to have breakfast and it also looks spectacular with the different layers. In this recipe we use muesli and thick yoghurt for the bottom two layers and a simple but delicious blueberry smoothie recipe on top, but we encourage you to use this as a starting points and try the technique with some of the other smoothies in the bundle or any smoothie of your own. Upside-Down Breakfast Smoothie Smoothie Ingredients 1 cup /­­ 120 g frozen blueberries 1 blood orange or a regular orange, peeled and roughly chopped 1 banana, peeled and roughly chopped 1 cup /­­ 250 ml plant milk of choice 1 tsp ground cardamom Layers 1 cup /­­ 125 g muesli, granola, puffed grains or just rolled oats 1 cup /­­ 250 ml full-fat plain unsweetened Greek or Turkish yogurt (for a vegan alternative, use coconut yogurt or organic GMO-free soy yogurt) Add all smoothie ingredients to a blender and blend on a high-speed until smooth. Divide the muesli between two glasses. Spoon the yogurt over the muesli in each glass. Pour the smoothie on top and serve with a spoon.

Warm Summer Fruit Salad + Video

June 14 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Warm Summer Fruit Salad + Video If my 15 year younger self would see me know. I am sitting here writing a text that praises a warm fruit salad. Young David would have told me  that I was an idiot: “Why heat fruit when you can have it cold?!” You see, young David wasn’t very fond of warm fruit. At all.  Back then, I could binge eat bowls of fresh fruit, but cook or bake it and I wouldn’t touch it. Even apple pie, the one dish that every normal person loves, made my stomach turn upside down. I sometimes allowed myself to eat the part of the crust that hadn’t been touched by the fruit, but my tongue cringed from the bare thought of warm apple in my mouth. And now I’m all of a sudden ridiculously excited about this fruit salad that has taken a quick tour through a hot oven. What happened? I would love to say that this recipe was the game changer. But truth be told, I think I just slowly learned to appreciate warm fruit, recipe by recipe. Apart from the fact that I used to hate warm fruit and now swear by this dessert. Apart from the fact that this recipe is dead-simple and can be prepared in no-time. And apart from the fact that it includes some of the best bounty of the season and you will get all these summer-bonanza-feelings just by preparing it. Yes, apart from all that, this fruit salad is also covered in grated dark chocolate (that melts!), coconut flakes and salted almonds (that pairs oh so well with dark chocolate). Young David might not approve, but old David thinks this is pretty darn good and would like you all to give it a try. If you are still not  convinced, we created this video for our youtube channel as a final selling point:  The original Swedish version of this dessert is called Gino. It’s baked strawberries, kiwis and bananas with white chocolate on top. Our version is quite different, but t he choice of fruit and measurements are really just suggestions here, add or subtract fruit to your liking. Peaches or pineapple would also be good baked. Or raspberries. We have used fruit in season, but baking fruit is also a great way to increase the flavours during the winter season. Luise and I haven’t entirely agreed on the baking time. Personally I think the fruit only should be heated quickly, so it’s still quite firm. Just 5-6 minutes or enough time for the chocolate to melt. Luise however prefers the fruit to be more baked and a bit softer so the juices and flavours come together more. That’s about 10-12 minutes. But we’ll leave that decision to you (in the photos and video it’s baked after Luise’s preference). Warm Summer Fruit Salad with Dark Chocolate & Salted Almonds Serves 4 1 cup almonds + 1 tbsp boiled water mixed with 1 tsp salt (or store-bought salted almonds) 3 kiwi fruits 3 apricots 2 bananas, peel 10 strawberries 10 cherries, pitted 2 plums, remove stones 1 lime, juice 1 oz /­­ 30 g dark chocolate (70% or darker) 1/­­3 cup dried unsweetened coconut flakes Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Prepare the almonds by placing them in a mixing bowl, pour the hot salted water over the almonds and combine until all almonds are covered. Place the almonds in a baking tray and roast in the oven for 10-15 minutes or until slightly golden and crunchy. Set aside. Prepare the fruit by cutting them into bitesize pieces. Place the fruit in a baking dish and add the lime juice, toss to mix. Chop the almonds and sprinkle over the fruit salad. Grate the chocolate until it covers the fruit. Sprinkle with coconut flakes and place the dish in the oven. Bake for 5-10 minutes, until the chocolate has melted and the fruit is warm and juicy (not mushy). Serve in bowls with a dollop thick plain yogurt or ice cream.

Bowls Like These

June 7 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Bowls Like These Today we just wanted to quickly share a simple salad recipe that puts our Golden Sauerkraut recipe from last month to good use. With all the fresh produce available this time of the year, bowls like these are on weekly rotation in our home. They are quick to make and easy adaptable to whatever vegetables we have available. Warm quinoa and a fried egg makes this more filling than a normal salad, and tahini, lemon and sauerkraut add flavour. We use a fork to break the egg and let the yolk incorporate with the other ingredients. Come to think of it, this is almost like a hippie sister to bibimbap. Hippie Bibimbap! We tried a few bowls similar to this, topped with krauts, on cafes in Sydney and Melbourne. They all had names like Buddha bowl, Yoga bowl and Sunshine bowl. In our version, we have kept the flavours quite simple and neutral to really let the kraut sing. You can of course use any type of sauerkraut, or kimchi. If you are making this without any sauerkraut, you might want to add some extra tahini and a squeeze of lemon to amp up the flavour. You can skip the egg as well to make it an entirely vegan dish (in that case, you also might want to add some extra tahini). On another matter, we are sorry that we have been so immensely slow at updating lately. We do however have two pretty exciting new posts lined up for you soon. Look here and here for clues. The Hippie Bowl Serves 2 1/­­2 cup uncooked quinoa (any color works), rinsed 2 carrots 4 radishes 1/­­2 fennel bulb 2 avocados, stone removed 2 small kale leaves, stems removed 1 handful mixed baby lettuce 2 tsp olive oil 2 tsp lemon juice 1 pinch sea salt and black pepper 2 tbsp tahini (sesame paste) 4 tbsp golden sauerkraut (see recipe here) 2 fried eggs 2 tsp hemp seeds Cooking the quinoa: Place rinsed quinoa, 1 cup water and a pinch of salt in a medium-size saucepan. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a bare simmer and let gently cook for about 15 minutes, or until you see small tails on the quinoa seeds. Set aside to cool in a large mixing bowl. Making the salad: Slice the carrots and the radishes. Slice the fennel very finely. Cut the avocados into small cubes. Remove stems from the kale and chop. Place all prepared ingredients, including the mixed baby lettuce, into the quinoa bowl. Drizzle with olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper and give it a good toss with your hands. Divide the salad in two bowls, drizzle each bowl with a generous tablespoon tahini and a couple of tablespoons sauerkraut. Finely top with a fried egg in each bowl and sprinkle with hemp seeds. Serve immediately.

Mocha & Black Bean Mousse Cake

May 27 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Mocha & Black Bean Mousse Cake It’s Wednesday lunch as I’m writing this text and I am fully aware that this probably is an exceptionally badly timed blog post. Being right in the middle of the week, you probably have your work jive going strong and a chocolate cake in your web browser stands the risk of messing all that up. So, instead of scrolling down to see the rest of the images and read this interesting little recipe, we simply suggest that you stop reading right away and close this window. Because if you continue, we plan to tell you that the filling is made from black beans and that might really get you out of focus. There is a risk that you will start thinking about what the beans does to the texture and how they affect the flavour. Well, since you obviously already are thinking about it: The texture is very smooth and creamy, and you can’t really taste the flavour of the beans at all. Instead this cake tastes of coffee. As it turns out, coffee, black beans and chocolate is an unexpectedly terrific combo. The cake can be served frozen, like an ice cream cake. Or thawed, as a creamy mousse cake.  I prefer eating it while it’s quite firm but Luise likes it to be more creamy and have that lush mousse consistency. Come to think of it, this must be one of the easiest cakes in our repertoire. It’s entirely vegan and gluten free, the ingredient list is conveniently short and you can throw everything together in more or less 15 minutes. Although it needs about two hours in the freezer before it can be devoured. Normally, I am the one making most of our desserts but this cake is entirely Luise’s creation. She didn’t even tell me about it at first, just went: “I’ve got a little cake in the freezer in case you want to take some photos of it”. So I did. And then we ate it. We got the inspiration for the drizzled chocolate decoration from one of Linda Lomelino’s beautiful cakes. We have made this cake twice since that first time and I suspect that we will be making it a few times more this summer. You should really try it. It’s different and it’s damn delicious. And if you would like to trick your kids or partner to eat more legumes, this is probably your best chance ever. A few things to consider before trying this recipe: o This recipe is perfect for an 8 inch /­ 20 cm springform pan, if yours is bigger we recommend increasing the measurements, or the cake will be too thin. o As usual with our desserts, this is not overly sweet but more balanced in flavour. If you know that you have a sweet tooth, go ahead and add a few more dates to the filling. o If you don’t like coffee, you can substitute it with 1/­4 cup of plant milk. Or nut butter, which also could be an interesting flavouring idea for the filling, it would probably taste fantastic together with chocolate and black beans. Mocha & Black Bean Mousse Cake Serves 8 Crust 1 cup /­ 125 g hazelnut 10 fresh and soft dates (100 g /­ 3,5 oz), pitted 3 tbsp cacao powder 1 tbsp coconut oil 1 pinch sea salt Filling 1 1/­2 cups /­ 200 g cooked black beans (equivalent to 1 can drained and rinsed beans) 5 dates, pitted 1 tbsp coconut oil 2 shots /­ 1/­4 cup /­ 60 ml strong coffee 1/­3 cup /­ 80 ml plant milk of choice (like rice, oat, soy or almond milk) 3,5 oz/­ 100 g dark chocolate (70%) Toppings 1/­2 cup /­ 65 g toasted hazelnuts 50 g /­ 2 oz melted dark chocolate Start by making the crust. Place hazelnuts in a food processor and pulse a few times until they have a pebbled texture. Add the rest of the ingredients and mix until everything is combined. Line the bottom of a 8 inch /­ 20 cm spring pan with parchment paper and pour the date and hazlenut mixture into it. Use your hands to firmly press down the mixture evenly. Place the spring pan in the freezer and continue on with the filling. Add beans, dates, coconut oil and coffee to the food processor an pulse on high speed for about a minute. Place a small sauce pan on low/­medium heat. Add the milk. Break up the chocolate into smaller pieces and add to the milk. Use a spatula to stir around and take the sauce pan off the heat just as the chocolate starts melting. Keep on stirring until you have a smooth and thick chocolate mixture. Add the melted chocolate to the food processor and mix until you have a smooth chocolate filling. Pour the filling into the spring pan on top of the crust and place it back in the freezer for 2-3 hours. You can also leave it in the freezer for weeks, just make sure to thaw the cake for at least 30 mins if it is deep-frozen. Decorate the cake before serving. You can either just use a lot of berries, or as we have done here, drizzle with melted chocolate and toasted hazelnuts. You can store the cake in the fridge for a few hours if you prefer it to be creamier, just remember to remove the sides of the springform pan while it is still frozen. Enjoy!

Golden Sauerkraut – Wild Fermentation

May 4 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Golden Sauerkraut – Wild Fermentation Before we start this post, we wanted to introduce a new little feature here on the blog. We call it Homemade Whole Food Staples. Unknowingly, we actually already started it a few weeks ago, with our post about homemade nut butter. A lot of you told us that this was the first time you’ve made nut butter at home, so we realised that this could be a good opportunity for us (and you) to learn more about classic methods, recipes and pantry staples that are popular in whole food kitchens. It’s nothing wrong to cut some corners and buy jars and cans of staples from the store, but if you want to save some money, learn what really is in those jars and get a better hum about the kitchen basics, you might find this new feature interesting. Our hope is that we can show how recipes that many find too intimidating to try at home, really isn’t complicated at all. We are discussing sharing how to make your own vegetable stock, the ultimate pomodoro passata, mastering a sourdough and how to make homemade coconut yogurt. But we are also really interested to hear what you want us to try/­­share. Leave us a comment and let us know if there is something specific that you are curious to learn more about. Today we are talking fermented vegetables. It’s one of the healthiest thing you can eat but the whole idea of food that needs 3 weeks before its ready, scares most people from even trying to prepare it. Right? But please folks, stay with us on this one. Not only are fermented/­­cultured vegetables on most top-lists of trendy food 2015, but a large spoonful of homemade Sauerkraut is also TRULY delicious on top of a salad or inside a sandwich. Furthermore, the natural occurring probiotics in fermented food are great for your stomach and body. The whole 3-weeks-to-prepare-issue is more like 20 minutes of active work and then 3 weeks of waiting. Best of all, we are going to show you the most natural way of doing it, without any starters at all. It’s called wild fermentation, only 2 ingredients are needed and the method has been around for hundreds of years. But you can also add a bunch of different flavourings to it, like caraway seeds, ginger, garlic, beetroot, chilli, fennel or turmeric. Does this project still sound impossible? Here in Scandinavia, we have quite the tradition of pickling, preserving and fermenting. But weirdly enough, Luise’s and my interest for fermented vegetables actually sparked during our recent trip to Australia. Almost all the cafes we frequented had at least one salad or bowl that was topped with fermented vegetables or sauerkraut. And the health food stores there have whole isles with different brands of organic raw fermented/­­cultured vegetables. It didn’t take long until we were hooked. The flavours were just so fresh and the acidity added a real kick to whatever we paired it with. And in a strike of unbelievable luck, we met Vivianne on our potluck picnic in Sydney, she is one of the founders of Raw Sisterhood, a Bondi based company that makes incredibly tasty fermented vegetables, raw crackers and raw granola. She promised to teach us some of their secrets and now we get to share one of their recipes here. We made the first batch together in her house and we have continued making it now when we are home. They call this version Golden Goodness and it’s basically wild fermented cabbage and carrots flavoured with turmeric and garlic Before we get on to the recipe, we wanted to let Brenda and Viv from Raw Sisterhood explain the magic behind Wild Fermentation and healthy bacterias: Why wild fermentation: Wild fermentation is a natural process in which we provide the perfect environment for nature to do its thing, so no starter is needed.  All fresh fruits and vegetables contain enzymes and bacteria (lacto bacilli) which allows them to break down (ripen). As fruits and veggies ripen they go through an enzymatic process, essentially they digest themselves.  When foods go off or rot, they have been exposed to oxygen. In a wild ferment, we allow the vegetables to digest themselves, in an oxygen free environment.  The lacto bacilli in the vegetables, eats the naturally occurring sugars and then produces lactic acid and more lacto bacilli....and the cycle continues.  Why eat healthy bacteria: Lactic acids can kill many strains of parasite and many other pathogens in the body purifying the intestines. Fermented veggies increase the healthy flora in the intestinal tract by creating the type of environment for them to flourish in. Increases nutrient values in the vegetables especially vitamin C. The high fiber content in cultured vegetables help to clean the digestive system, removing undigested food and unwanted toxins. Fermented foods also facilitate the break down and assimilation of proteins. Golden Sauerkraut - Wild Fermented Cabbage, Carrot & Turmeric Makes about 2 huge jars. You can easily half this recipe if you prefer. Be sure to sterilise your jars before your start. 2 green cabbages (3 kg) Save some of the outer layers of the cabbage for packaging on the top 800 g /­­ 7 cups carrots (6 medium size carrots) or beetroot 15 g /­­ 1,5 tbsp grated ginger 15 g /­­ 1,5 tbsp minced garlic 15 g /­­ 1 tbsp fresh grated turmeric (optional) 30 g /­­ 3 tbsp ground turmeric 5 g /­­ 1 tbsp caraway seeds 5 g /­­ 1 tbsp fennel seeds 2 tbsp /­­ 30 g himalayan sea salt (optional, you can do it without salt, but it speeds up the process) Wash the cabbage and scrub the carrots, then finely slice the cabbage and grate the carrots. Or use a food processor with a fine slicer attachment for the cabbage and rough grating attachment for the carrots. Place all ingredients in large mixing bowl. Use your hands (you might want to wear rubber gloves to prevent your hands to get stained by the turmeric) to mix and massage until it starts to get soft and juicy. The vegetables should release quite a lot of juice, if not, just add some more salt. Use a spoon or a tong to spoon the mixture into 2 large clean jars. Pack it really tight to leave out all air, keep packing until the jar is full of veggies and the veggies are covered in juice (important). Leave some space at the top to place a whole folded cabbage leave on top, this is to prevent any oxidation. Close with an air-tight lid. During the fermentation process the veggies will expand and the liquid will try to come out, we put our jars in a bowl or a plastic bag for any juice that might drip from the sides. Leave the jars to ferment in room temperature for 2-4 weeks (depending on room temperature), 3 weeks is usually perfect. When ready, it should be softly textured but not mushy and have a fresh, spicy and acidic flavour. Discard the cabbage leave at the top and store the jars in the fridge. We usually divide the fermented vegetables in smaller jars and hand out to friends and family or keep it in the fridge. Tip: o If your veggies are stinky and leaky, then place the jars in a bowl and place everything in a plastic bag and close it. Then place in a cupboard and drain the water after about 3 days. o If the top is discolored or has a bit mould, dont be alarmed just remove it and wipe around or just change the jars. o Use organic vegetables for fermenting and dont wash or scrub to much, it can destroy the natural enzymes on the vegetables.

Nut, Quinoa & Chocolate Bars

April 1 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Nut, Quinoa & Chocolate Bars This recipe picks up where our last post ended - it’s another great way to use nut butter. These bars are very simple and tastes just amazing: rich, chewy, crunchy, sweet and salty. Some of our friends called it a grown-up snickers bar although it’s a lot more energy packed and only made with a few good ingredients. It’s a great little dessert but also perfect as a post-workout snack. But before we jump to the recipe, there is another exciting thing we wanted to share. Apparently we’re one of the finalists in Saveur Blog Awards, in the category best use of video! We are so honoured to be included in this specific category since we still feel like rookies in the recipe video department. It’s so much fun to experiment with videos but we have also felt a bit trembling and unsure about the whole thing. So this truly made us happy! There are loads of new talents to explore so you should definitely head over to the saveur.com/­­blogawards to have a look. If you feel like casting a vote for us or any of the other finalists you just need to log in or register first. Thank you! To celebrate the nomination, we have created this little recipe video for the bars. Elsa is really in to ballet at the moment so she helped pick the music. If you like this video and would like to explore all our other, check out our youtube page: youtube.com/­­greenkitchenstories About this recipe. It’s decadent but energising, rich but still with a fresh punch from the ginger.  You can use any nut butter, we have tried it with various sorts and it seems to taste great regardless of sort. Our favourite is a mix of cashew, sunflower seeds and almonds. If you are allergic to nuts, we recommend using pure sunflower seed butter and skip the almonds in the recipe. Puffed/­­popped quinoa can be found in health food stores. We haven’t tried making it ourselves but would love to hear if any of you have tried it. You can replace the puffed quinoa with regular rolled oats or more nuts and seeds. Nut, Quinoa & Chocolate Bars Makes around 18 bars 2 tbsp cold-pressed coconut oil 10 fresh soft dates, pitted 1 cup /­­ 250 ml /­­ 250 g nut butter (see recipe in this post) 1 tbsp fresh ginger, grated 1/­­2 cup /­­ 80 g raw pumpkin seeds/­­pepitas 1 cup /­­ 80 g puffed quinoa a handful raw almonds, coarsely chopped a pinch sea salt flakes, optional 3,5 oz /­­ 100 g dark chocolate (70%) 1/­­3 cup desiccated coconut (unsweetened) Melt coconut oil in a medium size sauce pan on low/­­medium heat. Mash the pitted dates with a fork and add to the sauce pan together with the nut butter and freshly grated ginger. Stir around until it all comes together and cook for just a few minutes on low heat. Remove from the heat. Add pumpkin seeds, puffed quinoa and chopped almonds. Taste and add salt if needed (depending on how salty the nut butter is). Line an 8 x 10 inch /­­ 15 x 20 cm baking dish with parchment paper and scoop the batter into it. Use the palm of your hands to press everything together tightly into an even rectangle, roughly 2/­­3 inch /­­ 2 cm high. Put in the fridge or freezer while melting the chocolate on a double boiler /­­ water bath. Pour the melted chocolate over the bars and use a spatula to distribute it evenly. Sprinkle with desiccated coconut and put back into the fridge or freezer until cold and firm. You can store the bars in the freezer and they will last for months or in the fridge if you plan on eating them within a few days. We prefer having them in the freezer and eating them just slightly thawed but still chilled.

The No-Recipe Curry

March 16 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

The No-Recipe Curry Like all families, we have a few favourite dishes that we return to for dinner a couple of times each month. Our spinach crepes are on regular rotation. So are variations of this beetroot and vegetable salad, these quinoa patties and this carrot and red lentil soup. They are simple comforting recipes that we all love and almost always have the available ingredients for. I guess we could call them our family’s recipe staples. Another dish that has made it into our recipe staple list during the last year is this no-recipe curry. Not only have we been cooking it in our own kitchen, but also in kitchens in Melbourne, Sydney and on the tiny stow top kitchen in our camper van on New Zealand. A rather well-travelled dish.  I suppose it’s not our most brilliantly unique recipe (if you think of the quadrillion curry recipes available), but it is something we really love to cook and eat, so we figured that you would too. This simple curry/­­stew has a base of onion, garlic, ginger (heaps!) and turmeric, then we add whatever vegetables we have within reach, fill up with coconut milk and add some tofu. And right when it’s done cooking, we always add fresh spinach that we stir into it and let it quickly wilt down without loosing it’s sturdiness. The result is a sweet and creamy dish, with lots of  vegetables and a punch of ginger and garlic. It’s a very likeable dish and easy to adapt to whatever flavors you like. Elsa prefers it without chili but that would of course be a good addition if you like it spicy. We always make huge batches of this so we have lunch or dinner sorted for another day. It keeps well in the fridge and the flavours will develop even further. We call it no-recipe curry because we improvise it a bit every time. We are however giving you a specific recipe for it today. Our hope is that you will try it, tweak it and make it your own recipe staple. We would love to hear about your recipe staples. What recipes do you always return to? Perhaps we can learn a new on from you? Sweet Potato, Ginger, Spinach & Tofu Curry Serves 6 As I have mentioned above, there are plenty of ways to tweak this recipe. Feel free to add mustard seeds, ground coriander, curry leaves or chilli if you have it on hand. Replace any of the vegetables with whatever is in season - pumpkin, zucchini, tomatoes or aubergine will all fit right in. 2 tbsp coconut oil or butter 1 yellow onion 3 cloves garlic 1 large chunk (at least 2 inches /­­ 5 cm) fresh ginger root 1 tbsp ground turmeric or fresh, grated 1/­­2 tsp ground cumin (optional) 1 tsp salt 1 large sweet potato (approx 500 g /­­ 1 pound) 1 broccoli 1 cauliflower 2 cans (800 ml) coconut milk (or half water if you want it lighter) 200 g tofu, drained and cut into 1 inch /­­ 2,5 cm cubes 2 large handfuls fresh spinach 1/­­2 lime, juice Serve with fresh coriander/­­cilantro a sprinkle of nigella seeds (optional) a large handful cashew nuts, pan roasted 2 cups cooked quinoa Add coconut oil to a large sauce pan on medium heat. Peel and finely chop onion, garlic and ginger and add to the pan together with turmeric and cumin. Stir and cook for a few minutes until the onion is soft. Meanwhile, peel and cut the sweet potato in 1 inch /­­ 2,5 cm cubes. Add the sweet potato to the pan and let sauté for a few minutes. Stir around every now and then to make sure nothing is burnt. You can add a splash of water or more oil if the spices stick to the bottom of the pan. Cut broccoli and cauliflower into florets and add to the pan together with the coconut milk and tofu. Cook until the sweet potato cubes are soft and tender (about 15 minutes). Remove from the heat, add spinach and a squeeze of lime and stir around. Taste and add more salt and spices if needed. Serve in bowls with cooked quinoa (or rice), cashew nuts, nigella seeds and some fresh coriander.

Passionfruit & Coconut Macaroons

February 18 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Passionfruit & Coconut Macaroons I made these for Luise and Elsa on Valentine’s day with the intention of sharing the recipe here on the same day. I planned to call them Passionate Macaroons. But then I realised that I didn’t want to spend Valentine’s evening in front of a computer. So here they are, a few days late but just as good. Me and coconut macaroons go way back. Along with sticky chocolate cake, this was a treat that was easy enough for me to bake as a kid. So I did. Many times. And since then, I have been following more or less the same recipe, it’s so simple, quick, and delicious that I never found a reason to divert from it. That was until a few weeks ago. We were preparing our breakfast event at Little Bird Organics in Auckland when they handed us a bag of their passionfruit & macadamia macaroons that kind of blew my mind. Pairing passionfruit with coconut is just brilliant and it adds a new dimension to this classic cookie. I have borrowed their idea in my own version. The result is a very tropical, sweet and just slightly tart flavour mixed with all the richness that comes from coconut. This was also my first successful attempt at making them vegan without using an egg white as binder. Instead I use coconut milk, honey (or yacon syrup or maple syrup) and almond flour. They hold together well once they have cooled down but might be a little crumbly straight from the oven. Just pop them in the fridge if you want them firmer. You can replace the almond flour with almost any flour of choice, or cacao powder for a tropical chocolate version. Passionfruit & Coconut Macaroons (vegan + gluten-free) Makes 12 Depending on your preference and the sweetness of the passion fruits you might want adjust the honey accordingly before baking. We find this ratio to be just perfect for us. Vegans that don’t want to use honey can of course use one of the other sweeteners listed. We have tried this recipe with different versions of sweeteners and they all turn out good. 2 tbsp cold-pressed coconut oil (or just extra coconut milk) 1/­­2 cup full-fat coconut milk 1/­­3 cup raw honey (or yacon syrup or maple) 1/­­2 vanilla pod, seeds scraped or 1/­­2 tsp ground vanilla powder 2 cups desiccated coconut, unsweetened 3 tbsp almond meal/­­flour (or other flour if nut allergic) 1/­­3 tsp sea salt 3 passion fruits 1 lime, juice 50 g /­­ 2 oz dark 70% chocolate, for drizzling (optional) Preheat your oven to 350°F /­­ 180°C. Add coconut oil, coconut milk, honey and vanilla to a saucepan on medium heat and bring to a slow simmer. Add the desiccated coconut, almond flour and salt, stir and let it all come together into a sticky mess. Remove the pan from the heat, add passionfruit and lime juice and give it a good stir. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Use a large tablespoon, ice cream scoop or your hands to form the mixture into balls (about the size of a golf ball) with a flat bottom. Place them on the baking paper and bake for about 12 minutes in the oven. Let cool slightly before serving or start making the chocolate drizzle: Pop them in the fridge while melting the chocolate in a water bath. Take out the tray form the fridge, dip a teaspoon in the melted chocolate and drizzle back and forth over the macaroons. Repeat until you are happy with the amount of chocolate. Store in fridge, lasts for at least 5 days but will probably be gone within 24 hours.

Frittata Two Ways + New Zealand

February 8 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Frittata Two Ways + New Zealand After a month of winding roads, lush mountains, unbelievably turquoise lakes and sheep covered hills we are now in Melbourne. Our little campervan adventure on New Zealand sure was pretty unreal. We had the most beautiful and magical nature experiences combined with all the crazy shit that happens when you cram two adults, a 4-year old and a baby inside a minivan (why didn’t anyone warn us that there is no storage space in those vans…). But it was all fun! And right there, in between two car seats, a bag of dirty laundry, a floor covered in spilled out chia seeds and a fire larm that constantly was playing tricks on us, this happened! (PS. forget everything I might have said previously about getting married.) We also had two breakfast events at Little Bird Organics in  Auckland. We had so much fun, thank you to everyone that came! One of our favourite things with the trip was to stop at the small farm shops with honesty boxes along the road and pick up homegrown boysenberries, vegetables, manuka honey and eggs. It was really fun and challenging to cook in our mini campervan kitchen. We basically only had one frying pan, one pot, one mixing bowl and a knife. Most mornings and evenings on the south island were pretty cold so we started the day with warm oat porridge and ended it with warm turmeric milk and star watching. On our dinner repertoire was improvised curries, farmer’s frittatas, bean & quinoa salads and simple rye bread sandwiches. This is a little video we did on the road. We cooked a frittata only using produce that we got from the local farmers. Even the sheep’s feta cheese was handmade by one of the farmers. Click here to read the full recipe on our youtube channel. We are in such a good mood today that we wanted to give you two recipes for the price of one! So we are also sharing our Root & Spinach Frittata Muffins here below. These frittata muffins are pretty useful and really uncomplicated to make. You just fill up muffin cups with whatever vegetables and cheese you prefer, top them with beaten eggs and bake. Here we have made them using roasted roots, got’s cheese and spinach. Sure, it’s an extra step to roast the roots but it is definitely worth it, as they add a delicately sweet flavour and nice texture. The proportions in these frittatas are heavy on the vegetables because that is how we roll. If you are in a rush you can also just add some raw tomatoes, spinach and broccoli instead of the roots. Root & Spinach Frittata Muffins makes 12 muffins We usually don’t measure any exact amounts when we roast roots. Just fill two baking sheets with diced roots and if you are lucky to get any leftovers, use them in a salad or on top of a sandwich. Next time I might also try adding a spoonful of mustard to the egg mixture, as it usually goes really well with roots. 1 small/­­medium sweet potato 4 small parsnips (350 g) 1/­­2 small butternut pumpkin 1-2 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil or coconut oil 10 free-range eggs 3 sage leaves, finely chopped (+ more for garnish) 100 g goats cheese, crumbled 6 large spinach leaves, torn in pieces sea salt and black pepper Preheat the oven to 175°C/­­350°F. Wash and peel all the vegetables, cut into cubes and place on a baking tray. Drizzle with oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Toss to cover. Roast in the the oven for about 15-20 minutes or until tender. Meanwhile, prepare the egg mixture. Remove the vegetables from the oven when done and leave the oven on. Line a muffin pan with paper liners or grease the pan with olive oil or coconut oil. Divide the roasted roots, spinach and cheese into each of the muffin tins. Pour over the egg mixture, let it sit for a minute to let the egg work its way into the tin. Brush a few sage leaves with a little oil and garnish each muffins with one leave. Bake in the oven for 15-18 minutes or until the egg mixture is just set. Ready to serve. ******************* PS. We are having a few events in Melbourne and we’d love to see you there. 1. We will be selling and signing books at Pressed Juices in South Yarra on 14 Feb between 12-2 pm. This is a free event so you can just show up, have a cold-pressed juice and a chat with us. 2. We are also doing a similar cooking event as we did in Auckland. This time we are having it at the the awesome cafe Combi in Elwood on 23 & 24 Feb between 6.30-8.30 pm (same event on both days). We will talk about our approach to food and demonstrate six new and exclusive (and delicious!) breakfast recipes. There will be lots of tasting, handouts, Q&A time and information about the ingredients, as well as a delicious goodie bag filled with some of the finished recipes for you to enjoy at home.  Click here to get your tickets!

Beet, Apple, Quinoa & Sprout Salad

January 1 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Beet, Apple, Quinoa & Sprout SaladHey, happy new year everyone! Today we are excited to share this little project that we have been working on. It’s a whole bunch of new recipes including the delicious salad on the photo above. Before we tell you more about the recipes, let us just quickly share some thoughts behind them. Most people want to start the year by eating fresh, right. But getting a healthy start of the year doesnt mean that you have to go through a full detox. Sure, it can be great if you really feel like you need a complete cleanse, but we believe that it is even more important to focus on eating balanced throughout the year and then just increasing your intake of health boosting ingredients after the holiday season. When you live up in the northern parts of the world, the thought of restricting yourself to only drinking juices and eating raw meals during the coldest season of the year can seem quite difficult for most people. So we have created a recipe pack for our Green Kitchen app with 14 new and exclusive recipes that focuses on health and getting a fresh start of the year without having to feel like you are on a strict diet. We have worked with nourishing combinations of ingredients that are good for your body and taste delicious. Our recipes are not focused on being low fat or counting calories, we instead encourage healthy fats, complex carbohydrates and plant based proteins that your body needs. There are juices, smoothies, sides and salads in there, but also some warm meals and a soup. All recipes are gluten free and vegetarian and most of them are vegan or have vegan options. Here is a little preview of all the recipes. We have put a lot of love, time and effort into developing and testing these recipes, so we decided to sell them inside the app. If you have the app, there should be a new box with more info at the top of the grid. The price is $1.99 but we are giving it away for only 99 cents now during the first 24 hours of the new year. We always get the question about creating an Android version and the answer is that we are planning on doing it, but it’s just a different world to Apple nerds like us. So we keep pushing it forward. We are so sorry that it’s taking such time. We have however come up with a temporary solution for those of you that don’t have an ipad or iphone but still would like to try these particular recipes. We have gathered them in a mini recipe e-book that is available to purchase here in our temporary e-store.  To give you a preview, we are also sharing one of the recipes here today. It’s a beet, apple & quinoa salad that we have made perhaps a quadrillion times throughout the years, but for some strange reason it hasn’t made its appearance here until now. Beets and apples are shredded raw and they add both flavour, texture and sweetness to the quinoa. The beets also give the quinoa a beautiful red purple colour. It’s quick, simple and very easy to vary. You could add some tofu, tempeh or roasted vegetables to the salad if you want it even more nourishing. Have a happy, healthy and delicious 2015! Beet, Apple, Quinoa & Sprout Salad Serves 4 1 cup /­­ 190 g /­­ 250 ml uncooked quinoa (preferably soaked) 2 cups /­­ 500 ml water 4 raw beetroots 2 apples 1 handful lettuce, rinsed 2 tbsp olive oil 2 tbsp lemon juice salt black pepper Serve with 1 handful mixed sprouts a few dollops labneh or CashewCheese” (both recipes are included in the bundle) 1 small handful almonds or sunflower seeds, coarsely chopped Cooking the quinoa: Place rinsed quinoa, water and a pinch of salt in a medium-size saucepan. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a bare simmer and let gently cook for about 15 minutes, or until you see small tails on the quinoa seeds. Set aside to cool in a large mixing bowl. Making the salad: Peel and grate the beetroots and the apples on the coarse side of a box grater. Combine lettuce, quinoa, beetroots and apples in a bowl. Drizzle with olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper and give it a good toss with your hands. Serve in bowls with sprouts and a dollop of labneh or cashew cheese.

Orange & Ginger Chocolate Truffles

December 20 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Orange & Ginger Chocolate TrufflesOne of the last things we made before leaving for Australia was cleaning out our pantry and fridge. We found a bag of cacao butter that needed to be used, so these happened. We do truffles quite often at home, but most often it’s different versions of our date & chocolate truffles. As a Christmas treat, this cacao butter version is more decadent and creamier. They are the kind of truffles that smudge your teeth when you bite them and has chocolate, orange and ginger flavours that lingers on your tongue for quite a while. Wrap them in a jar and give them away as a last minute Christmas gift. Just make sure to save a few for yourself. Cacao butter is pure oil from the cacao bean and has a delicate chocolate aroma. It usually comes in a solid chunk or bar. Cacao butter consists of healthy fats including the essential omega fatty acids and is high in antioxidants. It melts on low temperature and is therefore great for raw food desserts and homemade chocolate. Try also adding it to smoothies, ice cream or rub it on your skin as a moisturiser. Another little project that we worked on before we left was this Natural Apotechary poster that we have created together with Swedish designers Dry Things. Luise has listed healthy ingredients from A to Z and explains a bit about why they are good for you. It’s 50×70 cm (19,5×27,5 inches) large. All their posters are made with the highest quality and printed on beautiful paper. It’s available in Dry Things cute little shop in Stockholm and in their webshop. We are working on a recipe and a post about our time here in Australia. In short, we are having a wonderful wonderful time. Best thing about the trip is that we get to spend all our days with these two monkeys! You can follow us on Instagram if you want to see more photos from our trip (David | Luise). Cacao Butter Truffles with Orange & Ginger 15-20 truffles 4 tbsp raw cacao butter (break off small pieces) 3 tbsp raw coconut oil 4 tbsp raw honey 3/­­4 cup /­­ 60 g cacao powder + more for rolling 4 tbsp orange juice 1 tbsp fresh grated ginger (or less if you prefer it milder) 1/­­2 tsp flaky sea salt Heat water in a small saucepan, place a heatproof bowl on top. Measure out all ingredients. Melt the cacao butter over a water bath, while stirring. Remove from heat, add coconut oil and honey and whisk until well combined. Add cacao powder, orange juice and sea salt and whisk until thick and smooth, for about 30 seconds to a minute. Place in the fridge to cool and set for 10 minutes. Then form 15 - 20 small round truffles with your hands; they should be half the size of a golf ball. Roll the truffles in cacao powder and store in the fridge. PS. If you are in Sydney you are welcome to meet up with us on a picnic tomorrow (Sunday). It’s very last minute and completely chillaxed. We just thought it could be fun to meet up with like-minded. We’ll be in beautiful Nielsen Park from 3.30 pm. Bring food and drinks and we can all share a bit with each other.

Spiced Parsnip Cake

December 9 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Spiced Parsnip Cake The first time I heard about parsnip cake was only a month ago. I did a photo job for a Swedish bakery and they wanted a photo of a parsnip cake as it, apparently, is a classic Swedish dessert. I have lived in Sweden my entire life and baked countless amounts of cakes but never encountered it before, so I am not sure I would go as far as calling it a classic myself. It is however wildly delicious and a very pleasant way to incorporate more vegetables in your life. To be honest, the parsnip cake is quite similar to a carrot cake but the parsnips add some delightfully unique tones along with the traditionally sweet flavour and moist consistency. Since Christmas is coming up, we spiced up the cake with warm tones like ginger, cinnamon and clove that go perfectly with the flavour from the roots. It might not be the most traditional Christmas cake on the table but I am quite certain that Santa won’t mind. It is topped with orange flavoured quark cheese or cream cheese, orange zest and roasted hazelnuts. If you can’t find quark, you can make a sweet quick version of labneh instead by mixing 2 cups greek yogurt with 1-2 tbsp maple syrup and some orange juice and strain it in cheese cloth for a few hours until it is firm enough to spread on a cake. This cake was included in the Christmas update of our Green Kitchen app. If you already have the app, you can just hit update to get the Christmas recipes without any extra cost. And while we are talking about the app, we just found out that it once again was selected for the AppStore Best of 2014 in Scandinavia and Germany. So exciting! And we got loads of new and exciting stuff lined up for it next year! Spiced Parsnip Cake Serves 8 If you dont want to make the cake gluten free, you can replace the oat flour, rice flour and arrowroot with 1 3/­­4 cups /­­ 200 g spelt flour. 3/­­4 cup (120 g) rice flour 1 cup (90 g) oat flour 2 tbsp arrow root powder or potato starch 2 tsp baking powder 1 tsp cinnamon 1/­­2 tsp vanilla powder 1/­­2 tsp ground ginger 1 pinch clove 1 pinch salt 225 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb (3 small/­­medium) parsnips 1 orange, zest 4 eggs 3/­­4 cup /­­ 160 ml honey or maple syrup 3/­­4 cup /­­ 160 ml rapeseed oil Topping 7 oz /­­ 200 g quark/­­curd or cream cheese (or unsalted labneh) 1 tbsp maple syrup or honey 1 orange, juice and zest 1 cup /­­ 125 g roasted hazelnuts, roughly chopped Preheat the oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. Line the sides and base of a 20-22 cm /­­ 8-9 inches springform tin with parchment paper. Sift together the flours, arrowroot, baking powder and spices. Peel and grate the parsnips (you can keep the peel on if you use organic) and zest the orange. Beat the eggs in a large bowl until frothy. Add the oil and maple syrup and beat for another minute. Stir in the parsnip and orange zest and then fold in the flours. Pour the mixture into the prepared springform tin. Bake on the middle shelf of the oven for about 45 minutes, or until golden and an inserted skewer comes out clean. Leave to cool before before removing it from the springform tin. Make the icing by simply stirring together quark or cream cheese with maple syrup and orange juice. Spread the icing over the cake when it has cooled completely. Garnish with roasted hazelnuts and orange zest. If you are making it ahead; store the cake in the fridge and add icing and topping just before serving. PS! We just heard that our book got a glowing review and was listed as one of the top cookbooks 2014 on BBC Radio 4. You can listen to the broadcast here (about 6.30 min into the show). It is still not too late to order Green Kitchen Travels as Christmas present *wink wink*. Here is a list of webshops that are selling it.

Sea Salt & Dark Chocolate Popcorn

November 30 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Sea Salt & Dark Chocolate Popcorn Our “To-do in November List” was four pages long. It was a list of highs and lows. Here are a few subjects to give you a small insight in our month: o Cooking on a morning-tv show [high] o Working on new recipes for an upcoming project (that we soon will share) [high] o Getting permission to rent out our apartment while we are gone [low - because of all the damn paper work, but high because we finally got the approval] o Releasing a Christmas update for our app (it will be out any day now) [high] o Getting new passports [low - we always manage to fill in something wrong on those damn forms] o Cleaning the bathroom sink [ultra low] o Finding some homeexhanges in Australia & NZ [high - we have found a few trades that will make it a bit less restraining on our budget]. o And about a 100 other things. But now we finally sit here in our half empty, cleaned apartment. All to-dos have been crossed off. Bags are packed. The kids are sleeping. And we are leaving for the airport in a few hours. We will be staying around Sydney in December. We’ll share mor of our plans as they are shaping up. This is almost too simple to call a recipe. But since popcorn + dark chocolate + sea salt is a damn good combo, that’s what we’re sharing today. Check out the video, make some popcorn and next time we’ll be writing from Australia. xo D&L Sea Salt & Dark Chocolate Popcorn Cold-pressed coconut oil or organic butter corn kernels (organic and GMO-free) 100 g /­­ 3,5 oz dark chocolate (80%) sea salt Place a large pot on medium high heat with enough oil to cover the bottom, be sure to keep the lid on the pot (you can tilt it slightly to let the moisture out. Drop a couple of kernels in, once they pop, you’re ready to add the rest and lower the heat to medium low. Add just enough to barely cover the bottom of the pot, put the lid on and wait until they begin to pop. You’ll be able to tell when it’s done when it’s about 5 seconds between each pop. Place the popcorn in a large bowl and immediately scatter the chopped dark chocolate over the warm popcorn and sprinkle with sea salt. Stir to combine. Ready to serve.

Hazelnut, Apple & Chocolate Buns

November 2 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Hazelnut, Apple & Chocolate Buns It sounds a bit goofy and I know it’s mainly a PR-stunt but we actually have an official Cinnamon Bun Day in Sweden, on the 4th of October. I don’t usually buy in to these things. All these Hug-a-Vegetarian-day/­Eat-a-salty-pretzel-day/­Jump-on-one-leg-with-a-blindfold-day … They are just awkward. But for some reason I found myself in the kitchen baking buns on the evening of the 3rd October. Let’s call it a coincidence. I wanted to bake a mash-up between a Swedish bun and the most amazing Hazelnut & Chocolate Babka that we tried in Tel Aviv earlier this year. So I started with the cardamom bun recipe from our first book, doubled the portions (I don’t bake buns often, so I want them to last), changed the proportions a bit and then added the most luscious filling I could think of: Mapled hazelnut butter, freshly ground cardamom, grated apples and dark chocolate. The combination was insane! The good kind of insane. I almost felt like Archimedes there for a while. I imagine that I screamed “Eureka!” as I ran naked into the living room to tell Luise about the flavours of the filling. Thinking back, I might not have screamed Eureka and I definitely wasn’t naked. But the filling was fantastic. And still is. Decadent, sweet, rich, whole grain buns with a fresh apple twist. They are good. You should try them. And you don’t need a fake-Cinnamon Bun Day to do so. Just a rainy autumn Sunday. It will take a few hours to bake buns but the reward is sweet. I didn’t finish until there was hardly any light outside, hence the dark and slightly blurry photos. We normally bake with spelt flours instead of all-purpose, but this time we were out of light spelt so I went with a nice, organic all-purpose flour that we had at home. I mixed it with some dark spelt to still give it a bit of a wholegrain touch. I must admit that result was clearly softer and better than when I use 100% spelt. But that is of course an option, if you prefer. Tying them into knots is the trickiest part. My mother makes the most perfect knots. I never manage to make them as pretty or regular shaped (as you can see from the photo below), but you can always call them rustic, so don’t worry too much about making them perfect. You can either cut them once or twice, I show both examples in the photo on the left. Cutting them twice makes more intricate knots and prettier buns, but they are also a bit more difficult to shape as they are so thin. If you don’t want to do knots, you can also roll the dough into a log, with the filling inside, and cut it into simple rolls.  Vegans can replace the butter with coconut oil and glaze the buns with plant milk instead of egg. I have never succeeded to make a gluten free version of buns as they need the gluten to hold together when they are tied into knots. If you make a good gluten free version, I’d love to hear your tricks. Hazelnut, Apple & Chocolate Buns Makes around 30 buns I have baked these using Swedish ingredients. Dried yeast and flours might be different depending on where you are from, so I recommend double checking the yeast vs flour amount to similar recipes in your own country just to make sure. 5 tsp fast-action dried yeast (or 50 g fresh yeast) 2 tsp cardamom seeds, freshly ground a pinch of sea salt 125 g /­ 4,5 oz unsalted butter 500 ml /­ 2 cups soy milk (or milk of your choice) 160 ml /­ 2/­3 cup clear honey or maple syrup 500 g /­4 cups organic all-purpose flour 250 g /­ 2 cups wholegrain  spelt flour Filling 180 g /­ 2/­3 cup hazelnut butter 4 tbsp maple syrup 2 large eating apples, grated, excess moisture squeezed out 1/­2 tbsp cardamom seeds, freshly ground 100 g /­ 3,5 oz dark chocolate (70-80%), grated 1 beaten egg, to glaze  A handful of hazelnuts, roughly chopped Stir the yeast, cardamom and salt in a large bowl and set aside. Melt the butter in a saucepan, add the milk and honey and heat until the temperature is about 40°C (100°F). Pour over the yeast and stir until dissolved. Sift the flours together and add about two-thirds of it to the yeast and milk mixture. Mix to a dough. Gradually knead in enough of the remaining flour just until soft and no longer sticky. Cover and leave to rise in a warm place for about an hour, or until double in bulk. While the dough is rising, mix together hazelnut butter and maple syrup for the filling. Divide the dough into two equal portions (unless you have a huge worktop, in which case you can roll the whole dough at once.). On a floured surface, roll and stretch the first dough to a rectangle, about 50 x 40 cm (20 x 16 in) wide and about 5 mm (1/­4 in) thick. Spread half of the hazelnut butter evenly across the dough and sprinkle half of the apple shreds, half of the cardamom and the chocolate. Carefully lift one third of the dough (closest to you) and fold it two-thirds of the way up, then fold down the top third. Now you should have a rectangle that is roughly 50 x 13 cm (20 x 5 in). Use a sharp knife to cut the dough into roughly 3 cm (11/­4 in) wide strips. Take each strip and carefully (so the filling doesnt fall out) stretch and twist them three times and tie into loose knot-shaped buns, with the ends tucked into the middle. Put on a baking tray lined with baking paper, cover with kitchen towel, and leave to rise for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, prepare the second dough the same way as the first. Pre-heat the oven to 220°C (425°F/­Gas 7). Brush the buns with a beaten egg, sprinkle with chopped nuts and bake for 10-12 minutes, until golden. Don’t forget to eat the first one fresh from the oven!

Chia & Raspberry Breakfast

October 14 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Chia & Raspberry Breakfast It has become more and more obvious to me that Luise and I have lived these last years inside the eye of a whirlwind. Life seems calm when we sit here in our Stockholm kitchen, but recipes, apps, emails, comments, books, raising a child, freelancing, workshops, photography and social media are spinning around us faster and faster every month. Our old professions and lives have been swept away and new things have come along. It has been unreal, in the best kind of way. All of a sudden we are working with our passion and with each other. We are constantly learning new things and have no idea how the next month will look like. It is everything I dreamed about but never dared to hope for. But living in a whirlwind also makes me dizzy. This pace. This flow of information. This constantly updating instagram-pinterest-email-life that we are so addicted to. It’s hard to find balance. Luise and I talk too much about food, answer emails too late at night and sometimes forget to just eat dinner because we are so busy discussing or shooting a recipe. I am sure we are not alone in this. The feeling that you want to be more present and not always watch your kids laugh through the lens of an iphone. The theoretical solution is easy. To work on the day and turn off our phones during evenings and weekends. But it is so hard to change our habits, so we have talked about also taking a physical step outside of the whirlwind for a little while. Our rough plan is to spend two months in Melbourne, Australia, and then drive around New Zealand in a campervan for a month. We plan on being together. Watch Isac grow. Teach Elsa some English. Watch kangaroos. Play and hug a lot. But we will most probably also blog from the road. Perhaps do a food video from a camp kitchen. We might even do some kind of cooking class or food photography workshop somewhere on the way. As long as we are spending more time with each other than with the computer. We are still not sure what we can afford or where we will end up, but we will probably be traveling from the beginning of December to the end of February. We would love to get some advices from you guys. You think we would like Melbourne more than Sydney? Great food, cafes or restaurants that we shouldn’t miss? Would anyone be interested in attending a workshop, if we arranged one in Sydney/­­Melbourne or New Zealand? Is the idea of driving around in a campervan with Isac when he is only five months old too crazy? All input is appreciated. Thank you friends! This recipe is a variation of a chia pudding with a flavorful raspberry twist. It’s a simple, satisfying and very delicious breakfast or mid-day snack. Or even dessert. You can prepare it a day in advance and keep it in the fridge. If you are not yet familiar with chia seeds, they are filled with protein, omega 3 fatty acid and calcium, have a very mild flavor and are incredible at binding liquids. They are therefore great as egg replacers in baking recipes and in desserts and breakfasts such as this. The only disadvantage is the price. They are rather expensive, but you don’t need so much each time so they last long. I almost forgot, here is a video from our youtube channel where Luise show how to make this recipe and tell you why she likes it so much. Berry & Chia Breakfast Serves 1 Feel free to play around with this recipe. You could replace the raspberries with other berries or mashed fruit and the milk with freshly squeezed juice. Or you could blend some dates with the milk and serve it as a dessert. Use whatever toppings you prefer. We do recommend including some kind of nut butter, it adds a nice balance to the sweet and tangy fruit flavors. 1 cup /­­ 125 g fresh or thawed frozen raspberries 1 pinch ground vanilla 3 tbsp desiccated coconut, unsweetened 3 tbsp chia seeds 1 cup /­­ 240 ml plant milk (we prefer almond, coconut or oat milk) Topping nut butter hemp seeds kiwi fresh mint Mash the berries in a bowl using a fork. Add vanilla, coconut and chia seeds and combine. Pour over the milk and mix. Set aside to soak for minimum 30 minutes or overnight in the fridge. Serve in a bowl or jar topped with nut butter, hemp seeds, fruit and mint.

The New Yoga Pot

September 28 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

The New Yoga Pot I am guessing that most of you don’t remember one of our earliest posts? It was back when Luise still was pregnant with Elsa. We shared a recipe for something that we called a yoga pot. It is the kind of warm and comforting stew that we typically make when cold weather hits our part of the world. It is also perfect pregnancy (and post-birth) food as it is easy to make double portions of and fill the freezer with. The week before Isac was born, we created and filmed a new version of that recipe originally intended for our youtube channel but now we also wanted to share it here. A few vegetables have been replaced and new flavors have been added, but the essence of this dish is the same. This is food that your whole body likes. Yoga bowl would perhaps be a more charming name, but we decided that it was more fun to stick with the old name. Have a look at the video, take a yoga class, cook the recipe, fill up your belly and then your freezer. We actually have another recipe for a savory crumble waiting around the corner, so check back with us soon. Oh, and if you for some reasons haven’t got the news already, Green Kitchen Travels is now also released in the States. You can order it here or ask for it at your local book store. The New Yoga Pot Serves 4-6 1 tbsp cold pressed coconut oil, ghee or olive oil 1 yellow onion, finely chopped 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 2 tbsp fresh ginger, finely chopped or 1 tsp ground 2 tbsp fresh turmeric, finely chopped or 1 tsp ground 1 pinch ground cayenne  pepper or more to taste 3,5 cups /­ 800 ml canned plum tomatoes 1/­2 cup /­ 125 ml uncooked red lentils, rinsed 2 cups /­ 500 ml water 1 tsp coarse sea salt 1 broccoli, cut into bite-size pieces 1 fennel, thinly sliced 1 zucchini, cut into bite-size pieces 1 handful green beans 1 cup /­ 400 ml cooked butter beans For serving fresh coriander/­cilantro, chopped plain yogurt Heat oil in a large saucepan and add chopped onion and garlic. Lower the heat and cook for a few minutes until the onions have softened. Add ginger, turmeric, cayenne and stir, ensuring that they do not burn. When the spices smell fragrant, add tomatoes, lentils, water and salt. Cover and simmer for 15 minutes. Stir in all the vegetables and cook for another 8-10 minutes. Add the cooked beans toward the end of the cooking time. Serve in bowls with a dollop of yogurt and fresh coriander/­cilantro. This dish can also be served with brown, black or red rice, if you prefer.

Green Kitchen Travels + Ribollita + Giveaway!

September 16 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Kitchen Travels + Ribollita + Giveaway! Our new book has finally been released in the UK and Australia! And already next week it will be available throughout the US. We really hope that you will find it an inspiring and helpful tool in the kitchen and also something beautiful that you want to keep in your home. And who knows, it might even trigger you to save up some money (actually, most of our travels have been done on very low budget) and bring the family or friends on your own travel adventures. To celebrate the occasion, we have created this book video. We filmed one half of the video in Marrakesh last winter and the rest quite recently with a little baby boy dangling on David’s shoulder while he was filming. So if you find the video shaky, Isac is to blame. Enjoy! Apart from all the recipes (more than 90 of them), we are also quite fond of the personal stories behind many of the recipes. Just like on this blog, the stories give the recipes extra flavour. You will find insights in our escapades that we haven’t shared on the blog before. Like the time in Sicily when we spent a night in a car to save money after a few too hefty restaurant bills. Or the look on David’s face when we visited a Californian Avocado farm and were told to watch out for the rattle snakes… The chapter about traveling with kids is also not to be missed. You can order the book within the UK from Waterstones (at the moment they have a ?5 discount) or Amazon.co.uk. In Australia from Booktopia. And in the US from Amazon.com. Or just pick up a copy from your local book seller. If you already have received the book and like it, please leave a review on the book sellers site. Thank you!!! *********** Giveaway! To make things extra fun, we are also giving away a signed copy of the book. The giveaway is open worldwide! Simply leave a comment with your name, where you are from and what your favorite cuisine from around the world is. We will pick one winner using random.org. The giveaway closes on Thursday at midnight and will be announced on Friday. *********** We are sharing one recipe from the book today. This rustic bread and bean soup sums up all the things I love about the italian way of cooking. Even if many italians themselves are very fashionable, with high heels, sunglasses and expensive clothes, their cooking is the opposite; simple, rustic and down to earth. They dont need any fancy accessories to cook up the most delicious and beautiful meals. A few good-quality vegetables, fresh herbs and beans are quickly turned into a warm and comforting soup. In Tuscany it is common to add some day-old bread and a few slices of Parmesan to it, but if you are vegan or gluten intolerant they can be left out. Zuppa di Ribollita 2 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil, plus extra for serving 1 onion, chopped 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 carrots, diced a pinch of dried chilli flakes 10 sage leaves a handful flat leaf parsley, leaves picked 1 tomato, diced 1 courgette (zucchini), halved lengthwise and sliced 300 g (101/­­2 oz) cavolo nero green kale or Savoy cabbage 100 g (3/­­1/­­2 oz/­­1/­­2 cup) dried cannellini beans, soaked and cooked (or a 400g/­­14 oz can, drained) about 1 litre (34 fl oz/­­4 cups) vegetable stock or water sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste To Serve 4 slices wholegrain sourdough bread, cubed or torn in pieces a piece of Parmesan cheese, shaved Heat the oil in a saucepan. Add the onion, garlic, carrots, chilli and sage and cook over a low heat for 20 minutes until softened but not browned. Add the parsley, tomato and courgette and cook for a couple of minutes. Add the cavolo nero and beans and cover with stock or water. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Season to taste. The soup should be the consistency of a thick stew with a little broth. Serve in bowls and arrange bread cubes, shaved Parmesan cheese and a drizzle of olive oil over each.

Carrot, Tomato & Coconut Soup

August 20 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Carrot, Tomato & Coconut Soup And just like that, we are a family of four. Little Isac is one week old tonight. Luise gave birth to him in our home. He was delivered under water and into the arms of the bravest, strongest and most beautiful mother I know. Isac is a cute and calm little fellow that spends his days grunting around on our chests, eating and then dozing away in sleep. We are spoiling him with hugs and kisses and eventually we will also spoil him with home cooked food that makes him a healthy and strong plant eater. Thank you so much for all your cheering comments on Instagram, we are so happy to feel your support and love. Take a look at this little bug. We could go on and on about him forever, but we also actually have a new recipe for you. It’s kind of tradition for us to create a new yellow/­­orange soup every year. We have done lentil soups, sweet potato soups, pumpkin soups and orange soup. Today we are sharing this warm, smooth and creamy carrot soup spiked with tomatoes and coconut milk and topped with a corn ceviche loosely inspired by one of Sprouted Kitchen’s recipes. The corn adds a really nice texture to the soup and a fresh twist in flavour. If you are looking for a recipe to start off autumn with, this soup is quite perfect. This is also a great recipe if you are on a budget. Carrots are always cheap to buy, but now, when they are in season they are extra frikkin’ delicious. Make a huge batch of this soup and fill the freezer with it. I am sure we have mentioned this before, but it’s worth mentioning again: Using seasonal ingredients is a great way to eat good organic vegetables without paying a fortune. Plan what you cook after which seasonal ingredients that are cheapest. Carrot, Tomato & Coconut Soup Serves 4-6 1 tbsp cold-pressed coconut oil or olive oil 1 onion, chopped 2 garlic cloves, chopped 1 tsp ground turmeric (optional) 10 medium size carrots, rinsed and sliced 1 can (400 g /­­ 14 oz) plum tomatoes or approx. 5 chopped fresh tomatoes water, enough to cover sea salt & black pepper 1 can (400 g /­­ 14 oz) full fat coconut milk or any plant milk of choice Heat oil in a pot. Add onions, garlic and turmeric and sauté until soft and fragrant. Add carrots and tomatoes and cook for a minute or so, while stirring. Now add water, sea salt and pepper, cover and let simmer for 15-20 minutes until the carrots are tender. Meanwhile prepare the corn topping. When the soup is ready, use an immersion (hand) blender to puree until smooth. Stir in the coconut milk, taste and adjust the flavors. Serve the soup in bowls with a couple of spoonfuls topping and a drizzle of olive oil. Raw Corn Ceviche 2 fresh corn cobs, husks removed 4 sprigs flat-leaf parsley juice from 1-2 limes 1 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil sea salt & black pepper Cut off the corn kernels from all sides. Chop the parsley. Place in a bowl. Combine all ingredients and season to taste. Okay, just one last photo of him. Because those lips are made for kissing!

Alligators and Butterflies

August 6 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Alligators and Butterflies Oh this feeling. To finally hold something in your hand that you have worked so much with. Feeling the weight of the 260 pages, the matte paper and the debossed title on the cover. Remembering the deadline that felt impossible only a few months ago. Relief. It’s like all those alligators that have been eating us up from the inside, suddenly have become butterflies that are dancing in our chests. We did it. Another book. It’s here. And in just over a month it will start popping up in book stores. Green Kitchen Travels is a natural extension of our first book. It has the same format, paper and feeling. But this time it is filled with recipes, photos and anecdotes inspired by our adventures around the world. As well a special traveling with kids-chapter where we share thoughts and tips that we have picked up on our trips with Elsa. There are almost 100 recipes in the book and most of them are completely new. We’re hoping that you will find lots of favorites - some of ours are the Mexican Breakfast Salad, the Harira & Date Soup, the No-Noodle Pad Thai and the Torta di Ricotta e Polenta. Oh, and the Paletas (bottom photo) are pretty awesome too! Travel cookbooks are often super inspiring to flip through but not as easy to cook from. We have kept this in mind and focused on recipes that we love and cook at home in our everyday life, using ingredients that are available in most supermarkets. The recipes are influenced by the countries we have visited, but they are in a much greater degree a reflection of us. They are based on the people we have met, the food we have tried and the ingredients we have come across and then adapted to our preferences, cooking habits and style to make our own. Almost all recipes are gluten-free (except two) and many are vegan or have tips on how to make them vegan. We know that some of you found it a bit confusing that the US and UK editions of our first book had different covers and titles. So this time we have made things simpler - a universal book for all english speaking countries! This way you can be sure that it’s the same book regardless of where you order it from. And it has all the measurements you need. It is published by Hardie Grant London. The release date is 15 September in UK & Australia and one week later in the US. But you can pre-order it right away! From Amazon.com if you live in the states, Amazon.co.uk if you are british and Booktopia in Australia. Or on Book Depository, they ship worldwide. Regardless of the tight deadlines and the crazy ups and downs that you experience when writing a cookbook, this has been such a dreamy thing to work on. It still feels unreal that we have been able to combine two of the things that we love most - food and travel. We are so grateful for this opportunity and it is without a doubt you, our beloved friends and blog readers that we owe the biggest thank you to. We would never have been down this path if it hadn’t been for all your support. So we made this book for you and we are crossing all our fingers and toes that you will like it.

Rhubarb Upside-Down Yogurt Cake

July 18 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Rhubarb Upside-Down Yogurt Cake Sun is shining and birds are chirping from a tree outside our window. It might just be the ultimate day for a summer cake. We created this one for our youtube channel and never intended to post it here, but it was just too pretty not to. This is an upside-down yogurt and almond cake with rose shaped rhubarbs on top that are drizzled with a rhubarb and ginger syrup. The cake is gluten free and the addition of yogurt makes its consistency somewhat similar to a cheesecake. All in all it’s a gorgeous cake for summer gatherings. If you are not fond of rhubarbs or if they are out of season, you can try replacing them with other types of fruit. Plums, apples or even pineapple would work great. Check out the video below to see how it’s done. And if you don’t want to miss out on any of our videos, make sure to subscribe to our channel. In other news, we have just heard that an advance copy of our new book Green Kitchen Travels is on its way to us, so expect a sneak peek soon. We can hardly wait. Have a great weekend everyone! Rhubarb & Almond Upside-Down Yogurt Cake Serves 8 4-5 stalks (1 lb /­ 450 g) fresh thin rhubarb 4 tbsp honey 2/­3 cup water 1/­2 inch /­ 1 1/­2 cm knob fresh ginger, grated 1 vanilla pod, seeds scraped 2 cups /­ 500 ml /­ 200 g almond flour 1/­2 cup /­ 125 ml /­ 75 g buckwheat flour 1 tsp baking powder? 2-3 tbsp poppy seeds? 1/­2 tsp sea salt? 100 g butter 1/­2 cup /­ 125 ml honey or maple syrup? 2 organic lemons, zest 3 eggs, separated 1 cup /­ 250 ml full-fat yogurt (we use Greek or Turkish yogurt) Heat the oven to 350°F /­ 180°C. Trim the rhubarbs and cut into 2 inch /­ 5 cm pieces on an angle. Combine rhubarb, honey, water, ginger and a scraped vanilla pod in a large pot over medium low heat. Cook for 7-8 minutes, stirring occasionally, until rhubarb is tender and slightly caramelized but still intact. Pick up the rhubarb pieces to cool off and save the syrup for later (you can strain the syrup if you prefer, we didn’t). If the syrup is too thin, you can let it reduce over heat for a few minutes more. If you want more syrup, you can add some extra water and honey and let it slowly cook for a few minutes more. Combine almond flour, buckwheat flour, baking powder, poppy seeds and sea salt in a small bowl and set aside. Place butter, honey and lemon zest in a medium size bowl and use an electric mixer to beat until creamy. Add egg yolks and continue to beat for another minute. Add the flour mixture and fold everything together. Clean the whisking blades and beat egg whites in a separate bowl until soft peaks form. Slowly fold the egg whites and the yogurt into the cake mixture. Put a baking sheet inside an 8 inch /­ 22 cm spring form cake pan. Arrange the rhubarb in a tight rose shaped pattern on the bottom of the pan. It will look extra beautiful if you place them in color order - with the dark red pieces furthest out and the light green ones towards the center. Carefully cover the rhubarb with cake batter. Bake for about 50-60 minutes, or until dark and golden on the top and baked all way through. Remove from oven and let cool for at least 30 minutes before turning it upside-down on a serving platter and removing the sides. Drizzle the rhubarb syrup on top before serving.

Fresh Pea, Mint & Coconut Soup

July 2 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Fresh Pea, Mint & Coconut Soup Hey friends, we are only doing a quick update today to share a simple, yet scrumptious, pea recipe video that we just uploaded on our YouTube channel. We are renovating our kitchen and are currently without water and worktop, so recipe development is a tad more difficult than usual. Luise has however shown some serious magician skills through the week, creating simple, healthy meals from our somewhat sparse kitchen. We are soon posting a few of our favorite oatmeal recipes and a small list of cute places from our Copenhagen trip. So stay tuned and meanwhile enjoy this Fresh Pea, Mint & Coconut Soup. This pea soup is gently prepared over low heat and only simmers for a short time to keep the nutrients intact and the flavor from the peas as intense as possible. If fresh peas aren’t in season you can simply use thawed frozen peas. The soup has a nice creaminess with a touch of mint and works great as a summer lunch or dinner. Fresh Pea, Mint & Coconut Soup Serves 4 1 tbsp coconut oil, ghee or cold-pressed olive oil 1 onion 2 cloves garlic 500 g shelled peas, about 1,5 kilo with pods (or thawed frozen peas) 1 tsp sea salt 10 sprigs fresh mint 1,5 cup /­ 350 ml vegetable broth or water 1,5 cup /­ 350 ml full-fat coconut milk purple micro greens (or pea sprouts) for serving cold-pressed olive oil for serving Coarsely chop the onion and mince the garlic cloves. Heat coconut oil in a saucepan on medium heat. Add onions and garlic and cook until soft, not browned, about 3-5 minutes. Add the vegetable broth or water, add peas, salt, mint and coconut milk and bring to a bare simmer. Turn off the heat. Blend, using and immersion blender, until smooth, add extra water if desired. Season to taste. Serve in bowls and drizzle with olive oil, micro greens, salt and pepper. Keeps for 3-5 days in the fridge.

Warm Cauliflower ‘Couscous’ Salad

June 8 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Warm Cauliflower ‘Couscous’ Salad Out of all the vegetables at the market, we can’t think of any that has made a bigger comeback during these last years than the cauliflower. Both Luise and I remember cauliflower as an often over-cooked side dish drenched in cheese, from when we grew up. Now it has become the surprising star of many dishes and is being prepared in an endless amount of ways. In our home, we blanch the cauli’ and serve it as a side with some black pepper and a good cold-pressed oil, we roast it and use in salads, we cut it thin and eat it as a raw carpaccio, we mix it in patties and soups. And of course, the latest classic - use it as a pizza base. In our new book we have krkrkkrkrkrkrkrkrkkrkrrk (this sentence has been removed due to spoiler alert reasons - you just have to wait until 22nd September!). We have yet to find a way to incorporate Cauliflower in a dessert, but that is probably only a question of time. Today we have mixed raw cauli’ into a couscous-like texture that can be used as a grain free alternative to regular wheat grain couscous. We give it a quick boil to get rid of the raw odor and to make it easier to digest, then toss it with an ocean of fresh herbs, spring peas, pepitas and crumbled feta cheese. It’s dinner in no-time and a very fresh, delicious and nourishing one. Perfect for the picnic basket as well. If you have any ideas of your own on how to further prepare the mighty cauliflower, please share in the comment section below. And the same goes if you have any good cauliflower subs, for those of you that aren’t too fond of it - has anyone tried using broccoli instead? If you want a quick dessert to go with this quick dish, check out our 5-minute avocado chocolate mousse. We have just posted the recipe video on our YouTube channel. Warm CauliflowerCouscous’ with Green Peas & Herbs 1 head of raw cauliflower 2 handfuls mixed parsley and basil 70 g /­ 1/­2 cup pumpkin seeds (pepitas) juice of 1/­2 lemon a drizzle cold-pressed olive oil sea salt and black pepper 200 g /­ 7 oz /­ 2 cups frozen (thawed) or fresh peas 100 g /­ 4 oz /­ 1 cup feta cheese, crumbled sprouts or micro greens to garnish (we have used purple Shiso leaves here) Bring a saucepan with water to boil. Meanwhile coarsely chop the cauliflower and place the florets and stem in a food processor or blender and process until fine couscous- or rice-like texture. Do it in batches if you have a small food processor. Pour the cauliflower into the boiling water, lower the heat to simmer and cook for about 3 minutes. Meanwhile finely chop the herbs, toast the pumpkin seeds in a skillet on low-medium heat until golden. Drain the cauliflowercouscous’ in a sieve and place in a large serving bowl. Add herbs, lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper and combine everything. Add peas, pumpkin seeds, crumbled feta cheese and toss until mixed. Garnish with sprouts or micro greens. Serve warm or chilled. Keeps for a couple of days in the fridge. PS. We also wanted to let you know that we have redesigned and rebuilt our two iPhone and iPad apps, Green Kitchen and Healthy Desserts. They are now completely integrated with iOS7 and have a stunning new look.

Rhubarb & Strawberry Quinoa Crumble

May 24 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Rhubarb & Strawberry Quinoa Crumble The three of us have just arrived home after a week with my family in Tel Aviv, Israel. It was inspiring in so many ways but we’ll talk more about that in a later post (and share some recipes from the trip). The most wonderful thing was however to focus on and spend time with our daughter without being occupied by book editing or any other work. This spring has been quite intense so now we try to savour every moment with Elsa before her little brother arrives. As some of you might have seen on Instagram, the Israeli food scene was right down our lane. We hardly missed anything from home. Apart from the one thing that Luise has started craving lately - Rhubarb. Apparently they aren’t very easy to come by in the Middle East. Luise has done this quinoa crumble for us a few times since the first organic rhubarbs popped up this year and it was the first thing she baked after we had landed. It is as lip smacking as it is simple (and vegan and gluten free). Quinoa flakes are a bit sturdier than oats and add a nice crunch to the otherwise very sweet crumble. Raw rhubarb has a very distinct tart flavour, but when baked together with apple and strawberries it all comes together into a well balanced and naturally sweetened delicious mess. Hardly anything needs to be added, but if you wanna balance some ice cream on top, we’re not gonna stop you. Lets get ready to crumble! We also wanted to thank you for your wonderful respons on our new YouTube channel! It was a pretty scary thing to launch, especially since we speak in the films. We have just posted another video with one of our favorite breakfast recipes from the blog; Raw Buckwheat Porridge. And we have one of Elsa’s favorite dinners coming up in just a few days. It’s something I believe all you parents will appreciate! If you haven’t already subscribed on the channel, you can do so here. Rhubarb, Strawberry, Apple & Quinoa Crumble serves 4 Fruit filling 8 thin red rhubarbs (around 500 g /­­ 1 lb) 2 handfuls (225 g /­­ 8 oz) fresh or frozen strawberries 1 apple 1 tsp ground vanilla juice from 1/­­2 orange or lemon 2 tbsp unheated honey or maple syrup Crumble topping 1 cup (110 g) rolled quinoa flakes (can be subbed for rolled oats or rolled millet) 1 cup (110 g) rolled buckwheat flakes (can be subbed for rolled oats or rolled millet) 1 pinch sea salt 6 tbsp cold-pressed coconut oil (room temperature) + more for greasing the dish 15 fresh soft dates, stoned Preheat the oven to 175°C /­­ 350°F. Grease a 22 cm /­­ 9 inch baking dish or pie tin with coconut oil. Rinse all fruit. Slice the rhubarbs, halve the strawberries if necessary and dice the apples (discard the seeds). Place in a baking dish and toss with vanilla, orange juice and honey. Prepare the crumble in a separate bowl. Start by thoroughly mixing quinoa flakes, buckwheat flakes and salt. Chop the dates and add to the mixed flakes together with the coconut oil. Use your hands to mix until large crumbs are formed. Pour the crumble filling evenly over the fruit. Bake in the oven for 30 minutes until the fruit juices are bubbling around the edges and the crumble is firm and browned. Keeps for about a 5 days in the fridge. Freezes and reheats well.

Turmeric Breakfast Muffins

May 2 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Turmeric Breakfast Muffins We have had an unusually intense relationship with these muffins for the past couple of months. Different varieties of them have been baked almost every weekend morning in our home. I blamed it on that the recipe needed to be perfected, but ahem, this particular version is actually very similar to my first version (they have however been altered a lot in between). The basic idea was pretty clear to me from the beginning; I wanted a muffin that we could enjoy for breakfast without feeling that we actually were eating dessert in the morning (which I am pretty certain most people that eat muffins for breakfast feel). Of course, muffin by definition is a dessert, but I at least only wanted to fill them with ingredients that normally made an appearance on our breakfast table. So, no artificial sweeteners, only bananas and a few dates. I wanted it to be simple to make and I also wanted the recipe to be gluten free. The result is a kind of mash-up between a banana pancake, oatmeal, granola and our turmeric lassi. They have a wonderful rich walnut flavor with a turmeric and blueberry twist. They are sweet, although in a perfectly breakfast kind of way. One muffin leaves you quite satisfied, but I often bring another one as a second breakfast to-go. This recipe can very easily be altered, so I have gathered some recipe notes: o One or two grated carrots can be a delicious addition. o The granola crumble is optional (although very delicious) and can be left out. o If you don’t have any problems with gluten, the buckwheat flour+arrowroot can be replaced with an equal amount of spelt flour. o The eggs can be replaced with chia seeds or flax seeds following the ratio 1 tbsp chia/­­flax + 3 tbsp water = 1 egg. o The blueberries can obviously be replaced with other berries. Blackberries would be good. o If you don’t like or am allergic to walnuts, you can replace them with sunflower seeds. o The dates can be replaced with 3-4 tbsp honey. You can also add a little honey along with the dates if you prefer a sweeter muffin. Turmeric & Blueberry Breakfast Muffins with a Granola Topping Makes 12 large or 15 smaller This makes a rather large batch for our small family, so we usually freeze half of them. Dry ingredients 100 g /­­ 1 cup walnuts 85 g /­­1 cup rolled oats, use gluten free if intolerant 90 g /­­ 2/­­3 cup buckwheat flour + 2 tbsp arrowroot (or potato starch) 1 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 1/­­2 tsp baking soda 1 tbsp turmeric (use a little less if you are not used to the flavor) 1 tsp freshly ground cardamom 1/­­2 tsp sea salt a pinch black pepper Wet ingredients 160 ml /­­ 2/­­3 cup buttermilk or plant yogurt 80 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup olive oil or butter 2 ripe bananas, mashed 5 fresh dates, mashed 3 large eggs A large handful blueberries, frozen or fresh Granola topping 1/­­3 cup rolled oats 2 tbsp olive oil/­­coconut oil 1 tbsp runny honey Preheat the oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Line a muffin pan with paper liners or grease the pan with oil or butter. Add walnuts and rolled oats to a food processor or blender (or mortle) and mix quickly into a coarse flour. Transfer to a large mixing bowl together with the rest of the dry ingredients. Add buttermilk, oil, bananas and dates to the food processor or blender and mix until smooth, then transfer to the mixing bowl with the dry ingredients. Crack the eggs in a separate bowl and beat them for about a minute before adding them as well. Use a spatula to carefully fold everything until combined. Divide the batter into the muffin tins, drop a bunch of blueberries on top of each muffin and gently push them down a bit. Mix together the granola crumble in a small bowl and add it on top of the muffins. Bake for about 18-20 minutes. Best enjoyed still warm from the oven. 

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