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Simply Sweet Elegance At Simply Raw Bakery

Cranberry-Carrot Cake from Vegan Holiday Kitchen

Butternut Squash and Spinach Alfredo

Vegan Gravy – 1 Pot Mushroom Free with Fluffy Mashed Potatoes










Golubka Kitchen vegetarian recipes

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes

yesterday 09:00 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes It’s been eight years since we started collecting recipes on this website, and over those years we’ve accumulated quite a few holiday recipe ideas. We thought it was finally time to do a big, comprehensive round up of our absolute favorites. We’ve got you covered on mains and hearty sides, as well as lighter sides, soups, salads, dessert, and drinks. Wishing you and your family a happy and healthy holiday season :) v = vegan, gf = gluten-free, veg = vegetarian, vo = vegan option Mains and Hearty Sides Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower (v, gf) There’s something so grand and ritualistic about a holiday table centerpiece that took time, care and anticipation. Since most such centerpieces involve meat, one can feel a little left out during the peak of a celebratory meal if meat is not their jam. In this recipe, we applied this grand, ceremonious approach to braising a head of cauliflower. Someone even made a video outlining the entire braising process. Baked Latkes (v, gf) Latkes are my ultimate weakness, but I’ve always dreaded the long and smoky process of frying them. My love for latkes is so strong though, that I had to come up with an easier path to that crispy, golden potato goodness. These baked latkes are SO much easier to make than the traditional fried kind, since the oven does all the main work for you. The flavor and texture are not compromised one bit, I promise. The recipe also includes a beet salad with an avocado mayo, which is to die for. Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna (v, gf) This healthful but hearty lasagna employs spaghetti squash in place lasagna noodles. There’s mushrooms, mung beans, kale, carrots, tomato sauce, and an easy almondcheese’ as well. Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash (v, gf) If you’ve never tried braising leeks, you are in for a serious surprise. They are amazing, especially served over a hearty cauliflower and white bean mash. If leeks are not your thing, consider making the mash alone and serve it as a side, to up your holiday mash game :) Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin (v, gf) I can’t say enough about this gratin comprised of layers of sweet potato, Brussels sprouts, and caramelized onions, showered with spices and coconut milk. It’s easy to make but so beautiful and satisfying at the same time. Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes, and Black Rice (v, gf) This will forever be my favorite fall/­­winter salad. It’s all about the contrast of flavors: aromatic black rice, nourishing spiced cauliflower, juicy grapes, and a slightly spicy miso dressing full of umami. Sprinkle in some pomegranate seeds for an extra festive look. Sorghum Beet Risotto (v, gf) This vibrant risotto would make for an excellent side dish at a holiday table, especially if you don’t know what to do with that forgotten bag of sorghum in the back of your pantry :) Curried Squash and Kale Riceless Risotto (vo, gf) Another alternative (aka riceless) risotto option. This one uses riced kabocha squash in place of actual rice. It’s luxuriously creamy, warming, and overall impressive. Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche (v, gf) This vegan quiche comes together quite magically, with no crust, eggs or cream to speak of. Chickpea flour acts similarly to the egg-cream foundation of traditional quiche and solidifies into a sort of custard when baked at a high temperature. Add a studding of silky root vegetables and greens to that, and you’ve got yourself the perfect, healthful and delicious fall/­­winter quiche. Soups and Sides Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale (v, gf) This is butternut squash soup elevated. The addition of cranberries and pear is as delicious as it is unexpected. There’s a special ingredient that will help aid digestion during a big meal, too. Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower (v, gf) A soup that’s both grounding and fortifying, and good enough to serve as an unexpected, colorful starter at the holiday table. Pink Soup with Roasted Onion and Broccoli (v, gf) Another stunning, colorful soup option. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage (v, gf) We love mashed potatoes, but we also love pairing a bowl of mashed potatoes with another, more interesting mash made with underutilized root vegetables. Both celeriac and parsnips are so uniquely flavored and healthful, it’s no wonder that they make for some delicious mash. Serve it with the Braised Holiday Cauliflower for the ultimate plant-based holiday meal. Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts (veg, gf) This recipe teaches you how to make your own ghee (golden, clarified butter that has a higher smoke point than normal butter and is low in lactose and casein /­­ not vegan), as well as how to make miso-date ghee, which is too delicious for words. It’s great on roasted Brussels sprouts, as well as everything else in this world. Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings (v, gf) A healthful take on nachos, with crispy sweet potatoes taking the place of tortilla chips. Great for self-serve style, snack-heavy parties. If you don’t want to go through the intricate process of making sweet potato chips, roasted sweet potatoes will work perfectly in their place. Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese (v, gf) This salad is simple but effective: visually stunning, healthful and delicious. Plus, you’ll want to sprinkle that almond cheese on everything! Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad (v, gf) Earthy, nourishing parsnips go so well with juicy, bittersweet citrus. The combination is especially irresistible when sprinkled with spiced and toasted walnuts and raisins. Use grapefruit if you can’t find pomelo. Desserts Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel (v) This is three favorite Thanksgiving pies in one: apple, pecan and pumpkin. It’s decadent and impressive, and a definite crowd-pleaser. (Also pictured in slice form at the beginning of this post). Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake (v, gf) Slices of this fruit and nut cake make for a great accompaniment to a cheese plate, as well as an awesome gift basket component. Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries (v, gf) The super-festive appearance of this decadent, frozen fudge basically speaks for itself. Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange and Miso Glaze (v) The universally loved combination of rum and raisins is elevated by a sweet and subtly salty orange and miso glaze in this vegan bundt recipe we developed for Food & Wine. Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat (v, gf) Oh man, this nougat! Not as sticky or sweet as traditional nougat, this one has a caramel-like complexity from our trademark sweet potato caramel. There is a studding of toasted nuts and cookie crumble throughout each slice, too. Great for homemade gifts or party platters. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake (v, gf) This cake is a crowd pleaser through and through. It’s got it all in terms of stunning looks and bright, special flavor. Black and White Chocolate Pudding (v, gf) These elegant, black and white chocolate pudding cups are easy to put together, but very impressive and full of whole food ingredients. Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache (v, gf) If you are looking for a grand and fun cake project, but still want something wholesome and not too sugary, look no further than this stunner of a cake. Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight In this recipe, we’ve updated the old school treat with the use of healthful ingredients, and the beautiful, floral flavors of hibiscus and orange blossom. Serve these Turkish delights alongside tiny tongs at a holiday party for the ultimate, fancy dessert experience :) Banana Toffee Tart (v) This tart is worth making just for the vegan date toffee alone, but combine that with a (vegan) buttery crust and caramelized bananas, and you’ll forever be everyone’s favorite host. Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats (veg, gf) Another crowd favorite from a few years ago, this cake is like carrot cake, but made with parsnips in place of carrots. The parsnips yield their moisture and delicate flavor to the cake dough, which is then layered with a cream cheese frosting and topped with candied kumquats. This recipe can easily be veganized – just use maple syrup in place of honey to candy the kumquats and make the frosting. Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream (veg, gf) All the components of this dessert can be made ahead of time, and assembled later. The cashew cream is not your average cashew cream, either – it’s extra-fluffy with the help of a special ingredient. White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart (v, gf) This delicate white chocolate mousse tart is flavored and colored with the juice and zest of blood orange. You also have the option of skipping the crust and making the mousse alone. Just distribute it amongst little ramekins for individual servings. Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies (v, gf) These cookies are crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside, and incredibly buttery throughout. Their unexpected green coloring looks beautiful, contrasted by the red topping of goji berries. Kabocha Squash Ice Cream with Maple Roasted Pecans (veg, gf) Winter squash does beautifully in ice cream, especially the naturally sweet, bright orange kabocha squash. In this recipe, kabocha ice cream is swirled with a simple, tart cranberry sauce and topped with maple pecans. This recipe can easily be vegan – just use maple syrup in place of honey. Miso Caramel Popcorn (v, gf) It’s entirely possible to make really good caramel popcorn at home! This popcorn is sweet, salty, and incredibly addicting – you’ve been warned :) Drinks Rosemary Hot White Chocolate (v, gf) This hot white chocolate is both cozy and decadent, with unexpected, warming notes from rosemary and a perfectly smooth, frothy consistency. Quick Persimmon Eggnog (v, gf) This is eggnog for both the adventurous and the health-conscious. Much lighter than the original, but still perfectly creamy and satisfying. Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules (v, gf) This is the perfect winter cocktail for those of us who don’t drink alcohol, but still want to participate in the celebratory ritual of clinking glasses and toasting with something special and delicious. Pear Cranberry Chai (v, gf) This cozy chai is brewed with the addition of pears and cranberries, which takes the flavor to the next level. Simply put, it’s the best chai we’ve ever had. H A P P Y   H O L I D A Y S  !  !  !   The post Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan

November 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan Chi San Wan is a creative consultant, mama, entrepreneur and author based in London. We love Chi’s beautiful cookbook, her aesthetic, and down-to-earth approach to wellness, and we were very excited to get a peak at her everyday routine. In this interview, Chi tells us about her morning and bedtime routines, her ways of dealing with stress, the simple beauty tricks she’s learned from her mother, making space for the occasional cake and wine, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I enjoy routine, especially in the mornings. Before Marloe came along, routine was the only thing keeping me grounded. I have all sorts floating around in my head, and working for myself means one day can be very different to the next, so I need my mornings to be predictable in order to get me in the right mind-set for the rest of the day. However, now that those routines are governed by Marloe, our one year old, things are somewhat less predictable, and I have learnt to let go of the importance of routine a little. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. They vary slightly from day to day, depending on whats on the agenda, but in an ideal and average world my morning would be waking up around 6am, do some stretching, then 20 mins of meditation. Around 6:30am Marloe wakes up and we like to cuddle in bed together as a family (shes really into giving kisses at the moment). We get out of bed around 7am and take turns to shower whilst the other one plays with Marloe, makes lemon hot water and preps breakfast. We sit down together for breakfast between 7:30am-8am and have our mornings chats – most of the time theres food throwing involved. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I like to stop any computer work by 9pm, make myself a small hot drink and climb into bed to do some reading – usually self-help or study. I try to sleep by 10pm latest, but sometimes me and my boyfriend just end up chatting about the day until 11pm or midnight… Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Typically… Breakfast – multi-grain porridge with almond milk, topped with whatever seasonal fruits are around and some nut butter Lunchquinoa, roast veg, salad, some kraut, some seaweed – usually leftovers Snacksourdough and avocado, or an apple with cheese /­­ nut butter, whatever I find on my travels Dinner – salmon and veg, or daal /­­ curry with rice, yoghurt and lots of freshly chopped herbs -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? If I have the time, I will make myself a matcha latte in the mornings or for a snack. If we have eggs, maybe I will have an Earl Grey tea or some fresh juice. I only ever drink coffee when I fancy a croissant! Then it would have to be a flat white with fresh almond milk or oat milk.  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I never used to! But somehow, during pregnancy and since Marloe was born, I have developed a sweet tooth! Maybe its to keep energy up? As the weather is colder now in London, I have been obsessed with searching for the best hot chocolate (always disappointing and not chocolatey enough!). When I get the urge for something sweet, its usually something very specific, not any old sweet thing will suffice, and I will have to go on a hunt for it. Though usually after dinner, I am happy with a piece of raw chocolate from the fridge.  -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I try and have a wide and varied diet to keep things in check, and food is the first thing I look to when trying to manage my general wellness. I try and listen to my body, even if sometimes its asking for wine or cake! Usually, it needs just that and feels much better for it. In terms of taking anything else, since pregnancy and the birth of Marloe I have taken a high DHA Omega 3 supplement and probiotics daily (just in case I dont get the chance to eat it in food form). Once a week I will make some water steeped in goji berries, longan (when my mum visits, she will always leave me some) and any dried herbs I have on hand and sip on that. I have some adaptogenics on hand too – chaga, cordyceps, reishi, ashwaghanda, schisandra – but I dont make a habit of taking them everyday, only when I need to. -- What is your approach to feeding your daughter? Do you try to guard her from all unhealthy/­­processed foods, or are you more relaxed about it all? Do you have any advice for parents who want to raise their kids to be comfortable with real, whole foods? For her first year I was a little precious about what I gave her to eat – everything was made at home and organic produce only. I went with baby led weaning which is so messy, anyone who knows me knows I cannot handle mess so this was, and still is, a learning curve for me. But it gives me great pleasure watching Marloe enjoy her food, and try anything I give her. She has days where she is super picky, but generally she is a happy eater. I am more relaxed and realistic about what she consumes now, because I cant always control where we are – she has predominately home made food, but when we are out she will have bits of whatever we are eating, and its fun to watch her try new things! I really recommend baby led weaning. If you read up on it, it makes a lot of sense to get kids to eat real, whole foods this way – who wants to eat mush? It could be anything! Real food looks and tastes much more exciting and it makes them more adventurous with food, and less fussy. Eating together at the table is important to me as well, and for Marloe to have what we are eating – she knows if we have given her a different meal and will shout until we feed her some of ours.  Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I love to fit yoga in when I can and I walk a lot (at a very fast pace), but other than that, its chasing the baby around. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I dont do any form of exercise that I find torturous, such as spin or anything high adrenaline; it doesnt work for me. I enjoy yoga – dynamic or kundalini, and walking in nature a lot.  Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I think if youre comfortable in your own skin, that is beautiful. But for everyone, that could be down to many different factors and it will chop and change with time. Someone who is confident but grounded with integrity – their beauty will shine through. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Its pretty simple and not that exciting! I try and dry-brush when I can, I use Dr. Bronners Baby soap for the body, and then after a shower, whilst the body is wet, I will rub a concoction of almond oil, sesame oil and essential oils that I fancy, all over. For my face, I take the day off with coconut oil and rose water (I make my own with 3/­­4 organic rose water and 1/­­4 colloidal silver). For my morning shower, I will use a thin flannel to scrub the face and spray with rose water, followed by a tiny bit of Nucifera, The Balm – a recent find in LA. Its been amazing for the change in weather in the UK.  -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water, water, water. Not eating so much dairy, wheat and sugar, but consuming more good fats like avocado, coconut and ghee. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mum looks so good and youthful, but she has never drank much, never smoked, never wore make-up...thats her trick! I have never smoked, I drink less now naturally, as I am breastfeeding and I’m too busy to do any make-up, so usually a go at the eyelash curlers will do for the day! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  I think fitting in meditation everyday greatly reduces stress for me and puts things into perspective. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Acupuncture. Talking it out with my boyfriend and friends. Knowing that ‘this too shall pass’. Treating myself to whatever food and drink I desire (within budget of course).  -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I take Wellness tablets. I make sure to be hydrated and wrap up warm at all times, especially the throat and chest. I make congee or daal, something warming and easy to digest so the body can rest.  -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? At the moment, I am very much governed by my daughters day to day antics, and I try and fit everything else around her. This does stress me out at times, but then I try and remember to enjoy these first years with her. I am lucky to have this time together with her, because I am freelance. I just try and plan my time carefully (shared iCal helps!), but not everything always goes to plan – which I am learning to let go of.  Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Things generally fall better into place when I take time to be kind to myself, so I just keep reminding myself that self-care is important, especially for a working mum. Setting routines like bed times for myself etc helps with this and saying no to some friends, projects, events etc when you just need the time to sort stuff out, so that everything else can run more smoothly. Obviously there is room for spontaneity, thats what keeps me feeling alive!  -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Meditation. Making the time for it. It keeps me feeling focused, rested and puts things into perspective. Its a form of self-care and love for myself, and is incredibly nurturing. I dont always do it every day twice a day, but when I do, it helps immensely. I learnt from Jacqui at The Broad Place in the summer and, hands down, they’re the best teachings of meditation I have come across, because its real and it works.  -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Its easier said than done, but I try not to stress about it, and just trust the process rather than sit and wallow. Ill meet up with friends and my peers and we chat it out – usually its something that is felt by a few people, and I find that it usually reverberates between similar minds, like theres something going on with the energy around us. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I cant pinpoint one thing, its a zeitgeist thing, its in the air...maybe because we are entering a revolution, the age of Aquarius. I am constantly  inspired and influenced by the people I surround myself with, the internet, social media, so books /­­ movies /­­ classes suggested through those mediums are naturally the ones I gravitate to.  Knowledge -- You co-authored A Simple Table, a beautiful cookbook that focuses on fresh and simple meals. What was the key message that you aimed to communicate with the recipes and lifestyle tips in the book? Thank you. The key message was that everyday nourishment neednt be difficult or a chore. It could be simple acts of kindness to yourself, or simple recipes that dont require crazy expensive ingredients. Its to encourage the reader to explore what makes them feel good inside and out, as everyone is different and there is no one formula. Most of all, it was to enjoy the simple pleasures.  -- Tell us a bit about the fresh almond milk company that you co-founded, The Pressery. What inspired you to start it and what did you learn from having that business? I felt a change in me, and the start of a movement back in 2013 when I became a little disillusioned working in fashion, and more excited about food and drink and the effects it has on us. I have always been a food fanatic, so it was natural for me to explore this familiar and yet unknown territory. My business partner had been feeling the same for a while, so it felt like the right time to launch a small business in something we were both passionate about. I was already making almond milk at home, and after some research we settled on focusing on making the one product the best we could. There is a lot to learn through starting a business from nothing (I was a freelance fashion stylist before that), and building a brand from scratch – we started selling at a market and then got into Selfridges, and I grew the social media following from 0 to 22k organically in 2 years. Ive met many people through the business, with whom I am still good friends now and work with today, as a creative consultant. It was a natural progression for me and I wouldnt be where I am now if it wasnt for The Pressery.  Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I like to have a glass of red wine, make dinner with my boyfriend and possibly have a candle lit bath with Epsom salts and essential oils.  -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – salt. by Nayyirah Waheed, there is always a piece that speaks to me at any point in my life Song/­­Album – I will never tire of Your Hand In Mine by Explosions In The Sky Movie – In The Mood For Love has been a long favourite – the soundtrack, the colours, the feelings… Piece of Art – anything by Agnes Martin really does feed and soothe my soul, when the exhibition was at the Tate Modern, I went about 5 times! -- What are your favorite places to eat in London? Leilas  for breakfast, Esters  for brunch, Towpath  for lunch, Granger & Co Kings Cross  for work meetings, Violet  for cake and tea, P. Franco  for wine and small dishes and for dinner – Primeur , Campania and Jones , Uchi , Westerns Laundry , Legs , Luca ...too many!  -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list . What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – comfy t-shirt and shorts for sleep – current book  – Nucifera The Balm – rose water spray – essential oils to mix – Weleda lip balm – Dr. Bronners Baby soap (which doubles up as shaving foam) – x2 pairs of jeans (one boyfriend, one flares) – x1 sunglasses – x1 rucksack, x1 fancy bag, x1 tote bag – x1 black trousers (usually wide culottes) – x3 different style tees – x1 cashmere sweater – x2 white shirts  – x1 jumpsuit /­­ playsuit  – x1 dress for day or evening – x2 sandals (one Birkenstocks, one Isabel Marant) – x1 trainers – x1 smart shoes (for me, its Doc Martens) – x1 jacket or coat (depending on the destinations temperature) – x1 light cashmere scarf -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Id love to hear from Julie from Rudy Jude, Rosa from Cereal Magazine, Serena Mitnik-Miller from General Store and Holly from The Acey. Photos taken by Jessica MacCormick, Emma Lee and Chi San Wan. 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Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette

November 15 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. I’ve been wanting to come up with a worthwhile roasted vegetable salad ever since the weather turned chilly. I can’t be the only one who loses appetite for cold, super-green, lettuce-y salads once it’s cold outside. I’ll still say yes to something like a hearty kale salad, but most other ones make me shiver, if not accompanied by something warm. This salad is anything but shiver-inducing. Fingerling potatoes, carrots, and red onion all get roasted together in the oven, then mixed with green split peas, parsley, and a very special miso vinaigrette. The result is a substantial and hearty fall salad that makes for a great side dish or even lunch. Lets talk about split peas for a second. Did you know they are not only good for soups? When I was growing up in the Soviet Union, split pea soup or split pea puree was on the menu of every kindergarten/­­school lunch, and neither item was my favorite. Since then Ive learned that I like my split peas left intact, with a little bit of bite even. They are protein-rich, instantly making any dish more nourishing, and they are great at drinking up any dressing that theyre mixed with, which makes them perfect for salads. They take this salad from being just a plate of vegetables to a complete, well-rounded dish, thats acceptable to eat on its own. Do you have any favorite split pea recipes? Whether you use split peas, beans, lentils or chickpeas, making a habit of incorporating at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week will lead to some sustainable, nourishing and affordable meals. For more recipes using pulses, check out our White Bean Tuna Sandwich, Smoky Chickpea Croutons, Fennel-Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans, Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans, Red Lentil Gazpacho, or any recipes on the Half Cup Habit website. Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the miso vinaigrette 2 tablespoons white miso paste 2 tablespoons brown rice vinegar 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime or lemon juice 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil 1 teaspoon tamari 1 garlic clove - minced ¼ cup olive oil for the salad 1 cup green or yellow split peas - soaked in purified water w/­­ a splash of acv overnight sea salt 2 lb fingerling potatoes - halved or quartered 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil - melted freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary (optional) 3 medium carrots - diced diagonally 1 medium red onion - cut into small wedges 1 small bunch parsley - finely chopped handful of dill - finely chopped (optional) Instructions to make the vinaigrette Place the the miso paste into a small bowl. Add 1 tablespoon of the brown rice vinegar and mix until smooth. Add the rest of the brown rice vinegar, lime/­­lemon juice, sesame oil, tamari and garlic, stir to combine. Continue stirring and slowly pour in the olive oil to emulsify. to make the salad Drain and rinse the split peas and combine them with plenty of purified water and sea salt in a medium pot. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook, partially covered, for about 30 minutes, until soft, but not mushy. Drain over a colander and set aside. In the meantime, preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare two parchment paper-covered baking trays. Place the potatoes on one of the trays, drizzle with half of the oil, sprinkle with salt, pepper, and half of the rosemary, if using, and mix. Put the carrots and onion on the second tray, do not mix them together. Drizzle both with oil, salt, pepper and the rest of the rosemary, if using, and toss to coat. Place both trays in the oven and roast for 30-40 minutes, until all vegetables are golden and cooked throughout. The onion might cook quicker than the potatoes and carrots. Remove it from the baking sheet earlier, if thats the case. Let the roasted vegetables cool slightly and combine them with the cooked split peas in a large bowl, add the herbs and the vinaigrette, and toss to coat. This salad gets even better with time, as everything marinates in the vinaigrette. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Metabolism Boosting Everything Salad Watermelon Panzanella Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Baked Veggie Spring Rolls .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips

November 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips Lacy Phillips is an LA-based manifestation advisor and founder of the blog Free & Native, an amazing resource for all things to do with emotional and physical wellbeing. Lacy’s manifestation approach is truly unique and rooted in psychology just as much as it’s based on spirituality. With her clients, she focuses on pinpointing the true self, which ultimately leads to the discovery of one’s personal freedom. We’ve been reading Free & Native for years, and it’s opened our eyes to so many new ideas – from the concept of self-worth, to the recipe for the nettle and raspberry leaf infusion that helps our hair grow like crazy. In this interview, Lacy tells us about her favorite transformative supplement as of late, her number one cold cure, exercising smart not hard, as well as her morning and bedtime routines, her approach to beauty and stress, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I LOVE routine. But when I have a free day, I’ll only schedule one or two things tops because I love the freedom to do whatever I want or process in my head all day alone. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. My mornings are pretty much the same. Right now, when I wake up, I sip my Chinese herbs, bone broth with gelatin, and then I have breakfast (always within an hour of waking because I’ve suffered from endocrine and blood sugar issues). That usually looks like sprouted GF oatmeal with honey and almond butter – something that I could NEVER do in the past until I had some massive healing on my endocrine and blood sugar issues, for I would have had to have animal protein to keep my blood sugar stable. It was quite a fete when I didn’t need to do that anymore. I credit all of this to my healer Anthony Cahill in LA. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Yes, as you’re probably gathering my endocrine and hormones are very sensitive. So a rule that I had to implement in our house is no screens in the bedroom after 9p. And all screens are always on F.lux or “nighttime mode” to do away with blue light, which was severely messing with my melatonin production. Instead, I light beeswax candles in the room to suggest that red/­­orange sunset light that produces melatonin. Nightly I also practice Haley Wood’s nighttime intuitive cleansing and lymph massage technique. And I’ll usually take some time out to get quiet and grateful for the day. I’m religious about my sleep cycle which is 10p-6a. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Sprouted oatmeal or a scramble with ferments or leftovers Lunch – Leftovers or I’ve gotten terrible at ordering lunch and dinner lately which usually consists of Honey Hi, Cafe Gratitude, Dune, Botanica, Sage Bistro… Snack – Usually a smoothie in the summer or a tonic in the winter -- Do you partake in caffeine? Because of my adrenals, I had to kiss caffeine goodbye four years ago. Along with cacao and sugar. I know, what’s the point of living? Thank God for bananas and avocado. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I do when I’m extra estrogenic (estrogen dominant), which is typical for those with endocrine issues. I’m pretty good about getting that balanced now, but I can always tell when I’ve gone too estrogenic because I get very anxious and I crave a lot of sugar. Due to giving up sugar, for me, a treat is usually a date with almond butter or a smoothie. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful to your energy level and general wellness? Oh man, it’s long. So I drink three teas a day from raw herbs prescribed to me by my acupuncturist Dr. Dao, and a supplement that has been transformative for me lately is Gold Genesis which Shiva Rose gifted me. Those are the two universal ones that can benefit everyone. However, the others are genuinely tailored to my issues based on blood work. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do. Three times a week I do HIIT, cardio three days a week, and I’m just now starting to do pilates and yoga again. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset to keep up with it?  I do. But I don’t kill myself with it. I can only exercise 20 mins a day, or I tax my adrenals, so I’m very gentle with all of them. I’m all for exercise smart, not hard. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Completely internal. In my work with my clients, it’s all about raising your subconscious worth to project magnetism. There is indeed nothing more radiant or prosperous. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Uncomplicated and hypernatural! Less is more. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Absolutely! My hair started growing like crack when I began swapping water for nettle herbal infusions in search of all of those bio-available minerals and vitamins. Herbal infusions, to me, are a real beauty secret that not enough people do! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. It’s interesting. I grew up with a mom that is very tough, androgynous and Irish. She washes her face once a week with Ivory soap. Skincare wasn’t something I was taught. I had to go out and learn. I think I’ve tried it all in the wellness realm now, and I do have to say that since my skin is extra dry two factors have been transformative: cleansing with oil and using a washcloth to wipe it off, which also exfoliates. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines to avoid stress? The BIGGEST is Vedic Meditation twice a day, which I learned from Jac of The Broad Place. Second is the reprogramming techniques that I teach my clients and community. Third has been Gold Genesis as it’s loaded with adaptogens. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Saying no to outside events or invitations so that I can be alone to gather my energy and ground. A lot of inward moments. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? The truth – which works every single time – the moment I feel even the slightest, I do a coffee enema, then I hop right in bed and rest. Without fail, I always wake up the next morning healthy since I flushed the liver and drained the lymph. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I do. I’m getting MUCH better at it. This next year, I’m cutting back immensely on one-on-one energy and making my offerings more accessible to everyone through new digital options which are much more affordable. Such as my UNBLOCKED classes and my entire Manifestation Formula and Reprogramming Video Workshop launching in mid-December. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Well, a lot of it has to do with my Manifestation work. So much of that is welcoming our darkness, looking at the patterns showing up in our lives, using it as a map to get into our subconscious limiting beliefs, and shifting those to get closer to our authentic essence which is our genuinely magnetic state. I’m the person that’s like, Oh wow, I’m so excited that these “issues” are showing up. Because I know exactly what to do with them and how they will turn into magnificent opportunities that connect me with what I’m calling in. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Working for myself. Only saying yes to what feels right. It’s what creates balance for me. And it took me a loooooonnnnggg time to get here. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I get out in the world and find it again. At galleries, in garments, weaves, cinema, literature… There’s more than I can consume in this lifetime. Always something. And I pull from it all. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Life experiences. They are what allowed me to discover my manifestation formula, which is hinged on self-worth = your manifestation. Knowledge -- What was your path to starting Free & Native and creating your manifestation formula? They were rather parallel. At the same time I said I’d never work for another person again, was the exact year that I threw away all of the superstitions that I head learned through New Age manifestation culture (and I had explored it all). I realized I was an incredible manifestor but never in the ways that those books and teachings suggested. And I also realized that I was worth more than I was being treated in previous jobs. I tossed them both away and decided to follow and note what works for me when. And here we are today. -- In your practice, you put a lot of emphasis on raising one’s self-worth and expanding beliefs. Why are those such key points in your formula? I realized that anytime I wouldn’t accept being small anymore, and then I wouldn’t settle for the small opportunities coming in after, while doing work on myself, bam my manifestations would come through. It all finally channeled through to me. The entire process. And I finally realized that The Universe’s only intention for us is to grow into our whole, authentic selves. Everything it does or gives us, good or bad, is to keep us on that trajectory. The gift that I realized I have is channeling those messages, and my claircognizance ability to spot energetic patterns. The third gift I have is taking the abstractness of energetic patterns and boiling them down into actionable steps and work. And now after helping hundreds of people and seeing result after result, I realized why I had to suffer through loads of superstitions and life-struggles. -- You seem to seamlessly marry psychology and spirituality in your work. Can you speak a bit about how you are able to achieve this balance? Absolutely. I always say manifestation is very easy; we’re complicated. We manifest from our subconscious beliefs rather than our thoughts. I always joke in my workshops by saying, “if only we were that powerful (manifesting from our thoughts). We think in such polarity all day long; our lives would look like a shit show.” Psychology is a means to our subconscious. Accessing it and shifting it. -- Are there any books that you recommend that are in line with your manifestation formula? I wish there was! This is a question I get all the time. In fact, I never intended to write a book, but I’m having to now as it just simply doesn’t exist. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Watch TV shows. We are avid show bingers. It’s one of the only ways that I can thoroughly check out as I’m so Aquarius and vata. I just transport to another world and completely disconnect with all the pressure I’m responsible for in this one. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Right now… Book – The Awakened Family Song/­­Album – Alice Coltrane, “Om Shanti” Movie – Lady Bird Art – Ryan Snow -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? A cozy wool sweater, boots, jeans, Gold Genesis, eye mask, and a book. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Shiva Rose and Meredith Baird. Photos courtesy of Free & Native and Serafina LoGiacco. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2

November 2 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2 Here comes Part 2 of our Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, complete with cozy dinner and dessert recipes for the week. There are stellar homemade veggie burgers, a nourishing stew, and beautifully simple roasted plums for dessert. To see the breakfast and lunch recipes, as well as the grocery shopping list for the entire meal plan, head to Part 1. We hope you’ll find this entire thing useful, and we’d love to hear any feedback you have, as always :) Menu (see Part 1 for breakfast and lunch recipes) Breakfast Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins Lunch Grain Bowl with Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup Dinner Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers w/­­ Any Fixings of Choice Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew Dessert Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Day by Day Prep List Monday Night: Make the Veggie Burgers to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you’ve already cooked the squash, rice, kale and lentils that are called for in the recipe during prep day. Roast the plums for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. - Make the Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers. - Make the Rosemary-Roasted Plums with Cardamom Sprinkle. Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the Veggie Burgers, prepare the Brussels Sprouts Stew for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week.  - Make the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew.   Recipes 1. These veggie burgers utilize the lentils, brown rice, squash, and kale that you already cooked during prep day. They are nourishing, satisfying, and cooked in the oven, which means that you won’t have to spend any time frying them on the pan. The flavors are earthy and warming, and the burgers develop really nice, crispy edges as they bake. Enjoy them for dinner with any fixings of choice, on burger buns, inside lettuce wraps, or even alongside a green salad. Make sure to try them with the Lentil and Squash Hummus from Part 1 as well. Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers   Print Serves: 9 veggie burgers Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes about 2 tablespoons chopped sage, rosemary and thyme (optional) 4 garlic cloves - minced blanched kale (from part 1) - chopped roughly sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 cup toasted pumpkin seeds 1½ cups cooked brown rice (from part 1) 1½ cups cooked lentils (from part 1) remaining ½ cup roasted butternut squash (from part 1) 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar or apple cider vinegar Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Warm the coconut oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add the onion, red pepper flakes and herbs, if using, and sauté for 7 minutes, until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic and cook for another minute, then add the kale, salt and pepper, and stir around for another minute. Add the tomato paste and toss to mix well. Remove the pan from heat. Transfer the pumpkin seeds to a food processor and pulse into small pieces. Add the rice, lentils, squash, vinegar, and the sautéed onion and kale mixture to the food processor. Pulse until well-mixed and combined into a chunky mixture. Taste for salt, add more if needed. Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Use a ½ cup measurement to form burger patties and finish shaping each patty with your hands. Arrange the patties on the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 25-35 minutes, until the burgers look nicely toasted. Serve on burger buns, lettuce wraps, or alongside salad with any burger fixings of choice. Store in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. These burgers also freeze very well. 3.5.3226   2. A pot of good stew is such a great solution to the weekday dinner problem, especially during the colder months. It doesn’t take too long to make and lasts a while in the fridge, only getting better with time. This one is made with so many star ingredients of warming fall fare: mushrooms, carrots, garlic and onion, as well as jarred tomatoes, brussels sprouts and lentils. There’s smoked paprika, too, which ensures a bit of piquancy and depth of flavor. Serve this stew with crusty sourdough bread or over any brown rice, left over from the veggie burgers. Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 teaspoon whole cumin seeds 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt 1 lb crimini mushrooms - sliced freshly ground black pepper 6 garlic cloves - sliced 1 jalape?o - seeded and chopped 2 medium carrots - sliced 1 lb Brussels sprouts - trimmed and halved (quartered for larger ones) 1 teaspoon smoked paprika kale cooking water from part 1, veggie broth or purified water 2-3 bay leaves (optional) remaining cooked lentils from part 1 - about 1½ cups 28 oz box or can crushed tomatoes 4 cups baby spinach Instructions Warm the coconut oil in a medium saucepan. Add the cumin and sauté for about 1 minute, until fragrant. Add the onion and salt and sauté for 5 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms and black pepper and cook for about 8 minutes, until all the liquid thats released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the garlic, jalapeno, carrots, Brussels sprouts and paprika, and stir to coat for about 2 minutes. Add enough of the reserved kale cooking liquid (from part 1), veggie broth, or purified water to achieve a thick stew consistency (keep in mind that youll also be adding crushed tomatoes). Add the bay leaves at this point too, if using. Bring to a simmer. Cook, partially covered, for 10 minutes. Add the cooked lentils and crushed tomatoes, bring everything back to a simmer and cook for another 10 minutes. Discard the bay leaves, if using. Add the spinach at the end, and stir it in until wilted. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Serve over rice or with crusty sourdough bread. 3.5.3226   3. Roasting up a sizable batch of fruit is a great way to ensure that you’ll have beautiful, healthy dessert for the week. Add a little dollop of ice cream or yogurt (have you tried this coconut one?!), and you’re in business. These plums are roasted with coconut sugar, which brings out their sweetness, and rosemary, which contributes its piney, earthy notes. Besides ice cream/­­yogurt, I love serving the plums with a sprinkling of toasted pumpkin seeds, cardamom and cacao nibs. Another idea: try topping the millet porridge from Part 1 with some of the roasted plums for one of your breakfasts. If you can’t find plums, try a similar roasting technique with apples or pears (and include cinnamon in your sprinkle). Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle   Print Ingredients 8 ripe plums - sliced in half and pitted 2 tablespoons coconut sugar 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary ¼ cup toasted pumpkin seeds - roughly chopped 2-3 cardamom pods - shells discarded, ground in a mortar and pestle 1 tablespoon cacao nibs (optional) vanilla ice cream or plain yogurt - for serving Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place the plums on the baking sheet, cut side up. Generously sprinkle each plum with the coconut sugar and rosemary. Put in the oven and roast for 20-30 minutes, until soft throughout. Meanwhile, combine the pumpkin seeds, cardamom and cacao nibs in a small bowl. Serve the plums with ice cream/­­yogurt, sprinkled with the pumpkin seed cardamom mixture. 3.5.3226   < < .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh

October 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Ally Walsh is a model and co-founder of Los Angeles-based organic coffee company, Canyon Coffee. Though we’ve never met, we love Ally’s easy-going approach to wellness, her beautiful instagram, and what her and her partner are doing over at Canyon. It’s an all-around girl crush :) In this interview, Ally tells us about her transition from a vegetarian diet to a feel-good, intuitive diet, the tonic she always takes before bed, the books she’s found to be instrumental to her well-being, exercise, beauty, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I love routine, but that probably has a lot do to with the fact that my schedule is constantly changing! I really enjoy my morning routine, waking up early and making coffee at home. But its always nice to switch things up and come back to that. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning.  I definitely try to ease into my morning. I used to grab my phone first thing when I woke up--now I keep it out of the bedroom. Instead, the first thing I do when I wake up (on a good day!) is sit upright and do a 20 minute meditation. To me, theres no better way to start off the day. Meditation is always followed by some Canyon Coffee. At home, I typically make a pour-over, which is another little opportunity to be mindful as I start my day. On a day off its so nice to sit outside on the porch with some friends and read and have coffee together. We get the New York Times delivered to our house on Sunday mornings and I could spend the whole day reading and relaxing outside in the sun. Its honestly one of my favorites things to do. If I’m shooting though, or out of town for a job, most days start early and end late. The schedule for modeling is often last minute--I sometimes dont know my schedule until the day or night before. In contrast, its nice to have Canyon, where I make my own schedule. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I make a glass of calm/­­magnesium before bed every night! I take that with me wherever I go--security always pull me aside at the airport to ask about what this white powder is ha :) Aside from magnesium, Ill sometimes make a warm tonic with some ashwaganda. And reading always helps me to fall asleep. I guess I wouldn’t call it a ritual, but I do love watching a show or movie before sleep, too. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast: I have a cup of black coffee and almond butter or avocado toast with gluten-free bread every morning. Im a creature of habit... I have my favorite go-tos, and Im happy eating them every day. If I have to work super early sometimes i like to make overnight chia seed oatmeal. Ill mix in some oats, chia seeds, almond milk, maca and flax seeds, and then in the morning top it off with some fruit and almond butter. Lunch:  Usually a salad with quinoa, avocado, kimchi, roasted seasonal vegetables, seeds, lemon and different oils like grapeseed, olive, and white wine vinegar. I would also be very happy with just roasted kabocha squash and pesto :) Snack: Cashews, pumpkin seeds, Dates and almond butter, green juice, avocado toast, and currently addicted to Honey Mamas Chocolate! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Well, it kind of comes with starting a coffee company ;) Some people are surprised to learn, though, that I only drink one cup of black coffee in the morning! Thats pretty much it. I cant do too much caffeine. Only on rare occasions, like when Im on vacation, will I have an afternoon espresso or cortado. I was in Copenhagen and Stockholm recently, and fell in love with oatmilk cortados! Definitely pushed my caffeine limit there! -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I honestly don’t! I love raw chocolate, but Im really sensitive to sugar! So Im kind of weird in that I really dont love sweets. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? In addition to magnesium at night (for sleep), Ill take ashwaganda at any time of the day for my adrenals, and probiotics daily. I feel such a difference when I take b12, too. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Yes. Yoga has been such an important practice to me, for years. I usually go to a class a couple times a week. I intersperse that with hiking in the Santa Monica mountains and walks on the beach. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I actually look forward to exercise. I dont really partake in any forms of exercise that arent enjoyable. For example, Ive never really gotten into spinning or boot camp-style workouts. I love getting out in nature for hikes, and I find an hour-and-a-half in the yoga studio to be very meditative. After a long work day, I really look forward to being able to do something nice for my body. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really think the most beautiful people are those that feel confident in their skin and are who they want to be--not what society expects them to be. Someone thats naturally comfortable in any setting. As a model, so much emphasis is put on the external, and thats important for a photograph or video. But in person, beauty really does come from within. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I think the most important thing for healthy skin is to eat and drink clean. Especially drinking lots of water. As for products, I use the most natural that I can find. I love Earth tu Face, True Botanicals, Osea and Linne! I use oils for moisturizing and just use water to wash my face in the morning. I love using Bodha and CAP Beauty rose water spray, too. Ill try to do a face mask once a week from Wildcare while taking a bath! Its very relaxing :) -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water! I also think getting a good night of sleep is just as important! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Stay hydrated. My mom is 59 & has the most beautiful skin – not one wrinklel! And she swears by drinking lots of water! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Im trying to get better at this, but acupuncture has been a life saver! Its a place to relax and reset. I see Maria at Elysia Life Care and she is life-changing! I think getting into a regular routine of acupuncture and meditation can help so much with stress. After having a consistent routine with both, you start to notice things that used to stress you or make you upset no longer have the same power or effect on you. You can laugh it off, or just observe it and not be affected by it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Going on a walk always helps. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Lycopene vitamin C packets, lots of ginger and tea tree oil (usually just put it in my water!) -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? This has been a learning process for me, how to balance everything. Modeling, Canyon Coffee, relationship with my partner, my friends, and time for myself. Especially with starting a company with your partner, that start-up grind can be all-consuming because theres always more work you can do! So weve had to learn how to turn off- and make sure to make time for a date night! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? My goal is to maintain a state of love (as opposed to state of stress, or lack, or anger, etc.). I was lucky to learn from a qi gong master named George Falcon for a couple years before he passed, and I feel like his teachings provided me with tools to help stay in this mindset throughout the stressors and obstacles of daily life. One of the big ones is to take responsibility for our actions and state of being. Its easy for us to blame, to say he, she, or it made me feel this way. But really its our decision. Of course, we sometimes fall out of that consciousness of love. When Im not feeling well, my first step is to take a break. To meditate, listen to a recorded guided meditation of George, go on a walk or a hike. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Ive made different changes throughout my life that have been substantial in terms of my wellness. I stopped eating meat when I was 19, then introduced fish (mainly salmon!) back in years later. Acupuncture has perhaps been the most substantial in helping me maintain balance and wellness. All of these changes or decisions are really informed by just listening to my body. You can get caught up in the mindset and identity of, say, Im vegan. But its important to check in with yourself and ask, Am I feeling good? Is this helping live a balanced and vibrant life? If not, then its important to make a change! -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. So many books! If I had to pick two, Id say Anatomy of the Spirit by Caroline Myss and Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert. Anatomy really opened me to the power of our bodies to heal and self-nourishment. It helped me connect my mental and spiritual state to my health and well-being. Its a book you can go back to, re-read and continue to learn from over time. Big Magic was instrumental in motivating me to start Canyon Coffee. It made me feel like I had more to give, creatively, and pushed me to start something with a greater purpose. It brought clarity to the creative process for me, breaking it down in a way that makes it approachable and applicable to my own life. Its one of those books that really inspires you to follow your dreams, and what could be more important for self-nourishment? Knowlegde -- You run Canyon Coffee together with your boyfriend, Casey. What was your path to starting your own coffee company? Personally, I was feeling uninspired. I felt like I wasnt making the most of my creativity and talents. Ive always been grateful for my modeling career, but I had also always wanted to start something of my own, and I was feeling that itch. Casey and I had both fallen in love with coffee over the years... through making it at home together and visiting coffee shops in our travels and around LA. Casey actually started working in the coffee industry, and we became friends with a roaster, James. Eventually, our passion for it grew to the point that we had the thought: why not start our own company? It really was a natural culmination. The moment we decided we wanted to do it, we just never looked back. -- What is your process when choosing beans for Canyon Coffee? Are there certain growing practices, flavor profiles, or geographical locations that are important to you? The universal practice of tasting different beans is called cupping. It involves preparing small roasted samples of different beans exactly the same way and trying them at the same time. For Canyon, our parameters narrow down our options. We usually decide on a country first, and then see what organic, seasonal beans grown at high altitudes are available through the network of importers near us in California. Then we order samples, cup, and choose the bean that smells and tastes best to us. High altitude is important because the elevation makes the coffee plant grow slower and put more energy into producing cherries. The slow growth results in cherries (and coffee beans) that are much more flavorful and vibrant. To start Canyon, we focused on Latin American coffees and wanted to find amazing-tasting beans in the chocolatey /­­ caramel flavor profile. We went with beans from Guatemala and Colombia first, because theyre known for these flavor profiles and they have great infrastructure for small coffee producers to process and export their beans. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love going to the movies :) And a nice dinner out before or after. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Anatomy of the Spirit .. anything from Krishnamurti & Ram Dass Song/­­Album – Paul Simon – Graceland, Feist – Let it Die, Lord Huron – Lonesome Dreams Movie – Beginners Piece of Art – Robert Lango Men In the Cities, Alfred Stieglitz’ Portraits of Georgia OKeeffe -- What are your favorite places to eat in LA? Gjusta/­­ Gjelina, Honey Hi, Amara Kitchen, Pace, Botanica, Necco, Destroyer, Erewhon -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Im actually in the process of moving out of my house right now! Were taking advantage of the end of our lease to do some traveling and try out living in some new neighborhoods. As a result, Im having to put a lot of my stuff in storage. Its been really nice to get rid of a lot of things and simplify to the essentials. But as far as traveling goes, I always have with me.. – new book and magazines – headphones – Jesse Kamm pants – Nikes – journal – Bodha rose water spray – probiotics – magnesium and ashwaganda  – sparkling water – ursa major rings – eye mask – almond butter packets -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Emily LAmi of Bodha, and Lacy Phillips at Free & Native! Both these women are a constant inspiration! You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte

October 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte This happens to me pretty much every day at around 3 o’clock, providing that I’m working from home. I get up from my desk, put on the teapot, throw a bunch of things in the blender, whirl it all together, and end up with a cozy and satisfying latte-ish drink that gets me through to dinner time. I don’t drink caffeine anymore, because I’ve always been very sensitive to it, and found that avoiding it altogether really helps with even energy levels (I may have made a few exceptions in Italy :)). But this little ritual takes me back to the days when 3 o’clock meant a cup of really good tea or a matcha. There’s really nothing better. I end up making a different drink every time, based on my mood and the ingredients I have on hand, but the general formula is the same. There’s always something for creaminess, something for flavor, something for an energy boost… So I thought I’d give a ‘no-recipe’ recipe here, as well as a few of my favorite combinations. Midday super-latte making is a really fun routine to add to your day if you’re around a blender, and it’s good for your in a number of ways: it gets you out of the busyness of the day and nudges you to take a break, it’s creative, and the beverage you’ll end up with will likely be good-for-you, warming and tasty. Tahini Hot Chocolate This was one of our most popular recipes last winter. It’s an incredibly satisfying blender hot chocolate that comes together in seconds. Rosemary Hot White Chocolate Another hot chocolate, but this one is a white hot chocolate infused with rosemary. A great case for using cacao butter in drinks, which lends both its chocolatey flavor, as well as a richness and a froth. Spirulina Latte Another blender latte, but this time boosted with all the green benefits of spirulina, without the swampy taste. Chamomile Latte The most grounding and delicious latte to drink before bed. Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca Playing off New Orleans-style coffee, this herbal mocha is a great option for those trying to take a break from coffee and missing it dearly. Chicory brings a coffee-like richness, while maca and cacao boost energy. Honey Miso Latte This is basically a golden milk latte, but boosted with the flavor and health benefits of miso and raw honey. I like to drink this one before plane journeys, since miso might be helpful when it comes to countering the radiation we are exposed to on any given flight. Hibiscus Ginger Latte This latte gets is beautiful color and a pleasant sour note in the flavor from steeped hibiscus flowers. Pear Cranberry Chai Any modesty aside, this is the best chai I’ve ever had or made in my life. A great example for how creative you can get with your beverages, this one uses both fruit and a bunch of healing spices to achieve an otherworldly flavor. No-Recipe Vegan Cozy Latte Start With: This is your base liquid, which will determine what other ingredients you will add to your blender. Choose one or a couple. Hot water is a blank canvas, while herbal coffee and tea will give you a base flavor, which you can play off off with your other ingredients. - hot waterchicory coffee or Dandy Blend - teaherbal, black, green, etc. - hot plant milkcoconut, almond, cashew, oat, etc. Creamy: Add one of these ingredients or a combination of a few of them for a rich, extra-creamy latte, especially important to include if you are just using hot water as the base. - coconut buttertahinialmond butter/­­cashew butter/­­any other nut butter - tocos - cacao butter Frothy: This is optional if you already have a creamy element, but adding some extra fat to your latte contributes to the most beautiful froth. Also, if your base is something with caffeine like a black or green tea, this will help slow the absorption of caffeine for a more even boost of energy (like in Bulletproof coffee). - Coconut oil/­­MCT oil - Ghee Sweet: Add as much sweetness as you need, tasting as you go. - dates - raw honey - maple syrup - date syrup Flavor: Play off your drink base while adding some flavor. Both cacao powder and turmeric do well in creamy, milky drinks, while spices, herbs and vanilla can be used millions of ways (just see the drink round-up above). - cacao powder - cacao butterturmeric - other spices like cinnamon, cardamom, nutmeg, gingervanilla - herbs - miso Extras & Boosts: My absolute favorite energy-boosting ingredient for drinks is maca powder – it instantly wakes me up and tastes so delicious. But there are a ton of other boosters you can add to your lattes, some ideas below. - maca powder - cacao butter - other adaptogens: chaga, reishi, lion’s mane, cordyceps, ashwagandha - more: pearl powder, tocos, mucura pruriens, spirulina, etc. etc. Blend all your components until frothy and enjoy :) You might also like... Berry Kombucha Float Peach and Zucchini Smoothie Avocado Kiwi Smoothie and a Jus by Julie Cleanse Giveaway Honey Miso Latte .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin

October 11 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Amy Chaplin is an author and chef, whose approach to whole foods and cooking is endlessly inspiring. Her cookbook is nothing short of a kitchen bible to us. We had the pleasure of meeting up with Amy in NYC a few years ago and had the best time chatting about our favorite subjects like sprouted flours, cookbook publishing, and acupuncture. Needless to say, we were excited to get a peak at her self-care routine. In this interview, Amy tells us about the valuable self-care tips she learned from her mother, her favorite meals made with pantry staples, the skincare brand she’s been using since she was a teenager, her approach to exercise, stress, and so much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I like both. I like to have a morning routine and create a work routine for whatever project Im working on but I also like to have time for free thinking and spontaneously connecting with friends. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I get up early, 6 am  is the usual time but sometimes eariler depending on what Im working on. I make warm lemon water, light a candle and mediate for 10 to 15 minutes. In late summer the sun is coming up just as I finish and I usually sit for a bit and often reply to messages from Austrlia (they are going to bed around that time). Then I feed our two dogs (my wife takes them out on a long morning walk) start making breakfast and make sencha tea. Sometimes I skip the sencha and have a matcha latte after breakfast but I try not to have too much caffeine, as much as I love it! If Im working on recipes from home, I quickly shower, dress and get started right away....sometimes before breakfast but it depends on what Im testing :) -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I stop working on the computer before dinner and leave it closed. I leave my phone downstairs so its far from my bedroom. I get into bed and usually read cookbooks or watch an episode of any series Im currently obsessed with :) Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast –  soaked oats + chia (recipe is in my book) or activated grain porridge with homemade nut milk, cardamom and berries. I usually eat grains once a day and its usually in the morning. LunchBeans of some kind --depending on recipes Im testing. Kraut or other fermented veg, greens--salad or steamed depending on weather. I usually add some toppings too: hemp seeds, toasted seeds, sunflower sprouts, scallions anything to make it tasty Snack – Seeded crackers and nut butter/­­avocado/­­bean pate or chia pudding or coconut yogurt Dinner – An egg or tempeh, avocado, steamed veg and a dressing of some kind--this is often quite small as Im not always hungry if I have a good lunch or if Im testing and sampling recipes. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Yes. I love green tea. Sencha is my favorite for its fresh, grassy umami taste. Rishi Tea First Flush Sencha is sublime. I also love their ceremonial grade matchas with foamed, homemade almond milk. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to but I havent eaten sugar on a regular basis for years. If Im craving something sweet I eat a few spoons of Anitas coconut yogurt--it has a naturally sweet flavor from coconut with no sweetener. If I have a berry compote around Ill have some of that with it but I never sweeten them as Ive gotten used to just the sweetness of the berries. Of course there are times when Im testing recipes for cakes and muffins and I do enjoy tasting them and the same goes for good raw chocolate. Im not rigid about it as its part of being a chef but I dont seek out sugar on a daily basis. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I change depending on what my acupuncturist recommends in the way of Chinese herbs. I have been taking spirulina to increase protein and greens lately. I take a vitamin D. Ive been adding maca powder to my breakfasts for years so dont really consider it a supplement. I like adding locally grown ashwagandha (from Furnace Creek Farm) and reishi or chaga mushroom powder to hot cacao drinks. I drink nettle tea everyday because I love it, especially when you can get it fresh from the farmers market. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  With my job being so physical, these days I gravitate towards Qi Gong and yoga--the gentler classes. I also tend to exercise by default. Walking everywhere, long dog walks, biking and general schlepping around the city and up and down stairs with heavy bags of veggies! -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I used to push myself with torturous classes and long runs but now I do less and enjoy it more. I know that I am more productive when I make time for movement but it has to be mindful.  I do yoga at home and love it when I have the time for long luxurious classes...especially restorative. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Beauty to me is an inner glow that comes from something beyond what and how we take care of our bodies. Mostly it comes with time and a spiritual sense of oneself, our path, the world and other beings around us. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Ive used Dr. Hauschka since I was a teenager. I have a huge respect for biodynamic growing practices and love the way they preserve their products naturally. I think its one of the most difficult things with natural skin care products--preserving. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Local organic veggies, lots of greens, seeds… -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I notice a difference in my skin when I use a warm compress of essential oils (Dr. Hauschka calls them bath oils). You put a few drops in warm water and soak a face cloth, squeeze it out and press it into your skin. I use lemongrass in the morning and lavender at night. Then you cleanse and use the same water to wash the cleanser off. They smell so good and your skin feels really clean and enlivened afterwards. Its my mothers beauty secret, she looks amazing! :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Mainly daily meditation and breathing. I dont feel as clear or grounded without it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Hot shower and miso soup :) -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Make miso soup with lots of ginger and scallions and I also take Woodstock C & F Seasonal Support. It always helps with a sore throat or when Im feeling under the weather. Gargling sea salt with warm water. Colloidal silver spray. Hot lemon drink with grated ginger and turmeric. Bath and sleep. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely overlap. I love what I do and have found comfort in the kitchen for as long as I can remember. Of course there are days when work completely takes over but even when my schedule is jam packed, I try and make time to spend with my partner, cuddle the dogs and see family--it just means well be eating recipes that are being tested and theyre grilled for feed back! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I aften find myself saying “everything is working out for my highest good and remembering that everything is perfect as it is. I grew up with Louise Hay books. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Over time my lifestyle and diet has improved and I have a much more balanced approach. I used to be quite strict at times and I know that its not the way to great health for me anyway. I think now I have better overall health so I dont get thrown off on a regular basis. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Paul Pitchford’s “Healing with Whole Foods has been in my life for over 20 years and I still consult it. It always gets me in the mood for pure, simple temple-like food. My self care is also influenced by my mother. She has a deep connection to nature and a daily ritual of foot baths, lemon water in the morning and making a nightly hot water bottle (in the cooler months) Ive carried on these rituals...but dont seem to get the foot baths in as often as she does. Knowledge -- Your recipes are so well thought out and always turn out delicious, as well as incredibly nourishing. What is your process when it comes to recipe development? Thank you so much! My recipes all begin with what I crave, which is mostly deeply nourishing food with clean uncomplicated flavors. They have to make sense to me and not only be healthy but also be visually beautiful. Nature and beauty are what inspire me most. When I am developing recipes I want the steps to be clear and thorough. I spend a lot of time with new recipes before they are published. Theyre all tested over and over again by myself, friends, family and recipe testers. I feel a lot of responsibility to readers who spend time and money and a lot of effort making my recipes...they have to work and taste delicious! -- You are a big proponent of keeping a well-stocked pantry. What are some of your favorite meals that you like to throw together with pantry ingredients? Simple wraps with nori, fermented veggies, avocado (not really pantry but I always have a few of varying ripeness around). Barrys tempeh, which is made from white beans and adzuki beans and sold frozen, it tastes amazing just panfried in coconut oil. In Australia you can get fresh fava bean tempeh and Im missing it so much! Red lentil soup with lemon and spinach from my cookbook. That is perfect for right now when the weather is getting cooler and if you dont have much in the way of veg. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Drive to the country with my wife, play with my nephew, drink tea and sit in the morning sun. Have a pedicure. Travel and be in nature. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – “The Power of Intention” by Wayne Dyer Song/­­Album – Blue by Joni Mitchell Movie – I recently saw Lion and was so moved Piece of Art – Yoko Onos simple, whimsical pieces -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in NYC? ABC V, Via Carota, Ilbuco Alimentari, De Maria -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – Good tea selection + strainer for infusing – Activated or toasted nuts – Spirulina – Pajamas and cosy sox (no matter the season) – Large scarf/­­shawl – Cardigans -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Luise from Green Kitchen Stories, Henrietta Inman, Elenore from Earthsprout, Emma from My Darling Lemon Thyme..... Photos by Amy Chaplin and Stephen Kent Johnson. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov

September 24 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Today’s self-care dialogue is with Tonya Papanikolov, holistic nutritionist, plant-based chef, and creator of The Well Woman. Tonya is a true renaissance woman, well-versed in all things wellness, mindfulness, and natural healing. We are constantly inspired by her otherworldly plant cheese plates and other whole food creations, as well as her radiance and spirit. In this interview, Tonya tells us about her approach to exercise and stress, the protocol she’s been implementing for skin integrity and gut healing, her favorite facial massage tool, her path to holistic nutrition, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I honestly really need both! Routine is so important in keeping me aligned, on track and grounded however too much of it interferes with my natural creative process. I like routine for certain things like: waking up in the morning, meditation, yoga, bowel movements, meals. However, Im a very spontaneous person and I absolutely need the freedom to throw everything up in the air to do something unpredictable. Im distracted quite easily, which means I may go on a walk and begin to inspect the sap coming out of a cedar tree which derails my routine for dinner time, hypothetically speaking ;) Those are moments I happily take freedom over routine. But its all a fine balance. There cant be too much regimentation and there cant be too much freedom. The pendulum is always somewhere along the spectrum being balanced and fine-tuned. Right now in my life, based on various situations and work, I have very little routine and it is actually something Ill be working on in the fall! Calling in some solid routine. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. Mornings do differ from day to day. It just depends on what I have going on. My ideal morning would be waking around 6:30-7am and having a big glass of lemon water before a 30-minute meditation, followed by a return to bed for a cuddle and hug. Next I would have a quick cold shower and head to the kitchen to make a morning elixir. This might be a coffee with nut milk and herbs or matcha, pearl, collagen or whatever else I feel like throwing in my blender that day based on how Im feeling! But definitely a warm beverage and some reading material. I would then begin to prioritize my day and make a list of everything I want to accomplish. I really like to save some time in the mornings to respond to emails, its been a goal of mine this year to get better at responding to emails in a timely manner. But if we had to strip everything down to the bare essentials: the absolute perfect morning is any morning that I have prioritized my meditation before everything else. This is absolute self-care time and if I do nothing else but this, I am ready for my day. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Not specifically at this time. I feel very lucky to be a great sleeper. Bedtime is funny because on the one hand I know I should be going to bed earlier but on the other Im never tired in the evening and am extremely productive during these hours. It is the time of the day I love to work the most! I am the clearest, calmest, there are so few distractions for me and I never feel my energy dip at night (for better or worse). I rarely feel tired at any point in the day so I will happily stay working until 11pm. I do try to limit computer time at night and if I cant then I always have f.lux on my screen to cast off the blue light. Im really working on this! Id like to begin shutting down work by 10pm latest but when you are working for yourself, its not always possible! I feel quite blessed that I fall asleep as soon as my head hits the pillow and that I wake with ease as well. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast - a big green smoothie, a green juice, a warm elixir in the winter time, often with cacao. I will usually add a plant-based, raw, fermented protein to my smoothie or elixir. Sometimes Ill have a piece of sourdough toast from a local organic bakery with nut butter or some avocado and lemon. Lunch - a salad with raw seasonal vegetables or some cooked vegetables like broccoli, squash, sweet potato. Or steamed greens with sauerkraut, hummus and sprouts. Snack - some of my plant-based cheeses with chia/­flax crackers DinnerSoup, dahl, kitchari I love making elaborate meals for dinner gatherings and special evenings but when Im cooking for myself I like to aim for simple, healthy and balanced. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do! But Im not that religious about it. I have one drink in the morning that is caffeinated which will alternate between a high-quality coffee or a matcha. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I cant say I do. I dont consume any processed sugar so this helps keep everything in check. When I do bake or use a sweetener I go for maple syrup, honey or dates. I dont feel fiendish about sweet stuff or have cravings for it. I feel lucky for this. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I am just getting through a protocol for strengthening skin integrity and gut healing. I was using a potent antioxidant Quercetin, vitamin C, collagen, an EFA supplement and a general clean diet free of the major allergens. My skin issue cleared up very quickly once I begun this protocol. I also got a good dose of salt water and vitamin D from the sun which played a huge role and were the missing pieces. But in terms of everyday stuff I take a vegan probiotic and ashwagandha. I rotate other things in and out like maca, he shou wu, schisandra. I also drink a nettle and astragalus tea. Id like to say I get everything I need from a healthful diet and clean water but Im a very sensitive being and have a long history of gut trouble like IBS (its really good now!) but this means that I do take extra care with supplementation and herbs when Im feeling sensitive or stressed. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  My day to day is extremely active and yoga is my main form of routine movement. I also dance a lot. I find it to be a wonderful way to start the day. Im usually on my bike for over an hour a day as well and this definitely gets my heart rate up. I go on the occasional run or to a spin class but as we move into Fall Im going to be looking for a new form of movement and exercise - something a bit more strenuous. This is part of the routine Ill be looking to form for fall. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I do find it pleasurable. I dont think Id ever describe the process as torturous (ha!) but I definitely think the hardest part is just getting to the class. Having the motivation to go every day or every other. Once Im there I feel good instantly. The moving and stretching make me feel stronger as the class gets more intense. And of course afterwards, the feeling is the best. Endorphins, detoxing, cooling the body down. Sign me up! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I like to think of beauty from an energetic, magnetism point of view. When I feel my most beautiful its generally an energetic state Im in where I exude magnetism. And Im not talking about a physical beauty magnetism but more of an energetic allure for life, a curiosity. I think other people notice that. I definitely notice that in other people. I find food and nature to have so much physical beauty and that definitely effects the final dishes/­plates I make. Im an aesthete through and through. My eyes see such beauty in ordinary everyday life moments: the colour of someones eyes, their laugh, the way they move their hands, little unnoticed smirks, hair blowing in the wind, a cluster of sunflowers growing toward the sun, the sound of leaves in the wind. This is all so beautiful to me. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Im big on my skincare regime! If I had it my way Id go for natural facials every month but it usually turns out to be once a season. I use natural products from Pure and Simple in Toronto, Naturopathica and Living Libations which is a Canadian company. Nadine makes incredible skincare products from Haliburton Ontario, you can read her interview on The Well Woman. I only use natural products on my skin which should come as no surprise! My regime is the usual: cleanser, toner, serum and cream. I also have a jade facial gua sha tool that I massage my face with after serum. Best Skin Ever is a pretty remarkable product, its an oil based serum. I try to stay on top of a weekly exfoliation and mask. If you notice your skin getting dull the best way to correct it is with some weekly exfoliation. I use a fig enzyme peel and a clay mask. I try to do this once a week. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­hair/­general glow? Water! The easiest way to get beautiful, hydrated and glowing skin is from drinking 2L + water a day. Other things that help are drinking bone broth, colonics or coffee enemas always make my skin and eyes glow because they are so beneficial to our gut health. Getting good sleep is key and meditation is always elevating and leaves me with a glow. A plant-based diet with lots of veggies, greens and fermented foods is also key. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My facial gua sha massage tool! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Meditation, yoga, breath-work, moving my body, laughing at myself, dancing. I use ashwagandha daily too. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? All of the above! I also will talk it out with friends and my sister, family, my therapist. My therapist uses an amazing method that she has been teaching me called the Sedona Method (its an amazing book that I highly suggest). Shes not your usual therapist who you just talk to. She makes me release on all feelings and this has been an incredible tool for releasing stress, fear or any negative emotion. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Oil of oregano, lots of water, a tea with ginger, turmeric and raw honey, minimal food (so that the body can send all of its energy into fighting off the bug instead of to digestion) and LOTS of sleep! -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? There is such overlap for me! Life and work are very intertwined, one in the same. And although I love it that way Im trying to implement some more boundaries and turn-off time. But the fact is that I love what I do so much so working doesnt come with a burden. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Some of the tools have become engrained at this point. I have a morning gratefulness practice of putting my hands toward the ceiling and going over everything I am grateful for in that moment. Its really just about making new habits and setting them as priorities. I try to take 20 minutes a day for stillness in the form of meditation and breath work. I journal regularly as well. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Eating a plant-based diet that consists of mostly vegetables, lots of green smoothies and healthy fats. Diet has been number one, followed by yoga and meditation. -- A book/­movie/­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Many books along the way. Siddhartha. The Great Work of Your Life (which not-so coincidentally appeared on my door step one day). All the books I read while studying at The Institute of Holistic Nutrition. Knowledge -- Have you always been interested in the connection between wellness and sustenance? What was your path to studying Holistic Nutrition?  My interest started quite young. I ate really healthy as a kid, my favourite food growing up were carrots (?!). The trend continued as a teenager but I definitely had a lot to learn. I knew I wanted to get into nutrition in high school and chose a university school and program accordingly. I studied nutritional science for four years at the University of Guelph and thought I would become a naturopathic doctor but decided to switch directions after school. I got into a totally different line of work in fashion, where I worked for a Canadian retailer doing fashion direction! It was a really fun job but after a substantial amount of stress and awakening, I decided to pivot back into health, wellness and food. I went back to school, to the Institute of Holistic Nutrition in Toronto. -- You make your own plant cheeses and even developed a plant cheese plate for the Toronto restaurant Nota Bene! How did you come across the plant cheese-making practice and develop your own recipes? What’s your favorite cheese that you make? I learned the process to make the plant-based cheeses while studying at Matthew Kenney Culinary in California, from there its just been experimenting and playing with new flavor and consistency combinations! Thats a tough question, I really love the truffle and charcoal flavor and the freshness of the dill and chive! -- You cook plant-based dinners for groups of people, often centering the food around beautiful themes, like your Spring Equinox dinner. Can you tell us a bit more about the dinners and your approach? Its really just about getting a group together to share in a healthy meal and to show people how versatile, delicious and vibrant a plant-based meal can be. The themes often come from inspiration around the seasons, a book, or an artist. I love the idea of working with a theme for dinners to tie everything together. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Ultimate unwinding is a weekend getaway to a cabin on a lake! Unwinding in nature is always my preference. I treat myself with a facial or going for acupuncture, reiki or to a restorative yoga class. Unwinding can be as simple as a walk. But the classic Tonya move is a back-scratch before bed. My! Favourite! -- A book/­song/­movie/­piece of art to feed the soul: Book - You Are a Circle and You Are a Message Song/­Album - This song that I wake up to each and every morning: Ik Ardas Wahe Guru by White Sun Movie - The Scent of Green Papaya by director Tran Anh Hung Piece of Art - Ronan Bouroullec drawings -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Toronto? Awai, Dandylion, Actinolite, nutbar, Kupfert and Kim, Earth and City -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I love this! Here are some of mine: - Probiotics - Oil of oregano - Camera - 2L of water - A book - My recipe/­poetry notebook - A good pen - A homemade trail mix - My favourite copper spoon - My Jesse Kamms - theyre comfortable and I love wearing them travelling -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Nikisha Brunson! Photos by Nathan Legiehn, Kelly Brown and Tonya Papanikolov. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King

September 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Today’s self-care dialogue is with LA artist and meditation teacher, Lauren Spencer King. We first learned about Lauren a few years ago, when we came across her bimonthly moon writings that ring incredibly true and clear up a lot of things for us every month. Since then, we’ve fallen in love with Lauren’s art and meditation work, which is centered around breath work and her extensive knowledge about the healing powers of minerals. Lauren was kind enough to open up a space for us in her 4 day online meditation workshop for stress and anxiety, and we had the most lovely and calming time following her techniques and suggestions, which we often use to this day. Lauren’s self-care routine is as inspiring as it is down to earth, with a focus on finding the wisdom in the inner self. In this interview, Lauren tells us about the Ayurvedic cleanse she’s on, what minerals she keeps next to her bed, her ideas about exercise and beauty, why she sees the concept of a work-life balance as a myth, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think in my everyday things do feel open and free, its part of the benefit of being an artist and working for yourself. But, I do find routine within that freedom. Days are also made up of habits (good and bad), and trying to prioritize things that are important and meaningful. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I like to have a few hours to wake up and start my day. I like the quiet of the mornings, the possibility of a new day. Sometimes if I happen to wake up really early for some reason, like 5:00am, I like to read in bed for a bit, or watch a scary movie early in the morning. Its weird... I know. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? On good nights I am in bed early and read before I go to sleep. I love reading in bed, there is something about it that feels so intimate. On a not so good night I will work too late, and fall asleep to a movie. I do like to sleep with a few minerals next to my bed, some make their way under my pillow at certain times: purple fluorite to relax my mind, danburite for sweet dreams, aquamarine for calming, a piece of dream quartz, and a piece of shungite that is next to my phone (on airplane mode). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: I am on an Ayurvedic cleanse right now. I have been working with this great Ayurvedic practitioner, her name is Meredith Carter. Years ago I did panchakarma (here), and if I could afford it I would do it annually. Its incredible. What I am doing now is like panchakarma lite! Breakfast – In the morning I make homemade almond milk. I will warm the almond milk and mix in my herbs and adaptogens, sometimes I will add fresh turmeric. I have been obsessed with making sweet potato toasts. I will top them with tahini and a cooked fruit compote (been loving cherry, wild blueberry, or pear ginger), with some pistachio nuts or pumpkin seeds. If I need some protein then I will eat two eggs toped with basil, and a tangerine. Lunch – I make fresh dahl with special non-heating spices and ghee, all of which I get from Surya Spa, they have the best mung beans and spices. Dahl is very healing. I will have a bowl full with some steamed chard or beet greens, black lava sea salt, toasted pumpkin seeds and lots of parsley or coriander on top. Snack – right now cherries are in season and they are making me so happy, I will have a bowl full of them with a handful of pistachios (lets be honest, like 1/­­2 a bag, I love pistachios). And some fresh ginger tea. Or I will make some beet hummus and have that with my favorite almond crackers. Dinner – I have been getting really into making soups! My two favorite are a green soup made with celery /­­ chard /­­ beet greens /­­ asparagus /­­ Japanese sweet potato. And a kabocha /­­ carrot /­­ginger soup. Or I will cook a big artichoke and dip the leaves into a melted ghee, lemon dip. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? None, I have never even had a cup of coffee. I usually have a huge jar of warm water with lemon or fresh ginger in the morning. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to when I was younger, until I developed all sorts of health problems because of it, some that I still deal with even over a decade later. I was living in Paris and eating nothing but delicious breads and sweets! It really took a toll on my body and since then I have cut both out. But, I still dream of flaky French almond croissants. Maybe in another life I will get to enjoy them again. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I love eating a spoonful of Chyawanprash in the morning. My good friend who runs Rebbl and develops all of their delicious drinks sent me a wellness mixture, it has very high grade reshi, ashwaganda and maca in it. I have that every morning. I love QuintEssentials 3.3 minerals. I also swear by Alexis Smarts flower remedies, she is amazing! I also almost always tend to all ailments physical and emotional with a homeopathic remedy from her. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I have an aversion to most forms of exercise, especially any kind of class where an instructor is wearing a headset and yells things at you like, Its almost swimsuit season, ladies. But sometimes I get into a routine where I go to yoga. I like to take hikes and go on walks, and I love to dance. But, my favorite is swimming. Recently I was swimming laps, and was having one of those days where I was feeling very unkind and judgmental of my body, and there was this older man in the lane next to me, he was a very serious swimmer, he might have even been a swim coach at some point, you could just tell. And I stopped to catch my breathe and he asked me how I had such a strong breaststroke. I told him it was because I was on swim team for years as a kid and maybe because I was tall. We talked for a bit about it and then I got back to my laps. And I started to think that in day to day life what I criticize most about my body in other contexts I use to my advantage. In this case, that my un-slender legs and bigger hips and butt actually made me a stronger swimmer and made my stroke more powerful. It really changed the way I thought about my body. I try to remember this. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really love natural beauty, which to me means being whole and owning all of who you are. You know, there are times when I see someone crying, and they dont maybe look their best, but they are so beautiful to me, because they are so present and authentic. Bodies arent meant to be perfect, thats not why we have them. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love oils and go through different phases of them on my face and body. Right now at night I use a hazelnut or arnica oil from a Paris apothecary for my face. I am also completely obsessed with Sans Ceuticalss Activator 7 Oil. I use it everywhere – body, face and hair! I dont really wear make up but when I do it is from RMS. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I either dry brush or do abhyanga massage with basil oil every day, its more for the internal lymphatic system, but it makes my skin really nice. Eating well and drinking enough water are also key. And a little sun is always nice. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I love using my jade face roller to refine the tone of my skin as well as relieve some tension I carry in my jaw. I also am into my second year of no bra, for the most part. For a few reasons, one of them being that they actually arent good for your body. No products with chemicals. My mum was a natural beauty, she really taught me what that was, she had a style that was all her own. She was radiant from the inside out. I sometimes think this is something you are born with. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Stress is often what I teach most about in class, because it has been the biggest teacher to me. I feel I am always at a growing edge with it. I try not to over schedule myself. Rest is a big part of being healthy for me. I have gone through some very difficult periods in my life of having sever adrenal fatigue, which comes from stress of all kinds. So, I have to listen really carefully not to push myself too hard, despite at times wanting to ignore my limitations. Recently I have been working with someone to understand the deeper level of stress that I unconsciously take on from people around me and from living in a city. It has been fascinating. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Yes, sometimes stress can not be avoided, like when I have a show, or need to be on the computer all day, or travel. Those are the big ones for me. I have to really work hard to stay grounded. Its really all sorts of little things, that when I do them really add up. And I just do the best I can, its not about perfection. Even stopping to dance the stress out of my body for five minuets really helps. Stress is more physical than we think. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Stop everything. Get into bed in something comfy with socks. Sleeping as much as I can. Raw garlic. Olive Leaf supplements. Colloidal silver. Apple Cider Vinegar if I have a sore throat. Hot shower (or bath) with eucalyptus oil. Thieves oil on my chest and throat. Lots of water. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I honestly think this idea of work /­­ life balance is a myth. At least it is for me. Sometimes its only about working on Fields of Study, sometimes I am all about being in the studio, sometimes its more relaxing and I can see friends and go on a trip or a weekend getaway. There is balance within the year if I am lucky. I recently just let this idea go, I was making myself feel so bad trying to make that ideal happen on a daily or even weekly timeline. I am also a bit of a workaholic, never feeling like I am doing enough. Thats something I am trying to work on. But, this pressure for balance seems like a modern day version of the women can have it all mantra. There are always compromises and I think its more empowering if we own that and voice it and have conversations about it. Instead of silently thinking that there is something wrong with us. Motivation -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Its not one single thing, but if it was it would be learning to listen to my body. My health and understanding of health has come from a bumpy road of making lots little shifts. I dont believe in a one size fits all mentality for health. I think we are all different and in every moment we need different things. I am wary of the companies and self proclaimed health gurus out there right now that give sometimes ill informed blanket recommendations. I think it is up to us to empower ourselves and take the time to learn about our bodies and ourselves. Its important to have support and create a team of people that can help you. I have an amazing doctor, a homeopathist, an Ayurvedic practitioner, a woman who I do energy work with, and a therapist that have all at different times saved my life in various ways. It can take time, but finding the people that resonate with your understanding of health is key. I have learned so much about my body and what health and healing is from working with all of them. And remembering that deep and true healing takes time. Its always a process. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. What came to mind was this movie Agnes Martin made called Gabriel. Its terribly long and boring. It is about the boy on a walk in nature, and it is very stripped down and minimal, no dialog and most of the movie is silent, it has one tiny part with music. But, I think it relates to the way I think about self-care in a way because it is about listening to the subtleties, and how all of that gets lost when there is a lot going on. Once I really started refining my diet, routine, relationship to my energy, my intuition, etc... I started to really be able to notice those subtle changes and messages my body was sending me, and as time goes on I keep going deeper and deeper. Its like in Martins paintings, when color is introduced, it feels monumental. Like for me, bananas are just too sweet now. Knowledge -- You are well-versed in so many amazing practices! Could you tell us a little bit about each of them: – Your art (would love to know more about your process on the mineral paintings) After graduate school I started making my own watercolors out of historical pigments, mostly from minerals and some earth pigments. I taught myself how to make paints the way they were made for centuries before there were synthetic colors. The mineral monochromes are just one aspect of the work I make, and they are about many things. But, the main ones are a redirection of how we think about representation. I think of them as representational paintings, as they are made of the very thing they are depicting: malachite, azurite, agate, epidote... They are also about an interest in the healing powers of art. They are made with the intention that the viewer and the space receive the same healing properties of the minerals and the earth from which they are sourced. I usually pair them with a highly rendered graphite drawings or watercolors. –  Fields of Study and mineral meditations Some years back after teaching meditation for a bit I was longing for an alternative to what I was seeing in the ways of spiritual teachings and mediation work, both in approach and aesthetic. I wanted to support people and teach them tools they could use in their every day life, while also creating a container for all the things I was interested in and all the things that I brought into my own spiritual practice, which I feel I am always shaping and discovering. Something that would allow for a deep conversation that also had breadth, and was based in every day life and could be accessible. Something that could be malleable and evolve as I did. And Fields of Study was born. I originally wanted to open up a non-profit space that would be like a modern day community center with classes and workshops for the community, as well as have a little shop and a residency space. And someday this might happen. But for now its just me – working to change the world, one person at a time. I say this with some humor, but its also a very real desire to be in service and help instigate change. The same goes for how I teach about minerals, I want to present an alternative, something that resonates with me and represents how I grew up with minerals in my home because of my mother, who was a silversmith. The goal of all those workshops is really to show people that they know more than they think they do, about most things, minerals included. And its not really about helping people feel like they know everything, but showing them that when they ask and they trust themselves they can source the answers. The participants really end up teaching the workshop, which I think is pretty amazing. – Your Moon writings I have been writing about the moon twice a month for about six years now. It really came out of a desire to understand its energy on a deeper level, and also to check in with myself about what I was feeling on a bimonthly basis. Its hard to take credit for the writing as I feel I have gotten to a place with it where I just sit down to write and something comes through me. As out there as that sounds, thats really what happens. I just listen as best as I can, I have gotten pretty good at listening. Writing in this way has really strengthened my intuition, its really incredible. Its also nice to get conformations from people when they write to tell me how right on it was for them. It reminds me that we are all connected. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Swimming in the ocean. The hot springs in Ojai or a trip to Joshua Tree. A bad movie. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Golden Bough and She by Robert A Johnson Song/­­Album – Gamelan Orchestra music, JD Emmanuel, and Neil Youngs album Harvest Moon, particularly Natural Beauty. Its my favorite song. Movie – The Color of Pomegranates Piece of Art – Fragonard, Brancusi, and John McCracken. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Funny enough I just re-read this essay from The White Album where she talks about her packing list related to her being a journalist. At the very end she mentions that the one thing she never had was a watch, which she supposes is some reflection of the climate of the late 60s. But, a watch is the thing I always have, perhaps that says something about me and the times we are living in now. When I travel I also always wear this gold Victorian compass. You never know when you will have to find your way home. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? My Ayurvedic practitioner – Meredith Carter, my Homeopath – Alexis Smart, or anyone of the ladies on the @onigiriemoji Instagram feed I am a part of. Its a feed where a group of friends post what they are cooking and eating. Also, I wish you could have interviewed my mum, she was the best cook, I wish I learned more about cooking from her. Photos by Lauren Spencer King, Claire Cottrell and from Lauren’s shop. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars

September 6 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars It’s been difficult for me to contain my excitement about these Blueberry Coconut Bars ever since I nailed the recipe a few weeks ago. They check all the boxes: easy/­­no-bake, gluten-free, vegan, refined sugar-free/­­not too sweet, fun to put together, and so so delicious. It’s the perfect recipe for those wanting to hold on to summer with all their might. These bars are made up of three complementary layers: there’s a crumbly, no-bake ‘shortbread’ crust, followed by a rich coconut creme layer, which is then topped with a juicy, no-cook blueberry chia jam. The combination is truly heavenly, especially since this is a lighter dessert that won’t weigh you down. You can see all the steps of the cooking process in the video we made above (P.S. We have a Youtube channel with lots of cooking videos, you can subscribe here). These bars are a definite, universal crowd pleaser – absolutely all the friends and family that have tasted them genuinely loved them. They would be the perfect, easy yet impressive dessert to bring to a gathering. Or just make the bars for yourself/­­your family for the week ahead, they’ll keep well in the refrigerator. Hope you’ll give these a try :) No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars   Print Serves: 16 square bars Ingredients for the blueberry chia jam 3 cups frozen blueberries - thawed (do not use fresh, non-frozen blueberries for this recipe) juice of 1 small lemon 3 tablespoons maple syrup 3 tablespoons chia seeds 3 tablespoons chia meal (ground chia seeds) for the shortbread ¾ cup gluten-free rolled oats 12 Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes ¾ cup coconut flour ¼ cup melted coconut oil 1 tablespoon lemon juice pinch of sea salt for the coconut creme 1 can full fat Thai coconut milk - refrigerated overnight to separate fat from water ½ cup unsweetened dried shredded coconut 2 tablespoons maple syrup splash of vanilla extract Instructions to make the blueberry chia jam Thoroughly mix all the ingredients in a medium bowl. Cover and refrigerate for a few hours or overnight, until the chia seeds have bloomed and the mixture resembles a jam-like consistency. Mash the berries partially with a potato masher, leaving plenty of them whole. to make the shortbread Put the oats in a food processor and grind them into a flour. Drain the dates and add them to the food processor, along with the rest of the ingredients. Process until you have a well-combined dough that sticks together when pressed between your fingers. Prepare an 8 x 8 baking dish by lining it with parchment paper, extending the paper up the sides of the dish. Press the shortbread into the bottom of the dish in an even layer. Set aside. to make the coconut creme Scoop the separated coconut fat from the top of the can of coconut milk into a food processor (use the leftover coconut water in smoothies, soups, porridges or lattes). Add the shredded coconut, maple syrup and vanilla extract to the food processor and process until well combined. Be careful not to over-process, as the coconut fat can separate and curdle. to assemble the bars Spread the coconut creme over the shortbread in a thin, even layer. Take the blueberry jam our of the refrigerator and spread it on top of the coconut creme in another even layer. Place the dish into the refrigerator for a few hours or overnight, for the shortbread and coconut layer to set. Once the shortbread and the coconut layer have set, lift out the bar from the dish onto a cutting board, using the extended edges of the parchment paper. Cut into 16 squares or any size/­­shape of choice. Keep refrigerated. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Multigrain Pear Ginger Cakes with Macadamia Whipped Cream Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder Rose and Lavender Parfait and a Breakfast with Friends .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans

August 30 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. I have a major weakness for anything marinated, especially vegetables and beans or lentils, probably because of where I grew up. Though Russian cuisine is known for straightforward foods like meat, potatoes, and mayonnaise-heavy salads, I come from a special pocket in the southwest of Russia, where the foods of many cultures intersect. We have culinary influence from Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Karachay-Cherkessia – all Southern nations that are known for their use of spices and herbs that make their food much brighter than traditional Russian fare. The region is also known for delicious, marinated foods, which I grew up eating lots of – marinated eggplant, peppers, mushrooms, green beans and so on. You name it, and chances are that they marinate it. That might be why I’m so excited to share this light, summery, fennel-marinated zucchini and mung bean dish. It’s comfort food to me, and I think you’ll really like it as well :) What brings this whole dish together is the lemony fennel marinade. I usually reach for cumin when putting together marinades for vegetables, but I had the epiphany to use fennel here, and I’m so happy I did. It has the perfect, bright and summery anise flavor, which is also quite unique. Another amazing thing about fennel is that it’s a digestion aid. In parts of India, fennel seeds are chewed after a meal precisely for that purpose, and also as a breath freshener. So cool! The preparation here is quite low maintenance, and we’ve got a video up top to show the whole process. The zucchini is not cooked, just ribboned and marinated, which makes it softer, but with a pleasant, crisp bite. It’s served over marinated mung beans (I mixed in some lentils as well), with lots of herbs, microgreens and avocado. This dish can serve as an excellent, summery side or an addition to salads, but honestly, I’ve been eating it as a light meal most of the time. It’s nourishing and filling enough because of the inclusion of fiber and protein-rich mung beans and lentils. Both mung beans and lentils fall under the nutritious category of pulses, together with all other beans, chickpeas and dried peas, which might just be the most affordable superfoods out there. This year, we are working with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada on creating some simple, weekday-friendly pulse recipes, as part of their Half-Cup Habit program. Making a habit of incorporating at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week always leads to some sustainable, nourishing and affordable meals. For more recipes, check out our Red Lentil Gazpacho, White Bean Tuna Sandwich, Smoky Chickpea Croutons, Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans, or any recipes on the Pulses website. Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 cup mung beans or French lentils, or a combination of both - soaked in purified water overnight sea salt 4 small zucchini - sliced into thin ribbons lengthwise, preferably on a mandolin ⅓ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice ⅓ cup olive oil ½ tablespoon fennel seeds - toasted and freshly ground 1 garlic clove - minced pinch of red pepper flakes about 1 cup minced fresh herbs, such as dill, mint, parsley, basil, cilantro freshly ground black pepper avocado - for serving (optional) microgreens - for garnish (optional) Instructions Drain and rinse the mung beans/­­lentils and place them in a medium soup pot. Cover with plenty of water, bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook for about 7 minutes. Taste for doneness and cook longer if needed, until fully cooked, but not mushy. Add salt at the end. Drain, transfer to a medium bowl or shallow dish and set aside. If cooking both mung beans and lentils, cook them separately, as they have different cooking times. Place the ribboned zucchini in a colander and generously sprinkle with salt. Let soften and release excess liquid for up to 30 minutes. In a small bowl, combine the lemon juice, olive oil, fennel seeds, garlic and red pepper flakes, mix until well combined. Add half of the marinade, half of the herbs, salt and pepper to the dish with the cooked mung beans/­­lentils and stir to coat. Rinse the zucchini, pat it dry with paper towels, and transfer to a medium shallow dish. Add the remaining marinade, herbs, salt and pepper to the zucchini, and toss to coat. Roll the zucchini slices and put them into the dish with the mung beans/­­lentils. Drizzle any remaining marinade over top. Alternatively, you can simply combine the beans, zucchini, all of the marinade, herbs, salt and pepper in a dish or bowl, and toss to coat thoroughly, skipping the rolling of the slices (that step is just for looks). Cover the dish and let marinate in the refrigerator for a few hours or days - the longer, the better. Serve garnished with avocado and microgreens, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches

August 23 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches We’re trying to get all of this summer’s most successful ice cream recipes out while it’s still prime time for frozen treats :) This one is our absolute dream-come-true ice cream sandwich with a no-bake chocolate brownie crust and a vanilla and cherry ice cream interior. Give us cherries and chocolate any time, and we’re in heaven. The chocolate brownie crust is no joke here – it’s rich, soft and so fudgy, very much like the real deal. All of that is achieved with a magical combination of coconut flour, tahini and cacao, sweetened with dates and banana. It’s a totally oven-free affair, too, which is always a bonus. The interior of the sandwich is store-bought, dairy-free vanilla ice cream (this one is my favorite), studded with fresh cherries. There’s a bit of waiting around for the layers to freeze, but otherwise, this sandwich is surprisingly easy and really fun to put together. The recipe makes sixteen sandwiches, and of course they keep well in the freezer. Make these, and you’ll have the tastiest, homemade dessert around your kitchen for a few weeks, possibly. Hope you’ll give this one a try! I will be making my third batch this coming weekend :) Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches   Print Serves: 16 sandwiches Ingredients for the brownie 1½ cups tahini or any other nut/­­seed butter, or even a blend of two butters 6 large, soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes 2 ripe but firm bananas - try to choose ones that are not too ripe or overly sweet ½ cup raw cacao powder pinch of sea salt splash of vanilla extract (optional) ¼ cup coconut flour for the ice cream 2 pints dairy-free vanilla ice cream 1½ cups frozen or fresh, pitted cherries (we used frozen ones from Trader Joes, which are really sweet and juicy) Instructions to make the brownie Spoon the tahini into a food processor. Drain the dates, reserving the soaking liquid and add them to the food processor, followed by the bananas. Process until smooth. Add the rest of the brownie ingredients to the food processor and process until well combined. Add 1-2 tablespoons of the date soaking liquid if your processor needs help to get going. Transfer the mixture into a mixing bowl and finish mixing with a spoon, if needed. You should have about 3 cups of the brownie mix total. Cover a 9 x 9, rimmed baking dish with parchment paper, extending the edges of the paper up the sides. Spread half of the brownie mixture over the bottom of the pan in an even layer with wet hands. Carefully lift out this first brownie layer from the pan by the extended edges of the parchment paper and place it onto a cutting board. Transfer the board into the freezer. Re-line the same dish with parchment paper, extending the edges of the paper up the sides. Make the second brownie layer with the remaining mixture. Leave it in the dish and place in the freezer. Let the brownie layers freeze while you are mixing the ice cream. to prepare the ice cream Remove the ice cream from the freezer and let it soften at room temperature, until its just spreadable. Take care not to over-thaw. Scoop the ice cream into a mixing bowl and stir it until evenly smooth and creamy. Fold in the cherries. to assemble the sandwich Check your brownie layers and make sure that they have solidified in the freezer, so that you can spread the ice cream layer over them, without smudging the brownie. Remove the dish with the brownie layer from the freezer and spread the ice cream over the brownie in an even layer. Remove the cutting board with the other brownie layer from the freezer and quickly invert the brownie over the ice cream to make the top layer. Peel off the parchment paper. Lightly press on the brownie to adhere all the layers together. Place the dish back in the freezer until completely frozen, preferably overnight or at least 4 hours. When your sandwich is ready to be cut, take the pan out of the freezer and lift out the sandwich onto a cutting board, using the extended edges of the parchment paper. Run your knife under hot water. Optionally, trim off the uneven edges for a cleaner appearance. Slice the sandwich in half lengthwise and crosswise,into 4 large squares. Proceed to slice each square diagonally into triangles, then slice each triangle in half one more time to end up with 16 triangular sandwiches. Enjoy right away or keep frozen. Remove from the freezer 5-10 minutes prior to eating. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Superfood Tie Dye Pops

August 2 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Superfood Tie Dye Pops Paloma’s been taking an active interest in cooking and working on fun food projects with me in the kitchen. This newfound fascination may have something to do with the fact that she’s on summer break and cannot stand being at home with nothing to do for more than a few hours at a time. Instead, she’ll wake up with wild ideas about what she’d like to cook that day. I try to carve out time for those little projects whenever possible, since I obviously support this type of hobby :) In all seriousness though, cooking with kids creates such a great awareness about the importance and power of ingredients, and teaches them all about our connection to food and nourishment. So we’ll cook colorful things like berry-filled ravioli with a green, spirulina-dyed dough and our raw chocolate with a ton of different flavorings, and the kid’s always happy to partake in the fruits of her labor. Paloma recently learned how to tie dye at a summer art camp, and got the idea to ‘make tie dye food.’ At first, I dismissed it as something too difficult and time-consuming, but then realized that it would be pretty easy to make tie dye popsicles with some fruit and all the different, colorful superfood powders I have lying around. All you have to do is make a few coconut milk mixtures of various colors, layer them in a popsicle mold, and freeze. The whole layering process is not unlike a fun art project, and the result doesn’t just turn out pretty, but surprisingly delicious as well. Our layers, all coconut milk-based and sweetened with maple syrup, included mango-turmeric, mango-beet, plain beet, spirulina, moringa and white chia. The contrast between the fruity, creamy and icy layers, plus a bit of crunch from chia seeds and bee pollen is truly heavenly. I know these aren’t your everyday popsicles, but they might be a fun thing to try with a couple of little ones. Adults love them, too :) Superfood Tie Dye Pops   Print Serves: 10 popsicles Ingredients 2 13.5 oz cans unsweetened full fat Thai coconut milk ¼ cup maple syrup 1 tablespoon chia seeds 1 small ripe mango - peeled, pitted and chopped 1 teaspoon turmeric 2 teaspoons beet powder or more to taste - divided 1 tablespoon moringa or matcha powder, or to taste 1 tablespoon spirulina powder to taste bee pollen (optional, not vegan) Instructions Soak wooden popsicle sticks in water for at least 1 hour. Blend the coconut milk with maple syrup in an upright blender. Pour ⅓ cup of the mixture into a small bowl, glass or jar. Add the chia seeds to the bowl, mix thoroughly and set aside to gel. This will be your white chia layer. Pour more of the coconut milk mixture into a different vessel until you have 1 cup of it left in the blender, set the vessel with the coconut milk aside for later. Add the mango to the blender and blend until smooth. Pour half of the mango mixture into a separate bowl, jar or glass. Add the turmeric to the remaining half of the mango mixture in the blender and blend to combine. Pour the turmeric mango mixture into another bowl, jar or glass. This will be your yellow turmeric-mango layer. Briefly rinse the blender and add the reserved half of the just mango mixture back into the blender and add 1 teaspoon of the beet powder. Blend until combined. Pour the beet-mango mixture back into the same bowl, glass or jar that it was in. This will be your red, mango-beet layer. Briefly rinse the blender and add a third of the reserved sweetened coconut milk into the blender, along with the rest of the beet powder. Blend to combine. Pour into a separate bowl, glass or jar. This will be your pink beet layer. Briefly rinse the blender once again and add another third of the reserved sweet coconut milk. Add the moringa/­­matcha powder and blend to combine. Pour into a separate bowl, glass or jar. This will be your green moringa layer. Add the remaining sweetened coconut milk to the blender (no need to rinse the blender here), add the spirulina and blend untill combined. Transfer to a bowl, glass or jar. This will be your aqua spirulina layer. You should end up with 6 different coconut mixtures to work with, providing that you use all the specified ingredients. Start pouring the mixtures into the popsicle molds in layers, alternating between colors. To make the layers bleed into each other a bit, insert a chopstick or skewer into the mold a couple of times, but make sure to not overdo it. Once filled, sprinkle the bottoms of the pops with bee pollen, if using. Cover the molds and place in the freezer for about 1 hour. Install the soaked wooden sticks, place the mold back into the freezer and let freeze completely before unmolding, preferably overnight. Enjoy right away or keep frozen. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Strawberry Oat Smoothie Bowl and Superfood Raw Chocolate Bar Green Smoothie Pops -- Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Superfood Tie Dye Pops appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Red Lentil Gazpacho

July 26 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Red Lentil Gazpacho This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. There’s something about the act of making gazpacho that makes me feel like I’m taking full advantage of summer. The chilled soup is definitely a constant on our family’s summer menu, simply because it combines the best of all worlds – it’s incredibly refreshing, packed with sun-grown produce, and such a breeze to make. Since I’m always feeling the urge to experiment in the kitchen, I try to switch up our gazpacho recipe pretty much every year. Some favorites have included this strawberry gazpacho, as well as ones made with tomatillos and watermelon. This summer, I’m all about this unexpected lentil version. It might sound a bit strange to puree lentils into gazpacho, but I assure you that it makes for some seriously tasty and nourishing soup. Red lentils were basically made for gazpacho, not only because of their color, but also because they seamlessly blend in with the rest of the ingredients, while contributing some extra savoriness. Lentils also do a great job of making the soup more filling and satisfying, since they fall into the category of pulses (together with chickpeas, beans and dry peas), which are protein and fiber-packed little superfoods. We’ve been working with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada this year on creating some simple, weekday-friendly pulse recipes, as part of their Half-Cup Habit program. Making a habit of incorporating at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week is a great idea, since you’ll end up with sustainable, nourishing and affordable meals. This gazpacho is a great place to start, as well as our White Bean ‘Tuna’ Sandwich, Smoky Chickpea Croutons, or any recipes on the Pulses website. Hope you’ll give this gazpacho a try :) Red Lentil Gazpacho   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients ½ cup red lentils - soaked overnight 3 garlic cloves - divided 1½ cups water 2 bay leaves (optional) sea salt 3-5 large to medium heirloom tomatoes - roughly chopped 1 medium cucumber - peeled and roughly chopped 1 red bell pepper - seeded and roughly chopped, reserve some for garnish 1 small red chili pepper - seeded, or ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes ¼ cup soft sun-dried tomatoes juice of 1 lemon freshly ground black pepper basil - for serving microgreens - for serving (optional) Instructions Drain and rinse the lentils. Smash 2 garlic cloves with the back of a knife and peel. Combine the lentils, garlic, water and bay leaves, if using, in a medium soup pot. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, partially covered, for about 5-7 minutes, or until lentils are soft and most of the water is absorbed. Add salt at the end and discard the bay leaves. Combine the lentils and cooked garlic, remaining raw garlic clove, tomatoes, cucumber, peppers, sun-dried tomatoes, lemon juice, salt and pepper to taste in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Taste and adjust salt if needed. Chill very well before serving. Serve garnished with basil leaves, microgreens, if using, and the reserved chopped bell pepper. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Green Skillet Pizza with Asparagus and Pesto Tile Flatbreads Clementine Fudge Cake Spring Vareniki .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Red Lentil Gazpacho appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1

July 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1 A few months ago, we asked if you would be interested in seeing semi-regular, seasonal meal plans here and heard a resounding yes. We love coming up with whimsical and creative, plant-based recipes to share here, but we also want this site to be a friendly space for busy people looking to eat more plants. You know, for those of you who might not have the time or brain space for making, say, an experimental aquafaba meringue, like we do. Meal planning is a great practice for saving money on groceries (and impulse takeout orders!), eating homemade meals (which inevitably equal healthier meals), and minimizing those situations of staring blankly into your refrigerator, wondering what to eat for dinner. Do I plan my meals? Sometimes. Ironically, I think that if cooking wasn’t my job, I would plan our family meals much more. But because I’m in the business of dreaming up recipes for this blog and for other publications, I often end up with random, non-coordinated dishes in my fridge, which then become our breakfast, lunch and dinner. For now, we are thinking of publishing one meal plan a season, while maintaining regular, single-recipe post programming the rest of the time. Not changing anything about the blog! Just adding to what’s already here. This is our meal plan for the Summer of 2017. I tried hard to make it comprehensive, practical, and budget-friendly, but also not boring and really delicious. It all starts out with cooking a big pot of chickpeas and making a batch of almond milk, and most of the recipes stem from there. We are splitting this plan into two parts. This first part will focus on the shopping list, prep, breakfast and lunch recipes. The second part is here, and it’s all about dinner and dessert. Here we go! Menu (for dinner and dessert recipes, see Part 2) Breakfast Almond Pulp Lime Ginger Granola Overnight Berry Chia Oats Lunch Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad Basil Zucchini Chowder Dinner Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas Zucchini Kimchi Tacos Dessert Peach and Blackberry Crisp *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Shopping List (print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, it’s got all the ingredients you’ll need for the recipes in this meal plan. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Produce Vegetables - 1 cauliflower head - 1 small broccoli head - 5-7 small to medium zucchini - 3 corn ears or 1 corn ear and 2 1/­­2 cups frozen corn - 1 of each green and red (or yellow, or orange) bell peppers - 1 poblano or jalapeno pepper - 2 portobello mushrooms - 2 medium carrots - 1 large and 1 small red onion - 2 yellow onions - 1-2 garlic heads (6-7 cloves) - 1-inch piece ginger - 2 avocados - 3-4 radishes (optional) Fruits - 3-4 limes - 3-4 lemons - berries: 1 pint fresh blueberries or 8 oz frozen, 1 pint fresh raspberries or 8 oz frozen, 1 pint strawberriesfresh (optional) - 1 cup blackberriesfresh or frozen - 3 ripe peaches or nectarines Herbs - 1 bunch (about 2 cups) basil - 1 bunch dill - 1 bunch cilantro - parsley (optional) Bulk - 1 1/­­2 cups dried chickpeas - 2 1/­­2 cups raw almonds or 2 cups almonds and 1/­­2 cup walnuts/­­other nuts of choice - 3/­­4 cup pumpkin or sunflower seeds - 3/­­4 cup chia seeds - 3 cups gluten-free old fashioned rolled oats - 1/­­4 – 1/­­2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut Other - 1 13.5 oz can light unsweetened Thai coconut milk - 1 can green or black olives - about 1 cup kimchi - tortillas of choice (corn for gf) - sun-dried tomatoes packed in olive oil (optional) - vanilla ice cream to serve with the fruit crisp (optional) Pantry /­­ Refrigerator Staples - white miso paste - sunflower butter /­­ tahini /­­ almond butter - Dijon mustard - Sriracha or chili sauce of choice - neutral coconut oil - maple syrupcoconut sugar - arrowroot powder (optional) - vanilla extract (optional) - kombu (optional) - capers (optional) Spices - whole cumin seeds - whole coriander seeds - red pepper flakessmoked paprikachili powder - garlic powder - cayenne pepper - black peppercorns - bay leaves (optional) Day by Day Prep List Saturday Night (Night Before Main Prep Day): These are just quick tasks that need to be done the day before your main prep day. Soaking nuts and beans helps rid them of phytic acid, which makes them easier to digest. It also kickstarts the germination process, making the nuts and beans more nutritious. - Soak 1 cup of almonds overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. You may need to repeat it later in a week to make more almond milk if needed more for granola. - Soak 1 1/­­2 cups dried chickpeas overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. Sunday (Main Prep Day): This is your main prep day, which you can also split into multiple days, depending on your schedule. You will find all the recipes for this prep day in this post, which includes two breakfast options and two lunch options for the whole week, as well as some simple prep for the dinners during the week. - Make almond milk for the overnight oats and granola, reserve the leftover almond pulp for the granola and fruit crumble. - Make the Almond Pulp Ginger Lime Granola - Cook the chickpeas to be used in the soup, fajitas, tacos and salad, reserve the cooking liquid for the soup. - Make the Overnight Berry Chia Oats - Make the Creamy Salad Dressing and the Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad - Make the Zucchini and Basil Corn Chowder - Mix the Fajita Spice - Prep the veggies for the Fajitas Monday Night: Make the fajitas to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you already prepped the vegetables and spice blend during prep day. Bake the crumble for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. The recipes for the fajitas and the crumble are in Part 2. - Make the Fajitas - Bake the Crumble (+ second batch of almond milk if you didn’t make it on prep day) Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the fajitas, prepare the Kimchi Zucchini Tacos for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. They are a very quick, weeknight friendly dish. These tacos would also work well as a lunch, if you need a break from the soup and salad. The recipe for the tacos is in Part 2. - Make the Tacos Recipes 1. Once you try making almond milk at home, it will be hard to go back to the store-bought kind, since it’s infinitely more delicious and affordable. In this meal plan, we also show you how to utilize the almond pulp that is left over from making almond milk in an addictive granola recipe. You will likely need to make two batches of almond milk throughout the week. You can make the first batch (to use for the granola and overnight oats) during the prep day, and the second batch on the day that you make the crisp, which will give you more milk to serve with the granola. You can also make both batches during the prep day. Almond Milk   Print Serves: about 4½ cups Ingredients 1 cup almond - soaked overnight, drained and rinsed 4 cups purified water Instructions Combine the almonds with the water in an upright blender, blend until smooth. Strain the milk through a nut milk bag into a jar or bottle. Squeeze the pulp dry as much as possible and reserve the almond pulp to use for the granola and crumble. Store the milk in the refrigerator. 3.5.3226 2. This Ginger-Lime Granola is made with the pulp, leftover from making almond milk. Besides being zero waste, this recipe is also incredibly delicious, with bright flavors from ginger and lime, rich notes from shredded coconut, and crunch from pumpkin and chia seeds. It tastes great served with almond milk and fresh berries. Almond Pulp Ginger-Lime Granola   Print Ingredients reserved almond pulp from making almond milk ¼ - ½ cup unsweetened shredded coconut ½ cup pumpkin or sunflower seeds ¼ cup chia seeds 2 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil ¼ cup maple syrup 1 tablespoon grated ginger zest of 1 lime juice ½ lime pinch of sea salt Instructions Preheat oven to 325° F (160° C). Combine the almond pulp, shredded coconut, pumpkin/­­sunflower seeds, chia seeds, coconut oil, maple syrup, ginger, lime zest and juice, and a pinch of sea salt in a large bowl. Mix thoroughly. Spread the granola mixture on a parchment paper-covered baking sheet in a somewhat even layer and toast for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and stir, breaking apart any large clumps. Place the sheet back in the oven and turn off the heat. Leave to dry in the oven for 1 hour. If granola is not completely dry by that time, turn the oven back on the lowest temperature and let dry for another 30 minutes or until completely dry and crispy. If you have convection oven, that setting is really useful here. Keep the granola in an airtight glass container at room temperature. Serve with almond milk and berries. 3.5.3226 3. Cooking a big pot of beans on a Sunday is always a good idea, since you will then have a solid base for all kinds of meals throughout the week. In this meal plan, the chickpeas are utilized in every savory recipe, making the dishes more nourishing and satisfying. Pot of Chickpeas   Print Ingredients 1½ cups dried chickpeas - soaked overnight, drained and rinsed 3-4 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife half a yellow onion 1-2 bay leaves (optional) 2-inch piece kombu (optional) sea salt Instructions While the granola is baking, combine the chickpeas with plenty of purified water in a soup pot. Add the garlic, onion, bay leaves and kombu, if using. The water level should be about 4 inches above the beans. Bring the chickpeas to a boil over high heat, lower the heat to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. Check for doneness. If the chickpeas are soft, salt the water generously and cook for another 10 minutes, until the chickpeas are tender but still intact. Simmer longer, before adding salt, if chickpeas are not yet soft. Drain the chickpeas, reserving the cooking liquid. Youll need 1 cup of it for this meal plan, for the chowder. Optionally, freeze the rest of the liquid for future use in place of vegetable broth in any dish. 3.5.3226 4. These overnight oats are a breeze to put together and make for a satisfying, summery breakfast. We like our overnight oats to be chia-heavy, so this is something between a chia pudding and overnight oats, layered with juicy summer berries. Overnight Berry Chia Oats   Print Ingredients 2 cups rolled oats ½ cup chia seeds 2¾ cups homemade almond milk - from above ⅓ cup maple syrup splash of vanilla extract (optional) about 2 cups mix of fresh or frozen blueberries and raspberries, or any other berries of choice Instructions While the granola is baking and the chickpeas are simmering, combine the rolled oats and chia seeds in a large bowl. Add the almond milk, maple syrup and vanilla extract, if using, and stir to combine thoroughly. Spoon the oats between 2-3 clean jars in layers, alternating them with fresh or frozen blueberries, raspberries or any other berries of choice. Cover the jars with their lids and place in the refrigerator overnight. Enjoy for breakfast. 3.5.3226 5. I make this simple, creamy dressing all the time. It’s perfect in salads, as well as a sauce or dip for so many veggie dishes. Universal Creamy Salad Dressing   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons white miso paste 2 tablespoons sunflower butter, tahini or almond butter 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon sriracha or other chili sauce of choice juice of 2 large lemons, plus more if needed Instructions Combine all the ingredients, with the exception of the lemon juice, in a glass jar or a bowl. Mix until smooth. Add the lemon juice and stir until well combined. Store refrigerated in an airtight glass container. 3.5.3226 6. This rainbow salad is loaded with nourishing summer vegetables, chickpeas, olives, herbs and seeds. At the base of the salad is garlicky, sautéed broccoli, which keeps much better than greens and makes for a really sturdy bed for the veggies. When slathered in the creamy dressing (above), this salad is completely irresistible. Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad   Print Ingredients ½ cauliflower head - chopped 1 cup cooked chickpeas - from above ¼ cup toasted sunflower or pumpkin seeds 1 small to medium carrot - shaved into ribbons with a vegetable peeler kernels from 1 corn ear ½ cup olives - halved or quartered ⅛ red onion - chopped ¼ cup chopped dill ¼ cup chopped parsley (optional) handful basil leaves - torn (optional) 3-4 radishes - sliced (optional) about 2 tablespoons chopped sun dried tomatoes (optional) 1 tablespoon capers (optional) 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 head broccoli - cut into florets sea salt 3 garlic cloves - sliced freshly ground black pepper about 6 tablespoons Universal Creamy Salad Dressing, plus more for serving - from above Instructions Place the cauliflower into a food processor and pulse a few times into rice-sized pieces. Combine the cauliflower rice, chickpeas, sunflower or pumpkin seeds, carrots, corn, olives, onion, dill, parsley and basil, as well as the radishes, sun-dried tomatoes and capers, if using, in a large bowl. Warm the coconut oil in a sauté pan over medium heat. Add the broccoli and salt and sauté until bright green, for about 5-7 minutes. Add the garlic and stir it around for 30 seconds, until fragrant. Add the garlicky broccoli to the bowl with the salad. Season the salad with freshly ground black pepper and add about 6 tablespoons of the Creamy Salad Dressing. Toss to combine well. Store the salad refrigerated in an airtight container. Serve with more dressing. 3.5.3226 7. One of our favorite, easy summer soups, with delicate flavors of zucchini and basil, sweetness from corn, and creaminess from coconut milk. It makes for the perfect, light warm weather lunch. Zucchini and Basil Corn Chowder   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 1 teaspoon ground coriander (optional) pinch of red pepper flakes 1 yellow onion - chopped sea salt freshly ground black pepper 2½ cups fresh or frozen corn kernels 3-4 small zucchini - cubed 3 garlic cloves - sliced juice of ½ lemon 1 can unsweetened light Thai coconut milk 1 cup reserved chickpea broth - from above 1 cup cooked chickpeas - from above 1 packed cup basil leaves, plus more for serving Instructions Warm the coconut oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the spices, onion, a pinch of salt and black pepper, and sauté for 5 minutes, until onion is translucent. Add the corn and another pinch of salt and sauté for another 5 minutes. Add the zucchini and garlic, and stir around for 1-2 minutes, until the garlic is fragrant. Add the lemon juice and let it absorb for about 1 minute. Add the coconut milk, chickpea broth and chickpeas and bring to a boil. Remove from heat. Measure 1½ cups of the soup into an upright blender, add the basil, and blend into a chunky puree. Return the pureed soup back to the pot and mix it in. Serve the soup garnished with more basil. Store refrigerated in an airtight container. 3.5.3226 8. Use this spice mix for the Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas, as well as in any other dishes, where a piquant savoriness would be welcome. Fajita Spice   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons chili powder ½ tablespoon sea salt ½ tablespoon smoked paprika ½ tablespoon ground cumin, preferably freshly ground ½ tablespoon coconut sugar ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon garlic powder (optional) a few grinds of black pepper Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a small jar with a tight fitting lid. Close the jar and shake until well-combined. 3.5.3226 9. Prep the vegetables for the Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas ahead of time, in order to simplify your weeknight dinner. Fajita Vegetable Prep   Print Ingredients ½ cauliflower - cut into florets 2 portobello mushrooms - sliced 1 large red onion - chopped 1 red, yellow or orange bell pepper - seeded and sliced 1 green bell pepper - seeded and sliced 1 poblano or jalapeno pepper - seeded and sliced Instructions Prep all the vegetables as specified in the ingredients list. Store the chopped cauliflower and mushrooms in separate containers. Store the chopped onion and all sliced peppers in one container. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight

July 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight This post was created in partnership with Whole Earth Sweetener Co. Turkish delight is one of those old-school sweets that was always around during my childhood in the Soviet Union, which is surprising because treats were scarce and mainly homemade. There was a tiny store a short walk away from our home, where they carried neat, white paper boxes, lined with tissue and filled with delicate pink, sugar-dusted Turkish Delight squares. We called the treat rahat lokum (just another commonly used name for Turkish Delight). I spent my childhood convinced that it was fairy food, and cherished every pleasantly jelly-like, aromatic bite from the magical paper box. I’ve since completely forgotten about rahat lokum, dismissing it as an outdated sweet of my semi-hungry childhood, until I was in Moscow a few months ago. There is a high-vibe sweets brand sold in some grocery stores in Russia, which makes chocolate, wafers and such, with surprisingly wholesome ingredients, cool herbal add-ins, and a pleasantly low amount of non-refined sugar. I always make a point of hunting down some of their stuff to bring back home. This time around, I discovered a new product of theirs, which was a healthier, green tea-flavored Turkish Delight. It was delicious and disappeared in no time once my family got a taste of it back in Florida. I quickly got the urge to figure out my own recipe, as I often do with these types of obsessions. Thankfully, I’m no stranger to the thickening and gelatinizing properties of arrowroot (starch from a tropical tuber) and agar-agar (sea vegetable). Both make for the perfect, allergy-friendly and healthful alternative to cornstarch, which is traditional to Turkish Delight recipes. After some consideration, I decided to color my delight with hibiscus tea, as a tribute to the pink treats of my childhood, and because I’m generally obsessed with hibiscus and its million health benefits. For an extra aromatic finish, I added some orange blossom water instead of the more commonly used rose water, which truly takes this treat to the next level. When coated in arrowroot powder, this Turkish Delight looks surprisingly professional, as though it was store-bought. The cool thing is that in reality it’s pretty easy to make at home, just take a look at the video above to see the whole process. For sweetener in this recipe, I used an organic blend of stevia and honey from Whole Earth. I’ve had a pretty turbulent relationship with stevia over the years. I’ve always wanted to get into it as a sugar substitute, knowing that it’s totally natural, free of calories, and a zero on the glycemic index, but I just cannot get used to its potent, powerful flavor (when extracted it’s something like 200 times sweeter than sugar!). Any time I add pure stevia extract to anything, it’s all I can taste, and that flavor lingers in my mouth for hours in an unpleasant way. Thankfully, Whole Earth Sweetener Co. figured out that when mixed with other, more traditional sweeteners, stevia is barely distinguishable, and they offer a few carefully considered stevia blends. The neat thing is that because of stevia’s potency, you only need half of the amount of their sweetener in any given recipe. In other words, this Turkish Delight recipe only calls for 1/­4 cup of the honey and stevia blend, while you would need twice the amount (1/­2 cup) of pure honey or maple syrup to achieve the same sweetness without the stevia. After trying the Whole Earth stevia-honey blend, as well as their stevia-raw sugar blend, I’m totally on board. I love being able to use less sugar in my sweet recipes, and I’m hoping that these products can help me ease into a love affair with pure stevia, some day :) I’m curious to hear about your guys’ experience with stevia. Do you use it? Did it take you some time to get used to it? Any tips and stories are much appreciated! Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight   Print Serves: about 48 pieces Ingredients 3½ cups purified water 2 tablespoons dried hibiscus flowers ⅔ cup plus ¼ cup arrowroot powder, divided ¼ cup stevia-honey blend or ⅓ - ½ cup pure honey or maple syrup 4½ tablespoons agar agar powder (not flakes) 1¼ teaspoon orange blossom water or rose water Instructions Combine the water with the hibiscus in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, cover and let the tea steep for 30 minutes. Prepare an 8 x 8-inch square, rimmed dish by lining it up with parchment paper. Set aside. Strain the hibiscus tea. Mix ½ cup of the tea with ⅔ cup of the arrowroot powder in a medium bowl. The mixture will be quite thick and difficult to mix at first. Set aside. Pour the rest of the hibiscus tea into the same saucepan used for brewing the tea. Add the sweetener and the agar agar powder, whisk to combine and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and simmer for 5 minutes, whisking periodically. At the end of the 5 minutes, give the prepared arrowroot mixture a good stir and slowly pour it into the saucepan with the agar mixture, stirring vigorously. The mixture will be very thick and stretchy. Remove from heat and add in the orange blossom water, whisking to combine. Immediately spoon the mixture into the prepared dish, evening it out as much as you can. Place the dish into the refrigerator for 1-2 hours, until the mixture is completely set. Once set, lift the delight square out of the dish onto a cutting board, using the extending ends of the parchment paper. Slice into around 48 cubes and roll them in the remaining ¼ cup arrowroot powder to coat. Store refrigerated in an airtight container. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Creamy, Garlicky Fettuccine with Roasted Green Vegetables

July 6 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Creamy, Garlicky Fettuccine with Roasted Green Vegetables Here’s a true weeknight dinner scenario. I found some leftover raw broccoli and green beans while cleaning out the fridge the other day, and decided to roast them up to extend their shelf life and work them into salads and bowls throughout the week. I love how roasting transforms both of those vegetables from something quite boring to savory and special. The very next day, they made it into this very easy, creamy green pasta that I spontaneously threw together. It exceeded my expectations and got my eight year old devouring both green beans and broccoli, which is a huge triumph in my book. She was even impressed enough to suggest that I share the recipe on the blog, so here I am :) Paloma is a pretty good eater as far as kids her age go. She eats most leafy salads, loves to munch on raw carrots and apples, and could easily devour a certain teff polenta of mine for breakfast, lunch and dinner. When it comes to things like broccoli and green beans (and mushrooms!) though, she is your typical, picky eight year old. If anything of the sort makes it onto her plate, she begins the meal with diplomatic negotiations about how she will eat this, but not that, and what sort of dessert she will be getting as a reward. We do have a rule that she has to try everything before refusing it, which is what got her with this pasta. In this recipe, the noodles are cooked in a creamy mixture of coconut milk and veggie broth, and jazzed up with some garlic and miso, while the caramelized, roasted vegetables get mixed in and slathered in all that creamy goodness as well. This preparation makes the otherwise tame green veggies into something irresistible, as proven by my kid’s enthusiasm. It’s also just a really great, easily customizable weeknight recipe. The roasted green beans and broccoli can be replaced by any other roasted vegetables, and you can play around with the addition of other types of greens, herbs and spices. I hope you’ll give this one a try :) Creamy, Garlicky Fettuccine with Roasted Vegetables   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the vegetables 1 small head of broccoli - cut into florets about 8 oz green beans - strings removed, if present 3 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or other oil of choice 3 garlic cloves - minced sea salt freshly ground black pepper for the pasta 1 13.5 oz can unsweetened Thai coconut milk or 1½ cups almond milk 2 cups vegetable broth sea salt freshly ground black pepper pinch of red pepper flakes 10 oz whole grain fettuccine 2 tablespoons miso paste 2 tablespoons vegetable broth or coconut/­­almond milk about 3 cups spinach (optional) 2-3 garlic cloves - minced juice of ½ lemon 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast (optional) handful parsley leaves - chopped handful basil leaves - torn (optional) Instructions to roast the vegetables Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Line a rimmed baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper and place the broccoli and green beans on the sheet. Drizzle the vegetables with the oil, sprinkle with minced garlic, salt and pepper, and toss with your hands, making sure to coat the vegetables thoroughly with the oil. Roast for 20 minutes, or until soft and golden in places, turning the baking sheet at half time. to cook the pasta While the vegetables are roasting, combine the milk, vegetable broth, salt, pepper and red pepper flakes in a wide saucepan and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Add the pasta and simmer until al dente, according to the time on the package. Add more broth/­­milk if needed. While the pasta is cooking, combine 2 tablespoons each miso paste and veggie broth/­­milk in a small bowl and mix until smooth. When the pasta is done, remove it from the heat and mix in the spinach to wilt it, if using. Add in the miso mixture, garlic, lemon juice and nutritional yeast, if using, and stir to incorporate. Mix in the roasted vegetables and herbs. Enjoy right away. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Pumpkinseed Caramel ‘Twix’ Bars

June 25 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Pumpkinseed Caramel ‘Twix’ Bars This post was created in partnership with Nuts.com Wow, am I excited to finally be sharing these bars here today! They are sort of like a much healthier, more colorful and plant-based version of Twix bars, they’re also no-bake and easy to make at home. The recipe was born out of a collaboration with Nuts.com, our favorite online bulk foods supplier that carries pretty much every magical whole food ingredient, from nuts to dried fruit, spices to superfood powders and snacks. They sent me a mystery ‘Pantry in a Box,’ and I had the fun challenge of coming up with a recipe using the ingredients in the box. The stand-outs were plump pumpkin seeds, the freshest coconut flour, electric pink beet powder, and flaky sea salt. It took me a while to simmer on the recipe. First, I wanted to go savory and tested out a few dishes in that direction, but I ended up arriving at these bars, and I’m so glad I did. The bottom, ‘shortbread’ layer is made with coconut flour and colored pink with beet powder, which is totally optional, but contributes to the bars’ stunning appearance (and nutrition!). No baking required there. The green ‘caramel’ layer is made with sweetened, homemade pumpkinseed butter, but you can pretty much use any nut or seed butter in its place. Everything is covered with chocolate and generously sprinkled with flaky salt. So good! The recipe looks long because I give directions for making your own seed butter and chocolate coating, but those two can easily be store-bought for a quicker prep time. We made a step-by-step video to show the fun of the process, too :) Pumpkinseed Caramel Twix Bars   Print Serves: 16 Ingredients for the shortbread cookie layer ½ cup coconut flour small pinch of sea salt (optional) 2 teaspoons beet powder (optional, you can also use any colorful berry powder) ½ cup coconut butter/­­manna (not oil) ¼ cup maple syrup for the pumpkinseed caramel layer 1½ cups pumpkin seed butter (recipe follows) or any nut/­­seed butter of choice ¼ cup maple syrup ⅓ cup toasted pumpkin seeds (optional) 1-2 tablespoons bee pollen (optional) for the raw chocolate coating 100 g (about 1 cup) shredded raw cacao butter 2 tablespoons maple syrup ½ cup raw cacao powder ¼ cup mesquite powder (optional) 2 tablespoons maca powder (optional) flaky sea salt - for sprinkling (optional) for the homemade pumpkinseed butter 2 cups raw pumpkin seeds 1 tablespoons neutral coconut oil, melted ½ teaspoon sea salt 2 teaspoons moringa or matcha powder - for color, (optional) about ¼ cup olive oil Instructions to make the shortbread cookie layer Line an 8 x 8-inch rimmed pan with parchment paper and set it aside. Combine the coconut flour, salt and beet powder, if using, in a medium bowl. Set aside. Combine the coconut butter with the maple syrup in a small saucepan and melt over low heat, stirring until mixed thoroughly. Add the coconut butter mixture to the bowl with the coconut flour and mix until combined, using your hands towards the end. Transfer the mixture into the prepared pan and press against the bottom into an even layer. Set aside while making the caramel layer. to make the pumpkinseed caramel layer Combine the pumpkinseed butter with the maple syrup in a small saucepan and warm it over low heat, stirring, until thoroughly mixed. If your butter is quite soft and creamy, you can mix in the maple syrup without heating it up. Evenly spread the pumpkinseed butter mixture over the cookie layer. Sprinkle with the toasted pumpkin seeds and bee pollen, if using, slightly pressing them into the caramel. Place the pan into the freezer until firm to the touch, for about 2 hours. to make the raw chocolate coating Gently melt the cacao butter in a medium heatproof bowl on a double boiler. Whisk in the maple syrup, sift in all the powders, if using, and whisk to combine thoroughly. Allternatively, melt about 1½ cups chopped dark chocolate or chocolate chips in a medium heatproof bowl on a double boiler. Add 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil and whisk to combine until smooth. to make the bars Remove the pan from the freezer. Pull the bar cookie out of the pan onto a cutting board by the sides of the parchment paper. Slice in half lengthwise and crosswise and continue slicing each piece in half until you have 16 slim bars. Working with one bar at a time, dip them into the melted chocolate using two forks. Turn to coat evenly, remove from the coating and gently shake over the bowl to let most of the chocolate excess drip back into the bowl. Place the coated bars on a drying rack over a piece of parchment paper. Optionally, drizzle with more chocolate and sprinkle with flaky salt. Transfer the coated bars into the freezer for about 10 minutes, until the chocolate is set. From here, you can enjoy them right away or store in an airtight container in the freezer. Remove 5 minutes prior to enjoying. to make the pumpkinseed butter Preheat the oven to 350° F (180° C). Line a rimmed baking tray with parchment paper. Combine the pumpkin seeds with the oil and salt and toss to coat. Toast for 7 minutes, until slightly golden. Transfer the pumpkin seeds into a food processor, add the moringa/­­matcha powder, if using, and grind into a fine meal. With the motor still running, add the olive oil, 1 tablespoon at a time, until a smooth, slightly runny butter forms. Stop the processor and scrape the sides periodically during the process. Keep refrigerated in an airtight glass container. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Ricotta Fig Tart with Chocolate and Roasted Grapes Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways Beet Mille-Feuille from the La Tartine Gourmande Cookbook Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Pumpkinseed Caramel ‘Twix’ Bars appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Black and White Chocolate Pudding

June 18 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Black and White Chocolate Pudding Out of all the desserts in the world, I crave the pudding/­­mousse-kind the most. A tiny cup full of something light, creamy and porous to finish off a meal is my idea of dessert heaven. I’m always on the lookout for new pudding/­­mousse ideas and constantly searching for ways to revolutionize my own tried and true recipes in one way or another, mostly to simplify the process or ingredients. I freestyled these black and white pudding cups the other day, when I made a fresh batch of almond milk and had all the other ingredients on hand. They turned out perfect and were gone within a day. I had no problem repeating them to photograph and share here :) There are some weekend links below, enjoy your Sunday! Amy’s Love Letter to Miso Soup – that recipe sounds amazing Best Books for Wellbeing – love this list Eye + I – Satsuki Shibuya (you’ve probably seen her intuitive watercolors) now has a podcast La Muralla Roja – I want to stay here If Sex and the City Came Out in 2017, Miranda Would be the Protagonist :) The Beguiled – on our list of things to watch Black and White Chocolate Pudding   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients 3 cups plus 4 tablespoons unsweetened almond milk (preferably homemade) - divided ¼ cup maple syrup or more to taste 1 vanilla bean, seeds scraped out, or a splash of vanilla extract 3 tablespoons agar agar flakes (not powder) pinch sea salt 4 tablespoons arrowroot powder 3-4 tablespoons shaved raw cacao butter - optional, but highly recommended 2-4 tablespoons raw cacao powder Instructions Combine 3 cups of almond milk with the maple syrup, vanilla seeds and bean, agar agar flakes and salt in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Combine the arrowroot powder with the rest of the almond milk in a small bowl. Slowly pour the arrowroot mixture over the agar-agar milk, whisking, until thickened. Discard the vanilla bean. Remove the mixture from the heat and pour into an upright blender. Add the cacao butter and blend until smooth. Taste for sweetness and add more maple syrup, if desired. Pour half of the pudding into small serving cups. Add the cacao powder to the remaining mixture in the blender (I added 4 tablespoons for a more intense chocolate flavor) and blend until well combined. Pour between serving cups. Cover and refrigerate until set, about 1 hour. Serve cold, garnished with berries, if desired. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Chocolate Truffles and Mango Sorbet on Palomas Birthday Chocolate Avocado Truffles and Concord Grape Sorbet Summer Greek Salad Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Black and White Chocolate Pudding appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade

June 11 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade Have you ever tried adding fresh aloe vera to your drinks? As soon as the days get unbearably hot around here, I like to keep a few aloe leaves in my fridge for a good number of reasons, especially for healing unexpected sunburns and making the most refreshing post-beach tonics. Aloe is one of those amazing, all-purpose healing plants; it’s anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, helps lower cholesterol, works wonders when applied topically to skin by moisturizing it and helping ease acne and blemishes, and the list goes on and on. If you’ve never taken apart a fresh aloe leaf before, its insides are made up of a clear, jellyfish-like material, which is where most of the healing magic is contained. The problem is that on its own, the flesh is quite bitter and soapy. I’ve noticed that citrus really helps neutralize that unpleasant taste, so I love adding aloe to lemonade. This lemonade recipe is pretty special – it’s just the most refreshing thing you can think of after a hot day outside. It’s minty, with a cooling effect from the cucumber and a nice tartness from freshly squeezed lemon juice. I also think it would make for a great summery cocktail mixer, if you feel so inclined :) One last aloe tip – when I’m cutting apart an aloe leaf in the kitchen and putting most of the flesh into the blender, I rub the green skins with any leftover flesh on my (clean) face, which makes for a refreshing face mask. There are some links below, Sunday hugs to you, friends. The Next Gluten Matthew Kenney on Pardon My French Human Design BodyGraph – sort of like an astrology birth chart, but it combines a bunch of traditional sciences like astrology, the Hindu-Brahmin Chakra system, the Zohar or Kabbalah, and the IChing to map out a ‘body graph.’ We found ours to be pretty accurate and fascinating. Patti Smith on Singing at Bob Dylan’s Nobel Prize Ceremony (make sure to watch the video) Six Seasons: A New Way with Vegetables – I’ve got my eye on this cookbook Roasted Poblano and Jackfruit Tacos – can’t wait to make these Our Youtube Channel – we are obsessed with making videos! Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade   Print Serves: 5-6 cups Ingredients 1 packed cup mint sprigs, plus more for serving 3 cups purified water half of a large cucumber 1 large aloe leaf 1 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (4-5 lemons) ¼ cup maple syrup Instructions Bruise the mint a bit by rubbing it between your hands. In a small saucepan, combine the mint sprigs and water, bring to a boil and let cool to infuse. Once cool, strain the mixture into an upright blender and discard the mint sprigs. Cut the cucumber half in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds. Optionally, shave off a few cucumber ribbons with a vegetable peeler for serving in the glass. Roughly chop the cucumber and put it into the blender. Cut the white base off the bottom of the aloe leaf, then cut off the spiky sides. Cut off the top layer of the skin lengthwise. Scoop out all the flesh into the blender using a spoon. Add the lemon juice and maple syrup to the blender and blend everything until smooth. Let cool completely in the refrigerator. Serve over ice, with cucumber ribbons and more fresh mint leaves. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Pi?a Colada Milkshake - Ice Cream Sunday Raw Spearmint and Chocolate Cheesecake Superberry Smoothie Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Strawberry Cardamom Milk

June 4 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Strawberry Cardamom Milk I didn’t grow up drinking strawberry milk and thus have no nostalgic connection to it, nor did I have any particular interest in making it, until I ended up with way too many strawberries this past spring. I might sound like a broken record to some of you, but for a bit of context, it’s worth mentioning (once again) that this year’s strawberry season yielded the craziest, dreamiest berries I’ve ever eaten in Florida or anywhere else in the world. I couldn’t stay away from the strawberry farm until my freezer could no longer fit the copious amounts of strawberries I was freezing. We consumed bowls and bowls of fresh strawberries with breakfast, lunch and dinner, but I also cooked with them a bunch (see some of the results here and here). I kind of ran out of recipe ideas towards the end there, so I decided to give this whole strawberry milk deal a try. Boy was I wrong to wait this long, this stuff is heaven. Refreshing, delicious and totally worth the little bit of effort. The method here is a bit more intentional than just blending some strawberries with milk, and yields a truly special little drink. I think spices are extremely important in cooking but especially in plant-based cooking, where building flavor is a bit more of a challenge. A dash of spice can really elevate a dish to the next level, and that’s where the cardamom comes in. The magical, slightly spicy and citrusy flavor of cardamom goes so well with the syrupy macerated strawberries and makes this milk that much more interesting. If you don’t have any cardamom though, this drink will still be delicious without it. There is a step-by-step video above, which shows you how to make almond milk as well as how to flavor it with strawberries. Consider giving this recipe a whirl some day soon when you get your hands on some jammy berries. Enjoy your Sunday :) Strawberry Cardamom Milk   Print Serves: about 3½ cups Ingredients for the almond milk 1 cup raw almonds - soaked in purified water overnight 3 cups purified water for the strawberry cardamom milk about 3 cups sliced strawberries ⅓ cup raw sugar 3 cups unsweetened almond milk 5 cardamom pods - green shells removed, seeds ground in a mortar and pestle Instructions to make the almond milk Drain and rinse the almonds. Place them in a blender along with the water and blend on high speed until completely broken down. Working in batches, strain the milk into a bowl through a nut milk bag. Discard the strained pulp or save for future use in granola, baking, etc. Transfer the milk to a clean bottle or jar and keep refrigerated for up to 3 days. to make the strawberry milk Place the strawberries in a medium bowl and pour the sugar over them. Toss and let macerate until the strawberries yield their syrupy juice, for at least 1 hour or overnight (the longer the better). Puree the strawberries together with their syrup in an upright blender until smooth. Strain the puree through a fine mesh strainer for the silkiest strawberry milk, this step is optional. Combine the almond milk, strawberry puree and freshly ground cardamom in an upright blender and blend until well combined and frothy. Pour the milk into a bottle or jar and chill very well the refrigerator. Enjoy cold. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sweet Potato Buckwheat Snack Bars with Cardamom Tahini Hot Chocolate Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho Spiced Hot Chocolate and a Cookbook of Our Own .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Strawberry Cardamom Milk appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones

May 25 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones This post was created in partnership with Bob’s Red Mill. When I was writing my first cookbook four years ago, I was completely infatuated with developing gluten-free baking recipes and baking almost every day. More than that, I was really into making my own flours (by blending whole grains in my Blendtec), and mixing my own gluten-free flour blends. I am one of those crazy people that enjoys making everything from scratch, but I also did all of those things out of necessity, since there were no high-quality gluten-free flour blends out on the market. Things have really changed since then! Health food stores are now flooded with all kinds of exotic flours and flour blends, which makes me a little less compelled to make my own. I still do from time to time, but I feel comforted by the fact that I can pick up a gluten-free flour blend in the store and whip up some tasty scones without getting messy with the blender and tons of jars. I should add that I don’t have a gluten sensitivity, but a few people I like to share scones with do, and I also just really love the challenge that gluten-free baking presents. I’ve been baking with Bob’s Red Mill 1 to 1 Gluten Free Baking Flour and can confidently say that it’s the best pre-mixed gluten-free flour blend I’ve tried. The blend was formulated to substitute wheat flour in baking recipes in exact amounts, which makes it super easy to use if you ever want to try your hand at a gluten-free version of your favorite recipe. These blueberry lemon scones are my favorite thing I’ve made with the flour so far. I’ve tested three batches, and each one has disappeared within a day, with the help of friends and family. They are a true crowd pleaser, and make for a satisfying little breakfast or dessert. Slightly crisp on the outside and nice and crumbly inside, with pockets of blueberries, and a sweet and tangy lemon ‘glaze.’ There’s a lovely zing from lemon zest throughout, and they are pretty low maintenance in terms of preparation, as scones should be. I hope you’ll give them a try :) Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones   Print Serves: 8 scones Ingredients for the scones ½ cup unsweetened almond milk ½ tablespoon apple cider vinegar ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons gluten free rolled oats 1½ cups 1 to 1 gluten free flour blend ¼ cup plus 1 tablespoon coconut sugar, plus more for sprinkling on top 2 teaspoons baking powder pinch of sea salt zest of 2 organic lemons, divided ¼ cup neutral coconut oil - scoopable, at room temperature ½ cup pistachios - chopped, plus more for garnish 1½ cup fresh or frozen (not thawed) blueberries ¼ cup aquafaba (water from a can of chickpeas or other beans) 1 teaspoon vanilla extract for the glaze ¼ cup cashew butter 1½ tablespoons maple syrup or honey ¼ teaspoon turmeric - for color juice of 1 lemon Instructions to make the scones Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a baking sheet by covering it with a piece of parchment paper. Combine the almond milk and apple cider vinegar in a small bowl and set aside to make a vegan buttermilk. Pulse the rolled oats several times in a high speed blender or food processor to grind them partially. Combine the oats with the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt and ⅔ the amount of the lemon zest in a medium bowl, toss to mix thoroughly. Add coconut oil and work it into the flour mixture with a fork until mostly mixed in, with some small clumps remaining. Add the pistachios and blueberries, toss to combine. Make a well in the center, add the buttermilk, aquafaba and vanilla, and mix to combine. Take care not to overwork the batter. Transfer the batter to a floured surface and use your hands to form a disk about 1-inch thick. Cut into 8 wedges with a floured knife. Transfer the wedges onto the prepared baking sheet with a spatula or a pie server. Sprinkle some coconut sugar on top of each scone. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until the edges are golden and crispy. Let cool and drizzle with the glaze (recipe follows), sprinkle with the rest of the lemon zest and pistachios. to make the glaze In a small bowl, combine the cashew butter with the maple syrup and turmeric, mix until smooth. Add lemon juice and whisk until shiny and smooth, add more lemon juice or water if the glaze seems too thick. Drizzle over the scones and enjoy. Notes I learned from Minimalist Baker that coconut oil works best in vegan scones when its not in a frozen or a liquid state, but in between those two and scoopable, the way its sold in grocery stores from. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway

May 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway My first experience with South Indian fare was in Toronto, in a buzzing, cafeteria-style restaurant that looked like a food court in any American mall, but instead of fast food, the offering consisted of the most mind-blowing, bold-flavored South Indian dishes that weren’t like anything I’d ever tasted before. That ended up being one of the most memorable meals of my life. Since then, I’ve continued to seek out restaurants that specialized in South Indian cuisine, but rarely considered trying my hand at any of the dishes at home. Chitra Agrawal’s debut cookbook Vibrant India changed all of that for me. Chitra has spent years documenting her family’s traditionally vegetarian South Indian recipes on her blog, as well as adapting them to use the local, seasonal produce that she comes across in Brooklyn, where she lives. Her cookbook is a stunning collection of modern recipes, which honor her mother’s South Indian heritage, rooted in the ayurvedic tradition. The cookbook truly opens up a whole new world of cooking to those of us used to a more Western approach to food (and we are giving away a copy, see below :D ). In a her intro, Chitra explains the difference between North and South Indian cooking, and chances are, the Indian food you’ve tried likely originated in the North – think naan, samosas and curries. Cuisine from the South is generally characterized by the use of lentils, rice and specific spice mixtures in dishes like dosa and sambar – delicious stuff that doesn’t get nearly as much attention in the West. The book is filled with Chitra’s super comprehensive explanations of Indian cooking techniques like tempering spices, etc., which takes the intimidation factor out of the recipes. Turns out, making flavorful and authentically rooted South Indian dishes at home is totally doable. I’ve already made the Dosa, Lemony Lentil Soup, Banana, Coconut and Cardamom Ice Cream, as well as a few of the rices, and each one came out explosive in flavor, as well nourishing to the core. One of my favorite chapters turned out to be the Rice and Bread chapter, which offers a ton of ideas on preparing rice to be enjoyed as a main dish. Who would have thought that basmati rice could be so flavorful and substantial?! There are recipes for Lemon Peanut Rice, Fragrant Eggplant and Green Pepper Rice, Coconut Rice with Cashews, and Yogurt Rice with Pomegranate and Mint, but my favorite one of all turned out to be the Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios, which I’m sharing here. Chitra talks about often getting a hefty bunch of dill from her farm share and not knowing what to do with the volume, which sparked the idea for this recipe that uses up plenty of dill. The result is rice so fragrant that it’s nothing short of heavenly. Chitra explains that she aims to achieve a balance of sweet, sour, bitter, spicy, and savory flavors in her recipes, which is what I mean when I describe her dishes as explosive, and that very much applies to this rice recipe as well. Other chapters within the book include Breakfast and Light Meals, Salads and Yogurts, Stir-Fries and Curries, Soups, Stews and Lentils, Festive Bites and Snacks,  Sweets and Drinks, Chutneys and Pickles – basically a ton of deliciousness packed into a beautiful cookbook. Well done, Chitra! In case you are wondering, the book does call for specialty Indian ingredients that you might not be able to find at your mainstream supermarket. However, if you enjoy cooking and learning about new ingredients, it’s SO worth seeking out a local Indian market in your area. I rely on our nearby Indian market for stocking up on ghee, fresh spices, rice and a variety of lentils, all at an affordable price. All the ingredients are also available online. Giveaway: To enter to win a copy of Vibrant India, leave a comment here letting us know if you would be interested in seeing weekly plant-based meal plans, complete with recipes and shopping lists as a new series on this site. We are thinking of starting up a conversation about meal prep, and would love to gauge your interest! The winner will be selected at random on Wednesday, May 24th. Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the turmeric rice 1 cup basmati rice (makes about 4 cups cooked) ⅛ teaspoon turmeric powder for the lime and dill rice with pistachios 4 cups cooked turmeric rice 2 tablespoons mild-flavored oil such as canola (I used coconut) ½ teaspoon black mustard seeds pinch of asafetida (hing) powder 1 teaspoon chana dal 1 teaspoon urad dal 5 fresh curry leaves 1 dried red chile, broken in half 1 large shallot or ½ medium yellow onion - finely chopped small bunch of dill - tough stalks removed, chopped ½ to ¾ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon sambar powder (optional) ¼ cup shelled pistachios - lightly toasted and coarsely chopped juice of half a lime (about 1½ tablespoons), plus more as needed serving options raita or plain yogurt hot pickle or Brooklyn Delhi (Chitras company!) achaar Instructions to make the turmeric rice Wash the rice in several changes of water until the water runs clear. Soak the rice in water, generously covered, for at least 30 minutes. Drain thoroughly, using a fine-mesh sieve. Place rice and 1¾ cups water in a medium saucepan. Mix in the turmeric powder. Place the saucepan over high heat and bring to a boil. Once the water is boiling, cover the saucepan and turn the heat to the lowest setting on your stove. Cook until the rice in tender and there is no water left in the pan, about 15 minutes. Turn off the heat. Remove the saucepan from the stove and leave it covered for 10 minutes, to allow the grains to separate. Fluff with a fork. to make the lime and dill rice with pistachios Coat the bottom of a wok (I used a large sauté pan w/­­ a lid) with the oil and place over medium heat. When the oil is hot and shimmering, add one black mustard seed. When the seed sizzles and pops, add the rest of the mustard seeds and asafetida. Keep a lid handy to cover the pan while the mustard seeds are popping. When the popping starts to subside (a few seconds), immediately add the chana dal and urad dal. Stir to coat with oil, and turn the heat to medium-low. Continue to stir the dals so they evenly roast, until they turn a reddish golden brown and smell nutty, less than a minute. Rub the curry leaves between you fingers a little to release their natural oils, and drop them and the dried red chile into the oil. Cover immediately, as moisture from the curry leaves will cause the oil to spatter. Then stir to evenly coat everything with oil, a few seconds. Add the shallot to the wok and fry over medium heat until softened, less than a minute. Add the dill, ¼ teaspoon of the salt, and a couple tablespoons of water. Turn the heat to medium-low, cover, and cook for 10 to 15 minutes. Stir from time to time. When cooked, the dill should be darker in color and not have as strong a flavor as raw dill. Add the sambar powder. Fry for another minute. Stir in the cooked rice and season with ¼ to ½ teaspoon salt. Stir-fry for 1 to 2 minutes. Mix in the pistachios, reserving a few for garnish. Turn off the heat. Stir in the lime juice and garnish with the reserved pistachios. Taste for salt and adjust as needed. Serve hot with yogurt and hot pickle. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Babamesco Dip

May 7 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Babamesco Dip Baba ganoush + romesco = babamesco! One fine day, I had some but not all of the ingredients to make romesco, as well as a few baba-ganoush appropriate items, and I was craving some kind of powerful dip/­­spread/­­sauce. I combined the two and ended up with something really special. I’m pretty sure that everyone who sampled it loved it, and that goofy name that I threw out in the moment really stuck. I’ve had friends call me and seriously ask me when I’ll be making another batch of babamesco. Now I can’t imagine calling it by any other name. A few ways it can be used: as a dip for pita chips, sandwich spread, pizza sauce, veggie bowl component, sauce for vegetables (try it with grilled ramps or roasted cauliflower). There’s a step-by-step video above and some weekend links below. Happy Sunday :) Dimes Spiced Porridge on Munchies – can’t wait to make this someday soon! Tortus Copenhagen – this ceramicist’s instagram is addicting. The potter’s wheel videos are so meditative and satisfying. Unsweetened Miso Chocolate Bar – Valentina used our almost savory raw chocolate recipe as a starting point for her own unsweetened chocolate bar, and it looks amazing. Margaret Atwood on What ‘The Handmaids Tale’ Means Today – have you been watching the show?! I find it to be so eerily believable. Loved this article from the author about how the novel relates to the world today, and this bit: ‘One of my rules was that I would not put any events into the book that had not already happened in what James Joyce called the nightmare of history, nor any technology not already available. No imaginary gizmos, no imaginary laws, no imaginary atrocities.’ Jessica Koslow of Sqirl – interviewed on Apiece Apart Woman Simplicity City – our favorite fashion instagram that draws from the past Babamesco   Print Serves: around 4 cups Ingredients 2 red bell peppers 1 small eggplant or 3 small Japanese eggplants - sliced in half 1 head of garlic neutral coconut oil or olive oil, plus more for garnish sea salt freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons tahini juice of 1 lemon handful of parsley, plus more for garnish zaatar - to garnish (optional) microgreens - to garnish (optional) Instructions Place the bell peppers on a baking sheet and turn your broiler to high. Broil the peppers for 2-4 minutes, flipping every minute or so, until the skin is blistered and the peppers are soft. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool. Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C) and prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place the eggplant on the sheet. Break the head of garlic into cloves and place them next to the eggplant, with the skins intact. Drizzle the eggplant and garlic cloves with oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper and mix with your hands to coat. Place in the oven. The garlic should be done after about 15 minutes, while the eggplant may need another 5-10 minutes until its ready, a total of 20-25 minutes. Once the bell peppers are cool enough to handle, peel off their skin and remove the core and seeds. Slip the skin off the roasted garlic cloves. Scoop the eggplant flesh out of the skin and discard the skin. In a food processor, combine the roasted pepper, eggplant, garlic, tahini, lemon juice, salt and pepper until just smooth. Add in the parsley and pulse to incorporate. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the babamesco with a drizzle of olive oil, a sprinkling of zaatar and microgreens, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Asian Flavoured Veggie Burgers with Asparagus Fries Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash Raw Apricot Lavender Tart and a Giveaway Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Babamesco Dip appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans + Quick Marinated Beans

April 30 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans + Quick Marinated BeansFagor recently sent me their 6 quart pressure cooker, and I was very excited since I’ve never had one before and knew that it would be a very practical addition to my kitchen. Aside from stews, soups, and rich veggie broth, I was especially thrilled about the prospect of perfect home-cooked beans. I’d heard that cooking beans in a pressure cooker makes them amazingly creamy, yet firm and intact, on top of significantly speeding up the cooking process. As an example, soaked kidney beans only take 5 minutes of active cooking time in the pressure cooker. Crazy stuff! All the rumors turned out to be true – my pressure cooker beans have been coming out amazingly buttery. The reason I’m so excited about a more efficient way to cook beans is that I really dislike buying canned ones. I’ll do it in case of an emergency, but it’s really not my favorite way to go. Firstly, canned beans never taste as good as my homemade ones, since I usually include some aromatics like peppercorns, garlic and bay leaf in the cooking water. Canned beans also seem to be harder on my digestion, since I take time to soak and rinse my beans, as well as cook them with kombu (more on that below), while most companies don’t. Maybe I’m just sensitive, but that’s a big factor as well. Plus, dried beans are more affordable than canned ones, and that’s always a great bonus. Today I’m sharing a few useful things I’ve learned about cooking my own beans after years of practice, as well as my favorite recipe for simple marinated beans. I like to make those on a Sunday and spoon them into meals throughout the week. Even if you don’t have a pressure cooker, there are still plenty of great tips and tricks that you might find helpful below. Have a great Sunday :) Soak I always soak dried beans before cooking them. I know, it seems like an annoying practice that doesn’t allow for any spontaneity in the kitchen, but it’s also really easy to make a habit out of it. Soaking reduces the cooking time, as well as helps eliminate the phytic acid (antinutrient) in beans and activates the germination process, making the beans easier to digest/­­more nutritious. To help break down phytic acid, especially during shorter soaking times, add a splash of acidic liquid, such as lemon juice, vinegar or even a few pinches of salt to your soaking water. Cover your beans with plenty of water and leave room in the bowl, since the beans will grow quite a bit as they take on the water. Once done soaking, rinse and drain the beans really well to wash off all of that unwanted stuff. I like to soak my beans overnight. I’ve gotten into the habit of asking myself if there’s anything that needs to be soaked before I go to bed, and sometimes I’ll just soak a cup of some bean/­­lentil/­­grain without even knowing what I’ll do with it the next day. If you happen to soak some beans and don’t have the time to cook them the next day, just change the water, cover, and put them in the fridge until ready to cook. Batch Cook & Freeze The trick that does allow for spontaneity when using home-cooked beans is batch cooking and freezing them for future use. Cook a whole pound of beans at a time and freeze them in 1 1/­­2 cup batches (equal to around a 16 oz can), and you’ve got a foundation for so many meals right in your freezer. It feels really good! You can freeze the beans in glass containers or zip lock bags for anywhere from 6 months to a whole year (labeling with a date is a good idea in these cases). A good tip I learned for preventing freezer burn is to cover the beans with their cooking liquid, then freeze. Add Aromatics & Kombu Another great thing about cooking beans at home is that you can flavor the cooking water any way you want. That will make the beans taste better, as well as provide you with a whole batch of broth, which you can use in place vegetable broth in any recipe. I pretty much never throw away the cooking water, and usually end up freezing it for future use. That way, I almost never have to buy boxed broth. The aromatics I personally like to add to the cooking water are bay leaf, black peppercorns and garlic. Some people add onions, carrots and herbs – the possibilities are endless. Another important addition to bean cooking liquid is kombu, which is a mineral-rich seaweed. Kombu yields all of its beneficial minerals to the beans and the water, as well as helps tenderize the beans and make them easier to digest – a life-changing tip I learned from Amy Chaplin. Pressure Cooking One quirk of pressure cooking is not being able to check the food for doneness while it’s cooking, since the pot cannot be opened while there’s pressure built up inside. It’s helpful to know how long your ingredient will take to cook ahead of time, and time the cooking process accordingly. Thankfully, there is this very helpful chart that tells you suggested cooking times for most common types of beans. I love that it has cook times for both soaked and unsoaked beans, since those vary pretty significantly, and I’ve found them to be very accurate. Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans   Print Serves: around 3 cups Ingredients 1 cup dried beans of your choice - soaked overnight in purified water w/­­ a splash of vinegar, lemon juice or salt 2 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife 2 bay leaves 1 piece kombu 1 teaspoon black peppercorns sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the beans very well. In a pressure cooker, combine the beans, garlic, bay leaves, kombu, peppercorns and plenty of salt. Cover the beans with plenty of water, water level should be about 4 inches above the beans. Remember that when cooking beans, you cannot fill up the pressure cooker any more than half way, since the foam from the beans might clog up the pressure release valve if there is too much water. Close the pressure cooker lid, set the pressure to high (15PSI) and turn up the heat to high. Wait until the pressure indicator shows that the pressure has been built up and turn the heat down to low. This is when your cooking time starts. Refer to this chart to determine the cook time for your beans and cook accordingly. Once the time is up, turn off the heat and let the pressure release naturally, which will take around 10 minutes. Open the pressure cooker, drain the beans, preserving the cooking liquid to use as broth or as freezing liquid. Discard the bay leaf, peppercorns and kombu. Enjoy the beans :) 3.5.3226   Quick Marinated Beans   Print Serves: 3 cups Ingredients 3 cups mixed cooked beans (I used baby Lima and kidney) handful of parsley - chopped handful of chives - sliced 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar juice of 1 lemon sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste Instructions In a bowl, combine the beans with parsley and chives and give everything a stir. Add the olive oil, vinegar, lemon juice, salt and pepper, and mix thoroughly. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Store the beans in the refrigerator, in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. The flavors will develop further as the beans marinate. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Garden Juice Fruit and Root Salad Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl Avocado Truffles .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans + Quick Marinated Beans appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Quick Rhubarb Soft Serve

April 23 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Quick Rhubarb Soft Serve Have you ever heard of the quick soft serve ice cream technique, where you freeze coconut milk in ice cube trays and then blend the cubes with fruit, sweetener, etc. into into a perfectly spoonable frozen treat? It’s been on my radar for a while, but I have an ice cream maker, which I’m very faithful to, so I’ve been slow to warm up to the idea. I finally gave the whole thing a shot recently, and now I see what the big deal is about. This is entirely different from the typical ice-cream making experience. When I set out to make ice cream, I know that it will be a process, and I’m quite fond of the little bit of fuss that it takes. This soft serve is its own thing – delightfully quick and easy and with little fuss to speak of, especially if you already have the coconut ice cubes ready to go. The rhubarb component is a breeze to put together as well. You just stew the rhubarb with maple syrup until jammy, spread it out onto some parchment paper in a thin layer, and let it freeze before blending it with the frozen coconut milk. All the freezing can be done the night before or in the morning/­­afternoon to have it ready for dessert time in the evening. It’s all perfectly lazy :) There’s so much you can do as far as the flavorings go with this sort of technique, but this particular combination is so so lovely. The slight sourness of the rhubarb is softened by the fattiness of the coconut milk, and the kiss of maple syrup rounds everything out into a mind-blowing treat. And the color! Visual color therapy right there. There are some great links below, have a nice Sunday! Leo Babauta (of Zen Habits) on the Rich Roll Podcast 43 Self-Care Practices for the Highly Sensitive Person – we both happen to be highly sensitive people, so Renee’s post really resonated with us. So many great tips there. The Other Mr. President (This American Life) – what it’s really like to live in Putin’s Russia. While I feel like Russians are constantly misrepresented in the American media, this was a refreshingly multifaceted view at the complexity of our home country. #Vanlife – ‘what began as an attempt at a simpler life quickly became a life-style brand’ Seeded Gluten Free Sourdough Bread – thinking about resurrecting my sourdough baking habit, can’t wait to try out this gluten-free recipe. Green Kitchen at Home – excited for this book, loved the book trailer too. Quick Rhubarb Soft Serve   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients 1 13.5 oz can full fat coconut milk ¼ cup + 2 tablespoons maple syrup, divided about 3 cups chopped rhubarb (1 pieces) splash of vanilla extract poppy seeds - for garnish (optional) Instructions In a blender, combine the coconut milk with 2 tablespoons maple syrup. Pour the coconut milk into an ice cube tray and freeze for a few hours or overnight. In a medium saucepan, combine the rhubarb with ¼ cup maple syrup and a splash of vanilla extract. Bring to a boil over medium hight heat, then lower the heat and simmer for 7-10 minutes, until rhubarb is soft and jammy. Spread the stewed rhubarb on a parchment paper-covered baking sheet in a thin layer and place in the freezer for a few hours or overnight, until completely frozen. Put the coconut ice cubes in the blender and blend on high until just broken down. Remove the frozen rhubarb from the freezer, peel away the baking sheet and break the rhubarb into manageable pieces, then put in the blender with the coconut milk. Blend everything on high to achieve a soft serve consistency. You might have to stop and scrape the walls of the blender periodically, or if you have a Vitamix, the tamper is really helpful here. Enjoy right away, garnished with poppy seeds, if using. If you have leftovers, they will freeze into a solid block in the freezer because this ice cream hasnt been properly aerated. My suggestion is to freeze the leftovers in an ice cube tray and re-blend into soft serve once ready to eat again. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho Beet Tahini Snack Bars Barley Tomato Salad Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Quick Rhubarb Soft Serve appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Hydrating Fennel, Mango and Avocado Smoothie

April 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Hydrating Fennel, Mango and Avocado Smoothie I’m generally one of those people that won’t eat ice cream or drink smoothies when it’s cold outside, but as soon as spring hits, I start dreaming of smoothies. I’m in that phase right now – the warmer air and blossoming trees are making me crave refreshing foods, and I can honestly imagine myself drinking a smoothie for every meal. This year, I’m trying to be a bit more experimental with my smoothies and to get out of my usual routine. My general go-to recipe is swampy in color, full of greens, berries, a frozen banana, and whatever superpowders I have lying around. It’s good, but also gets repetitive after a while, as well as too sweet. I’m striving to use less bananas and more fruit/­­veg other than berries and kale. In today’s smoothie, I combined a bunch of ingredients I’ve been craving lately, specifically fresh fennel, mango and avocado. I then figured that a bit of ginger, mint and lime would go really well with all those things, and splurged on raw coconut water to use instead of regular water. The smoothie turned out so insanely refreshing, hydrating, and barely sweet (in a good way), that I knew I was onto something and had to share the recipe here. I honestly cannot wait until tomorrow morning, when I can make it again. I’m pretty certain that this smoothie will still turn out great if you use regular water instead of the coconut kind (maybe add a bit more lime juice in this case), and I also think you can skip the mint if you don’t have any. Hope you give it a try. There are some great links below that we’ve collected over this past week. Enjoy your Sunday :) Rome in April – we’re going to Rome this coming fall and Pauline’s beautiful photos are adding to our excitement. Mostly Veggie Chocolate Smoothie – I’ve been trying out (and liking) smoothies made with more frozen veggies and less bananas, and Lindsey’s recipe looks so good. David Hockney’s Home in 1983 – photos from the Architectural Digest archive Peaceful Cuisine – just discovered this Japanese vegan chef’s (wildly popular) cooking videos. They have such a calming effect on me. Check out the Lemon Curd Tarts, Homemade Kim Chee + the rest of his food videos. Daphne Javitch of Doing Well – interviewed on the Atelier Dore podcast (love her instagram, too) Catzorange – dreaming about one of these bags for the summer Hydrating Fennel and Avocado Smoothie   Print Ingredients 1 avocado 1 cup cubed frozen mango 1 fennel bulb - roughly chopped (use the green fronds, too) 1-inch piece ginger juice of 1 lime handful fresh mint leaves (optional) ½ - ¾ cup raw coconut water - depends on the kind of consistency you like, I used ½ cup for a creamy, spoonable smoothie Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a blender until smooth. Adjust the amount of liquid if needed. Garnish with fennel fronds and mint leaves. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sprouted Almond Romesco Pasta with Roasted Cauliflower and Blistered T... Gingery Rutabaga and Pear Handpies Welcome Spring Raw Cake from Karolina Eleonóra Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Hydrating Fennel, Mango and Avocado Smoothie appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Savory Superfood Sprinkle

April 9 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Savory Superfood Sprinkle I love having a jar of this meal-saver sprinkle in my refrigerator, because it always comes in handy when a quick savory meal or snack is missing a bit of sparkle. The inspiration here comes from sesame salt (gomashio), which is a Japanese condiment made up of a mix of toasted sesame seeds and salt. It’s a genius thing, because there is generally much less salt in proportion to the amount of sesame seeds, but the flavor is still satisfyingly salty, plus toasty from all the sesame. Gomashio is also highly regarded in the macrobiotic diet as a healthier salt alternative. So, sesame salt is my inspiration here, but I mix in a few other healthful, sprinkle-appropriate ingredients – dulse seaweed (iodine = thyroid love), nutritional yeast (B12) and hemp hearts (protein!). I depend on dulse and nutritional yeast for their naturally salty properties, so the amount of actual salt is minimal in this recipe. I like to toast half of the dulse and leave the other half raw, which gives another dimension to its flavor. The whole mix is perfectly salty, toasty, with hints of the sea from the dulse and umami from the nutritional yeast. Most importantly, so many meals and snacks can be saved from being boring with this stuff – salads, veggie bowls, avocado halves, savory porridge, etc. etc. Give it a try! There are some links below, Sunday hugs :) S-Town – you’ve probably already heard of this podcast a million times and possibly already binge-listened to the whole thing. But if you haven’t, we highly recommend this amazing series from creators of This American Life/­­Serial. Georgia O’Keeffe’s Powerful Personal Style + This Interview with Wanda Corn, Curator of Georgia OKeeffe: Living Modern New Zealand Road Trip with a Toddler Heidi Swanson’s Youtube Channel De Maria – this restaurant’s beautiful Instagram Hannah Henderson (owner of the General Store) on Garance Dore Savory Superfood Sprinkle   Print Serves: around ¾ cup Ingredients ½ cup sesame seeds (I used a combination of regular and black) 2 tablespoons dulse flakes 2 tablespoons hemp hearts 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast ½-1 teaspoon sea salt (preferably flaky) Instructions Warm a dry pan over medium heat and add the sesame seeds. Toast, tossing frequently, for 1-2 minutes, until the seeds begin to pop and become fragrant. Be careful, the seeds can burn quickly. Transfer the seeds to a medium bowl. Coarsely grind half of the toasted sesame seeds in a mortar and pestle or a dedicated coffee grinder, and put them back into the bowl. In the same dry pan, toast 1 tablespoon of dulse for 1-2 minutes until fragrant. Stir frequently and take care not to burn. Mix the toasted dulse into the bowl with the sesame seeds, along with the remaining 1 tablespoon of the raw dulse. Mix in the hemp hearts and nutritional yeast. If using flaky salt, massage it into the mixture with your hands to break it down a bit. If using regular salt, just mix it in with a spoon. Keep the mixture refrigerated in an air-tight glass container to preserve the freshness of the raw dulse and to keep the seeds from going stale. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage Temaki-zushi Beet Mille-Feuille from the La Tartine Gourmande Cookbook Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Savory Superfood Sprinkle appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Almost Savory Raw Chocolate

April 2 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Almost Savory Raw Chocolate We are so excited to share our very first cooking video today! This has been a dream of ours for years now, but it has stayed on the back burner for way too long due to the laborious nature of video-making. We loved the process so much, and will have more step-by-step videos to share in the near future. The idea for this *almost* savory raw chocolate came about from me having daily chocolate cravings, but not wanting to eat sweets every day. I’m one of those people who is okay with eating very dark and bitter chocolate, and I will even eat a 100% cacao bar if I get the chance. So I knew that loading up a chocolate bar with all kinds of savory goodies from my pantry and adding a minimal amount of sweetener would result in a treat that I could get behind. In my favorite batch, I included toasted seeds, spices, seaweed, tahini and miso. There are also a ton of optional add-ins like bee pollen and spirulina that I added for their nutritional content, simply because I had them on hand, but they can be left out and other things from your pantry can be added in. This recipe is very forgiving and customizable. As far as the flavor goes, this chocolate still reads as a treat, and a square or two with tea satisfies all of my chocoholic cravings perfectly. It’s texturally rich from all the crunchy add-ins, and the salty notes from the seaweed, miso and nutritional yeast play well with the rich flavor of raw chocolate. Enjoy and have a great Sunday :) Almost Savory Raw Chocolate   Print Serves: about 8 3 x 7 chocolate bars Ingredients 200 grams (about 2 cups shredded) raw cacao butter - shredded or chopped ½ cup sesame tahini 4 tablespoons maple syrup or date syrup 1 tablespoon unpasteurized miso paste 1 cup raw cacao powder ½ cup mesquite powder 4 tablespoons maca powder ⅓ cup hemp hearts ⅓ cup pumpkin seeds - toasted ¼ cup chia seeds ¼ cup dulse flakes ¼ cup nutritional yeast 1 tablespoon turmeric 3 sheets nori - cut or torn into small pieces other add-ins: ¼ cup cacao nibs 1 tablespoon spirulina ½ tablespoon moringa powder ½ tablespoon bee pollen ½ teaspoon ground ginger sweet and/­­or smoked paprika for sprinkling Instructions In a large bowl, gently melt the cacao butter on a double boiler over medium to medium-low heat. To the bowl, add the tahini, maple/­­date syrup and miso, and whisk to incorporate. To the same bowl, add the cacao, mesquite and maca powders, and whisk until well incorporated. To the same bowl, add the hemp, pumpkin and chia seeds, dulse, nutritional yeast, and turmeric. If using, also add cacao nibs, spirulina, moringa, bee pollen and ginger. Mix everything with a spoon to combine well and fold in the nori until incorporated evenly. Optionally, sprinkle the bottom of your chocolate mold with sweet and/­­or smoked paprika, moringa, turmeric, hemp hearts and pumpkin seeds for decoration. Spoon the chocolate mixture into the mold, evening it out with the back of a spoon. Place into a the freezer for about 5 minutes, until the chocolate hardens completely. Remove from the mold and enjoy. Store in an air-tight container in the freezer or refrigerator. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw New Year Doughnuts Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice... Temaki-zushi Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Almost Savory Raw Chocolate appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways

March 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Quick Blender Pancakes, Three WaysThis post was created in partnership with Revol. So excited to share this recent discovery with you today. If you follow us on instagram, you may have seen me posting an abnormal number of pancake photos recently. That would be because Ive been cooking some variation of blender pancakes almost every morning for the past couple of weeks. Seriously obsessed. Blender pancakes start out with whole grains instead of flour, which get soaked overnight in purified water. Soaking not only softens the grains and makes them more blend-able, but also awakens the life within each individual grain and rids them of phytic acid, making them more bioavailable and easier to digest. You could use a number of grains here, but I find raw buckwheat to be the perfect neutral base. Buckwheat is also incredibly nutritious, and is actually not a grain at all, but a fruit/­­berry of the buckwheat plant (related to rhubarb!). In the morning, simply combine your soaked grains with a liquid and other add-ins in a blender, whirl everything into a smooth batter and you are ready to fry up your pancakes. Its all super quick, easy and so tasty, and there is a lot of room to get creative, too. The whole process kind of reminds me of making a smoothie because the flavor combo possibilities are endless, and because you can just throw a bunch of ingredients into the blender and expect totally delicious results (almost) every time. I offer three of my favorite flavor combinations here, two sweet and one savory. The orange, sweet potato pancakes are subtly sweetened with maple syrup and jazzed up with spices. They are hearty, warming, and very kid-friendly. The green ones are flavored with matcha and studded with sesame seeds that add tiny pops of crunch throughout. Matcha is the star in this variation, youll be able to taste its lovely, grassy and sweet notes very well. The pink, savory pancakes, combine beet with spices, ginger and greens, making them a great option for those who favor a non-sugary breakfast. I love them with our avocado mayo, but you can employ pretty much any one of your favorite, creamy sauces as an accompaniment. Whichever variation you try, you will love how easily they come together and how forgiving the recipes are in terms of add-ins. I know by now youve noticed the beautiful plates/­­cups /­­enamel board in the photos. They are from Revol, a French cookware and bakeware brand with a newly launched website. They sent me a few items of my choice from their Color Lab and Crumple collections, and I was blown away by the quality of their wares. The half-glazed dinner plates are handmade in France and feel incredibly sturdy. They stack up perfectly when you store them in the cupboard and are just a true pleasure to eat off of. I couldnt resist the pink crumple cups because they are adorable, and because I was missing vessels of that size in my kitchen. They are the ideal size for espresso or cappuccino, if thats your thing, but I will be using them for my occasional morning ginger-turmeric shots. The little cheese plate/­­presentation board is hand-dipped in enamel, and will make for a perfect snack board at any get-together. All the pieces are refined and minimal, yet they still feel warm and welcoming, and you can definitely sense the hand in all of them. Everything is oven and dishwasher safe, too, so there’s a perfect balance of beauty and utility. Spiced Sweet Potato Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 12 pancakes Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato coconut oil for roasting sweet potato and frying ¾ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight 1 tablespoon sesame tahini or other nut/­­seed butter 1 cup almond milk or water 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar ½ teaspoon baking powder pinch of sea salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg 4 cardamom pods - green shells removed (optional) ½ teaspoon ground ginger (optional) 1 tablespoon maple syrup, plus more for serving 1 tablespoon ground flax or chia seeds (optional) 2 tablespoons hemp seeds (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 400°F (200° C). Prick the sweet potato with a fork several times and place it on a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Roast for 40-50 minutes or until tender throughout. Let cool, then peel. Alternatively, peel the sweet potato and roughly chop it into cubes. Place onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray and roast for 30-40 minutes, until tender. Mash the sweet potato pieces a bit with a fork when you are measuring out 1 cup of the flesh in the next step. Drain the buckwheat over a colander and rinse very well. Combine it with 1 cup sweet potato flesh, sesame tahini, almond milk/­­water, apple cider vinegar, baking powder, salt, spices and maple syrup in an upright blender, and blend until smooth. Add flax/­­chia and hemp seeds, if using, pulse to combine. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan and spread each one out slightly with the back of a spoon, into roughly a 4-inch pancake. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with fresh fruit, maple syrup/­­honey, yogurt and/­­or cacao nibs. These pancakes are best eaten fresh, but you can also reheat them on low temperature in the oven or toaster, in case you have leftovers. 3.5.3226 Matcha Sesame Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 8 pancakes Ingredients ½ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight ½ cup almond milk or water 1 teaspoon matcha powder 1-2 tablespoons maple syrup, plus more for serving 1 tablespoon sesame seeds (I used black) Instructions Drain the buckwheat over a colander and rinse very well. Combine it with almond milk/­­water, matcha, and maple syrup in an upright blender, and blend until smooth. Add sesame seeds and pulse on low to mix the seeds into the batter. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 more minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with more sesame seeds, coconut flakes, fresh fruit, maple syrup/­­honey, yogurt, etc. These pancakes are best eaten fresh, but you can also reheat them on low temperature in the oven or toaster, in case you have leftovers. 3.5.3226 Savory Beet Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 9 pancakes Ingredients ½ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight ½ cup whole sorghum groats or more buckwheat/­­barley/­­quinoa etc. - soaked in purified water overnight ½ small cooked beet 1 tablespoon sesame tahini ½ cup water 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon tamari or more to taste ½-inch piece ginger ¼ teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon cuminteaspoon red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon chia or flax seeds (optional) 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast (optional) 1 tablespoon dulse (optional) large handful chopped spinach/­­kale leaves or small handful sliced scallions avocado mayo - for serving (optional) Instructions Drain and rinse the buckwheat and sorghum very well. Combine the grains with the beet, sesame tahini, water, apple cider vinegar, tamari, ginger, baking powder, smoked paprika, cumin, red pepper flakes, and chia/­­flax, nutritional yeast, dulse, if using, in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Add chopped spinach/­­kale/­­scallions and pulse to mix in. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan and spread each one out slightly with the back of a spoon, into roughly a 4-inch pancake. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with avocado mayo/­­plain yogurt/­­any sauce of choice and more sliced scallions. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Raw Greenylicious Herb Soup and BBQ Grissini by Earthsprout Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Daikon Noodle Ramen

March 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Daikon Noodle Ramen Every time I get vegetable ramen while out, I end up walking away a little disappointed. The first slurp always starts out super intense and satisfying, but then I quickly realize how overly salty the broth is, probably in compensation for the lack of meat, and things go downhill from there. I do know that the whole point of ramen is that meaty/­­seafoody broth plus noodles, not a veggie-based umami noodle bomb, but a girl can dream. For now, I just make my own. Thankfully, there are plenty of umami-rich ingredients in the plant world, and many of them happen to be perfect for making an intense, savory soup. Broth is everything when it comes to ramen, and in this recipe, I employ a combination of fresh and dried mushrooms, hot pepper, ginger, garlic, and miso to create a dark, powerful, full-bodied broth. I shape daikon radish into noodle-like strands (using this handy tool) and use them in place of noodles, in an effort to lighten things up and to squeeze another beautiful but underutilized vegetable into the mix. I boil the daikon strands like I would any other noodles, so they soften up, lose some of that radish edge and become pretty similar to the real thing. This is a really good dish to make while we are on this uncertain line between winter and spring. Its still very warming and nourishing but a bit lighter than all those root vegetables and rich stews that youve probably had enough of by now. I know the ingredient list looks long, but a bunch of them, like black garlic (!) are optional, and you might already have a lot of the other ones in your pantry. I do have to talk a bit about black garlic here, because its kind of a life-changing little ingredient. Its made by consistently heating whole heads of garlic over the course of several weeks, which results in something similar to roasted garlic, but even more earthy and caramelized in taste. This was my first time trying black garlic and I of course fell in love - I think anyone would fall for roasted garlic x 10. Its been making its way into many of my everyday dishes, and black garlic simply spread on toast with some ghee is a revelation. Follow this link to get the recipe for the Vegan Daikon Noodle Ramen :) You might also like... Raw Greenylicious Herb Soup and BBQ Grissini by Earthsprout Cauliflower Rice with Zingy White Beans and Kale Ginger Marinated Tofu with Citrus Salsa Daikon Radish Pasta With Corn and Tomatoes in Creamy Coconut Sauce .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Vegan Daikon Noodle Ramen appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake

March 8 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Upside Down Citrus Polenta CakeThis post was created in partnership with North Coast. March is tricky. It’ll throw out a few of those luxuriously warm days in a row, which cause collective memory loss about the fact that it’s still winter, and you’ll suddenly see a few dazed people out on the street wearing shorts. And then it gets cold again, and it might even snow soon, and the warm coat you so optimistically tucked away into your closet has to come back out. By this time, you might also be really tired of root vegetables and stews, and all things earthy and hearty. I am. Thankfully, there is citrus. Bright, sweet, lush, like little suns in fruit form. I’m continually amazed by the variety of citrus fruit available at the grocery store this time of year. Based on my last scan of the citrus section, there are at least three types of oranges, the blood variety being the star, about as many kinds of grapefruits (red, pink, white), and don’t even get me started on the numerous hybrids, smooth-skinned, wrinkled and everything in between. I wanted to make a treat that really captures that brightness and abundance, so an upside down cake was in order. It looks involved to those not in the know, but it’s actually the easiest kind of cake to make. For the cake itself, I wanted a batter that would come out of the oven moist and fluffy, and I aimed for gluten-free and vegan, since that is what most of you guys seem to enjoy. There was a large jar of polenta in my pantry – there always is, since my eight year old is a polenta fiend – and I had the idea to go the corncake route. I’m really happy I did, and the cake was gone within a day as proof of its success. It’s sweetened with dates, apple sauce and orange juice, so nothing too sugary here. The mellow sweetness and crumbly texture of the cake combines really well with the fragrant, bright notes of the blanket of citrus on top. I like keeping the skin on the citrus slices, since its oils contribute lovely, complex notes to the overall flavor, but if you or your kids are not fond of a little bitterness, you can cut the skin off the slices. One of the main challenges of vegan baking is coming up with the correct combination of ingredients for a moist batter that doesn’t fall apart, without eggs. I’ve found apple sauce to be the essential ‘secret’ ingredient that makes all of the above possible, while adding a bit of its subtle sweetness to the mix. It also seamlessly integrates into sweet baked goods, so you won’t be tasting apple sauce in the finished product. Plus, it’s a healthy, clean, plant-based ingredient, and we all love those here. I was excited to work with North Coast on this recipe, since their apple sauce is the best I’ve ever tasted and contains no preservatives and no added sugar, all the while being made with real, organic, non-GMO ingredients. Their sauce tastes incredibly fresh and crisp, and they offer well-considered flavor options, like plain, berry, apricot, pumpkin spice and more, made with all U.S. grown fruit. Besides this cake, I’ve been using North Coast apple sauce in so much of my cooking lately, from these brownies, to my morning oats, atop a cup of coconut yogurt and even in smoothies. The brand also offers apple cider vinegar, cider and juice, so there is a definite mastery of wholesome apple products, which I absolutely love. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake   Print Serves: one 9-inch cake Ingredients for the cake 1 cup non-GMO polenta 1 cup brown rice flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon baking powder sea salt zest of 2 organic oranges 10-12 soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in warm water for 10 minutes, soaking liquid reserved 1 cup freshly squeezed orange juice ⅓ cup apple sauce 2 tablespoons coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pan 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 2-3 oranges - sliced ½-inch thick (You can use a variety of different kinds for a more colorful presentation. I used navel, cara cara and blood oranges.) Instructions to make the cake Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Cut out a parchment paper circle to cover the bottom of a 9-inch spring form or cake pan. Thoroughly oil the sides of the pan with coconut oil. In a large bowl, combine the polenta, brown rice flour, baking soda, baking powder, a pinch of salt, and orange zest, and mix thoroughly. Reserve 1/­­2 cup of the date soaking water and add it to an upright blender along with the dates and orange juice, blend until smooth. Add the apple sauce, coconut oil and apple cider vinegar and pulse to combine. Pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the dry ingredients and stir to just combine. Arrange the orange slices to cover the parchment paper-lined bottom of your pan and pour the batter over them. Even the batter out with a spoon. Lift and drop the pan gently a couple of times to get rid of any possible air bubbles. Bake for 40-45 minutes, or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean. Let cool for at least 20 minutes before inverting the cake onto a plate or a cake stand and peeling off the parchment paper. Slice and serve with plain yogurt or coconut yogurt. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway

March 1 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway When I first heard that Laura Wright was writing a cookbook about two years ago, I began a very impatient wait for a book that I knew would become very important to me, as well as a staple in my kitchen. Now that the wait is finally over, I truly haven’t been able to stop cooking from this masterpiece of a book, and it has exceeded all of my very high expectations. Every time I set out to read Laura’s blog, The First Mess, I know that I will be walking away with a smile, as well as inspired to cook something bright, comforting and nourishing to the core. Laura’s writing style is so uniquely heartwarming and honest, like being in a conversation with a dear old friend, and that tone is very much echoed in the very well-considered, homey recipes and beautiful photography in The First Mess cookbook. All of the recipes in the book are vegan and whole food/­­vegetable/­­fruit-forward, but more importantly, they are delicious, unique yet somehow familiar, considerate of time, and made with accessible ingredients. The book is for absolutely everyone, whether vegan, vegetarian, omnivore, health-conscious or not, and it will get you excited to cook. This all-inclusiveness and approachability is so hard to achieve with a plant-based cookbook, but that is Laura’s genius. Ever since receiving my copy a few weeks ago, I’ve been floating on a cloud of cooking inspiration, and I’ve already made the French Onion Lentil Pots, Roasted Chili Basil Lime Tofu Bowls, Mustard-Roasted Broccoli Paté, Lazy Steel Cut Oatmeal, Fudgy Nut and Seed Butter Brownies (twice), plus the two recipes in this post, all to insanely good results. I chose to feature the Moroccan Stew recipe here, since I think it really captures the essence of Laura’s cooking. The stew comes together quickly, with pantry and grocery store staples, yet it tastes completely new and luxurious. Plus, it’s a great recipe to make during this seasonal produce limbo that we are in right now. Of course, I couldn’t choose just one recipe to post, so I made the Sunshine Everything Crackers to snack on as well. They are so addictive! As well as gluten-free, colored golden with turmeric, and they taste like better, healthier cheez-its/­­goldfish crackers. We plowed through them in a few days, and they made for an excellent lunchbox snack for the kid, too. The First Mess cookbook comes out on March 7th, but you can preorder it now to save a few bucks and to receive the delicious-looking bonus recipe bundle that Laura created for preorder customers. G I V E A W A Y /­­/­­ We are giving away one copy of The First Mess cookbook. To enter, leave a comment here telling us about your go-to recipe for this transitional time of year, or your favorite recipe from The First Mess blog until next Wednesday, March 8th, 2017. Giveaway is for U.S. and Canada only. Reprinted from The  First  Mess  Cookbook  by arrangement with Avery Books, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, A Penguin Random House Company. Copyright (C) 2017, Laura Wright. Sunshine Everything Crackers   Print Serves: about 60 1-inch (2.5 cm) crackers Ingredients 1 cup (250 ml) chickpea flour 1 cup (250 ml) gluten-free oat flour 2 teaspoons nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon fine sea salt 2 teaspoons garlic powder 1 teaspoon ground turmeric pinch of cayenne pepper (optional) ¼ cup + 2 tablespoons sunflower oil (I used neutral coconut oil) ¼ cup filtered water, plus extra if necessary ¼ cup mixed raw seeds (I used flax, hemp, sesame) Instructions Preheat oven to 350° F (180° C). In the bowl of a food processor, combine the chickpea flour, oat flour, nutritional yeast, sea salt, garlic powder, ground turmeric, cayenne pepper, if using, and oil. Pulse the machine to get everything lightly mixed. Mix on high until you have a wet and uniform crumbly mixture. With the food processor on low, slowly pour the filtered water through the feed tube of the food processor. The cracker dough should start to form a large ball. If the ball isnt forming, add more water by the teaspoon through the feed tube. Open the lid of the food processor and add the mixed seeds. Pulse the dough a couple of times to distribute the seeds. Lay a sheet of parchment paper, about the size of a large baking sheet, on the counter. Dump the cracker dough onto the parchment and flatten it a bit with your hands. Lay another sheet of parchment paper on top of the dough. With a rolling pin, evenly roll the cracker dough out to roughly an ⅛ inch (3mm) thickness. Remove the top sheet of parchment paper. Carefully transfer the parchment with the rolled-out cracker dough to a large baking sheet. With a knife, score the cracker dough into a gird, forming 1-inch (2.5 cm) square crackers. Slide the baking sheet into the oven and bake until the edges of the crackers have browned slightly, about 20 minutes. Let the crackers cool completely before storing in a sealed container. The crackers will keep for about 5 days. 3.5.3226   Moroccan Stew   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients 2 teaspoons coconut oil 1 medium yellow onion - small dice 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 2 teaspoons ground cumin 2 teaspoons ground coriander ½ teaspoon dried chili flakes (optional) 2 cloves garlic - minced 3 to 4 Medjool dates - pitted and chopped 2 carrots - chopped into ½-inch (1 cm) pieces 1 large sweet potato - peeled and chopped into ½-inch (1 cm) pieces salt and pepper - to taste 1 can (28 ounces/­­769 ml) crushed tomatoes 3 to 4 cups (750 ml to 1 L) vegetable stock 1 yellow bell pepper - stemmed and chopped into ½-inch (1 cm pieces) 2 cups (500 ml) cooked chickpeas for serving pitted green olives lemon wedges cooked brown rice, millet or couscous Instructions Heat the coconut oil in a large, heavy-bottomed soup pot over medium heat. Add the onions and immediately lower the heat until they are sizzling quietly. When the onions are soft and translucent, add the cinnamon, cumin, coriander, and chili flakes, if using. Slowly sauté and stir the spiced onion mixture until the onions are quite soft, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the chopped dates, carrots, and sweet potatoes. Season the vegetables with salt and pepper. Stir to coat the vegetables in the spices and oil. Add the crushed tomatoes and stir. Add 3 cups (750 ml) of the vegetable stock. Bring to a boil uncovered, and simmer until the sweet potatoes are just tender, about 10 to 12 minutes. Add the yellow bell pepper and chickpeas and stir. Season the whole thing again with salt and pepper. If the stew seems too thick, add the remaining 1 cup (250 ml) of vegetable stock. Simmer until the yellow bell peppers are tender and the sweet potatoes are quite soft, about 5 minutes. Check the soup for seasoning and adjust if necessary. Serve the stew hot with a few green olives per portion, lemon wedges and warm cooked grain. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Caramelized Vegetables in Crispy Coconut Cups Mint and Chocolate Milkshake with Aquafaba Whipped Cream - Ice Cream S... Raw Pad Thai with Baby Bok Choy and White Crab Mushrooms Sweet and Savory Energy Bites, What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna

February 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean LasagnaThis post was created in partnership with Newman’s Own Organics. I’ve always thought of lasagna as an intimidating dish in terms of its layered preparation, though I love the flavor and find myself craving it often during the cooler months. I set out to change my outlook with this simple and nourishing spaghetti squash version that tastes every bit as comforting as the original. Spaghetti squash performs impressively well as a lighter and more nutritious substitute for lasagna noodles that’s still hearty and substantial here. The uppermost layer of the squash that tops the lasagna becomes slightly crispy and golden in the oven and reminds me of my lacy, oven-baked latkes, for which I have a major weakness. The core of the lasagna is made up of the flavor-building trio of onions, carrots and celery, as well as affordable, protein-rich mung beans (you can also use lentils), kale and mushrooms. For the cheesy element, I went with my go-to almond ricotta that is a breeze to make, as well as fluffy, slightly tangy and cheesy, much like the real thing. I was very excited to partner with Newman’s Own Organics for this recipe for numerous reasons. Pasta sauce is one of the few things that I don’t mind buying pre-made, especially when I know that I can stand behind all the ingredients like I can with Newman’s. Their organic pasta sauce is made with real vegetables and herbs, all of which are organic, and that’s very much reflected in the delicious, classic flavor that works incredibly well in this lasagna. There’s no added sugar, either, the sauce just depends on the natural sweetness of the tomatoes. Another great reason to support the brand is that they donate 100% of their net profits to all kinds of charities around the world, which is an idea that got put into motion by Paul Newman in 1982 and has been carried out gracefully to this very day. This Paul Newman quote is at the core of the company’s mission and basically says it all: I want to acknowledge luck. The benevolence of it in my life and the brutality of it in the lives of others. Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna   Print Serves: one 9 x 13 baking dish or two 9 x 9 baking dishes Ingredients for the almond ricotta 2 cups almonds - soaked overnight in purified water 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1 garlic clove - chopped generous squeeze of fresh lemon juice pinch sea salt for the lasagna 1 large or 2 small spaghetti squash 3-4 tablespoons neutral coconut oil sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 cup mung beans or French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water 1 large yellow onion - chopped pinch red pepper flakes dried thyme, oregano, marjoram - to taste (optional) 2 medium carrots - sliced 2 celery ribs - thinly sliced 1 lb crimini mushrooms - sliced two 24 oz jars marinara sauce or crushed canned tomatoes Instructions to make the almond ricotta Drain and rinse the almonds. Optionally, squeeze each almond to slip off the skin for a whiter, smoother ricotta, rinse well. Place almonds into the bowl of a food processor along with the rest of the ingredients. Add ¼ cup water and grind to a ricotta consistency. Add another 1-2 tablespoons of water, if needed. Use right away or refrigerate for up to 3 days. to make the lasagna Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Cut the squash in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds. Generously oil the inside of each half with about 1 tablespoon of the coconut oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place the squash cut side down on a parchment paper-covered baking tray and bake for 30-40 minutes or until tender. Remove from the oven and set aside. Reduce the oven temperature to 375° F (190° C). While the squash is roasting, drain and rinse the mung beans/­­lentils, place them in a medium saucepan and cover with purified water. Bring to a boil over high heat, lower the heat to a simmer, add salt and cook, partially covered, for 10 minutes. Taste for doneness, simmer for 2-5 minutes more if the beans are not yet tender. If using lentils, cook them for 20-30 minutes until done. Drain and set aside. Warm 2 tablespoons of coconut oil in a large saute pan over medium heat. Add onion, a pinch of salt, black pepper, red pepper flakes, and thyme/­­oregano/­­marjoram, if using, and saute for 5 minutes, until onion is translucent. Add carrots, celery and another pinch of salt and saute for another 5 minutes. Add mushrooms and saute for about 8 minutes or longer, until the liquid released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add mung beans and saute for 2 minutes, until coated and incorporated. Remove pan from the heat and set aside. Grease a 9 x 13 baking dish (or 2 smaller square dishes, about 8 x 8 or 9 x 9, as pictured) with the remaining 1 tablespoon of coconut oil. Spread ⅓ of the marinara sauce/­­crushed canned tomatoes over the bottom of the dish. Using a fork, scoop the spaghetti squash strands out of the skin and spread ⅓ of them over the marinara in an even layer. Reserve about 1 cup of the ricotta for garnish, if desired. Crumble ⅓ of the remaining ricotta over the squash. Top with half of the mung bean and vegetable mixture in an even layer. Repeat with ⅓ of the marinara, squash, ricotta and vegetables. Finish with the last layer of marinara and the squash. Cover and bake for 20 minutes. Increase the oven temperature to 400° F (200° C). Uncover the lasagna and bake for another 10 minutes, until the marinara is bubbling through to the surface. Optionally, turn the broiler on high and broil for a couple minutes, until top layer of the lasagna is golden in places. Remove from the oven, garnish with the reserved ricotta, if using, let cool slightly, slice and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice... Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet and Savory Energy Bites, What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp

February 10 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet and Savory Energy Bites, What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp Last week, I talked a little bit about my love for homemade nut milk, how it always tastes better than the store-bought kind, and how the amount of control I have over the process and ingredients makes it all worth the tiny bit of fuss. I’ve noticed that whenever I discuss making nut milk with anyone, the question of utilizing the leftover nut pulp is bound to come up. No one wants to throw it away, but not many people know what to do with it, either. I was in the same boat for years – sometimes, I would freeze the pulp for later use in place of almond flour in baked goods, which didn’t always work out because the pulp is not quite as dry as almond flour. Other times, I tried incorporating it into granola, but If I’m being honest, I often ended up throwing it away, not without some serious guilt. About a month ago, I opened up the question on instagram and got so many fascinating suggestions that went way beyond baking/­­granola: a base for stuffing, a thickener for smoothies, chicken feed, face scrub (!), and energy balls. I found the idea of pulp-based energy balls to be really compelling and set out to make both a sweet and a savory version. I’m really excited to share the results! Both of these recipes are ‘kitchen sink’-style and can easily act as a pantry cleanout aid. The sweet bites are full of toasty notes from the nuts, seeds and coconut, chocolatey and energizing with the addition of cacao, and sweetened with dates. The savory ones remind be a bit of the raw falafel I used to make back in the day. There’s miso, tahini, and tamari, as well as invigorating spices, herbs and even seaweed. Both make for an amazing pick-me-up snack, easy to transport and a breeze to prepare. And I definitely won’t be throwing away any more nut pulp. Savory Energy Bites   Print Serves: about 30 balls Ingredients 1 cup nut pulp, left over from making plain nut milk ¼ cup toasted unhulled sesame seeds, plus more for coating 2 tablespoons ground flax seeds 2 tablespoons sesame tahini 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tablespoon miso paste 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil ½ tablespoon tamari 1 teaspoon smoked paprika, plus more for coating 1 teaspoon turmeric, plus more for coating optional add ins 1 tablespoon dulse seaweed 3 scallions - thinly sliced 1 garlic clove - minced 1 tablespoon chopped dill Instructions Mix all the the ingredients in a food processor or in a bowl by hand, until well combined. Roll into balls about 1-inch in diameter. Coat with sesame seeds, turmeric and/­­or smoked paprika, if desired. Keep refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   Sweet Energy Bites   Print Serves: about 30 balls Ingredients 1 cup mix of various toasted nuts and seeds, such as hazelnuts, walnuts, pumpkin, sunflower or sesame seeds, plus more for coating 2 large, soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes 1 cup nut pulp, left over from making nut milk 4 tablespoons raw cacao powder 3 tablespoons honey or maple syrup, or to taste 2 tablespoons almond butter 2 tablespoons tahini 2 tablespoons chia seeds 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil optional add ins 1 tablespoon hemp hearts handful toasted coconut flakes or desiccated coconut 2-3 tablespoons cacao nibs ½ tablespoon mesquite powder ½ tablespoon moringa powder 1 teaspoon maca powder 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon ground ginger matcha powder - for coating raisins - for decorating Instructions Place toasted nuts/­­seeds into the bowl of a food processor and grind into a meal. Drain dates and add them to the food processor with the rest of the ingredients. Process until thoroughly combined. Roll into balls about 1-inch in diameter. Coat in seeds and matcha, if using, and decorate with various nuts and raisins, if using. Keep refrigerated in an airtight container for up to a week. 3.5.3226   Have you heard of Daily Harvest? They deliver healthy, ready-to-blend smoothies and ready-to-heat soups to your door, which casually include all kinds of superfoods like açaí, cacao, camu camu, adaptogenic mushrooms, astralagus, and ginseng, in addition to freshly frozen fruits and veggies. I love making my own soups and smoothies, but I’m not going to lie, having a wholesome and delicious option in the freezer is really nice on busy days, especially when I know that I can stand behind all the ingredients. If you happen to be in need of a healthful shortcut, use the discount code above to get 3 free smoothies or soups :) You might also like... 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Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways

February 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways This post was created in partnership with Quinoa Queen. I’m pretty convinced that I’ll be on team homemade nut milk forever. I do buy bottled almond milk from time to time, and there are great brands out on the market that I feel lucky to have access to. But every time I make a batch at home and taste my first, bright-white sip, I make a mental note to never purchase the store-bought kind again. It’s that good. If you’ve never made nut milk at home, you’ll be surprised by how easy and satisfying the process is. It does take more effort than buying a bottle at the store, but the superior flavor and heavenly texture make it well worth it. Nut milk is made by blending nuts in water – the nuts break down and yield their creaminess and fattiness to the water, coloring it an opaque white. All you need for whipping up a batch of nut milk is a blender and something for straining out the nut pulp, once the nuts are blended up. I’ve heard of people using multiple layers of cheesecloth and fine-mesh strainers, but I’ve found the nut milk bag to be the most effective tool for the job. Run your blended mixture through the bag, give it a squeeze, and you have your milk. Easy! Another advantage to making nut milk at home is the amount of control you have over the process. Many nut milk brands add stabilizers, sweeteners and natural flavors to their mix, and by making your own, you are taking all that unwanted stuff out of the equation. You can soak your nuts/­­seeds, too, which I highly recommend. Soaking gets rid of enzyme inhibitors, which in turn makes the nuts easier to digest and improves their nutrient bioavailability. I’m pretty sure none of the nut milk brands out there are taking care to soak their nuts, so there’s another reason to make your own. You can have all sorts of fun with the kind of milk you make. Use any nuts you like, following the basic proportion, from the more common almonds and cashews, to hazelnuts, pecans and Brazil nuts. Seeds work really well, too! Pumpkin, sesame and sunflower seeds all yield delicious milk and make the endeavor more affordable. You can also make nut/­­seed blends and flavor your milk all kinds of ways. I give you a few luscious flavoring ideas here, including Chocolate-Orange Hazelnut Milk, Matcha-Mint Pumpkinseed Milk and Spiced Pecan Milk. We’ll have more on what to do with the leftover pulp soon, too. I didn’t try my first bite of cereal until the early 90s, when American goods were finally allowed to be imported into Russia after the fall of the iron curtain. Back then, we looked at cornflakes, Snickers, McDonalds and chewing gum with wide and hungry eyes, taking in their then exotic flavors with all kinds of enthusiasm. Nowadays, I find most cereal brands out there to be much too sweet and full of too many unwanted ingredients. Still, a single bite of something crunchy and porous floating in (nut) milk sends me back to those times, when I coveted cornflakes like I now covet coconut butter. I’ve been loving Quinoa Queen, the gluten-free, 100% quinoa cereal brand that uses a minimal amount of wholesome, natural ingredients. The creator of Quinoa Queen is a food scientist and comes from the Andean mountains of Ecuador, where she works with her native community to harvest the quinoa used in her product. QQ cereal is not too sweet, and there is even an unsweetened, single ingredient option which I love, especially when combined with one of these flavored nut milks. The rest of the flavor offerings are subtle and well-considered, there is a lightly sweetened one, as well as a citrusy one, which my eight year old has been eating for breakfast with the Chocolate Orange Hazelnut milk (so it’s kid approved, too). Quinoa works so well as a cereal ingredient, it’s neutral in flavor and contains a wealth of protein and fiber, among other vitamins and minerals that help with starting the morning off right. I’m pretty thrilled to have found a wholesome cereal I can enjoy with all my homemade nut milks, and if you are looking for something similar, consider giving Quinoa Queen a try. Note: You can use raw almonds, cashews or any other nuts or seeds of choice for any of these milk variations. Cashews are especially convenient, as they don’t need to be strained – their pulp breaks down enough in the blender. Chocolate-Orange Hazelnut Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 cup raw hazelnuts - soaked overnight in purified water 3 large, soft Medjool dates, or more to taste 2 tablespoons raw cacao powder, or more to taste 1 teaspoon maca powder (optional) zest of 1-2 organic oranges Instructions Drain and rinse the hazelnuts. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for future use. Pour the hazelnut milk back into the blender, add dates, cacao and maca, if using, and blend until smooth. Add the orange zest and pulse several times to combine. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226   Spiced Pecan Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 heaping cup raw pecans or walnuts - soaked in purified water for 4 hours or overnight 5 green cardamom pods - green shells removed 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg or a few shaves/­­slices of whole nutmeg 2-3 soft Medjool dates - optional (I like it unsweetened) Instructions Drain and rinse the pecans/­­walnuts. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for the future use. Pour the walnut milk back into the blender, add the rest of the ingredients and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226   Matcha-Mint Pumpkinseed Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 cup raw pumpkin seeds - soaked in purified water for 4 hours or overnight 2 teaspoons matcha powder or more to taste handful fresh mint leaves - to taste sweetener of choice - to taste (optional, I like it unsweetened) Instructions Drain and rinse the pumpkin seeds. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for future use. Pour the pumpkinseed milk back into the blender, add the rest of the ingredients and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Cauliflower Rice with Zingy White Beans and Kale

January 26 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Cauliflower Rice with Zingy White Beans and Kale There’s something very powerful about turning a pile of vegetables into a proper meal. The satisfaction/­­general victorious feeling that I get from finding a place for produce in our daily meals is one of the main reasons I’m attracted to cooking with plants, besides the more obvious nourishment factor. Another powerful feeling is finding a way to whip up a solid, plant-centric meal when you seemingly have no food left in the house. For me, that usually involves surveying the bottom of my crisper and pulling heavily from my pantry. That was the case with the recipe I have for you today, which took me from panicking about not having enough groceries to being well-fed and quite satisfied. I had a head of cauliflower I’d been ignoring, kale that was getting dangerously old, a bag of random Florida citrus, and mushrooms that didn’t make it into a stew (which are also optional in this recipe). The rest of the ingredients came straight from my pantry. We eat a lot of cauliflower around these parts in the fall and winter months, and at this point, everyone under my roof is pretty tired of the roasted-cauliflower-with-one-spice-or-another scenario. So cauliflowerrice’ is a good option when roasted cauliflower fatigue hits – it makes for a great, neutral bed for whichever ingredients you choose to serve with it and can be flavored so many different ways. It’s also a nice option for those trying to stay away from grains and looking for a sub that’s still tasty and comforting. I wanted to give a zingy, citrusy flavor kiss to the whole dish, since nature is awesome enough to supply us with the brightness that is citrus in the dark of winter. The ‘rice’ is cooked simply with onions and garlic, then finished off with some lemon juice. Served on top there’s a humble mix of sautéed kale, white beans and mushrooms if you have them. The white beans are also a base for the sauce, which involves orange juice and zest to get more of the sunny factor into the dish. This meal comes together pretty quickly, even more so if you make the cauliflower rice ahead of time. It’s a good candidate for a weekday meal, especially if you too happen to have all the ingredients on hand :) Cauliflower Rice with Zingy White Beans and Kale   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients for the white bean sauce 1 cup cooked white beans (butter, navy, etc.) ¼ cup + 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice (from about 2 small oranges) 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar 1½ tablespoons tamari 2 tablespoons olive oil sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste zest of 1 orange for the cauliflower rice with zingy white beans and kale 1 head cauliflower - roughly chopped into florets 3 tablespoons coconut oil - divided 1 shallot - diced 2 cloves garlic - minced ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes ½ cup water juice of ½ lemon sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste 8 oz crimini mushrooms - sliced (optional) 1 medium bunch kale - stemmed and chopped ½ tablespoon balsamic vinegar ½ tablespoon tamari 1 cup cooked white beans (butter, navy, etc.) white bean sauce (from above) Instructions to make the white bean sauce Combine all the ingredients, except orange zest, in a blender until smooth. Mix in the orange zest on the lowest blender speed setting or by hand with a spoon. to make the cauliflower rice with zingy white beans and kale Make the cauliflower rice. Divide your roughly chopped cauliflower florets into two even portions. Place the first portion into a food processor and pulse a few times, until you have pieces that are approximately the size of rice grains. Take care not to over-chop, you dont want your cauliflower to turn to mush. Transfer to a large bowl and repeat with the second half. Heat 2 tablespoons of coconut oil in a large sauté pan on medium heat. Add the shallot and sauté for 5 minutes, until soft and translucent. Add the garlic and red pepper flakes and sauté for another 2 minutes until fragrant. Add the chopped cauliflower, then mix in the water, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Cook for 8 minutes until the liquid absorbs and the rice becomes cooked but not mushy. Take care not to overcook. Transfer to a large bowl, keep warm and covered. Wipe the pan clean with a paper towel. Warm the remaining 1 tablespoon coconut oil over medium heat. Add the mushrooms, mix, then let them sit for about a minute to start releasing liquid. Add a pinch of salt to the mushrooms, mix and sauté for another 4 minutes, until all the liquid released by the mushrooms evaporates. If not using mushrooms, proceed with the kale. Add the kale, balsamic and tamari. Mix and sauté until the kale starts wilting. Add the white beans and let them warm through until the kale is completely wilted. Add the sauce, starting with ¼ - ½ cup and tasting as you go. Add more if needed. Let the sauce warm through and turn off the heat. Serve the kale and white beans over the cauliflower rice, garnished with more orange zest and more sauce, if desired. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushroo... Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi Sprouted Almond Romesco Pasta with Roasted Cauliflower and Blistered T... 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No-Recipe Healing Soup

January 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

No-Recipe Healing Soup A few years ago, I developed this soup recipe for Food & Wine, and since then, it has become a staple in our household during the winter months. The soup is all about the broth, which is based on a combination of immunity-boosting, anti-inflammatory ingredients like turmeric, ginger, garlic, lemon and miso. Any time I feel a cold coming on or if I’m simply in need of something warming and comforting, I make a batch of this gingery, spicy, sinus-clearing soup, and it’s proven to be a lifesaver many times. I never follow the original recipe exactly, in fact I’ve developed a sort ‘no-recipe’ approach, which considers my mood and the ingredients I have on hand. Sometimes, when in a hurry, I make the broth on its own and sip on it like I would on hot tea. When looking for a more substantial soup, I add other wholesome ingredients like veggies, greens and mushrooms. Each time is a little different, but the golden broth framework ensures that the soup will be tasty and nourishing to the core every time. The original recipe I did for Food & Wine involved pre-roasting the vegetables, but I’ve simplified it a great deal since then. Everything basically gets thrown into a pot and simmers into a magical mixture. I even cook soba right in the broth whenever I feel like having soba in my soup. I’m sure many people would call that an incorrect approach to the delicate thing that is soba, but the convenience of the method wins me over here, and it still tastes really good, so why not? I’m giving you my no-recipe recipe here. It’s a little different than usual, but it is the way I cook most of the time, and I suspect many of you do as well – with a great deal of improvisation, modification and at times simplification, whether following a particular recipe or not. No day is the same, so why should any one recipe stay rigid? Nothing wrong with going with the flow :) No-Recipe Healing Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients The ingredients in this recipe are divided into two sections - broth constants and optional add-ins. The constants are ingredients that are mandatory for making a flavorful broth. The optional add-ins are just that - optional. You can make just the broth and sip it on its own when feeling under the weather or in need of some comfort, or add one or more of the add-ins that you are craving/­­have on hand for a more substantial soup. This recipe is highly customizable, so feel free to get creative, following the basic broth framework. If you feel like including all the optional add-ins in the soup, all of them work well together except for the soba and spaghetti squash noodles - I recommend using one or the other as the noodle element. broth constants 2 teaspoons ground turmeric or 2 piece fresh turmeric - peeled, grated/­­minced 1 piece ginger - peeled, grated/­­minced 5 whole garlic cloves 1 jalape?o or small chili pepper - minced (leave seeds in if you prefer a spicier soup) 10-12 cups filtered water freshly ground black pepper - to taste 1-2 tablespoons tamari or to taste juice of 2 lemons 2 heaping tablespoons white/­­sweet/­­mild miso or to taste optional add-ins 1 large sweet potato or 3-4 medium carrots, or any other root vegetable of choice - cubed 8 oz shiitake or crimini mushrooms - sliced 2 lemongrass stalks - bruised with the back of a chefs knife, sliced into 3 pieces per each stalk handful kaffir lime leaves 1 piece kombu about 4 oz soba 1-2 clusters baby bok choy - separated into leaves or 1 small bunch any other greens - torn spaghetti squash noodles (from 1 roasted spaghetti squash) 1-1½ cups cooked beans or lentils handful cilantro leaves - for garnish Instructions Add all the broth ingredients, except black pepper, tamari, lemon juice, and miso to the pot. Also add any of the following optional add-ins that you are using: sweet potato/­­carrots, mushrooms, lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves and kombu. Lower the heat and simmer for 15 minutes, covered. If using sweet potato/­­carrots, check them for doneness by pricking a few pieces with a knife or fork, which should go in easily if the vegetables are cooked through. If not done, simmer for another 5 minutes and check again. Turn off the heat and add pepper to taste. If you have time, its great to let the broth sit and infuse for anywhere from 30 minutes to overnight (refrigerate if overnight), but this step is completely optional. Discard lemongrass stalks, kaffir lime leaves and kombu, if using. If making broth only, or if youve already added all the add-ins you have, you can stop here and add tamari, lemon juice and miso according to directions in step #5. If continuing with other add-ins, bring the soup back to a boil over medium high heat. If using soba, add it to the boiling broth and cook, uncovered, about 2-3 minutes less than the required time on the package until al dente (the soba will continue sitting in the hot broth and might get a little too soft if you cook it for the whole required time). Turn off the heat and add any of the following optional add-ins that you are using: baby bok choy/­­greens, spaghetti squash noodles, beans/­­lentils. Cover the pot and let the soup sit for about 2-5 minutes, until the greens are wilted and spaghetti squash noodles, beans/­­lentils are warmed through. Mix in lemon juice and tamari. Combine about 1 ladleful of the hot broth with the miso in a small bowl and mix until the miso is incorporated. Mix the miso broth into the soup. Taste for salt and adjust by adding more tamari if needed. Distribute between bowls, garnish with cilantro, if using, and serve. Notes 1. I call for 10-12 cups water here. Begin by adding 10 cups, if the pot seems too crowded, add 2 more cups. If you are making the broth only, you can add less water if you prefer, about 8 cups. 2. If you can get your hands on organic ginger and/­­or turmeric, dont peel them, as the skin holds lots of nutrients. Non-organic ginger and turmeric should be peeled. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl

January 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl This post was created in partnership with Naked Nutrition. Two carrot-centric recipes in a row? Yes, and I can explain :) I got a whole lot of questions about making last Sunday’s remedy tonic in a blender as opposed to a juicer, so I thought this would be the perfect time to share the recipe for one of my favorite smoothies made with similar ingredients. This one comes together in a few quick minutes with the help of a high-speed blender and tastes very much like carrot cake in a bowl, with the added benefits of raw carrots, ginger, pea protein and spices. Carrot cake is among the desserts I crave most often, but I rarely make or eat it for all the obvious reasons – it’s cake, it’s involved, it’s quite a bit of sugar. Plus, once I figured out that a quick, healthful carrot cake smoothie bowl is a possibility, my cravings for the real deal have subsided. All the ingredients in this one are pantry staples for me. I keep a big bag of carrots on hand for soups and stews, ginger – for tea and as a general immunity saver and digestive, rolled oats – for a variety of breakfasts, and my spice rack is generally overflowing, since spices are key for building flavor in plant-centric cooking. So I know this bowl of goodness is always at arm’s reach, and I end up reaching for it quite often. Another good thing about this smoothie is that while it can most certainly be dessert, it can also easily pass for breakfast. I generally like to include protein powder in all of my smoothies to make a meal out of them and to balance my sugar intake with protein, since smoothies tend to be on the sweet, fruity side. There are so many great powdered protein brands and varieties out there, that I find that aisle in the grocery store to be quite an overwhelming place. I’m especially stumped by lengthy lists of ingredients – they look great on paper, but I always end up wondering if that tiny percentage of broccoli powder or sprouted-anything powder could offer much in terms of nutrition. I’ve been using Naked Nutrition’s plant-based protein powders for a few months now, and truly love everything about the brand, from their philosophy rooted in simplicity, to the high quality of their ingredients. All of their plant-based protein powders have no more than three whole-food ingredients with no added artificial sweeteners, flavors or colors. They carry a variety of plant sources for protein like pea, rice and even peanut butter (!), and have simple flavor options like unflavored/­­unsweetened, along with chocolate and vanilla. Naked Nutrition’s flavored powders are sweetened with coconut sugar, while I’ve found that many other healthy protein powder brands use stevia. As much as I aspire to love stevia, I haven’t been able to get on board with it at all – its flavor is the only thing I can taste when I add it to absolutely anything, so coconut sugar has been my #1 powdered natural sweetener choice for years. For this smoothie bowl, I like using either the vanilla pea protein or the chocolate one, but vanilla is my favorite for this recipe, since it goes very well with the carrot cake spices. I also love the naked rice when I don’t want any flavor or sweetener, and I can’t wait to try baking with the choc peanut butter. Can you tell I’m enthusiastic about this company? If you aren’t vegan, Naked Nutrition offers single ingredient grass-fed whey and casein proteins that are also undoubtedly great. Golubka Kitchen readers get 10% off all orders on Naked Nutrition + free shipping – use code SPINACH at checkout. Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients for the smoothie 2 medium carrots - peeled 1 frozen banana 2-3 dates 1-inch piece ginger ¼ cup rolled oats 1 scoop vanilla protein 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon nutmeg seeds from 3 cardamom pods 1-1 2/­­2 cups almond milk topping options toasted walnuts toasted desiccated coconut hemp hearts dried mulberries stovetop granola from our tahini-ginger smoothie Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a high-speed blender until smooth. Distribute between bowls, garnish and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices

January 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices This post was created in partnership with Amira. This month we are focusing on recipes that will hopefully be helpful to those wanting to hit the reset button after all the holiday eating and drinking. I wanted a very manageable weekday dinner to be the first in the series, because we haven’t had one up in a while, and because I myself have been on the hunt for some new but trustworthy, quick and wholesome meal ideas. Most of my focus right now is on completing the kitchen renovation, a good part of which my husband and I have been doing ourselves. It’s been dragging on much longer than we expected – a common theme when it comes renovations, as I hear. We are finally down to the small finishing touches, but they somehow seem to be the hardest to complete. Cooking up large batches of un-elaborate, nourishing dishes like this stew to have on hand during the week has been one of my strategies for staying sane throughout this whole process. It’s amazing how helpful a home-cooked meal can be during times of stress. When looking for inspiration for balanced winter weeknight meals, I often turn to South Indian cuisine for its array of delicious vegetarian dishes and Ayurveda-approved ingredients. This particular stew is based on a recipe for sambar – a mung dal (yellow split mung beans that are protein-rich and affordable) stew that comes in hundreds of variations. The base for sambar is most commonly made up of mung dal that’s been cooked down to a porridge-like consistency and spiced, after which almost anything goes. You can include one or many stew-friendly vegetables in season, as well as other fun add ins like desiccated coconut. I love the versatility of this dish and usually just add in whatever vegetables or greens I have on hand. For this version, I kept things simple and only added chopped butternut squash and dried coconut – it can be as simple or as involved as you’d like. The ingredient list might seem long, but it’s mostly composed of spices, which play a huge role in building flavor in this otherwise modest stew. Each spice also brings its unique healing properties to the table – fennel helps aid digestion, turmeric is anti-inflammatory, fenugreek helps with blood sugar balance and much, much more. Like many Indian dishes, sambar is traditionally served over rice, and I’ve been truly enjoying serving it over Amira’s fragrant Thai Jasmine Brown Rice. Amira sent me a few of their premium long grain rice varieties to try, and I was consistently impressed with their quality and how distinctly different each kind tasted. Besides the jasmine brown rice, the variety that stood out to me is their Smoked Basmati Rice, which has a very unique smoked flavor and is really good in salads, and as a base for all kinds of veggie bowls. I’m crazy about smoked foods, so that one really hit the spot. If you see Amira rice in your grocery store, give it a try, I think you’ll really enjoy it! Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients 3 cups water ½ cup mung dal ¼ teaspoon turmeric ¼ teaspoon cumin ¼ teaspoon whole fenugreek seeds (optional) 3 sprigs fresh curry leaves (optional) 1 small yellow onion - chopped ½ medium butternut squash - peeled and cubed ¼ cup desiccated coconut sea salt 1 tablespoon red chili powder 2 tablespoons ghee or coconut oil ¼ teaspoon whole black mustard seeds 1 whole dried red chili - torn in half ⅛ teaspoon whole fennel seeds 1 tablespoon fresh lemon or lime juice 1½ cups cooked rice of your choice - for serving cilantro - for garnish (optional) coconut milk or yogurt - for garnish (optional) Instructions Bring 3 cups of water to a boil in a medium pot. Have a tea kettle or another pot with about 1 more cup of hot water ready, in case you need more water later in the process. Once 3 cups of water in the pot are boiling, add mung dal, turmeric, cumin, fenugreek and curry leaves (if using). Lower heat to establish a steady simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Mix periodically to ensure the mung dahl doesnt stick to the pan. Discard curry sprigs, if using. Add onion, squash, desiccated coconut, and salt to the pot. If it seems like there isnt enough liquid in the pot, add a little more hot water from the tea kettle until the vegetables have room to simmer in the water, keeping the dal consistency like a soupy porridge. Continue simmering, covered, for another 20 minutes or until the vegetables are cooked through. Stir in chili powder at half time. Mix periodically to prevent any sticking. Once the vegetables are around 5 minutes away from being done, warm ghee/­­oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add mustard seeds and let toast for about 30 seconds, tossing all the while. Add the chili and fennel seeds and toast for another 30 seconds or until fennel is toasted in color and fragrant. Add the toasted spices along with the ghee/­­oil from the pan into the pot with the stew, mix it in and let simmer, covered, for another 5 minutes. Once stew is done cooking, discard the pepper and mix in the lemon/­­lime juice. Taste and adjust the salt. Serve stew over rice, garnished with cilantro and coconut milk/­­yogurt if desired. Notes 1. You can add any vegetables/­­greens you have on hand in place of the butternut squash here and simmer until done, thats what makes this stew so versatile. 2. Curry leaves are completely optional here, but if you can get your hands on some, add them - their unique flavor works very well in this stew. 3. Traditional sambar calls for hing and tamarind. If you have one or both, add ⅛ teaspoon of hing to the pan with the toasting spices, towards the end and add to the stew with the rest of the toasted spices and ghee/­­oil. Add 2 teaspoons tamarind paste in place of the lemon/­­lime juice and simmer stew for another 5 minutes to let the flavor incorporate. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings

December 30 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings I’ve been thinking about party snacks crowd-pleasing enough to serve during a New Years get together and came up with these vegetable-forward nachos. At this point in the holiday season, I’m pretty tired of over-indulgent food and have been leaning towards cleaner, simpler meals. I used sweet potato instead of tortilla chips here exactly for that reason, and I think most guests will appreciate that as well. These nachos are still comfort food and definitely reminiscent of the original, but much lighter, more nourishing and kinder to your bod. I recently replaced my old, dull mandolin slicer with a new one and have been like a kid with a new toy these past couple of weeks. Most lunches have been composed of salads with tangles of paper-thin vegetable ribbons, and every bowl of oats or smoothie has gotten a crown of mandolined apples or persimmon. Needless to say, the purchase might have had something to do with the birth of this recipe, which happens to strongly encourage the use of a mandolin. I love how rediscovering a kitchen tool interweaves utility and nostalgia – basically my idea of fun. There’s some controversy out there about making perfect oven baked sweet potato chips. What I’ve found is that they won’t come out perfect because home ovens aren’t perfect, and we aren’t perfect, but I do have a few tricks that will ensure a batch of delicious and crispy, imperfect chips. Those include using a mandolin for thin, even slices, giving the slices a soak in water to get rid of some of the starch, and brushing on the oil with a brush for even distribution. I kept the nacho toppings pretty classic to offset the alternative chip choice – black beans and avocado for creaminess and substance, and crunchy things like red onion, scallions and radishes for some brightness. The vegan cheesy chipotle sauce is out-of-this-world delicious and simple, and if you don’t want to bother with making sweet potato chips, please give this sauce a try on regular tortilla chip nachos, I have a feeling you’ll really love it :) Wishing everyone peace, health and warmth as we ring in the New Year! Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the sweet potato chips 1 very large or 2 medium sweet potatoes - peeled and thinly sliced on a mandolin coconut oil - melted for the cheesy chipotle sauce 1 cup cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours 1/­­2 cup purified water 1 teaspoon ground chipotle spice/­­flakes or 1/­­2 to 1 chipotle pepper in adobo sauce 1 tablespoon tamari 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon miso ¼ cup nutritional yeast 1 small garlic clove ½ teaspoon turmeric for color (optional) for the nachos sweet potato chips (from above) 1 14oz can black beans or 1¼ cups home cooked ¼ medium red onion - diced 2-3 radishes - thinly sliced on a mandolin 2 scallions - sliced diagonally 1 avocado - peeled, pitted and chopped cheesy chipotle sauce (from above) 1 lime - quartered Instructions to make the sweet potato chips Soak sweet potato slices in a bowl with water for 30 minutes to decrease starch, for crispier chips. Preheat oven to 250° F (120° C) and position both oven racks in the middle of the oven. Prepare 2-3 parchment paper-lined baking sheets. Remove sweet potato slices from water and pat dry with a clean kitchen towel or paper towels. Begin arranging sweet potato slices on the baking sheets, oiling each slice on the front and the back, using a pastry brush for best results. Distribute baking sheets between the two racks in the oven and bake for 1 hour. Remove baking sheets from the oven and flip over each sweet potato slice. Place back into the oven and bake for 30 minutes to 1 hour more, until crispy and lightly browned in parts. Take care not to burn the chips, check them after the initial 30 minutes and every 10 minutes thereafter. to make the cheesy chipotle sauce Combine all the ingredients in a high speed blender until very smooth. Keep leftovers refrigerated in an airtight container. to assemble the nachos Prepare a rimmed tray or shallow dish for serving the nachos. Layer half of the chips at the bottom of the dish, followed with half each of black beans, red onion, radishes, scallions and avocado. Drizzle with the chipotle sauce. Layer the remaining chips on top, followed by the remaining toppings and more sauce. Squeeze juice of ¼ lime over the nachos and serve the rest of the lime quarters on the side. Serve more of the sauce on the side in a small bowl for dipping, if you wish. Nachos are best eaten immediately (which will be very easy!). The leftovers are still good, but the chips will loose crispiness after refrigeration. Notes Dont be afraid to choose a really big sweet potato - the sweet potato slices will significantly decrease in size when baked. The bigger the chips, the easier it will be to scoop up the toppings and sauce. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Miso Caramel Popcorn

December 18 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Miso Caramel Popcorn This popcorn is the treat I’ll be gifting my friends and bringing to holiday parties this coming week. After spending some time contemplating the bags of caramel popcorn for sale at the grocery store, I became curious about making it at home. After a few trials, I’m pleased to say that it’s quite easy and satisfying to put together on your own, delicious and – I have to warn you – extremely addictive. The caramel here is on the healthier side of the spectrum, made with coconut milk and coconut sugar instead of butter/­­regular sugar, and the addition of miso adds a nice, salty hint to contrast all the sweetness. If you’ve never made stovetop popcorn before, we’ve got some tips to help you through the process in the recipe. There are some weekend links after the jump. Stay warm this Sunday :) Fire Cider – this recipe from Kimberley of The Year in Food looks amazing, going to give it a shot to keep the bugs at bay Chyawanprash – just ordered this Ayurvedic herbal jam that stimulates the metabolism, aids digestion and helps strengthen the body in face of stress. So curious to try it out! Has anyone had it before? Interview with Nahvae Frost on Local Creatives – can’t wait to visit her cafe Durga Chew-Bose’s Twitter – captivated with this writer’s words The Well Woman – new instagram crush McKel Hill on Chris Ducker’s podcast – stripping back a personal brand success story Miso Caramel Popcorn   Print Serves: 12-15 cups Ingredients for the miso caramel 1 can full fat usweetened Thai coconut milk 1/­­2 cup coconut sugar 1 tablespoon neutral extra virgin coconut oil 2 teaspoons vanilla extract (optional) 1 tablespoon sweet miso paste for the caramel popcorn 1½ tablespoons coconut oil ½-3/­­4 cup popcorn kernels (see note) miso caramel (from above) 2 tablespoons chopped dark chocolate (optional) Instructions to make the miso caramel Combine coconut milk and coconut sugar in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for about 30 minutes, stirring, until thickened to a caramel consistency. Remove from heat and whisk in coconut oil, vanilla extract and miso paste, until smooth and well combined. to make the caramel popcorn Warm a large, heavy bottomed pot (pot must have a tight fitting lid) over high heat. Add coconut oil and let it melt and heat up for about 30 seconds. Drop in 3 popcorn kernels to test the heat and shake the pot a bit to cover them with oil. Once those kernels pop, your oil is hot enough and you are ready to add all the popcorn kernels. After adding all the kernels to the pot, cover it with a lid and begin moving the pot back and forth over the burner, to ensure that all the kernels are being covered with oil and to keep them from burning. Once you hear that the popcorn has started popping, turn down the heat to medium low and keep moving/­­shaking the pot quickly. Youll know that all/­­most of the kernels have popped when you hear the popping slow down - once there are about 5 seconds between each pop, remove the pot from the heat, your popcorn is ready. If you smell any burning at any point, remove the pot from the heat. Preheat oven to 250° F (120° C). Place two oven racks in the top and bottom third of the oven. Prepare two parchment paper-covered baking trays. Pour caramel into the pot with the popcorn, a little bit at a time, mixing it in every time. If possible, have someone help you - one person can pour and the other can mix. Immediately distribute the popcorn between the two baking trays in a single, even layer. Place in the oven and bake for about 1 hour, mixing every 15 minutes, until caramel is candied. Once popcorn is ready, optionally sprinkle the chopped dark chocolate over one of the trays of popcorn while its still hot and mix to coat to make chocolate caramel popcorn. Keep the popcorn in an airtight container or distribute between paper bags for gifts. Notes 1. The amount of popcorn kernels you use depends on what kind of popcorn you want. If you want popcorn thats completely covered in caramel (like the second photo in this post), use ½ cup kernels. If you want popcorn with bits of caramel here and there, with some white still showing (like the first photo in this post), go for the ¾ cup. 2. Caramel popcorn technique adapted from The Kitchn. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower

December 11 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower Since winter in the northern hemisphere is most definitely in full swing, we thought it was time for another quick, creamy winter soup recipe that’s nourishing and warming to the core. This one’s got a balance of grounding winter roots like celeriac and parsnip with some brighter, crisper veggies like spinach and fennel, finished off with a kiss of lemon. The roasted cauliflower pieces that stud each bowl are cooked in a special, sweet and spicy dressing that helps create those caramelized edges we are all so fond of. Eating this soup during this time of year just feels right – it’s incredibly cozy and feeds both body and soul. This soup is stunning enough in looks to serve as a starter to a festive meal, so we encourage you to get radical and serve green soup at your holiday party :) There are some weekend links after the jump, have a cozy Sunday. Natalie Weinberger interviewed on Sight Unseen – one of our favorite ceramicists Botanica – a soon to be, vegetable forward restaurant in LA + a lovely online journal with some amazing recipes like Spiced Spaghetti Squash Pancakes, Whole Roasted Cauliflower, Banana Buckwheat Poppyseed Bread The Founders of CAP Beauty interviewed by Ashley Neese – and if you haven’t heard of CAP Beauty, check it out, it’s an amazingly well-curated one stop shop for natural beauty products Pirelli Calendar 2017 Goes Makeup-Free McKel Hill of Nutrition Stripped interviewed on Chris Ducker’s podcast Pulp Pantry – a snack company that utilizes pulp from making juice, which normally gets discarded, to make granola, veggie crisps and more – such a smart idea! GIFs by NASA Gourmet Print Shop – Sarah Britton of My New Roots is now selling some of her beautiful food photographs for making prints Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the cauliflower 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil - melted ½ tablespoon Dijon mustard ½ tablespoon maple syrup ½ tablespoon tamari ½ teaspoon sriracha 1 medium cauliflower head - cut into florets for the soup 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 2 teaspoons whole coriander seeds or 1 teaspoon ground coriander 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt - to taste 2 small or 1 medium to large celery root - peeled and roughly chopped 1 medium parsnip - peeled and roughly chopped 1 medium to large fennel bulb - roughly chopped, green fronds reserved 3½ - 4 cups purified water 2-3 bay leaves (optional) few large handfuls arugula or spinach leaves freshly ground black pepper - to taste ½ lemon - juice Instructions to roast the cauliflower Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Combine coconut oil, mustard, maple syrup, tamari and sriracha in a medium bowl and whisk until smooth. Place cauliflower florets onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray, drizzle with the dressing and toss to coat evenly. Roast for 30 minutes or until soft and caramelized at the edges, stirring at halftime. to make soup While the cauliflower is roasting, warm coconut oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add coriander and toast for 1-2 minutes, until fragrant. Add onion and a pinch of salt and let onion sweat for a few minutes. Lower the heat to medium low and sauté for 20-30 minutes, stirring frequently, until onion is soft and caramelized. Add celery root, parsnip, fennel, water, bay leaves, if using, and a few generous pinches of salt to the pot, bring to a boil over medium high heat. Adjust the heat to establish a strong simmer and cook, partially covered, for about 20 minutes, or until vegetables are soft throughout. Remove and discard bay leaves. Combine soup with half of the roasted cauliflower, arugula/­­spinach, fennel fronds (reserve a few for garnish) and black pepper in an upright blender and blend until smooth. You may need to do this in batches, depending on the size of your blender. Use caution when blending hot liquids. Transfer the pureed soup back into the pot, squeeze the lemon juice and mix it in. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Distribute between bowls and serve warm, garnished with the rest of the roasted cauliflower florets and fennel fronds. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Tahini Hot Chocolate

December 4 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Tahini Hot Chocolate Most of us know that feeling that usually rolls around at around 3 pm on a workday, when it seems as if you’ve hit a wall and need to somehow recharge before going back to work. I have to say that since I’ve been taking a break from caffeine, it has been less a of a crash and more a need to get up, stretch and whip up some kind of fun potion in the blender, just as a mental breather. Since it’s been cold out, I’ve been really into making hot, frothy, restorative drinks as my 3 pm activity, and this super quick tahini hot chocolate has come out on top many times. This drink gets its decadent chocolate flavor from raw cacao powder, which, contrary to popular (and my own until very recently!) belief, contains insignificant amounts of caffeine. The energizing properties of cacao come from theobromine, a mild cardiovascular stimulant (while caffeine is a nervous system stimulant) that increases heart function and blood flow and is much milder in effect than caffeine. Cacao is also high in magnesium, a mineral known for its relaxing properties, anandamide – the ‘bliss chemical,’ and PEA – the ‘love chemical.’ So this drink will calmly wake you up and give you a lift in mood – nothing crazy and no jitters. It gets its creaminess from tahini and nut butter, and its sweetness from prunes (you can also use dates, but I like the richer flavor the prunes yield here) and honey. It’s very easy to make and comes together in no time. I drink this hot chocolate as an afternoon pick-me-up, but it’s good enough to serve on a special occasion, and could act as an elegant, sweet finish to a festive meal. There are some links after the jump, have a nice Sunday :) Immunity Herbal Infusion – I’ve been very much into making herbal infusions and drinking them instead of water throughout the day (nettle, raspberry leaf and goji is still my favorite), and this immunity-supporting one sounds amazing. Actually, Let’s Not Be in the Moment – an article questioning the recent trends of mindfulness, full of many valid points and this response, very valid in its own way. Willka Yachay Instagram – amazing photographs of the Q’eros Nation of Peru by an organization helping their community thrive in the modern world. Well + Good’s Health and Wellness Trends of 2017 – I’m especially into the #s 5, 11, 13 and 14 Amanda Chantal Bacon on the One Part Podcast How Ayurvedic Beauty Can Change Your Health – all good reminders Tahini Hot Chocolate   Print Serves: 1 mug full (about 1½ cups) Ingredients 1½ cups hot water 2 prunes or dates 1 heaping teaspoon tahini 1 heaping teaspoon almond butter 1 tablespoon raw cacao powder 1 tablespoon raw honey, or more to taste pinch cinnamon (optional) Instructions Combine all ingredients in a blender until smooth and frothy. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes Black Sesame Cappuccino Beet Tahini Snack Bars Garlic Onion Veggie Dip from Food Loves Writing .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Tahini Hot Chocolate appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream

November 23 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream This post was created in partnership with Smiley Honey. Roasting pears is the easy road to a sophisticated dessert. You let the heat of the oven do the work of softening their flesh to a silky, melt-in-your-mouth consistency while tending to other things (perhaps making something creamy to serve the pears with). More specifically, honey-roasting with various spices will always be a winning technique, especially when you use a high-quality honey like the wild thyme blossom honey from Smiley Honey I used here. The honey melts under heat and envelops whatever you are roasting with its soothing, complex sweetness, contributing to those crispy, caramelized edges we all love so much. Serve the warm pears with a scoop of vanilla ice cream, or take it one step further and make a nutritious cashew vanilla cream. This is not your ordinary cashew cream, as it’s made lighter with the addition of one of the roasted pears. When whipped up, the pear contributes an airiness to the cream, making it less dense and adding interest to the flavor. There is also a studding of ground chia, for its gelling abilities and amazing nutrition. The cream pairs perfectly with the jammy pears, and the garnish of pomegranate seeds, though optional, adds to that festive look and flavor. The whole thing is easy and quick to whip up, so if you are still looking for a dessert to serve this Thursday and like pears and cream, this might just be the one. Smiley Honey is a raw honey company offering a fine collection of uniquely flavored honeys from around the world, from Spain to Romania, Italy to a number of states in the US. They sent me some samples of their honey, and I was impressed by how distinctly different each of them tasted. There is a tendency to think that honey is honey and that’s that, but there is a world flavor in each kind, depending, of course, on the blossoms the bees forage the nectar from, among other factors. The Smiley Honey shop has a thoughtful flavor profile description for each kind of honey they sell – it almost feels like choosing a wine, and rightly so. I chose to go with the thyme honey from Spain for this dessert – it has a boldness of flavor, along with savory and earthy notes, is very aromatic and absolutely delicious. Other flavors that caught my eye are sage, tulepo, sourwood and acacia. All Smiley Honey is raw, which means it’s rich in health benefits and will help boost your immune system. Together with Smiley Honey, we think that a jar from them would make for a perfect gift or treat to yourself during this time of year. If you’d like to try it out, use code Golubka at checkout in their store to get 10% off any of the honeys. Lastly, it’s the time to give thanks in these parts, so thank you for cooking from this page throughout the years. Wishing a Happy Thanksgiving to all those in the U.S. and a peaceful rest of the week to those elsewhere :) Our Holiday Menu so far - M A I N Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower S I D E Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage S O U P Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale D E S S E R T Apple Pumpkin Pie with Salted Pecan Caramel D R I N K Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules Pear Cranberry Chai Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream   Print Serves: 4-8 Ingredients for the honey roasted pears neutral coconut oil - for oiling the baking dish 5 ripe pears - cut in half and cored ¼ cup filtered water 1 cinnamon stick 5-7 cardamom pods - green shells removed, coarsely crushed in a mortar and pestle 3-5 whole cloves 1-2 star anise (optional) freshly squeezed juice of ½ lemon honey - to taste for the vanilla cashew cream 1½ cups cashews - preferably soaked for 2 hours ¾ cup unsweetened almond milk - preferably homemade ⅓ cup honey 1½ tablespoons chia seeds 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 roasted pear - from above ¼ cup plus 3 tablespoons neutral unrefined coconut oil - melted for serving more honey to drizzle crushed pistachios (optional) pomegranate kernels (optional) Instructions to roast the pears Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Lightly oil the baking dish with coconut oil. Arrange pears inside the dish cut side down. Pour water over the bottom of the dish and place spices in between pear halves. Drizzle with lemon juice and honey. Bake for 40-45 minutes, basting the pears with the liquid every now and then, until soft throughout. Let cool. to make the vanilla cashew cream and serve Drain and rinse cashews. Combine with almond milk, honey, chia seeds, vanilla extract and roasted pear in an upright blender, blend until smooth. Drizzle in the coconut oil with the motor still running and blend to incorporate. If using a regular blender (not a high-speed one such as Vitamix or Blendtec), optionally strain the cream through a fine-mesh sieve for a silky-smooth consistency. Refrigerate for 2-4 hours or overnight, letting the cream set. To serve, whisk cream to fluff it up. Distribute between bowls, top with 1-2 pear halves, drizzle with honey, garnish with crushed pistachios and pomegranate kernels and enjoy. 3.5.3208 This post was created in partnership with Smiley Honey, with all opinions being genuine and our own. Thank you for considering the sponsors that help keep Golubka Kitchen going. You might also like... Pink Peppercorn Cookies from Small Plates and Sweet Treats Chocolate-Blueberry Pudding by Scandi Foodie Raw Lady Apple and Cranberry Cookies Raw Chocolate Candy .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese

November 17 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese To those who shared a little about someone special in your life in our last post, thank you. Reading every single one of your notes was an amazing experience, and we are so happy to have created a small space for nurturing a little love and appreciation. Chances are, most of us don’t express our gratitude enough – I know I don’t – yet it’s so important to our individual and collective wellbeing, not to mention it just feels so good and so right. I’m going to start doing that more, right now, by thanking you for coming to this page and cooking from it, you are awesome. And there’s still a chance for you to enter that copper mug giveaway and talk about someone, anyone who makes a positive difference in your life here. This salad is another idea for you to consider for brightening up your holiday table with some seasonal vegetables. It’s easy and parts of it can be prepared ahead of time, and there’s almond cheese! Lentils and beets do so well with marination – both are quite neutral and earthy in taste, and make an excellent canvas for whatever flavors you choose to infuse them with. In this case, they are marinated in a number of warming and piquant spices, along with garlic, parsley and oil. The marinade is transformative, taking the beets and lentils to the territory of being completely irresistible. They are great served on a bed of massaged kale or any other greens you fancy. I steamed the beets here, because of the healthfulness of the method and for that velvety texture that steaming creates, but you can also roast or boil them for this salad. You can easily prepare the marinated beets and lentils the night before, giving the flavors a chance to develop overnight, and having the major component of the salad ready for assembly. Same goes for the almond cheese. I took all the recipes for almond cheese that I’ve experimented with throughout the years and put them together to create the simplest, quickest version that still tastes cheesy and amazing, and that’s the recipe you see here. Its creaminess definitely adds to this salad, as does the sprinkling of bright, bursting pomegranate kernels. And if you are able to eat regular cheese and aren’t up to making this almond one, some nice sheep’s feta or many other crumbly cheeses of your choice would work well here, too. This salad has a nice balance of the qualities I aim to check off in my recipes – easy but sophisticated, interesting in flavor, nutritious and visually stunning, and I hope you’ll consider it :) Our Holiday Menu so far - M A I N Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower S I D E Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage D E S S E R T Apple Pumpkin Pie with Salted Pecan Caramel D R I N K Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules Pear Cranberry Chai Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the salad 1/­­2 tablespoon cumin seeds 1 teaspoon coriander seeds 2 teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon sweet or smoked paprika 2 tablespoons olive oil 4 garlic cloves - minced 1 lemon - juice 6-8 small beets - quartered, steamed, roasted or boiled until silky soft and peeled 1 cup cooked French lentils about 2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley 1 bunch kale - leaves torn into bite-sized pieces 1 tablespoon olive oil small pinch of sea salt kernels from ½ pomegranate almond cheese (recipe below) for the almond cheese 1 cup almonds - soaked overnight, skins optionally removed for a whiter color 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 teaspoon raw honey 1-2 tablespoons nutritional yeast pinch of sea salt Instructions to make the salad Toss cumin and coriander seeds in a small frying pan over medium heat for 2-3 minutes, until fragrant. Grind in a mortar and pestle. Combine ground spices, salt, paprika, olive oil, garlic and juice of 1 lemon. Place cooked beets and lentils into a bowl and sprinkle with parsley. Pour the marinade over and toss to coat. Cover and let marinate at room temperature for 1-3 hours or overnight. Keep refrigerated for up to 5 days. Place torn kale into a large bowl, add olive oil and a small pinch of salt and massage with your hands until tender. Add marinated beets/­­lentils to the bowl, along with pomegranate kernels and toss. Serve garnished with almond cheese. to make the almond cheese Combine all ingredients in a high-speed blender or food processor until smooth. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Raw Kale Chips Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso Caramel and Chocolate - Ice Cream Sund... 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Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel

November 10 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel Focusing on love, peace and hope today and sending all those vibes your way, but we know you come here for the pie, among other tasty things, and today’s pie is a true beaut. Cooking heals and sharing food breaks all kinds of walls, so let’s keep cooking together, no matter what :) If you are still looking for a pie to make for Thanksgiving, but being thrown in different directions while deciding between the traditional apple, pumpkin, or pecan pies, this one might be your solution. It’s sort of a three-in-one of all those flavors, and is guaranteed to impress those you feed. Although this pie’s got a harmonious combination of apple/­­pecan/­­pumpkin, it’s the silky baked apples that take on the main role here, cozied up in heavenly spiced layers to make up the filling. The pumpkin and pecans come in in the form of a decadent, salted caramel that tops the pie and seeps into the apple filling, too. There’s also a crumble that comes between the apple filling and the caramel, and adds crunch, texture and some seriously comforting toasty notes. If all this sounds like too much to you, don’t worry – there is just the right amount of every element to make for a well-balanced dessert that’s not too sweet, just the way we like it. Going to keep it short and sweet today. Hope you consider this treat to share in celebration with your loved ones during the holidays or at any time that calls for pie. Hugs and warmth to you all. Our Holiday Menu so far - M A I N Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower S I D E Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage D E S S E R T Apple Pumpkin Pie with Salted Pecan Caramel D R I N K Pear Cranberry Chai Lots more coming your way until the end of the year. Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel   Print Serves: one 9 pie Ingredients for the pumpkin caramel 1 can full fat unsweetened Thai coconut milk ¾ cup coconut sugar ⅓ cup canned or freshly made pumpkin/­­squash purée ¼ teaspoon sea salt for the pecans 1 cup pecan halves for the crust 1½ cups sprouted or whole spelt or wheat flour pinch sea salt ½ cup neutral coconut oil - cold and solid 4-5 tablespoons ice cold water for the crumble ½ cup oats ½ cup pecans - chopped 1 tablespoon coconut sugar or other sugar of choice 3-5 cardamom pods - freshly ground 1 teaspoon cinnamon powder pinch sea salt 3 tablespoons neutral coconut oil - cold and solid for the filling 5-6 apples - peeled, cored and thinly sliced 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice ½ cup coconut sugar or ⅓ cup raw sugar 2 teaspoons cinnamon powder 5-7 cardamom pods - shelled, freshly ground about ¼ teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg 1 teaspoon vanilla extract (optional) 2 tablespoons arrowroot powder Instructions to make the pumpkin caramel Combine coconut milk and sugar in a small/­­medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Establish a steady, strong simmer and let reduce for about 15 minutes, until thickened. Add pumpkin purée and salt, and cook for another 5-7 minutes. Let cool completely, keeping in mind that the caramel will thicken further once cool. Keep refrigerated if making in advance. The caramel is delicious on its own, drizzled over yogurt, granola, fruit, etc. to toast the pecans Preheat oven to 350° F (180° C), spread pecans on a baking tray and toast for 10 minutes, or until golden. to make the pie crust Keep oven at 350° F (180° C). Combine flour and salt in a food processor. Cut oil into small pieces and add to the flour. Pulse until the mixture resembles sand. Add 4 tablespoons cold water and pulse to combine. Test the mixture by pressing it between your fingers, it should stick together. If not, add more water, 1 tablespoon at a time until dough sticks together between your fingers. Oil a 9-inch pie dish thoroughly. Press the dough against the bottom of the dish into an even crust, starting in the middle and working up the sides. Prick with a fork several times and let chill in the refrigerator for 1 hour. Cover the crust with a piece of parchment paper and place baking beans inside. Bake blind for 20 minutes. Let cool. to make the crumble Mix all the crumble ingredients, with the exception of oil, in a bowl. Work in the oil using your fingers, until all ingredients are well combined. to make the pie Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Combine all the filling ingredients in a large bowl and mix gently to coat evenly. Transfer apples into the chilled crust, sprinkle with the crumble and bake for 20 minutes. Reduce the heat to 375° F (190° C), cover crust with a pie cover or a piece of parchment paper and bake for 35-40 minutes, or longer, until apples are completely cooked through and soft throughout. Let cool completely, allowing at least 2 hours before serving, for the filling to solidify. You can stop here and serve the pie as is with a scoop of vanilla ice cream, or spread the pumpkin caramel over the chilled pie and sprinkle with the toasted pecans - ice cream is good with this variation as well. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower

November 2 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower This post was created in partnership with San-J. Happy November! It’s so hard to believe that the year is almost over. November in the U.S. means Thanksgiving, and for the rest of the world, those December and January holidays are not so far off as well. We are here to give you some ideas to consider for those festive family dinners, friendsgivings and potlucks, with an emphasis on vegetables, fruit and whole food ingredients. The holidays can be a little tough if you are trying to stay on track with eating well or even simply keeping away from meat/­­dairy/­­gluten. If you aren’t participating in one or more of those categories, chances are, you might feel excluded at a holiday table. And even if you are totally fine with eating those veg-centered sides only, others might find it offensive or feel as though they are not being good hosts, etc. The point is, there is usually a main event to a holiday table, and although to me it’s always been the pie, to most it’s the bird, or another grand platter of some sort of meat. There is a ceremony to getting that platter on the table – it takes time and care to pick out and prepare, which creates anticipation and excitement. Here, I applied that kind of thinking to cauliflower, a whole cauliflower, prepared in a way that feels ritualistic, celebratory and fun, and delicious enough to be a holiday table centerpiece. This cauliflower is slowly stewed whole in a rich, tomato-based sauce with greens, carrots, onions, mushrooms, spices and autumn herbs. Tamari, balsamic and prunes help create body, depth and complexity in flavor. In the end, the cauliflower comes out incredibly tender and cuts like butter – ‘carving’ it is quite a pleasure. It’s incredibly good served over anything starchy, which should be easy since many holiday tables will likely include some sort of potato/­­root mash in their setting. The cauliflower is pictured here served with a delicious celeriac and parsnip mash with crispy sage, which makes for a perfect accompaniment. We will be posting the recipe for the mash this coming weekend, so make sure to stop by for that, it’s a real winner. Tamari, the gluten free soy sauce, is such a staple ingredient in my kitchen, that I feel at a loss whenever I run out. It’s a basic requirement in many Japanese and Asian-inspired dishes, but I use it in all kinds of meals, way beyond Japanese. It’s an essential flavor builder in this cauliflower, for example. I find tamari to be especially great for vegan and vegetarian cooking – it helps immensely with developing flavor depth and complexity when added to vegetables, and of course, it’s an amazing addition to sauces. When it comes to tamari brands, San-J is a classic that’s been around for eight generations, and the brand you will likely see when you search for gluten-free soy sauce in your store. The difference between San-J tamari and regular soy sauce is that tamari contains no wheat, just organic fermented soybeans, while soy sauce usually has 40%-60% wheat. The higher concentration of soybeans in tamari also contributes to its richer flavor and smoother texture. San-J tamari contains no artificial preservatives or additives, the soybeans are non-GMO, and are brewed for up to six months according to traditional Japanese techniques. It really is the best, and I’m so happy to have partnered with San-J on this festive recipe. Enjoy :) Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower   Print Serves: 1 cauliflower head Ingredients 5 prunes - roughly chopped 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - sliced 2 medium carrots - diced about 6 cups roughly chopped collard greens about 3 tablespoons tamari - divided 1 lb crimini mushrooms - quartered 5 garlic cloves - sliced 1 chili pepper - seeded and chopped 3-4 sprigs thyme - chopped about 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary handful sage leaves - chopped freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon tomato paste two 28 oz boxes/­­cans of crushed tomatoes 1 large cauliflower head - outer leaves trimmed Instructions Drizzle prunes with balsamic vinegar in a small bowl and set aside. Warm coconut oil in a large pot over medium high heat. Add onion, carrots, collard greens and a splash of tamari and sauté for 10 minutes, until onion is translucent and collard greens are wilted. Add mushrooms and sauté for about 8 minutes, until all their liquid is evaporated. Add garlic, chili, thyme, rosemary, sage and black pepper and saute for 2-3 minutes. Add prunes together with balsamic vinegar, followed by 2 tablespoons tamari and tomato paste and stir around until the liquid evaporates, about 1 minute. Add crushed tomatoes, stir to combine and bring to a near boil. Carefully drop cauliflower into the sauce and spoon plenty of sauce on top of the cauliflower to coat it completely. Stir some of the vegetables out from under the cauliflower to ensure that its covered with the sauce as much as possible. The top of the cauliflower may peek out a little and thats ok. Bring the sauce back to a boil, adjust the heat to a slow simmer, cover and cook for 40-50 minutes, until the cauliflower is completely cooked and soft throughout. Scoop the simmering sauce over the cauliflower every now and then while its cooking. Remove the cauliflower from the pot, slice and serve it warm with plenty of sauce, over vegetable mash or any grains of choice. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Pear Cranberry Chai – Holiday Recipe Month

October 30 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Pear Cranberry Chai – Holiday Recipe Month Are you guys dressing up for Halloween? I’m not, but Paloma is going to be John Lennon circa 1974 (the rest of her friends are princesses). Yep, the Beatles obsession is as strong as ever. Right now, John is the absolute favorite. 1980 (year of his death) is the WORST number, not to be spoken in the house, and she’s been know to put on Imagine and cry to it more than a few times. And this is an otherwise cheerful, happy kid too. Crazy! Anyways, whether you are participating in this weekend’s spooky activities or not, maybe you can consider treating yourself with this seriously autumnal chai, or better yet, plan to serve it at some sort of holiday occasion. I’m confident your guests will be blown away. As far as I can recall, this is the best chai I’ve ever tried. Besides all the required, invigorating spices, this one is infused with fresh pears and cranberries, which add lovely flavor and a tiny hint of sourness. It’s a bit sweet, spicy, gingery and creamy. And if you are wondering what I do with all the leftover stewed pears, I blend them into a pear sauce and spoon it onto all kinds of dishes. There are some weekend links after the jump. Have a nice one :) Protein, Iron, Calcium – I’ve been finding Gena’s articles about protein/­­iron/­­calcium-rich plant food combinations so helpful Urban Moonshine – I’ve been taking these digestive bitters before almost every meal and have really noticed a difference. Highly recommended if you have any mild issues with digestion or even as a blood sugar stabilizing aid. Also, want to make this Happy Belly Seed Mix soon. Sophie Buhai’s New Jewelry Collection – the photos! Exceptional Advice from Anthony Bourdain’s New Book – please never change Tony .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Pear Cranberry Chai – Holiday Recipe Month appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin

October 27 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin This post is created in partnership with Truffle Toast Home. Hey! It’s good to be back after a week off. We are going to try something different with the way we post recipes here from week to week. Instead of presenting you with a random assortment of whatever dishes strike our fancy, we are going to have more focused themes to center our recipes around. We are doing this to be more purposeful, exploratory and thorough with our recipe development, and to learn alongside our readers as we cook and elaborate on our themes. Ultimately, we want our recipes to be more useful to you, to help you avoid the dead end of making a recipe once and then never again, and to start more of a conversation and community around your suggestions for these themes. The themes can be based on all kinds of circumstances, from the time of year to a particular ingredient, type of dish, or a feeling we are shooting for. So, without further ado, starting with today’s post and until the end of this year, we will be focusing on holiday recipes – indulgent but healthy, full of whole foods and plant power, festive and fun. There will be things to serve at your holiday table, bring to a potluck, or even gift as a present. We are so excited to get this going! We came back from a peaceful week in a North Carolina cabin (including some photos from the trip here) to an empty, disassembled kitchen and just today sold our stove on Craigslist unexpectedly fast. I am basically left with very little to nothing in terms of cooking space and equipment and feel a bit at a loss. I did set up a small cooking nook in our garage, but I’m hoping I won’t have to be there too long, as the kitchen renovations are well on their way. Thankfully, we got a bunch of holiday recipes pinned down while in NC (always-working-on-vacation-club here), starting with this lovely gratin. It’s a perfect side dish for the holiday table for so many reasons – there are seasonal Brussels sprouts and sweet potato, it’s a single dish affair and simple in preparation, which will give you time to focus on other more elaborate main dishes, it’s quite striking in color, and so impressively tasty. It’s also worth mentioning that this is my new favorite treatment for Brussels sprouts. They stew in the spiced turmeric coconut milk and become incredibly tender, silky, almost buttery. I have an inkling that this would be a great dish for converting Brussels sprout skeptics into lovers. Besides the Brussels, there is a middle layer of sweet, caramelized onions, along with thinly sliced sweet potato, which gets slightly crispy at the edges after some time in the oven, then finished with a grating of garlic, pecans and nutmeg. So good! Truffle Toast Home is a well-curated online shop for wine and specialty food accessories. They sent me a set of their stainless steel graters to try out, and I put them to the test while making this gratin. The set includes a fine grater, coarse grater and a shaver, all of which are hand held and great for finishing off all kinds of dishes. I used the shaver for the thinner shavings of sweet potato (I also sliced some), the coarse grater for garlic and pecans, and the finest one for grating whole nutmeg – all were a pleasure to work with. I was especially happy about how effortlessly I was able to grate the nutmeg, because at times grating whole nutmeg can seem like a daunting task. So whether you are in the market for some good graters or need a gift/­­stocking stuffer idea, consider these Truffle Toast Home ones. They come in a very presentable, gift-ready drawstring pouch, too ;) To get 20% off your grater order, use code CUC7MCNV at checkout here until November 25th, 2016. Enjoy! Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil - divided, plus more for oiling baking pan 1 large yellow onion - sliced sea salt - to taste 3 large sweet potatoes - thinly sliced or shredded on mandolin 1 lb Brussels sprouts - thinly sliced or shredded 2 large garlic cloves - shredded or minced, divided freshly ground black pepper - to taste 1 can unsweetened coconut milk 1 tablespoon curry powder - preferably homemade, or to taste ⅓ cup pecans or walnuts - chopped or shredded whole nutmeg - to taste, for grating on top (optional) Instructions Warm 1 tablespoon coconut oil over medium heat in a medium sauté pan. Add onion and a pinch of salt and sauté until caramelized and lightly golden, for about 15 minutes. Set aside. Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a medium baking dish or 10-inch cast-iron pan by oiling it with coconut oil. Arrange half of the sweet potatoes on the bottom of the dish/­­pan. Scatter caramelized onion on top. Combine Brussels sprouts, 1 garlic clove, pinch of salt, freshly ground black pepper and the remaining ½ tbsp of coconut oil in a mixing bowl, toss to coat. Spread Brussels sprouts in a layer on top of the onions. Arrange the rest of the sweet potatoes on top. Combine coconut milk and curry powder, whisk or blend to mix. Pour mixture over the gratin. Combine pecans with the rest of the garlic, sea salt and black pepper to taste. Sprinkle the mixture on top of the potatoes. Cover your baking dish or pan with a lid or foil and bake for 25 minutes. Take off the cover and continue to bake for another 30 minutes, or until soft throughout. Garnish by grating nutmeg on top and serve right away. Leftovers are delicious when reheated in the pan, with some coconut oil and covered, over medium-low heat, or at 350° F in the oven for about 10-15 minutes. Notes 1. If you dont have curry, you might have all the spices to mix your own curry. Use a mixture of turmeric (1 teaspoon), cumin seeds (1 tablespoon), 5 crushed cardamom pods and a pinch of red pepper flakes instead of pre-made curry powder. Adjust amounts of spices to your taste if desired. Fresh turmeric root is also an excellent addition here, when blended with coconut milk and other spices. 2. I find that the best and most convenient way of preparing this gratin is baking it in a cast-iron pan. In the absence of my own kitchen and dishes, I made it in baking dishes for this post. 3.5.3208 This post was created in partnership with Truffle Toast Home, with all opinions being genuine and our own. Thank you for considering the sponsors that help keep Golubka Kitchen going. You might also like... 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Vegan Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat and The Mighty Fix

October 5 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat and The Mighty Fix This post is created in partnership with MightyNest, keep reading for a great discount. Right off the bat, I want to say that this tasty treat is not exactly nougat, as in, it doesn’t exactly have that distinct sticky, chewy texture. It’s not made of eggs, being vegan, nor is there a crazy amount of sugar. It is, however, similarly shaped and has a nice studding of toasted nuts and cookie crumble throughout. Now that we’ve gotten the name out of the way, let me tell you a bit about how lovely it is. Sweet potato caramel is at the base of this nougat, and is something I came up with a few years back. I’ve since been able to apply it to many things, from snack bars to cakes, I once even tried it in a smoothie. Roasted sweet potato mash tastes surprisingly similar to caramel when mixed with dates and nut/­­seed butters. It’s rich, decadent and very versatile. This nougat very much reminds me of a dessert I grew up eating, which was a mixture of cookie crumble, nuts and condensed milk, similarly formed into a sliceable log. We had a funny name for it in Russian – sweet kielbasa. I had it in mind when testing out this recipe. It might be nostalgic for me, but I truly can’t wait for you to try it – it’s just so delicious and simple, and includes a whole nutritious root vegetable. It’s a no bake type of affair (once you’ve baked the easy cookie crumble) and quite a breeze to put together, requiring not much more than a blitz in a food processor and some time to harden in the freezer. I give a recipe for two flavors here – caramel and chocolate, both dotted with crunchy, roasted hazelnuts, pecans, and the aforementioned cookie crumble. Considering the holidays coming up, I think this nougat would make for a wonderful dessert option at a festive gathering, or even a thoughtful, sweet gift. The neat, hive-patterned wrappers I used for shaping the nougat are called Bee’s Wrap – the best re-usable alternative to plastic wrap I’ve seen so far. I’m in love with this stuff! Bee’s Wrap is simply made of organic cotton muslin, beeswax, jojoba oil and tree resin (it smells so good). The wax in the wrap allows you to mold it with the warmth of your hands, and both the beeswax and jojoba oil have natural antibacterial properties, keeping your food fresh. It can be washed and re-used. I feel all kinds of guilt using plastic wrap, but sometimes, nothing can replace its functionality in cooking, or so I thought. This nougat was the perfect recipe to test out Bee’s Wrap on, since I would have normally used plastic wrap to shape and store this treat. The wrap truly exceeded all my expectations and was such a pleasure to work with – it smells fresh, it molds well, and just feels like a high quality product. I learned about Bee’s Wrap from MightyNest – an amazing online one stop shop for natural solutions to synthetic goods, from cookware to cleaning supplies, body care to baby gear and more, all free of harmful chemicals and carefully considered to help you make a better choice for yourself and the planet. They have a really cool subscription program called Mighty Fix, which sends you a new product to test out every month, at a lower cost than its original value, encouraging you to try out an alternative and more sustainable way of doing things. Think reusable produce bags and stainless steel food storage containers to replace plastic, nice-looking Swedish dishcloths to replace disposable sponges/­­paper towels, and much more (free shipping too). If you want to purchase something from the website independently from the subscription (perhaps some nut milk bags, a Chemex, or Dr. Bronner’s?) they will ship your order to you together with your monthly fix, free of shipping charges. I love that the fix helped me discover Bee’s Wrap, it’s a tool I will use in my kitchen for years to come. Want to try it? MightyNest is offering GK readers a special price of $3 for Bee’s Wrap (retail price is normally $13, so it’s a crazy good deal). Use code GOLUBKABEESWRAPFIX when you sign up for the fix and receive your first month, which includes two sheets of Bee’s Wrap, for a total of $3 + free shipping. Your next month and all months thereafter will cost $10, but there is no mandatory subscription period, so you can try out the fix for as long as you want. Follow this link, and the discount code will be automatically applied to your shopping cart. Enjoy :) Vegan Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat   Print Serves: 2 nougat logs Ingredients for the cookie crumble 1 tablespoon ground chia seeds 2-4 tablespoons ice cold water - divided 1/­­2 cup (70 g) oat flour 1/­­2 cup (50 g) almond flour 1/­­4 cup (30 g) tapioca flour/­­arrowroot powder 2 tablespoons coconut sugar pinch sea salt 1/­­2 cup (125 ml) neutral coconut oil - cold and solid, plus more for oiling the pan - soft for the sweet potato caramel 1 cup soft Medjool dates - pitted 1 medium sweet potato - baked and cubed ½ cup sesame tahini ⅓ cup almond butter 4 tablespoons neutral coconut oil 1 teaspoon vanilla extract (optional) 5-7 cardamom pods - green shells removed, toasted and ground (optional) pinch sea salt 3 tablespoons raw cacao powder 2 tablespoons maple syrup for the nougat 1 cup hazelnuts - toasted 1 cup pecans - toasted Instructions to make the cookie crumble Combine ground chia and 1 tablespoon cold water into a paste in a small bowl, keep refrigerated. Combine oat, almond and tapioca flours, along with coconut sugar and salt in a food processor, pulse to mix. Add in refrigerated chia paste and pulse to incorporate. Cut cold coconut oil into cubes, add to the food processor and keep pulsing until the mixture resembles sand. Add 2 tablespoons cold water and pulse. Test the mixture by pressing it between your fingers, it should stick together. If not, add more water, 1 more tablespoon until dough sticks together between your fingers. Form an about 2-inch thick rope with the dough, wrap in bees wrap/­­plastic and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 350° F. Remove the dough from the refrigerator, slice into slightly less than ⅜-inch thick rounds and place them on a parchment paper covered baking sheet. Bake for 15 minutes, flip and bake for another 15 minutes, until golden. Crumble up the cookies before mixing them into the caramel. to make the caramel and nougat Cover dates with boiling water and let soften for 10 minutes. Drain and place into the bowl of your food processor. Add sweet potato, tahini, almond butter, coconut oil, vanilla extract (if using), cardamom (if using), and salt. Blend until smooth. Scoop out ½ of the mixture into a bowl, add ½ nuts of the toasted nuts and ½ of the crumbled cookie dough and stir to incorporate. Transfer the mixture onto a sheet of bees wrap/­­plastic wrap. Wrap it around to enclose the nougat mixture and shape into a thick (2-2½-inch) rope. Place into the freezer until firm. Add cacao powder and maple syrup into the remaining caramel mixture and process until well-combined. Transfer the chocolate mixture into the same bowl and add in the rest of the nuts and crumbled cookie dough. Proceed to shape as with caramel nougat. Place into a freezer until firm. Store nougat in the freezer. Remove from the freezer right before eating. Slice and enjoy immediately. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake

September 21 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Concord Grape Fruit and Nut CakeThis post was created in partnership with Nuts.com I have a whole lot of cozy fall and holiday recipe ideas bouncing around in my mind, even though it’s still warm out and even though we are still enjoying the sweetest of summer tomatoes daily (I swear the yellow cherry tomatoes truly taste like candy this year). This transitional time is always exciting to me – all the fall produce brings back so many new or forgotten possibilities. I think autumn is much more of vegetable territory than summer – all the stone fruit and berries come in a quick, bright and happy flash, and before we know it, we are left with squash, roots, and sturdy winter greens. But there are still a few sweet gems like apples, pears, figs (fig recipe hopefully coming next week), and grapes to grace our fall cobblers, salads and such, and I plan to take full advantage of them this fall. If you’ve been sticking around this space for a while or have my cookbook, you might know about my love for Concord grapes. I can never resist them at the store or market, being completely mesmerized by the stunning, cloudy berries. Their flavor is lovely too – deep and concentrated, much like the color. The main issue with Concord grapes lies in their prominent seeds. There is no way around them, so I usually end up making juice or compote with Concords – anything where the seeds can be strained out. I did so for this fruit and nut cake, where a myriad of dried fruit is gently cooked in Concord grape juice to soften the fruit’s skin and infuse them with the grape flavor. It’s worth mentioning here that, in the absence of Concord grapes, you can use all kinds of fruit juice for this cake – regular grapes, oranges or even apples would make for a fine juice substitute. This cake is dense and punctuated by comforting flavors of toasted nuts, along with aromatic sweetness from dried fruit and Concord grape juice. A small slice goes a long way. There is no added sugar, as the dried fruit and grape juice bring plenty of sweet to the plate. This is the kind of cake that can serve many purposes. It would make for a perfect edible holiday present, whether brought whole to a festive potluck, or divided into smaller, rectangular cakes, wrapped, tied with a ribbon and gifted. Little squares of this cake would also make a nice addition to a fancy cheese plate, if you’re into that kind of thing. Or it can simply be enjoyed as a dessert at home – it keeps well refrigerated for a good amount of time, and a slice makes for a good component to a kid’s school lunch (or adult’s work snack!). You can get crazy with the decorating like I did here, or not decorate it at all, depending on the occasion. I’ve been shopping on nuts.com for years (since the days when they were still called nuts online) and was thrilled to collaborate on a post with them. All the dried fruit and nuts in this cake came from their online store, which made for extra-delicious results, because their products are consistently fresh and delicious. If you aren’t familiar with nuts.com, they are a family-owned, premium bulk nut and dried fruit supplier, and so much more than that, really. The business has been in the family for three generations now, starting with a stand at a farmer’s market back in 1929,  and they’ve built up an amazingly extensive catalogue of natural bulk foods. In addition to nuts/­­dried fruit, they carry grains, beans, flours, teas, snacks, superfood powders, spices, and more. I feel like a kid in a candy store when I’m on their website. Their dried fruit are the juiciest I’ve ever gotten anywhere, and both Paloma and I are hooked on their dried mango. They also freshly roast their nuts the same day they are shipped out to customers, which is just so cool. The best news is that Nuts.com has a great offer for GK readers – follow this link and choose four free gifts (like chia seeds, goji berries, hemp protein powder, habanero pistachios and more) to receive together with an order of $25 or more. Enjoy :) Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake   Print Serves: one 10 cake Ingredients for the cake (inspiration from At Home in the Whole Foods Kitchen) 4 cups mixed dried fruit - figs, prunes, apricots, raisins - chopped (no need to chop raisins) 4 Medjool dates or 6-8 regular dates - pitted and chopped 1½ cups freshly squeezed Concord grape juice or other fruit juice - hot 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon nutmeg other spices such as ground cardamom, cloves and allspice - to taste (optional) 1 tablespoon vanilla extract (optional) 1¼ cup toasted almonds - ground ½ cup toasted hazelnuts - chopped ½ cup toasted pecans or walnuts - chopped neutral coconut oil or other vegetable oil for oiling parchment paper for the decoration (all optional) cashews pumpkin seeds pistachios pecans dried apricots dried lemon slices dried cantaloupe dried mango Instructions to make the cake Preheat oven to 300° F (150° C). Place 1½ cup of mixed dried fruit and all the dates into a medium bowl. Pour hot Concord grape/­­fruit juice over them, cover and let soak for 15 minutes. Place the remaining 2½ cups of dried fruit into a medium saucepan and set aside. Drain the soaked fruit into a strainer, over the saucepan with the dried fruit, pouring the soaking juice into the saucepan. Bring contents of the saucepan to a boil over high heat, adjust the heat to a simmer and cook until most of the juice is absorbed, about 8-12 minutes. Transfer the cooked fruit into a food processor, add spices and vanilla extract, if using, and blend until smooth. Transfer into a large bowl, add ground almonds and mix to combine. Stir in soaked fruit, chopped hazelnuts and pecans/­­walnuts, mixing well. Line a 10 cake pan with well-oiled parchment paper and press the fruit-nut mixture into the pan, evening it out with a spoon. Optionally, decorate with nuts and dried fruit to your liking. Bake for 1 hour, until firm. Let cool completely before slicing. The cake stores very well refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 2 weeks. Notes 1. In the absence of Concord grapes, any other grapes, oranges or apples can be used to make juice for this cake. 2. If you dont have a juicer for juicing grapes, blend them in a blender and strain through a fine mesh strainer to get rid of any seeds and skins. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Jujube Ginger Tea

September 11 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Jujube Ginger Tea A friend of mine is from Korea and frequently has a pot of Jujube tea simmering away in her office kitchen. It sends the most enticing and comforting, sweet and spicy aroma around the whole space and creates the warmest atmosphere – I always have a hard time leaving. She hands out a little cup of the tea to all her customers, which is such a thoughtful little detail of her endless hospitality. Everybody loves it. Of course, I asked her for the recipe the very first time I tried the tea and have been making it ever since. Jujube dates are also know as red/­­Chinese/­­Korean/­­Indian dates and are a bit different from the dates we are accustomed to in the Western world. They’re smaller and stouter than regular dates, with deep red skin, and come from a tree belonging to the buckthorn family, thus they’re quite nutritious. Jujube are widely used in Chinese medicine for regulating blood pressure, aiding sleep, digestion and more. This tea is made by Koreans and Chinese alike, with small variations depending on the culture, and takes on many of the health benefits of the jujube. My friend adds cinnamon and ginger to the tea and garnishes it with pine nuts, which is a Korean twist. The result is a subtly sweet, gingery and slightly spicy tea that just smells of happiness. Jujube tea is especially great in the fall and winter, since it’s based on cinnamon and ginger, but I also love to drink it iced, for a more refreshing beverage. Jujubes are not that hard to come by – they are widely available online and in Asian/­­Indian markets, so I encourage you to try out this gem of a drink, I know you will love it. Read on for some weekend links and have a chill Sunday :) The 21st Century’s 100 Greatest Films – a list by BBC. Have you seen them all? I’ve seen a good bunch, but still have a lot of cultural catching up to do (still haven’t watched No Country for Old Men!) Kenzo Perfume Ad – a perfume ad making fun of perfume ads, directed by Spike Jonze The New Jock – a whole bunch of workout routine interviews with all kinds of people, if you’re ever in need of some moving motivation Mia Chaplin’s Paintings – .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Jujube Ginger Tea appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

A Summer of Ice Cream

September 3 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

A Summer of Ice Cream Somehow, we’ve reached the weekend that is considered by many to be the last hurrah of summer. It always goes by in a blink, and every year, the blink seems like the fastest one yet. Though very sentimental, I also can’t help but feel some excitement toward the cooler temperatures, fall produce and general coziness to come. At the beginning of this summer, we gave ourselves a challenge to come up with a new ice cream to post here every Sunday. We are happy to have fulfilled the plan, and the result consists of twelve original ice cream recipes that we are very proud of (+1 recipe from an author we love). Sometimes, I really love setting difficult-but-realistic goals for myself that I know will make me grow, whether personally or professionally – this one made me grow in both ways. Some weeks, it was definitely challenging to think up yet another frozen treat, but mostly, it was very rewarding and quite fun. I generally find myself having a more lighthearted approach, when it comes to ice cream recipe development, as opposed to the more serious savory recipes. The abundance of summer produce made the process of coming up with new flavors quite fluid, and I worked with what was available. Below, a round up of our summer of ice cream. It’s neat to see it all lined up chronologically, starting with rhubarb in the early summer, followed by strawberries, peaches, very light sorbets for the hottest of days, tropical milkshakes, and my youngest daughter’s birthday cake. We are currently brainstorming ideas for a similar weekend series to run during the colder months of the year, and would love to hear from you on what kind of recipes you’d like to see (snacks? sandwiches? soups? It doesn’t have to start with an S!). Have a lovely weekend :) Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt – Frozen yogurt is one of the easiest frozen treats to make, especially if you have an ice cream maker. All it takes is some good yogurt, whatever secondary ingredients you choose for flavor, and a quick whirl in the machine. Ive always found rose flavor to be very invigorating, and combined with the subtle tartness of the rhubarb and creamy tanginess of the yogurt, this is dessert and aromatherapy all in one bowl. Emma’s Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet – Aside from eating them just as they are, nothing showcases seasonal fresh berries more than homemade sorbet. This one is from Emmas beautiful cookbook, My Darling Lemon Thyme - Recipes from My Real Food Kitchen. One of the things I adore about Emmas cooking style is her love of fresh herbs. Just like her, I often include herbs in sweet dishes, its a little trick to turn many ordinary desserts into a completely unique and memorable treat. The inclusion of Thai basil in this recipe is genius and makes this creamy sorbet even more refreshing, aromatic and summery. Its also hard to believe that this intense crimson colour comes just from strawberries - a real show stopper. Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits – My go-to vegan lavender ice cream recipe with the addition of rich and decadent chocolate-tahini bits. It has a creamy, luxurious texture, which combines so well with the refreshing flavors of lavender and chewy, bittersweet pieces of chocolate. Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream – Chamomile, honey and lemon are flavors that seem to have been made for one another. In this ice cream, they unite into a subtle taste that I can only describe as soothing, steadying and balancing. Theres that unmistakably floral quality from the chamomile, sweetness from the honey, a sour citrus note from the lemon, all combined in a cooling and smooth ice cream. Green Smoothie Pops – A green smoothie on a stick that can be easily eaten for breakfast on a very hot day, or as an extra nutritious dessert, on any day. Papaya Lime Sundae – Papaya always pairs amazingly well with lime - both are tropical in flavor, and lime gives creamy and mild papaya just the right hint of brightness and zing. Presented here as a very refreshing version of a sundae, with delicious and healthful add-ins - desiccated coconut, cacao nibs (which we sprinkle on everything sweet in this house), and a drizzle of Lady Date pure date syrup. Pi?a Colada Milkshake – A recreation of my favorite beachside cocktail in non-alcoholic, vegan milkshake form. Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles – These lemonade popsicles, with a bit of zing from ginger, have been in my beat-the-heat arsenal for many summers now - a dessert for the toastiest of days, requiring minimal effort. The lemonade can also be had in its original, un-frozen state, and is an incredibly refreshing, summery drink. Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso and Caramel and Chocolate – These vegan tahini ice cream bars, covered with a generous drizzle of miso caramel and chocolate, very distantly remind me of Snickers ice cream bars, which I used to love, but these particular ones are much more healthful and interesting in flavor. SuperfoodCherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core –  A recreation of my favorite Ben & Jerrys ice cream flavor, made vegan and nutritious with the addition of a few energizing superfoods, and complete with a decadent chocolate core. Mint and Chocolate Milkshake with Aquafaba Whipped Cream – A classic ice cream flavor in milkshake form. Its creamy, with little hard specs of cacao nibs, invigorating with the addition of fresh mint, and topped with a chickpea-based vegan whipped cream. Pistachio and Raspberry Fields Ice Cream Cake – Paloma’s birthday cake, named for her obsession with the Beatles. Pistachio and raspberry complement each other perfectly here, the pistachio flavor being nutty and earthy, while the raspberry becomes its perfect, juicy and fruity pair. The cacao buckwheat crust adds just the right hint of chocolate and crunch to the mix. Berry Creamsicles with White Chocolate Drizzle – These beauties are a breeze to make, requiring no ice cream maker, and are colored lilac with all of summers sweetest, sun-ripened berries. The white chocolate drizzle, made with cacao butter and cashews, adds a nice, extra bit of texture to the creamy berry base, but the creamsicles are great on their own as well, in case you dont want to bother with the drizzle. The post A Summer of Ice Cream appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder

August 10 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder This post was created in partnership with Moringamio. This little blog started out as a raw foods recipe journal. Back then, in 2010, I was struggling with some very unexpected health issues that kept popping up after I had my second daughter a bit later in life. My thyroid was acting up, and I had trouble sleeping, but none of the treatments offered by the doctors seemed right to me. Most of the medicine was meant for covering up the symptoms, and not any actual healing, while having terrifyingly long lists of side effects. I decided to go the holistic route, having been into natural healing since I was very young, and having had some previous success with homeopathy and herbs. I started looking into healing through diet, and came across a little paperback on raw food, and how it had changed a whole family’s life by allowing them to regain their health. Something clicked after I read that book – the idea that plants can feed our cells in the most powerful way just made so much sense to me. I was incredibly inspired from that point on and ate and ‘cooked’ exclusively raw for a while, which really helped me feel much better. Since I was cooking up a storm, Masha and I decided to document the recipes online, and here we are, six years later. The recipes and my diet have evolved since then to be much less restrictive, but still largely plant-based. But I’m really here today to talk about an avocado, oat and nut breakfast porridge that I discovered during that honeymoon phase of eating raw foods. It was somewhat similar to the overnight oats I have for you today, but a bit more weighed down with nuts and sweetness. Upon making it for the first time, I was amazed at how easy and tasty it was, and became completely obsessed, eating it every morning for months on end. I recently remembered about that breakfast, not without some nostalgia, and decided to elaborate on the original recipe. These overnight oats are a breakfast that will likely keep you full past noon, perfect for a busy day when lunch seems like a distant prospect. It’s quite energizing and full of healthy fats and fiber, not to mention absolutely delicious. The texture here is fluffy from the oats and peach puree, and the fresh berries add juicy bursts throughout the creamy porridge. I think I’m obsessed all over again. There’s also a special, new-to-me ingredient in these overnight oats that I’m very excited about – moringa leaf powder. I first learned about moringa when my friends went blueberry picking at a nearby farm, where the farm’s owners also grew moringa and raved about it endlessly. My friends ended up coming home with a moringa seedling, to plant in their own back yard. Moringa powder is made of ground up leaves from the moringa tree, which is a drought-resistant tree from south Asia and Africa. Many parts of the plant have been utilized for culinary and healing purposes since the antiquity, and widely used in Ayurvedic medicine. Moringa is very nutritionally dense, containing all nine essential amino acids, along with vitamins A & C, iron and calcium, earning itself the label of ‘superfood,’ and you know you love those :) It has a pleasant, grassy aroma, sort of similar to matcha, which I love, but also very much its own, unique product. So of course I was very excited when Moringamio sent me their moringa leaf powder to sample, as their stuff is the best of the best, being incredibly high-quality, organic and very fresh. I’ve tried it in lattes and smoothies, and it works perfectly in these overnight oats, making the breakfast even more invigorating and nutritious. For more moringa recipes, check out Amy’s breakfast bowl and Sophie’s matcha moringa latte. Enjoy! Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 3 medium, sweet and ripe peaches or nectarines - pitted and roughly chopped ¼ cup honey or maple syrup, plus more for serving, if desired 1¼ cup rolled oats - I used old-fashioned and gluten free 2 tablespoons chia seeds 1 ripe but firm avocado freshly squeezed juice from ½ lemon 1 tablespoon moringa leaf powder handful hemp hearts or other nuts (optional) topping suggestions cacao nibs goji berries bee pollen hemp hearts dried mullberries fresh berries sliced peaches fresh mint Instructions Place peaches and honey/­­maple syrup in a blender or food processor and pulse until pureed. Thoroughly mix the peach puree with the rolled oats and chia seeds in a medium bowl, cover and refrigerate overnight. In the morning, roughly chop avocado and place it into a food processor, along with lemon juice, oat and peach mixture, moringa leaf powder and hemp herts/­­other nuts, if using. Pulse briefly to combine. Taste and add a splash of honey if desired. Serve with fresh berries, cacao nibs, goji berries/­­dried mullberries, bee pollen, etc. (see topping options above). 3.5.3208 This post was created in partnership with Moringamio, with all opinions being genuine and our own. Thank you for considering the sponsors that help keep Golubka Kitchen going. You might also like... Raw Black Currant Panna Cotta Roasted Root Vegetable, Red Rice and Lentil Stew Sprouted Sunflower Seed Cocoa Bars Mint and Chocolate Milkshake with Aquafaba Whipped Cream - Ice Cream S... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn

August 3 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn A bit on the state of things around here - The kitchen renovations have been put off until October, and all I can say is that I’m very relieved. I knew that gutting the kitchen right after submitting the cookbook manuscript would be chaotic, but when it actually came down to it, I felt even more unprepared and exhausted than I ever expected. Not to mention, I still have a list of recipes to perfect for the book, which requires a fully working kitchen. Thankfully, our contractor – the only good one we could find after months of meetings and unreturned calls (because sometimes people in Florida are too chill) – is booked up two months in advance. A blessing in disguise, if I ever saw one. Among other things, I’m finding it painfully difficult to choose tile for the kitchen floor (Moroccan? Spanish? Mosaic? Forget the tile and do hard-wood?) and I’m really welcoming this extra time for making a decision. I am still working on the staircase leading up to the kitchen, and if you follow us on snapchat (golubkakitchen), you’ve likely seen some snaps of that whole process. The stairs were covered in bad carpet by previous owners, and finally stripping off that dust magnet of a surface felt great. Re-finishing the wooden stairs underneath, however was a huge pain, and re-awakened my carpal tunnel, which started when I was working in the dental field. But at least the stairs are looking great. Paloma goes back to school mid-August and turns eight around the same time too. We’re looking for a Beatles-related present (girl has serious Beatlemania), and the birthday cake will be an ice cream cake, which I will hopefully share here one of the coming Sundays. I recently promised to do more salad posts, and since we are getting into the hottest part of the summer, salads are the key item at any given meal around these parts. And this Caesar, you guys! I’ve already made it several times since coming up with the entirely vegan Caesar dressing. The dressing is everything you want your salad leaves drenched in (and you will want to drench with this one, not just drizzle) – it’s garlicky, creamy and incredibly savory. I aimed for a salad that can be eaten as a main course, and besides the addition of protein-rich beans in the dressing, there are crispy, golden tempeh ‘croutons’ that will fill you up nicely. Grilled peaches and corn contribute perfect little pockets of juice and sweetness here, and Laura’s pine nut parm is optional but very addictive. This Caesar is also easily adaptable to other seasons – instead of the peaches and corn, include roasted squash in the fall/­­winter, asparagus/­­peas in the spring, etc., etc. It’s August! Take it easy and enjoy this last stretch of summer, perhaps even with some hearty Caesar in tow ;) Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients for the Caesar dressing 1 cup cooked white beans, plus cooking liquid/­­liquid from can to achieve desired dressing consistency 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice ½ tablespoon Dijon mustard ½ tablespoon vegan Worcestershire sauce 1 teaspoon capers ½ teaspoon maple syrup ¼ teaspoon sriracha 1 garlic clove sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste 2 tablespoons olive oil for the salad 4-6 corn ears 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil - divided freshly ground black pepper - to taste 3-6 ripe, sweet peaches - cut in half 1 package tempeh - cubed 1 medium bunch kale - stems removed, leaves cut into bite-sized pieces ½ tablespoon olive oil sea salt - to taste 1 small head Romaine lettuce - torn into bite-size pieces pine nut Parmesan - optional Instructions to make the dressing Combine all the ingredients, with the exception of the cooking liquid and olive oil in an upright blender. Blend until smooth, adding in cooking liquid as needed to achieve the desired creamy salad dressing consistency. Add olive oil with the motor still running. to make the salad Rub corn ears with 1 tablespon coconut oil, salt and black pepper and grill on an outdoor grill or under the broiler, watching and rotating the corn, until charred in places. Let cool slightly and cut kernels off the ears, set aside. Grill peaches on an outdoor grill or under the broiler until charred. Let cool and slice into wedges. Set aside. Warm the remaining 1 tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium pan. Add tempeh cubes, sprinkle with salt and fry until golden and crispy. Set aside. Place kale in a large mixing bowl, drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt, and massage until wilted. Add in torn Romaine lettuce. Pour the dressing over the greens and toss to coat. Distribute between bowls or plates, top with corn kernels, peach slices, tempeh croutons and sprinkle with pine nut Parmesan, if using. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core

July 31 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core This week, I wanted to re-create my favorite Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavor, making it vegan (though B&J came out with their own non-dairy ice cream, which is so awesome) and nutritious with the addition of a few energizing superfoods. Another thing I know people can’t get enough of in B&J’s ice cream are their decadent cores, so I went ahead and gave these SuperfoodCherry Garcia’ Pops a chocolate core to really drive the point home. If you’re wondering why the pops are minty-colored, it’s due to the addition of spirulina, along with other nutritionally dense ingredients like hemp hearts and cacao nibs. A bonus – no ice-cream maker is needed for these. Moving to the U.S. from small-town Russia in the 90s and going to a Ben & Jerry’s ice cream shop for the first time was completely mind-blowing because a) back home, we did not have dedicated ice cream shops, b) ice cream flavors I grew up with were very basic and I had never seen so many extensive flavor options c) they sold little tubs of ice cream to take home, which was unheard of in Russia at the time d) everything tasted incredibly decadent and delicious. So here’s my B&J tribute, as a thanks for opening my eyes to possibilities I didn’t know existed. Read on for some weekend links and have a peaceful Sunday. Kids Taste-Test the New Ben & Jerry’s Vegan Ice Cream  Essentials – since we get many questions about our chosen kitchen and photography tools, we’ve made a page with links to all our favorite and most-used products – Kitchen Tools here, Photography here (also working on a round-up of favorite health-related books/­­cookbooks and natural beauty!) The Sad, Sexist History of Salad – Americans, in particular, strongly associate healthy or light foods, such as salad, chicken, and yogurt, with women, and unhealthy or heavy foods, such as beef, potatoes, and beer, with men, both men and women preferred unhealthy foods with masculine packaging and healthy foods with feminine packaging. Fascinating. The World’s Most Innovative Companies in 2016 – according to Fast Company Julia Turshen on the One Part Podcast – loved this, especially her point on asking for credit/­­compensation – if you don’t ask, you will never know what the possibilities are. You may know Turshen from co-authoring Gwyneth Paltrow’s cookbook, along with many others. Cannot wait for her own cookbook to come out. Meryl Streep: A League of Her Own, also, Taste of Streep!? Obama After Dark – how one can average only 5 hours of sleep a night AND run the country is beyond me, also Obama Sets the Record Straight on His 7-Almond Habit :) About Us – we’ve updated our about page a bit, with very important info like our zodiac signs ;) Snapchat – follow @golubkakitchen for all behind-the-scenes Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core   Print Serves: 7-10 pops Ingredients for the cherries 1 heaping cup cherries - pitted and halved 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder 1 tablespoon water for the spirulina mix 1½ cup raw cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours 1 cup canned unsweetened full fat Thai coconut milk 3 tablespoons maple syrup or more to taste ½-1 tablespoon spirulina powder ½ tablespoon vanilla extract ½ teaspoon xanathan gum or 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder (optional) 1 tablespoon shaved dark chocolate or raw chocolate 1-2 tablespoons cacao nibs for the chocolate core ⅓ of the spirulina mix 2 tablespoons shaved dark chocolate or raw chocolate 3 tablespoons raw cacao powder for the pops 7-10 tea cups, small glasses or pop molds neutral coconut oil for oiling the cups spirulina mix (recipe above) chocolate core (recipe above) 7-10 wooden sticks - soaked for 2 hours or overnight hemp hearts cacao nibs Instructions to prepare the cherries Combine cherries with maple syrup and bring to a boil in a small saucepan. Reduce the heat to a simmer and simmer for 2 minutes. Combine arrowroot powder with water in a small bowl and add to the saucepan, while stirring. The cherry compote should thicken slightly. Remove from heat and let cool. to make the pops Make the spirulina mix. Drain and rinse cashews and put into an upright blender, preferably high-speed. Add coconut milk, maple syrup, spirulina, vanilla, and xanathan gum/­­arrowroot powder, if using and blend until smooth. If not using a high-speed blender, optionally strain mixture through a fine-mesh strainer for the most smooth and velvety texture. Spoon about ⅓ of the spirulina mix into a medium, heat-proof bowl and set aside. Add shaved chocolate and cacao nibs to the blender with the remaining ⅔ of the spirulina mix and pulse to combine briefly. Transfer the mixture into a separate bowl, then fold in the cherries. Make the chocolate core. Place the reserved ⅓ of the spirulina mix onto a double boiler, add chocolate and let it melt, stirring to incorporate. Remove from the heat, add in cacao powder, mix to combine and let cool. Make the pops. Oil your cups/­­molds generously with coconut oil and spoon the spirulina-cherry mix in, leaving a well in the center for the core. Spoon the chocolate core into the well. Even out the surface and insert the wooden stick. Repeat with the rest of the pops. Freeze until completely firm. Prepare a plate with cacao nibs and hemp hearts for coating, along with a parchment paper-covered surface for placing pops onto. Take cups with pops out of the freezer and place into a dish with hot water for a minute, for easier removal. Remove popsicles from cups, pulling them out by the sticks. Dip the top of each pop into the prepared hemp/­­cacao nib mixture and press gently to make the pieces stick. Place onto a parchment paper-covered surface and keep frozen until ready to eat. Take the popsicles out of the freezer 5-10 minutes prior to eating. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso Caramel and Chocolate - Ice Cream Sunday

July 24 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso Caramel and Chocolate - Ice Cream Sunday I’m so excited for today’s ice cream flavor, I could hardly wait until Sunday to share it. These delicious ice cream bars are centered around two of my most used and loved ingredients – sesame tahini and miso paste. I find myself reaching for one or the other almost daily, and adding them to everything from dressings and sauces, to smoothies, soups, desserts and more. Both miso and tahini are perfect for adding complexity to so many dishes, savory and sweet alike, and are both quite nourishing. These vegan tahini ice cream bars, covered with a generous drizzle of miso caramel and chocolate, very distantly remind me of Snickers ice cream bars, which I used to love, but these particular ones are much more healthful and interesting in flavor. I find the tahini ice cream base to be evocative of halva, and therefore completely irresistible. Miso caramel is a recent discovery I’m very happy with. With its saltiness and creaminess, miso works perfectly for creating a healthy caramel, that I can imagine being useful in many vegan desserts. Once all the components are joined together, these ice cream bars have it all – smooth and creamy texture, combined with sweet and savory notes, just the right hint of salt from miso, and depth and decadence from chocolate. Read on for some weekend links and enjoy your Sunday :) Tips to reduce food waste – many delicious tips for economy in the kitchen (NYT) How to brew your own kombucha – Sarah has created the most comprehensive kombucha-brewing guide I’ve ever seen. I’ve been making my own for years and still learned some new things and useful tips. Roald Dahl’s important food inventions – a fun read How to manage your blood sugar naturally – found this article to be quite enlightening Pinch of Yum’s Income and Traffic Reports – one website’s honest, month-by-month accounts of how they make a living blogging, full of amazing tips for improving your space on the internet. A dreamy Sag Harbor home – that sun room! Blog Lovecauliflower shawarma, gluten-free grilled pizzatahini stuffed dates, matcha chocolate bark Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso Caramel and Chocolate   Print Serves: 12 bars Ingredients for the tahini ice cream 2 cans full fat unsweetened Thai cocout milk ⅓ cup sesame tahini (I prefer the unhulled variety here) ¼ cup maple syrup 1 tablespoon vanilla extract 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder or ½ teaspoon xanathan gum (optional) for the miso caramel 1 can full fat usweetened Thai coconut milk (I prefer this brand) ½ cup coconut sugar 1 tablespoon neutral extra virgin coconut oil 2 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 tablespoon sweet miso paste for the assembly dark chocolate or chocolate chips for drizzling Instructions to make the tahini ice cream Blend all the ingredients in an upright blender until smooth. Let the mixture chill well in the refrigerator, preferably overnight. Churn in an ice cream machine for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Line an 8 x 8 dish with parchment paper, extending it up the sides. Spoon the ice cream into the dish in an even layer and smooth up the surface with the back of a spoon. Cover and freeze for at least 4 hours, or until firm. to make the miso caramel Combine coconut milk and coconut sugar in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for about 20 minutes, stirring, until thickened to a caramel consistency. Remove from heat and whisk in coconut oil, vanilla extract and miso paste, until smooth and well combined. to assemble the bars Remove the ice cream from the freezer and take it out of the dish onto a cutting board, lifting it out by the extended ends of parchment paper. Slice into 12 bars. Generously drizzle with miso caramel and place back into the freezer. Melt about 1 cup dark chocolate or chocolate chips on a double boiler. Take the bars out of the freezer and drizzle with melted chocolate. Place back into the freezer to let the chocolate harden. Keep bars in the freezer, covered and take out 5-10 minutes prior to serving. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream Sunday

July 17 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream SundayThis post was created in partnership with Crafted Honey. It’s been so hot! Every summer, without fail, my general appetite decreases, while cravings for all things fresh, crisp, light, and, most importantly, juicy go through the roof, and I know I’m not alone in this. Thankfully, summer produce is full of all the hydrating qualities we require, and that’s one example for why eating with the seasons is a graceful way to go through life. Mid-summer sun is finally warm enough to give blush and sweetness to all kinds of stone fruit, and peach harvest – the most luscious and anxiously awaited of the bunch – is finally sweeping across the Northern hemisphere. These peach, honey and thyme lemonade popsicles, with a bit of zing from ginger, have been in my beat-the-heat arsenal for many summers now – a dessert for the toastiest of days, requiring minimal effort. We are in the middle of renovations right now, and I’ve been taking old coats of paint off our stairs and railings, which has turned out to be much more involved than it sounds. Having one of these popsicles at the end of the day, once I dust off, has been very therapeutic. The lemonade can also be had in its original, un-frozen state, and is an incredibly refreshing, summery drink. When I got the chance to try Crafted Honey’s raw, small batch honey, I knew that its addition would take the flavor of these pops to the next level of sophistication, and it truly did. Crafted Honey is a husband and wife-run company out of North Carolina, with bee farms situated at the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, and producing some of the most unique honey varieties I’ve ever tasted. I chose to use their Strawberry Henbit for these popsicles, made by honeybees that gather nectar from the both strawberry and henbit (plant belonging to the mint family) blossoms, making for a delicious and complex, berry-flavored and lightly colored honey that sings of summer. Crafted Honey has all the ideals one would want from a honey brand – the honey is pure, made with no additives and not over-heated, the hives are never chemically treated and always handled with bee welfare in mind – all practices we feel passionate about supporting. Today also happens to be the Crafted co-owner Erica’s birthday, so we are wishing her the happiest of days :) Read on for some weekend links and have a sweet Sunday. Como Como – just discovered Fernanda de la Puente’s fun health and wellness website Jonathan Safran Foer & Natalie Portman – loved reading this email exchange interview between the two, big fan of both Herb Infused Oil – a great idea for not letting your herbs go to waste, with an instructional video Escape to Bro-topia – about Foster Huntington’s newest project, a treehouse Valeda Beach Stull’s Instagram – love this photographer’s instagram, and enjoyed this interview with her about her process and moving Upstate from California The First Image Sent Back from Juno – gives me goosebumps 10 Rules for Students, Teachers and Life – by John Cage and Sister Corita Kent Blog LovePeach and Rosemary Water, Farro Salad w/­ Crispy Chickpeas and Sumac Vinaigrette, Slow Cooked Apple Tart Overnight Oats, Easy No-Bake Cookies This post was created in partnership with Crafted Honey, with all opinions being genuine and our own. Thank you for considering the sponsors that help keep Golubka Kitchen going. Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles   Print Serves: 10 popsicles Ingredients 1 bunch thyme - divided 3 cups purified water about 1½-inch piece ginger - peeled and roughly chopped 3 large or 5 small ripe and sweet peaches - pitted, plus more whole slices for decoration 1 cup juice from about 5 organic lemons ¼ cup honey Instructions Soak wooden popsicle sticks in water for a few hours or overnight. Reserve a few sprigs of thyme for decoration and place the rest into a medium saucepan. Muddle with a wooden spoon to release oils. Add ⅔ of the ginger and smash it with the back of a spoon. Add water and bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat to a simmer and let simmer for 1 minute. Remove from heat, cover and let cool to a room temperature. Combine peaches, remaining ginger, lemon juice and honey in a blender, blend until smooth. Strain puree through a fine mesh strainer over a pitcher or bowl. Pour the ginger and thyme-infused water through a strainer into the puree, discard cooked thyme and ginger. Stir to combine. Chill well and serve over ice as a lemonade or make popsicles. Fill the popsicles molds with the lemonade, ½ mold at a time. Add peach slices and thyme sprigs, if desired, then fill the rest, making sure to leave some room for expansion. Cover with the lid and insert soaked wooden sticks. Place into the freezer and let freeze completely. Briefly run molds under hot water before removing popsicles. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Curry Coconut Ice Cream Gingery Rutabaga and Pear Handpies Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Marinated Summer Vegetables and Beans over Freekeh

July 6 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Marinated Summer Vegetables and Beans over Freekeh Today I thought I would share an everyday recipe that I make quite often, great for satisfying a vegetable craving, and nourishing but summery at the same time. One of my favorite treatments for vegetables, besides the go-to roasting/­­steaming/­­sautéing, is marinating, which is especially good for summer, since marinated vegetables are at their best when cold. Marinated beans are another staple in our house. I try to make a pot of beans most weekends, and let them develop in a marinade of lemon juice, oil, garlic and herbs over the week. It’s a great thing to have in the refrigerator for spooning into salads and bowls throughout the workweek – an easy way to make a quick, nourishing meal. Right now, I’m obsessed with Rancho Gordo’s heirloom Scarlet Runner Beans, which are perfectly plump, meaty and creamy all at the same time, but use any favorite beans in this recipe. In this dish, a rainbow of crisp, blanched and sautéed summer vegetables and velvety beans is marinated in a simple, garlicky and mildly spicy dressing. Use whichever vegetables you have on hand here – omitting a few is fine – but I recommend keeping the cauliflower as a constant, whether purple or regular in color, as it tastes amazing here. Have you tried freekeh yet? It’s fairly new to me, and very much worth seeking out if you’re looking for variety in your grain selection for salads and bowls. Freekeh is made of an ancient wheat variety, which is harvested when young and roasted over an open fire, which burns off all of the grain’s outer shell, while the inner young grain stays intact. This intricate process yields a pleasant, slightly smoky flavor. These veggies and beans taste delicious over freekeh, but any grain of choice can of course be used in place of it. Lastly, this year’s Saveur blog awards are upon us, and being nominated has proven to be an important milestone for any food blog, a kind door opener if you will. If you enjoy our recipes and photos, we would be absolutely thrilled if you could take a minute out of your day and nominate us for the food obsessive award category, which is basically a special diet category, (or any other category that you see fit). It would truly mean the world. Thank you for your support, and as always, we wouldn’t be here without your readership. Marinated Summer Vegetables and Beans over Freekeh   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the marinade 1 tablespoon cumin seeds 4 garlic cloves - minced juice of 1 lemon - freshly squeezed 1 teaspoon sweet Hungarian paprika ½ teaspoon sriracha/­­chili sauce of choice or more to taste 3 tablespoons olive oil sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste for the vegetables and beans 1 small cauliflower head - cut into florets 1 yellow summer squash or zucchini - sliced into bite-sized pieces 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 small broccoli head - cut into florets handful green beans - strings removed if present sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste 2-3 large kale leaves - stems removed and sliced (optional) 1 large carrot - shaved into ribbons with a vegetable peeler 1 cup cooked beans large handful fresh dill - minced large handful parsley - minced 1 cup freekeh or other grain of choice - cooked (optional) Instructions to make the marinade Toast cumin seeds in a small pan until fragrant, for about 1 minute, then grind in a mortar and pestle. Combine all the ingredients in a small bowl and whisk until blended well. Set aside. to cook the vegetables Bring well salted water to a boil in a medium soup pot. Prepare an ice or cold water bath for blanched vegetables. Add cauliflower to the boiling water and blanch for 2 minutes. Add zucchini and blanch together with the cauliflower for another minute. Drain and transfer into the cold water bath. Warm coconut oil in a large saute pan over medium high heat. Add broccoli and green beans, sprinkle with salt and freshly ground black pepper, and saute for 3-4 minutes, until bright green and crisp-tender. Add kale and stir around until wilted. Add cauliflower, zucchini and carrots, toss to combine. Remove from heat, add beans and herbs. Pour marinade over and toss to coat. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Serve immediately over freekeh/­­other grain of choice or transfer to a glass container and let sit at room temperature for 30 minutes. Refrigerate until ready to eat. The flavors will develop further with time. Notes You can cook the vegetables any preferred way - steam, boil or sauté. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Papaya Lime Sundae - Ice Cream Sunday

June 26 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Papaya Lime Sundae - Ice Cream Sunday Papaya is one of my favorite things to eat this time of year, so figuring out a papaya sorbet recipe that worked was very exciting. It admittedly took me a few tries. One version that involved banana came out tasting quite strange, while another one just tasted like plain ice.  Then I had a revelation about the fact that papaya always pairs amazingly well with lime – both are tropical in flavor, and lime gives creamy and mild papaya just the right hint of brightness and zing. Presented here as a very refreshing version of a sundae, with delicious and healthful add-ins – desiccated coconut, cacao nibs (which we sprinkle on everything sweet in this house), and a drizzle of Lady Date pure date syrup, an amazing new discovery (thank you Laura for the tip). In the absence of this sorbet, we’ve been having fresh papaya slices with all the same add-ins, as an easy summer dessert. Since our book manuscript is due this coming Thursday, we’ve had our heads down and haven’t had the time to read any interesting articles for our Sunday link list. Instead, we thought it would be fun to compile a list of old and new cookbooks that have been inspiring us and helping us get through these final stages of the manuscript, whether with their recipes, visually or both. Read on for the list and have a relaxing Sunday! Bowl by Lukas Volger Gjelina by Travis Lett Hartwood by Eric Werner Nopi by Yotam Ottolenghi Ayurveda: The Science of Self Healing by Vasant Lad Dandelion and Quince by Michelle McKenzie (got a sneak peak from my publisher and it’s a beauty) Ripe and Tender by Nigel Slater It’s All Easy by Gwyneth Paltrow At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen by Amy Chaplin Hot to Cook a Wolf by MFK Fisher Sweeter Off the Vine by Yossi Arefi Papaya Lime Sundae   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1 medium papaya - peeled, seeded and roughly chopped ½ cup freshly squeezed lime juice - from about 3 limes ⅓ cup maple syrup pinch sea salt cacao nibs - to taste desiccated coconut - to taste pure date syrup - to taste Instructions Combine all the ingredients, with the exception of cacao nibs, coconut and date syrup, in a blender and blend until smooth. Chill the mixture well in the refrigerator, preferably overnight. Churn in an ice-cream maker for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Spoon into a container and freeze for at least 2 hours before serving. Top with cacao nibs, desiccated coconut and pure date syrup. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Zucchini Blossoms with Roasted Eggplant Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Black Bean Chocolate and Fig Cookies Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Papaya Lime Sundae - Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Green Smoothie Pops -- Ice Cream Sunday

June 19 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Green Smoothie Pops -- Ice Cream Sunday This Sunday, we are going for something very light, summery, fruity, and very nutritious. More particularly, a green smoothie on a stick. Green smoothies have been making an almost daily appearance at our house, ever since I got a high-speed blender about six years ago (here’s a nice flashback video from four years back, those little chubsters are so grown up now). It’s the easiest way to pack a ton of greens into your daily eating routine. I almost feel like I’m cheating when I put a huge bunch of leaves, together with some fruit and powders into a blender, and end up with a pleasant and smooth, drinkable meal, that I can consume in a few minutes and continue on with my day. Do you know what I mean? The ease of it all is something to be thankful for. Of course, this can be done in any blender, but a high-speed one just has that amazing ability to break down all the fibers into the creamiest smoothie. These pops are exactly that – a little green pick-me-up that can be easily eaten for breakfast on a very hot day, or as an extra nutritious dessert, on any day. Read on for some weekend links and enjoy your Sunday. Chef Jacques La Merde – have you seen this instagram account? Photos of the most beautiful plates of meticulously styled dishes, but there’s a twist to it all when you look closer and read the ingredients list. Hilarious. Plus, the woman behind it all. On Being – been diving into the archives of this podcast lately, loved the interviews with Barbara Kingsolver and Dan Barber. How To Cook a Wolf – reading this book (for the first time!) and loving it. M.F.K. Fisher has such a straightforward and witty voice, and I have so many passages underlined already, like this one, from 1942: “In the first place, not all people need or want three meals each day. Many of them feel better with two, or one and one-half, or five […] ‘balance ‘ is something that depends entirely upon the individual. One man, because of his chemical setup, may need many proteins. Another, more nervous perhaps, may find meat and eggs and cheeses an active poison, and have to live with what grace he can on salads and cooked squash.” Awesome read. Adaptogens – a complete guide Berlin’s Honey Bees – “Honeybees visit 2 million flowers to create just 1 lb of honey.” Forever blown away by bee facts. All the Food That’s Fit to Print – on edible 3D printing The Gentlewoman Library – just discovered that the magazine has an entire online library of their interviews with all kinds of amazing women, from Yoko Ono to Beyonce to Martha Stewart to Tilda Swinton. Curb Your Enthusiasm – is back :) Blog Love – hummus for dinner, golden milk chia pudding, new potato and lentil salad w/­­ lemon caper dressing, peach and blackberry cobbler Green Smoothie Pops   Print Serves: 10 popsicles Ingredients 1 ripe mango ¼ ripe pineapple 1 ripe banana (optional) 3-6 kale leaves or other leafy greens - stems removed purified water maple syrup - to taste (optional) 1 kiwi, peach, strawberry, etc. - sliced, for decoration (optional) Instructions Blend all ingredients, except kiwi/­­other sliced fruit, in a blender until very smooth, adding enough water to achieve a thick milkshake consistency. If using kiwi/­­other sliced fruit for decoration, arrange the slices inside ice pop molds, sticking them to the walls so they will be visible on the surface of the pops. Carefully pour or spoon the smoothie into the molds, taking care not to create large air pockets. Once full, lift and gently drop the molds on the counter several times to eliminate any air bubbles. Cover with the lid and insert wooden sticks. Freeze for 3-4 hours or overnight, until completely frozen. Let sit for 5 minutes or run hot water over the molds and the lid to remove the pops. Notes The amount of kale used in this recipe can greatly vary depending on the size of your kale and your preference. I like to use a whole bunch for that extra green, but 3-6 leaves is plenty. Soak wooden popsicle sticks in water overnight for better hold. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Simmered Squash Soba Bowl Banana Toffee Tart Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard Black Bean Chocolate and Fig Cookies .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Green Smoothie Pops -- Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday

June 12 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday To continue with the herbal/­­floral theme from last week, this Sunday, we’ve got Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream. We’ve been having quite a steady supply of fresh chamomile at the local market, and those bouquets fill the house with the most calming, quiet aroma, which I usually associate with bedtime and all things peaceful, due to the herb’s well-studied chill-out properties. I’ve had a note to make chamomile ice cream ever since I made chamomile sorbet years ago, which was essentially frozen chamomile tea and honey – sounds so simple, but its refreshing flavor left quite an impression for all these years. Chamomile, honey and lemon are flavors that seem to have been made for one another. In this ice cream, they unite into a subtle taste that I can only describe as soothing, steadying and balancing. There’s that unmistakably floral quality from the chamomile, sweetness from the honey, a sour citrus note from the lemon, all combined in a cooling and smooth ice cream. Read on for the recipe and some weekend links, and have a chill Sunday :) Is sugar really bad for you? – starting in 2018, nutrition labels on packaged foods will have to list the amount of added sugars in addition to total sugars, and this article answers some important questions in regards to that. Obviously, we love sweets, so – everything in moderation :) Aloe Vera – summer beauty food The Voyageur – a favorite, dreamy online travel journal All You Need, You Already Have – an inspiring post on Zen Habits Kid Friendly Herbs – to go with the theme of this post, a round up of herbs that are ok to give to children Sarah Britton interview – “It was about three years before I got a comment from someone whose last name wasn’t mine.” One Part Podcast – been listening to this while doing things around the kitchen. So far loved episodes with Bryant Terry, Dana Shultz, Laura Wright. Blog love – we are in complete awe of The Artful Desperado’s food photography, green caesar non-alcoholic cocktail, soft meringue s’mores with blood orange, roasted artichoke and cauliflower with creamy harissa dip. Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 cans full fat Thai coconut milk ¼ cup dried chamomile flowers ¼ cup honey - divided, plus more for drizzling juice and zest of 1 lemon 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder Instructions Combine coconut milk and chamomile in a medium saucepan. Bring to a gentle simmer, preferably on a double boiler, or over regular heat. Simmer for 15 minutes. Remove from heat, cover and let infuse and cool to room temperature. Strain chamomile milk. In a blender, combine milk with 2 tablespoons honey, lemon juice and arrowroot. Blend until smooth. Chill the mixture well in the refrigerator, preferably overnight. Process mixture in an ice cream machine for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Spoon ice cream into a container in layers, drizzling the remaining honey between the layers. Serve immediately as soft serve or place in the freezer to harden further for at least 4 hours. Remove from freezer 10-15 minutes before serving. Garnish with lemon zest and more honey when serving. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Tarragon and Mint Ice Cream Raw Blackberry and Lime Miniature Tarts with Cardamom Ice Cream Bee Pollen and Manuka Honey Ice-Cream Beet Tahini Snack Bars .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday

June 5 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday This Sunday’s flavors are lavender, chocolate and tahini. I’ve talked about my love for lavender on this blog quite a lot, and it’s hard not to sound like a bit of a broken record, but this small flower really does hold a special place in my heart (I cannot wait to make this milkshake and tart sometime this summer). I’m sharing my go-to vegan lavender ice cream recipe with the addition of rich and decadent chocolate-tahini bits. It has a creamy, luxurious texture, which combines so well with the refreshing flavors of lavender and chewy, bittersweet pieces of chocolate. Read on for some weekend links + a few more snaps, and enjoy your Sunday. Rachel Roddy’s Instagram – author of the Five Quarters cookbook shares snaps from her very Italian kitchen. Love the ‘real’ photography style and all the beautiful produce/­­dishes (also, her recipes at The Guardian). Aquafaba – have you tried cooking with it yet? I haven’t, but gearing up to. Olafur Eliasson – loved this feature on him and cannot wait to check out his cookbook, Food is more important than art. You die from not having food. You die from not having art, too--just not as fast. Ingredients in an all natural banana do not sound as natural as one would think – a fun infographic, plus blueberry and coffee bean Claire Cottrell on Apiece Apart Woman – enjoyed this interview and photos (love her Instagram as well) I found this to the point Q&A about antibiotic resistance to be very clear and helpful Things the world’s most and least privileged people say – for some perspective Blog Love – turmeric honey almond buttervegan onigiri, white chocolate mousse with strawberry compote Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients for the chocolate tahini bits ½ cup dark chocolate chips or chopped chocolate ¼ cup tahini pinch of salt for the lavender ice cream 2 cans full fat Thai coconut milk ¼ cup plus 1 teaspoon dried lavender flowers ¼ cup maple syrup ½ teaspoon xanthan gum or 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder handful blueberries - for color (optional) Instructions to make the chocolate tahini bits In a double boiler, combine chocolate, tahini and salt. Gently heat to melt and stir to achieve a smooth mixture. Prepare a parchment paper-covered tray or cutting board. Spread the chocolate over the parchment in a thin layer. Place in the freezer to harden until ready to use. to make the ice cream In a medium saucepan, combine coconut milk and ¼ cup lavender. Bring to a boil over a medium-high heat, reduce to a simmer and let cook for 5 minutes. Remove from heat, let cool to a room temperature and strain. In a blender, combine the lavender milk with the remaining 1 teaspoon of lavender flowers, maple syrup xanthan/­­arrowroot, blueberries if using, and blend until smooth. Place the mixture in the refrigerator and let cool thoroughly, preferably overnight. Process in an ice cream maker for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. When the ice cream is almost done, remove the hardened chocolate out of the freezer and chop. Add to ice cream machine with the motor still running. Spoon ice cream into a container. Serve immediately as soft serve or place the ice cream in the freezer for 4 hours/­­overnight to harden. Remove from freezer 5-10 minutes before serving to let soften. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Melon Basil Summer Rolls Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Kohlrabi Avocado Salad Raw Chocolate Layer Cakes with Black Cherry and Orange .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Emma’s Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet -- Ice Cream Sunday

May 29 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Emma’s Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet -- Ice Cream Sunday Florida is on its own schedule when it comes to growing seasons, and we usually have our local strawberries in March. This year’s strawberry crop was especially abundant, a field of ruby-red like I’ve never seen it before. We went strawberry picking at the nearby organic farm and ended up gathering way more of the sun-ripened beauties than we initially planned. We took home enough to enjoy fresh for a week and froze the rest. Soon after, Roost Books sent me Emma’s beautiful cookbook, My Darling Lemon Thyme – Recipes from My Real Food Kitchen, and all stars aligned for me to make her Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet. I waited a bit to share this until strawberry season kicked off in northern climates, and when I saw strawberries being sold at the Union Square Greenmarket while visiting NYC last weekend, I knew it was finally time. Aside from eating them just as they are, nothing showcases seasonal fresh berries more than homemade sorbet. One of the things I adore about Emma’s cooking style is her love of fresh herbs. Just like her, I often include herbs in sweet dishes, it’s a little trick to turn many ordinary desserts into a completely unique and memorable treat. The inclusion of Thai basil in this recipe is genius and makes this creamy sorbet even more refreshing, aromatic and summery. It’s also hard to believe that this intense crimson colour comes just from strawberries – a real show stopper. As the heat approaches, My Darling Lemon Thyme offers a nice collection of easy frozen desserts, like Watermelon, Rose and Mint Icepops, No Churn Banana Berry Ice Cream and dreamy Chocolate Cream Pops. The breakfast chapter includes such gems as Tahini, Orange and Coconut Toasted Mueslicreamy porridges, crepes and pancakes. When I turned the page to the Raspberry, Dark Chocolate and Pistachio Brownies, I knew I had to make them right away and have several times since then – they came out perfect every time. The savory dishes in the book are just as exciting, ranging from flavorful salads and soups to big dinner plates, all influenced by various cuisines and utilizing the most beautiful array of vegetables, grains, legumes, spices and herbs. The whole book is gluten-free and I was especially excited to receive it and study the thorough and detailed instructions for the Gluten-Free Sourdough Starter that is used in the Brown Rice, Millet and Chia Sourdough Bread. The recipe for the Gluten-Free Pizza Crust is also at the top of my list of things to try. My Darling Lemon Thyme is Emma’s debut cookbook, and although the U.S. edition came out a few months ago, Emma already released her second cookbook, A Year in My Whole Food Kitchen, in Australia and New Zealand. It looks nothing short of amazing and I can’t wait for it to be published in our side of the world. Below, some links for the long weekend. Michael Pollan interviewed on the Here’s the Thing Podcast Rene Redzepi is the chef/­­co owner of Noma and his Instagram is full culinary wonders – veggies preserved in beeswax for 5 months, pickling wild roses, crazy peas, or how about stale pumpkin flowers that didn’t come out tasting so good :) Nettle, Raspberry Leaf and Goji Beauty Tonic – I’ve been making this for a few months now and I swear I’ve noticed my nails get stronger in the process. Transcendental/­­Vedic Meditation has been on my mind a lot lately and I enjoyed this interview on the subject between Bob Roth and Jerry Seinfeld. Who would have ever guessed Seinfeld has been meditating since the 70s? States of Undress – a very typically Vice show about global fashion intertwined with cultural and political issues, hosted by girl crush Hailey Benton Gates. GKS Smoothies Cookbook – so excited for this! Blog Love – Shelly’s Chive Blossom Vinegar, Laura’s White Lentil Spring Onion Sauce, Sophie’s Pistachio Ice Cream, Jodi’s Rhubarb Panna Cotta, and this Mango Tahini Sauce! Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet   Print Serves: 8 Ingredients 2 lb/­­1 kg strawberries - hulled and sliced ¾ cup/­­200 g unrefined raw sugar (1 cup in original recipe) 1 cup loosely packed Thai basil leaves - roughly torn ½ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice Instructions Combine strawberries and sugar in a large bowl and set aside for 1-2 hours, stirring occasionally until syrupy. Drain syrup from the berries into a small saucepan, add basil and bring to a boil. Boil for 1 minute, remove from heat and let infuse while cooling down to a room temperature. Puree strawberries in a blender until smooth and strain through a fine sieve. Discard the seeds. Strain basil syrup over the strawberry puree, squeezing basil leaves with your hands to get the most flavor out of them. Add lemon juice, stir to combine and chill in the fridge for at least 2 hours - I prefer overnight. Churn in an ice-cream maker for 20-25 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Transfer to a container and freeze for another 2 hours. Notes If you dont have an ice cream machine, pour the mixture into a shallow, freezer-proof container, freeze for 1 hour until the edges are starting to freeze, and then beat with a whisk to break down ice crystals, until smooth. Return to the freezer and repeat this 2-3 times before leaving to freeze for 2 hours. Or make popsicles - pour the final mixture into a popsicle mold and freeze. 3.5.3208   You might also like... Spiced Apple and Blackberry Kuchen Ice Cream Valentines Day Dessert - Rose Ice Cream, Pomegranate Sorb... Homemade Yogurt and Frozen Yogurt Lemongrass Raspberry Pops Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Emma’s Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet -- Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt - Ice Cream Sunday

May 22 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt - Ice Cream Sunday I think I first got the desire to make rhubarb frozen yogurt when I saw a photo of Nigel Slater’s Rhubarb Eton Mess. Slater always does the most amazing things with rhubarb, making me dream about the days when the blushing pink bunches will appear at the market. Since those days are fully upon us, I went ahead and made this treat for the weekend, in celebration of rhubarb season and its elusiveness. I couldn’t resist appointing rose as a component of this frozen yogurt for two reasons – for one, rhubarb and rose has always sounded like the most magical combination that I’ve been thinking about for years, and secondly, I’ve had some beautiful dried roses sitting in my pantry without getting any use for too long. Yogurt is a complete weakness for me and all members of my family – we always have some in the fridge to use for breakfast and snacks. I like to make my own, whether with real milk or coconut, but I also love trying new brands. There seem to be many great yogurt companies out there today, which make it very easy to be a happy consumer – if you’re curious, I like Maple Hill, Wallaby, Seven Stars and Anita’s Coconut Yogurt is a delicious vegan variety. Frozen yogurt is one of the easiest frozen treats to make, especially if you have an ice cream maker (I’ve had an older model of this ice cream maker for years and it’s one of my favorite kitchen appliances). All it takes is some good yogurt, whatever secondary ingredients you choose for flavor, and a quick whirl in the machine. With this possibility in mind, you are always less than an hour away from a dessert that many consider to be a treat to only acquire outside of the home. This batch matched my very high expectations. The first spoonful I had made me stop in my tracks and close my eyes for a second or two. I’ve always found rose flavor to be very invigorating, and combined with the subtle tartness of the rhubarb and creamy tanginess of the yogurt, this is dessert and aromatherapy all in one bowl. Since I make so much ice cream/­­popsicles/­­frozen yogurt, we’ve decided that Sunday posts will be reserved for frozen treats of all kinds. We hope that will make you smile. Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt   Print Serves: 6-10 Ingredients 1½ lb rhubarb - sliced ½ cup dried rose petals (optional) ½ cup maple syrup - divided 32 oz Greek yogurt (I used Wallaby for this batch) 2 tablespoons rose water Instructions In a medium saucepan, combine rhubarb with rose petals, if using, and ¼ cup maple syrup. Bring to a boil over medium heat, reduce to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes, until rhubarb is soft. Let cool to room temperature and chill in the refrigerator for about an hour. Combine well-chilled yogurt with half of the rose-rhubarb mixture, remaining ¼ cup of the maple syrup and rose water. Process in an ice cream maker for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Spoon into a container, alternating between layers of frozen yogurt and the remaining rose-rhubarb mixture. Eat right away as soft serve or place in the freezer and make sure to remove from the freezer 10-15 minutes before serving. Notes If you dont have an ice cream maker, you can make popsicles. Just pour the final rhubarb-yogurt mixture into popsicle molds and freeze. Rose petals are optional, rose water gives plenty of flavor. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Lavender Ice Cream with Apricots Poached in Blueberry Sauce Homemade Yogurt and Frozen Yogurt Lemongrass Raspberry Pops Tarragon and Mint Ice Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt - Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard

April 28 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard Mung beans have been my legume of choice as of late. I love them for their versatility, good nutrition record (protein of course, manganese, potassium, magnesium, zinc, etc.), brief cooking time, and a very fair price tag. They work well for falafel, with very similar properties to chickpeas, albeit lighter in every way. Soaking the mung beans overnight and baking the falafel instead of frying makes them easy on the stomach – I say this because even though I love to get traditional fried falafel when out, it always makes me feel unwell. These mung bean falafels are made with my favorite spice mix that goes well with their bright, lemony flavor. When I go to the farmer’s market, I often have the eyes bigger than the stomach problem, especially with greens. Last week, there was lots of beautiful rainbow chard at the stand, and I carried away more bunches than we could ever eat. Pickling was the next best choice and I was pleasantly surprised by the result. The marinade I came up with is very mild and simple, and the pickling only takes a day. It seems that in our little health food community, bowl format has become the default lunch format, and we are right there with everyone, happy to enjoy a veggie loaded and colorful lunch bowl, any time of day really. As usual in spring, I can’t get enough of quickly sautéed, crispy and tender asparagus, which complements any grains or legumes. A base of quinoa, which can be substituted with any grain, tangy tahini sauce, crunchy nuts, herbs, and pickles complete this meal. All these components are, of course, suggestions, and dishes like these are highly customizable. I do very much recommend trying all the parts – the falafel, the pickles and tahini sauce – if not together, then independently, added to sandwiches, salads, and the like – you won’t regret it. Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard serves 4-6 for the mung bean falafel bowl 1 cup rainbow quinoa or other grain of choice – cooked sea salt – to taste 1/­­2 tablespoon neutral coconut oil about 20 asparagus – tough ends removed freshly ground black pepper – to taste mung bean falafel – recipe below pickled rainbow chard – recipe below large hadful baby spiach/­­other salad greens handful cilantro leaves/­­pea shoots/­­other microgreens tahini sauce – recipe below sesame seeds – for garnish (optional) chopped pistachios/­­other nuts – for garnish (optional) to assemble the falafel bowls Distribute quinoa between bowls. Warm coconut oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add asparagus to the pan, sprinkle with a pinch of salt and black pepper and cook, undisturbed, for 3 minutes. Flip and cook for another 3-4 minutes, until soft and bright green. Divide asparagus between bowls on top of quinoa. Arrange falafels on top, followed by chard pickles, if using. Add spinach or other salad greens, herbs/­­microgreens. Drizzle with tahini sauce, sprinkle with sesame seeds and nuts. Mung Bean Falafel makes about 18 falafels 1 cup mung beans – soaked overnight 1/­­2 cup pumpkin seeds juice of 1 lemon 2 tablespoons sesame tahini 2 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil or olive oil 1/­­2 tablespoon cumin seeds – freshly ground 1/­­4 teaspoon red pepper flakes sea salt – to taste freshly ground black pepper – to taste 1. Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). 2. Drain and rinse mung beans and cook them in plenty of salted water for about 7 minutes, or until soft but not mushy. Drain over a colander and set aside. 3. Coarsely grind pumpkin seeds in a food processor. Add mung beans and the rest of ingredients. Pulse to combine. 4. Shape about 18 small falafels and arrange them on a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Bake for 10 minutes on each side. Keep covered and warm, if using right away. Otherwise, keep refrigerated in an airtight container and reheat in the 350° F (180° C) oven for about 10-15 minutes. Pickled Rainbow Chard 1 large bunch rainbow chard – leaves and stems separated 4 garlic cloves – sliced pinch red pepper flakes roughly chopped dill and cilantro – to taste (optional) Thinly slice chard stems and leaves into bite sized pieces. Place into a large water-proof bowl, and pour purified water over them to just cover. Drain water, reserving it, and measure it, as you will need to prepare the marinade according to these proportions: 5 cups water 1/­­2 cup apple cider vinegar 2 1/­­2 tablespoons sea salt 1 teaspoon coconut sugar 2 bay leaves 3 whole cloves 1/­­2 teaspoon coriander seeds 1/­­4 teaspoon black peppercorns to pickle Combine measured water with other marinade ingredients in a medium saucepan. If you have more or less water than the recipe calls for, adjust the amount of vinegar, salt and spices accordingly – it doesn’t have to be exact. Bring the marinade to a boil over medium high heat, lower the heat to a simmer and simmer for 3 minutes. Meanwhile, add garlic, red pepper flakes and herbs to the chard, mixing to distribute evenly. Pour hot marinade over the chard and place a plate over it to keep all the chard emerged in the marinade. You can use a heavy object to weigh the plate down, such as a jar filled with water. Pickles will be ready the next day. Keep refrigerated. Best within 1 week. Tahini Sauce 1/­­4 cup sesame tahini 1/­­4 cup purified water juice of 1 lemon 1 garlic clove – chopped sea salt – to taste tiny pinch red pepper flakes (optional) Combine all the ingredients in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated for up to 1 week.

Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables

April 15 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables I’m a savories-for-breakfast type of person, although you wouldn’t be able to tell when looking at the breakfast section in our recipe index. I’m working on correcting that and including more non-sweets in the mix. I enjoy an occasional smoothie bowl or porridge with dried fruit, especially when making them for Paloma, but having a breakfast that’s not too sugary always sets me up for the day in the best way possible. During the Flordia growing season, when I go to the farmer’s market every weekend, I like to have a salad for breakfast. I can make it filling or light, depending on my needs that day, but I just cannot resist those super fresh greens any time of the day. When it’s a bit chillier outside, I love a savory porridge with any seasonal add ins, which is where these creamy steel cut oats come in. Steel cut oats have a longer cooking time than their rolled counterparts, but, in my opinion, their superior flavor and texture makes it all worth it. They have a potential to be very creamy, but not too mushy, and to maintain a nice bite, which I’m crazy about. Consider making this breakfast this weekend. It takes a little more time and attention than a quick weekday breakfast, and it’s loaded with all the green and crunchy things that spring provides to us this time of year – sugar snaps, snow peas, asparagus, greens and broccoli. There are mushrooms and pine nuts too, for ultimate indulgence. The great thing about this recipe is that you can customize it according to what you have, to your mood, or time of year. Add fruit instead of veggies, sprinkle with favorite crunchy toppings, include spices, and so on. Enjoy the weekend! Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables serves 4 -6 2 tablespoon neutral coconut oil or ghee – divided 1 cup steel cut oats 3 cups hot water sea salt – to taste 1 cup homemade almond milk or canned coconut milk 1/­­4 cup pine nuts 1/­­2-1 lb shiitake – stems removed, caps sliced about 1 1/­­2 cup broccoli florets large handful sugar snaps/­­snow peas – strings removed if present about 5 asparagus sprigs – tough ends removed, sliced diagonally about 1 cup green peasfresh or frozen about 2 cups baby spinach/­­arugula/­­dandelion/­­watercress 1 tablespoon tamari 1. Warm 1 tablespoon coconut oil/­­ghee in a medium saucepan over medium heat until melted. Add steel cut oats and toast until golden and fragrant. 2. Add 3 cups of hot water and salt. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a slow simmer and let cook, covered, for 25 minutes. Stir periodically to prevent oats from sticking to the bottom of the pan. Add almond/­­coconut milk and simmer, partially covered, for another 15 minutes. Keep stirring periodically to prevent any sticking. Use this time to prep vegetables. 3.When the porridge is about 10 minutes from being done, warm the remaining 1 tablespoon of oil in a medium saute pan over medium low heat. Add a pinch of salt and pine nuts and toast them for about 2 minutes, until golden. Remove with a slotted spoon and set aside. 4. Increase heat to medium. Add shiitake, broccoli, sugar snaps, asparagus and a pinch of salt and saute for about 5 minutes, until vegetables are bright green. Add peas and spinach, stir until spinach just wilted. Stir vegetables and tamari into the porridge, once its cooked. Remove from heat and let stand for a couple of minutes. 5. Distribute between bowls to serve, garnish with toasted pine nuts.

Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans

March 22 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans As though writing a cookbook and trying to stay on top of a second grader’s homework and extracurriculars is not enough, we’re planning a long overdue and major kitchen renovation this summer. When I say long overdue, I am not exaggerating one bit, as we haven’t put a hammer or paintbrush to the kitchen in the thirteen years of living in this house. Something has always topped it on the priority list, which, I know, sounds crazy considering what I do. Our kitchen is nicely sized and sunny, but has many questionable and outdated details from the 90s along with badly aging countertops, the layout needs improvement, and there is a low hanging ceiling in an otherwise high ceilinged house. There’s lots of unearthed potential, and we are finally coming around to letting it free. To me, this is extremely exciting – the kitchen is my office, the place where the family eats, and also happens to be the central hangout spot in the house. Somehow, we’ve managed to put ourselves onto a very tight schedule – the book manuscript is due June 30th, and the kitchen is being knocked down July 1st, the next day! For now, I’m planning and gathering ideas, scouting Craigslist and Pinterest, and picking up old pieces of driftwood off the beach – who knows when I’ll need them. Hot soup has always been my ultimate comfort food, and I know I will be needing lots of it in the months to come. Vietnamese pho is king when it comes to soups that warm you from the core, and I’ve been experimenting with vegetarian pho recipes during the past couple of weeks. The main component of any pho, but especially vegetarian pho, is the broth. This pho broth is first and foremost based on toasted spices – star anise, cinnamon, coriander, cardamom, peppercorn, and clove – each bringing its individual character to the flavor profile. I’m not normally the biggest fan of cinnamon in savory dishes, but in this broth it balances with tamari, brown rice vinegar and chili to create a fragrant and deeply nourishing broth.  I bought a few too many sweet potatoes from my favorite local farm and they made it into the pho in place of rice noodles, truly hitting the spot. This soup is all I want to eat right now. It’s warming, spicy and substantial, but also loaded with springy, crunchy vegetables and tons of herbs – the perfect balance, if you ask me. Ciao Italian readers! Our book The Vibrant Table is now available in Italian, and you can order it here. Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans Note: I noticed that making the broth the night before lends the best flavor, so if you have time, let the aromatics sit in the broth for a night. 2 star anise 2 cinnamon sticks 1 teaspoon whole coriander seeds 1 1/­­2 teaspoon black peppercorn 5 whole cloves 3 cardamom pods – green shells removed 1 medium onion – sliced into 8 wedges 3 garlic cloves – crushed with a knife 1-inch piece ginger, sliced and crushed with a knife 1/­­2 lb shiitake – hard stems removed, caps sliced 6 cups purified water 3 1/­­2 tablespoons tamari 1 tablespoon brown rice vinegar 1/­­4 teaspoon sriracha 1 1/­­2 cup cooked beans (I used these beautiful ones) 2 medium sweet potatoes – spiralized (I use this spiralizer) 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 small or 1/­­2 large broccoli head – cut into florets 2 baby bok choy or 1 regular bok choy – sliced handful mung bean sprouts juice of 1 lime, plus more for serving handful each cilantro, basil and mint leaves 1 tablespoon sesame seeds 1. Warm dried spices in a medium soup pot over medium heat, stir around until toasted and fragrant, for about 2-3 minutes. Add onion, garlic and ginger and toast for another couple of minutes, until fragrant and onion begins to get some colour. Carefully add water (it may splatter) and shiitake stems, followed by tamari, brown rice vinegar and sriracha. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to simmer and cook, covered, for 30 minutes. Remove from heat and let infuse further for at least 30 minutes or as long as you have time (overnight is best). Strain, discard solids. 2. Warm the coconut oil in a medium saute pan over medium heat, add broccoli and bok choy and saute for about 3-4 minutes, until they turn bright green in color. Set aside. This step can be eliminated and you can add broccoli and bok choy directly to the broth, along with the sweet potato noodles or later, together with mung bean sprouts, if you want to keep the greens extra crunchy. 3. In the meantime, bring the broth back to a boil, add cooked beans, sweet potato noodles and sliced shiitake caps. Adjust the heat to a simmer and cook for 3 to 5 minutes, depending on the type of spiralizer used. Mine makes very thin threads, so 3 minutes is enough time, while other spiralizers produce much thicker noodles, which need longer cooking time. Add sauteed broccoli and bok choy to the broth, followed by mung bean sprouts. 4. Remove pho from heat, add lime juice, herbs and sesame seeds. Serve warm with more lime juice and/­­or fresh herbs.

Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas

February 20 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas A seven year old’s palate, at least my seven-years old’s palate, is completely unpredictable. There have been many times when I’d cooked up something along the kid friendly lines of muffins, pancakes, pizza, or chocolatey anything, convinced that Paloma will eat some, only to see a frown and hear around ten melodramatic versions of ‘I don’t like it.’ Just as often, she’ll surprise me with falling for flavors that I never thought she’d like. Last summer, during our long stay in Russia, Paloma discovered parsley and became obsessed with snacking on whole parsley leaves, frankly leaving me speechless. Lately, Florida farmer’s market Romaine lettuce sprinkled with balsamic vinegar and olive oil, or pizza topped with a mound of rainbow chard have been among those unexpected favorites. I have a variation of this polenta recipe I developed for the new cookbook, with a different grain. The dish is full of amazing flavors, but ones I thought to be too sophisticated for a child’s palate. I was wrong once again, when Paloma not only ate the polenta for dinner the night I made it, but became completely fixated on eating it every day, asking for it each time she came home from school. Since then, ‘polenta’ has become quite a hot item in our house. I’ve been experimenting with different grains and toppings, and this version came out on top. Creamed, lemony millet is topped with nourishing green vegetables and beans. The vibrant colors of the dish speak for its flavor – also zingy, sunny and comforting. I use chard stems along with the leaves in this recipe, which I cannot stand to see thrown away. They just need a little extra cooking time to be delicious. Enjoy the weekend! Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas 1/­­2 cup dried chickpeas – soaked overnight 1 medium onion – halved 3-4 garlic cloves – crushed with a knife 6 cups water sea salt – to taste 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or ghee – divided 1 cup millet – soaked overnight juice of 2 lemons – divided 2 tablespoons olive oil – divided 1 tablespoon tamari 2 tablespoons sweet miso paste 1 tablespoon mustard 1 garlic clove – minced pinch of cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon cumin 1 large leek, white and pale green parts only – sliced 1 bunch rainbow chard – leaves separated from stems, stems chopped, leaves torn into bite-size pieces 1. Drain and rinse chickpeas and place them into a medium soup pot together with onion, garlic and water. Bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and let cook, partially covered, for about 30 minutes or until completely soft. Add salt at the last 10 minutes. Drain chickpeas, reserving the broth. Discard onion and set chickpeas aside. Pour the broth back into the pot and keep it hot. 2. Drain and rinse millet. Add to a food processor and grind until partially broken down, but not completely smooth. 3. Warm 1 tablespoon coconut oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat, add millet, stir to coat. Add 1/­­2 lemon juice, stir in for about 30 seconds until absorbed. Add 3 cups of hot chickpea broth and salt. Bring to a boil while stirring. Lower the heat and simmer for 20 minutes, until polenta is creamy. Stir frequently to prevent clumping. Add 1 tablespoon olive oil or ghee and tamari. Cover and keep warm. 4. Meanwhile, mix together miso paste, mustard, the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil and cayenne pepper. Set aside. 5. In a large pan, warm the remaining 1 tablespoon coconut oil. Add cumin and stir around until fragrant. Add leek, saute for 5 minutes, then add chard stems, salt and pepper and saute for another 3-4 minutes, until soft.  Add chickpeas, stir to coat and warm through. Add chard leaves, 1/­­4 cup hot chickpea broth and the miso dressing. Stir until chard leaves are wilted and everything is coated evenly. 6. Distribute the polenta between bowls, top with the chickpea-veggie mixture and serve hot.

Simmered Squash Soba Bowl

January 18 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Simmered Squash Soba Bowl Today’s soup was inspired by the Simmered Winter Squash recipe from Heidi Swanson’s beautiful new cookbook, Near and Far. I’m used to roasting or steaming squash, so Heidi’s take on the Japanese technique of simmering it in a flavorful mirin and tamari-based broth had me intrigued. Simmering turned out to be a simple and quick way of preparing very flavorful squash, so I decided to build on Heidi’s recipe, originally a side dish, and make it into a meal. I made a soup, adding more water to make the simmering liquid into a broth, with the addition of kombu and shiitake for a more pronounced broth flavor. As a side note, I’ve been adding kombu to many of my broths lately, for its amazing health benefits and subtle sea flavor. I served the squash covered with its broth, alongside soba noodles, tofu, toasted black sesame seed paste and herbs, making for a nourishing winter bowl. Whether you are getting home from the cold in need of a hot meal, or feeling under the weather, this soup will be your friend this winter. And if you haven’t gotten a chance to take a look at the Near and Far cookbook, do not wait much longer. It’s a thoughtful piece of work, full of recipes that will inspire you to get up and cook, explore new ways of seeing familiar ingredients, and feel as if you are a world traveler with every flip of the page. Simmered Squash Soba Bowl (adapted from Near and Far) serves 4 -6 1 package firm non-GMO tofu 5 cups water 3 1/­­2 tablespoons tamari 4 1/­­2 tablespoons mirin 1 tablespoon coconut sugar 4-inch piece kombu 1 small winter squash – kabocha, kuri or butternut, seeded, sliced into wedges or chunks, peeled for butternut about 1/­­2 lb fresh shiitake – stems removed, sliced 12 oz soba noodles 2 tablespoons black sesame seeds, toasted and crushed with mortar and pestle few drops of toasted sesame oil, optional handful wakame seaweed, optional 1 watermelon radish – thinly sliced, optional for garnish handful fresh basil leaves or finely chopped green onions for garnish 1. Drain tofu and place it on a plate. Cover with another plate and place a weight on top, like jar filled with water. Let drain while you’re working on the rest. 2. Combine water, tamari, mirin and sugar in a medium soup pot, stir to combine. Add kombu and squash and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook for about 15 minutes, partially covered, until the squash is tender. Add shiitake at the last 5 minutes. 3. Add a few drops of sesame oil to the crushed black sesame seeds, if using, set aside. Prepare a separate pot of water for cooking soba noodles 4. When squash is almost done, cook soba noodles according to the packaging instruction. 5. Taste the broth, add more tamari if more salt is needed and remove from heat. Remove and discard kombu, add wakame if using, stir it in and let sit for a couple of minutes. 6. Drain and slice tofu into large chunks. Distribute tofu between bowls, followed by soba noodles and squash. Pour the broth with shiitake and wakame into the bowls. Garnish with slices of radish, black sesame paste and fresh basil. Enjoy right away.

Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi

November 23 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi These gnocchi are one of my favorite fall dishes to make for company. The process of gnocchi-making is fun and gratifying, and the result is always a tasty, light and unmistakably autumnal crowd pleaser. These gnocchi are gluten-free (and can be vegan if ghee is substituted with coconut oil), with nutritious buckwheat flour and sweet winter squash acting as main ingredients. Even without eggs, these have a nice pillowy texture, thanks to the softness of pureed squash. The great thing about this recipe is that it can be interpreted and adapted based on the produce you have on hand. There is  a variation on these gnocchi in The Vibrant Table, where I use beets and sweet potato in place of squash. I went for the classic earthy combination of sage and squash for the herbal pairing here, which is hard to beat. I also like to serve these gnocchi alongside chimichurri, one of my favorite simple herb sauces. I like to make homemade sprouted buckwheat flour for this recipe, but you can also use store-bought flour, which is darker in color and has a slightly denser texture, but also a more distinct nutty flavor. I created this recipe as part of a healthy recipe package for Food & Wine online, see the detailed recipe here. I want to take this opportunity to wish all U.S. readers a very Happy Thanksgiving and express my immense gratitude for your readership and support! Here are a few Thanksgiving table ideas: Sorghum Pilaf with Roasted Brussels Sprouts, Cranberries and Grapes Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice Shaved Brussels Sprout, Pomegranate and Lentil Salad Roasted Parsnip and Apple Soup with Radish Greens Gingery Pear Rutabaga Handpies Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats Butternut Squash and Cranberry Cookies

Summer Vegetable Saute

September 10 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Summer Vegetable Saute It’s been a month since we came home from our stay in Russia. School is back in session (second grade for Paloma), and the vacation seems like a long gone dream. Now that we are all situated, I’m finally finding the time to talk about Sochi – the last stop of our trip, where we had a chance to fully relax. I’ve been visiting Sochi every summer, with small breaks here and there, ever since I can first remember myself. My aunt and cousins have an old, wooden house there, built on the slope of a hill, dating all the way back to the 1940s. The narrow street, on which it stands, is shaded by dense growths of cypresses, palm and fruit trees, which are abundant all over the city. To me, Sochi is a magical place. There is something special about the mix of sweet mountain air and salty Black Sea breeze, tropical vegetation, clear and refreshing seawater, pebbled beaches and busy ethnic markets that surround one at all times. I can never can get enough. Last year’s winter Olympics brought about major updates to Sochi. The old house on the hill, however, remains the same. The city has been threatening to demolish that whole street for decades, as the houses there have seen their better days, but to our delight, the family house is still there, as welcoming as ever. Traditionally, generations of cats guard the house. They are tough and self-sufficient like street cats, but also social and friendly like house pets. Each one has a big personality, and all are treated with much respect. Paloma was in heaven, playing in the charming courtyard at the footsteps of the old garden surrounded by cats of all sizes, just like I had done as a kid. And although we live on the beach in Florida, Paloma can’t stop talking about Black Sea beaches, where she would not leave the water for longer than two minutes at a time, turning into quite the little mermaid. I’ve talked about food from the Caucasus region last year here and here. The markets there supply a wealth of colorful pickles (pictured above on the yellow table), endless fermented dairy and pretty treats like churchkhela. Local cuisine is rich in herbs and spices, and the vegetables are commonly cooked and served whole, or in large chunks, as opposed to Russian cooking, which favors mincing and shredding everything very finely. In the summer, eggplant is present at any table, and there are hundreds of ways to prepare it. The most common and simple eggplant dish is a mixture of vegetables charred over open fire or hot coals, dressed with tons of fresh herbs and garlic. The dish is smoky and fresh at the same time. In the absence of open fire, the recipe below is an alternative way of showcasing eggplant and other summer vegetables in a vegetable dish to complete any table. Summer Vegetable Saute 3-4 small eggplants – sliced lengthwise, 1/­­4-inch thickness 2-3 bell peppers – seeded and sliced lengthwise 1-2 onions – sliced lengthwise about 7 small tomatoes or 2 cups cherry tomatoes coconut oil or other vegetable oil sea salt and freshly ground pepper – to taste 3-4 cloves garlic – minced good amount of fresh herbs – parsley, dill, basil, mint 1. Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium high heat and fry eggplant slices in batches, on both sides, until golden brown. Add oil as needed and sprinkle with salt and pepper as you go. Remove eggplant slices from the pan onto paper towels to absorb excess oil, set aside. 2. Saute peppers until soft, add salt to taste, set aside. 3. Saute onions until golden, add salt to taste, set aside. 4. Increase the heat to high. Add whole tomatoes to the pan. Let them sit for about 2 minutes, until they begin to  blister, stir and leave to sit for another 2 minutes or longer, until cooked through, but with a bite remaining. Add salt and pepper. 5. Arrange vegetables on a large platter. Top eggplant slices with onion and pepper, finish with tomatoes. Sprinkle with garlic and herbs, more salt and pepper, if desired. Alternatively, you can mix them in a bowl.

Lavender Milkshake and Chamomile Latte

July 20 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Lavender Milkshake and Chamomile Latte Cooking with edible flowers has been one of my greatest pleasures in the kitchen. Floral infusions provide amazing flavor and can add beneficial, healing properties to any dish or drink. My favorite was the Rose Ice Cream and Rose Petal Mille Feuille I made a few years ago with organic rose petals and the purest essential rose oil from my perfume maker friend. The oil was so concentrated that a tiny drop turned a portion of ice cream into a magical bowl of aromatherapy. Here are two refreshing drinks we’ve been enjoying this summer, featuring some of the most loved, calming culinary flowers – lavender and chamomile. Chamomile is an amazing little flower, and its oils are anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal and antiallergenic. It has long been used as a sleep aid all over the world. Having a cup of chamomile tea before bed has become one of my daily rituals – it really does the job of getting me ready for some wholesome rest. Lately, I’ve been loving this creamy chamomile latte. My favorite way to enjoy it this summer is cold, but it also makes for a comforting warm drink for the cooler parts of the year. Lavender, with its own share of antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties, is king of the aromatherapy world – even the smallest whiff sends a relaxation signal to the mind. This milkshake combines lavender and blueberries, as the two are a match made in heaven. Drink it as a refreshing mid-afternoon snack after some time in the sun or even as dessert after dinner. The most important variable when cooking with dried edible flowers is their freshness. If a flower is freshly dried, a little of it will go a long way, while older dried flowers have likely lost their potency. It’s also important to remember that the best way to extract the beneficial oils from herbs such as chamomile and lavender is gently heating them in a double boiler for longer periods of time. Directly pouring boiling water over the herbs is a harsher method, which kills off many of their benefits. We are off to Sochi for the last stretch of our Russian vacation. Black Sea, here we come. Chamomile Latte serves 2 1 1/­2 cups water 4 tablespoons dried German chamomile flowers – make sure to get them from a store with a good rotation 1/­2 cup almond milk (I like homemade unsweetened) honey to taste – optional Combine water with chamomile in a small, heatproof bowl. Place the bowl into a heavy bottomed pot or pan. Add water to the pan, making sure that water level in the pan is lower than the bowl. Bring water in the pan to a simmer and simmer for 15 minutes. Let cool enough for safe handling. Strain chamomile tea, mix with almond milk and honey, if using. For an extra creamy and foamy consistency, blend the tea and almond milk in a blender. Drink warm or chilled in the fridge. I like it best cold and unsweetened. Lavender Milkshake serves 2 1 1/­2 cups almond milk or other plant milk (I like homemade unsweetened almond milk) 1 tablespoon edible dried lavender flowers (make sure to get them from a store with a good rotation – flowers should be lavender, rather then grey in color, with a fresh, strong aroma) 6-8 scoops of your favorite vanilla, blueberry or lavender ice-cream handful of fresh or frozen blueberries – optional, for color handful of ice cubes – optional, for smoother texture splash of maple syrup – optional, to taste seeds of 1 vanilla bean or splash of vanilla extract – optional Combine almond milk and lavender flowers in a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, cover and let cool. Strain and chill in the refrigerator. Combine lavender milk and the rest of ingredients in a blender and blend to a smooth and thick milkshake consistency. If your lavender flowers are very fresh and aromatic, you can skip the infusion step and simply blend almond milk, 1/­2 tablespoon (or to taste) lavender and blueberries, in a high speed blender until completely smooth. Then add the rest of ingredients and blend to a smooth and thick milkshake consistency.  

Welcome Summer Multigrain Salad with Strawberries and Asparagus

June 15 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Welcome Summer Multigrain Salad with Strawberries and Asparagus By the time this post goes up, Paloma and I will be in Russia spending some much anticipated time with grandma. I will try to keep Instagram updated with some snaps from our travels. I leave you with this salad, made with plenty of nutritious grains, herbs, and two stars of the spring/­­summer farmer’s marketasparagus and strawberries. It’s a variation on one my all time favorite salads, from our book (Fava Bean, Quinoa, and Mint Salad on pg. 89) – simple, rich in textures, filling and very fresh. Mint is essential to the flavor here, so try not to skip it. Enjoy the beginning of summer! Multigrain Summer Salad with Strawberries and Asparagus for the salad 1 bunch asparagus 2 cups strawberries – sliced handful fresh mint leaves – chopped handful basil leaves – chopped (optional) 2 cups cooked grains (I used a combination of sorghum, red rice and spelt, but any grains like quinoa, faro, frekkeh, any type of rice, or even buckwheat would work fine here) sea salt and freshly ground black pepper (optional) for the dressing 1 1/­­2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon maple syrup 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 2 tablespoons olive oil pinch of sea salt 1. Cut tough ends off the asparagus. Cook it your preferred way – blanch, steam or grill. I like to blanch asparagus in salted water for 3 minutes, then shock it in an ice bath, so it stays bright green and crispy. Slice into bite sized pieces. 2. Whisk together all the dressing ingredients in a small bowl until well combined and set aside. 2. Place cooked grains into a large mixing bowl. Add asparagus, strawberries and herbs. Pour the dressing over the salad and toss gently. Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper if desired. This salad tastes best when eaten within a day.

Salad with Ghee Poached Radishes and Smoked Salt

May 12 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Salad with Ghee Poached Radishes and Smoked Salt Sarah B. of My New Roots hardly needs an introduction. Her blog has been a major source of inspiration for a long time now, and I look forward to her new posts, which are always full of interesting culinary ideas and encouraging nutritional facts. Sarah has a talent for explaining the benefits of whole foods in a friendly, approachable, yet very knowledgeable way, which without fail leaves me hungry after reading her posts. Sarah was one of the few people to see an early copy of our cookbook and wrote a very kind review, for which we are thankful. Sarah’s new, much anticipated cookbook is a beauty, full of inspiring photographs, engaging writing and appetizing recipes. She covers the basics – sprouting, nut milks, ghee and the like – and then goes on to presenting delicious, healthy recipes for all five seasons, dividing Summer into Early and Late Summer (with which I agree with much enthusiasm – those two are quite different in terms of produce). I chose to make this spring salad with Ghee Poached Radishes, having never tried cooked radishes before. I immediately regretted waiting to try it as long as I did. Sautéing radishes rids them of any bitterness, transforming them into mildly sweet, silky spheres. I even threw them on pizza, which turned out delicious. Smoked sea salt is another interesting ingredient that this recipe calls for. I bought a bottle of it months ago but could never find a dish to incorporate it into. I was happy to finally utilize the beautiful, grey colored salt in this recipe, and it worked perfectly with the buttery radishes. Among the recipes I plan on trying from the My New Roots cookbook are Caramelized Fennel on Herbed Polenta, Roasted Cauliflower with Lebanese Lentils and Kaniwa, Ginger-Rosemary Roasted Grapefruit, Salt ‘n’ Pepper Chocolate Chip Cookies, and I’m confident that any reader of this blog will benefit from having Sarah’s book on their kitchen bookshelf. Salad with Ghee Poached Radishes and Smoked Sea Salt 1 bunch radishes – tops removed 2 tablespoons ghee (I’ve also tried unrefined neutral coconut oil here, it works well) 2 garlic cloves – minced pinch of sea salt 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar 2 teaspoons raw honey or pure maple syrup about 3 cups arugula or other salad greens (the original recipe calls for dandelion) smoked sea salt – for sprinkling over the salad sunflower sprouts or other microgreens for garnish – optional 1. Slice radishes in half lengthwise or quarters for bigger sized ones. 2. Melt the ghee (or coconut oil) in a large pan over medium low heat. Add garlic and saute for about one minute. Increase the heat to medium and add radishes, cut side down, together with a pinch of salt. Saute for about 10 minutes until they become translucent and tender, but not mushy. 3. Drizzle the vinegar over the radishes and toss to coat. Remove the pan from heat and drizzle honey over, tossing to incorporate. 4.  Arrange arugula or your greens of choice on plates, top with radishes and drizzle the juice from the pan over the salad. Garnish with microgreens, if using, and season with smoked sea salt.

Black Sesame Cappuccino

April 1 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Black Sesame Cappuccino I don’t mean to offend those who are passionate about their coffee by naming this drink cappuccino, but I can justify. The rich, foamy texture and deep flavor of this black sesame tea reminded me so much of all of cappuccino’s finest qualities, that I couldn’t resist giving it this name. I generally don’t drink coffee, but that changes as soon as I find myself on the other side of the Atlantic, where vacation mode and the magic of the European lifestyle make coffee into a very pleasant necessity for me. Otherwise, it’s always tea. Out of the caffeinated teas, good quality black, loose leaf tea is my drink of choice. In my latest attempt to take a break from caffeine, I came across the possibility of using black sesame seeds and dates in a hot, tea-like drink. Chinese black sesame tea has long been known for its therapeutic properties. It is especially believed to nurture and restore hair strength, and is generally a great, calming whole body tonic, thanks to the overwhelming amount of nutrients in black sesame seeds. When I made my version of black sesame seed tea for the first time, I couldn’t believe its rich taste and velvety texture. It really hit the spot and I’ve been drinking it in the morning for the past couple of weeks, not missing caffeine very much. Sesame seeds contain lots of lecithin, which, aside from helping keep your arteries flexible, accounts for the silky, creamy texture of this tea. In the absence of black sesame seeds, I’ve substituted with unhulled tan sesame seeds, which worked great as well. I’ve included a recipe for another sesame drink I discovered while making my cappuccino. The taste of this milk reminds me of halva, one of my favorite childhood treats. This one is quick to prepare and quite satisfying in its own way. Black Sesame Cappuccino 1 cup black sesame seeds 2 soft dates – pitted 3 cups water 1 cup homemade almond milk or almond-sesame milk (see recipe below) 1. Combine sesame seeds, dates and water in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil, adjust heat to a strong simmer and cook for 30 minutes, partially covered. The water volume should reduce by about 1/­­3. Towards the end, mash dates against the sides of the pan with a spoon, letting them further release their sweetness. Strain the liquid and collect black sesame seeds in a large strainer. 2. Pour the strained liquid back into the saucepan, add one cup of almond or almond-sesame milk and reheat gently. Add sweetener of choice, if needed (I find the subtle sweetness from dates to be enough). Optionally blend at high speed to make it foamy. Enjoy hot. Note: Optionally, you can dry the leftover black sesame seeds for future use. To do that, spread them on a baking sheet and keep them in the oven at the lowest temperature for a couple of hours. When almost completely dried, turn off the oven and leave the seeds in until the oven is cold. Halva Milk 2 cups homemade almond-sesame milk (see recipe below) – warmed if desired 2 tablespoons toasted black sesame seeds – ground in a coffee grinder any preferred sweetener – to taste. Combine all the ingredients in a blender until well combined and frothy. Enjoy hot or cold. Almond Sesame Milk 1 cup almonds 1/­­4 cup unhulled sesame seeds Soak almonds and sesame seeds in purified water overnight. Drain by catching the seeds in a fine-mesh strainer, rinse under cold water. Combine nuts and seeds in a strong blender with 4 cups of purified water. Blend until smooth. Strain through a nut bag or cheese cloth. Keep refrigerated for up to 3 days.

Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies

March 7 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies I’ve grown very used to making my own nut butters, it’s complete second nature by now. I buy nuts and seeds in bulk, which is cheaper, and blending them up to a buttery stage in my food processor is quick, easy and produces delicious results.  The other day I ran out of my homemade tahini and needed it as an emergency for a recipe, deciding to grab a jar at the store. I got a look at my local health food market nut butter shelf for the first time in a long time and was amazed at the variety of different nut and seed butters on display. A beautiful bright green butter caught my eye – it turned out to be sprouted pumpkinseed butter. I didn’t buy it that day, but the idea haunted me for a few weeks before I finally gave in and made my own pumpkinseed butter. Mine is not sprouted but toasted, and the color is not as brilliant but still very beautiful. After having it on toast and loving it, I imagined that the butter would be a nice base for baked goods. That’s when these cookies were born. They are crunchy on the outside and chewy on the inside, with the pleasant addition of goji berries. If you don’t have goji, replace them with other dried fruit, chocolate pieces or nut of choice. Enjoy! Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies (loosely adapted from here) makes 16 cookies for pumpkinseed butter 2 cups raw pumpkin seeds 2 tablespoons olive oil plus more as needed 1/­­2 teaspoon sea salt for cookies 1/­­4 cup oat flour, plus more if needed 1/­­4 cup brown rice flour 1/­­2 cup quick oats 1/­­2 teaspoon baking soda 1/­­2 cup pumpkinseed butter (see below) 3 tablespoons coconut oil – soft, at room temperature 1/­­3 cup plus 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/­­4 cup goji berries to make pumpkinseed butter 1. Preheat oven to 375 F. Combine pumpkin seeds with 2 tablespoons olive oil and salt in a medium bowl, mix to coat. Spread on a parchment paper covered baking sheet and toast for 10 minutes. Let cool. 2. Place pumpkinseeds in a food processor and grind finely. Add 1 tablespoon of olive oil through the funnel with machine still running. Continue to process until a ball of pumpkinseed butter forms. Scrape the walls of the food processor if necessary. Add more oil, 1 tablespoon at a time and continue processing until seeds turn into creamy, runny butter. You’ll need 1/­­2 cup of it for the recipe, keep the rest refrigerated in an air tight container and spread on toast or use in more baking. to make cookies 1. Keep oven at 375 F. Combine 1/­­4 cup of oat flour, brown rice flour, oats and soda in a medium bowl. 2. Combine pumpkin butter, coconut oil, maple syrup and vanilla extract in a separate medium bowl and mix to combine. 3. Add flour mixture to butter mixture and stir to combine. If the batter appears too runny, add more oat flour, about 2 tablespoons should be enough. Add goji berries. 4. Prepare a baking sheet covered with parchment paper. Using a small (1 1/­­2″) ice-cream scooper or 2 teaspoons, scoop a cookie at a time and arrange on the sheet 2″ apart. Bake for 8-10 minutes, until the edges are slightly golden brown. Let cool completely to firm up.

Black Sesame Matcha Rolls with Miso Lemon Glaze

February 10 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Black Sesame Matcha Rolls with Miso Lemon Glaze Call me crazy, but I’ve never been attracted to sticky cinnamon buns. I blame the fact that I didn’t grow up eating them, and that I enjoy cinnamon only in moderation. The dreamy combination of matcha and black sesame has long been haunting me, and I’ve been searching for the right shape in which to marry them. After seeing yet another beautiful photo of glazed cinnamon rolls somewhere in the social media sea, I was inspired to join my two key ingredients in this green and black treat. I went with a spelt dough and a very simple toasted black sesame filling. For the glaze, I utilized miso, following the logic that ingredients from the same part of the world go well together. Turns out that matcha, sesame and miso are the perfect trio from the East. The buns came out to be satisfying on so many levels – soft, moist dough with the subtle notes of matcha, followed by a chewy, fragrant filling, and complete with the sweet and sour, slightly salty glaze – it’s a heavenly combination. And just for fun, I’ve included a timelapse iPhone video of the whole process, I think that somehow these rolls seem less daunting after you see how they are made. P.S. I finally made a Pinterest account (late bloomer, I know) – see it here. Click here to view the embedded video. Black Sesame Matcha Rolls with Miso-Lemon Glaze Note: It’s important to refrigerate full-fat coconut milk the night before for the miso glaze. I found that organic Thai coconut milk is the most reliable type for separating fat from water after overnight refrigeration. for the matcha dough (adapted from Laura and here) 1 1/­­2 teaspoon active dry yeast 3/­­4 cup unsweetened plant based milkalmond, hemp, coconut, etc. 4 tablespoons coconut oil – divided, plus more for oiling the bowl 2 tablespoons cane sugar 2 cups light spelt flour 1/­­2 teaspoon sea salt 2-3 tablespoons matcha powder to make the dough 1. Line 8-10 inch baking dish with parchment paper, extending it to the sides (a cast iron pan would work well here). 2. Warm up milk with coconut oil and sugar in a small saucepan over medium heat. Stir until coconut oil is melted and incorporated into the milk and sugar is dissolved. The mixture should be warm to the touch, about 105F. Let it cool if it feels hot. Add yeast and leave it to foam for about 5 minutes. 3. Meanwhile, mix flour, salt and matcha in a medium mixing bowl. Add foamy milk to the flour and stir to incorporate. Knead on a floured surface for about 5 minutes. Leave to rise in warm place in an oiled bowl covered with plastic wrap. The dough should double in size in a about 40 minutes. for the sesame filling (adapted from Cynthia) 1 1/­­2 cup black sesame seeds 1/­­3 cup honey Preheat oven to 350 F. Spread sesame seeds on a baking sheet and toast for 7 minutes. Place them in a food processor and grind into a paste. Add honey and continue to mix until smooth. to assemble and bake the rolls 1. Roll the dough on a floured surface into a rectangle roughly 11 by 14 inches in size. Brush the entire surface with remaining 2 tablespoons melted coconut oil. Evenly spread sesame filling over the dough. 2. Roll up the dough from the longer side of the rectangle. Seal the sides. Cut into 8-10 even pieces. Arrange them in the prepared parchment covered baking dish/­­pan. Cover with plastic wrap, let rise for 1 hour. 3. Preheat oven to 375F. Bake for 20 minutes or until slightly golden. Let cool before glazing. for the miso-lemon glaze 4 tablespoons coconut fat (see below) 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon sweet or light miso paste 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon honey zest of 1 lemon 2 teaspoons lemon juice 2 teaspoons coconut water from the can – plus or minus (see below) 1. Place a can of full fat Thai coconut milk into the refrigerator the night before. The coconut fat should separate from the water and accumulate on top. 2. Make the glaze right before you’re ready to glaze the rolls, which should be at room temperature. Scoop 4 tablespoons of fat into a small mixing bowl, add miso paste and honey and mix until smooth. 3. Add lemon zest and juice, mix and add coconut water from the same can of coconut milk. The amount of coconut water will differ depending on the types of milk, honey and miso paste, so add 1/­­2 to 1 teaspoon at a time and watch for consistency. The glaze should be thick but pourable. 4. Pour the glaze over the rolls and enjoy!

Sweet Dukkah Cigars

January 20 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Dukkah Cigars Dukkah is an Egyptian spice mix traditionally made of various nuts, sesame seeds, herbs and spices like coriander and cumin. It is typically served alongside bread as a savory dip, but can also be sprinkled on many dishes to add texture and spice – think salads, roasted vegetables and pasta. Having tried and completely fallen in love with traditional, savory dukkah, I had an idea to make a sweet dukkah mix. Mine consisted of pistachios, hazelnuts, black sesame and poppy seeds, with plenty of bright spices like cardamom, coriander, cinnamon and nutmeg. To stick with a Middle Eastern theme, I rolled up the dukkah into spelt dough cigars. The ‘cigar’ or ‘sigara’ is a traditional Turkish pastry shape, usually made with filo dough, cheese and herbs. The great thing about dukkah is that you can add or substitute nuts, seeds and spices based on your preference and what’s on hand. For this particular mix, I suggest to keep sesame seeds and cardamom as a constant, building around them. The result will be a fragrant, chewy, slightly crunchy, and subtly sweet pastry. A topping of chocolate is optional, but adds that perfect touch for all the chocoholics out there. Sweet Dukkah Cigars makes 20 cigars for sweet dukkah 1/­­2 cup raw hazelnuts or walnuts 1/­­3 cup sesame seeds 2 tablespoons poppy seeds – optional 4 green cardamom pods – crushed in mortar and pestle, green shells removed 1/­­2 teaspoon coriander seeds – ground in mortar and pestle 2/­­3 cup raw, unsalted pistachio nuts 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1/­­2 teaspoon nutmeg 3 soft dates – pitted and chopped pinch of sea salt to make dukkah 1. Preheat oven to 350 F (180 C). Spread hazelnuts or walnuts onto a baking sheet and toast for 5 minutes. Add sesame and poppy seeds, if using, and continue to toast for another 5 minutes. Remove from the oven. 2. Toast cardamom and coriander seeds in a pan over medium heat until fragrant, for about a minute or so. Grind them in a mortar and pestle. 3. Add hazelnuts/­­walnuts and pistachios to a bowl of a food processor, pulse a few times. Add sesame and poppy seeds, cardamom, coriander, cinnamon, nutmeg, dates and salt to the food processor. Pulse to combine to the consistency of coarse bread crumbs. for dough 1 1/­­2 cups sprouted or whole spelt flour 1 1/­­2 tablespoons melted coconut oil 2 tablespoons miso paste 2 tablespoons plus 1/­­2 cup very warm water to make dough 1. Put the flour into a medium mixing bowl, add oil and work it in. Make a well in the center. 2. Combine miso paste and 2 tablespoons water in a separate bowl and mix until smooth. Add the mixture into the flour well, followed by the rest of the water. 3. Start mixing with a fork, slowly incorporating flour into the liquid. Continue by kneading the dough with your hands until smooth. Cover with plastic wrap and let rest for 30 minutes. for cigars 4 tablespoons ghee or coconut oil plus more for brushing finished cigars 4 tablespoon honey about 1/­­4 cup chopped dark chocolate to assemble and bake cigars 1. Melt 4 tablespoons ghee or coconut oil with 4 tablespoons of honey on a double boiler, combine well and keep warm. 2. Divide the dough into 2 even parts, keep one of them wrapped in plasticFlour your working surface. Form a rope from the first part and cut it into 10 equal pieces. Roll each piece into a very thin wrapper, keeping the surface floured. 3. Preheat oven to 375 F (190 C). Brush each wrapper with coconut