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Self-Care Interview Series: Beth Kirby

January 7 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Beth Kirby Beth Kirby is a photographer, cookbook writer, entrepreneur, and the creator of Local Milk, her food, travel, and lifestyle blog. We are endlessly amazed by Beth’s ability to present her work with both authenticity and style, and we were completely blown away by each one of her thoughtful and inspiring answers in this interview. It’s a true gem. In this dialogue, Beth tells us about self-care as the foundation for happiness, having a schedule as a way to avoid stress, why she doesn’t believe in the idea of work-life balance, and how her routine has changed since becoming a mother, as well as her newfound love for weight training, the adaptogens and herbs she incorporates into her everyday potions, beauty, motivation, sustenance, and much more. There’s some amazing business advice here, too! Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Routine is so very important to me. Routines ensure that time is carved out for the important things in my days & life. Im super flexible with my routines so theres no such thing as failing, but the closer I adhere to the routine, the more impact I tend to make in my day. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I actually just wrote a little guide to a slow morning routine that details mine! I usually wake up when my baby wakes up, between 6:30-7:30 AM. The first thing I do every morning is make the bed because I feel this sets the tone for the rest of my day. My husband takes the baby to give me 10 minutes to meditate (I love the Headspace app) and do a few sun salutations to wake my body + mind connection up. After that I brew my morning elixir, a simple lemon, ginger, and turmeric tea, and then I do some journaling while I drink it. After that comes breakfast & a matcha potion, a shower & getting dressed for the day, a quick tidy of my space if I need it, and then Im down to work! I dont always do every single thing, but the more of them I hit, the better my morning! -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Im so exhausted at the end of the day, I dont usually need much help sleeping! I love making moon mylks with sleep promoting herbs as a little night time luxury. We keep the bedroom a sleep only zone with no television or computers, so its quite easy to pass out once Im in my own bed (or whatever bed I happen to be in!) -- How has your routine changed since you had your daughter? Its gotten a lot more flexible! If shes having a bad morning, things like preparing breakfast can take a lot longer or maybe I skip the shower (truth time!), but in a lot of ways, its made me more routine because if I dont have a plan and stick to it, the day can slip away a lot more easily when you have kids. I kinda floated through my days doing whatever I wanted whenever I wanted before she was born because I had all the time in the world. Now its make hay while the sun shines or forget having any hay! Haha. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast –  Miso Soup, 7 minute veggie & egg steam, and rice. After spending a fair amount of time in Japan, this has become my breakfast of choice. I keep dashi in the fridge for a quick miso soup so it takes literally minutes, and I steam a few veggies, whatever is on hand, in my steamer with an egg in its shell for 7 minutes. It all, including the egg, comes out perfectly! We cook rice in a rice cooker or donabe depending on where we are. I usually have a little miso dressing in the fridge to dip my veggies and eggs in and enjoy them alongside the rice & soup. Its so comforting and healthy, but its also really quick and easy as long as you throw the rice in a rice cooker and have dashi on hand. Lunch –  Smoothie! I usually hit my work stride during midday, and I dont like to take a massive amount of time (or make a big mess!) for lunch, so my favorite thing to do is whip up a super food adaptogen rich smoothie. I love pineapple and avocado as a base, and if its after a workout I make sure to throw some hemp & moringa in there for a plant based protein punch. Snack –  Ume plum onigiri. I almost always have leftover rice on hand, so I make rice balls with pickled plums in the center and wrap them with toasted nori for a quick snack. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Coffee makes me crazy, so I only have it on special occasions (like if Im near a really, really amazing café I might have a cappuccino), but when Im at home Ive started making a morning matcha potion.   -- Do you have a sweet tooth? I used to! But its lessened over the past couple of years as I cut back on candy & sweets. I love sugar, but I like to save it for feast days like holidays and celebrations instead of consume it as part of everyday life. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I incorporate adaptogens & tonic herbs--particularly rhodiola, ashwaghanda, he shou wu, astragalus, maca, and reishi--into a lot of my food like smoothies, mylks, and matchas. I also love Wooden Spoon Herbs tinctures, especially Anxiety Ally (anxious lady over here!) as well as her Green Protein Powder after workouts. Ive also recently discovered tocos and MCT oil, which I work into either my smoothie or matcha each day. -- Youve spent significant amounts of time in both Japan and France. How have those cultures influenced your cooking? For sundry reasons, Japan has definitely had a bigger impact on my cooking than France even though we live in Paris about half the year. I love to eat French food, but I find a lot of it is richer than I care to eat on a daily basis, and because I cook vegetarian at home 99.9% of the time, Japanese cuisine is, in my experience, much easier to adapt to that. And I just love Japanese flavors. I would say I cook Japanese inspired meals more than anything else (even when in Paris!) -- What is your approach to feeding your daughter? Weve done baby led weaning which simply means offering solids around 6 months and letting her decide what and how much shed like to eat of what we offer. We try to make sure shes offered a wide variety of whole food options, and dont worry about it after that. She eats what we eat, and at 16 months shes still breastfed, and thats fine by me. We are super, super laid back about it. She eats what and when we eat, and she can still have mom milk whenever she wants. That said, those organic baby food pouches are a lifesaver on the go because she can hold them! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I see a personal trainer for an hour a day, five days a week. On my days off I do one day of cardio and one day of rest. I do mainly resistance training with weights and bodyweight and a little cardio. I think a lot of women do a toooonnn of cardio and are afraid of weights because they think theyll bulk up when in reality getting big is incredibly difficult. Instead weights make you stronger, toned, healthy, and able to eat more…which I love! Before Eula I ate very few calories and did lots of cardio, and while I was thin, I never felt healthy. Now I eat as much healthy food as I want when Im hungry and lift weights. While Im not where I want to be post-baby yet, Im on the road! -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I freaking hate cardio. Especially running. I dont run. Unless something is on fire. I actually like weight lifting and resistance training. Its hard, but the time flies, and I can feel my body getting stronger. Having a trainer, while an investment, has been the trick for me. I need that accountability, and I needed to feel like someone who knew my goals for my body was guiding me towards them as opposed to me just randomly doing things. What motivates me is freedom from issues around food, being fit for the first time in my life, being a good example to my daughter, keeping up with my fit husband, and getting a toned butt! Haha! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? This is probably cliché but confidence. When someone is confident in their own skin and in who they are as a person, confident about where they are in the journey whether theyre only beginning or years down the road, that is beautiful. When you love yourself inside and out, you glow. Easier said than done, I know, but when we work towards banishing self loathing we arent only more beautiful to ourselves, we are more beautiful to others as well.   -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? As for my face, I keep it super simple: I wash and exfoliate with Aesop, and then I tone with Thayers Rose Tonic and hydrate with Evan Healy moisturizer. I love her formula because its natural and it isnt greasy like so many. It goes on so light. I also get a HydraFacial every couple of months. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I drink tocos daily in my smoothie or matcha, as its amazing for skin. He Shou Wu is another herb I take for beauty, again usually stirred into tea or a smoothie since I have one of those two things almost every day. I also take an ultra collagen supplement by Reserveage.   -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Dont wash your hair everyday! This strips hair of its oils and can dry it out and make it brittle. I wash mine once every 3-4 days, and I use a dry shampoo by Oribe on the days in between as needed. And if nothing else, if I can throw on a bit of Benefit Porefessional, mascara, and do my brows, I feel done. But the truth is, I hardly ever do my make up unless I have an event or am going to be on camera. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Not taking on more than I can handle, delegating, saying no as often as needed, having a schedule, and planning help me avoid stress. As a very DIY spirited entrepreneur, I constantly have to fight the temptation to just do it myself, and as a person who really likes to do what I feel like doing when I feel like doing it, I have to fight the urge to float through my days working on whatever catches my eye. Instead, batching days and time blocking (i.e. Mondays are for marketing & meetings, Tuesdays are for client work, Wednesdays are for editing & writing, Thursdays for content creation, Fridays are for finance, Saturday is for family, and Sunday is for weekly food prep, etc...) helps keep me on track. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Meditation is my not-so-secret weapon. And exercise. And sleep. If Im meditating, sleeping at least 7 hours a night, and getting my work-outs in, I can field whatever stress comes my way with reasonable grace. And it does come. I also find the simple belief that everything happens for a good reason calms down the stresses of life, big and small. Whether Im stuck at a red light when Im running late, or I didnt get something I thought I wanted, this belief frames it as a blessing. I choose to believe the universe knows better than I do what should happen and when. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Garlic! I immediately start sucking on cloves of garlic. More than 50% of the time this knocks it out. It smells strong, but hey, it works! It has antibiotic properties (they called it Russian Penicillin during the war!), and it can kill bugs. I also start drinking a lot of herbal tea. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? This may sound strange to say, but I dont believe in work life balance. Balance implies everything has equal weight all the time. I believe in boundaries, but not balance. I dont believe anything great was ever created meting out time to it in a stingy way. Passion is going all in. Its long days and late nights. Its a pendulum swing. Whats important to me is not living these perfectly balanced days where everything gets equal weight, but rather in knowing when to swing back. You have to define your non-negotiables, and then the rest of your time is fair game. My non-negotiables are my weekly workouts, morning routine (though I shorten it as needed depending on the day), and an hour or so at the end of the day to cuddle and connect with my family. When Im in a season of intense work, say launching something new or writing a book, people know they will see less of me. I will spend less time on other things. And when I need a break or when its complete, I will just the same pour myself all into to rest and enjoying the people I love. Its about knowing your own limits, setting boundaries so that the priority gets to be the priority, pushing it to the boundary, and then stepping back when its time. Thats my approach. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself. When you truly, fully grasp that if you dont take care of yourself all the other things you want will forever remain out of your grasp, then it becomes really easy to stay motivated and prioritize yourself. We all have different goals and dreams, but what most people have in common is that they quite simply want to be happy. You can make seven figures and be perfectly miserable if you dont take care of yourself. Its the foundation the rest is built on. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Working out, specifically weight training. I have spent my entire life avoiding exercise. I always really hated it, and it felt like a waste of time when I could be working. Which was so silly! It gives me more energy, better focus, elevates my mood, and helps me make better food choices because when you make one good choice it becomes easier to make others. Also, full disclosure, it really helps with libido! As a woman who is crazy about her husband but definitely suffered from sloth like tendencies post baby, this has been awesome! Intimacy is such a priority for me, and working out has totally reenergized our relationship. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Ha! Story of my life. Honestly, I lean into it. What those periods mean, usually, is that Im burnt out or theres some big issue in my life or business that isnt working, and Im not dealing with it. In those periods, I let myself rest. And I take a look at whats not working, and I try to develop a solution. If Im simply burnt out, a good rest will leave me totally inspired. And if theres something that isnt working in my life or business, taking time to figure it out becomes the priority. Once the problem is solved, motivation and inspiration return. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Tools of Titans, The One Thing, and Essentialism are all books that deeply influenced my routines and my general philosophy on life. While largely geared towards entrepreneurs, I think their principles can apply to anyone. Knowledge -- Your home birth story was incredibly inspiring and touching. How did you come to the decision to have a natural home birth? Do you have any resources to recommend to future parents thinking of doing the same? Well, Id actually planned to give birth at the hospital for the majority of my pregnancy. I decided to have a home birth weeks before she was due! It was kind of crazy. In the process of writing my birth plan, I realized how against the grain I was going for a hospital birth by simply wanting no medication or unnecessary medical interventions. I didnt want to be swimming upstream while doing the hardest thing I would ever do. If someone is thinking about doing the same, I would say do a lot of research on the quality of midwifery care in your area. Not every area of the world is created equally when it comes to available care. The Farm Midwifery Center has lots of great resources for people considering the option! -- Do you have any tips for surviving or minimizing jetlag, and for dealing with a jetlagged baby? I actually have a whole blog post on traveling with baby! If you are traveling across many, many time zones and its at all possible, build a few extra days into your schedule to take it easy and recover from jetlag. When she was under one year old, we took turns getting up with her those first few nights, and tried to keep her awake as long as possible near bed time. And while I know a lot of people might not be comfortable with this, once she was over one year old we gave her a small, weight appropriate dose of benadryl the first two to three nights to help reset her clock. It was an amazing life saving discovery that our pediatrician approved, and we felt comfortable with after lots and lots of research. If you dont want to do that, you can try melatonin or herbal remedies like No Jet Lag. In the end whether you use anything or not, the baby adjusts much quicker than the adults in my experience! -- Youve masterfully created your own brand, and your photography style is instantly recognizable, yet weve read that you are completely self-taught. What was your path to building such a successful lifestyle brand? What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out? Oh man! I have WAY too much to say about this. Im writing e-courses for 2018 that deal with this very topic. So! My path was to embrace the public learning curve. I didnt wait until I had it all figured out to start. I just started, and I got better as I went along. The better I got, the more readers and opportunities I had. There was no overnight success. There was passion, hard work, and showing up everyday for years. I have ALWAYS focused on two things above all else: content and relationships. I dont deal in mediocre and always strive to produce the best content I possibly can, and I aim to treat everyone I come in contact with love and respect. Those are the foundations, in my estimation, of any successful enterprise. The advice I would give to someone starting out, the short version, is this: First, you need to figure out what youre passionate about and be super specific, start with one thing. For me, that was cooking. You can branch out into other niches later, but start with one. Then you need to figure out the core values of your brand. For instance beauty, mindfulness, and authenticity are some of the core values of Local Milk. This is going to set the tone for all that you do. The next thing, the most important thing, you need to figure out is who youre talking to. Who is you dream customer, client, audience? What do they love? What are their hopes, dreams, fears, struggles? How can you make their lives better? This is where youll get ideas for content, revenue streams, copywriting, and everything. Its so important. You cant skip it. You cant hit a target you arent aiming for, and you need to know what your target audience looks like (eg: is it magazine editors or stay at home moms? or both? why?) and responds to before you go on to create your brand. I could keep going! But Ill leave the nitty gritty details for the e-course! The biggest advice I can give is: Just start! There is ALWAYS room at the top, and NO ONE starts there. -- You are a true believer in the fact that a dream life and dream job is achievable for anyone, even those at their lowest point. Can you tell us a bit more about how you were able to come to this realization? Well, Im living proof, so its an easy thing for me to believe. I spent the first decade of my adult life in the throes of bipolar and drug addiction. Im a high school AND college drop out. I started this business when I was 29 on VERY little money. The only thing Id ever done before this was wait tables. I had to heal myself before I could start this journey, but once I did that, I didnt quit, and I didnt look down. Every small win felt like a huge win to me. I was grateful for the first $20 I was ever paid for a photo. And to be honest, it was probably only worth $20. I have the unshakeable belief that if you work hard at something youre truly passionate about, you cannot fail. But you have to work hard. And you have to be passionate, you have to love it. Before you can do any of it, however, you must take care of yourself spiritually and physically. That was the key to all of my success. Ten years of failure because I could not and would not take care of myself. Once I started, it all just flowed. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? In no particular order: sailing anywhere with clear blue water, Netflix and chill with my husband, and playing Warcraft. Haha! I try to make it to the sea at least once a year, and I love to hang out with my husband doing anything or nothing. When work is done for the day, I like to relax with a good series. And Warcraft is my secret pleasure. Especially when Im really burnt out, and I just need to get away”. I absolutely love video games, specifically WoW, and while I cant play full time anymore, whenever Im taking one of those breaks from work to rejuvenate, Ill get on there for a few days. Im hoping to find time soon to play! Its great because it has NOTHING to do with work. And when you have a lifestyle brand, EVERYTHING can be turned into work! But I think its safe to say the World of Warcraft remains and always will remain firmly off brand! -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Nabokovs Lolita (topic notwithstanding its some of the best writing in the world) Song/­­Album – Songs of Leonard Cohen Movie – The Empire Strikes Back (its my favorite movie, so you know...it sure feeds my soul!) Piece of Art – anything by Cy Twombly -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are a few essential objects that would be in yours? This is actually labeled my minimalist packing list in my evernotes! camera laptop external hard drive phone earphones passport/­­visas wallet medicine dry shampoo brush Cosmetics aesop face wash + exfoliant thayers rose tonic deodorant toothbrush + paste underwear black boots blockshop scarf sunglasses 1 oversized necklace 1 pair earrings 1 hat 2 trousers 2 elizabeth suzann linen tunics 1 over sized sweater 1 silk shift dress 1 pair black tights lauren manoogian capote coat socks -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Heidi Swanson, Jenna Kutcher, Alison Wu, and Melyssa Griffin are my current woman crushes. Photos by Beth Kirby. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Beth Kirby appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Favorite New Year Reset Recipes

January 4 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite New Year Reset Recipes Happy New Year, friends! We wanted to stop by with a round-up of 18 vegan and gluten-free New Year reset-friendly recipes that are vegetable-forward and deeply nourishing, but also satisfying and delicious. We’ve got you covered on healing soups and stews, vibrant mains, energy-boosting breakfasts and snacks, a powerful cold remedy drink, and even a minimally sweetened dessert that still very much tastes like a treat. Wishing you all the health and happiness in 2018 :) No-Recipe Healing Soup (v, gf) One of our most popular recipes of 2017. This is a highly customizable soup, built on a powerful broth made with immunity-friendly ingredients. It’s delicious and warming, but especially helpful to those under the weather or low on energy. Make sure to seek out 100% buckwheat soba noodles to make this recipe gluten-free. Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices (v, gf) A deeply nourishing and simple stew recipe, heavily influenced by South Indian cuisine, with a high potential for customization. Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew (v, gf) The ultimate, cozy stew from our Fall Meal Plan, loaded with so many star ingredients of fall/­­winter fare: mushrooms, carrots, garlic and onion, as well as jarred tomatoes, brussels sprouts and lentils. Check out the whole meal plan, too – it has all kinds of other great ideas for a new year reset menu for a whole week. Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup (v, gf) A soup that’s both creamy and chunky, full of grounding, winter-appropriate ingredients. Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip (v, gf) Mango season is coming soon, and this curry is the perfect way to celebrate the sunny fruit’s arrival. Besides the mango, it’s loaded with all kinds of other nutritious, health-promoting produce like broccoli and fennel. Make sure to seek out 100% buckwheat soba noodles to make this recipe gluten-free. Mung Bean Falafel (v, gf) Mung beans make for a great alternative falafel base. They are incredibly nutritious and affordable, and their cooking time is a lot shorter than that of chickpeas. This falafel is very simple to prepare, and it makes for a perfect component to complete a bright and flavorful veggie bowl. Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas (v, gf) An incredibly savory, alternative polenta recipe made with millet instead of corn. Simple in looks, but surprisingly complex in flavor. Taco Collard Green Rolls (v, gf) All the flavors of a great veggie taco, contained in a collard green roll. A crowd-pleaser through and through. Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans (v, gf) If you happen to have access to good zucchini this time of year, try out this light, plant-powered dish. One of my favorites to prepare when I’m feeling sluggish and non-vibrant. Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango (v, gf) Another great recipe for ushering in mango season. Cucumber noodles are a life-changing discovery, and the glazed tofu technique is our absolute favorite way to prepare tofu. Quick Marinated Beans (v, gf) A great thing to make on the weekend, to have in the fridge throughout the week. These marinated beans are able to transform any salad or bowl into a complete, satisfying meal. Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut (v, gf) Incorporating more fermented foods into your diet is always a great idea, especially during a new year reset. Gut health is everything! If you are up for a home fermentation project, consider making this colorful sauerkraut. Omit the blueberries if you can’t find any this time of year. Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways (v, gf) Taking a break from grains or bread? Sweet potato toast might be the perfect thing to curb any toast cravings or withdrawals you may be having. It’s also just a really delicious dish in its own right. Immunity-Boosting Beet and Camu Camu Breakfast Bowl (v, gf) Raw beet, avocado, cranberries, camu camu: these are just some of the ingredients in this powerful, immunity-boosting bowl. Makes for a perfectly vibrant breakfast. Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways (v, gf) These are truly healthy pancakes, made with nutritious, protein-rich, gluten-free grains, and vibrant veggies. The blender technique makes them very easy to put together, too. Sweet and Savory Energy Bites (What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp) (v, gf) Having healthy snacks on hand is the key to success, in our opinion. These energy bites are one of our favorite things to make with leftover nut milk pulp, and they make healthy snacking easy and delicious. Almost Savory Raw Chocolate (v, gf) We know that a lot of people take a break from sugar after all that holiday indulgence. This chocolate recipe is a life-saver for any true chocoholics having a hard time with that idea (aka us). You can make it with zero sugar, but still feel like you’ve had your chocolate fix after having a square or two of this stuff. It’s gold! Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy (v, gf) If you or anyone around you is thinking of getting sick, MAKE THIS! It’s helped us and countless friends of ours fight off colds in their beginning stages. It’s also an invigorating and firey tonic, perfect for any bitter winter day. You might also like... Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho Garlic Onion Veggie Dip from Food Loves Writing Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Favorite New Year Reset Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes

January 1 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes Lauren Haynes is a folk herbalist, medicine maker, plant enthusiast, and the founder of Wooden Spoon Herbs, a small apothecary line based in the Appalachian mountains. Take a look at Lauren’s shop offerings, and you’ll be immersed in a world of plant-powered tinctures, salves, oxymels, and teas, each one more magical than the other. In this interview, Lauren tells us about self-care as a form of self-respect, kindness as a form of beauty, her favorite plants for stress, beauty, and colds (and more!), the importance of sourcing her ingredients locally and working with what’s available, as well as exercise, sustenance, inspiration, procrastination, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Oh, open and free, absolutely. Since I work from home, things end up being pretty routine: tea, emails, breakfast. But if I have my way I love to see how the day unfolds uninhibited. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. Most mornings start with a hot tea or something creamy with raw milk and occasionally marshmallows. I check and return emails first thing, then Ill meditate and make some breakfast and get to work. On lazier mornings well go into the small town nearby and eat eggs benedict and read the paper. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My new favorite nighttime tool is the Flux app for my computer. It gradually turns your screen from blue light to orange with the arc of the day, so the blue light doesnt deter melatonin production come bedtime. Other than that, just reading a great book until my eyes get tired. Living out in the county where its dark and quiet helps me sleep soundly every night. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfastsmoked salmon omelette with sauteéd greens Lunch – egg salad sandwich with a bowl of good soup Snackfruit or hummus or a little chocolate Dinner – soul food: pinto beans, cornbread, a baked sweet potato and collard greens, topped with hot sauce and ferments and a slice of blue cheese -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink tea most mornings. Sometimes matcha or Earl Grey, or sometimes just ginger and lemon balm, to ground and calm myself before a hectic day. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Um... yes, check. I have a major sweet tooth and Lilys stevia-sweetened chocolate bars save my life. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Right now my regimen includes fish oil, Mothers Best beef liver pills, a tincture of medicinal mushrooms, and evening primrose oil. I also love using lymphatic herbs steeped in vinegar throughout the year. Every spring I steep whatever edible herbs are coming up naturally in raw apple cider vinegar: plantain, violet leaf, dead nettle, dandelion greens, chickweed and cleavers. That lasts me all year and keeps me feeling vital, just a spoonful a day. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I try to exercise but if I have a full schedule its the first thing I cut out. I live on a tract of wilderness, so walking a few miles a day is super easy and I do that interspersed with yoga when Im feeling too tired to get outside. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? A little bit of both! Its definitely hard to make the time for it since I work from home and just go, go, go. I definitely find walking in the woods pleasurable, so that keeps me motivated to exercise. I cant even imagine going to a gym... Maybe someday. Exercise is something Im starting to get excited about. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? True beauty is when someone makes you feel like your soul is illuminated by the way that they treat you. Thats what is beautiful to me. If I want external beauty, Ill just scroll Instagram for a bit, you know? But true kindness is actual beauty. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Laidback is how I would describe my skincare routine. See also: erratic. I use a rosewater and witch hazel toner daily (Poppy & Someday), followed by a blend of rosehip and carrot seed oil (Zizia Botanicals). Sometimes I use a gentle rose quartz scrub on my face (Aquarian Soul), followed by oil cleansing, but usually Im pretty lowkey. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Yes! Nettle and alfalfa infusions, and also evening primrose oil internally. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Drink tons of water, sleep as much as you can, and wear red lipstick. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Consistent routines are hard for me, but I am constantly checking in to make sure I dont get overwhelmed by stress, even if that means five minutes of yoga in the middle of the day. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I really love regular acupuncture treatments and massage, as well as daily meditation and moxibustion. Calming teas that ease tension, like ginger and chamomile. Also just goofing off as much as I can get away with. You cant be silly and stressed at the same time. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? My first line of defense is a few dropperfuls of fire cider. I make one called Sunshine Cider with turmeric and rosehips, but my friend Gretchen made me some with habanero peppers and that always helps me stay on the right side of health. Fire cider, a shot of elderberry syrup and then some red root tincture, an amazing lymphatic herb that relieves a sore throat. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely bleed together, as I work from home and run my business with my partner. I try to take the weekends off and get out of the house daily to break up the work mode, even if its just a drive to the post office. Luckily, I love my work because its a huge part of my life. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Honestly, mindfulness is key. Just checking in with myself constantly to see how Im feeling, why Im feeling that way and what I need. I just take little tea or chocolate breaks or go put some sun on my face or make a nourishing meal. A hot shower if Im feeling cold. Self massage if Im feeling anxious. Shutting the computer if Im getting tired. And making time for the little things that make me happy, like reading a book. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Cleaning up my diet was key for me in resolving a lot of health issues. In college I was just eating garbage and drinking alcohol and doing all the teenage things. Once I realized that youre literally what you eat, and started treating my body with respect, a lot shifted for me. I really feel like that small change helped align me with the path Im on now, which is 100% what Im supposed to be doing. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Im usually brimming with ideas and running myself ragged trying to make them all happen, so if I struggle with anything its occasional procrastination. Usually this looks like doing the easier things on my to-do list before the hard-hitting work chores, which isnt such a bad thing. I just kind of let myself have some slower times, because I work really hard. I may sip tea and pull tarot cards and then eventually get a burst of energy. Or sometimes I do nothing for like two full days. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. So, so many. I love The Gift of Healing Herbs by Robin Rose Bennett and Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz, as well as so many books from the 70s by obscure hippies and natural living advocates. Living on the Earth by Alicia Bay Laurel, for example. Knowledge -- What was your path to studying herbology and founding Wooden Spoon Herbs? I came to herbs when looking for a path to self-sufficiency. I romanticized living off the land, providing all that I would need for myself through my connection to the earth. And thats basically how it happened. I got all the books I could find about herbalism, read them, and started making herbal remedies. I started selling them slowly and it just kind of took off. Then I got to put my business hat on and thats been such a rewarding challenge. -- Can you talk a little bit about your decision to work only with herbs native to your home region of Appalachia? Theres so much to say about this. When I started opening my eyes to the bounty that surrounded me, it struck me as absurd to order herbs from suppliers that sourced from the far corners of the earth, when we had so many of the same herbs that could be sourced from the bioregion of Appalachia. For example, why am I going to order nettle that comes from Croatia when my friend has an acre of it on her farm? And no offense to Croatia or the herbalists that use those sources, but it just wasnt for me. I saw the opportunity to create a righteous supply chain and source from local farmers and forage my materials. To this day I still source directly from small organic farms around the country. Appalachias medicinal herbs are legendary: ginseng, goldenseal, bloodroot. People from all over the world use these herbs exclusively. And many of the herbs used in Traditional Chinese Medicine grow in Appalachia, because when the continents were Pangea parts of what is now China and parts of Appalachia were the same land. The geography of these regions is still very similar, and that is really special. So I wanted to learn about these plants for myself, because they are my neighbors and we share the same space. Not to mention that my family has been on this land for at least five generations, probably more. Its my most recent ancestral tradition, and I think its really important to learn about the traditions of your own ancestors so that youre not co-opting someone elses. Our pasts are precious. Finally, I believe in slow, local medicine for the same reasons I believe in slow, local foods – because theyre more potent and they taste better. -- What are some of your best-selling products and what herbs is your customer most excited about at the moment? My bestsellers are the Anxiety Ally, Brain Tonic, Moontime Magic and Migraine Melter tinctures. Elderberry Sumac Syrup is always a hit, as well as the Golden Cocoa (adaptogenic golden milk meets hot chocolate). I also have some new, more esoteric offerings based on the elements, and the Spirit one has been selling really well. I think my customers are just always after herbs that ground and expand the spirit, which is super beautiful. That and herbs for stress, always. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment?  Podcasts! All the podcasts: Medicine Stories, Thats So Retrograde, So You Wanna Be A Witch, Being Boss. That and the color cobalt blue. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love seeking out hot springs, getting massages and acupuncture, going to the movies with my partner and eating at good restaurants. In the summer, swimming in the river behind my house and lying in the sun. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Caravan by Stephen Gaskin Song/­­Album – Tried So Hard by Gene Clark Piece of art – the entire Motherpeace tarot deck -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? My favorite mohair cardigan, a striped shirt, high-waisted leggings and denim, Poppy & Somedays Gypsy Rose Toner, whatever books Im reading, a notebook and Uniball pen, magazines, calming tinctures, bagged tea, thermos, Ricardo Medina botines, charcoal toothbrush -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Jess Fuery, Beatrice Valenzuela, Shiva Rose, the founders of Cap Beauty, Ashley Neese, Connie Matisse of East Fork Pottery, jeweler Annika Kaplan, Erica Chidi Cohen, Rachel Craven, Beth Kirby of Local Milk, Rachel Budde of Fat and the Moon, Kristen Dilley of Nightingale Acupuncture, and, naturally, Ilana Glazer Photos by Beth Kirby and Lauren Haynes You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust

December 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Since this is our last recipe of 2017, we wanted to make sure that it’s a special one. It needed to check all the boxes we usually try to check with our recipes: nourishing, delicious, seasonal, beautiful, convenient, and a little bit unexpected. This veggie and lentil-centered one pan pie is all of those things. It’s very cozy and fun to prepare, too. If I had a choice, most of my savory dishes would be one-pan dishes :) Convenience is hard to beat. That little bit of initial effort you put into assembling all the ingredients for a single-pan dish pays off incredibly well when you end up with a big meal, plus a ton of leftovers for the week, having only used one pan or pot in the process. This one-pan dish is something like a vegetable pot pie, but the crust is made up of thinly mandolined winter roots – potatoes, sweet potatoes, and celery root. The filling is shredded Brussels sprouts, mushrooms, and red lentils (you can add barley, too, for a grain component) that cooks in a mixture of healing spices and coconut milk. The whole thing is packed with a great variety of plants. It’s perfect for those looking to up their intake of vegetables after the holidays, but still wanting to keep their cooking hearty and cozy. The ingredient that takes this dish into the complete meal category are the red lentils. Vegetable dishes are great on their own, but adding any kind of pulses (lentils, beans, chickpeas, dry peas) to your plant-centric meals will up their nutrition and ability to satisfy quite a bit. Pulses are incredibly nutrient-dense, like superfoods, but they are also very affordable, unlike most other superfoods, so it’s a win-win all around. Try adding about a half a cup of pulses to your meals a few times a week – your cooking will greatly benefit from them, and you’ll be on your way to discovering a whole new world of deliciousness (of you haven’t already, of course). Head here for more of our recipes using pulses, and be sure to check out Half Cup Habit. Happy New Year! Thank you so much for visiting GK, trying out our recipes, and reading up on the self-care series. It all means so much to us .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya

December 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya Satsuki Shibuya is an artist and spiritual thinker based in L.A. We are in awe of Satsuki’s intuitive watercolors, her constant willingness to go deeper, and her incredibly thoughtful approach to work and life as a whole. In this interview, Satsuki tells us about her morning, bedtime, and exercise routines, as well as love as a form of self-acceptance, what it’s like to see the energy of others, her unique approach to her life schedule, her mother’s universally wise beauty advice, the lifestyle change that helped clear up her skin, nourishment, stress, and so much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I find myself being right in-between, but veer on the side of things being more open and free within a loose schedule. It is dictated not so much by a 9-5 setting, but more dependent on what my body is communicating for the day. I’ve found that the more I am able to flow naturally, without resistance, better work is produced. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. My mornings are usually the same -- wake up sometime between 7 and 7:30am, wash up, meditate/­­journal/­­read for about an hour or some light gardening. Around 8:30am, start preparing breakfast for the household and eat while catching up on some articles online. By 10am, I am warming up to start the work day. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Not a bedtime ritual, per se, but I do find my biological clock the happiest when I am in bed by midnight. Any later and I will wake up feeling groggy. Unfortunately, some of the best messages come through from the Universe around this time and find myself writing clear into the witching hour. -- We read that you have a unique approach to your work schedule. Can you tell us about it and why it works for you? Sure. It’s not so much as my work schedule, but life schedule as a whole. As I am quite sensitive to energies, especially from people, as much as I love being with others, I also need a lot of down time to recharge, otherwise, burn out. The best balance I’ve found thus far is to have a point system where each time I am interacting with another, depending on the intensity, receives a particular number of points. For example, going to a doctor’s appointment would be 1/­­2 a point since there is not much interaction, overloading of the sensory system, and is one-on-one contact, which doesn’t require too much processing of different energies. On the other hand, if I am scheduled to do a talk or to meet people at a large gathering, it would be 2-3 points. The points correlate with how many days it might take me to recover and recharge. 1/­­2 point would be half a day of recharging afterwards whereas 2-3 points would be two to three days of recharging necessary after the event. Then, I go week by week and figure out how many points are available for social interactions. If a week is only 3 points maximum, then that might mean 1 meeting and 1 doctor’s appointment (1/­­2 point + 2.5 points) and the rest would be downtime, meaning minimal outside interaction. Depending on where my entire being is (body, mind, soul), the weekly points, or I usually go monthly, will fluctuate. If I am getting over a cold, there may only be so many points available to a week, but if balanced, there may be more available. When I first started this system, it was more rigid, but now, relaxed as it has become second nature. This helps not only to keep a balance, but also to set boundaries in order to create space in my heart. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Something light, centered upon veggies and fruits with some grains. I usually opt for some gluten free toast, an avocado with hummus, and either dried or freshly cut fruit or miso soup with rice. Light and simple. Lunch – The heaviest meal of the day and usually containing either a plant-based or animal-based protein. It can be anything from a rice bowl to a large salad, but usually a variety of ingredients. Snack – I have a soft spot for chips or crunchy nibbles so like to have something around 3:30pm and/­­or a piece of fruit. Dinner – A medium sized meal, usually Japanese-based, but other times adventure elsewhere. Mostly veggies and some protein, usually not much carbs as it tends to make the digestive system a bit sluggish before going to sleep. Some tea afterwards while doing dishes is always a treat. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I am not able to partake in caffeine as it makes my heart pitter-patter like no other, but do love the smell of coffee or English Breakfast tea.  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to have a horrible sweet tooth where if I did not have at least one thing sweet each day around tea time, whether cake or a sweet bean bun, I would be the crabbiest crab of the land! I’ve since stopped eating sugar (going on 4 years now) due to health reasons and thankful for the difference in my health -- it is night and day! -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I see a Naturopathic Doctor regularly and through her, work with supplements, herbs, and tinctures/­­tonics, which do truly help to keep my body in balance. Otherwise, on my own, I find meditation, working with crystals, burning incense specifically from Ry?an-ji temple in Kyoto, and spraying Aura Cleanser from Botanical Alchemy works wonders for my overall well being and energy. I do know this formula may be different for each individual due to our aura body make-up, but currently, this program seems to work best. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I wouldn’t say I’m a gym bunny, but do love the feeling of working with the body/­­mind simultaneously and yoga seems to fit the bill quite nicely. Still a long ways to go, but hoping to be able to integrate yoga into my morning preparations for the day. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I wish I could say I love to exercise, but in truth, it does take a lot of willpower to get myself to do physical activities. I’ve never been very competitive in nature and therefore sports did not appeal as a possible opportunity for exercise, but since meeting yoga, feel I’ve finally found something that speaks to my spirit. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I believe the internal comes through to the external in all aspects -- if our organs are taken care of, our skin clears, if our emotions are balanced, our smiles appear, and when our soul is nourished, our being glistens. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Simple seems to be the way my entire being prefers things, including skincare for face and body. I’ve been a huge advocate for natural skincare and use one that consists of face wash, toner, moisturizer, Balancing Oil for night time and eye cream. Sometimes spot cream for blemishes and face scrub/­­face pack a few times a week. For body, I use a 5-ingredient, shea butter bar soap. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? No sugar. This alone has cleared up my blemish-prone skin considerably. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Nothing much, except for beauty advice my mother has shared since I was young, “Invest in your skin, trim your hair often, and moisturize your elbows.” I continue to follow her advice. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? I try my best to keep a balance in my schedule, not overload it with activities and make time to tune into my higher self. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? To close my eyes and tune into my breath. Speak slower. Concentrate on one happening at a time. To hide away in the bathroom for a few minutes and catch my breath. Check-in internally and focus on my root chakra. Ground my energies into Mother Earth. Also, to understand that nothing is permanent and the stressful situation, too, shall pass. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Eat shiitake mushrooms, drink a hot tea of lemon with manuka honey, down some bio-available vitamin C, up the liquids including broths, and consciously raise my energy. Also, lots of sleep. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Work/­­life balance is key to my well-being. I continue to let go of rules that I have placed upon myself in order to feel complete in the world and instead, tune into what makes me feel whole. Saying yes to what resonates and no to the things that do not fulfill my spirit. My approach is to tune into my intuition and let it be the guide towards where I need to go next. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself. The simple answer to this is love. Not so much the cliché love we think of, but of accepting oneself for where we are currently and not force ourselves to be someone we are not. With acceptance, comes letting go and by letting go, we are able to fill in our space with a being entirely made up of our true selves. When this can be done, we are able to share love with ourselves and in turn, share love with others. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? To not worry about success in terms of monetary gain, but of spiritual awareness. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Allowing the lack of inspiration and procrastination to take me where I may go. Not to try and stop it, but to experience it fully and understand where it is originating. I don’t necessarily think it is a bad thing -- sometimes we need rest to appreciate our next step. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a painter? After being on hiatus for a year and a half due to an unexplainable illness, I received a message to paint. After reconnecting back to my childhood self, of sensing and seeing beyond the physical realm, leaning into this part of my being opened up new ways of communicating beyond and through this, the message came through. -- Intuition plays a key role in your watercolor work. Why do you find it to be crucial to your approach? The medium has shown the necessity of letting go, trusting the process and understanding that there is more than what we can see in the physical realm. By approaching my work intuitively, it becomes almost meditative, channeling energies beyond and appearing as is, without any manipulation. -- Can you tell us a bit about the energy readings that you do? When did you discover that you have the ability to feel an individual’s soul energy and aura? It was by accident. I’ve always been able to read others’ energies and since young, would do so to the detriment of my own health. I found myself at the doctor’s office, when often, every other week, to which many times, no illness could be found. During my year and a half of being ill, I began to understand what I was sensing since young and honing in, began to receive messages in code. After deciphering many of these messages in my journal, I decided to share my internal self with my mother, who was in the dark about this internal world, to which she was extremely shocked. It took her a good week, after speaking with many of her friends who have known me since I was born, to figure out that she was actually the only one  not recognizing this ‘other self’. After coming full circle with my mother, during a gathering consisting of elder buddhist practitioners, which I attend with my mother from time to time, I shared my spiritual insights with the group. A woman sitting next to me whom I met for the first time that day, asked if I could read her energy. I’d never explicitly read another’s energy before and did not know what to expect, but agreed as I, too, was curious as to what would come forth. I saw images, colors, movie-like scenes, shapes, sensed emotions, all flashing, happening and shared, as if a translator, all I was seeing, experiencing simultaneously to her. After finishing, she looked at me and said, “How do you know all these things about me?” To which I said, “I don’t know. I just said what I saw.” Since then, I’ve done many energy readings and now have a better understanding of what happens during a session. I liken it to a translation of the other’s energy, subconscious, and higher self; sometimes beyond. What is important to note, though, is that all the things I see, sense, and share are things the individual already knows, whether consciously or subconsciously. I just bring it to the forefront and at times, help word it in a way so that the message can understood in the best possible way. -- Besides being a painter, you also write poetry, play music and make books. Do you feel that all these disciplines are interconnected for you, or do you treat them as separate entities? Yes, they are all interconnected, all coming from the same source, just expressed differently. I would say painting is the most direct form of expressing what I experience internally, without translation. The next being words -- a way of describing what I am experiencing. Music being another translation, although not as intuitive as painting or writing. Books are my passion and feel it is a way to leave energies in this world even after passing onto the other side. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love watching Japanese comedy shows and dramas, while eating chips. In an ideal world, though, instead of chips, I would be eating a fruit tart. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Untethered Soul by Michael A. Singer Song/­­Album – All Things Must Pass by Rourourourous Movie – Laputa by Studio Ghibli Piece of Art – Any of the older pieces created by Agnes Martin -- What are your favorite places to eat in LA? Rice in Manhattan Beach -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? For carry-on: - a comfortable eye mask - slippers and socks - pressure point bands - iphone for listening to music and audio books - bottled water purchased after passing through security For suitcase: - jeans - sneakers - flat shoes that are a bit more dressy, but still comfortable - small travel pillow as I have a sensitive neck - food stuffs for my dietary needs (I have a many food allergies) - book, journal, pencil case - tshirts, long shirts, under shirts, and extra underwear - a warm top - and anything that allows me to be comfortable while still feeling in line with my own style - slippers for usage in room - warm socks as my feet tend to get cold - pajamas - room wear - pyrex for heating up my own food - liquid dish soap for washing dishes/­­utensils - one set of semi-dress up clothes, in-case  -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Rei Kawakubo. Artwork by Satsuki Shibuya. Photos by Sisilia Piring and Women With Superpowers /­­ Tasya Van Ree + Nitsa Citrine. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff

December 10 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff Sasha Swerdloff is a Certified Ayurvedic Consultant and blogger at Tending the Table, where she shares plant-based recipes and writes about sustainability, health, and wellness. We love Sasha’s thoughtful approach to cooking, breathtaking photography, and Ayurvedic advice. In this interview, Sasha tells us about her morning, bedtime and exercise routines, as well as self-care as a type of non-violence, addressing the root cause of health-related imbalances, the breathing technique she uses during stressful times, skincare, nourishment, yoga, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Routine is super important for me. Without it I tend to feel scattered, flustered and irritable. I think this has a lot to do with my constitution. I know that I tend to struggle with uncertainty so having a routine makes me feel a little more in control and a little less terrified. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I usually wake up around 7am, do my morning stuff (scrape my tongue, do neti, wash my face etc.) then try to drink a big mug of hot lemon water. I like to listen to NPR and snuggle on the couch with my pups while I drink my morning matcha latte. Then I do yoga before making breakfast. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Ive struggled with insomnia a fair amount but paying attention to my stress level and having a solid bedtime routine has helped a lot. A hot bath and self massage with plenty of herbal oil especially on my head works wonders. I also really love sipping on some warm almond milk with spices before bed. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast - Sautéed greens, a fried egg from the chicken ladies in the backyard, and sourdough toast. LunchSoup or a big bowl of roasted veggies with some sort of cooked grain, some protein, and a half an avocado. SnackApple and almond butter DinnerSoup, roasted veggies, salads, veggie tacos with beans, roasted sweet potato, cabbage slaw and avocado. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Ive never been able to drink coffee or black tea without getting super jittery but it took me years to finally listen to what my body was telling me. Instead of coffee I drink a matcha latte with almond milk and raw honey every morning. --  Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Not having sweet stuff around is the only way to stop me from eating a whole bar of chocolate or way too many cookies. --  Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Im not a fan of taking lots of herbs or supplements for long periods of time. Its easy to take a pill but its a lot harder to address the root cause of an issue and make diet and lifestyle changes to address that imbalance. In the long term though, addressing the root cause through diet and lifestyle is a whole lot more affordable and leads to long term results. I do take Ashwagandha and Vit D regularly to support my nervous system and to keep me sane through the dark winters here in Seattle. Exercise --  Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I try to practice at least an hour of yoga daily. I also walk a fair amount and jog every once in a while. In the winter I cross country ski as much as I can. Ive noticed that the forms of exercise I enjoy most incorporate some sort of rhythmic, repetitive motion which I find to be super calming and meditative. Also, any time I can get outside Im happy. --  Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? Both. There are days when I dont exercise or get outside but I try to not beat myself up about it. Its too easy to get into a pattern of negativity and its much more beneficial long term to practice having compassion for yourself. The things that motivate me to get on my mat each day are my physical and mental health, someone else (my husband) holding me accountable, and the respect and admiration I have for my yoga teacher and the Ashtanga lineage. Beauty --  What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Confidence is beautiful to me. I feel more beautiful when I stand up straight and hold my head high. Im slowly learning that its less about how I look and more about how I feel. --  What is your skincare approach – face and body? My skin has always been sensitive and problematic and Ive always had negative body image issues associated with it. Im finally starting to get a handle on it by going off of hormonal birth control and eliminating sugar and dairy. I also have a pretty strict routine that helps keep my skin free from breakouts. In the morning I wash my face with warm water and moisturize with January Labs Revitalizing Day Cream or Osmia Organics Purely Simple Face Cream . In the evening I cleanse and exfoliate with Beauty Counters Charcoal Cleansing Bar and the Clarisonic skin brush then moisturize with grapeseed oil and Living Libations Dew Dab which helps prevent breakouts and combat hyper pigmentation. In the summer I spritz my face with rose water to help me cool down. --  Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I started taking a zinc supplement a few months ago for my skin and it has helped a ton. Overall though, I notice that cutting out sugar and dairy from my diet makes the biggest difference. --  Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Like I said before, for me, diet makes a huge difference. But I also love my Clarisonic skin brush. It seems like a weird gadget but it has made all the difference for me. Stress, etc. --  If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Making sure not to get too over stimulated or overcommitted helps me stay grounded but if I do get spun out I practice Nadi shodhana breathing and take some Anxiety Soother to take the edge off. I also like to do Yoga Nidra . Getting some fresh air and planting my feet on the ground or pulling out the watercolors always helps too. --  What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I usually mega dose on Echinacea and Sambu Guard then take a hot bath and bundle up. I also try to slow down since for me, colds are often the result of stress. If I slow down my body can usually heal itself. Motivation --  Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I like to think about yoga philosophy and the eight limbs. The first limb is yama. The yamas are a set of five precepts that help us interact with the world in an ethical manner. The first yama is ahimsa or non-violence. This means non-violence towards all living things, including ourselves,  in thoughts, words and actions. For me self-care is a type of non-violence towards my physical and mental being. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I take a break from whatever it is that Im struggling with and do something else to clear my mind. Knowledge --  What was your path to studying Ayurveda and yoga and how do you incorporate that knowledge into your everyday?  I first learned about Ayurveda from my yoga teacher, Christine Hoar . I had been practicing yoga with her for a year or so and was struggling with some health problems so decided to do an Ayurvedic consultation with her to see what she could recommend. Her simple diet and lifestyle recommendations completely changed things for me. I felt like all of a sudden, all of the issues I had struggled with throughout my life made sense and fit into a bigger picture of who I am. I continued studying Ayurveda with Christine and then after college completed an Ayurvedic Certification program and Kripalu. For me, Ayurveda provides a framework from which to view the world and my place in it. Im constantly thinking about the qualities of the foods I eat and the things I do or experience from an Ayurvedic perspective. Ayurveda helps me understand and take control of my health. --  Do you practice a certain type of yoga, and why did you choose that particular branch?  I practice Ashtanga Yoga. I sort of stumbled into it. A college friend told me about a summer special at a nearby studio and suggested I sign up. I did and I went to class there every day for a month. After the month was up I just kept going. I was hooked. I think a big part of why Ive stuck with Ashtanga is because of my teacher. Shes pretty incredible and has been a huge influence in my life. The method of Ashtanga also really resonates with me. I enjoy the repetition, the meditative quality of the breath, the focus and concentration required, the rigor of it and the tradition. --  Do you have any recommendations for someone who wants to establish a daily yoga practice but doesnt know where to begin? Find a teacher you connect with. Finding the motivation to practice on your own is challenging but if you have a teacher you admire and respect and a community of fellow students who are counting on you, youll show up every day. --  Your recipes are so beautiful, approachable and inventive. What is your process when it comes to developing recipes? Thank you! Sometimes Im inspired by meals Ive had while travelling but mostly I draw inspiration from whatever produce I have on hand. I love combining flavors and experimenting with spices and herbs to elevate something simple and make it unique. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Im excited to be incorporating more Ayurveda and wellness themes into my work. Its a big part of my life and I want to share it with others so they can feel empowered to heal themselves. Ill be teaching my first Ayurvedic workshop in the Spring here in Seattle which should be a lot of fun. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love a good pedicure or a trip to the Korean spa for a soak and body scrub. But more often I find myself going for a walk or taking myself out to tea if I need a boost. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book - Mary Oliver New and Selected Poems Song/­­Album - No Hard Feelings The Avett Brothers Piece of Art -  Satsuki Shibuya -- What are your favorite places to eat in Seattle? We dont eat out all that often, but when we do we usually head to Delancey , Seawolf , The Whale Wins or Frankie and Jos . -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? -Earplugs – Anxiety Soother -A headlamp -Licorice tea -A big scarf – Lip balm -A snack (always) -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Jessie Snyder of Faring Well Photos by Sasha Swerdloff and Renee Byrd You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford

December 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford Trinity Mouzon Wofford is the founder of GOLDE Turmeric, a line of high-quality turmeric blends for golden milk, lattes, and more. We are in love with everything GOLDE, and were so excited to get a peek at its radiant founder’s wellness routine. In this interview, Trinity tells us about her rule-free approach to self-care, her path to self-acceptance, and the importance of giving the body exactly what it’s craving, as well as a Geisha-approved moisturizer that works wonders for her skin, her number one cold remedy that’s likely in your kitchen right now, exercise, beauty, stress, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think having some form of a routine is crucial to your mental health when you run a business from home. It’s been sort of tricky as of late because we’re in transition from our home in Upstate New York to moving back down to Brooklyn. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. On an ideal day, I’m up around 6:30am and checking my phone for email and GOLDE‘s social media. Following that, I’ll do a bit of stretching to loosen up, and then hop in the shower. After I’ve gotten ready, I’ll sit down to work and make a to-do list for the day -- this is crucial for me. I forget things and get really anxious about what I’m forgetting if I don’t bother to organize my thoughts and tasks in advance. I’ll usually dig into whatever those tasks are for an hour or so before pausing for breakfast. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My partner, Issey, and I always make sure to have a cut-off time for work, barring emergencies. Once that point rolls around (it varies day-by-day), I’m usually catching up on the news or my favorite blogs while Issey preps dinner. We’ll eat together and then usually end off binging some TV show. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Issey’s miso soup with tons of mushrooms and seaweed. He makes it completely from scratch using his mom’s recipe. LunchLunch is usually whatever is leftover from dinner that week  -- lately its a lot of hearty stews. Snack – We’ll do a little crudite plate with raw veg from the farmer’s market: carrots, turnips, radishes, persian cucumbers. Always with some cheese and seed crackers. Sometimes also with wine. Dinner – Tibetan food from our favorite spot in Jackson Heights, Queens. It’s a lot of dumplings (momos), noodles, and warming soups. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I can’t, really. I love the taste of coffee, but it turns me into a shaking, anxious mess. I always start the day with a turmeric tonic made with one of our blends -- usually cacao or original because the matcha also makes me a bit hyper. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Yes, yes, yes. I try not to “keep it in check” so much as listen to it with a variety of foods. Sometimes it’s fruit or homemade popcorn with coconut sugar. Sometimes it’s half a box of Dots eaten while laying on the couch. Refined sugar is trash for your system, but so is getting too regimented with your foods. I keep it light (emotionally) and eat what I’m craving. When junk food isn’t off limits, you’re not going to crave it every day. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Well, turmeric, of course. It makes such a difference in my skin and immunity. Issey loves it for instant allergy relief. There are apparently over 10,000 medical studies on its effects on the body --it’s really incredible. We’re also huge proponents of ashwaghanda in our household. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Upstate New York is not exactly the land of boutique fitness, so it can be more challenging to get in a sweat on the regular. I focus mostly on stretching and going on walks/­­hikes on the weekend. I think I’ve probably gained a bit of weight since I’ve been up here because I’m not moving as much as I did in NYC, but I don’t really mind. It’s okay for your body to fluctuate with your circumstances, as long as you’re treating it with respect. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? It varies. I really like working out as a method to clear my head, so often I do look forward to it. But that said, I don’t really try to push myself too much. If you want to be a world-class athlete, then by all means, train 2+ hours a day. I’m just looking to keep my body and psyche in good health, so if I don’t feel like making it to my workout, I don’t feel the need to punish myself later. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I grew up black in a very white town, so I’ve had a lot of really emotional moments coming to terms with what beauty means for me. At the moment, I like to keep things really natural with my curls out and minimal makeup. It took a while to accept my looks for exactly what they are, so now I’m really openly embracing it. I feel more beautiful now than I did 5 years ago, mostly due to opening myself up to the concept that I’m perfectly fine just as I am. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I try to keep my routine relatively simple. I’ll wash my face with raw African black soap or something gentle like Cerave. I love Drunk Elephant products, and I apply their C-Firma and B-Hydra serums every day. They help a lot with keeping my skin clear and getting rid of dark marks. After that I’ll moisturize with raw shea butter, or a cream that has that. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Turmeric, again. Because it’s anti-inflammatory, I’ve found it to be really helpful in clearing up redness or breakouts. Besides that, I try not to get too bogged down with a ton of supplements. I focus mostly on eating a variety of plants every day. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Shea butter is amazing for my skin. My partner’s Japanese mother recently put me on to this cream called Secret de Maiko. It contains shea butter and a few other natural, organic ingredients. Apparently this is what young Geisha girls would use as a moisturizer/­­makeup base. This cream is better than pure shea butter because it won’t leave you greasy at all. I use it twice daily. It’s great for keeping your skin clear and calm. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Well, cannabis helps. I use a vaporizer pen so there’s no smoke-related health detriments/­­lingering smell. I really want to try the Hmbldt pen because I’m a sucker for sharp design. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? There’s going to stress sometimes. I try to deal in healthy ways like going for a walk to clear my head, or talking to a close friend about whatever I’m dealing with. But life isn’t perfect, so sometimes you just end up being a bit tense for a few days. I think that’s normal and natural -- I try not to fight it too much. You have to let yourself feel it so that you can process it and move past it. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Garlic!! At my old job, everyone in the office knew about this because I would practically through bulbs of raw garlic at anyone who complained of illness. Nothing works better for immediately beating a bad cold. If I feel something coming on, I take 2-3 whole cloves (swallowed like horse pills) with a ton of water. That can save you in just a couple hours -- it’s crazy. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I really like to work, so what I consider to be a healthy work/­­life balance might not be the right approach for someone else. I genuinely enjoy spending my free time dreaming up new campaigns, product ideas, or designs for GOLDE. I guess that’s the benefit to doing your own thing -- it doesn’t always feel like work. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I’ve gotten a lot better with this with age. I try not to have any food or exercise rules. Being militant about your body is not self-care, and it can really easily spiral into disordered behavior that veers on the edge of “orthorexia.” I mostly just listen to my body and allow itself what it wants, whether that has to do with food, movement/­­exercise, socializing vs. indulging my natural introvert, etc. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? I really think doing away with rules (re: food, etc.) has been the most important change I’ve made. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with avoiding gluten or dairy because it upsets your stomach or causes breakouts, but don’t complicate your life with structure that does not serve you. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Usually moments like these mean I need to re-focus myself. I’ll start by making to-do lists, and go from there. Knowledge -- What was your path to starting GOLDE? I was pre-med at NYU, with plans to practice holistic medicine. By my senior year of college, I wasn’t so sure about spending more time and money on schooling, and sort of fell into a marketing role at a tech startup. I really loved the creative aspects of marketing, and found that GOLDE was a way of combining my interests in sharp branding with making holistic health more accessible. The interest in turmeric actually came from my mom, who has Rheumatoid Arthritis. She noticed a huge difference in her overall levels of inflammation when she started incorporating it into her daily routine -- that’s when I started paying attention. -- How do you approach the sourcing of your ingredients for GOLDE? We actually just started sourcing all of our turmeric with a company called Diaspora Co. They focus 100% on supporting ethical and high-quality spice trade that empowers rather than disenfranchises the people of color who have been growing and ingesting medicinal plants like turmeric for generations. The turmeric that we’re going to be using is an heirloom variety with almost twice the typical amount of curcumin. It’s grown on a fourth-generation, family-owned farm in India, and farmers are paid 6X the standard commodity prices to ensure truly fair wages. We’re really excited to be featuring a product that’s not only incredibly high-quality, but also works to re-build lingering inequality left in the wake of colonialism. -- What’s your favorite way to use your wellness blend? I love to have it just with hot water and raw honey in the morning. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Heading to the Union Square Greenmarket is one of my favorite activities. When I’m in the city, I like to go every Monday morning when it’s not too crowded. It’s mostly just you and the chefs (or their assistants?) shopping for what they’ll be preparing that day. I also love infra red sauna. I go to Higher Dose in the East Village. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Americanah – Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie Song/­­Album – Songs in the Key of Life – Stevie Wonder -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I am nowhere near as regimented as our dear Joan. Usually my suitcase is packed haphazardly with whatever clothing is clean and well-suited for the weather. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? More people of color, please! A few of my favorites: Diane Chang Yaminah Mayo Dr. Tiffany Lester Latonya Yvette Nikisha Brunson Alex Elle Lauren Ash Sana Javeri Kadri Photos by Sana Javeri Kadri, Issey Kobori and Nico Behnzukeh. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes

November 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes It’s been eight years since we started collecting recipes on this website, and over those years we’ve accumulated quite a few holiday recipe ideas. We thought it was finally time to do a big, comprehensive round up of our absolute favorites. We’ve got you covered on mains and hearty sides, as well as lighter sides, soups, salads, dessert, and drinks. Wishing you and your family a happy and healthy holiday season :) v = vegan, gf = gluten-free, veg = vegetarian, vo = vegan option Mains and Hearty Sides Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower (v, gf) There’s something so grand and ritualistic about a holiday table centerpiece that took time, care and anticipation. Since most such centerpieces involve meat, one can feel a little left out during the peak of a celebratory meal if meat is not their jam. In this recipe, we applied this grand, ceremonious approach to braising a head of cauliflower. Someone even made a video outlining the entire braising process. Baked Latkes (v, gf) Latkes are my ultimate weakness, but I’ve always dreaded the long and smoky process of frying them. My love for latkes is so strong though, that I had to come up with an easier path to that crispy, golden potato goodness. These baked latkes are SO much easier to make than the traditional fried kind, since the oven does all the main work for you. The flavor and texture are not compromised one bit, I promise. The recipe also includes a beet salad with an avocado mayo, which is to die for. Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna (v, gf) This healthful but hearty lasagna employs spaghetti squash in place lasagna noodles. There’s mushrooms, mung beans, kale, carrots, tomato sauce, and an easy almondcheese’ as well. Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash (v, gf) If you’ve never tried braising leeks, you are in for a serious surprise. They are amazing, especially served over a hearty cauliflower and white bean mash. If leeks are not your thing, consider making the mash alone and serve it as a side, to up your holiday mash game :) Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin (v, gf) I can’t say enough about this gratin comprised of layers of sweet potato, Brussels sprouts, and caramelized onions, showered with spices and coconut milk. It’s easy to make but so beautiful and satisfying at the same time. Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes, and Black Rice (v, gf) This will forever be my favorite fall/­­winter salad. It’s all about the contrast of flavors: aromatic black rice, nourishing spiced cauliflower, juicy grapes, and a slightly spicy miso dressing full of umami. Sprinkle in some pomegranate seeds for an extra festive look. Sorghum Beet Risotto (v, gf) This vibrant risotto would make for an excellent side dish at a holiday table, especially if you don’t know what to do with that forgotten bag of sorghum in the back of your pantry :) Curried Squash and Kale Riceless Risotto (vo, gf) Another alternative (aka riceless) risotto option. This one uses riced kabocha squash in place of actual rice. It’s luxuriously creamy, warming, and overall impressive. Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche (v, gf) This vegan quiche comes together quite magically, with no crust, eggs or cream to speak of. Chickpea flour acts similarly to the egg-cream foundation of traditional quiche and solidifies into a sort of custard when baked at a high temperature. Add a studding of silky root vegetables and greens to that, and you’ve got yourself the perfect, healthful and delicious fall/­­winter quiche. Soups and Sides Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale (v, gf) This is butternut squash soup elevated. The addition of cranberries and pear is as delicious as it is unexpected. There’s a special ingredient that will help aid digestion during a big meal, too. Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower (v, gf) A soup that’s both grounding and fortifying, and good enough to serve as an unexpected, colorful starter at the holiday table. Pink Soup with Roasted Onion and Broccoli (v, gf) Another stunning, colorful soup option. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage (v, gf) We love mashed potatoes, but we also love pairing a bowl of mashed potatoes with another, more interesting mash made with underutilized root vegetables. Both celeriac and parsnips are so uniquely flavored and healthful, it’s no wonder that they make for some delicious mash. Serve it with the Braised Holiday Cauliflower for the ultimate plant-based holiday meal. Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts (veg, gf) This recipe teaches you how to make your own ghee (golden, clarified butter that has a higher smoke point than normal butter and is low in lactose and casein /­­ not vegan), as well as how to make miso-date ghee, which is too delicious for words. It’s great on roasted Brussels sprouts, as well as everything else in this world. Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings (v, gf) A healthful take on nachos, with crispy sweet potatoes taking the place of tortilla chips. Great for self-serve style, snack-heavy parties. If you don’t want to go through the intricate process of making sweet potato chips, roasted sweet potatoes will work perfectly in their place. Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese (v, gf) This salad is simple but effective: visually stunning, healthful and delicious. Plus, you’ll want to sprinkle that almond cheese on everything! Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad (v, gf) Earthy, nourishing parsnips go so well with juicy, bittersweet citrus. The combination is especially irresistible when sprinkled with spiced and toasted walnuts and raisins. Use grapefruit if you can’t find pomelo. Desserts Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel (v) This is three favorite Thanksgiving pies in one: apple, pecan and pumpkin. It’s decadent and impressive, and a definite crowd-pleaser. (Also pictured in slice form at the beginning of this post). Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake (v, gf) Slices of this fruit and nut cake make for a great accompaniment to a cheese plate, as well as an awesome gift basket component. Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries (v, gf) The super-festive appearance of this decadent, frozen fudge basically speaks for itself. Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange and Miso Glaze (v) The universally loved combination of rum and raisins is elevated by a sweet and subtly salty orange and miso glaze in this vegan bundt recipe we developed for Food & Wine. Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat (v, gf) Oh man, this nougat! Not as sticky or sweet as traditional nougat, this one has a caramel-like complexity from our trademark sweet potato caramel. There is a studding of toasted nuts and cookie crumble throughout each slice, too. Great for homemade gifts or party platters. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake (v, gf) This cake is a crowd pleaser through and through. It’s got it all in terms of stunning looks and bright, special flavor. Black and White Chocolate Pudding (v, gf) These elegant, black and white chocolate pudding cups are easy to put together, but very impressive and full of whole food ingredients. Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache (v, gf) If you are looking for a grand and fun cake project, but still want something wholesome and not too sugary, look no further than this stunner of a cake. Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight In this recipe, we’ve updated the old school treat with the use of healthful ingredients, and the beautiful, floral flavors of hibiscus and orange blossom. Serve these Turkish delights alongside tiny tongs at a holiday party for the ultimate, fancy dessert experience :) Banana Toffee Tart (v) This tart is worth making just for the vegan date toffee alone, but combine that with a (vegan) buttery crust and caramelized bananas, and you’ll forever be everyone’s favorite host. Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats (veg, gf) Another crowd favorite from a few years ago, this cake is like carrot cake, but made with parsnips in place of carrots. The parsnips yield their moisture and delicate flavor to the cake dough, which is then layered with a cream cheese frosting and topped with candied kumquats. This recipe can easily be veganized – just use maple syrup in place of honey to candy the kumquats and make the frosting. Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream (veg, gf) All the components of this dessert can be made ahead of time, and assembled later. The cashew cream is not your average cashew cream, either – it’s extra-fluffy with the help of a special ingredient. White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart (v, gf) This delicate white chocolate mousse tart is flavored and colored with the juice and zest of blood orange. You also have the option of skipping the crust and making the mousse alone. Just distribute it amongst little ramekins for individual servings. Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies (v, gf) These cookies are crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside, and incredibly buttery throughout. Their unexpected green coloring looks beautiful, contrasted by the red topping of goji berries. Kabocha Squash Ice Cream with Maple Roasted Pecans (veg, gf) Winter squash does beautifully in ice cream, especially the naturally sweet, bright orange kabocha squash. In this recipe, kabocha ice cream is swirled with a simple, tart cranberry sauce and topped with maple pecans. This recipe can easily be vegan – just use maple syrup in place of honey. Miso Caramel Popcorn (v, gf) It’s entirely possible to make really good caramel popcorn at home! This popcorn is sweet, salty, and incredibly addicting – you’ve been warned :) Drinks Rosemary Hot White Chocolate (v, gf) This hot white chocolate is both cozy and decadent, with unexpected, warming notes from rosemary and a perfectly smooth, frothy consistency. Quick Persimmon Eggnog (v, gf) This is eggnog for both the adventurous and the health-conscious. Much lighter than the original, but still perfectly creamy and satisfying. Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules (v, gf) This is the perfect winter cocktail for those of us who don’t drink alcohol, but still want to participate in the celebratory ritual of clinking glasses and toasting with something special and delicious. Pear Cranberry Chai (v, gf) This cozy chai is brewed with the addition of pears and cranberries, which takes the flavor to the next level. Simply put, it’s the best chai we’ve ever had. H A P P Y   H O L I D A Y S  !  !  !   The post Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette

November 15 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. I’ve been wanting to come up with a worthwhile roasted vegetable salad ever since the weather turned chilly. I can’t be the only one who loses appetite for cold, super-green, lettuce-y salads once it’s cold outside. I’ll still say yes to something like a hearty kale salad, but most other ones make me shiver, if not accompanied by something warm. This salad is anything but shiver-inducing. Fingerling potatoes, carrots, and red onion all get roasted together in the oven, then mixed with green split peas, parsley, and a very special miso vinaigrette. The result is a substantial and hearty fall salad that makes for a great side dish or even lunch. Lets talk about split peas for a second. Did you know they are not only good for soups? When I was growing up in the Soviet Union, split pea soup or split pea puree was on the menu of every kindergarten/­­school lunch, and neither item was my favorite. Since then Ive learned that I like my split peas left intact, with a little bit of bite even. They are protein-rich, instantly making any dish more nourishing, and they are great at drinking up any dressing that theyre mixed with, which makes them perfect for salads. They take this salad from being just a plate of vegetables to a complete, well-rounded dish, thats acceptable to eat on its own. Do you have any favorite split pea recipes? Whether you use split peas, beans, lentils or chickpeas, making a habit of incorporating at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week will lead to some sustainable, nourishing and affordable meals. For more recipes using pulses, check out our White Bean Tuna Sandwich, Smoky Chickpea Croutons, Fennel-Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans, Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans, Red Lentil Gazpacho, or any recipes on the Half Cup Habit website. Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the miso vinaigrette 2 tablespoons white miso paste 2 tablespoons brown rice vinegar 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime or lemon juice 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil 1 teaspoon tamari 1 garlic clove - minced ¼ cup olive oil for the salad 1 cup green or yellow split peas - soaked in purified water w/­­ a splash of acv overnight sea salt 2 lb fingerling potatoes - halved or quartered 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil - melted freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary (optional) 3 medium carrots - diced diagonally 1 medium red onion - cut into small wedges 1 small bunch parsley - finely chopped handful of dill - finely chopped (optional) Instructions to make the vinaigrette Place the the miso paste into a small bowl. Add 1 tablespoon of the brown rice vinegar and mix until smooth. Add the rest of the brown rice vinegar, lime/­­lemon juice, sesame oil, tamari and garlic, stir to combine. Continue stirring and slowly pour in the olive oil to emulsify. to make the salad Drain and rinse the split peas and combine them with plenty of purified water and sea salt in a medium pot. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook, partially covered, for about 30 minutes, until soft, but not mushy. Drain over a colander and set aside. In the meantime, preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare two parchment paper-covered baking trays. Place the potatoes on one of the trays, drizzle with half of the oil, sprinkle with salt, pepper, and half of the rosemary, if using, and mix. Put the carrots and onion on the second tray, do not mix them together. Drizzle both with oil, salt, pepper and the rest of the rosemary, if using, and toss to coat. Place both trays in the oven and roast for 30-40 minutes, until all vegetables are golden and cooked throughout. The onion might cook quicker than the potatoes and carrots. Remove it from the baking sheet earlier, if thats the case. Let the roasted vegetables cool slightly and combine them with the cooked split peas in a large bowl, add the herbs and the vinaigrette, and toss to coat. This salad gets even better with time, as everything marinates in the vinaigrette. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Metabolism Boosting Everything Salad Watermelon Panzanella Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Baked Veggie Spring Rolls .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Olive Oil Loaf with Hibiscus Beet Icing

November 9 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Olive Oil Loaf with Hibiscus Beet Icing Checking in really quickly with this olive oil loaf that we haven’t been able to get out of our heads. We knew that we wanted it to be vegan and naturally sweetened, with a pink, plant-based icing, but the rest took a bit of debate. Should it be gluten-free or not? Should we aim to make it golden yellow like traditional olive oil cake? We finally decided on a simple, spelt version (maybe we’ll tackle a gf one later?), sweetened with coconut sugar, and thus darker in color than your average olive oil batter. It is still moist and hearty, and the icing is so easy and very special :) I love baking with spelt flour, especially sprouted spelt, which I used quite a bit for the baked goods in our new cookbook. The batter here is very simple, and yields a nice, crumbly yet moist dough, perfect for baking projects like this one. I would usually use coconut oil in this batter, but decided to go the traditional route and use olive oil. I love the subtle, earthy flavor that it brings to this loaf. I discovered that coconut butter makes an excellent base for vegan icing back in my raw food days. It melts well, but maintains shape, which makes it easy to work with. I love hibiscus tea for its color, pleasant, sour flavor, and myriad of health benefits. We used it here to offset the sweetness of the icing with some sour notes, as well as to color it pink. The beet came in because we wanted the icing a bit more electric in color, since hibiscus only colors the icing a dirty pink (which is pretty in its own way). You can completely omit the beet here, or use a fresh beet if you don’t have beet powder. Just grate about a half of a small beet and squeeze it through a cheesecloth to extract some juice. Then add the juice to the icing little by little until you have the color you like. Hope you’ll give this one a try! Olive Oil Loaf with Hibiscus Beet Icing   Print Serves: one 8½ loaf Ingredients for the olive oil loaf coconut oil for oiling the loaf pan 1½ cups (150 g) sprouted spelt flour or whole spelt flour 1/­3 cup coconut sugar 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/­2 teaspoon baking soda pinch of sea salt 5-7 cardamom pods - green shells removed, ground (optional) 1 teaspoon ground ginger (optional) 1 cup warm water or strong hibiscus tea 1/­3 cup olive oil 1/­2 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice or apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract for the hibiscus beet icing ¼ cup raw coconut butter (not oil) ¼ cup strong hibiscus tea ½ teaspoon beet powder (for color, optional) 2 tablespoons maple syrup a splash of vanilla extract Instructions to make the olive oil loaf Preheat oven to 350° F (180° F). Thoroughly oil an 8½ loaf pan with coconut oil and line the wide side with parchment paper. In a bowl, combine the flour, coconut sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cardamom and ginger, if using. Mix well with a fork. Add the warm water, olive oil, lemon juice/­acv, and vanilla extract. Mix to combine and pour the batter into the loaf pan. Carefully lift and drop the pan a couple of times to eliminate air bubbles. Bake for 50-55 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Let cool before icing. to make the hibiscus beet icing While the the loaf is baking, combine all the glaze ingredients in a small saucepan over low heat. Whisk until the coconut butter is melted, and the icing is smooth and creamy. Remove from heat and allow to cool, until thickened to an icing consistency. You can refrigerate the icing to speed up the thickening process, but be very mindful, as it might turn too thick very quickly when refrigerated. Once the icing has cooled to a good consistency, glaze the loaf, allowing some of the icing to drip down the sides. You might have a little bit of left-over icing - spread that on top of your loaf slices and enjoy :) 3.5.3226 You might also like... Ginger Marinated Tofu with Citrus Salsa Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans + Quick Marinated Beans Peach and Raspberry Summer Tart and a Guest Post for Scandi Foodie Root Vegetabe Chickpea Flour Quiche .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Olive Oil Loaf with Hibiscus Beet Icing appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1

November 1 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 This summer, we set out to share one practical, budget-friendly, and non-boring plant-based meal plan per season. Here is our meal plan for the Fall of 2017! We are really excited about the recipes in this one. It all starts out with cooking a pot of lentils and a pot of rice, roasting some winter squash, and prepping some kale. Those foundations then make their way into breakfast, lunch and dinner recipes that will take you through a whole week of nourishing and cozy fall meals. As usual, we are splitting this meal plan into two parts. This first part will focus on weekend prep, as well as breakfast and lunch recipes. Part 2 is here, and it’s all about dinner and dessert recipes. Here we go! Menu (see Part 2 for dinner and dessert recipes) Breakfast Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins Lunch Grain Bowl with Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup Dinner Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers w/­­ Any Fixings of Choice Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew Dessert Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Shopping List (print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Produce Vegetables - 1 large and 1 medium butternut squashes - 2 medium delicata squashes - 1 lb Brussels sprouts - 2 bunches kale (or 1 very large bunch) - 4 cups baby spinach - 1 jalape?o pepper - 1 lb crimini mushrooms - 2 medium carrots - 3 large yellow onions - 2 heads of garlic Fruits - 2-3 green apples - 1 lemon - 1-2 limes (if using in place of brown rice vinegar for the marinated delicata) - 8 ripe plums Herbs  - rosemarysagegreen onions (optional) - thyme (optional) Other - 3 cups almond milk or other plant milk of choice - 1 13.5 oz can unsweetened Thai coconut milk - 1 28 oz can or box crushed tomatoes - 1 cup brown rice flour or other gluten free floursesame tahini - white sweet miso - burger fixings like buns, lettuce, or anything else you like w/­­ your veggie burgers - vanilla ice cream or plain yogurt to serve with the roasted plums (optional) - crackers to snack on with the hummus or sourdough bread to eat with the hummus, soup or stew (optional) Bulk - 2 1/­­4 cups dried green lentils - 3/­­4 cup millet - 1 1/­­2 cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for the grain bowl) - 1 cup other grain of choice for the grain bowl, or 1/­­2 more cup of brown rice - 5-7 Medjool dates - 2 cups pumpkin seeds – toasted - unsweetened coconut flakes (optional) - cacao nibs (optional) Pantry /­­ Refrigerator Staples - neutral coconut oilapple cider vinegar - brown rice vinegar (if not using limes for delicata marinade) - balsamic vinegar (optional) - tamari - olive oiltoasted sesame oil - tomato paste - coconut sugar - sea salt - maple syrup or honey - sriracha/­­chili sauce of choice - baking soda - baking powder Spices - whole cumin seeds - whole coriander seeds - green cardamom pods - smoked paprika - black peppercorns - turmeric - red pepper flakes - bay leaves (optional) Day by Day Prep List Saturday Night (Night Before Main Prep Day): These are just quick tasks that need to be done the day before your main prep day. Soaking grains and lentils helps rid them of phytic acid, which makes them easier to digest. It also kickstarts the germination process, making the grains and lentils more nutritious. - Soak 3/­­4 cup of dried millet overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 2 1/­­4 cups of lentils overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 1 1/­­2 cups of brown rice (2 cups if you are using it for the grain bowl) overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - If not using brown rice for the grain bowl, soak 1 cup of another grain of choice for the grain bowl in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. Sunday (Main Prep Day): This is your main prep day, which you can also split into multiple days, depending on your schedule. You will find all the recipes for this prep day in this post, which includes two breakfast options and two lunch options for the whole week, as well as some simple prep for the dinners for the coming week. - Roast the butternut and delicata squashes to be used in Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. - Cook the lentils to be used in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. - Cook the brown rice to use in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl, if that’s your grain of choice for the bowl. - If you chose another grain for the grain bowl, cook it now as well. - Cook the kale and coconut kale to be used in the Grain Bowl and Veggie Burgers. - Make the Lentil and Squash Hummus to be used in the Grain Bowl, on the Veggie Burgers, and on crackers/­­bread as a snack throughout the week. - Marinate the roasted delicata squash to use in the Grain Bowl. - Make the Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup. - Bake the Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins. - You can also cook the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash for your breakfasts ahead of time, but I suggest making it in the morning. It’s pretty quick. Monday Night: Make the Veggie Burgers to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you’ve already cooked the squash, rice, kale and lentils that are called for in the recipe during prep day. Roast the plums for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. The recipes for the Veggie Burgers, Brussels Sprout Stew and the Roasted Plums are in Part 2.  - Make the Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers. - Make the Rosemary-Roasted Plums with Cardamom Sprinkle. Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the Veggie Burgers, prepare the Brussels Sprouts Stew for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. The recipe for the stew is in Part 2.  - Make the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew.   Prep 1. Winter squash is a beautifully versatile vegetable that can be used in millions of ways in both sweet and savory dishes. It’s always a great idea to roast a bunch of squash on the weekend, to use in all kinds of dishes throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use Butternut and Delicata Squashes in the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. See what I mean? It really is a super-vegetable. Roasted Butternut and Delicata Squashes   Print Ingredients 1 large and 1 medium butternut squash - cut in half lengthwise and seeded 2 medium delicata squashes - seeded and sliced into ½-inch rings neutral coconut oil - soft sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2-3 parchment paper-lined baking sheets. Arrange all the squashes on the baking sheets in a single layer. Oil them with the coconut oil and sprinkle with salt and paper. Roast the delicata squash for 10 minutes, then flip all the rings and roast for another 15-20 minutes, until cooked through and golden on both sides. Delicata squash skins are edible, so no need to peel off the skin. Roast the butternut squashes at the same time, for about 40 minutes or until soft throughout. You should end up with about 3 cups of roasted mashed squash flesh from the large butternut squash, which you will use for the hummus, muffins, porridge and burgers. The remaining 1 medium butternut squash will be used for the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. 3.5.3226   2. A pot of lentils, cooked on the weekend, can easily take you through a week of meals. They are nourishing, affordable, and can work as a base for so many meals. In this meal plan, we use French lentils in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. Pot of Lentils   Print Ingredients 2¼ cups dried French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the lentils. Place them into a medium-large pot, cover with purified water, and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook for about 15-20 minutes, or until soft, but still intact. Add salt at the last 5 minutes. Drain and use in recipes right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   3. Similarly to lentils, a pot of rice or any other grains, prepared on the weekend, can help you pave the way to quicker and better meals throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use brown rice in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl (if that’s the grain you chose for your bowl). Serve any leftover rice with the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. If you chose a different grain for your grain bowl, cook it now as well. Pot of Brown Rice   Print Ingredients 1½ cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for your grain bowl) - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2½ cups filtered water (3½ cups if cooking 2 cups of rice) sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the rice. Combine it with the water and plenty of sea salt in a medium pot, cover with a lid and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 25-40 minutes, until all the water is absorbed and the rice is cooked. Use in recipes right away or store refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   4. Blanching kale is one of my favorite, low maintenance ways of prepping a whole bunch of it for the week. In this meal plan, it will be used for the Coconut Kale and the Veggie Burgers. I also like to use the leftover kale cooking water for soups, stews, etc. In this meal plan, you can use the leftover kale broth for the Coconut Kale, the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew and even the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. Half of this blanched kale gets stored away for later use in the Veggie Burgers, while the other half becomes the Coconut Kale for our grain bowl lunch. You’re going to love the coconut kale – it’s velvety, creamy, and keeps well throughout the week. Blanched Kale and Coconut Kale   Print Ingredients 2 bunches (or 1 very large bunch) kale of choice sea salt 1 can unsweetened Thai coconut milk Instructions Separate the kale leaves from the stems. Wash and tear the leaves into roughly bite-sized pieces. Reserve the stems to use in homemade vegetable broth in the future, if desired. Place the torn kale leaves in a large pot and cover with purified water. Add salt and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes. Drain the kale, reserving the cooking liquid for the Coconut Kale and the Brussels Sprouts Tomato Stew. Return half of the kale to the same pot. Squeeze the other half of the kale dry and store it away in an air-tight container, in the refrigerator, to use later in the veggie burgers. Add ½ cup of the reserved kale cooking liquid and 1 can of coconut milk to the pot. Bring to a strong simmer and cook for 10-20 minutes, until creamy. Add more of the kale cooking liquid throughout the cooking time, if needed. Taste for salt and adjust, if needed. Eat right away or store refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   5. The good news is, you already have all the important ingredients prepared for this hummus – you’ve cooked the lentils and roasted the squash, which you’re going to puree with autumn herbs, garlic, tahini, lemon juice, and olive oil. Though for efficiency’s sake, we use lentils instead of the traditional chickpeas here, the spread still very much tastes like hummus. And not just any hummus – it’s fresh, savory, earthy hummus that’s better than anything you can get at the store. Use it throughout the week in the Grain Bowl, on top of the Veggie Burgers, or as a quick snack with some crackers. Lentil and Squash Hummus   Print Ingredients ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil - divided 4-5 cloves of garlic - peeled and sliced 1-2 tablespoons chopped herbs, such as rosemary, sage and thyme 1 cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1½ cups cooked green lentils (from above) juice from 1 lemon ¼ cup sesame tahini 3-4 tablespoons cold water toasted pumpkin seeds - for garnish (optional) Instructions Warm 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a small sauté pan over medium heat. Add garlic and herbs and sauté for about a minute, until garlic is fragrant and cooked, but not burnt. Add the squash, salt and pepper, and toss to coat. Stir around for a minute or so for the flavors to mix. Add the mixture to a food processor or a high-speed blender like a Vitamix. Add the lentils to the food processor/­­blender, followed by the lemon juice, sesame tahini, and more salt, to taste. Process until smooth, scraping the walls if needed. With the motor still running, pour in ¼ cup of the olive oil through the funnel, followed by the cold water. Pour in the water 1 tablespoon at a time until you achieve a desired, creamy consistency. Sprinkle the hummus with the toasted pumpkin seeds when serving, if using. Store the hummus in the refrigerator in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   6. Marinating vegetables is one of my favorite preparations, especially if I’m cooking ahead. It’s as easy as mixing up a marinade, and the veggies will only get more flavorful with each passing day. This miso-marinated delicata squash has got it all – it’s a little sweet, a little savory, and a bit spicy. It’s the perfect, powerful component to a memorable grain bowl, which is how it’s utilized in this meal plan. If you are planning on eating this squash at work/­­social settings, you might need to be cautious with the garlic – the squash is still really good without it! Miso-Marinated Delicata Squash   Print Ingredients 2 sliced and roasted delicata squashes (from above) 2 tablespoons white sweet miso paste 1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey (not vegan) 2 teaspoons chili sauce, such as sriracha 4 tablespoons brown rice vinegar or lime juice 1 tablespoon tamari 2 teaspoons sesame oil 1 garlic clove - minced (optional) 1 tablespoon finely chopped green onion (optional) Instructions Place the sliced and roasted delicata squash in a shallow dish. In a small bowl, combine the miso with the maple syrup and sriracha, and mix until smooth. Add the rice vinegar/­­lime juice, tamari, and sesame oil, and mix until smooth. Mix in the sesame seeds, garlic and green onion, if using. Pour the marinade over the delicata squash and toss to coat. Cover and let marinate at room temperature for 1-3 hours. Keep refrigerated for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   Recipes 1. These gluten-free muffins make for a great breakfast or snack. They are very subtly sweetsweetened only with dates – and get their soft, crumbly texture from the roasted squash that’s hiding in the batter. There are pockets of cubed apple throughout, and the pumpkin seeds on top add a nice bit of crunch. Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins   Print Serves: 10 medium-sized or 12 small muffins Ingredients 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pan ¾ cup brown rice flour or other gluten-free flour pinch of sea salt 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda 5-7 soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in 1 cup of hot water for 10 minutes ½ cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1-2 Granny Smith apples - peeled and finely cubed (optionally slice some of the apple to decorate the tops of muffins) 2 tablespoons chopped sage leaves (optional) pumpkin seeds - for sprinkling Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare a muffin pan by thoroughly oiling the holes or lining it with paper muffin liners. Combine the flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda in a medium bowl. Put the dates in an upright blender, together with their soaking water. Add the squash and blend until smooth. Add the coconut oil and vinegar and pulse to combine. Pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the dry ingredients and quickly stir to mix. Fold in cubed apples and sage, if using. Fill the muffin holes with the batter until each hole is about ⅔ full. Sprinkle each muffin with pumpkin seeds and decorate with apple slices, if using. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean. Let cool a little, then remove the muffins from the pan and let them cool on a cooling rack. Enjoy right away or store in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   2. This millet porridge is warming, cozy, satisfying, and overall perfect for chilly fall mornings. Millet is a humble and affordable gluten-free grain, but it has the potential to be quite creamy and luxurious when cooked in plant milk with turmeric and squash. The porridge is pictured here topped with some of the roasted plums from Part 2 of this meal plan, which makes it even more special. Turmeric Millet Porridge   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons coconut oil or ghee (not vegan) 1 teaspoon turmeric a few grinds of black pepper (to activate the turmeric) ¾ cup millet - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 1½ tablespoons coconut sugar pinch of sea salt 4 cups almond milk or other plant milk (or 3 cups milk and 1 cup water) - divided 1 cup roasted butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes - for serving (optional) Instructions Warm the oil/­­ghee in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the turmeric and black pepper, and stir around for about a minute. Add the millet, coconut sugar, salt and 3 cups of plant milk (or 2 cups of milk and 1 cup of water). Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Stir periodically to prevent the porridge from sticking to the bottom. In the meantime, blend the squash and the remaining 1 cup of plant milk in a high-speed blender. Mix the blended mixture into the porridge after the 20 minutes of cooking and stir to combine. Simmer everything for another couple of minutes. (Alternatively, skip blending the squash and the remaining plant milk in a blender and add both the squash and the rest of the milk to the porridge, stirring to warm everything through. This will result in a less smooth porridge with some pockets of squash, which I like as a nice change from a smooth porridge). Serve the porridge topped with toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes, if desired. Store in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. Reheat gently over medium low heat with more ghee/­­coconut oil and a splash of plant milk or water. 3.5.3226   3. This grain bowl will come together very quickly during a weekday lunch, since you’ve already gotten all the components ready during prep day. As an alternative to the bowl, you can spread the hummus on some sourdough bread and top that with the squash for an open-faced sandwich, with the coconut kale on the side. Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Grain Bowl   Print Ingredients cooked brown rice or another grain of choice (from above) coconut kale (from above) miso-marinated delicata squash (from above) lentil and squash hummus (from above) toasted pumpkin seeds Instructions Heat up the rice and coconut kale in a pan or saucepan with a bit of oil or water. You can also gently heat the miso-marinated squash, but be careful not to heat it too much because of the miso. Serve all the components together in a bowl, sprinkled with toasted pumpkin seeds. 3.5.3226   4. Our second lunch option is a very lovely and very simple pureed fall soup, with flavors of butternut squash, green apple, and autumn herbs. Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 green apple - peeled, cored and chopped 2 garlic cloves - sliced 1 teaspoon coriander seeds - preferably freshly ground about 1 tablespoon chopped sage and rosemary sea salt freshly ground black pepper flesh from 1 medium roasted butternut squash (from above) Instructions Warm the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, apple, garlic, coriander and herbs, if using, and sauté everything for 10 minutes. Scoop the flesh out of the roasted squash and add it to the saucepan, followed by the sea salt, pepper and 3 cups of purified water. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes, until all the flavors are combined well. Carefully blend everything in an upright blender until smooth. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226 Continue to Dinner and Dessert Recipes > > >  You might also like... Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Squash Noodle Soup with Healing Turmeric-Ginger Broth, Roasted Carrots... Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2 .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bites

October 25 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bites This post was created in Partnership with Nuts.com Coming to you with my favorite, easy treat as of late. Though the desserts section of our recipe index has plenty of bar recipes of all kinds (check out our lemon bars, ‘twix’ bars, matcha lime bars, etc.), I can’t stop coming back to them as one of my favorite dessert formats. These cookie dough ones are a little different though – they are shaped into perfectly indulgent, bite-sized treats. They are: made with pantry ingredients, low-maintenance in preparation, gluten-free and vegan, and they really do taste like cookie dough! Since the concept of eating raw cookie dough is non-existent where I come from, I was very skeptical when I first found out about it some years ago. My mind was quickly changed when I tried one of the crazy Ben & Jerry’s flavors involving chunks of cookie dough, dispersed throughout their ice cream. I get it now. I really do. Our cookie dough is a bit less indulgent and more nourishing than the average, but still tastes rich and perfectly decadent. It’s made with flours that are okay to eat in their raw form – almond (made of just almonds) and coconut (made of coconut pulp), and the buttery element comes from tahini or cashew butter. Once mixed with a bit of coconut oil, maple syrup and cacao nibs, it’s remarkable how much the stuff actually tastes like chocolate chip cookie dough. Add a coating of tahini chocolate to that, and you’re in business. I haven’t yet met anyone who wasn’t immediately impressed by these bites. All the ingredients for this recipe come straight from my favorite online bulk foods shop, Nuts.com. Though we often talk about them on this blog, I never tire of marveling at their amazing selection. It’s true bulk food heaven. They also take real pride in the quality of their ingredients, and it really shows. I haven’t been able to find juicier dried fruit anywhere else. AND they roast their nuts the same day they are shipped! I love seeing that type of care put into businesses, and I’m always grateful to have Nuts.com as a sponsor. Hope you’ll give these bites a try! Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bites   Print Ingredients for the chocolate chip cookie dough ½ cup almond flour ½ cup coconut flour generous pinch of sea salt 1 tablespoon maca powder (optional) ½ cup tahini, cashew butter, or a mixture of both 2 tablespoons coconut oil 2-3 tablespoons maple syrup ¼ cup cacao nibs for the chocolate layer ½ cup dark chocolate chips 1-2 tablespoons tahini or cashew butter 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 tablespoon maca powder (optional) Instructions to make the chocolate chip cookie dough Prepare an 8 x 8 square dish and line it with parchment paper, extending the edges up the sides for easy removal later on. Combine the almond and coconut flours with the salt, maca powder, if using, tahini/­­cashew butter, coconut oil, and maple syrup in a food processor. Mix until well-combined. Transfer the mixture to a bowl and fold in the cacao nibs. You can also mix all the ingredients by hand in a bowl. Press the cookie dough mixture into the bottom of the lined dish to create an even layer. to make the chocolate layer and assemble Melt the chocolate chips on a double boiler. With the heat still on, add in the tahini/­­cashew butter, coconut oil, and maca, if using. Stir everything together until smooth and turn off the heat. Pour the chocolate mixture over the cookie dough layer in the baking dish. Spread into an even layer with a spoon. Place the dish into the refrigerator for at least 20 minutes, or until the chocolate layer is hardened. Lift the cookie out of the dish, using the extended sides of the parchment paper, and place it onto a cutting board. Start by cutting the cookie in half lengthwise and crosswise with a sharp knife. Then continue cutting each piece in half until you have 1 cookie dough bites. Alternatively, make them any shape or size you want. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast)

October 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast) We went to Italy earlier this month and visited the Amalfi Coast and Rome. Having visited the Abruzzo region a few years ago, I continue to be amazed at how different Italy is from region to region. They are almost like separate, tiny countries. It was a great trip – we lucked out with the weather, all our extensive train, plane, bus and boat journeys went pretty smoothly, and we got to see so many breathtaking things. The only complaint we had is a classic one – not enough time there. Below are some photos from the trip, as well as some notes and suggestions that we hope will be useful to future travelers :) Amafli Coast Our first impression was that this is an amazingly beautiful area that’s been completely overrun by tourism. That being said, there are still ways to enjoy it less like a tourist and more like a visitor, and it’s honestly so breathtaking that it’s very worth the visit. We stayed in Vettica, a quiet village right next to Amalfi, in a tiny Airbnb with a big terrace overlooking the cliffs and the sea. For us, it was the best of both worlds. We saw close to no tourists in Vettica, and instead got to see how people lead their lives in such an amazing setting. We watched locals going to church, to the market, feeding their cats, and being completely unaffected by the copious amounts of stairs in their cliffside neighborhoods (we were out of breath every time). Yet Amalfi was close enough (still a 45 minute walk or a stressful bus ride, but totally doable) that we had access to the boats and buses that shuttle people to Capri, Positano, and other beautiful places on the coast. It was really nice to have some distance from Amalfi, because it’s incredibly crowded with tour groups on any given day, but you have to go through it to get pretty much anywhere on the coast. Capri Once we got to Capri, we were wishing that we could spend the night there. There’s so much to do and it’s so incredibly beautiful. Take the chairlift up to Monte Solaro, the highest peak, to see the insane panorama that opens up. Walk around both Capri and Anacapri. Capri is better for partying and Anacapri – for quiet walks on tiny streets. Visit the Church of San Michele in Anacapri to see the intricate, hand-painted floor. Eat torta caprese and caprese sandwiches in the spirit of true tourism :) A complete must is a visit to the Villa San Michele, a villa built by Axel Munthe, the Swedish physician and author. Munthe was a collector of classical artifacts, so the whole villa is tastefully decorated by objects from the antiquity, some of which were found right on site during the construction of the villa. There is a lush garden, a breathtaking panorama of the island and the sea, and every inch of the place is pristine and photogenic. Positano Although Positano is an incredibly beautiful town with stunning architecture, we concluded that we would have been better off having a second day in Capri instead of coming here. The reason: it is swamped with tourists and touristy shops in a way that feels quite forced and concentrated (Capri, though also very touristy, had a more spread out feel). Maybe we went to the wrong places? If you have more than four days on the Amalfi coast, which is all we had, we would still recommend coming here. It also largely depends on your goals for your travels, of course :) Ravello We went here mainly because the host of our favorite Russian travel show visited the town in one of the episodes, and it looked totally breathtaking. Ravello is a town very high in the mountains, and the bus ride up took us on some of the tightest serpentines we’ve ever seen. The views from the top are the pay off, and the air feels different – very much like the freshest mountain air. Another beautiful villa to visit is the Villa Cimbrone in Ravello, full of ancient structures, fountains, sculptures, a beautiful garden and yet another breathtaking panorama. Food We were surprised to learn that the region is actually not known for its food, and finding a good, authentic meal isn’t easy because large amounts of tourists equal large amounts of tourist trap restaurants. It is Italy however, where even bad food is decent. We did manage to find some gems, but Rome really took the prize over Amalfi in the culinary department. Here are a few favorites: Pizzeria Da Nino, Conca dei Marini A charming, small restaurant in the town neighboring Vettica, with home-cooked food and a super charming owner (Nino!) that greets you at the door and is easy to understand even when you don’t speak a word of Italian. Go for the fresh-made pasta. Al Pesce d’Oro, Vettica A restaurant at a bed and breakfast in Vettica with good pizza. We went for the zucchini and squash blossom one and were pleasantly surprised at how solid and tasty it was. Da Ferdinando, Positano An outdoor restaurant right on the beach in Positano, with a really fun atmosphere and tasty dishes. La Vecchia Cantina, Ravello When visiting Ravello, lunch presented itself as a problem, because we didn’t research anything beforehand. We wandered off the central square and into this restaurant, and ended up having a pretty solid meal with very nice service. Bar Ferraro, Anacapri Went here when visiting Capri to try the mandatory torta caprese. It was very good, and so were the little frozen ricotta shortbread cookies. Rome We are so completely in love with Rome. We only had three days there, which is nothing! It was hard to cover everything we wanted, but we tried our best. We stayed in a really cool Airbnb near Campo de Fiori, which is a centrally located square that’s busy at all times of the day. Luckily, our actual location was on a very quiet, narrow street, so it was the best of both worlds. We visited the main historic sites (the Forum, Colosseum, Pantheon etc.), as well as the Jewish Ghetto, Trastevere, Testaccio and Monti. Below are some favorites. Sites The obvious: the Forum, the Colosseum, Ponte Sant’Angelo, Piazza del Popolo, Piazza Navona, the Pantheon. Even though the Pantheon was incredibly crowded, it was still super impressive. This inscription on Raphael’s burial is still in my mind: ‘Here lies Raphael, by whom nature herself feared to be outdone while he lived, and when he died, feared that she herself would die.‘ Wow. Churches: Santa Maria del Popolo, Santa Maria Sopra Minerva, San Luigi dei Francesi, Santa Maria in Trastevere, it’s endless really :) Food La Montecarlo A really fun place that serves Roman-style thin crust pizza and more, crowded with locals at any given time. They casually line each new customer’s table with white paper in place of a tablecloth, and write out the check on the paper at the end of the meal, from memory. The service is fast and efficient. We liked the super thin-crusted pizza (endless topping options), the pesto pasta and mushroom pasta, and of course, the arancini (fried rice balls served as an app). Roscioli If you’ve ever watched any food & travel shows about Rome, chances are Roscioli was featured as a mecca for everything delicious in the center of the city. Roscioli has a whole cluster of eateries right near Campo de Fiori: a deli/­­restaurant, a cafe with a coffee counter and bite-sized pastries, a bakery, and a full-on pizza restaurant called Emma. The coffee at the cafe is excellent. At the bakery, get any of the delicious by-the-slice pizzas that they are putting out all day, as well as the bread. We liked the bread so much, we smuggled a loaf home in our luggage. If you go to Emma, definitely try the pizza, since it’s the specialty there, and apparently a whole lot of effort went into developing the pizza dough recipe. If you go to the restaurant/­­deli, Katie Parla has some great advice on navigating the menu there. Antico Forno Cordella (or Urbani) If you find yourself in the Jewish Ghetto in the morning or afternoon, stop in here for a slice of their delicious, thin and crispy pizza rossa. Pianostrada A fun dinner place with neat decor and a more modern, deconstructed take on Roman classics. Urbana 47 If you go to the Colosseum, you might as well stop here for lunch, as it’s about a 10 minute walk away. They focus on local and seasonal ingredients, and we really loved every pasta dish we ordered here. (Thank you Pauline for the recommendation!) Sant’Eustacchio il Caffe We really enjoyed sitting at an outside table here with a cappuccino and a cornetti (both very good), watching the morning world go by. Go here on your way to the Pantheon and/­­or Piazza Navona, both are super close. Don’t miss the church Sant’Eustachio that’s right there, with a beautifully sculpted deer head on the facade. Volpetti If you are in the mood to visit a serious deli, check out Volpetti in Testaccio. They carry an overwhelming amount of cheeses, meats, olives, marinated veggies, pizza by the slice, and fried snacks. They are also able to vacuum wrap anything you buy, so that you can put the stuff in your luggage with little fear of it being taken away at the airport. Sack Food Another really interesting delicatessen that carries really unusual cheeses and meats. If you are anything like us and gift food as travel gifts to your omnivore friends, this place is great. You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Travel Notes: Chicago Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Saveur Magazine Best Food Blog Awards, Golubka in Special Interest .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway

September 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + GiveawayThis post was created in partnership with Raw Rutes, fermenting crock giveaway below. I grew up with home-pickling and fermenting as the norm. Food in the Soviet Union was not only scarce, but also highly seasonal, so if you didn’t take care to preserve some tomatoes or cucumbers for the winter, you wouldn’t be able to taste any until the next summer. My mom made sure to stock our cool basement with jars of pickles, tomatoes, and fruit preserves every summer, as did pretty much every woman around. Other common fermentation projects included kombucha (or the ‘tea mushroom’ as we call it) way before it was cool, kefir, and of course sauerkraut. I can’t say that I’ve continued all these traditions. I do make my own kombucha, but I can’t motivate myself to do a big batch of pickles, and you can buy such good ones in the store anyways. Same goes for tomatoes, especially since California grown ones are available all year round, and will do if a big craving hits. Sauerkraut is a different story though, because it takes very little work, and the return is so good. I’ve fermented sauerkraut in jars and in big pots, inventing weighted contraptions out of any appropriately-sized object I could find, but what I’ve always dreamed about is a nice, clay fermenting crock with custom weights that fit inside perfectly. The two things that have stopped me from getting a proper fermenting crock were the hefty price tag and the considerable size that they usually come in, which is not very countertop-friendly. I was incredibly excited when Raw Rutes reached out about their Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock, because it addressed those two points perfectly. It’s petite and sits on my countertops very compactly, yet it can still fit two small-medium heads of shredded cabbage. It’s also quite a bit more affordable than traditional crocks. I love that it’s a clean white too, because they are often brown – not my favorite color, at least for my kitchen. If you’re not familiar with fermenting crocks, the main thing to know is that they make the whole fermenting process really easy and safe. All you have to do is shred whatever vegetables/­­fruits you want to ferment, salt them with either salt or salty brine until they are covered with water, weigh them down, and leave them be for a few weeks while they magically transform. The natural clay that the Yaozu crock is made with makes the environment clean and safe, and the water channel up top takes away the need for an airlock. The crock comes with clay weights, which fit inside perfectly, and ensure that all your veggies are submerged in the brine, which prevents any mold from developing. It’s truly a magical pot. For my first fermenting project, I wanted to do a sauerkraut that was a bit more colorful and exciting than the traditional kind. I used purple cabbage together with blueberries and apple, with a bit of coriander seeds for extra interest in flavor. It took about a week and a half, and came out really delicious. The predominant flavor is of sauerkraut, but there are juicy, sweet and salty bursts from the blueberries, as well as a bit of crunch and sourness from the apple. I can’t wait to experiment more. I even know my next project – the fruit kimchi from Sandor Ellix Katz’ book, The Art of Fermentation. Making your own kraut/­­any fermented vegetables is a really addicting activity. Once you try your first batch, you won’t be able to stop, which is great, since fermented foods are so nourishing. Probiotics are on the tip of everyone’s tongue nowadays – we’ve all heard that having a balanced microbiome is key for good health. Completing little fermenting projects at home and enjoying the results daily is the perfect, incredibly affordable way to contribute to that gut health of yours :) Giveaway: Raw Rutes, the charming online shop full of back-to-basics kitchen tools, is giving away their Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock to one Golubka Kitchen reader. To enter to win, leave a comment here with your favorite item from the Raw Rutes offering or favorite fermented food until October 11th, 2017 (USA only). Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut   Print Serves: about 2 large jars Ingredients 2 small-medium heads of red cabbage 2-3 tablespoons sea salt 2 green apples - peeled and sliced into 1-inch sticks 12 oz blueberries 2 teaspoons coriander seeds (optional) Instructions Rinse your cabbages and remove the outer leaves. Save a few of the leaves and set them aside. Cut the cabbages in half and cut out the core. Cut each cabbage half into quarters and shred on a mandolin slicer or with a sharp knife. Put the shredded cabbage in a large bowl and mix in the salt, then massage it well until the cabbage starts to release juices. Let the cabbage sit in the bowl for about 30 minutes to release more juices. Mix in the apple slices, blueberries, and coriander with your hands. Pack everything tightly into your fermenting crock using your fist. Cover the surface with the reserved cabbage leaves - this will make sure that nothing will float to the top. Place the ceramic weights on top. At this time, all the contents of the crock, including the ceramic weights, should be completely submerged in juices. If thats not happening, let everything sit for a few more hours and see if the cabbage releases more juices to submerge. If there is still not enough liquid after a few hours, make brine with 1 cup filtered water and 1 teaspoon sea salt. Pour the brine into the crock, until the weights are just covered with the liquid. Its important to have everything submerged in liquid at all times to prevent any mold from forming. Pour brine or filtered water into the water channel and cover the crock with its lid. Let everything ferment for 1-2 weeks, tasting periodically, until the flavor is sour to your liking. Refill the water in the water channel as it evaporates. After a few days of fermenting, the brine should be nice and bubbly. If you have a cool basement, you can also start out the fermentation in a warmer room for the first week, and then move the crock to the basement to finish off the process (the basement should not be too cold!). Once your sauerkraut is done, pack it into clean glass jars, covered with brine, and keep it refrigerated. Save some of leftover brine to use as a starter in your next fermentation project, which will kick-start the process much quicker. You can also take little shots of the brine for a nice probiotic, booster. Have fun! 3.5.3226 You might also like... No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars Roasted Parsnip and Apple Soup with Radish Greens Babamesco Dip Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Cauliflower ‘Pesto’ Pasta

September 20 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Cauliflower ‘Pesto’ Pasta I’m back with another recent weeknight dinner favorite. It’s a hearty pasta dish, and it’s a keeper. I can always count on pasta to get Paloma (9) eating dinner without too many negotiations, and I generally try to hide/­­pack as many vegetables as possible between the noodles. She would definitely be much happier eating plain pasta with a few grates of sheep’s milk cheese on top, but she’ll also tolerate most veggies when they’re interwoven with any pasta-like food. This one is made wholesome with a special, cauliflowerpesto’ with pistachios, herbs and golden raisins. We roast cauliflower florets pretty often around these parts, and I go through phases where I get very sick of roasted cauliflower. I’m in one of those phases now. I still automatically grab a head of cauliflower every time I buy groceries for the week, and that’s when I’m forced to be a bit more creative and figure out something else to do with it. If I’m lazy, I’ll just steam and freeze the cauliflower to use in the veggie-packed smoothies that Masha and I are obsessed with right now. If I’m a bit more motivated, I’ll experiment and generally come up with something really tasty like this ‘pesto’ number. I credit cauliflower with all my experimental success, since it’s one of the most delicious and versatile vegetables, in my opinion. Pulsed cauliflower sautéed with onion takes the leading role in the ‘pesto’, much like basil would in a traditional pesto. There are nuts, herbs and garlic, too, and it’s quite flavorful and almost like a chunky sauce in texture, hence the choice of name. Plumped, golden raisins take the whole thing to the next level – imagine sweet, juicy pockets in the midst of everything savory and carb-y. Delicious all the way. Any leftover cauliflower pesto is really good on toast, in salads or bowls. We are going to Italy next week, Rome and the Amalfi Coast to be more specific. If you’ve been there, we would greatly appreciate any recommendations you might have as far as things to see /­­ do /­­ eat. Thank you :) Cauliflower Pesto Pasta   Print Serves: serves 4 Ingredients half a cauliflower head - roughly chopped 2 tablespoons coconut oil 1 yellow onion - chopped 8 oz pasta (preferably noodle shape like fettuccine, linguini, spaghetti, etc.) sea salt 3 garlic cloves - sliced pinch of red pepper flakes juice of 1 lemon 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon smoked paprika ¾ cup golden raisins ½ cup chopped pistachios ¼ cup chopped parsley large handful of basil leaves (optional) Instructions Place the chopped cauliflower florets in a food processor and pulse into rice-sized pieces (some will be bigger, some smaller, and thats fine). Set aside. Warm the coconut oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onion and sauté for 7 minutes, or until translucent. In the meantime, bring a large pot of water to a boil, add salt and cook your pasta according to the time on the package. Drain, reserving ½ cup of cooking water and set aside. Add salt, garlic and red pepper flakes to the sautéed onion and cook for another minute. Add the riced cauliflower and lemon juice, increase the heat and stir around until the lemon juice is absorbed/­­evaporated. Lower the heat back to a medium. Add the reserved pasta cooking liquid, mustard, paprika, raisins and pistachios. Mix well and cook for about 8 minutes, until the cauliflower is cooked, but not mushy. Add the cooked pasta and toss to combine. Mix in the herbs and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Tahini Hot Chocolate Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post CauliflowerPestoPasta appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet

September 13 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

I’m writing from a hotel in Orlando, where we’ve been waiting out hurricane Irma. Man did we dodge the bullet with this one. Our home is on a tiny island off the West Coast of Florida, and originally the storm’s projected path fell right over the island as a very powerful category 4. So powerful that we were getting ready to say goodbye to our house. Due to some extremely fortunate weather circumstances, our home only got hit with a category 1 storm and the island did not flood. There’s no power or cell reception, the streets are a mess, the bridge to the island has a large boat jammed against it, and everything is closed, but we still have a house! Hope everyone is staying as safe as possible this hurricane season. This is an extra cozy, late summer meal that I made last week when we were trying to figure out exactly what to do as the hurricane was approaching. It’s great for weekdays and tastes amazing, even in times of total uncertainty :) Eggplants are at their absolute tastiest right now, so this is a friendly reminder to take advantage of late summer produce while it’s abundant. There’s something about cutting eggplant into large wedges that makes it taste entirely different than roasted halves or whole roasted eggplant. That shape just speaks of comfort, sort of like huge oven fries. Here it’s sprinkled with za’atar and served with delicious and warming herbed pistachio millet, quick pickled onion, as well as a classic, creamy tahini sauce. Hope you’ll give this one a try! P.S. We just heard that our power is back on, so I’m off to pack up and finally go home. Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the quick pickled red onion half of a red onion - thinly sliced apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon coconut sugar (optional) for the herbed pistachio millet 1 cup millet - soaked in purified water w/­­ a splash of apple cider vinegar 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil or ghee 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 1½ teaspoons turmeric sea salt - to taste 1 cup mixed chopped herbs like dill, parsley, cilantro, basil, mint ⅓ cup pistachios - chopped for the eggplant wedges 2 medium eggplants - sliced into wedges 1 tablespoon coconut oil sea salt freshly ground black pepper zaatar for the tahini sauce 1/­­4 cup tahini 1 teaspoon maple syrup or honey ½ teaspoon sriracha (optional) pinch of sea salt freshly squeezed juice of 1 lemon 1/­­4 cup purified water Instructions to make the quick pickled red onion Place the sliced onion in a small bowl and generously drizzle it with apple cider vinegar. Add the coconut sugar, if using, and toss to coat. Let marinate while cooking the millet and roasting the eggplants. to make the herbed pistachio millet Drain the millet and thoroughly rinse it in a strainer. Warm the oil over medium heat in a medium pot, add cumin seeds and toast for 1-2 minutes, until fragrant. Add turmeric and stir it around for a minute. Add the millet and toast, stirring, for a few minutes. Add 2 cups of purified water and salt. Increase the heat to a medium high and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer the millet for 15-20 minutes, covered, but stirring occasionally. Let the millet cool a bit and stir in the herbs and pistachios. to roast the eggplant wedges Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place the eggplant on a the baking sheet. Drizzle with the coconut oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper and mix to coat. Roast for 20 minutes, then flip the wedges and roast for another 15 minutes until soft and golden on both sides. Let cool a bit and sprinkle with zaatar when serving. to make the tahini sauce Combine the tahini, maple syrup, sriracha (if using), salt and lemon juice in a small bowl, mix until smooth. Add water gradually, while mixing, until you achieve a smooth sauce consistency. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Flatbread Pizza Raw Pad Thai with Baby Bok Choy and White Crab Mushrooms Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Red Cabbage and Sweet Potato Smoothie

September 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Red Cabbage and Sweet Potato Smoothie Smoothies are my absolute favorite breakfast. I always get sad once the mornings start getting cooler, because an ice-cold smoothie bowl no longer seems like a very appropriate breakfast option. I continue making them into October anyway :) For years, I’ve had the same smoothie formula that consisted of frozen banana, frozen berries, as well as any greens and super-powders I had on hand. This past year though, I decided to start packing more stuff into my smoothies, specifically more veggies. If you have a blender, especially a high-speed one like a Vitamix, it’s so easy to ‘hide’ all kinds of things in your smoothies. I’ve been favoring steamed and frozen cauliflower, sweet potato, and zucchini in place of frozen banana. I’ve also been adding things like raw beets, red cabbage, and even mung bean sprouts into the blender. At first, eating a barely sweet smoothie was strange, but now I can honestly say that I’ve grown to appreciate and love having a less sugary breakfast. I realized that it’s more important to me to have a smoothie, any smoothie than to have a sweet, dessert-like one in the morning. This red cabbage and sweet potato smoothie has been my favorite variation since I randomly decided to throw some leftover red cabbage into the blender. Its flavor is barely noticeable in the final product, but it adds excellent color and nutrition into the mix. Steamed and frozen sweet potato contributes some sweetness and creaminess, while making the smoothie quite filling and satisfying. Avocado ensures an even silkier smoothie and brings all of its healthy fats to the table. Frozen berries make the whole thing seem and taste like an actual smoothie. I like to add maca, because I swear it gives me all kinds of energy in the morning, as well as puts me in a really great mood. You can also add cacao, medicinal mushroom powder, or any other super-powders you like. I doctor it up quite a bit with nut butter or coconut yogurt, more berries and seed sprinkles, and eat it with a spoon. I love seeing the rainbow of color that all the ingredients create in the blender. To me, it’s the best thing. Would love to hear about your favorite smoothie combos! Have a nice Sunday. Red Cabbage and Sweet Potato Smoothie   Print Serves: 2 big smoothie bowls Ingredients about an eighth of a small head of red cabbage (should be a small wedge, smaller than in the photo) half of an avocado ½ cup cubed, steamed and frozen sweet potato ½ cup frozen blueberries, plus more for garnish ¼ cup frozen strawberries 1-2 teaspoons maca powder (optional) handful of any greens of choice (optional) 1½ - 1¾ cup purified water almond butter or coconut yogurt - for garnish sprinkles like chia seeds, cacao nibs, bee pollen or any other nuts/­­seeds of choice - for garnish Instructions Combine the red cabbage, avocado, sweet potato, blueberries, strawberries, maca, if using, greens, and water in a high-speed blender. Blend until smooth. I like to start out with just 1½ cups of water for a spoonable smoothie consistency and add more water if needed. If you would like the smoothie to be drinkable, add 1¾ - 2 cups of water. Serve right away, garnished with more berries, almond butter/­­coconut yogurt and sprinkles. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder Grapefruit Smoothie Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Red Cabbage and Sweet Potato Smoothie appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah

August 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah Hope everyone is having a nice weekend. Just a quick check-in today with a salad we made for lunch during the week that turned out especially lovely. I recently revisited one of my favorite dessert recipes on this blog, the Sweet Dukkah Cigars. I enjoyed them so much, that I was inspired to make a savory dukkah to have for sprinkling on various salads and soups for the weeks to come. Traditionally, dukkah is an Egyptian spice, herb and nut mix, served as a dip for bread. Ours is packed with nuts (almonds and pistachios), seeds (sesame, chia, pumpkin), and invigorating spices (cardamom, cumin, coriander), and it can serve as the perfect finishing touch for a variety of dishes. This salad came together pretty effortlessly, thanks to the abundance of colorful summer produce, which doesn’t need much to taste amazing. There are steamed, multicolored beets, juicy, sweet peaches, spicy watercress, creamy avocado, and a refreshing mint vinaigrette. The dukkah contributes an extra punch of flavor and crunch. It’s vibrant, seasonal food, just the way we all like it :) Below are some links to things we’ve enjoyed looking at on the internet these past couple of weeks. Have a great Sunday. Magic Lessons with Elizabeth Gilbert – we love that so many inspiring people have podcasts nowadays, since they are our favorite thing to listen to while cooking. Just discovered this one from author Elizabeth Gilbert. Rosemary Auberson – interviewed on Apiece Apart Woman, we love her art Stevie Nicks singing Wild Heart backstage, 1981 – obsessed with this video Rachel Saunders – love this ceramicist’s work and instagram Healing Wise – can’t wait to read this book DOEN – love so many of the blouses from this brand Coming Soon – want many things from this home goods store. Love that you can shop according to astrological signs :) Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the multi-seed dukkah ½ cup raw almonds ¼ cup sesame seeds ¼ cup raw pumpkin seeds 2 tablespoons chia seeds 7 green cardamom pods - crushed, green shells discarded ½ teaspoon cumin seeds ½ teaspoon coriander seeds ½ cup raw pistachios sea salt - to taste for the mint vinaigrette 4 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard ¼ cup olive oil ¼ cup minced fresh mint leaves for the salad 4-6 small beets - cut into wedges (we used a combination of red and golden beets) 2-4 ripe peaches or nectarines - sliced about 4 oz watercress or other salad greens 1 ripe avocado - sliced or cubed mint vinaigrette - from above multi-seed dukkah - from above mint leaves for garnish (optional) Instructions to make the multi-seed dukkah Preheat your oven to 350° F (180° C). Spread almonds on a baking tray, place in the oven and toast for 7 minutes. Add the sesame, pumpkin and chia seeds to the tray with the almonds and toast for another 5 minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside. Toast the cardamom, cumin and coriander seeds in a dry pan over medium heat for a couple minutes, until fragrant. Remove from heat and grind the spices in a mortar and pestle or a spicecoffee grinder. Combine the toasted almonds and seeds, ground spices, pistachios and salt in a food processor and pulse until most of the nuts/­seeds are broken dow, with some bigger pieces remaining. Set aside. to make the vinaigrette Combine the lemon juice and mustard in a small bowl and mix until smooth. Add the olive oil and whisk until fully combined. Mix in the mint leaves. Set aside. to make the salad Steam the beets in a bamboo steamer or in a steaming basket over a pot of boiling water for about 15 minutes, or until beets are soft. Let cool for safe handling. The beets should peel easily once cooked or you can even leave the skin on, if they are organic. Divide the watercress between plates, arrange the beets, peaches and avocado on top. Drizzle the salads with the mint vinaigrette and sprinkle with the dukkah. Garnish with more mint leaves, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Watermelon Panzanella

August 9 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Watermelon Panzanella Hey friends, this is Masha checking in with my (now annual) Woodstock, NY trip photos and a really good watermelon panzanella recipe that we cooked while there. My boyfriend and I went to Woodstock for the first time last summer and were completely enamored by its lush nature, chill swimming spots, and friendly small town vibe. We couldn’t wait to repeat the experience this year, and ended up staying at the same cottage in the woods for a weekend, which is perfect as far as we’re concerned. For our Saturday night dinner, we repeated the routine of shopping at Kingston Farmer’s Market in the morning and cooking dinner with all the bounty we found there at night. We made grilled pizzas and watermelon panzanella, and enjoyed the sweetest local blueberries together with Fruition chocolate for dessert. The panzanella turned out so lovely, and I couldn’t help but think how perfect it would be for any type of summer gathering or potluck. The inclusion of watermelon is a bit unexpected for panzanella, but it works so well in place of tomatoes and makes the salad extra cooling and hydrating. It’s also a pretty satisfying dish since it’s a bread salad, so it could be served as the prominent or only side at any summery event. I hope you’ll give it a try while August is in full swing! Below is a list of a few new-for-us places we visited and liked in Woodstock and around, but make sure to check out this post from last year for a more extensive list of things to do, if you’re looking to visit the area. Food Cucina – a modern Italian restaurant located in a beautiful farmhouse, serving dishes made with local and seasonal ingredients. I highly recommend getting a table on their wraparound porch, it’s stunning. Oriole 9 – a breakfast and lunch restaurant with an inspired menu and great specials. The coconut tofu hash was really good. Kimchee Harvest – sold at the Kingston Farmer’s Market on Saturdays. Really tasty kimchi made with unique ingredients. They have cucumber kimchi and rhubarb kimchi! I highly recommend getting the rhubarb one. Stuff to Do /­­ Visit High Falls Waterfall – a big waterfall with excellent swimming a bit downstream from the main fall, as well as cliff jumping. Zaborski Emporium – a huge, four story warehouse full of chaotically organized ‘architectural salvage.’ You kind of have to see it to believe it. A very impressive place to visit, especially if you are looking for a vintage door, sink, bathtub, stove, dishes, furniture and sooo much more. Candlestock – a shop full of every kind of candle and candle accessory imaginable. I’m especially into their beeswax candles. Tinker Toys – the coolest toy shop I’ve ever been too. Little to none of that bright-colored plastic, but a ton of educational games and toys for every age. It made shopping for Paloma’s birthday present a breeze. Watermelon Panzanella   Print Serves: 4-6 as a side Ingredients half of a small red onion - thinly sliced 2½ tablespoons apple cider vinegar - divided about 6 slices of crusty, whole grain sourdough bread - torn into bite-sized pieces 1/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil - divided 2 large garlic cloves - minced 1/­­2 teaspoon salt quarter of a medium-large watermelon - cubed 1 English cucumber - sliced into half-moons 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard handful of sprouts or microgreens handful of torn basil Instructions Place the onion into a small bowl and drizzle 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar over it. Set aside. Place the bread onto a covered baking tray, drizzle with 2 tablespoons of olive oil and sprinkle with the minced garlic and salt. Toast in the oven for 10-15 minutes, until the edges are golden. Combine the watermelon, cucumber and toasted bread in a large bowl. Whisk the remaining 1 1/­­2 tablespoons of the apple cider vinegar together with the Dijon mustard in a small bowl. Add the remaining 1/­­4 cup olive oil, whisking it until smooth. Pour the dressing over the salad and mix very well. Serve right away, garnished with sprouts/­­microgreens and basil. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Peach and Zucchini Smoothie

July 30 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Peach and Zucchini Smoothie I love those stands at the farmer’s market, where the fruit is a little too ripe and bruised, and therefore discounted. I can never pass one by and end up stocking up on the rejected fruit to freeze for smoothies. Since there’s an amazing abundance of peaches around right now, I’ve managed to collect quite a bit of them, sliced and bagged, in my freezer. They are great for making the most refreshing smoothies, but can also be easily defrosted for a crumble. In any case, it’s always a great idea to buy and freeze some overripe peaches :) Like seemingly everyone else in the (smoothie) world, I’ve been changing up my smoothie routine by using various frozen vegetables in place of banana, for a lower sugar start to the day. So far, I’ve had success with a mix of steamed and frozen cauliflower and sweet potato, as well as raw, frozen zucchini. Zucchini is especially lovely in combination with peaches, and I’ve been really liking the very minimal smoothie that we’re sharing here today. It’s nothing more than frozen zucchini, peaches, basil and a splash of vanilla, whirled with your liquid of choice. It’s barely sweet and very refreshing, but if you prefer your smoothies on the sweeter side, you can add any sweetener you like, or even a banana. Lots of great weekend links below. Enjoy your Sunday :) Kitty – Chloe Sevigny’s directorial debut is magical Bonsergent Studio – the most beautiful vintage online store based in Paris Alison Scrapulla – in love with this photographer’s work (the double exposures!) Shiso Delicious – a plant-based bento master, her Stories are also great Recipes at The Fullest – so many good ones + beautiful photos Clarisse Demory in Another Mag – we love her work, really excited to see this more in-depth profile about her approach Hormone-Balancing Helva Bars – into these A Simple Table – why don’t I have this cookbook yet? Vegan Ice Cream Enters A Golden Age – always great to hear, and if you want to try making vegan ice cream at home, we have a bunch of recipes here Peach and Zucchini Smoothie   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients 2 ripe, sweet peaches, plus more for garnish 1 medium zucchini handful of basil leaves splash of vanilla extract 1½-2 cups coconut water, water, almond milk or other liquid of choice bee pollen - for garnish (optional, not vegan) desiccated coconut - for garnish (optional) Instructions Slice the peaches and zucchini, and place them on a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Place in the freezer for about 2 hours or overnight, until frozen, then transfer to freezer bags to store. Combine the frozen peaches and zucchini with the basil, vanilla and liquid in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Serve, garnished with fresh peach slices, bee pollen and desiccated coconut, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Avocado Kiwi Smoothie and a Jus by Julie Cleanse Giveaway Almond Milk and Almond Pulp Cookies Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2 Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Peach and Zucchini Smoothie appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2

July 20 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2 Here comes Part 2 of our Plant-Based Summer meal plan, which we created in hopes of helping some of you get more plants into your life on a day-to-day basis. We aimed for efficiency, but also tried to come up with recipes that are inspired and delicious. Part 2 focuses on dinner and dessert only. There are tacos and fajitas, as well as a juicy fruit crisp. To see the breakfast and lunch recipes, as well as the grocery shopping list for the entire meal plan, head to Part 1. If you use this meal plan, we would appreciate your feedback a whole lot. Tell us which parts were useful and where we could improve. These meal plans are a ton of fun to come up with, but they are also a ton of work, so we want to make sure that we are putting our energy into something that’s practical to you. Providing that everything goes well, we’ll come out with the next meal plan in the fall. Until then, we are back to our regular schedule of two recipe posts a week :) Menu (see Part 1 for breakfast and lunch recipes) Breakfast Almond Pulp Lime Ginger Granola Overnight Berry Chia Oats Lunch Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad Basil Zucchini Chowder Dinner Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas Zucchini Kimchi Tacos Dessert Peach and Blackberry Crisp *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Day by Day Prep List Monday Night: Make the fajitas to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you already prepped the vegetables and spice blend during prep day. Bake the crumble for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week.  - Make the Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas - Bake the Crisp (+ second batch of almond milk if you didnt make it on prep day) Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the fajitas, prepare the Kimchi Zucchini Tacos for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. They are a very quick, weeknight-friendly dish. These tacos would also work well as a lunch, if you need a break from the soup and salad. - Make the Zucchini Kimchi Tacos   Recipes 1. These fajitas make for a very satisfying dinner, and they taste like the real deal, too. They utilize the chickpeas and half of the cauliflower, left over from Part 1, as well as the piquant fajita spice. When wrapped in a tortilla, the spicy onions and peppers, meaty portobello wedges, caramelized cauliflower, and chickpeas make up the perfect pocket of flavor, especially when finished off with all the fixings. Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas   Print Ingredients 4 tablespoons neutral coconut oil 1 cup cooked chickpeas (from part 1) fajita spice mix - (recipe in part 1) ½ cauliflower - cut into florets (left over from part 1) juice of 2-3 limes - divided 1 large red onion - chopped 1 red, yellow or orange bell pepper - seeded and sliced 1 green bell pepper - seeded and sliced 1 poblano or jalapeno pepper - seeded and sliced 2 portobello mushrooms - sliced tortillas of choice (corn for gf) 1 avocado - sliced, for serving cilantro - for serving vegan sour cream or yogurt - for serving (optional) Instructions Warm 1 tablespoon of coconut oil in a large cast iron pan over medium heat. Add the chickpeas, sprinkle with the fajita spice and sauté until golden. Remove the chickpeas from the pan and set aside. Add another tablespoon of oil to the pan, add the cauliflower florets in a single layer, sprinkle with the fajita spice and cook for about 3 minutes, until the underside is golden. Flip the florets, sprinkle with more of the fajita spice and cook for another 3 minutes or until the other side is golden. Pour the juice of ½-1 lime over florets and cook until it evaporates, stirring. Remove the cauliflower from the pan and set it aside. Add one more tablespoon of the oil to the pan, followed by the onion and all the peppers. Sprinkle with the fajita spice and sauté for about 8 minutes, until the onion the vegetables are soft and golden in places. Pour the juice of 1 lime over the vegetables and stir them around until it evaporates. Push the vegetables to one side of the pan and add another tablespoon of the oil to the emptied space. Add the mushrooms in a single layer, sprinkle with the fajita spice and let them cook for about 3 minutes, until the underside is golden. Flip the mushroom slices, sprinkle with more of the fajita spice and cook for another 3 minutes, or until the other side is golden as well. Pour the juice of ½-1 lime over the mushrooms and stir around until evaporates. Stir the onion-pepper mixture into the mushrooms and turn off the heat. Warm the tortillas, if desired, and keep them wrapped in a kitchen towel. To serve, place a few pieces of the cauliflower in the middle of the tortilla, followed by a small handful of the pepper and mushroom mixture and some chickpeas. Top with avocado slices, cilantro leaves and sour-cream, if using. Repeat with the other tortillas, as you go, and enjoy. 3.5.3226 2. These tacos are incredibly easy to make, but mindblowingly good despite that fact. I make them at least once a week in the summer, for a reliable, no brainer-style dinner. The kimchi basically does all the work for you here, infusing the zucchini and carrots with its powerful flavor, while the creamy avocado and cilantro bring on the perfect finishing touch. Zucchini Kimchi Tacos   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 small to medium carrot - shaved 2-3 small to medium zucchini - spiralized or julienned about 1 cup kimchi, or more to taste ½ cup cooked chickpeas (from part 1, optional) 1 avocado - cubed handful cilantro leaves - for serving tortillas of choice (corn for gluten-free) - for serving Instructions Warm the oil in a large sauté pan. Add the carrot and zucchini and sauté for a couple of minutes, until they are just beginning to soften. Remove the pan from the heat, add the kimchi and chickpeas, if using, and toss to mix. Warm up the tortillas, if desired, and serve the zucchini-kimchi mixture inside the tortillas, topped with the cubed avocado and cilantro. 3.5.3226 3. A fruit crisp is one of the easiest desserts to make, especially in the summer, when so many fruits and berries are at the peak of their flavor. This recipe utilizes the almond pulp, left over from making almond milk, for the crisp topping, leaving no part of the almond behind! Feel free to use any other fruit or berries for this recipe, just make sure to adjust the sweetener if you have a fruit that’s less sweet, like plums. Peach and Blackberry Crisp   Print Ingredients for the filling 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 3 ripe peaches - sliced 1 cup blackberries freshly squeezed juice from ½ lemon 2 tablespoons coconut sugar or maple syrup splash of vanilla extract (optional) ½ tablespoon arrowroot powder (optional) for the topping 1 cup almond pulp (left over from making nut milk in part 1) 1 cup rolled oats sea salt ¼ cup chopped almonds, walnuts or other nuts of choice ¼ cup maple syrup ¼ cup coconut oil - soft Instructions Preheat the oven to 375° F (190° C). Oil a medium-sized baking dish or a 9-10-inch cast-iron pan and combine the rest of the filling ingredients in the pan. Toss to mix. Combine all the topping ingredients in a medium bowl and mix thoroughly with your hands. Sprinkle over the filling. Place the pan into the oven and bake for 30 minutes. Cover with parchment paper and bake for 10 more minutes, until the fruit is bubbly and the topping is golden. Enjoy right away with vanilla ice cream, if desired. Store in the refrigerator. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna Roasted Root Vegetable, Red Rice and Lentil Stew Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream Sunday Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Berry Kombucha Float

July 9 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Berry Kombucha Float A confession – I’ve never actually tried a classic root beer float, but if it’s anything like this kombucha float, I’m all in. It’s a recent discovery for me, and the absolute favorite, quick treat of the season in our household. I’ve been making my own kombucha for years, but took a very long break from the booch production recently, because of all the chaos that came with the kitchen renovations. I finally got the scoby and starter back in shape, and have been infusing my kombucha with strawberries, raspberries and basil for a summery flair. I thought a berry kombucha would make for a nice, probiotic alternative to root beer and decided to drop a few scoops of my favorite vanilla ice cream into a glass of it to see what happens. That first sip was so good that I had to take a quiet moment to myself and take the float down to the pool to enjoy it in the sun. The contrast of the bubbly sharpness of the kombucha and the smooth creaminess of the ice cream is heavenly. The berries and basil contribute their fresh, sunny notes, and I could imagine infusing this treat with all kinds of other fruit and berries. If you aren’t into making your own kombucha, you can just buy it (already flavored) for an express version of the float :) Lots of great weekend links below, enjoy your Sunday! 16 Personalities – this nicely designed personality test was so fun to take and the results were pretty accurate (Anya is a ‘Mediator’ /­­ Masha is an ‘Architect’) The Savvy Cook – Izzy Hossack’s new budget vegetarian cookbook looks amazing Stasher Reusable Food Bags – I use ziplock bags a whole lot, and even though I tend to reuse them a few times, I don’t feel great about storing my food in plastic, not to mention eventually throwing the plastic away. Putting an end to that with these reusable, food grade silicone storage bags that are freezer/­­dishwasher safe. Self Care: Routines for Busy People – an interview with the founders of CAP Beauty The Vegan Argument (Made by a Non-Vegan) Sans Ceuticals Journal – even though I’ve never tried this brand’s products, I love the interviews and recipes over at their journal. Pyramid Crudité – tempted to cut all of my veggies this way from now on :p Raspberry Tomato Yogurt Pops?! – what a great idea Loungewear Dress – I want one in every color A Quick Interview With Me on The Plus Berry Kombucha Float   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients handful of mixed organic strawberries and raspberries, plus more for serving - sliced for strawberries handful of basil leaves - rubbed between your hands to bruise 3-4 cups plain kombucha a few scoops of vanilla ice cream (I used Coconut Bliss non-dairy) Instructions Place the berries and basil in a bottle or jar and muddle with the back of wooden spoon. Add the kombucha, cover and place in the refrigerator for about 24 hours. Distribute the kombucha between two glasses and drop a few ice-cream scoops inside each glass. Add more berries, if desired, and enjoy immediately. If using store-bought flavored kombucha, distribute the berries and basil between two glasses and muddle with the back of a wooden spoon. Add the chilled kombucha to the glasses and drop a few ice-cream scoops inside each glass. Enjoy right away. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Peach and Raspberry Summer Tart and a Guest Post for Scandi Foodie Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Double Chocolate Layer Cake and a Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Berry Kombucha Float appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway

June 28 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway This post was created in partnership with Raw Rutes. We’ve got a zinger of a hot weather dish for you today. Have you ever tried cucumber noodles in favor of the more common spiralized zucchini? I’m obsessed. They are the perfect, cooling and hydrating food, especially when dressed with plenty of lime juice, herbs and a kiss of spice. They’re great with tropical fruit, creamy avocado, and a sprinkling of toasted seeds, as well as tofu for more substance and a savory element. The glazed tofu recipe I give here is an absolute favorite of mine and generally very special, easy, and able to transform any tofu hater into a true believer. It’s garlicky and spicy, and with a touch of sweetness. You can see the video of the whole process above. I love cooking with tofu because it’s a flavor sponge and therefore extremely versatile. One of the most important steps in achieving outstanding tofu involves draining it of the liquid that it comes in. Generally, the less liquid tofu holds, the better it is at absorbing all the surrounding flavors. That’s where the beautiful, stainless steel Tofu Press from Raw Rutes comes in. Raw Rutes is a charming, online shop full of back-to-basics kitchen tools, from dreamy fermenting crocks to home brewing supplies, dehydrators and even freeze dryers (!). They sent me their Ninja Tofu Press to try out, and though I’m often skeptical of single-purpose kitchen tools, this one stole my heart. Previously, I would make a contraption of two plates, kitchen towels and a large jar of water for draining tofu, and I’m pretty relieved that I no longer have to make that much mess for such a simple step. This tofu press looks great and comes with a 4.5 lb weight, which gets all the liquid out of the tofu quickly and efficiently, with no required effort on your part. It can also be used for making your own homemade tofu (still on my list of things to try), as well as getting moisture out of pretty much any foods that fit. I’ll definitely be using it for my homemade nut cheeses. Some other items on my Raw Rutes wish list include this terra-cotta sprouter, this fermenting crock, and this crazy cherry pitter (why not?). Discount Code and Giveaway! For 11% off any items on Raw Rutes, enter code GOLUBKA at checkout through July 31st, 2017. To enter to win one Ninja Tofu Press, leave a comment here with your favorite item from the Raw Rutes offering or favorite way to prepare tofu until July 5th, 2017 (USA only). Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the glazed tofu 1 14 oz (398 g) package firm tofu (I used sprouted tofu) 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice - divided ½ tablespoon tamari 1 teaspoon sriracha 1 tablespoon miso paste ½ tablespoon honey or maple syrup 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil 4 garlic cloves - minced for the bok choy (optional) 1-2 baby bok choy - sliced into wedges splash of tamari juice of half a lime for the cucumber noodles 2 English cucumbers - spiralized or julienned ½ -1 lime sea salt pinch of red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil large handful each basil and cilantro leaves for serving 1 ripe, firm avocado - thinly sliced 1-2 small ripe, sweet mangoes - thinly sliced toasted sesame seeds basil/­­cilantro/­­mint leaves - for garnish Instructions to prepare the glazed tofu Press the tofu for 15-30 minutes to drain it of as much liquid as possible. Slice it into cubes. Combine 1½ tablespoons lime juice together with the tamari and sriracha in a small bowl. Set aside. In another small bowl, combine the miso paste, honey/­­maple syrup and the remaining ½ tablespoon lime juice, and set aside as well. Warm the coconut oil in a medium sauté pan over medium heat. Add the tofu and sauté, flipping periodically until golden on all/­­most sides. Add more oil if needed throughout the process. Drizzle 1 teaspoon of the sesame oil over the tofu and add the minced garlic, sauté for 30 seconds until fragrant. Add the tamari mixture, bring it to a boil and cook until reduced and syrupy, for 1-2 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the miso mixture into the pan and toss until well-combined. Remove the tofu from the pan and set it aside. to cook the bok choy Return the pan to the heat and add the bok choy. Cook for about 2 minutes on each side, or until the white parts are lightly golden. Add a splash of tamari and a squeeze of lime juice, and stir until most of the liquid is evaporated. Remove from heat. to prepare the cucumber noodles Place the spiralized cucumber into a medium/­­large serving bowl. Squeeze the lime juice over the noodles, sprinkle with salt and red pepper flakes, and drizzle with sesame oil. Add the herbs and toss gently to coat. to serve Distribute the noodles between serving bowls. Arrange the avocado slices on top of the noodles, followed by the mango, bok choy and spicy tofu, toasted sesame seeds and herbs. Enjoy right away. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream Turnip Blueberry Muffins Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Grapefruit Smoothie .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Summery White Bean ‘Tuna’ Sandwich

June 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Summery White Bean ‘Tuna’ Sandwich This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Everything tastes better on the beach. The sun and saltwater create a special kind of exhaustion that will make even the blandest piece of food taste mind-blowing. When I was a kid, we were usually handed fresh peaches after a long, tiring swim. The peach juice would inevitably end up all over our faces and running down our arms, but no one cared because the way they tasted made the whole world go quiet. Those same peaches never seemed quite as delicious at home, and one year I even made a point of only eating them when at the seaside. Today’s sandwich can be eaten anywhere and anytime, but it will also make for one very special beach snack. The main component of the sandwich is a white bean ‘tuna’ that has all of the best flavor components of tuna salad, with a little summer flare from fresh cucumber and basil. When mixed with red onion, pickles, olives, sunflower seeds, herbs and a mayo-like sauce, white beans taste remarkably close to tuna salad, especially sandwiched between some bread. Once you have all your ingredients at the ready, the ‘tuna’ comes together easily, and the batch will last you for close to a week’s worth of sandwiches. It’s sturdy and portable, and as a bonus has none of that characteristic scent that follows a tuna sandwich lunch. It’s satisfying and nutritious too, since white beans (as well as all pulses, aka chickpeas/­­beans/­­lentils/­­dry peas) are protein and fiber-packed little superfoods. This year we are partnering with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada on sharing some tasty, simple recipes centered around pulses, as part of their Half-Cup Habit program. The goal is to kindly inspire you to include at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week, for sustainable, nourishing and tasty meals. This sandwich is a good start :) Summery White Bean Tuna Sandwich   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients for the white bean tuna salad juice of half a lemon ¼ medium red onion - chopped ½ cup dried white beans (such as cannellini, navy, baby lima, etc.) - soaked overnight in purified water and cooked ½ cup chopped English cucumber ⅓ cup chopped pickles ⅓ cup chopped olives ⅓ cup toasted sunflower seeds ⅓ cup chopped dill and/­­or parsley 1 tablespoon capers 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast freshly ground black pepper handful basil leaves (optional) ½ teaspoon garlic powder (optional) ¼ cup mayo, or more to taste - recipe follows sea salt - if needed for the mayo 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon sweet miso paste 1 tablespoon sunflower butter or any nut/­­seed butter 1 teaspoon sriracha juice of 1 lemon or more if needed sandwich add-ins shredded red cabbage tomato slices more whole basil leaves sprouts or microgreens Instructions to make the white bean tuna salad Pour the lemon juice over the chopped red onion in a small bowl and let it sit while preparing the rest of the ingredients. Combine the onions in lemon juice with the rest of the ingredients in a food processor. Pulse a few times, taking care not to over process; the mixture should be slightly chunky. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container. Serve on good sandwich bread, with red cabbage, tomato, more basil, sprouts/­­microgreens, or any other favorite sandwich add-ins. to make the mayo Combine all the ingredients, except the lemon juice, in a small bowl and mix until smooth. Add the lemon juice and combine thoroughly. Add more of the lemon juice, if needed to achieve a creamy, slightly runny consistency. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Kohlrabi Avocado Salad Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice Lemon Tarts from Laura at The First Mess Ethiopian Injera with Mustard Lentils and Braised Cabbage .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Summery White Bean ‘Tuna’ Sandwich appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright

June 14 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright We’re so excited to introduce this new interview series today! It’s something that we’ve had in the works for a while, and we’re really happy to be kicking it off with such a special guest. Self-care has been a very prevalent topic in the wellness sphere lately, and it’s something that we’re both very passionate about, as evidenced by our love for nourishing foods :) We do, however, find that many articles on the subject can be quite generalized and anxiety-inducing, often leaving us with a feeling of not doing it right, or not doing enough. We became interested in digging a little deeper, in order to see what self-care looks like applied to real life, by real people we admire. We are fascinated by the quiet elegance of everyday routine and always searching for day-to-day inspiration, which we’ll strive to discover plenty of in the series. We hope you enjoy these in-depth conversations, and feel free to reach out with suggestions for future interview guests! Today’s dialogue is with Laura Wright, blogger and author of The First Mess Cookbook. Laura is a magician when it comes to approachable, plant-based cooking, and we look to her blog and cookbook almost every day for reliable, delicious recipes, as well as beautiful photography and an overall feeling of warmth and lightness. In this interview, Laura talks about her approach to self-nourishment, exercise, beauty, stress, fun, and much more. As expected, her self-care routine is full of wisdom and inspiration. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I get in moods where both are equally important. I stick to a certain rhythm with my early mornings and evenings though because I find it makes for better sleep and more productive days. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I wake up with the sun and take our dog out. Then, I drink a huge glass of water and make coffee, tea, matcha, or some sort of elixir. It’s usually coffee though. I read for a bit while I have my first morning beverage, or I’ll do a bit of journaling. After my partner leaves for work, I head out for a walk/­­run or do some form of exercise. Then, I fix up breakfast (usually a smoothie) and plan out what I’d like to accomplish that day. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? This time of year, I do most of my gardening after dinner, and I find that really helps me wind down. Just being out there as the sun’s going down seems to send a good message to my brain that it’s time to relax. Also, limited screen exposure after dinner is key. I use the Saje Natural Wellness Sleep Well roller on the soles of my feet, too. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Either a smoothie with greens and healthy fats (avocado, almond butter, coconut etc) or steel-cut oatmeal with tons of toppings in the winter. Lunch – Usually whatever I’m working on suffices as lunch, but ideally a salad with a little bit of grains tossed in and some legumes/­­nuts/­­seeds for protein. Stuff on toast is a go-to lunch for me as well. Snack – Right now I’m really into plantain chips with guacamole. Dinner – This time of year, we grill almost all of our vegetables and serve them with a big salad or slaw, whatever protein we’ve got, and a little heap of fermented vegetables or sauerkraut. I’ve been making these amazing grilled veggie tacos with cassava flour tortillas lately too. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Yes! Coffee, matcha, black tea, green tea–I love it all in moderation. I can be sensitive to caffeine sometimes, so I try to limit myself to 2 caffeinated beverages a day, and always before 2 pm . -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I try to never skip breakfast because when I do, I need something sweet by the time 3 o’clock  hits. I find that consuming a good amount of healthy fat in the mornings helps me curb those cravings. Sometimes you just need a treat though. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? So many! I have this tray on my counter with all of these powders and tinctures that I sprinkle into my coffee/­­tea or other elixirs. For supplements, I take a probiotic, Vitamin D3, B12, and Omega 3 daily. With superfoods/­­powders etc: I like all of the mushroom powders these days (reishi, chaga, lion’s mane and cordyceps) because they help soothe my nerves as well as provide a focused mental energy of sorts. I put spirulina in every smoothie I make because it has so much going on nutritionally. I take ashwagandha and mucuna pruriens to help with stress management. I love all the Moon Juice Dusts, too (Spirit Dust is my go-to). -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I could count a hundred personal influences in the realm of self-care, but I think Jason Wachob’s Wellth is a good place to start for a lot of people thinking about the subject. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do! I’m always changing it up because I like variety. I like to run, hike, do weight and resistance routines, swim in the summertime, and yoga here and there too. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I really like it, but I find I need some convincing to get started. Getting to it early in the morning is the safest bet for me personally, just to have it ticked off the list before the day really starts. And thinking about the delicious smoothie I’m going to drink after always helps :) -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Getting a step tracker! I know that sounds weird. I work from home and sometimes I spend way too much time puttering on the computer or standing still in my kitchen. Now I head out for at least 13,000 steps a day in addition to my workouts. I sleep deeper and have so much more energy during the day. Plus our dog loves all the extra walks :) Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Feeling clear-minded, open, and confident in any situation. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? My skin is so sensitive so I have my routine down to a science. I love to dry brush before I hop in the shower. From there, I use this special oil-based soap from France, and then while my skin is still damp, I moisturize with coconut oil. For my face, I use a similar oil-based cleanser, rosewater and witch hazel toner, the Cell Serum from Living Libations and Tata Harper’s Clarifying Moisturizer. I’ve also been using Cocokind’s Chia Facial Oil at night along with their Full Brow Balm. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Tocotrienols! They make smoothies/­­hot drinks super creamy and my skin loves all that Vitamin E. Plus all the usuals like greens, proper hydration, and omega-rich foods like flax seeds. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? The only tip I have is to pay attention to what you’re eating and drinking! Your skin/­­hair/­­overall appearance is a direct reflection of what’s happening on the inside. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? I’m a lot better at knowing my limits these days. I can sense when I’m bordering on overcommitment, and I just shut it down and start saying no to stuff. I try to nourish my body well and carve out frequent pockets of time for quiet and stillness. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Going outside, meditating, reading a good book, cooking a beautiful meal with no intention of posting it to Instagram :) -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I’ll eat lots of citrus and ginger and make a pot of vegetable broth with thyme, garlic, and shiitake mushrooms. I do immune tonics with mushroom powders too, drink lots of fluids, and take extra care to get a good night’s sleep and think positive. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Like I mentioned before, I’m a lot better at sensing when a project may not serve me/­­my career than I used to be. I think the work/­­life balance comes a lot more naturally now. When I was making my cookbook, it felt like I lived in that world, and I was eating a lot of takeout and just not looking after myself because I put that work first. When I start turning to certain shortcuts or I’m habitually depending on caffeine or working on the computer past my bedtime, I know it’s time to reset my outward glance. A reset usually means a day off with some gardening, intentionally simple meal prep, and creative pursuits that aren’t food related. Knowledge -- Your way of coming up with healthful, plant-based recipes that are unique and modern, but also doable and approachable is unprecedented in the food blog world. What is your process when it comes to developing recipes? That is very generous of you to say! I have a professional cooking background, but I also appreciate the comfort of ease and efficiency. Ultimately I want my recipes to bring some kind of enjoyment or sense of ease/­­relief in someone’s life. Those two goals are front of mind when I get to work on a certain recipe concept. The recipe will usually start out slightly chef-y (lots of ingredients, multiple cooking methods, longer prep time), and then slowly I edit it down to streamline and make it do-able for most lightly experienced cooks. I also read every food magazine/­­food media website I can to stay up to date on new cooking methods and ingredients. Fun & Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I work on my house! I like tinkering with the layout and picking up new pieces, plants, rugs etc. My favourite/­­ultimate “treat yourself” strategy though is booking a weekend (or longer) away somewhere with my partner. -- A book/­­song/­­movie to feed the soul: Book – Invincible Living by Guru Jagat Song/­­Album – The Master of None Season 2 soundtrack on Spotify. Italian disco, classic New Edition etc.! Movie – Win It All on Netflix (such a feel good movie, seriously) -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? –  A rosewater sprayer in TSA-approved size for a fresh/­­hydrating face mist –  Snacks (raw nuts, bars etc) –  Amazing Grass packets for when I need greens fast. –  Moisturizer –  Large scarf that doubles as a blanket –  A smoky quartz that I don’t leave home without. –  A hemp cloth and tiny container of oil-based soap because I always want to wash my face immediately after a flight, even a short one. –  Minimal clothing–usually neutral coloured basics that work well for a variety of situations. I tend to always buy clothing at my destination so I go light on it when I’m packing. –  Saje Peppermint Halo: I get back pain here and there and use this as a pain killer of sorts, both at home and away. It’s like rolling ice right onto the problem area! –  Bamboo utensils and metal straw for minimizing waste on the go. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Renee Bird! Based on this amazing post, I think she may be just the person for this series ;) All photos courtesy of Laura Wright The post Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Gluten-Free Strawberry Cobbler

June 8 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Gluten-Free Strawberry Cobbler Checking in really quickly today with a recipe and step-by-step video of this gluten-free and vegan Strawberry Cobbler. I wasn’t kidding when I said I would be flooding this space with strawberry recipes this spring and summer :) Similarly to crumbles or crisps, cobblers are delightfully lazy fruit desserts that require no perfection on the cook’s part, but manage to come out a perfectly jammy and satisfying mess almost every time. Earlier this spring, I set out to develop a version that is both gluten-free and vegan, but also quick and with a manageable list of ingredients – here is the result! Sweet summer berries don’t need much to taste good in a cobbler. In this recipe, I add a minimal amount of maple syrup to the berry mix, as well as lemon juice for a hint of brightness, and arrowroot powder to help make things jammy. You can easily adapt this recipe to use any fruit or berry, just use a little more maple syrup if you have fruit that’s less sweet than strawberries. The cobbler topping is made with a mix of gluten-free oat and corn flours, and comes out of the oven perfectly buttery (thanks to coconut oil/­­fat) and crumbly. The fruit and the topping marry so nicely with the contrast of juicy, sweet berries and buttery dough – it’s what cobbler is all about. Add a scoop of vanilla ice cream and you’re in heaven. Enjoy! Gluten-Free Strawberry Cobbler   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the filling neutral coconut oil for oiling the pan 4 cups strawberries - hulled and halved, quartered for larger berries juice from 1 lemon 2 tablespoons maple syrup 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder for the batter 1¼ cup gluten-free rolled oats 1¼ cup corn flour 1 teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons baking powder ¼ cup coconut sugar, plus more for sprinkling 5 tablespoons coconut oil - cold, firm 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1 13.5 oz can full fat coconut milk - refrigerated overnight Instructions Preheat the oven to 425° F (220° C). Prepare a 8-9 inch cast iron skillet or other heavy-bottomed skillet/­­baking pan by oiling it thoroughly. Place the strawberries into the pan, pour the lemon juice and maple syrup over them, add arrowroot powder, and toss to coat. Grind the rolled oats into a flour in a blender, food processor or coffee grinder (use oat flour if you have it) and pour it into a large bowl. Add the corn flour, salt, baking powder, and coconut sugar, and mix to combine. Cut the firm coconut oil into the bowl and work it into the flour with your hands. Add the apple cider vinegar and mix to incorporate. Scoop the fat from the top of the jar of coconut milk (it should separate in the refrigerator overnight) and add it to a small saucepan along with 3 tablespoons of the coconut water from the same can. Heat the mixture up until melted and hot and add it to the batter, mix to combine. You can also do all of the mixing in a food processor. Scoop and drop the batter over the filling with an ice cream scoop. Sprinkle the cobbler with more coconut sugar. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until the filling is bubbly and the batter is lightly golden. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Portobello Nachos Sour Cherry Pie - Moms Specialty Spiced Amaranth Porridge with Ginger Stewed Apples and Raisins Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Gluten-Free Strawberry Cobbler appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate

May 31 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate I’m so excited to talk bit about Heather Crosby’s new cookbook Pantry to Plate today. When I received my copy and took a scan from cover to cover, I was immediately blown away by the way this book kindly invites the reader to be both spontaneous and practical in the kitchen by working with the ingredients that are already on hand. With thirty clever recipe templates, Heather demonstrates how to improvise your way to delicious, plant-based meals. For example, Dense Veggies + Protein + Herbs + Binder + Spices = Vegan Meatballs (or Veggie Burgers)! The templates specify the required amount for each component, as well as which components are a must and which ones can be skipped altogether. In addition to the templates, the book is full of other useful tools that help make intuitive cooking a breeze: besides a regular recipe index, there is a cook by ingredient index, as well as mini-templates for creating flavor with aromatics, a whole bit on pairing spices, and a dressing and sauce section that has pretty much every staple sauce recipe you’ll ever need. If you don’t have a particular ingredient for a recipe, chances are you have something on hand that could act as a substitute, and there is a whole chart of interchangeable mix-and-match ingredients in the book to help you work through that. I’m quite terrible at sticking to recipes myself, since I always want to play, add, subtract and find alternative ingredients, so it’s as if this book was made for me. How Heather managed to define freestyle cooking in such clear, comprehensive terms, will remain a mystery to me :) Some more sections/­­recipes I’m most excited about: Coconut Yogurt, Dairy-Free Milks, Probiotic Cream Cheese, Veggie Fries, Cheesy Comfort Food, Hand Pies, Sneaky Brownies, Nice Cream. YUM! Onto the (not) meatballs. These Italian-style veggie meatballs come from the Veggie Burger section of the book and can be easily shaped into burgers or sliders, as Heather points out. They get their substance and ‘meatiness’ from lentils and portobello mushrooms, and a bit of sweetness from carrots and onions, while herbs like oregano, parsley and thyme, and spices like fennel and pepper give them that characteristic Italian flare. We enjoyed them two ways, the first day with zucchini noodles and pesto (pictured here), and the second day, a bit more traditionally, with real pasta and tomato sauce. Both were equally delicious. Heather also suggests to serve the meatballs in a sub roll, or even as an appetizer, along with some tasty sauce. Whether you live and breathe freestyle cooking, or you want to learn a bit more about being intuitive in the kitchen, check out Pantry to Plate, I have a feeling it will earn an important place on your bookshelf :) Italian Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate   Print Serves: 20 to 24 Meatballs or 5 to 6 Full-Sized Burgers Ingredients 2 tablespoons unrefined coconut oil, grapeseed oil, or avocado oil 2 cups (260 g) diced carrots 1 cup (70 g) chopped portobello mushrooms 1 cup (160 g) diced yellow onion 2 cups (400 g) cooked green, brown, or French green lentils (roughly 3/­­4 cup/­­140 g dry) 2 tablespoons water 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme 3 garlic cloves, minced 2 teaspoons ground psyllium husk 2 teaspoons rough-chopped fennel seed 1 teaspoon fresh-cracked black pepper 1 teaspoon sea salt, plus more to taste 1/­­2 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika Instructions In a skillet heated to medium, add 1 tablespoon of the oil and sauté the carrots for 20 minutes, until easily pierced with a fork but firm, not mushy. Add the mushrooms and onion and sauté over medium heat for 5 to 10 minutes, until softened and browning a bit. Transfer to a food processor with the remaining ingredients. Pulse together 30 to 35 times, until just broken up and sticky with texture and bits of color intact. Taste--if needed, season with more salt or seasonings. Pulse or stir to incorporate. Form 1 1/­­2 -inch (4 cm) meatballs with your hands. Heat a skillet to medium and add the remaining oil. Slow-cook the meatballs, rotating often, for 10 to 15 minutes, until browned on all sides. Serve warm. Notes Recipe from YumUniverse Pantry to Plate (C) Heather Crosby, 2017. Photographs copyright (C) Heather Crosby, 2017. Reprinted by permission of the publisher, The Experiment. Available wherever books are sold. theexperimentpublishing.com 3.5.3226 You might also like... A Salad for the Weekdays Roasted Pepper Lasagna Melon Basil Summer Rolls Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Strawberry Guacamole

May 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Strawberry Guacamole Earlier this spring, I talked a little bit about what an explosive strawberry season we experienced this year. I couldn’t keep myself away from our nearby organic strawberry farm, and as a result ended up with lots of berries that needed to find a home in one dish or another, since my freezer can only fit so much. I made this pie, a cobbler, and sprinkled the berries over everything from morning bowls to salads. I also remembered that strawberries work surprisingly well in guacamole, as proven to me by a friend years ago. I love how every family seems to have their own specific guacamole recipe, and my friend came from a clever bunch that dealt with an influx of home-grown strawberries by enjoying them in guacamole. I can’t say enough about how much the combination of creamy avocado, sharp red onion, cilantro, jalape?o, and lime benefits from the juicy, sweet bursts of strawberries. It’s heaven. I could easily eat a bowl all to myself. Give this guac a try one hot day this summer with some good chips and a glass of something cold and fizzy, you won’t regret it! There is a quick step-by-step video above and weekend links below. Sunday hugs to you, friends :) Fields Of Study – currently participating in this four day online meditation workshop for anxiety and stress, and can’t say enough about it. There’s breath work, reading, exercises, and recorded guided meditations, as well as all kinds of practical tips on the use of minerals, flower remedies, etc. as tools for grounding and stress relief. My Place – liking this video series on Nowness The Hippies Have Won – yay Dear Sugar – a new-to-me podcast I’ve been enjoying The Planted One – a seriously inspiring meal-planning instagram Excited to get my hands on these books – Just the Essentials, The Wellness Project Strawberry Guacamole   Print Serves: 4-ish Ingredients 2 large, ripe but firm hass avocados 2 cups strawberries - hulled, sliced in half or quartered 1 cup cilantro leaves ¼ small red onion - finely chopped 1 small jalapeno - seeded and minced juice from 1 large or 2 small limes sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste Instructions Cut the avocados in half vertically and remove their pits. Scoop the avocado flesh into a medium bowl, using a spoon. Mash with the avocado with a fork. Add the strawberries, cilantro, onion, jalape?o, lime juice, salt and pepper to taste. Mix until well combined. Serve with your favorite tortilla chips. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Ramp Flatbread Pizza with Garlic Cream Pear Cranberry Chai Baked Latkes with Beet and Avocado Salad Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Strawberry Guacamole appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Portobello Nachos

May 10 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Portobello Nachos This post was created in partnership with Newman’s Own Organics. Roasting up a bunch of goodies and serving them up right on the baking sheet together with sauce and toppings is a sure way to a fun dinner or a low-maintenance spread for last minute company. In the winter, I’ll bake an assortment of roots rubbed with plenty of spices, and slather them with herby sauce or tahini/­­cashew cream to go alongside some beans or grains. In the summer, it’s all about the slow-roasted tomatoes, eggplants and peppers served with some sort of bread, herbs, greens and good olive oil. Nachos definitely fall into this throw-together oven meal category, and we tend to crave them often around here, so I’m constantly thinking about ways to freshen up the format. These healthful portobello nachos utilize meaty, roasted portobello caps instead of chips, which then get topped with all kinds of savory and spicy components. There is an addictive, plant-powered ‘queso’ sauce made with roasted sweet potatoes, avocado, a bit of Newman’s Own Organics Mild Salsa, and spices. There’s also a simple, spicy corn and black bean sauté, as well as some extra roasted sweet potato cubes, more of that salsa, and all the fixings. The combination is incredibly flavorful and satisfying enough to pass for a meal. The whole thing can be served up family style, with all the toppings piled on top, and maybe even some extra sauce on the side. We made a step-by-step video for you to see the fun of the process :) I used Newman’s Own delicious organic mild salsa twice in this recipe – as one of the toppings and whirled into the sauce. I suspect that I’m not the only person who has opened a jar of salsa for a meal, only to use a small portion and then proceed to forget about the rest of the jar until it’s too late. This recipe uses more, if not all of the jar. All the ingredients in this salsa are as recognizable and pure as can be, and every single thing inside the jar is organic. It’s mild in spice, but all the other components in this dish compensate with their own spicy kick, and the balance ends up quite perfect. This is the second recipe we’ve made in collaboration with Newman’s Own Organics (the first one involved their tasty marinara sauce), and we love working with this classic brand that donates 100% of their net profits to charities around the world. It’s also so exciting to see them expanding their Organics line and working towards popularizing organic foods with their accessible, quality products for over twenty years now. Enjoy! If you like these nachos, you might like these: - Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings - Spring Vegetables with Smoky Chickpea Croutons and Avocado Aioli - Taco Collard Green Rolls Portobello Nachos   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 8 large or 12 small portobello mushrooms 2 large or 4 small sweet potatoes - peeled and cubed 3 tablespoons neutral coconut oil - divided sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 1 yellow onion - chopped 4 garlic cloves - sliced 1 jalapeno - seeded and minced kernels from 3 corn ears or about 3 cups frozen corn 1¼ cups cooked or canned black beans 1 ripe but firm avocado 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon chipotle in adobo sauce or ¼ teaspoon ground chipotle, or to taste splash of tamari juice of 1 large lime, plus more to serve 1 16 oz jar prepared tomato salsa, divided vegetable broth or water ¼ cup olive oil ½ cup olives (optional) ½ medium red onion - chopped cilantro - for garnish microgreens - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 450° F (230° C). Place the portobello caps and sweet potatoes on two large, parchment paper-covered baking trays, drizzle with 2 tablespoons coconut oil and mix to coat. Spread everything out in a single layer and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast for 10 minutes, then remove from the oven, flip the portobellos and stir the potatoes. Roast for another 10 minutes or until golden and soft throughout. Remove from the oven and set aside. In the meantime make the corn and black bean sauté. Warm the remaining 1 tablespoon coconut oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add cumin and toast for 1 minute, until fragrant. Add onion and a pinch of salt and sauté for 5 minutes, until translucent. Add garlic and jalapeno and sauté for 2 more minutes, until fragrant. Add corn and another pinch of salt and sauté for 5 minutes. Add black beans and sauté for another 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside. Make the sauce. In an upright blender, combine ⅓ of the amount of the roasted sweet potatoes, ¼ avocado, nutritional yeast, chipotle, a splash of tamari, lime juice, ½ cup salsa, and ¼ cup vegetable broth or water until smooth. Add more vegetable broth/­­water if needed to achieve the consistency of thick but pourable sauce/­­queso. With the blender still running on low add in ¼ cup olive oil. To assemble, arrange the portobellos caps on a tray or a platter, top with the corn and bean sauté, sweet potato cubes, the remaining avocado (sliced), olives, if using, and red onion. Drizzle with the sauce and spoon in some more salsa to taste, top with cilantro and microgreens, if using. Squeeze more lime juice over the nachos and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Spring Vegetables with Smoky Chickpea Croutons and Avocado Aioli

May 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Spring Vegetables with Smoky Chickpea Croutons and Avocado Aioli This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. By the time this post is up, I will be in Russia. First in Moscow for a few days, checking out a few theaters and museums, then on to my hometown to spend time with family. Besides the simultaneous happiness and heartache that comes with finally getting to see your people after a few years away, here are some other things I’m really looking forward to: staring at the blossoming chestnut trees outside of my mom’s kitchen window, visiting the food market across the street from there every day, fresh sorrel soup, mom’s melt-in-your-mouth zucchini fritters, and a good morel mushroom season, if I’m lucky. All but one food related, what a surprise. I’m also excited to breathe sweet spring air and see the juicy green of newly budding leaves, since spring in Florida is typically only marked by a transition from hot to hotter. All those things that I used to take for granted when living in a four season climate now make me happy to no end. Spring. I miss it. That’s all. One place where there’s been no shortage of spring is my kitchen. I have to make up for it somehow. I love that spring produce needs very little in order to taste good – a quick steam, a drizzle of oil, a sprinkle of salt, and you’re good to go. A plate with a rainbow of vegetables, tasty sauce and some pulses (also known as chickpeas/­­beans/­­lentils/­­dry peas) has been a common dinner around these parts ever since April rolled around. The pulse component is important, since the addition of those is one of the most graceful and easy ways to make a veggie-forward meal into something truly satisfying and nourishing. I confessed my love for batch-cooking dried beans in last weekend’s post, so it goes without saying that I’m very excited to partner with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada on sharing some quick and simple pulse recipes here throughout the year. The goal is to hopefully help inspire some of you to include more beans, lentils and such into your weekly meals, and something tells me that a few of you are already on board :) In case you need any convincing, think of pulses as protein, fiber and antioxidant-packed little superfoods, but minus the hefty price tag that usually comes with most superfoods. On top of all that, pulse crops are sustainable, with low water and carbon footprints, and they act as natural fertilizers, enriching whatever soil they grow in. This colorful plate of barely-cooked, crisp spring vegetables is sprinkled with addictive, smoky and crispy chickpeas that are like croutons, but infinitely more nutritious and a breeze to put together. I’ve been on a real aioli kick lately, and I make it right in my mortar and pestle, since I tend to agree with those that say hand-mixed aioli is the way to go. I wanted a bright and striking sauce for this platter, so I came up with an avocado aioli that fits the bill perfectly. This can be an entirely fork-free meal – just dip the veggies in the aioli and chase them down with handfuls of chickpea croutons. Or chop the veggies up into more bite-sized pieces and serve as a salad with a sprinkling of croutons and dollops of the aioli. Spring Vegetables with Smoky Chickpea Croutons and Avocado Aioli   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the smoky chickpea croutons? 2 cups cooked chickpeas ½ tablespoon neutral coconut oil ¾ teaspoon sea salt 1 heaping teaspoon smoked Spanish paprika ¾ teaspoon garlic powder for the avocado aioli? 2-3 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife sea salt handful cilantro leaves (optional) freshly squeezed juice from 1 lemon - divided 4 tablespoons olive oil 1 small avocado freshly ground black pepper for the vegetables 1 bunch baby carrots - peeled 1 bunch asparagus - tough ends trimmed 1 tablespoon olive oil sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste 1 small bunch radishes handful chives - chopped (optional) handful microgreens (optional) Instructions to make the smoky chickpea croutons? Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Cover a large baking tray with parchment paper. Dry the chickpeas with a clean kitchen towel and remove any loose skins. Place the chickpeas on the baking tray, drizzle with the oil, and toss to coat. Sprinkle with salt, paprika and garlic powder and toss to coat once more. Place the tray in the oven and roast for 20 minutes, then stir and roast for another 10 minutes, or until golden. to make the avocado aioli? Place the crushed garlic and a large pinch of salt into a mortar, and partially crush the garlic with a pestle. Add the cilantro leaves, if using, and continue crushing the garlic and cilantro into a paste. When the paste is almost done, squeeze about 1 teaspoon of lemon juice into the mortar and work it in with the pestle. Begin to add the olive oil, slowly drizzling about 1 tablespoon in while continuing to stir, allowing the oil to emulsify. Continue to add in the rest of the oil by drizzling it in slowly while stirring until all of the oil is incorporated and emulsified. Cut the avocado in half, remove the pit and scoop the flesh out into a medium bowl. Mash with a fork and mix in the rest of the lemon juice and freshly ground black pepper. Fold the avocado mash into the aioli. Taste and add more salt and chopped cilantro, if desired. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to three days. If you dont have a mortar and pestle, combine all the ingredients but the olive oil in a blender. Slowly pour in the olive oil with the blender still running to emulsify. to prepare the vegetables and serve Arrange the asparagus and baby carrots in a multi-level bamboo steamer or a steamer basket. Steam the asparagus for around 3 minutes, until just tender, and the baby carrots for around 4 minutes. Move the carrots and asparagus to a medium bowl, drizzle with the olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper and mix. On a large platter, arrange the steamed asparagus, carrots and radishes. Garnish with chives or microgreens. Serve with avocado aioli and chickpea croutons. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Strawberry Coconut Cream Pie

April 26 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Strawberry Coconut Cream Pie Strawberry season happens much earlier in Florida than in most places, and it’s already come and gone. Thankfully, I have a friend who shares my enthusiasm for getting my paws on some really good local berries, and is always willing to come along on the hour plus drive to an organic strawberry farm in the area. Something aligned this year, and the strawberry harvest was like nothing we’ve ever seen before. The berries were small, but absolutely explosive in taste – almost unnaturally sweet and as though artificial from the intensity of their strawberry flavor. It was hard to believe that something like that could be produced by the earth and sun alone. We were so astounded by the radioactive berries that we took the journey to the farm twice, since we underestimated the rarity of the situation and didn’t gather enough the first time around. I froze a bunch of the berries, but also went wild with strawberry recipes for the blog. I’m going to spread them out a bit throughout the spring/­­summer, since I know the season happens later for most of you, but hope you guys won’t mind the impending strawberry recipe series. I’ve been wanting to make a coconut cream pie for a long time, but held off until I could figure out a way to make it a bit more noteworthy than just a veganized version of the traditional. Crowning the pie with these beautiful strawberries seemed like the perfect special touch, so I went for it. This pie is nothing short of heavenly. The juiciness of the macerated berries marries so well with the rich, creamy pie base. Think of the perfection that is berries and cream. It’s also worth mentioning that this is an entirely no-bake affair, so if you make this pie in the summer, you won’t need to worry about any oven heat. If you don’t feel like following the recipe for the strawberry topping, you can just top the pie with really good fresh strawberries, or combine your strawberries with a bit of sugar and let them sit to quickly macerate, then proceed to top. I’ll leave you with some wishes for a warm spring and an abundant strawberry season :) Strawberry Coconut Cream Pie   Print Serves: one 9-inch pie Ingredients for the crust 1⅓ cups macadamia nuts 1⅓ cups unsweetened dried coconut flakes 2 tablespoons maple syrup 3 tablespoons coconut oil, plus for oiling the pie dish 1 tablespoon coconut water (from the can used in the coconut cream) pinch of sea salt for the coconut cream two 13.5 oz cans full fat coconut milk - refrigerated overnight 2 teaspoons arrowroot powder 1⅓ cups cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours ½ cup unsweetened dried coconut flakes 1/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoons maple syrup 2 teaspoons vanilla extract pinch of sea salt 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil for the strawberry topping (adapted from At Home in The Whole Food Kitchen) ½ cup plus 1 teaspoon apple juice 1½ teaspoons agar-agar flakes ½ teaspoon arrowroot powder about 3 cups small to medium strawberries - hulled and halved for medium sz 1 teaspoon coconut sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract coconut flakes - for garnish (optional) Instructions to make the crust Place the macadamia nuts in the freezer 30 minutes prior to making the crust. Put the chilled macadamia nuts and coconut flakes into the bowl of a food processor and pulse to achieve rice-sized pieces. To the food processor, add the maple syrup, coconut oil, coconut water (from the separated can of coconut milk to be used for the coconut cream) and salt, and pulse until the mixture is well-combined and sticking together. Prepare a 9-inch pie pan by oiling it thoroughly. Spoon the crust into the dish and press it against the bottom and sides to create an even crust. Place in the freezer while making the filling, or at least 30 minutes. to make the coconut cream Remove the cans of coconut milk from the refrigerator and open them, the coconut fat should be accumulated at the top of the cans. Scoop out the fat from one can and half of the fat from the second can into a small saucepan. Melt and bring to a simmer over medium low heat. Meanwhile, combine the arrowroot powder with 3 teaspoons of the remaining coconut water from one of the cans in a small bowl and stir to combine. Pour the arrowroot mixture into the simmering coconut fat and stir until the mixture thickens slightly. Remove from the heat and set aside. Combine the cashews, dried coconut, 1⅓ cups of the coconut water remaining in one of the cans, maple syrup, vanilla and salt in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Add the thickened coconut fat, followed by the coconut oil and blend to incorporate. Take the crust out of the freezer and pour the coconut filling into the crust. Put the pie in the refrigerator while preparing the strawberries. to make the strawberry topping Combine ½ cup apple juice and agar-agar in a small sauce pan. Bring to a boil over high heat, lower the heat to a simmer and cook for 5 minutes, or until all the agar flakes are dissolved. In the meantime, combine the arrowroot with the remaining apple juice in a small bowl and slowly drizzle it over the simmering apple juice, whisking until the mixture thickens slightly. Remove from the stove and cover. Combine the strawberries with coconut sugar and vanilla in a medium bowl and toss to combine. Pour the warm agar juice mixture over the strawberries and toss gently but quickly to coat. Remove the coconut cream pie from the refrigerator and top it with the strawberries. Refrigerate until the pie sets, preferably overnight. Serve sprinkled with coconut flakes, if using, slice and serve. Store covered and refrigerated. Notes If you dont feel like following the recipe for the strawberry topping, you can make a simpler one. Either mix the strawberries with a bit of sugar and let them sit to macerate, then top, or just top with really good fresh strawberries if you can find them. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Green Skillet Pizza with Asparagus and Pesto

April 20 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Green Skillet Pizza with Asparagus and Pesto We enjoyed this pizza the other day, but wanted to hold off one more week before posting it here, until things got truly springy for most of you in the Northern hemisphere. Then some stuff didnt work out with this weeks scheduled recipe, so pizza it is. Im the type of person that has to have everything laid out ahead of time, and get overly stressed when things dont go according to plan. At the same time, I sometimes find it helpful to run into those plan-ruining situations, deal with them, and come out on the other side with the realization that none of it was as bad as I was making it out to be. Might as well exercise that muscle whenever we can, because how often do things in life actually go as planned? Just a note to self here, but thought it could serve as a nice reminder, in case someone out there is also dealing with a minor frustration and having trouble seeing any sort of bright side. To the pizza! One of my favorite weeknight-friendly recipes that weve ever posted is this lemony millet polenta from last spring. Its easy to make, requires some of the most affordable and modest ingredients, and the final result is outright delicious. I worked on a lot of alternative skillet pizza crust ideas for our second cookbook, ones made with vegetables and whole grains instead of flour, and since then, quick skillet pizzas have become a dinner staple in our house. When I was recently making the aforementioned millet polenta, I had the realization that, with some adjustments, the polenta would make for another great gluten-free skillet pizza crust. And it really did! The pizza is topped with a quick kale pesto, but you can use pretty much any pesto here, if you happen to have some on hand. Following the pesto, a mound of everything bright, fresh and springy – asparagus ribbons and tips, a ton of fresh greens and microgreens. Our fam has no problem consuming the whole thing in one sitting, but the leftovers keep well, in case you are more restrained. We also put together a step-by-step video (above), where you can see that the process is pretty quick and very satisfying. Enjoy :) Green Skillet Pizza with Asparagus and Pesto   Print Serves: one 9-10 inch pizza Ingredients for the crust 1 cup millet - soaked in purified water overnight 1 tablespoon ghee or neutral coconut oil, plus more for oiling the skillet juice of 1 lemon 3 cups warm vegetable broth sea salt 1 teaspoon garlic powder freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup ground flax seeds for the pesto ½ cup almonds - soaked in purified water overnight 1 garlic clove sea salt about 3 cups roughly chopped kale juice of ½ lemon ½ cup olive oil for the pizza 1 bunch asparagus sea salt freshly ground black pepper neutral coconut oil or olive oil for drizzling topping options fresh salad greens microgreens nutritional yeast hemp hearts Instructions to make the crust Drain and rinse the millet and place it in a food processor. Grind until partially broken down. In a medium saucepan, warm up the ghee/­­oil over medium heat. Add the millet and stir to coat. Add lemon juice and stir until absorbed, for about 30 seconds. Add the broth, salt, garlic powder and black pepper, and bring to a boil while stirring. Lower the heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Mix in the flax and simmer for another 10 minutes, until creamy. Stir frequently to prevent clumping. Oil a 9-10-inch cast iron skillet or another heavy bottomed oven-proof pan. Evenly spread the millet over the bottom to make the crust. Refrigerate for 30 minutes to let set. to make the pesto Drain and rinse the almonds, optionally slip them out of their skins and rinse again. Add the almonds, garlic and salt to a food processor and grind into rice-sized pieces. Add the kale and lemon, and grind into pesto. With the motor still running, slowly add in the oil through the funnel. to make the pizza Preheat oven to 450° F (230° C). Bake the millet crust for 20 minutes. Cut the tough ends off the asparagus sprigs and discard them. Shave the sprigs into ribbons with a veggie peeler. Reserve the leftover, unshaved parts and cut them into bite-sized pieces. Remove the crust from the oven and evenly spread the kale pesto over it (you may have some leftovers). Pile the asparagus ribbons and pieces on top of the pesto. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, drizzle with oil and place under the broiler, on the low setting, for another 10 minutes. Remove from the oven, and let cool slightly before topping with greens and microgreens, if using. Optionally, garnish with nutritional yeast and hemp hearts, slice and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash

April 13 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash Food magazines and online food publications are all about bright and green spring recipes right now, but I know that a lot of us are still waiting for that first asparagus to pop up, and for rhubarb to show its blush at the stores and markets. I’m checking in with one more transitional meal today, still cozy and hearty, but very vegetable-forward. There’s a step-by-step video, too :) Have you ever tried braising or roasting whole leeks? It’s a revelatory way of preparing the vegetable, since leeks usually play a secondary role, where they get thinly sliced and pretty much disappear into whatever dish they are in. Cooking leeks whole yields surprisingly delicious results, and brings forward their sweet, mildly oniony flavor. The texture becomes incredibly buttery, and the modest vegetable becomes completely transformed. One thing that makes me nervous about cooking with leeks is throwing away the majestic, green tops, since most recipes only call for the more tender, white parts of the leek. I always save the tops to include in homemade vegetable broth, and I suggest making a quick broth out of the tops and cauliflower stems here (although you can of course use store-bought broth as well). The cauliflower and white bean mash is the perfect, hearty pairing to the braised leeks. It’s smooth and peppery, with a studding of fresh herbs throughout. Both components of the dish keep well and make for great leftovers. I can imagine the mash working well served with roasted carrots or grilled asparagus for another quick meal. Enjoy! Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients for the braised leeks 5-6 large leeks with long white parts 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or ghee sea salt freshly ground black pepper veggie broth - reserved from boiling green parts of the leeks or store bought for the cauliflower white bean mash 1 cup dried white beans - soaked overnight 3-4 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife 2 bay leaves (optional) one 2-inch piece kombu (optional) sea salt 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil or ghee pinch red pepper flakes 1 large yellow onion - chopped 3 garlic cloves - sliced 1 small head of cauliflower - cut into florets leek broth from above or any veggie broth freshly ground black pepper handful each parsley and dill - chopped (optional) olive oil - for serving microgreens - for serving (optional) Instructions to braise the leeks Cut the dark green parts off the leeks. Wash the green parts thoroughly and place into a large soup pot together with leftover cauliflower core and stems, cover with water. Bring to a boil over the high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer, add salt and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. You can also add any vegetable scraps you have on hand to this broth. Reserve the rest of the broth for the future use - refrigerate for up to 4 days or freeze for up to 2 months. This step could be done the day before. You can of course skip this step entirely and just use store-bought or pre-cooked vegetable broth. Slice the white parts of the leeks in half vertically and place into the sink or a large bowl and cover with water. Let soak a bit and carefully wash all the dirt from between the layers. Warm the oil or ghee in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the washed and dried leeks to the pan face down in a single layer. Leave to cook undisturbed until golden on one side. Flip, add salt and pepper and let the other side caramelize. Add leek broth/­any veggie broth to cover the leeks partially. Establish a strong simmer, cover the pan and cook for 15-20 minutes, or until the leeks are tender throughout. Add more broth if too much evaporates. Reserve the rest of the broth for the future use - refrigerate for up to 4 days or freeze for up to 2 months. Serve the leeks on top of the cauliflower white bean mash, below. to make the cauliflower white bean mash While the leek broth and leeks are cooking, drain and rinse the beans and add to a large pot. Cover the beans with plenty of water, add garlic, bay leaves and kombu, if using, and bring to a boil, covered. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, partially covered. Start checking the beans for doneness after 30 minutes and continue to cook until tender, if necessary. Add salt at the last 10 minutes. Drain the beans and set aside. This step can be done the day before. The cooking liquid from the beans can be reserved and used as vegetable broth in other dishes, as well as frozen for up to 2 months. Warm the oil or ghee in a large saucepan over medium heat, add red pepper flakes, onion and a pinch of salt and cook for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add garlic and cook for another 2 minutes, until fragrant. Add cauliflower, a large pinch of salt, black pepper and the leek broth/­any veggie broth to cover the bottom of the pan. Bring to a simmer, cover and cook for 7-10 minutes, or until cauliflower is tender. Add more liquid if too much evaporates to ensure that the cauliflower is being steamed. Add in cooked beans at the end, toss to warm them through. Add the cauliflower and beans to a food processor, along with a splash of the leek broth/­any veggie broth. Process until smooth. Test for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Add parsley and dill and pulse to incorporate. You may need to do this in batches, depending on the size of your food processor. Serve drizzled with olive oil and topped with the braised leeks from above. Notes 1. If you dont have time to cook dried beans, you can use 3 cups already cooked/­canned white beans in this recipe. 2. Although kombu is optional, its a great thing to throw into the pot when cooking beans, as it helps make beans more digestible, as well as contributes its minerals. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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No Bake Coconut Lemon Bars

April 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

No Bake Coconut Lemon Bars I’ve been dreaming about making no-bake lemon bars for a while now and finally got around to the idea a few weeks ago. The goal was to have absolutely no oven time required for both the crust and the lemon filling, while having solid bars that stay together nicely and, of course, taste delicious. The idea to include coconut in the mix came about naturally, since I knew that I would have to use coconut milk for the creamy lemon mousse anyway. I decided to take it one step further and incorporate dried coconut flakes into the crust, and I loved the way all of the flavors came together. I’ve made these bars three times within the past couple of weeks, and each time they disappeared before I knew it. Definitely a universal crowd pleaser. We’ve got another step-by-step video for you today, which shows the fairly simple and very fun process of making these lemon bars. We are kind of addicted to the whole video-making thing now, so there are many more to come. The no-bake crust here is very simple, consisting of macadamia nuts, coconut flakes, lemon juice/­­zest and a bit of sweetener. The yellow mousse mixture gets its lemony flavor from plenty of lemon juice, while a pinch of turmeric helps bring out that beautiful yellow color. The mousse comes together in the blender and hardens in the refrigerator overnight to a perfectly sliceable consistency, made possible by coconut milk and oil, as well as a bit of arrowroot powder. The whole package is just sweet enough, creamy and rich. I like to shape the bars into small squares, since they are quite satisfying and a few bites go a long way. Enjoy! No Bake Coconut Lemon Bars   Print Serves: about 16 small bars Ingredients for the crust 1⅓ cups macadamia nuts 1⅓ cups dried coconut flakes, plus more for garnish 3 tablespoons maple syrup or honey 3 tablespoons neutral coconut oil zest from 1 lemon - preferably organic 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice pinch sea salt for the mousse 1 13.5 oz can full fat coconut milk - refrigerated overnight 1½ teaspoons arrowroot powder 1¼ cups cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours ⅓ cup plus 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice ¼ cup maple syrup or honey ¼ teaspoon turmeric pinch sea salt 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil Instructions to make the crust Place macadamia nuts in the freezer 30 minutes prior to making the crust. Put the chilled macadamia nuts and dried coconut flakes into the bowl of a food processor and pulse to achieve rice-sized pieces. To the food processor, add the maple syrup/­­honey, coconut oil, lemon zest, lemon juice and salt, and pulse until mixture is well-combined and sticking together. Prepare an 8 x 8 baking dish and cover it with parchment paper - parchment paper should extend up the sides for lifting the bars out of the dish later. Spoon the crust into the dish and smooth it out into an even layer. Place in the freezer while making the mousse. to make the lemon mousse Remove the can of coconut milk from the refrigerator and open it. The coconut fat should be accumulated at the top of the can. Scoop out the fat into a small saucepan. Measure 2 tablespoons of the remaining coconut water from the can and add it to the saucepan. Melt and bring to a simmer over medium low heat. Meanwhile, combine the arrowroot powder with 2 teaspoons of the remaining coconut water from the can in a small bowl and stir to combine. Pour the arrowroot mixture into the simmering coconut fat and stir until the mixture thickens slightly. Remove from the heat and set aside. Combine the cashews, lemon juice, maple syrup/­­honey, turmeric, salt and vanilla in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Add the thickened coconut fat and coconut oil and blend to incorporate. to assemble and serve Take the crust out of the freezer and pour the lemon mousse over the top, distributing it evenly and smoothing out with a spoon if needed. Place the dish in refrigerator until set, preferably overnight. Remove the bar out of the baking dish, lifting it up by the extended parchment paper. Place on a cutting board and slice into 16 square bars or bars of any shape of choice. Sprinkle with coconut flakes and serve. Store refrigerated in an air-tight container. Notes 1. Make sure to place the can of coconut milk in the refrigerator overnight so that the fat separates from the water. Also a reminder to place the macadamia nuts in the freezer 30 minutes prior to making the bars. 2. If you can get them, Meyer lemons work really well in this recipe. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Ant Hill Forest Cake Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Spiced Amaranth Porridge with Ginger Stewed Apples and Raisins Raw Strawberry Shortcake .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post No Bake Coconut Lemon Bars appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip

March 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip This is the time of year that I start having uncontrollable cravings for all things bright, fresh and fruity. I want more smoothies and salads, raw fruit, snappy veggies, etc. Thankfully, this is also when yellow champagne mangoes start showing up everywhere. They perfectly satisfy my cravings with their sunny, sweet flesh, and I manage to fit them into almost every one of my meals while the season lasts. I of course love using mangoes in sweet dishes (smoothies, porridges, dessert), but they also make for a really special addition to savories. That’s how the idea for this curry came about. Nothing about it is terribly authentic, in fact it’s sort of a mishmash of ingredients used in cuisines around the world, but it’s vibrant, delicious, loaded with nourishing produce, and it’s exactly the kind of curry I want to eat right now. There’s silky fennel with its refreshing, mild anise flavor, parsnips for some substance and earthiness, chili and curry powder for spice, and broccoli for a flash of green. Everything gets cooked in a heavenly, creamy mixture of mango, pureed with coconut milk, and the result is a satisfying, savory, sweet and sour curry that’s incredibly good for you. You might be wondering what the soba noodles are doing in a curry, but hear me out. I’ve recently been really into adding noodles to creamy soups for texture and substance. A common weekday meal for me is a quick blender soup of avocado, bell pepper, greens, a bunch of cilantro, dulse, and lemon juice served over soba. The soba gets slathered with the creamy soup, and the whole thing makes for a really nice eating experience. It works the same way in this curry, but you can of course serve the curry over any rice of your choice instead. Enjoy! Follow this link to get the recipe for the Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip :) You might also like... Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage Ant Hill Forest Cake Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules & a Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways

March 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways I finally got around to trying sweet potato toast this week, a concept that I’ve been seeing circulating around the internet. Our instagram post about it generated a lot of interest, so I thought I would go into more detail here today. Basically, the whole idea is replacing bread with thinly sliced, toasted sweet potato and topping it as you would any toast. I know, why mess with an already perfect concept like toast? For one, it’s great for those trying to take it easy on grains or gluten. It’s also perfect for sweet potato lovers just looking to change things up for breakfast, snack, etc. (me). It’s a fun way to eat a nutritious root vegetable, and I have a feeling that it could easily be made very kid-friendly. It is decidedly its own thing, not toast, but totally stands on its own as tasty and filling fare. As with any toast, there are infinite possibilities when it comes to the toppings, since sweet potato gives a pretty neutral base. I offer my favorite sweet and savory options below. In the sweet one, earthy and creamy tahini is studded with jammy, smashed raspberries (I use frozen and defrosted ones this time of year), drizzled with honey/­­maple syrup and sprinkled with cacao nibs and seeds, and that combination is incredibly lovely. The savory one is (surprise!) avocado toast, but made a bit more substantial with the addition of balsamic lentils, a dusting of nutritional yeast and seeds. On a technical note, the whole reason behind the sweet potato toast craze is that you can cook the sweet potato slices right in the toaster. The catch is that I don’t own a toaster, so what I like to do is cook the slices in the oven the night before and then re-heat them, either in the oven or in a pan on the stovetop whenever I’m ready to eat my ‘toast.’ You could even cook a bigger batch for the week ahead, since the roasted sweet potatoes hold up well in the refrigerator. But if you do have a toaster, by all means cook the potato slices in there. I offer directions for both methods in the recipes. There are some weekend links below, Sunday hugs to you :) What The Health – a new film from the creators of Cowspiracy, this time targeting health organizations. Really excited to watch it, it’s available to stream on their website now. Hugh Forte’s Food Photography – just learned that the photographer behind Sprouted Kitchen has a separate Instagram account for his dreamy food photos, I can stare at them for ages. How Millions of Kids Are Being Shaped by Know-It-All Voice Assistants Sweet Potato Sheet Pan Dinner Salad – looks perfect, and those photos are amazing. The Avocado Show – an Amsterdam cafe centered around everything avocado, look at that. What We Eat When We Eat Alone – recently discovered this gem by Deborah Madison. Raspberry-Tahini Sweet Potato Toast   Print Serves: 4-6 toasts Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato ½ tablespoon coconut oil - soft (if using the oven) 2-4 tablespoons sesame tahini ¼ cup raspberries (fresh or frozen and thawed) honey or maple syrup for drizzling mixed seeds for garnish (I used cacao nibs, hemp, pumpkin seeds) Instructions Peel and slice the sweet potato into even, ¼-thick slices. If you have an organic sweet potato, you can leave the skin on, but I prefer it peeled. If using an oven, preheat it to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet and place the sweet potato slices on the sheet. Add the coconut oil and mix with your hands to coat. Put the baking sheet into the oven and cook for 15 minutes. Flip the slices and cook another 10-15 minutes until cooked through. Add toppings and enjoy right away or refrigerate in an air-tight container until ready to eat. Reheat in a 350° F (175° C) oven for about 5 minutes, then top. If using a toaster, place the sweet potato slices in the toaster and toast on high for about 5 minutes, until cooked through and toasty at the edges. Cooking time will vary slightly for different toasters. Spread tahini on each slice. Add raspberries, mashing them a bit with a fork. Drizzle each slice with the desired amount of honey/­­maple syrup and sprinkle with mixed seeds. Enjoy! 3.5.3226   Avocado-Lentil Sweet Potato Toast   Print Serves: 4-6 toasts Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato ½ tablespoon coconut oil - soft (if using the oven) ⅓ cup cooked black or French lentils 1 teaspoon olive oil ½ teaspoon balsamic vinegar, plus more for drizzling 1 small, ripe avocado juice of ½ small lemon sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste nutritional yeast for garnish mixed seeds for garnish (I used hemp, flax, pumpkin, and sunflower seeds) Instructions Peel and slice the sweet potato into even, ¼-thick slices. If you have an organic sweet potato, you can leave the skin on, but I prefer it peeled. If using an oven, preheat it to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet and place the sweet potato slices on the sheet. Add the coconut oil and mix with your hands to coat. Put the baking sheet into the oven and cook for 15 minutes. Flip the slices and cook another 10-15 minutes until cooked through. Add toppings and enjoy right away or refrigerate in an air-tight container until ready to eat. Reheat in a 350° F (175° C) oven for about 5 minutes, then top. If using a toaster, place the sweet potato slices in the toaster and toast on high for about 5 minutes, until cooked through and toasty at the edges. Cooking time will vary slightly for different toasters. In a small bowl, combine lentils, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, half of the lemon juice, salt and pepper. In another small bowl, mash the avocado with the remaining lemon juice, salt and pepper. Spread mashed avocado onto each sweet potato slice, followed by the lentils and a sprinkle of nutritional yeast and mixed seeds. Drizzle with more balsamic vinegar and enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Spirulina Latte

March 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Spirulina Latte Checking in really quickly with this trippy spirulina latte. Half the fun of eating spirulina is its color, the other half is knowing its many incredible health benefits, while the swampy, algae flavor is no fun at all. I usually just include spirulina in smoothies, where the flavor gets masked by the sweetness of the fruit, but that also means that its magical, aquamarine color will get lost among the numerous berries that I put in my smoothies. This latte is a more direct and, let’s say, conscious way of consuming spirulina – it’s fun to make, warm, cozy, slightly sweet, and not at all swampy in taste. Drinking a beverage of this color will definitely make you appreciate spirulina in all its glory and provide you with a bright start to your morning or a smile during your afternoon break. There are some links after the jump, enjoy your Sunday! Immigrant Food Stories 25 Songs That Tell Us Where Music Is Going (have your sound on) Scott Chalky, America’s Favorite Farmer – interviewed on Here’s the Thing Laura Miller’s Talking in Circles This ‘Poke’ Bowl! Speaking of Superfood Lattes – check out the Good Sort’s… Enjoyed This Zadie Smith Interview on Fresh Air (from November ’16) Spirulina Latte   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients 2 cups almond milk or other plant milk of choice (I used homemade hazelnut) 1-2 teaspoons organic spirulina powder 1 teaspoon maca powder (optional) ¼ - ½ teaspoon ground ginger 1 tablespoon honey or more to taste 1 teaspoon coconut butter (optional) 1 teaspoon sunflower lecithin (optional) beet powder mixed with coconut sugar - for garnish (totally optional) Instructions Pour the milk into a medium saucepan and warm over medium high heat until pleasantly warm but not boiling. Put the warmed milk into the blender together with the rest of the ingredients, except the beet powder garnish. Blend until smooth and frothy. Distribute between cups, garnish with the beet powder and enjoy warm. Store the leftovers refrigerated in an airtight container. This latte can also be enjoyed chilled or iced. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Lavender Milkshake and Chamomile Latte Juicing Elderflower Lemonade Honey Miso Latte .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Spirulina Latte appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sorghum Beet Risotto

March 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sorghum Beet Risotto Ive been seeing a lot of why not just make it with rice reactions to alternative grain risotto recipes. I have a few reasons. Trying to get a variety of potentially more nutritious grains into my meals is one. Making a risotto-like dish with any grain makes it taste delicious and a little more special than just a bed for the more dominant stuff on your plate. Its also a creative challenge, and I welcome those when they occur in the kitchen. The flavor will always be a bit more new and unexpected than traditional risotto, but the creamy grain dish format will keep it in cozy territory, which is nice. Of course, no grain will quite replace starchy Arborio rice, which is what usually gives risotto that wonderfully creamy consistency. I like to incorporate blended roasted root vegetables, beans or coconut milk to achieve that sought-after texture. In this risotto, I went with coconut milk, which integrates seamlessly with the flavors of the beets, ginger, garlic and chili. Though the spicy, sweet and earthy flavors in this dish are a bit far from the classic, its absolutely delicious in its own right, and kind of perfect for this transitional time of year. Ive tried sorghum in salads and bowls in the past, but always found it to be a bit too chewy for my liking. That toothsome texture works perfectly in risotto, though, so I was very happy to rediscover this nutritious, gluten-free grain with this dish that I developed for Nuts.com. There are some weekend links below, have a great Sunday! Chani Nicolas – been loving her weekly horoscopes Jesse Kamm, Living Off the Grid – that house! Slicing Pretty Avocados – can’t stop doing this now Georgia OKeeffe: Living Modern – this exhibition sounds amazing, love that they are making an emphasis on her clothing. Tea Blends for Healthy Skin, Digestion and Energy Za’atar Swirl Bread – so beautiful and sounds delicious Follow this link to see the recipe for the Sorghum Beet Risotto :) You might also like... Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Clementine Fudge Cake Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sorghum Beet Risotto appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles

February 26 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles These cheesecake truffles are another fun recipe I developed for Nuts.com. Chocolate truffles full of healthful ingredients are everywhere these days, but that’s not so much the case with white chocolate, since it is admittedly more difficult to reinvent into a high-vibe and wholesome treat. It is possible, though, and the two ingredients perfect for the job are coconut and cacao butters, both of which happen to be really good for you, loaded with healthy fats and all. If you’ve never heard of coconut butter before, it’s a product made of the entire contents of the coconut – meat and oil – and you will most likely be amazed by how rich and delicious it is upon your first taste. I love having a jar of it in the kitchen, and since a little of the butter goes a long way, the jar lasts a pretty long time, while I add it to desserts, hot drinks, porridges, smoothies, and even slather it on toast. Cacao butter is another entirely natural ingredient that’s amazingly luxurious, so it goes without saying that these vegan cheesecake truffles are as decadent as they get. The sweetness comes from your choice of maple syrup or honey, and the characteristic, tart cheesecake flavor is brought out with the addition of fresh lemon juice and zest. The texture is soft, airy and very cheesecake-like –  you could technically eat these truffles with a fork if you wanted, but I recommend biting. Indulging in these feels good, since all the ingredients are real foods, which is not generally the case with white chocolate truffles. There are some links below, a lot of really good ones this week. Enjoy your Sunday! Chef’s Table Season 3 – the 1st episode with Jeong Kwan, a Buddhist nun recognized for her temple food cooking by chefs around the world, blew me away. The Woman Behind Martin Margiela Nigel Slater Quotes – a twitter account that makes me smile, highlighting some of Slater’s finest quotes like ‘Cooking has always been the cheapest therapy in town,’ ‘I swear I can hear the courgettes growing,’  ‘You could measure my life in fishcakes,’ and ‘Ginger swings both ways.’ Inside Sarah Britton’s Kitchen The True Hard Work of Love and Relationships – Alain de Botton interviewed on the On Being podcast Caren Motika and Adam McPherson’s Home – in love with the photos (and the house) I Work From Home – made me laugh Vegan Samosa Shepherd’s Pie – YUM Follow this link to get the recipe for the Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles :) You might also like... Sweet Dukkah Cigars Raw Ginger and Lemon Pyramid Cakes Taco Collard Green Rolls Sweet and Savory Energy Bites, What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

The Kitchen Renovation

February 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

The Kitchen Renovation Vintage European bistro chairs found on Craigslist, kitchen table passed down to my husband from his grandmother. We’ve been living in our home for fifteen years now and up until this fall, we had never put a hammer or paintbrush to anything in the house except for Paloma’s baby room, right before she was born. We inherited some classic 90s Florida detailing from the previous owners – dust-attracting, shaggy red and white carpeting, stucco walls, green laminate countertops and a low-hanging ceiling in the kitchen. Just like many other families I know, we are quite food-oriented and tend to crowd in the kitchen, since that’s where most of the action happens. It’s also where I work, where I come up with recipes for this site and for my cookbooks, so it’s fair to say that I spend most of my life in this space. We recently completed a long, laborious kitchen renovation that spilled out into the living room, and I cannot describe how much my heart sings when I come downstairs every morning and see this kitchen that finally feels so entirely mine. It took us a decade and a half to gather up the courage and the funds to do this, and these past few months have brought some of the most trying times for us as a family, but it finally feels like it was worth it and I’m so excited to share some snaps of Golubka Kitchen HQ with you. We took a documentary approach to these photos, and instead of shooting everything in one day, the photos were taken over a week, on cloudy days and on sunny days, in the morning and in the evening. There are different aspects of the kitchen that shine on different days, and we really wanted to capture that. ‘Farmhouse’ kitchen sink from Ikea, faucet from Ebay. Our house has three stories – garage on the first floor, open kitchen and living room on the second, and bedrooms on the third. We renovated the kitchen, the living room floor, ceiling, and fireplace (yes, we have a fireplace in Florida and we use it, too), and both staircases leading up and down to the kitchen and living room. The most expensive part of the whole renovation was the removal of the old hanging ceiling in the kitchen, together with all the electrical work involved. We decided on the cabinets and countertops quickly, but the easy decisions ended there. It took me so incredibly long to settle on a cohesive look for the kitchen. As a notoriously undecisive Libra, I endlessly kept changing my mind about the wall treatment, the tile, the light fixtures, the shelves, the faucet, cabinet pulls, etc. I do love those clean, white kitchens with minimal everything, but in the end I decided that in order to stay true to my heart, I had to go with something a little more feminine and detail-oriented, with a hint of the Downton Abbey kitchen. The old kitchen had endless cabinets on the walls, some of which always ended up a mess, while others weren’t utilized at all, so I knew I wanted exposed shelves. I’m super happy with that decision – I love having my dishes and jars within arm’s reach and at eye level, since it allows me to be more organized and minimal. Many people wonder whether dust is an issue with open shelves, and I’ve found that it’s not any more of an issue than anywhere else in the house. I also use all the objects on the shelves quite frequently, which doesn’t allow too much dust to accumulate. The shelves are made of very beautiful and sturdy wood reclaimed from an old barn in Kentucky, which we found at Barn Works. I finished the wood myself without the use of a wood stain. The floating shelf arrangement was made possible with the heavy duty brackets from Shelfology, which secure the shelves to the wall very safely and seamlessly. Tadelakt Moroccan Plaster with Benjamin Moore ‘White Stone’ color pigment Industrial brass rod with copper hooks from Etsy, vintage Brazilian copper utensils with wooden handles found on Craigslist. During the initial planning stage, I was certain that I wanted a subway tile backsplash, but was simultaneously seeing and liking backsplashes made with Moroccan, Spanish and Mexican patterned tiles. I agonized over my choice between the two until I discovered Tadelakt, the Moroccan plaster, and there was no turning back. I knew I wanted grey shaker kitchen cabinets, but the plaster treatment also presented the possibility of grey walls. I’ve always been attracted to grey rooms, to me they just speak of serenity, so I was pretty happy with this opportunity. Finding someone who would apply the plaster masterfully but for a fair price, and getting the job completed was probably one of the most nerve-racking parts of the renovation. We did find someone brilliant, and it ended up worth the stress, because I am completely in love with my new walls. The material is so warm, textural and interesting, and it totally ties the whole kitchen together. As much as I loved the idea of a patterned tile floor, I was still torn between its beauty/­­practicality and the homey feel of hardwood floors, which I wanted to have in the living room. I finally settled on the idea of combining the two, and as a result, the tile follows the line of the kitchen cabinets in the shape of an inverted ‘Z,’ while we can still enjoy the warmth of the hardwood floors in the sitting area and into the living room. The tile is from the Cement Tile Shop, which offers an overwhelming array of the most beautiful, authentic patterns. Of course I found settling on one to be a near impossible task. I went from multicolored to black and white, to pastel, to monochrome tiles dozens of times before landing on the Fountaine Antique pattern with a custom border. As for the hardwood floor, I’d always dreamt of an old-fashioned herringbone pattern in real wood, which proved to be really difficult to find within the United States. The one company that carried thick oak planks in a herringbone pattern didn’t have enough to cover our floor at first, but they later ended up finding one extra box tucked away in a different warehouse. I’m so glad that they did because I’m completely over the moon about how the floors turned out. It’s worth mentioning that the old kitchen floor was white tile that showed off every spec of dust that landed on it, and the living room floors had white plush carpeting, and I am so happy to finally be rid of both. We found the best contractor, Don, who left us endlessly impressed, together with his talented and considerate team. He truly cared about every step of the process and saved us so many times with his expert advice and creative input. The most standout showcase of the team’s work is the spacious drawer pantry they built out of vintage fruit crates from Schiller’s Salvage. My idea was realized even better than I had envisioned – the crates were originally too long and the crew manually disassembled, shortened and rebuilt them, then positioned them on smoothly sliding tracks. The countertop over the crates is made of old barn oak and finished by me in the same way as the floating shelves. The whole piece, on top of being unique and beautiful, is the most functional and spacious storage space in the whole kitchen. Quartz countertops from the Home Depot in ‘Snowy Ibiza’ Antique Spanish hutch from the 1800s, a lucky Craigslist find, brought to the U.S. from Madrid Vintage ceramic and brass cabinet pulls from Ebay and Etsy Vintage ceramic door knob from eBay, ‘Pink Shadow’ Sherwin Williams paint on the door. Custom built computer shelf made by Algis from old barn wood. My favorite thing about the vintage French chandelier that I found on Etsy are the rainbows it sends onto the walls in the evenings. Fireplace brick wall made with 100 year old sliced brick from Craigslist, arranged beautifully by Algis. Stairs leading up to the third floor with the bedrooms. Since both of the staircases connect to the kitchen and living room, we realized that we had to redo them as well, so that they wouldn’t be an eyesore within the new renovation. My husband and I set out to do the whole thing ourselves to save some cash, but in hindsight, I wouldn’t wish this type of adventure upon my worst enemy. All the stairs were covered with red carpeting, and the railings were painted an ugly orange-ish brown. The original plan was to remove the old carpet and to cover the existing stairs with new wood planks. To our surprise, however, we discovered a beautiful pine under the carpeting and decided to restore the original stairs along with stripping and re-finishing the railing. It took me two and a half months to complete this part of the project alone. Stairs leading up to the kitchen/­­living room from the garage. Ceramic tile from Spain with weathered grey hues, uneven borders, satin finish. This kitchen renovation wouldn’t have been possible without the help and generosity of Cement Tile Shop, Shelfology, Barn Works, Schiller’s Salvage, and Floor and Decor. My eternal gratitude goes out to Don and the team for your incredible care and craftsmanship in everything you do, Algis for the amazing job with the tile, plaster, fireplace and shelf, Vadim for the impeccable hardwood installation, and Dale for the immense help with the tile and stairs. Resources Contractor – Don Violette at V & P Construction and Maintenance Kitchen Tile – Cement Tile Shop Shelves – Shelfology for the floating shelf brackets, Barn Works for the reclaimed lumber Vintage Fruit Crates – Schiller’s Architectural and Design Salvage Hardwood Floors – Floor and Decor Kitchen Cabinets – Floor and Decor Countertops – Home Depot, quartz in ‘Snowy Ibiza’ Accessory Resources – in photo captions If you happen to be looking for some incredibly talented craftsmen for your renovation in the Tampa Bay area, please reach out to me and I will be happy to connect you. The post The Kitchen Renovation appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Spiced Amaranth Porridge with Ginger Stewed Apples and Raisins

February 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Spiced Amaranth Porridge with Ginger Stewed Apples and Raisins This creamy amaranth porridge is another cozy breakfast recipe we developed for Nuts.com. Amaranth is the superstar of the pseudograins, since it has more protein than both quinoa and buckwheat, and is the only grain/­­pseudograin to contain vitamin C. Needless to say, it’s a great thing to start yourself off with in the morning, and tastes absolutely delicious when cooked with a bunch of warming spices, and topped with stewed apples. Paloma is currently obsessed with apple sauce and eats it with breakfast and as a snack at school, so a pot of stewing apples on the stovetop has been a weekly occurrence in my kitchen. If you’ve never made apple sauce/­­stewed apples before, the process is surprisingly easy – the apples pretty much take care of themselves with some heat and water, and become incredibly velvety in a short amount of time. Add some spices to the equation, and you’ll have yourself an incredibly versatile topping for porridges, yogurt and even toast. We’ve got some links for you after the jump, wishing you a peaceful Sunday. Stuff We Can Do – a comprehensive instagram outlining the actions we can take to oppose some of the crazy things happening in our country concerning human rights, the environment, etc. Lots of very doable stuff there. Healthyish – loving Bon Appetit’s new spinoff website, which follows the philosophy that healthy food = delicious food. Lots of great interviews, recipes, and ideas there. Dr. Melanie Joy on the Rich Roll podcast – a psychologist who coined the term carnism, which examines the meat paradox, or why we love certain animal species (cats, dogs) and eat others (cows, pigs). A Cook’s Remedy – Aran Goyoaga’s beautiful new video series, which explores her relationship with food and cooking. Red Velvet Hot Chocolate – so excited to try Sophie’s recipe, made with beets! Follow this link to get the recipe for the Spiced Amaranth Porridge with Ginger Stewed Apples and Raisins :) You might also like... Tile Flatbreads Creamy Apple-Anise Soup and Pumpkinseed Cheese Black Bean Chocolate and Fig Cookies Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Spiced Amaranth Porridge with Ginger Stewed Apples and Raisins appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Hibiscus Ginger Latte

January 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Hibiscus Ginger Latte Hibiscus is a powerful tropical flower with a long list of health benefits (anti-inflammatory, digestive aid, metabolism-boosting, helps with cholesterol level and blood pressure maintenance). It also happens to produce the most brilliant, ruby red-colored tea with a prominent tart flavor. I’ve always found pure hibiscus tea to be a little too sour for my taste, but came up with this latte in a recent attempt to get more of its stunning color into my morning routine, and now I’m completely hooked. The creaminess of the almond milk helps offset the harshness of the hibiscus, and the ginger adds a nice note of warmth and complexity, making this latte a great winter drink. The green tea is optional here, but a great addition when you need a little help waking up in the morning or as a mid-afternoon boost. And I swear I feel like I’m getting color therapy when drinking this latte – the fluffy, pink foam is so soothing to look at, I’m in a complete state of peace by the time I’ve taken my last sip. We have some weekend links for you after the jump, have a great Sunday :) - The Cookbook Deal – I’ve been so excited for this podcast, in which Jessica Murnane documents a whole year of her life while making her first cookbook. I loved the first two episodes, and although that might have something to do with the fact that I’ve now gone through the book-making process twice, I think anyone can enjoy it because Jessica is such a great and charming storyteller. And if you are thinking of writing a cookbook, you should definitely give this one a listen. - This Hibiscus Mask from S.W. Basics - Andrea Gentl’s Photo Essay From Her Time in the Andes – breathtaking - Feedback, NY, Down the Aisle – interesting people interviewed about their grocery shopping routines. So far I’ve enjoyed interviews with Julia Turshen, Hannah and Landon Metz, Kenny Anderson. - The Matriarch Behind Beyoncé and Solange - On The Rocks – crystals explained on Garance Doré Hibiscus Ginger Latte   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients 1 tablespoon dried hibiscus flowers 1 piece ginger - shredded 1 green tea bag 1½ cups hot water 1½ cup unsweetened almond milk or other milk of choice 1 tablespoon honey/­­any other sweetener of choice, or to taste (optional) Instructions Combine hibiscus, ginger, green tea and water in a teapot or a large mug, keep covered while steeping. Remove the green tea bag after 2-4 minutes of steeping. Let the hibiscus steep for another 15-20 minutes. Warm up the milk if you prefer a hot latte. Pour the tea into a blender through a strainer. Add the milk and honey to the blender and blend until frothy and smooth. This latte also tastes great iced. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Elderflower Lemonade Black Sesame Cappuccino Spiced Hot Chocolate and a Cookbook of Our Own Quick Persimmon Eggnog .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Hibiscus Ginger Latte appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Immunity-Boosting Beet and Camu Camu Breakfast Bowl

January 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Immunity-Boosting Beet and Camu Camu Breakfast Bowl Hope your weekend’s been great so far! Checking in with a fun, immunity-boosting smoothie bowl recipe that we developed for Nuts.com. This smoothie contains a powerful, vitamin C-rich trio of raw beet, cranberries and camu camu powder. Camu camu is a magical amazonian berry that has the highest naturally occurring vitamin C content of all the known plants in the world. I did a little test and have been adding camu camu powder to my morning smoothies and porridges this winter instead of taking my usual C vitamins, and no major cold yet! This smoothie is perfectly good without camu camu too, in case you aren’t planning on adding another item to your pantry/­­superfood collection. If you are worried about the raw beet here, don’t be – its flavor gets neutralized and masked by the other ingredients, while you benefit from its wealth of nutrition and magnetic color. There are also bananas and dates for sweetness, seasonally-appropriate cranberries for bit of tartness, and avocado for some healthy fats. Some weekend links below. Enjoy your Sunday :) - Invincible Living: The Power of Yoga, The Energy of Breath, and Other Tools for a Radiant Life – currently reading this book, written by an inspiring Kundalini yoga teacher. Perfect for a Kundalini beginner like me and very down to earth – not too technical or woo woo, with tons of practical tips for a more healthful and mindful existence. I’ve been very curious about Kundalini for a while now, and have began incorporating simple techniques from this book into my daily routine, like 7 minutes of Breath of Fire (breathing in and out through your nose at even increments), which is supposed to help get your glandular system back in order. Really loving it so far! - The Well/­­Aware Podcast – we love our podcasts around here and super thrilled about this new discovery, favorite episodes include interviews with Kerrilynn + Cindy of CAP Beauty, Satsuki Shibuya, Caitlin Mociun - Anny Wang – obsessed with this Swedish artist/­­furniture designer who does these insane in 3D illustrations, just look at them! Want her prints all over my walls. - In My Fridge: Heidi Swanson - How To Put Plants at the Centre of Your Plate by Anna Jones – that celeriac steak! - The First Mess Cookbook – I’m not sure I’ve ever been this excited for a cookbook to come out, it’s going to be SO good! Laura has a little preview of the book here. Follow this link for the Immunity-Boosting Beet and Camu Camu Breakfast Bowl Recipe :) You might also like... Sprouted Sunflower Seed Cocoa Bars Sweet Potato Buckwheat Snack Bars with Cardamom Ginger Marinated Tofu with Citrus Salsa Mango, Jicama and Grilled Corn Tacos .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Immunity-Boosting Beet and Camu Camu Breakfast Bowl appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Garlic and Parsnip Hummus

January 15 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Garlic and Parsnip Hummus If you ever do meal prep on the weekends for the week ahead, hummus is a great thing to consider including in your repertoire of preparations. It’s easy to make, keeps pretty well, and is a very useful thing to have on hand, since so many meals can be centered around it. Plop a generous dollop into your salads and grain bowls, spread onto sandwiches and flatbreads, use as a dipping component for snacks (roasted winter roots dipped in hummus is a recent favorite) – any way you use it, it’s a great, fast way to make your meal more filling and nourishing. Plus, homemade hummus tastes so much better than store-bought! I don’t think I’ve ever made the same hummus recipe twice. It always differs based on my mood and what I have on hand, but I tend to include a bit more than just garlic when it comes to the veggies (pack them in whenever you can!). Roasted cauliflower, red pepper, sweet potato and beets have all made their way into my hummus throughout the years, and it’s tasted good pretty much every time – hummus has a very forgiving and highly customizable recipe. Have you ever made a smoothie by packing your blender full of not only fruit but also a ton of greens, superfood powders, seeds, nuts and who knows what else? Did you then proceed to marvel at the result, which came out tasting nice and fruity, despite looking like swampy slush? It’s sort of the same deal with hummus – anything goes. Or most things do, anyway. This past week, I added roasted garlic, parsnips and red onion into a batch of hummus and it turned out exceptionally delicious. All the vegetables are roasted together until soft and caramelized, then thrown into a blender/­­food processor together with the chickpeas and the rest of the ingredients. The process is quick, and the veggies bring all kinds of additional nourishment to the hummus, along with sweet and earthy notes. The recipe is very alteration-friendly, too – add sweet potato instead of parsnips, regular onion instead of red, a few small cloves of raw garlic instead of the whole head of roasted garlic, it will all taste great in its own way. And you will be prepared for success with your meals and snacks for the next week or so. Last Sunday, we hosted a Moon Juice cookbook giveaway in our newsletter. In order to enter, we asked you to share one inspiring book, article, film or podcast that’s made an impression on you throughout the years. We were so moved by all your amazing suggestions and inspiring, personal notes, that we were truly wishing we had a cookbook to give away to each and every one of you. We feel so lucky to be connected with you guys, even in this tiny way. This Sunday’s links feature a selection of the suggestions and inspirations we received during the giveaway. We wish we could share them all because every one was amazing, but the list would be much too long, so there’s just a snippet below. So much good stuff there! Enjoy your Sunday :) Books - The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing World (by the Dalai Lama) – from Angelina - Radical Beauty: How to Transforms Yourself from the Inside Out – from Danae - A People’s History of the United States – Kendal says, ‘it’s inspired me to think about our history in the Big Picture, and even helps a little with not getting too bogged down by all the bad news that’s out there. The main thing I think we need to do in these times is take care of ourselves and each other.’ - You Are a Badass: How to Stop Doubting Your Greatness and Start Living an Awesome Life – from Susan - Consolations: The Solace, Nourishment and Underlying Meaning of Everyday Words  – from Dina - Anam Cara: Spiritual Wisdom from the Celtic World – from Elizabeth Cookbooks, Nutrition, Food - Nutrition Stripped: 100 Whole-Food Recipes Made Deliciously Simple – from Joana - The Oh She Glows Cookbook: Over 100 Vegan Recipes to Glow from the Inside Out – from Isa - Kitchen Literacy: How We Lost Knowledge of Where Food Comes from and Why We Need to Get It Back – from Rebekah - Healing With Whole Foods: Asian Traditions and Modern Nutrition – from Deb Podcasts - WANT Podcast – stands for ‘women against negative talk.’ Guests include Sarah Britton of My New Roots, Jessica Murnane of One Part Plant, Adina Grigore of S.W. basics and many, many more – from Lea - The Dinner Party Download, especially this episode – from Ariela - Radio Cherry Bombe, especially this episode – from Maia - The Rich Roll Podcast, especially The Best of 2016 – from Abigail Videos, Movies - World Peace and Other 4th Grade Achievements, the Ted Talk – from Robin - Minimalism: A Documentary About the Important Things – from Valentina - Why Some of Us Don’t Have One True Calling, Ted Talk – from Elizabeth Roasted Garlic and Parsnip Hummus   Print Serves: 3-4 cups Ingredients 3 medium parsnips - peeled and cut into strips 1 red onion - sliced into 8 wedges olive oil or neutral coconut oil sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 head garlic - about ¼ cut off the top of the garlic head, some of the outer skin peeled off 1 15oz can chickpeas or 1¾ cup cooked chickpeas ½ cup tahini 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for garnish 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 teaspoon toasted whole cumin seeds - ground 1 teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon sea salt or more to taste 1 cup water olives - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place parsnips and red onion onto the baking sheet, drizzle with oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and mix well with your hands. Drizzle the top of the garlic head with oil, salt and pepper. Make a parchment paper packet or tin foil packet and place the garlic inside. Place packet onto the tray with the vegetables. Garlic must remain covered when roasting. Put the tray with the vegetables into the oven and roast for 15 minutes. Remove from the oven, mix the parsnips and onion, trying to flip over each piece, then roast for another 15 minutes, until soft throughout and caramelized at the edges. Check the garlic, it should be soft and cooked through after the 30 minutes. If not, roast it for another 5 minutes or so until nice and soft. Let the garlic cool down a bit and slip all the garlic cloves out of their skins. Combine all the roasted vegetables, chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, lemon juice, cumin, paprika, ½ teaspoon sea salt and water in a high-speed blender or food processor until smooth and creamy. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the hummus garnished with more olive oil and olives, if using. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Miso Caramel Popcorn Garlic Onion Veggie Dip from Food Loves Writing Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Roasted Garlic and Parsnip Hummus appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy

January 8 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy It’s interesting how motivating the tiniest tips from people you care about or respect can be. I was recently on a short flight and read the autobiography of a certain Soviet-era singer, whose music I grew up with. It was a thin, throwaway paperback that I read back to back during the flight, but something about her positivity really made an impression on me. This singer is almost eighty years old, but looks great and has stayed incredibly active, and the book is studded with small, often old-school tips of how she believes she’s managed to keep up her health. She walks everywhere she goes, covering large distances on foot in Saint Petersburg, Russia, and her two drinks of choice are carrot juice in the morning and chamomile tea at night. Sure enough, I’ve been noticing myself drinking both of those with more frequency and taking longer walks whenever possible. And it doesn’t matter to me how silly of a motivation that was, if it helps me get from point A to point B in taking more care of myself, I’m all in. So here’s the carrot-based tonic I’ve been inspired to drink more often. Since I don’t love pure carrot juice, I doctor it up with ginger, turmeric, lemon and honey, which makes it a true remedy and a preventative for winter colds and flu. It’s delicious – potent, refreshing, spicy and sinus-clearing, and a little goes a long way – I like having a shot or a small glass at a time. Some weekend links after the jump, stay warm this Sunday :)   Yvon Chouinard of Patagonia on the How I Built This Podcast (scroll down a few) Mark Bittman on Changing the Food Industry and Living Dangerously – on Tim Ferriss’s podcast Ron Finley, Gangsta Gardener Amy Revier, Weaving Worlds Beyond Words   Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy   Print Serves: 1 large glass Ingredients 8-10 large carrots - peeled if not organic 1 piece ginger or more - peeled if not organic 1 piece fresh turmeric root - peeled if not organic 1 lemon 1 teaspoon raw honey Instructions Run the carrots, ginger, turmeric and lemon through a juicer. Pour juice into a blender, add the honey and blend until the honey is incorporated. Enjoy. Notes 1. I like to use organic lemons for this juice, so that I can run the peel through the juicer and get its oils and benefits into the tonic. 2. I generally use a bit more than 1 of ginger for this amount of juice, but I like things really fiery. If you are the same way, add some more ginger. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Jujube Ginger Tea Quinoa Collard Wraps from the Sprouted Kitchen Cookbook Root Vegetabe Chickpea Flour Quiche Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding

January 2 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding Happy New Year! Checking in with a quick breakfast recipe idea that was born out of my struggle to feed my very picky eight year old a nutritious breakfast. Chia pudding used to be a staple breakfast for her, flavored differently depending on the season or what was on hand, and I felt pretty good about her starting the day with a nice portion of the Omega-3 rich seeds. Then, one day she decided that she doesn’t like the texture of chia in her pudding any longer (too crunchy! too chewy!), and getting breakfast into her before leaving for school became a monumental task. I’m sure many parents out there can sympathize with me when I say I would pay money for this picky eating stage to be over. But for now, I deal with it by identifying a food Paloma loves and then trying to mask other nutritious ingredients with it. For example, she’s crazy about tomatoes, so I make a crushed tomato-based stew with other veggies mixed in, and she tends to be ok with eating that. Recently, Paloma’s been obsessed with our tahini hot chocolate, and I figured that blending chia seeds into a similar mixture and letting it sit to solidify into a pudding could work. The chia is still there, but not as noticeable since it’s whipped up with the rest of the ingredients. And it worked – the child is fed, chia is back in business, and I loved the result so much for its simplicity that I decided to share it here. I like to make this pudding the night before and let it chill in the refrigerator overnight for the chia to become its most springy self. I’m also planning on trying this one out with carob powder instead of cacao, just to ease up our cacao consumption. There are some links after the jump, have a peaceful Monday :) Patti Smith on the Here’s The Thing Podcast The Making of the Sqirl Cookbook Cover – one of our favorite cookbook covers of all time The Art of Forecasting Food Trends – a prediction for what’s hot in 2017: ‘Jackfruit! Sorghum! Harissa! And dont ignore horseradish, spirulina and Asian-inspired breakfasts. Authenticity and its cousin transparency are in. So is food inspired by Africa. Or maybe its the Philippines. Even French food has a constituency.’ Destroyer – an LA restaurant’s beautiful instagram Dreaming in French, The Paris Years of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, Susan Sontag, and Angela Davis – currently reading Things to Come – can’t wait to see this movie Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding   Print Serves: 3-5 Ingredients for the pudding 5-6 prunes 1½ tablespoon raw cacao powder 4 tablespoons chia seeds 2-3 tablespoons honey 1 tablespoon coconut oil ½ tablespoon almond butter ½ tablespoon tahini 2¼ cups water cacao nibs - for garnish hemp hearts - for garnish optional add ins 1 tablespoon hemp (or other) protein ½ tablespoon mesquite powder 1 teaspoon maca powder 1 teaspoon moringa powder Instructions Comine all the ingredients in a high-speed blender until very smooth. Distribute between bowls or pour into a large jar, cover, and let sit in the refrigerator for a minimum of one hour or overnight before eating. Garnish with cacao nibs and hemp hearts. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Berry Tarts with a Peach and Herb Sorbet Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange Miso Glaze & A New Cookbook! Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake Valentines Day Dessert - Rose Ice Cream, Pomegranate Sorb... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Quick Persimmon ‘Eggnog’

December 23 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Quick Persimmon ‘Eggnog’ Yes, calling this drink eggnog is a bit of a stretch, but it does have most of eggnog’s better properties – creamy, spiced, slightly sweet, beautiful in color. Most vegan ‘eggnog’ recipes I see out there involve cashews and/­­or frozen banana and rightly so – those things are excellent for creamy texture. That’s why any time I come up with a creamy drink recipe that doesn’t involve either and still tastes good, I feel especially accomplished. This nog gets its creaminess from frozen persimmon and tahini. It’s rich, but much much lighter than the original and definitely not as lethally filling. There are plenty of wintery spices involved and dates yield the subtle sweetness. Most importantly, this eggnog comes together very quickly, so it can easily be made in between festivities or relaxation sessions this weekend, if you are celebrating or have time off, or at any point during the winter. I’ve always been drawn to ‘strange’ fruit like figs, quince, and persimmons. Persimmon season is one of the main events I look forward to in the winter, and I proceed to eat little else for dessert or breakfast when the fruit becomes widely available. If you’ve never tried persimmons before but would like to, navigating the different types out there can be a bit confusing, so I wanted to clear that up here. Hachiya persimmons are the persimmons you see pictured in this post, they are acorn-shaped and have to be completely ripened before consumption (unripe hachiya can cause an unpleasant, astringent feeling in your mouth). My favorite way to enjoy ripe hachiya persimmons is frozen whole and thawed to a scoopable consistency, then eaten with a spoon like sorbet. The freezing also helps get rid of any remaining astringency. When choosing a ripe hachiya, pick out the softest one that’s still orange (avoid any with large brown spots) – it should feel uncomfortably soft, like there is jello inside the skin, that means that the persimmon is truly ripe. Fuyu is other widely available type of persimmon. Fuyus are flatter in shape and lower maintenance than hachiya, but, in my opinion, also less fun. Fuyus can be eaten at pretty much any time once they are orange – you can eat them when they are hard as an apple or a bit softer and richer in color, but they will never get as soft and jammy as a hachiya. Happy Holidays! Wishing you peace and rest :) Quick Persimmon Eggnog   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients 1 small or ½ large frozen hachiya persimmon - defrosted for about 5-10 min, chopped 4 large dates 2 heaping tablespoons tahini few slices of whole nutmeg or ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg, plus more for garnish 5 cardamom pods - shelled 1 teaspoon cinnamon plus more for garnish 1 tablespoon chia seeds (optional) 2-2½ cups water (2 for thicker consistency) honey or maple syrup - to taste, if needed Instructions Combine all ingredients in a blender until smooth. Distribute between cups, garnish with cinnamon and nutmeg and enjoy. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Rhubarb Raspberry Fizz from Sarah at The Vanilla Bean Blog Spiced Hot Chocolate and a Cookbook of Our Own Pi?a Colada Milkshake - Ice Cream Sunday Grapefruit Smoothie .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Quick Persimmon ‘Eggnog’ appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Root Vegetabe Chickpea Flour Quiche

December 16 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Root Vegetabe Chickpea Flour Quiche We’ve been developing some recipes for Nuts.com, our favorite online one-stop-shop for bulk foods, using their amazing ingredients. This Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche is one of those recipes, and there will be more to come, since they are all too good not to share here. This quiche recipe is definitely of the lazy kind, since it comes together quite magically and quickly and requires no crust-making. Chickpea flour (protein, fiber and iron-rich) is the perfect ingredient for making vegan quiche, since it performs similarly to the egg/­­cream foundation of traditional quiche when mixed with water and oil, solidifying into a sort of custard when baked at a high temperature. So you basically place a pie pan full of batter and veggies into the oven and end up with a soufflé-like pie, all through a quick and satisfying process. This quiche is studded with roasted winter roots for some seasonal vitamins, and made delicious with flavor-building spices like turmeric, smoked paprika and black pepper. And if you love socca/­­farinata, this recipe is most definitely for you, as the quiche is reminiscent of a plumper, more substantial version of socca (basically any socca lover’s dream). This quiche would make for an excellent, nutritious addition to your holiday table or any other meal, served alongside soup or a green salad. And a bit of housekeeping – did you know that we have a newsletter that goes out every time a new recipe is posted? We love our newsletter community, so as a little holiday/­­new year gift and sign of gratitude to all our subscribers, we will be sending out one extra recipe a month starting this December and onto the new year. That is one nourishing bonus recipe that won’t be published anywhere else. December’s recipe might involve something along the line of cozy miso steel cut oats, so if that sounds good to you, you can sign up here, or in the signup form in our sidebar ;) Follow this link for the Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche Recipe :) You might also like... Raw Apricot Lavender Tart and a Giveaway Banana Toffee Tart Curried Squash and Kale Riceless Risotto Ramp Flatbread Pizza with Garlic Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Root Vegetabe Chickpea Flour Quiche appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache

December 8 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache Since we’ve been making a point of keeping things festive around here for the past month or so, we thought it was time that we do a proper cake recipe. By proper I mean layered, frosted, stunning and decadent. Then again, this cake is also vegan, gluten-free and the chocolate layers contain no added sugar, which are all elements not very commonly seen in those ‘proper’ cakes, but that’s just the way we do things around here ;) By now it’s no secret that sweet root vegetables are not to be underestimated when it comes to vegan baking. They are so good at contributing that right texture, moisture and body to baked goods, together with a neutral base for any flavor. Beets, the root vegetable I use in this cake, are all that and happen to be nature’s very best food coloring. The rich and moist chocolate layers of this cake are made of a mixture of gluten-free flours, dates and beet, and get their depth of flavor from cocoa, chicory coffee and a splash of balsamic vinegar. If you are wondering what the coffee and balsamic are doing in this recipe – they both work well at emphasizing the chocolate flavor and taking it up on the decadence scale. The beet-colored frosting is based on home-‘condensed’ coconut milk and is creamy but very light, and the same can be said for the chocolate ganache that glazes over the cake. Although this is a layered cake that requires time, attention and ritual, I would say that technique-wise, this cake is on the simpler side when it comes to traditional layer cakes. All the elements come together fairly quickly, and I find the assembly and frosting to be the most challenging part, as always. We hope this beauty makes it on your holiday table or birthday table, or rainy day baking table. In any case, let us know how it goes :) Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache   Print Serves: one 6-inch, double layer cake Ingredients for the pink frosting 2 cans full fat unsweetened coconut milk ⅔ cup raw sugar 2 tablespoons coconut oil, plus more for oiling parchment paper 1½ cups cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours, divided ¼ small beet root 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice ⅔ cup almond milk or purified water for the cake 1 cup brown rice flour ½ cup almond flour ½ cup cocoa powder 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda pinch sea salt 1 cup Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes 1 cup chicory coffee (1 teaspoon ground roasted chicory root or coffee substitute such as Dandy Blend per 1¼ cups boiling water, brewed for 5 minutes and strained) or strong regular coffee ⅓ cup apple sauce 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil - melted 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar 1 medium beet root - peeled and shredded for the chocolate ganache ½ cup condensed coconut milk (reserved when making frosting) ¼ cup cashews (reserved when making frosting) 5-7 tablespoons cocoa powder 2 tablespoons almond milk or water Instructions to make the frosting Combine coconut milk and sugar in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat to establish a strong simmer and cook, stirring often, for 20 minutes, until the mixture thickens and resembles condensed milk. Stir in coconut oil until well incorporated. Reserve ½ cup of the condensed coconut milk and ¼ cup soaked cashews for the ganache, below. Combine the rest of the condensed coconut milk, remaining soaked and rinsed cashews, beet, lemon juice and almond milk/­­water in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Scoop into an airtight container and chill in the refrigerator until firm, preferably overnight. to bake the cake Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare two 6-inch spring forms or cake pans by lining them with lightly oiled parchment paper (if you only have one spring form/­­pan, you can bake one chocolate cake layer at a time). Combine all flours, cocoa powder, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Reserve ½ cup of the date soaking liquid and combine it with the dates, chicory coffee/­­regular coffee and apple sauce in an upright blender, blend until smooth. Add coconut oil and balsamic vinegar and pulse to incorporate. Pour the blended liquid into the bowl with the dried ingredients and mix to combine. Fold in the shredded beet. Divide batter in half between prepared pans and bake for 40-45 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean (or bake one at a time if you only have one pan). Remove from the oven and let cool completely. to make chocolate ganache Combine reserved ½ cup condensed coconut milk and ¼ cup reserved soaked and rinsed cashews with cocoa powder and 2 tablespoons almond milk/­­water in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Set aside. to assemble the cake Invert one of the chocolate cake layers onto a large plate or cake stand. Frost with about ⅓ of well-chilled, firm frosting. Place the other cake layer on top and frost the entire cake with the rest of the frosting. Chill the cake in the refrigerator for 10-15 minutes to firm up the frosting once again. Take the cake out of the refrigerator and pour the chocolate ganache over the cake, taking care to create photogenic drips, if you wish. Place the cake in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to an hour before slicing. Keep the leftovers refrigerated. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Asian Flavoured Veggie Burgers with Asparagus Fries Kohlrabi Avocado Salad Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream Raw Berry Tarts with a Peach and Herb Sorbet .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts and How to Make Ghee at Home

December 2 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts and How to Make Ghee at Home I’ve recently been putting more emphasis on having plenty of good fats in my diet. Hormonal balance, healthy brain function, energy, and yes, weight regulation are all associated with a regular intake of healthy fats (together with a diet mindful of sugar), and that’s enough reasons to get me to be a bit more attentive to my fat consumption. Virgin coconut oil is on high rotation in my kitchen, so I’m covered there, but I’ve recently been adding more variety to my fats by mindfully incorporating things like avocado, flax/­­other seeds and nuts, and ghee into everyday meals. I just got back into making my own ghee (golden, clarified butter that has a higher smoke point than normal butter and is low in lactose and casein) at home. It’s such an easy and gratifying process, and I thought I would share my method here, since I’ve heard some people describe ghee-making as intimidating. It is not! It does take some time, but my double-boiler recipe does not require too much babysitting – the magic mostly happens on its own. Since gift season is fast approaching and I like to cook my gifts, I’ve been brainstorming edible presents I’ll make this year. The idea for compound ghee came up. Chances are, you’ve heard of compound butter, which is butter mixed with other flavorful ingredients like herbs, spices, dried fruit and more, and used as an extra-flavorful agent in cooking. I applied this flavoring idea to ghee and whipped it with miso and dates, to mind-blowingly delicious results. In Ayurvedic tradition, ghee is regarded as a highly medicinal food (anti-inflammatory, immune-boosting and a digestive aid), and what better thing to give your loved ones than a jar of health-promoting ghee that also tastes amazing and can be used to enhance so many foods in their kitchens – anything from toast to veggies. And of course, the flavor possibilities for compound ghee are endless, next on my list is a roasted garlic and herb one. It’s going to get wild. This easy, festive brussels sprout dish is one idea for utilizing the miso-date ghee. To me, well-roasted brussels sprouts often resemble popcorn in flavor, so a slather of buttery, sweet and salty ghee seems like a very logical finishing touch. Serve it as a side dish on your holiday table and don’t forget to offer your guests a dish of extra miso-date ghee for dipping, they will appreciate your generosity very much ;) Miso-Date Ghee   Print Serves: 3¼ cups ghee, 1 cup miso-date ghee Ingredients for the ghee 2 pounds (8 sticks/­­908g) unsalted butter, preferably grass-fed (I use Kerrygold) for the miso-date ghee 1 cup ghee 1 tablespoon sweet white miso 3-4 dates Instructions to make the ghee Cut the butter into large chunks. Place into a medium-sized heatproof pan/­­bowl that is approximately twice as large as the volume of the butter. Prepare a large, heavy-bottomed pot or saucepan that can fit the bowl of butter within to make a double boiler. Half-fill the large pot with water and place the bowl with butter inside. Make sure the bowl is stable and not floating and the water in the pot is somewhat level with the butter. Bring the water to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and simmer for about two hours or longer, until the upper foamy layer of the butter turns golden in color. Keep an eye on the water level in the pot and add more hot water as needed. The butter will melt and separate into three layers - foam on top, clear golden ghee in the middle, and white milk solids on the bottom (some might float atop). Remove bowl with butter from the heat and let cool slightly. Skim the foam off the top with a slotted spoon and discard. Prepare a cheesecloth-lined, fine-mesh strainer and strain the ghee into a clean jar, pouring carefully and trying to keep the milk solids at the bottom from sliding into the strainer. If you see that a lot of the white solids got into the jar through the strainer, strain one more time. The finished product should be clear and golden in color. Ghee does not have to be refrigerated, but you can refrigerate it if you prefer. The ghee will solidify a bit at room temperature and harden in the fridge. It stays fresh for months. to make the miso-date ghee Use soft, room temperature ghee. Combine all ingredients in a blender until smooth. If you prefer to have some larger date chunks in your ghee, reserve one date and add it in once the ghee has been whipped smooth, pulsing once or twice to break the date up into chunks. Distribute the miso-date ghee between small gift jars or place into one jar and keep refrigerated. 3.5.3208 Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts   Print Serves: 4 as a side Ingredients 3-4 cups brussels sprouts - outer damaged leaves removed, halved sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 teaspoon plain ghee or neutral coconut oil - soft 3-4 teaspoons miso-date ghee at room temperature (from above), plus more for serving ¼ cup pecans - toasted and crushed Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Place brussels sprouts onto a parchment paper-lined baking sheet. Add salt, freshly ground black pepper and plain ghee/­­coconut oil, mix thoroughly. Place in the oven and bake for 15-20 minutes, depending on the size of your brussels sprouts, until baked throughout and charred in places. Let cool slightly. Place the still warm brussels sprouts into a bowl and add the miso-date ghee, mixing thoroughly. Taste and add more if needed. Add toasted pecans and mix. Place onto a serving plate and serve with more miso-date ghee for dipping. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Zucchini Blossoms with Roasted Eggplant Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange Miso Glaze & A New Cookbook! Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage Vegan Cheese Plate .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts and How to Make Ghee at Home appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale

November 20 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale We’ve got a little upgrade on classic creamy butternut squash soup for you today. This one still has plenty of butternut squash for its creaminess and ochre hues, but with the addition of leeks, pear and cranberries. Leeks contribute a savoriness, while the pear gives a bit of sweetness, and the cranberries bring a subtle sour note. There’s also an addition of fennel seed, for its subtle anise flavor and digestive aid properties (useful during a big holiday meal). When cooked in coconut milk and pureed together, the vegetables make for a delicious whole, more interesting in flavor than your classic butternut soup, but still very familiar, comforting and soul-warming. This soup would make for a great starter to a Thanksgiving/­­holiday meal, guaranteed to be a crowd pleaser. There are some links after the jump, enjoy your Sunday :) How the Brain Powers Placebos, False Memories and Healing The New York Times interviews Frank Ocean Let It Go 30 Minute Yoga Routine – been loving this super slow, super relaxing yoga routine with Tara Stiles lately Zadie Smith’s Brexit Diary Ana Kra¹: Ikebana Albums – a book I’d love to own Millennials are Drinking The World’s Coffee Supply Dry Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the soup 2 tablespoons olive oil or neutral coconut oil 2 leeks, white and light green parts only - sliced 1 tablespoon fennel seeds 1 medium butternut squash or 2 honey nut squash - cubed 1 pear - cored and cubed 1 cup cranberries - thawed if frozen 1 13.5oz can light Thai coconut milk - optionally reserve some for garnish ¾ cup water sea salt freshly ground black pepper for the crispy kale 1 small bunch kale - leaves torn into bite-sized pieces 1-2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon maple syrup 1-2 tablespoons nutritional yeast sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions to make the soup Heat oil in a medium pot over medium high heat. Add leeks and cook for 3 minutes until tender. Add fennel, squash, pear and cranberries. Stir to coat with oil and fennel. Add coconut milk and water and bring to a boil. Lower to a simmer and let cook, covered, for 15 minutes or until vegetables are cooked through and tender. Transfer soup to a blender and puree, seasoning with salt and pepper. You might have to do this in batches, depending on the size of your blender. Serve garnished with reserved coconut milk (optional) and crispy kale (recipe below). to make the crispy kale Preheat oven to 400°F (200° C). Place kale onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Drizzle with olive oil and maple syrup, add nutritional yeast, salt and pepper and mix thoroughly with your hands. Place into the oven for 7-9 minutes, until crispy. Kale can burn very fast, so take care not to burn and watch it closely. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi Pear Cranberry Chai Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules & a Giveaway

November 13 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules & a Giveaway Ending an emotional week with a light, fizzy drink and a giveaway for the beautiful Moscow Mule copper mugs you see in these photos. I very rarely drink alcohol anymore, not because I have much against having a drink on a special occasion, but because it throws me completely off track for the next couple of days – it’s a feeling of zero balance and uselessness in anything I try to do. A few years ago, I decided to take the matter into my own hands and not let myself feel that way anymore, thus the no drinking. During the holidays, though, I do like to make myself a special something to cheers with and sip on to get into a festive mood. My homemade kombucha always comes to the rescue in this department. This is the drink I’ll be making with it this year, with all the foundations of a Moscow Mule – ginger, lime, mint, plus some warming winter spices to add a bit of interest and a holiday spark. I use fresh ginger juice here, which adds that extra bit of kick and brightness to this drink. Before you get discouraged, making a small portion of ginger juice is super easy. All you have to do is run some grated ginger through a fine mesh strainer or cheesecloth to extract a little bit of the juice. You can definitely make this mule into a boozy drink as well, just reduce the amount of kombucha and add vodka, about 1 part vodka to 3 parts kombucha, or whatever ratio you prefer. Now onto the giveaway. The very nice people at Knooop are giving away a set of their beautiful, 100% copper, hammered Moscow Mule Mugs to two GK readers. The set also comes with a copper shot glass. To enter the giveaway, leave a comment here telling us about one special person in your life. It can be anyone from your mom to your neighbor, your pharmacist, or someone you encounter on your commute. Let’s spread some love! Giveaway is U.S. and Europe only and open until November 20, 2016. Some links after the jump. Enjoy your Sunday :) Remembering Leonard Cohen – this interview, this documentary, this video conversation, this song .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules & a Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage

November 6 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage This past week, we posted a recipe for a Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower, which was pictured served with this very nourishing and super tasty Celeriac and Parsnip mash. We promised to come back with the mash recipe this weekend, so here it is. I grew up on mashed potatoes – my mom probably made them twice a week or more, which is quite standard for a Russian household, where potatoes somehow make it into every meal every day. I love mashed potatoes to this day and can easily put away a good portion, which I think is true for a lot of people due to the dish’s comfort food status. I remember discovering that other roots could be eaten as a mash upon moving to the U.S. – I was at one of my first Thanksgiving dinners and was quite impressed with the mashed sweet potato option that was offered. Slowly, I came around to the idea at home, and now, whenever I have a craving but don’t feel like being weighed down by the inevitably large portion of mashed potatoes I will consume, I make something similar with other, more nutritious and lighter roots. This celeriac and parsnip mash is my absolute favorite version for that scenario. Each of the pale roots are known for their unique, characteristic flavors, which combine well in this mash and become quite complementary with that earthy sweetness they both have going on. This is mash elevated – lighter and more nourishing than mashed potatoes and more interesting in flavor than mashed sweet potato, but still starchy, creamy and very comforting. This stuff is great to have on your holiday table to surprise your guests with something new, yet familiar, or just make a batch of it to have alongside your meals for the week, to get more nutritious wintery roots in your diet. Frying up sage leaves until they are crispy is an easy trick for fancying up a modest looking autumn dish like this one, and the chip-like sage itself is surprisingly delicious. There are some weekend links after the jump, have a cozy Sunday ;) How to Master the Art of Getting Noticed – Austin Kleon’s advice to aspiring artists Salad for President – always so much good stuff on this website, like Leif Hedendal cooking salad at the David Ireland House, Yuri Shimojo’s home and Japanese Crudité Recipe, Laila Gohar’s food as installation art and more The Woman Code Cleanse Review – just read Alisa Vitti’s The Woman Code (and loved it), and was very excited to read about Dana’s experience of the gentle four-day cleanse proposed in the book Noël Graupner – new instagram crush, plant-based private chef with an Ayurvedic tradition background and great photography skills Street Vendors of Hanoi, Photographed from Above – amazing Jade Rolling – have you tried it? I saw a lady doing this on the subway recently (weird setting for that), and it looked really relaxing. Three New Cookbooks, for Health’s Sake – so many health-centered cookbooks coming out nowadays, and these three look great (two of them are from our publisher!) I have a copy Dandelion and Quince and it’s a beauty. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1 large or 2 medium celeriacs - peeled and roughly chopped 2-3 parsnips - peeled and roughly chopped sea salt 1 large red onion - peeled and sliced into 8 wedges 1-2 garlic heads - separated into cloves (no need to peel the cloves) coconut oil - to taste freshly ground black pepper any plant milk or cooking water from boiling the roots - to taste ghee or olive oil - to taste 1 small bunch sage - leaves smoked paprika - for garnish (optional) olive oil - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven 400° F (200° C). Bring celeriac and parsnips to a boil in a large pot of water. Reduce heat to a strong simmer and cook vegetables for 10-15 minutes, until soft throughout, adding salt towards the end. Place onion and garlic onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Add coconut oil, salt, pepper and mix well. Bake for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes, garlic should be done but the onions might need more time - in this case, remove garlic from oven and finish baking the onion until completely soft and caramelized. Slip garlic cloves out of their shells. Drain the boiled vegetables, reserving some of the cooking liquid if youll be using it in place of plant milk. Place vegetables into a large bowl together with the roasted garlic and mash with a potato masher to your desired consistency. Place roasted onion and ½ cup plant milk/­cooking water into a blender and blend until smooth. Add blended onion to the mashed vegetables, adding more liquid if needed to achieve your desired consistency. Add ghee or olive oil to taste. Alternatively, mix all the vegetables in a food processor together with the plant milk/­cooking liquid, which will make for a smoother, less textured puree. Heat 2-3 tablespoons coconut oil in a medium pan on medium heat. Add well-dried sage leaves to the pan along with salt and pepper and fry, stirring, for a couple of minutes until crispy. Mix the oil left over from frying the sage into the mash. Optionally, mix in some of the crispy sage into the mash as well. Garnish mash with crispy sage, smoked paprika and olive oil, and serve. Notes You can use just celeriac or just parsnips for this mash as well. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries Raw Rainbow Lasagne with Heirloom Tomatoes, Mushrooms, and Castelvetra... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Pear Cranberry Chai

October 30 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Pear Cranberry Chai Are you guys dressing up for Halloween? I’m not, but Paloma is going to be John Lennon circa 1974 (the rest of her friends are princesses). Yep, the Beatles obsession is as strong as ever. Right now, John is the absolute favorite. 1980 (year of his death) is the WORST number, not to be spoken in the house, and she’s been know to put on Imagine and cry to it more than a few times. And this is an otherwise cheerful, happy kid too. Crazy! Anyways, whether you are participating in this weekend’s spooky activities or not, maybe you can consider treating yourself with this seriously autumnal chai, or better yet, plan to serve it at some sort of holiday occasion. I’m confident your guests will be blown away. As far as I can recall, this is the best chai I’ve ever tried. Besides all the required, invigorating spices, this one is infused with fresh pears and cranberries, which add lovely flavor and a tiny hint of sourness. It’s a bit sweet, spicy, gingery and creamy. And if you are wondering what I do with all the leftover stewed pears, I blend them into a pear sauce and spoon it onto all kinds of dishes. There are some weekend links after the jump. Have a nice one :) Protein, Iron, Calcium – I’ve been finding Gena’s articles about protein/­­iron/­­calcium-rich plant food combinations so helpful Urban Moonshine – I’ve been taking these digestive bitters before almost every meal and have really noticed a difference. Highly recommended if you have any mild issues with digestion or even as a blood sugar stabilizing aid. Also, want to make this Happy Belly Seed Mix soon. Sophie Buhai’s New Jewelry Collection – the photos! Exceptional Advice from Anthony Bourdain’s New Book – please never change Tony .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Pear Cranberry Chai appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin – Holiday Recipe Month

October 27 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin – Holiday Recipe Month This post is created in partnership with Truffle Toast Home. Hey! It’s good to be back after a week off. We are going to try something different with the way we post recipes here from week to week. Instead of presenting you with a random assortment of whatever dishes strike our fancy, we are going to have more focused themes to center our recipes around. We are doing this to be more purposeful, exploratory and thorough with our recipe development, and to learn alongside our readers as we cook and elaborate on our themes. Ultimately, we want our recipes to be more useful to you, to help you avoid the dead end of making a recipe once and then never again, and to start more of a conversation and community around your suggestions for these themes. The themes can be based on all kinds of circumstances, from the time of year to a particular ingredient, type of dish, or a feeling we are shooting for. So, without further ado, starting with today’s post and until the end of this year, we will be focusing on holiday recipes – indulgent but healthy, full of whole foods and plant power, festive and fun. There will be things to serve at your holiday table, bring to a potluck, or even gift as a present. We are so excited to get this going! We came back from a peaceful week in a North Carolina cabin (including some photos from the trip here) to an empty, disassembled kitchen and just today sold our stove on Craigslist unexpectedly fast. I am basically left with very little to nothing in terms of cooking space and equipment and feel a bit at a loss. I did set up a small cooking nook in our garage, but I’m hoping I won’t have to be there too long, as the kitchen renovations are well on their way. Thankfully, we got a bunch of holiday recipes pinned down while in NC (always-working-on-vacation-club here), starting with this lovely gratin. It’s a perfect side dish for the holiday table for so many reasons – there are seasonal Brussels sprouts and sweet potato, it’s a single dish affair and simple in preparation, which will give you time to focus on other more elaborate main dishes, it’s quite striking in color, and so impressively tasty. It’s also worth mentioning that this is my new favorite treatment for Brussels sprouts. They stew in the spiced turmeric coconut milk and become incredibly tender, silky, almost buttery. I have an inkling that this would be a great dish for converting Brussels sprout skeptics into lovers. Besides the Brussels, there is a middle layer of sweet, caramelized onions, along with thinly sliced sweet potato, which gets slightly crispy at the edges after some time in the oven, then finished with a grating of garlic, pecans and nutmeg. So good! Truffle Toast Home is a well-curated online shop for wine and specialty food accessories. They sent me a set of their stainless steel graters to try out, and I put them to the test while making this gratin. The set includes a fine grater, coarse grater and a shaver, all of which are hand held and great for finishing off all kinds of dishes. I used the shaver for the thinner shavings of sweet potato (I also sliced some), the coarse grater for garlic and pecans, and the finest one for grating whole nutmeg – all were a pleasure to work with. I was especially happy about how effortlessly I was able to grate the nutmeg, because at times grating whole nutmeg can seem like a daunting task. So whether you are in the market for some good graters or need a gift/­­stocking stuffer idea, consider these Truffle Toast Home ones. They come in a very presentable, gift-ready drawstring pouch, too ;) To get 20% off your grater order, use code CUC7MCNV at checkout here until November 25th, 2016. Enjoy! Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil - divided, plus more for oiling baking pan 1 large yellow onion - sliced sea salt - to taste 3 large sweet potatoes - thinly sliced or shredded on mandolin 1 lb Brussels sprouts - thinly sliced or shredded 2 large garlic cloves - shredded or minced, divided freshly ground black pepper - to taste 1 can unsweetened coconut milk 1 tablespoon curry powder - preferably homemade, or to taste ⅓ cup pecans or walnuts - chopped or shredded whole nutmeg - to taste, for grating on top (optional) Instructions Warm 1 tablespoon coconut oil over medium heat in a medium sauté pan. Add onion and a pinch of salt and sauté until caramelized and lightly golden, for about 15 minutes. Set aside. Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a medium baking dish or 10-inch cast-iron pan by oiling it with coconut oil. Arrange half of the sweet potatoes on the bottom of the dish/­­pan. Scatter caramelized onion on top. Combine Brussels sprouts, 1 garlic clove, pinch of salt, freshly ground black pepper and the remaining ½ tbsp of coconut oil in a mixing bowl, toss to coat. Spread Brussels sprouts in a layer on top of the onions. Arrange the rest of the sweet potatoes on top. Combine coconut milk and curry powder, whisk or blend to mix. Pour mixture over the gratin. Combine pecans with the rest of the garlic, sea salt and black pepper to taste. Sprinkle the mixture on top of the potatoes. Cover your baking dish or pan with a lid or foil and bake for 25 minutes. Take off the cover and continue to bake for another 30 minutes, or until soft throughout. Garnish by grating nutmeg on top and serve right away. Leftovers are delicious when reheated in the pan, with some coconut oil and covered, over medium-low heat, or at 350° F in the oven for about 10-15 minutes. Notes 1. If you dont have curry, you might have all the spices to mix your own curry. Use a mixture of turmeric (1 teaspoon), cumin seeds (1 tablespoon), 5 crushed cardamom pods and a pinch of red pepper flakes instead of pre-made curry powder. Adjust amounts of spices to your taste if desired. Fresh turmeric root is also an excellent addition here, when blended with coconut milk and other spices. 2. I find that the best and most convenient way of preparing this gratin is baking it in a cast-iron pan. In the absence of my own kitchen and dishes, I made it in baking dishes for this post. 3.5.3208 This post was created in partnership with Truffle Toast Home, with all opinions being genuine and our own. Thank you for considering the sponsors that help keep Golubka Kitchen going. You might also like... Tile Flatbreads Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Roasted Parsnip and Apple Soup with Radish Greens Daikon Radish Pasta With Corn and Tomatoes in Creamy Coconut Sauce .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin – Holiday Recipe Month appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca

October 12 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca This weekend, we are off to a log cabin in the Appalachian Mountains with the whole family. Our kitchen is finally being taken apart in preparation for renovations, so we’re getting away from the dust and craziness for a week while the space gets stripped. The cabin is in a pretty remote and quiet place, and the leaves are turning – all great reasons to chill, hike, meditate, and get some much needed sleep. I’ve already packed up all the ingredients for this mocha to bring on the trip, since it’s been my favorite thing to drink in the mornings, and I can’t wait to sit on the cabin porch, sipping on this cozy herbal coffee. The base for this drink is roasted chicory root, a common coffee substitute, which gives it the deep flavor and rich color. In the U.S., chicory coffee is known as New Orleans style coffee, where it became popular during the Civil War, when the importing of coffee was stalled due to blockades. Chicory is also very common throughout Europe, and I grew up in a culture, where it was highly regarded as a medicinal plant and foraged in the summer for making herbal tea. Chicory is easy to distinguish in the wild due to its bright blue flowers (pick some if it grows around you!) and is related to dandelion, so you can use Dandy Blend here if you can’t get your hands on pure chicory (Dandy Blend includes both dandelion and chicory roots). It contains no caffeine, is rich in vitamin C and has the highest concentration of inulin of all plants. When roasted and ground, chicory miraculously resembles the flavor and depth of coffee. These days, I mostly try to stay away from caffeine, so coming up with drinks that will provide some of that much-needed comfort in the morning, minus the jitters, makes me quite happy. I add raw cacao and maca powders here for an energy boost, which also contribute more wealth to the flavor and take this drink into the ‘mocha’ territory. I’m in love with this cozy sip and find myself craving it throughout the day. It’s great hot and equally as good chilled, after some time in the fridge, or even iced. We’ve accumulated quite a few interesting links, which we are sharing today. We will be back with our weekend link roundups, along with all kinds of other good stuff very soon ;) Enjoy. Inside Glossier – I find this beauty company’s no-makeup makeup strategy and image quite fascinating and inspiring, so I found this in depth article and interview with their founder very interesting How I Built This – I listen to podcasts almost every day in the kitchen, and get very excited when a new, high-quality one comes out. This one is by NPR and has a series of interviews with successful entrepreneurs about how they started their businesses. So far they’ve interviewed creators of Instagram, Vice, Spanx and more. Reluctance NY – love cool bakery instagrams like this one Sans Ceuticals Journal – a natural beauty company with a journal full of clever, health-centric recipes like lacto pickles, Buddhist lunchvegan butter, Bloodlesss Mary, vegan berry Eton Mess and much more How the Sugar Industry Shifted Blame to Fat – this is crazy!!! Navigating the Beauty Supplement Aisle Interview with Jacqui Lewis – Vedic meditation teacher Lauren Spencer King – studio and short interview, love the photos here Eat This Food – refreshingly unique food blog design Behind the Scenes with Solange + love her new, perfectly pastel videos, one, two Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients 1 teaspoon roasted and ground chicory root 2 soft Medjool dates - pitted 1⅓ cup boiling water 1 cup unsweetened almond milk or other plant milk 1 tablespoon raw cacao powder 2 teaspoons maca powder ½ tablespoon mesquite powder (optional) seeds of ½ vanilla bean (optional) 1 teaspoon coconut oil - if drinking hot (optional) Instructions Place chicory into a strainer or a tea bag and combine with dates in a heat-proof vessel. Pour boiling water over them and leave for 10 minutes to steep. Combine chicory coffee, dates, almond milk, cacao, maca, mesquite, vanilla, and coconut oil, if using, in an upright blender. Blend until smooth and frothy. Serve warm, chilled or over ice. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette

September 29 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette This post was created in partnership with Infinity Jars. Having recently finished a cookbook manuscript with the backbone of seasonality, I turn to seasons more than ever when coming up with recipes. It’s hard not to sound like a broken record when talking about the topic, but I find just as much romance as I do practicality in eating what grows at any given time of the year. I grew up in a place, where the season completely dictated what we ate, which at times led to scarcity and deprivation, but made the periods of abundance that much sweeter. Nowadays, I fall back on that feeling, having made peace with waiting a year for the sweetest summer tomato or the plumpest fig. Of course, I will also buy boxed tomatoes for stews and roast up well-traveled California cherry tomatoes when a craving hits out of season – frankly I’m grateful for such options, having experienced what it’s like to have no options during my Soviet childhood. But I also know that the wait for the real deal will be well worth it in the end, so why not embrace it? Another thing I’m constantly encouraged by, when it comes to cooking with nature’s rhythms, is how well a lot of a given season’s ingredients fit together. Let’s take this bowl as an example. I started with the fig – the ultimate fruit of indulgence in the late summer and early fall. Figs are jammy and sweet, especially when broiled, and make easy friends with dense sweet potato and buttery eggplant. Sturdy-leafed kale, known to do well in the cold, together with a hearty grain and lentils make a nice bed for the vegetables. Sage is an evergreen and can be harvested well into the fall months, and coincidentally has that intoxicating, deep, piney flavor that pairs so well with autumn produce. It’s all quite seamless and effortless – the ingredients fit together as if they have been sharing a place under the sun, which, theoretically speaking, is true. This bowl is the opposite of boring, full of those complementary flavors and a variety of textures, from chewy kale and grains, velvety eggplant and sweet potato, to juicy figs and crunchy hazelnuts. It’s a complete meal, and, like any bowl is highly customizable. The hazelnut vinaigrette here is quite special – an interesting twist on a classic dressing, with the addition of well-toasted hazelnuts and sage. It keeps well in the refrigerator, and will improve any one of your bowls or salads. I would very much like to hear your thoughts on cooking with the seasons – do you follow them? do you find it helpful to have them as a guide? or do you find it overwhelming? Whatever it is, I would love to open a conversation. Infinity Jars sent me a variety of their airtight and lightproof ultraviolet glass jars, and I have nothing but great things to say about them. I’m kind of a stickler for storing ingredients in glass whenever possible, and keep a lot of uncommonly refrigerated things in the fridge, from matcha to tamari, to certain nuts and spices. It makes a lot of sense to me to take care of my ingredients and try to preserve their freshness as log as possible, especially for those pricier items. Infinity Jars go above and beyond when it comes to keeping things in top shape – the glass is thick and pigmented to block any harmful UV light, and the seal is scent-proof and airtight. I’ve transferred my loose leaf teas and a few spice mixes, along with some homemade lotions and oils to their screw-top jars. I’ve also been using their oil bottle for basil oil and dressings like the vinaigrette here, all to impressive results. The jars are so pretty too, I love having the uniform black glass on my shelves. Infinity Jars is offering GK readers 15% off all orders, just use code GOLUBKAKITCHEN at checkout until October 28th, 2016 :) Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients for the salad 1 medium sweet potato - cubed 1 medium eggplant - sliced into ½-inch rounds, halved if large 2 tablespoons neutral coconut or untoasted sesame oil sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste 1 tablespoon smoked paprika 8-12 fresh figs - cut in half 1 tablespoon chopped sage leaves 1 bunch kale - stems removed, leaves chopped 1 tablespoon olive oil 1½ cup cooked faro, freekeh or other grain of choice 1½ cup cooked puy lentils or other legumes of choice ¼ cup toasted hazelnuts for the hazelnut vinaigrette ¼ cup toasted hazelnuts - divided 5 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar ½ tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon maple syrup a few sage leaves (optional) ⅓ cup olive oil Instructions to make the salad Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Place cubed sweet potato and sliced eggplant into a large bowl, drizzle with oil, add salt, pepper and paprika. Toss to coat and arrange on one or two baking trays - the trays shouldnt be too crowded. Roast for 20 minutes, then mix and roast for another 15 minutes, until soft and golden. Remove from the oven and set aside. Turn on the broiler to high. Broil figs for 4-5 minutes. Remove from the oven and sprinkle with 1 tablespoon chopped sage. Broil for another 1-2 minutes, until caramelized and golden brown at edges. Remove from the oven and set aside. Place chopped kale into a large bowl, add 1 tablespoon olive oil and a pinch of salt, and massage until darkened and wilted. Add cooked farro and lentils to the bowl with kale, top with roasted sweet potato and eggplant. Distribute between bowls, top with figs, drizzle with hazelnut vinaigrette, and garnish with toasted hazelnuts. to make the hazelnut vinaigrette Combine hazelnuts, lemon juice, balsamic vinegar, mustard, maple syrup and sage leaves, if using, in an upright blender. Blend until smooth. Slowly pour olive oil into the mixture, with the motor running on slow, to emulsify. 3.5.3208 This post was created in partnership with Infinity Jars, with all opinions being genuine and our own. Thank you for considering the sponsors that help keep Golubka Kitchen going. You might also like... 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Spiced and Seeded Multigrain Loaf & A Giveaway

September 15 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Spiced and Seeded Multigrain Loaf & A GiveawayBefore I tell you about this bread, I want to mention that we are hosting an amazing giveaway for one KoMo grain mill this week, so be sure to read on for the details – it’s a beauty! I have a friend who inspires me to no end (hi Ira!). When she comes over, we sit at my kitchen table for hours, exchanging stories and drinking way too many cups of tea. My husband is always amazed – what can we possibly be discussing for that long? Ira formally studied Ayurveda and has an amazing wealth of knowledge when it comes to a good wellness routine, so there’s one answer to his question. We can go on and on about things like oil pulling, abhyanga, herbs, Tibetan rites, and food, always food. She is one of those cooks who is just naturally really good at it. As in, every one of her ‘recipes’ sounds as if she threw a bunch of things together, always eyeing and never measuring, but the result is devastatingly delicious every time. The idea for this bread comes from this magician of a friend, who prepares something similar weekly. It falls into the category of soda breads, which is a lower maintenance breed of bread that rises with the help of baking soda instead of yeast. The approach here was to make a ‘complete’ loaf of bread, full of freshly ground flours, grains, seeds, nuts, and aromatic spices. It’s not a traditional loaf, being more dense, nutritious and filling than your basic sourdough – one slice goes a long way. I feel okay about making a simple sandwich with it for my eight year old’s school lunch, knowing that she will stay full throughout classes and an after school activity after eating it. It’s special and it’s powerful. Make it, and you will have a dependable accompaniment to any one of your meals throughout the week. This week, we are hosting one of the most exciting giveaways we’ve ever done. It’s for one KoMo grain mill from Pleasant Hill Grain – a beautiful, electric stone-grinding appliance for dry grains and beans, which I used/­­talked about in last week’s recipe. I utilized it to grind the wheat and rye for this bread, and baking with the super-fresh flours it produced was such a pleasure. I talked in depth about the benefits of stone grinding in my previous post, but basically, stone grinding preserves all of the grain’s nutrition and produces the most delicious flour. The mill itself is almost a museum-worthy object, skillfully crafted in Austria. I truly can’t wait for one of you to get a hold of this beauty. To enter the giveaway, Pleasant Hill Grain asks that you like their Facebook page, visit their website and leave a comment here with the product(s) you like from their offering – they will appreciate your feedback. The giveaway is for U.S. 48 Contiguous States only and open until 9/­­22/­­16. Good luck ;) Spiced and Seeded Multigrain Loaf   Print Serves: 1 loaf Ingredients 2 cups sprouted/­­whole spelt flour 1/­­2 cup rye flour 1/­­4 cup corn grits/­­polenta 1/­­4 cup steel cut oats ½ cup mixed chopped nuts and seeds (ex: walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, sunflower, pumpkin, sesame, chia and poppy seeds), plus more for garnish 1/­­4 cup coconut sugar 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 tablespoon coriander seeds - freshly ground 1 tablespoon cumin seeds - freshly ground 5 cardamom pods - freshly ground 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ cup millet - soaked overnight 1 1/­­3 cups plain kefir or yogurt neutral coconut oil or other vegetable oil for oiling the baking surface Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Combine spelt and rye flours, corn grits, steel cut oats, nuts and seeds, sugar, salt, baking soda and spices in a large bowl. Drain and rinse millet and set aside. Make a well in the center of the flour mix and pour kefir/­­yogurt in, then add the millet. Mix by gradually incorporating flour into the kefir in a circular motion. You should end up with a very soft dough thats not too sticky. Turn the dough onto a well-floured working surface and gently roll into the flour. Shape into a round loaf. Place the loaf onto a well-oiled baking surface - a cast-iron pan or tray. Alternatively, put the dough into a well-oiled or lined loaf pan. Slice the top surface of the bread a couple times and sprinkle with nuts and seeds of choice. Bake for 40-45 minutes, until the crust is golden. The base of the bread should sound hollow when you tap on it. Notes If you dont have rye flour, use 2 1/­­2 cups sprouted/­­whole spelt flour. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushrooms

September 7 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushrooms I’ve found a new favorite weeknight meal that allows me to pack in as many different vegetables as I want, and, after the initial chopping, pretty much cooks itself. I’ve been needing for something like this to come along, since we’ve been having some very busy times around here. Going through house renovations, book edits and a third grader’s school homework all at the same time is no piece if cake, while food easily becomes that much needed escape from daily stress. There have been too many no-food-all-day-then-pizza-at-night days for me, and I knew it had to stop. It goes without saying, I’m very excited to share this lifesaver of a recipe with you today! I’ve been making lots of sweet skillet crumbles this summer, with any and all fruit I’d come across, from cherries and strawberries, to peaches and plums. It’s kind of the perfect lazy man’s dessert – so easy to prepare (chop, mix, bake) and very delicious. It’s really no wonder I’ve gotten hooked on whipping one up almost every week. This is where I got the curiosity to try out a savory crumble – what if the same breezy and flavorful preparation could be applied to vegetables? Well, turns out that it can, and it’s really good. For this particular savory crumble, I used the vegetables that are most abundant right now – zucchini, eggplant and tomatoes, with an addition of mushrooms for their meatiness and substance, and complete with warming curry spice. That being said, this recipe is highly customizable – use any vegetable in season (squash soon!), and any spice mix you prefer, keeping the crumble topping the same. After about an hour of slow-baking in the oven, you will have an amazingly comforting and nourishing meal. The leftovers are really tasty, too. Now you might be wondering what that beautiful wooden appliance gracing some of the photos is. Pleasant Hill Grain, a supplier of high-quality kitchen equipment, sent me one of their grain mills made by KoMo for grinding dry grains and beans, and I am in love! I wrote a lot about the advantages of freshly grinding your own flour in my book – it’s more affordable (whole grains are generally cheaper than flour), more nutritious, and so much more flavorful. It’s an especially great strategy for gluten-free baking, where a mix of various flours is often required. Before this mill, I did all my grinding in my high-speed Belndtec, but the way the KoMo mill is different and better for grinding flours is through its use of stones. Stone grinding is the most ancient form of pulverizing grain, and creates the most nutritious flour, simply because the flour never gets heated up too much while milling, allowing it to retain all the nutrition of the grains. KoMo also uses state of the art stones, made of a combination of corundum and ceramic, which basically never get worn down, and can produce very fine to coarse flour, based on your setting. I can genuinely say that fresh, stone-ground flour is absolutely the best, most flavorful flour you’ll ever cook with. Lastly, can we talk about the minimal design of this mill – is it not the most beautiful appliance you’ve ever seen? It’s designed in Germany and made in the Austrian Alps, and there’s not a single detail that doesn’t have function. The housing is made of Beechwood, and those meticulously crafted finger joints at the corners make me swoon. Once my kitchen is renovated, this guy will be on display, front and center. The most exciting news, though, is that we will be giving away one KoMo mill next week, so a hot tip – stick around for that :) Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushrooms   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the vegetables 1-2 eggplants - cubed 2 zucchini - diced into thick half-rounds ½ lb crimini or baby bella mushrooms 3-5 tomatoes - roughly chopped 1 yellow onion - chopped 3-5 garlic cloves - sliced 1-2 tablespoons curry powder, preferably homemade (I use recipe from this book) sea salt and freshly ground black pepper - to taste 2 tablespoons vegetable oil (I used untoasted, unrefined pure sesame oil, a new discovery, excellent for cooking and oil pulling) or ghee for the crumble topping 1 cup old fashioned rolled oats ½ cup freshly ground barley, or cornmeal/­­polenta ½ cup ground almonds sea salt and freshly ground black pepper - to taste 1 teaspoon baking powder ¼ cup ghee or neutral coconut oil - cold and solid (I prefer using ghee for this recipe as it goes really well with the curry spice) ¼ cup unsweetened, cold almond milk or other plant milk Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Combine all the vegetables and mushrooms in a large bowl. Add curry powder, salt, pepper and oil and toss to coat. Transfer the mixture into a 10-inch cast iron pan and set aside. Combine oats, barley flour/­­cornmeal, almonds, salt, pepper and baking powder in the same bowl. Cut the cold ghee or coconut oil into pieces and add to the bowl. Use your hands to mix the ghee/­­oil into the dry ingredients thoroughly. Add milk and mix to incorporate. Scatter the topping over the vegetables in the skillet and place into the oven. Bake for 1 hour. Serve garnished with fresh herbs, if desired. Reheat leftovers in a pan over low medium heat. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Giveaway)

August 31 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Giveaway) Hey friends, this is Masha. I usually do the photos and editing around here, but I am now venturing into doing some full posts as well. Today I’m excited to share some photos I took this past weekend in magical Woodstock, NY and its surrounding areas, along with a dish my boyfriend and I cooked there from Kristin Donnely’s beautiful new cookbook, Modern Potluck. True to its title, the book offers plenty of original, make-ahead recipes for gatherings, where contribution in the form of food is encouraged, along with useful potluck prep tips. Despite this wonderful theme, however, the recipes are very appealing to make and eat at home just as well. The book is not vegan or vegetarian (perfect for omnivores), but offers plenty of vegetarian, vegan, dairy-free and gluten-free options. Some of the recipes that caught our eye include Potato Salad with Fennel and Pickly Things, Miso and Molasses Baked Beans, Samosa-Filling Stuffed Poblanos, Vegetarian Borscht Salad, and Vegan Caprese Salad. All the photography is done by Yossi, who is one of our favorite food photographers in this whole wide world. We are giving away a copy of the book too, so read on for the giveaway details. I live in NYC, and my man and I have been thinking about getting away from the city to explore Upstate New York for a while. We finally got it together on one of the last weekends of summer and had the most incredible time. Woodstock exceeded all my expectations – I knew it would be nice, but didn’t expect it to be as breathtaking as it was, and now I daydream about one day moving there. The whole town seems to be woven into the woods, and this time of year, the forest is thick with green leaves and sweet summer air, accompanied by bird and cricket songs, scurrying chipmunks, and majestic deer. At night, it’s dark enough to see the Milky Way, of which we are very deprived in the city. We rented this Airbnb – a cottage built by the owner, an artist, and secluded in the woods, right off his main property. The place was amazing, from the layout and tree-filtered light streaming through the windows all day, to all the well-considered, hand-crafted details. The kitchen was very well equipped for all the cooking we did, and there is an outside grill, as well as a fire pit. It’s technically in the town of Saugerties, but very close to the main stretch in Woodstock, The Big Deep and Opus 40. Big Deep  A popular swimming hole in the area. You leave your car in an unpaved parking lot in the woods and follow a short trail to the water. We were there right around golden hour and I felt like I was in a fairy tale – the water was clear and refreshing, with sunrays streaming through the surrounding tall trees. As we witnessed, it can get crowded at the immediate entrance off the trail, but if you walk away from the main area a bit, you can find plenty of quieter, semi-private spots for taking a dip. Opus 40 A huge environmental sculpture, built by sculptor Harvey Fite over the course of 37 years in an abandoned bluestone quarry. Fite originally planned out the space as an outdoor sculpture gallery, and had a 40 year plan for finishing it, but died on the 37th year of completion. The structure is composed of curving steps, levels, passageways and water pools, and the entire thing is built without cement, inspired by ancient Mayan building techniques, and using old quarrymen’s tools. Everything about Opus 40 is incredibly impressive, and the whole time, I felt like I was walking around an alien-built playground. It’s also a great spot for eating lunch – there are plenty of places to sit down and enjoy the view. Kaaterskill Falls A 260 ft waterfall, one of the highest in New York. We overheard someone talking about it at a cafe and decided to check it out, and so glad we did. It’s a drive away from Woodstock, around 20 minutes, up a serpentine road and into the Catskills. The amazing thing about this waterfall is that there are trails leading to both the crest of the waterfall, where it first begins to drop, and the bottom, where it makes a nicely-sized pool, and you can swim in both places. As in, you can stand under a waterfall (!) and you can swim in river pools, in water which will be dropping hundreds of feet after it brushes past you. Insane. This was the last thing we did before heading back to the city, and it was the perfect closing to our trip. Some food-related places we liked: Kingston Farmer’s Market There are plenty of farmers markets in the area, but we only got to try out this one. A very nice, medium-sized farmer’s market with a good number of produce stands. The August produce was absolutely beautiful – heirloom tomatoes the size of a baby’s head, jewel-colored eggplants, ground cherries, peaches, shiso leaf (!), purslane, etc, etc. Open Saturdays 9am-2pm. Bread Alone We buy this company’s bread in NYC and were interested in visiting one of their home stores, since the company originated in the Catskills. This location sells many different varieties of their bread, a ton of pastries, coffee (Irving Farm) and sandwiches. Good for breakfast and lunch. Shindig Good burgers (they do have a brown rice and beet veggie burger for the veggie-inclined) and sandwiches (veggie melt), but I liked the watermelon gazpacho special I got the most. The cocktails are also fun, generously sized, and unique – their booze of choice seems to be soju and sake. Provisions Went here for lunch. A modern deli that bakes its own bread, pickles their own veggies and uses local produce. Lots of interesting sandwich options and a few salads. Sunflower Natural Foods Market A very well stocked local health food store. Fruition Chocolate  A local bean to bar chocolate company that offers a variety of chocolate bars for all tastes. They even sell a 100% cacao bar! Vinnie’s Farm Market A crazy place we stopped at on the way back from Kaaterskill Falls. A family-owned produce stand and store with a TON of homemade canned goods, from pickles to jams to hot pepper spreads, pastries and bread, homemade butter, farm eggs and milk. The amount of product they have is almost overwhelming, and the whole place feels like a step back in time. Since the cottage we rented was so cozy, we had no problem staying in for dinner and cooking with all the amazing produce we got at the farmer’s market. I’d been flipping through Modern Potluck the week prior, and was really attracted to the cover recipe for Spice-Roasted Carrots Over Lentils, which seemed perfectly simple, and like a good accompaniment to the grilled pizza we were planning on making in Woodstock. We loved the dish, it was a breeze to make and had all the elements I love in a side dish – substance from lentils and carrots, sweetness from dates, complexity from the spices and a fresh finish from the herbs. I imagine that bringing a platter of these lentils to a potluck would definitely earn you a status of a famous cook among your friends. Giveaway: For a chance to win a copy of Modern Potluck, leave a comment with your favorite potluck dish and a working email until Wednesday, September 7th, 2016. Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck   Print Serves: 8-16 Ingredients for the carrots 3 pounds real baby carrots or other small carrots - scrubbed if organic, peeled if not 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon ground coriander 1 teaspoon paprika 1 teaspoon ground cumin salt and freshly ground black pepper ½ cup tender fresh herb leaves - cilantro/­­dill/­­tarragon/­­mint/­­basil - roughly chopped, plus more for garnish ¼ cup finely sliced pitted medjool dates, dried figs or prunes for the lentils 1 pound dried black beluga or french green lentils salt and freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil 1 large onion - quartered lengthwise, peeled and thinly sliced crosswise 1 tablespoon minced garlic (about 2 large cloves) 1 teaspoon ground coriander 1 teaspoon ground cumin ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 1 cup fresh cilantro leaves - roughly chopped plain yogurt or cashew cream for serving (optional) Instructions prepare the carrots Preheat oven to 425°F. Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment paper. In a large bowl, toss the carrots with olive oil, coriander, paprika and cumin, and season generously with salt and pepper. Spread the carrots out on the baking sheets. Roast, rotating the baking sheets halfway through and shaking the carrots, for 20 to 30 minutes, until the carrots are nicely browned and tender. Let the carrots cool slightly, then transfer to a large bowl and toss with the herbs and dates. prepare the lentils In a medium saucepan, cover the lentils with water by 2 inches and bring to a boil. Simmer over medium heat until tender, 20 to 25 minutes. Drain the lentils, reserving ½ cup of the cooking liquid and season with salt. In a deep skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onion and season generously with salt. Cook, stirring frequently until lightly browned, about 15 minutes. Add the garlic, coriander, cumin, and cinnamon, and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the lentils and reserved cooking liquid, and cook until heated through, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in the lemon juice and the cilantro. Arrange the lentils on a platter and top with the carrots. Garnish with more herb leaves and dollops of yogurt/­­cashew cream and serve warm or at room temperature. potluck prep The lentils and roasted carrots, without the herbs and dates, can be refrigerated separately, overnight; bring to room temperature before serving. Bring the dish to the potluck already assembled with the vegetables on top of the lentils, then garnish with yogurt/­­cashew cream and herbs just before serving. Notes I halved the recipe for two people, but giving you a whole one here as per the book. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Mint and Chocolate Milkshake with Aquafaba Whipped Cream - Ice Cream Sunday

August 7 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Mint and Chocolate Milkshake with Aquafaba Whipped Cream - Ice Cream Sunday We have a classic ice cream flavor in milkshake form for you today – mint and chocolate. It’s creamy, with little hard specs of cacao nibs, and invigorating with the addition of fresh mint – just a great summer treat in every way. Now let’s talk about what’s on top of these milkshakes. Have you heard of aquafaba yet? It’s cooking water from beans or the water, in which canned beans come. Basically, a by-product that is usually discarded, which was found to have properties similar to egg whites, once whipped. I’ve been taking my time warming up to it, but now I can say that I’m officially on board with this whole idea. I’ve already successfully made eggless, porous pancakes, mousse and this whipped cream with the stuff, and it really does work, almost magically. It’s basically free, if you are already cooking beans for a meal or have cans of beans on hand, which is always a bonus. The most favored beans used for aquafaba are chickpeas or white beans, since they don’t color their water. Any other beans can technically be used for aquafaba, but black beans will produce purplish whip, and whip from red beans will be pinkish. Pretty awesome, huh? Read on for some weekend links and have a nice Sunday :) Michael Pollan and Psychedelics – one of my favorite modern-day writers on the new, fascinating research in the field of psychedelics To Fall in Love with Anyone, Do This – read aloud on the Modern Love Podcast Kerry Diamond & Claudia Wu – interview with the creators of Cherry Bombe magazine Mental Models for Decision Making – What is important is seldom urgent and what is urgent is seldom important.-Dwight Eisenhower Ester Perel on the Pardon My French Podcast – great interview with the psychotherapist on modern relationships, insecurities, gender roles Ditte Isager on Apiece Apart Woman – one of my favorite food photographers at home Slave Labor, Mast Brothers, Cheap Chocolate – “Our whole system is built around getting things for cheap, without understanding where that product came from, and who made it.” Blog Love – intrigued by this vegan sunflower ‘tuna’ idea from Faring Well and GKS, Coconut Twix Bars, Preserved Lemon Pappardelle + Emma’s Dreamy Garden Mint and Chocolate Milkshake with Aquafaba Whipped Cream   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients for the milkshake ½ cup cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours 1 large or 2 small frozen bananas 1½ cups almond milk/­­other plant milk large handful fresh mint leaves, plus more for garnish large handful cacao nibs few scoops favorite mint chocolate or vanilla ice cream (optional) aquafaba whipped cream - recipe below shaved dark chocolate - for garnish (optional) for the aquafaba whipped cream ¼ cup aquafaba (liquid from cooking beans, preferably chickpeas/­­white beans, or from canned beans) ½ teaspoon lemon juice 3 tablespoons powdered raw sugar (raw sugar powdered in a coffee grinder) Instructions to make the milkshake Drain and rinse cashews and combine them with banana, almond milk, mint and cacao nibs in an upright blender. Blend until smooth. Add ice-cream, if using, and pulse to combine. Garnish with whipped aquafaba cream, shaved chocolate and mint leaves. to make the aquafaba whipped cream Beat aquafaba with an electric hand mixer for 1 minute. Without stopping, add lemon juice and powdered sugar, ½ tablespoon at a time. Continue to beat for about 5-6 minutes or until stiff peaks form. Use immediately. The cream will deflate after some time, but can be re-whipped to become fluffy again. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie and a Glass Straw Giveaway Double Chocolate Layer Cake and a Giveaway Taco Collard Green Rolls Quinoa Collard Wraps from the Sprouted Kitchen Cookbook .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Mint and Chocolate Milkshake with Aquafaba Whipped Cream - Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice Cream Sunday

July 31 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice Cream Sunday This week, I wanted to re-create my favorite Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavor, making it vegan (though B&J came out with their own non-dairy ice cream, which is so awesome) and nutritious with the addition of a few energizing superfoods. Another thing I know people can’t get enough of in B&J’s ice cream are their decadent cores, so I went ahead and gave these SuperfoodCherry Garcia’ Pops a chocolate core to really drive the point home. If you’re wondering why the pops are minty-colored, it’s due to the addition of spirulina, along with other nutritionally dense ingredients like hemp hearts and cacao nibs. A bonus – no ice-cream maker is needed for these. Moving to the U.S. from small-town Russia in the 90s and going to a Ben & Jerry’s ice cream shop for the first time was completely mind-blowing because a) back home, we did not have dedicated ice cream shops, b) ice cream flavors I grew up with were very basic and I had never seen so many extensive flavor options c) they sold little tubs of ice cream to take home, which was unheard of in Russia at the time d) everything tasted incredibly decadent and delicious. So here’s my B&J tribute, as a thanks for opening my eyes to possibilities I didn’t know existed. Read on for some weekend links and have a peaceful Sunday. Kids Taste-Test the New Ben & Jerry’s Vegan Ice Cream  Essentials – since we get many questions about our chosen kitchen and photography tools, we’ve made a page with links to all our favorite and most-used products – Kitchen Tools here, Photography here (also working on a round-up of favorite health-related books/­­cookbooks and natural beauty!) The Sad, Sexist History of Salad – Americans, in particular, strongly associate healthy or light foods, such as salad, chicken, and yogurt, with women, and unhealthy or heavy foods, such as beef, potatoes, and beer, with men, both men and women preferred unhealthy foods with masculine packaging and healthy foods with feminine packaging. Fascinating. The World’s Most Innovative Companies in 2016 – according to Fast Company Julia Turshen on the One Part Podcast – loved this, especially her point on asking for credit/­­compensation – if you don’t ask, you will never know what the possibilities are. You may know Turshen from co-authoring Gwyneth Paltrow’s cookbook, along with many others. Cannot wait for her own cookbook to come out. Meryl Streep: A League of Her Own, also, Taste of Streep!? Obama After Dark – how one can average only 5 hours of sleep a night AND run the country is beyond me, also Obama Sets the Record Straight on His 7-Almond Habit :) About Us – we’ve updated our about page a bit, with very important info like our zodiac signs ;) Snapchat – follow @golubkakitchen for all behind-the-scenes Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core   Print Serves: 7-10 pops Ingredients for the cherries 1 heaping cup cherries - pitted and halved 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder 1 tablespoon water for the spirulina mix 1½ cup raw cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours 1 cup canned unsweetened full fat Thai coconut milk 3 tablespoons maple syrup or more to taste ½-1 tablespoon spirulina powder ½ tablespoon vanilla extract ½ teaspoon xanathan gum or 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder (optional) 1 tablespoon shaved dark chocolate or raw chocolate 1-2 tablespoons cacao nibs for the chocolate core ⅓ of the spirulina mix 2 tablespoons shaved dark chocolate or raw chocolate 3 tablespoons raw cacao powder for the pops 7-10 tea cups, small glasses or pop molds neutral coconut oil for oiling the cups spirulina mix (recipe above) chocolate core (recipe above) 7-10 wooden sticks - soaked for 2 hours or overnight hemp hearts cacao nibs Instructions to prepare the cherries Combine cherries with maple syrup and bring to a boil in a small saucepan. Reduce the heat to a simmer and simmer for 2 minutes. Combine arrowroot powder with water in a small bowl and add to the saucepan, while stirring. The cherry compote should thicken slightly. Remove from heat and let cool. to make the pops Make the spirulina mix. Drain and rinse cashews and put into an upright blender, preferably high-speed. Add coconut milk, maple syrup, spirulina, vanilla, and xanathan gum/­­arrowroot powder, if using and blend until smooth. If not using a high-speed blender, optionally strain mixture through a fine-mesh strainer for the most smooth and velvety texture. Spoon about ⅓ of the spirulina mix into a medium, heat-proof bowl and set aside. Add shaved chocolate and cacao nibs to the blender with the remaining ⅔ of the spirulina mix and pulse to combine briefly. Transfer the mixture into a separate bowl, then fold in the cherries. Make the chocolate core. Place the reserved ⅓ of the spirulina mix onto a double boiler, add chocolate and let it melt, stirring to incorporate. Remove from the heat, add in cacao powder, mix to combine and let cool. Make the pops. Oil your cups/­­molds generously with coconut oil and spoon the spirulina-cherry mix in, leaving a well in the center for the core. Spoon the chocolate core into the well. Even out the surface and insert the wooden stick. Repeat with the rest of the pops. Freeze until completely firm. Prepare a plate with cacao nibs and hemp hearts for coating, along with a parchment paper-covered surface for placing pops onto. Take cups with pops out of the freezer and place into a dish with hot water for a minute, for easier removal. Remove popsicles from cups, pulling them out by the sticks. Dip the top of each pop into the prepared hemp/­­cacao nib mixture and press gently to make the pieces stick. Place onto a parchment paper-covered surface and keep frozen until ready to eat. Take the popsicles out of the freezer 5-10 minutes prior to eating. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream Sunday Ramp Flatbread Pizza with Garlic Cream Black Sesame and Ginger Ice Cream Wild Blueberry Daisy Cake and a Cookbook Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post SuperfoodCherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Honey Miso Latte

July 28 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Honey Miso Latte Let’s talk about air travel for a bit. I never, ever eat airplane food anymore. After years of partaking in complementary in-flight meals and dealing with the resulting, brutal stomach aches, I realized that it’s the always-questionable food that was making me feel unwell, not so much the elevation as I initially suspected. The first time I brought my own, home-cooked meal onto an overseas flight was a revelation – I felt none of the usual discomfort after eating and could actually get some sleep. Since then, I take all kinds of steps to prepare for air travel, especially long, international flights and find the extra effort to be very much worth it. First off, a few days before flying, I make an extra effort to stay hydrated and to eat at least a few very nutritious and balanced meals. Along with buying a huge water bottle after security, I bring a few sleepy-time tea bags with me on the flight, then ask the flight attendant for hot water and steep a strong, relaxing cup of tea, which helps me go to sleep, since I usually need help. A good sleep mask is always good for blocking out the neighbor’s screen light, too. For food, I like to bring a spinach, strawberry and basil salad, which sounds complicated but is really the best. Since I usually travel during the summer, all three of those ingredients are at peak season and taste amazing on their own, so no dressing is needed and the salad is leak-proof, almost weightless and very manageable. I feel nourished and light after that salad and don’t crave much more. For snacks, I will make some kind of sprouted seed bars and pack a few strips of untoasted nori, along with some dark chocolate. And I find that having an apple helps freshen up after an airplane nap. It’s amazing to see the bewilderment on the flight attendants’ and seat neighbors’ faces when they realize I’ve brought my own food and even teabags – it’s just not a common practice at all. But with the huge difference it makes, I don’t see why not! Since I’ve learnt that eating miso might be helpful when it comes to countering the radiation we are exposed to on any given flight, I’ve been trying to incorporate it into my pre-flight meals, whenever I can remember. Aside from the obvious miso soup, I’ve been making this miso latte, warm in the winter and iced in the summer, before heading out the door for the airport. It’s very quick and has that whole delicious balance of sweet, salty and umami flavors going for it. There is also an immunity boost from turmeric, honey and ginger to help you fight off the myriad germs swirling around that flying can you will be spending some time in :) If you have any in-flight health tips, I would love to hear them! Always looking for more. Enjoy! P.S. We are on Snapchat under golubkakitchen, follow along for behind-the-scenes GK. Honey Miso Latte   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients 2 cups almond milk 1-inch piece ginger - sliced (optional) 2-3 teaspoons sweet miso paste 2 teaspoons raw honeyteaspoon turmeric (optional) black pepper - if using turmeric, for optimal absorption Instructions warm version If using ginger, simmer it in the milk for 10 minutes, then strain. If not using ginger, warm the milk on its own. Combine warmed milk with the rest of the ingredients in a blender and serve hot, sprinkled with more turmeric and black pepper, if desired. iced version If using ginger, simmer it in the milk for 10 minutes and let cool. If not using ginger combine cold milk with the rest of the ingredients in a blender and serve over ice, sprinkled with more turmeric and black pepper, if desired. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Quinoa Collard Wraps from the Sprouted Kitchen Cookbook Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream Sunday Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso Caramel and Chocolate - Ice Cream Sund... Gingery Rutabaga and Pear Handpies .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Honey Miso Latte appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Cobb Salad with Watermelon Bacon

July 20 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Cobb Salad with Watermelon BaconThis post was created in partnership with Kuisiware. I’m sure I’m not alone in my desire to live off salads during these hot summer months. Leafy greens are in abundance and at their most flavorful right now, and if I don’t take full advantage of them, I feel as though I’m missing out. So this summer, our goal is to expand the salad section of our recipe index with all kinds of twists on the classics and more. This week, the idea was to come up with the most vibrant vegan version of Cobb Salad, and putting it together was a true pleasure. Since Cobb Salad is an entire meal type of affair, I knew I had to load my plant-only version with all kinds of nourishing, savory components. Big, buttery beans replace eggs here, while velvety roasted eggplant could be seen as a stand-in for chicken. There is roasted corn and sweet cherry tomatoes to celebrate the season, avocado for a good dose of healthy fat, and briny Castelvetrano olives for an additional saltiness. I couldn’t resist the edible flower salad mix at the market, but you can use any favorite greens or lettuce as a bed for the ingredients here. Overall, although fruity and colorful in appearance, this Cobb Salad is full of deep, umami flavors. I left the dressing to be quite a traditional, simple vinaigrette, which nicely marries all the ingredients. Now on to watermelon bacon! An amazing and addictive new discovery, which is essentially just dehydrated strips of watermelon, with salt, lime juice and smoked paprika, for a smoky, bacon-like flavor. The preparation is simple too – the only downside is that it takes quite a long time to make. Although I have a dehydrator, I know that most people don’t, and I really wanted to see if this ‘bacon’ was possible to make in the oven, and it turned out that it is, as pictured. I provide instructions for both oven and dehydrator versions in the recipe below. If using an oven, you will have to keep it on for quite a while, but the temperature that the watermelon dries at is so low, that it shouldn’t heat up your kitchen very much at all. In the end, with some patience, you will have a delicious, sweet and savory snack, that goes very well with this faux-Cobb. For a person, who cooks with greens a whole lot, I came around to the idea of salad spinners pretty recently. I’m very protective of my kitchen space, having quite a good amount of cooking equipment already, and always wary of adding another thing to the collection, especially one dedicated to a single task. But some time ago, I used a salad spinner while cooking at a friend’s house, and was amazed at how little effort it took to dry the greens – no endless shaking and drying off needed. Since then, I’d gotten a spinner of my own, the kind where you pull a string to spin the bowl. The string had broken numerous times, and I kept replacing it, thinking that’s just how it went with salad spinners. When Kuisiware sent me their salad spinner to try out, I realized that not all spinners are created equal. This one is made with BPA-free materials and is incredibly sturdy, with a hand pedal that takes a few satisfying pushes to get your greens spinning fast. It’s nicely sized, able to fit the curliest bunches of kale, and does its job perfectly. I feel good about adding it to my kitchen repertoire, and can tell that it will last me a long time. To get $5 off the Kuisiware salad spinner, use discount code XGK5OFFX, starting today at 3 pm PDT. Enjoy the salad and have a nice rest of the week :) This post was created in partnership with Kuisiware, with all opinions being genuine and our own. Thank you for considering the sponsors that help keep Golubka Kitchen going. Vegan Cobb Salad   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the red wine vinaigrette 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard ¼ cup olive oil sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste for the salad 1 medium eggplant - cut into cubes 3 tablespoons neutral coconut oil/­­olive oil - divided sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste 2 corn ears mixed salad greens or lettuce - washed and dried thoroughly 1 cup cooked beans (I used Christmas Lima and Butter Beans) - to taste olives - to taste 1 cup cherry tomatoes - sliced if necessary 1 avocado - sliced basil (optional) Instructions Whisk together all vinaigrette ingredients and set aside. Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Cover a baking tray with a piece of parchment paper. Place eggplant cubes onto the tray, drizzle with 2 tablespoons oil, salt and pepper, and toss to coat. Roast for 25-30 minutes, tossing at halftime, until soft and golden. Remove from the oven, set aside and turn on broiler to high. Oil corn ears, sprinkle with salt and paper and place under the broiler. Broil for about 5 minutes, or until dark in places, turn and broil 3-5 more minutes, continuing to turn until both ears are visibly grilled. Let cool and cut kernels off the ears, set aside. Alternatively, grill corn on an outdoor grill. Wash your greens well and dry thoroughly. Distribute between bowls and top with roasted eggplant, corn, beans, olives, tomatoes, avocado and basil, if using. Drizzle with red wine vinaigrette and garnish with torn watermelon bacon (recipe below). 3.5.3208 Watermelon Bacon   Print Ingredients ½ medium watermelon ½ teaspoon sea salt 2 teaspoons smoked paprika lime juice - optional Instructions Preheat oven to 170° F (77° C). Slice watermelon into very thin strips, around ⅛-inch in thickness, remove and discard green rind. Pat dry with paper towels. Arrange watermelon slices on 2 baking trays, covered with parchment paper, and sprinkle with salt, paprika and lime juice, if using. Place trays on racks positioned in the upper and lower ⅓ of your oven. Let dry for 5 hours, flip pieces and rotate trays. Dry for another 2-3 hours, or until dry and chewy. Alternatively, use a dehydrator - dry watermelon strips on mesh screen trays for 8-12 hours, at 135° F. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Raw Portobello Mushroom and Curried Spinach Quiche Tipsy Watermelon Salad and Summer Cooking Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard Salad with Ghee Poached Radishes and Smoked Salt .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Vegan Cobb Salad with Watermelon Bacon appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles

July 13 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles We made and photographed these beauties this past winter, but they kept getting pushed back on the blog post schedule, as something more seasonal or appropriate always came up. I recently re-made them for a birthday party, with big help from Paloma, who is home for summer break before she becomes a third-grader, and expressing lots on interest in participating in the kitchen. The truffles were such a hit at the party, that I decided to post them right away, since they passed the real life test with flying colors. Although there are millions of good vegan truffle recipes out there, this particular recipe is a bit different from most date and nut-based truffles – the velvety truffle texture here comes from sweet potato and nut butters, while dates are used as a sweetener (if looking for an easy date-based raw truffle recipe, here is a good one we posted 6! years ago). Sweet potato is generally a life-saver when it comes to vegan baking and desserts. It contributes that sought-after, creamy texture, with a very mild, subtly sweet taste that generally becomes background to any other added flavor, plus there is the bonus of having a nutritious root vegetable in your dessert. There are a few good reasons healthy truffles are so adored in the community – they are a breeze to make, and the result is surprisingly decadent, in this particular case so much so, that it’s hard to believe there is no heavy cream or butter involved. The recipe leaves plenty of room for customization, too – add hemp hearts, goji berries, maca/­­mesquite powders, spirulina, or any other superfood powders. Deciding on the natural superfood sprinkles is fun, and the possibilities here are endless. Paloma pointed out that, once coated, these truffles looked like various planets she’s been learning about, so that’s the origin of the cosmic name. She had fun assigning planet names to each particular coating and color – if I remember correctly, matcha was for Earth, while lavender represented Venus, turmeric – Mars, and so on. Enjoy! Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles   Print Serves: about 45 truffles Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato 1 cup hazelnuts or almonds ¾ cup chopped dark chocolate/­­chocolate chips (I like these) 1 cup soft dates - pitted ½ cup sesame tahini or any nut/­­seed butter of choice ¼ cup almond butter 2 tablespoons neutral unrefined coconut oil - soft, at room temperature 2 tablespoons cacao powder pinch sea salt sprinkles cacao powder (new favorite brand) matcha powder turmeric powder bee pollen (vegans beware) dried lavender flowers Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prick sweet potato several times with a fork and bake for 30-40 minutes, or until soft throughout. Set aside to cool. Lower the heat to 350° F (180° C). Spread the nuts on a baking sheet and toast in the oven for 10 minutes. Grind into a meal in a food processor and set aside. Melt chocolate on a double boiler. Peel sweet potato and add it to a food processor, along with dates, tahini, almond butter, coconut oil, cacao powder, salt and melted chocolate. Process until well combined. Add ground nuts and pulse to incorporate. Chill the mixture in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to 1 hour to let it firm up. Using 1 tablespoon of truffle mixture per truffle, gently roll into a ball between the palms of your hands, then roll in any coating of choice. Repeat with the rest of the mixture, arranging truffles on a parchment paper-covered tray or a cutting board. Keep in the refrigerator or even the freezer. Take out right before eating - the truffles will never be completely frozen. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats Raw Green Mountain Parfait Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Quinoa Collard Wraps from the Sprouted Kitchen Cookbook .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Strawberry Oat Smoothie Bowl and Superfood Raw Chocolate Bar

July 1 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Strawberry Oat Smoothie Bowl and Superfood Raw Chocolate Bar Cookbook manuscript submitted – check, kitchen renovations begun – check, long weekend ahead to relax – check! Now that the weight of the manuscript is lifted from my shoulders a little bit (although the work doesn’t stop here), there will finally be some more time for all the things that often get neglected when a big project takes over one’s life – more beach hangs with the fam, catching up with friends who’ve long declared me a hermit, grilling outside until sunset, and long, leisurely breakfasts, like this one. Smoothie bowls are always a winning morning meal in our household – Paloma eats them without any questions, the adults enjoy them, and any friends who frequently stop by after work to test-taste my recipes will surely slurp up any leftovers. This one is a special smoothie bowl that I make when I want to treat myself and whoever is around to a more indulgent breakfast, which is still very nourishing and filling. There are sweet summer strawberries for fruitiness, oats for substance, and many energizing superfood seeds and powders – just add whatever you have on hand here. I’m also sharing my go-to recipe for raw chocolate today. I like to make a few of these bars at a time, to keep on hand as a dessert or snack, or for sprinkling onto dishes like this smoothie bowl. Chocolate always pairs so well with sweet and tart strawberries, and in this breakfast, the combination is heavenly. This chocolate bar is full of goodies as well – aside from raw cacao butter and powder, there is spirulina and all kinds of crunchy, nourishing toppings including goji, hemp hearts and quinoa puffs. Have a relaxing weekend and treat yourself with a smoothie bowl :) Strawberry Oat Smoothie Bowl   Print Serves: 2-4 Ingredients 1½ cups almond milk - preferably homemade ¾ cup rolled oats - gluten-free if needed seeds of 1 vanilla bean or 1 tablespoon vanilla extract 1 large frozen banana 1-2 large, soft dates - pitted 2 tablespoons hemp hearts, plus more for garnish 1 tablespoon almond butter 1 tablespoon maca powder 1 tablespoons cacao nibs, plus more for garnish 1 tablespoon chia seeds (optional) 1 teaspoon cinnamon (optional) several pieces of superfood raw chocolate (recipe below) - shaved, divided about 1 cup strawberries - chopped, plus more for garnish 1 tablespoon maple syrup Instructions Combine almond milk, rolled oats, vanilla, banana, dates, hemp hearts, almond butter, maca, cacao nibs, chia seeds and cinnamon, if using, in an upright blender. Blend until smooth. Add shaved chocolate and pulse to combine. Distribute between bowls, leaving about ⅓ cup of the smoothie in the blender for the strawberry swirl. Add strawberries and maple syrup and blend until smooth. Pour pink mixture between serving bowls, creating a swirl with a toothpick or other utensil. If you dont want the swirl, combine all ingredients in the blender at once. Garnish with strawberry slices, cacao nibs and more shaved superfood chocolate. 3.5.3208 Raw Superfood Chocolate Bar   Print Serves: 3-4 bars Ingredients for the chocolate 1 cup (100 g) shaved raw cacao butter ½ cup (45 g) raw cacao powder ¼ cup (40 g) mesquite powder 2 tablespoons maca powder 2 tablespoons maple syrup ½ cup hemp hearts ¼ cup cacao nibs ¼ cup quinoa puffs 2 tablespoons spirulina powder pinch Himalayan or Maldon salt options for the topping goji berries raisins cacao nibs quinoa puffs hemp hearts Instructions Gently melt cacao butter over a double boiler in a medium bowl over low heat. Remove from heat, add cacao, mesquite and maca powders through a fine mesh sieve to prevent clumping. Add maple syrup and stir to combine. Add hemp hearts, cacao nibs, quinoa puffs, spirulina powder and salt, stir to incorporate evenly. Spoon into bar molds and sprinkle with toppings. Place in the freezer to harden. Remove from molds and store in the freezer or refrigerator in a covered container. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Raw New Year Doughnuts Grapefruit Smoothie Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho Raw Chocolate Persimmon Tart and a Guest Post at Green Kitchen Stories .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Strawberry Oat Smoothie Bowl and Superfood Raw Chocolate Bar appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Summer Greek Salad

June 23 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Summer Greek Salad I’m getting over a bad cold that really took me down by surprise, and finding myself craving plates of vegetables and not much else, after having no appetite for a few days. Having a big batch of this summery Greek salad in the refrigerator has been helpful for regaining some strength and vibrance. I’ve been making salads like this one quite a lot these past few hot months, they are can serve as a great fridge clean-out aid, and are just really delicious. I love to order a bowl of good Greek salad when out. Everything about the combination of fluffy lettuce (original Greek salad does not come with lettuce, I’ve learned), juicy tomatoes, crunchy cucumbers, briny olives, a bit of sharpness from onion, and creamy feta is just right. This is my upgraded and loaded summer version of Greek salad, with the addition of protein-rich chickpeas, grilled and raw zucchini, bell peppers, spears of asparagus and green beans, and various herbs. Since I’m wanting to eat plants only while getting over this cold, I opted out of feta cheese, replacing it with savory toasted pine nuts and a sprinkle of nutritional yeast – the vegan answer to cheese. If you haven’t tried nutritional yeast yet, it’s a really neat and nourishing little topping, composed entirely of flakey, deactivated yeast, and with a surprisingly cheesy, nutty flavor. Enjoy :) Summer Greek Salad   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients for the dressing 3 garlic cloves - minced 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 teaspoon sea salt freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup olive oil for the salad ½ red onion - sliced thinly juice of ½ lemon handful asparagus - tough ends removed handful green beans - strings removed if present 1-2 small to medium zucchini - grilled 2 cups romaine lettuce - torn 1 cup cooked chickpeas 1 small to medium yellow summer squash - shaved w/­­ a vegetable peeler 1 cup cherry tomatoes 1-2 heirloom tomatoes - sliced 1 small English cucumber - sliced 1 red or yellow bell pepper - sliced 1 cup olives ½ cup pine nuts - toasted nutritional yeast - for sprinkling, to taste handful basil leaves - torn handful parsley and dill - finely chopped Instructions to make the dressing Combine all the ingredients in a small jar, whisk until smooth. to make the salad Place red onion in a small bowl, squeeze lemon juice over it, toss to coat and and let marinate while making the salad. Grill, blanch or saute asparagus and green beans until crisp-tender and bright green. Grill the zucchini. Arrange romaine lettuce, chickpeas, yellow squash ribbons, tomatoes, cucumber and bell pepper slices, olives, asparagus, green beans, and grilled zucchini on a large platter. Drain onion slices and scatter them over the salad. Drizzle the dressing over the salad and sprinkle with pine nuts and nutritional yeast. Garnish with fresh herbs. Serve immediately. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Sorghum Pilaf with Roasted Brussels Sprouts, Cranberries and Grapes Beet Mille-Feuille from the La Tartine Gourmande Cookbook Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard Ginger Marinated Tofu with Citrus Salsa .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Summer Greek Salad appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Strawberry and Asparagus Black Rice Sushi

June 15 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Strawberry and Asparagus Black Rice Sushi My kid is completely obsessed with sushi rolls, and I’m starting to figure out that it’s the format itself that elicits all her fondness – she will eat anything wrapped up in nori and rice. Take these rolls, for example – there are strawberries, which Paloma loves, but there is also asparagus, which, at this stage in her life, she would never consider eating on its own. But last week, I made one batch of this sushi, most of which was eaten by Paloma with no notice of asparagus, and the next day she asked me to make more of the ‘same exact thing’… If that’s what gets her eating asparagus, I’m all for it! For the adults and the less picky, these sushi rolls have it all. They are summery, light and bright, a great small meal or snack for the sunny days ahead. I used black rice, one of my favorite grains out there, for a little more bite and nutrition. There are sweet summer strawberries, tender, crisp asparagus, and spinach for that extra green. Avocado is always a great finishing touch to any vegetable sushi, its buttery texture just goes so well with rice and slightly crunchy nori. There’s a certain belief out there about sushi being difficult to make at home, but unless you are shooting for Jiro-like perfection and tradition, it’s not a big deal at all, I promise. With a casual approach, it only takes a few fun motions to roll up a mean sushi meal for yourself. Strawberry and Asparagus Black Rice Sushi   Print Serves: 32 sushi rolls Ingredients 2 tablespoons brown rice vinegar - divided 3 cups cooked black forbidden rice 1 teaspoon neutral coconut oil about 8 asparagus spears - tough ends cut off sea salt and black pepper - to taste 1 avocado - quartered 1/­­2 lemon or lime - juice 4 nori sheets - raw or toasted about 4-6 medium strawberries - sliced about 2 cups baby spinach Instructions Drizzle brown rice vinegar over cooked black rice in a medium bowl, mix to coat evenly. Warm coconut oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add asparagus to the pan, followed by a pinch of salt and black pepper and saute for about 5 minutes, until bright green and crisp-tender. Slice each avocado quarter into three wedges. Squeeze lemon or lime juice over the avocado to prevent discoloration. Place one nori sheet at a time on a sushi mat or a cutting board, shiny side down and lines going horizontally. Measure 3/­­4 cup of black rice and cover the nori with it evenly, leaving a 1-inch border at the side opposite to you, parallel to the horizontal lines of the nori. Wet your hands to prevent rice from sticking to them when distributing. Arrange 3 avocado wedges along the side of nori closest to you, slightly overlapping them. Top with about 5-6 strawberry slices, overlapping those as well. Place 2 asparagus spears next to strawberry slices, tips facing the edges, followed by a few spinach leaves. Lightly moisten the uncovered border of the nori with water. Start rolling by folding the end of nori closest to you over the filling, squeezing firmly, and continue rolling to the end. The moistened border will stick and seal the roll. Wrap the sushi mat around the roll and squeeze gently to form the roll into its final shape. If not using a mat, squeeze with your hands to stabilize. Put the roll aside, seam-side down, and repeat with the rest of nori sheets and filling ingredients. Place one roll at a time on a cutting board and slice in half with a sharp, moistened knife. Then cut each piece in half again, wiping the knife in between cuts if necessary, and repeat by cutting each of the 4 pieces in half one last time. You should have 8 pieces. Serve immediately with tamari. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle Mango Salsa and an Ayurveda Birthday Welcome Summer Multigrain Salad with Strawberries and Asparagus .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Strawberry and Asparagus Black Rice Sushi appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle

June 8 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle This is a simple plate of tangled summer vegetables – tender zucchini noodles and carrot ribbons, gently blistered green beans and shallot-kissed mushrooms, all dressed up in a bright, smoky sauce. We’ve been eating it this week, first as a salad on its own, then as a side dish, and the leftovers made their way on top of hearty sourdough toast – all equally delicious and so fresh. There’s a few things to be said about the bright orange sauce that completes this summery veggie tangle. The color comes from Spanish smoked paprika, which is one of my most reached for items on the spice rack. The spice, which comes from hot peppers that have been smoked dry and then ground, can add just the right amount of deep, savory flavor to so many dishes. It yields a warming, complex flavor, but isn’t as hot as pepper flakes or cayenne, so I use it pretty generously. In the winter, when I roast squash and roots, I often give them a pinch of smoked paprika, which takes them to that next level of heartiness. I also love adding it to all kinds of grain dishes, stews and marinades. If you haven’t tried smoked paprika yet, I encourage you to give it a go, it’s a game changer and will be your friend when building up flavor in many savory dishes. At first, the sauce acts as a dressing, but after a few nights in the fridge, the vegetables marinate in all the smokiness, and the dish gets a sort of second life, and a delicious one at that. This kind of spicy, marinated vegetable dish reminds me of the cuisines of my homeland in the southwest of Russia, the Caucasus, where in the summer, the markets are overflowing with stands full of the most colorful pickles and marinated veggies that you can buy by the kilo. Food has an extraordinary ability of bringing back the feeling of home, if even for a second. Enjoy! Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the smoky sauce 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon tamari juice of 1 lemon ¼ teaspoon sriracha/­­hot sauce of choice 2-3 garlic cloves - minced for the tangle 1-2 small to medium firm zuchini - sliced into noodles using a julienne peeler, spiralizer or mandoline (I use this one) 1 medium carrot - shaved into ribbons with a vegetable peeler ½ tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon neutral coconut oil - divided 1 shallot - chopped ½ lb crimini mushrooms - sliced tamari for drizzling - to taste 2 large handfuls young green beans - strings removed if present juice of ½ lemon handful parsley leaves - chopped (optional) salad greens and/­­or microgreens few tablespoons chopped hazelnuts or almonds - toasted if preferred Instructions to make the smoky sauce Combine all ingredients in a small bowl and whisk until smooth. Set aside. to make the tangle Combine zucchini and carrots in a large mixing bowl or platter. Set aside. Warm ½ tablespoon coconut oil over medium heat in a large saute pan. Add shallot and saute for 5 minutes. Add mushrooms and saute for another 5-7 minutes, until they begin to brown. Lightly drizzle with tamari and stir around until absorbed. Add the sauteed mushrooms and shallot to the zucchini and carrots. Warm the remaining 1 teaspoon coconut oil over medium heat in the same saucepan. Add green beans and saute for 2-3 minutes, until bright green and blistered in places. Squeeze lemon juice over beans and lightly drizzle with tamari. Cook for another 1-2 minutes, until liquid is evaporated and beans are crisp-tender. Add to the bowl with the vegetables. Add parsley, if using, and salad greens and/­­or microgreens. Drizzle the smoky sauce over vegetables. Toss to coat and sprinkle with chopped nuts. Serve immediately. You can also store the tangle in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. The vegetables will become marinated and delicious in a new way. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Mango Salsa and an Ayurveda Birthday Vegan Cheese Plate Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Chocolate-Blueberry Pudding by Scandi Foodie .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Tropical Soba

June 1 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Tropical Soba The hotter the weather gets, the more I find myself substituting meals with just a ton of watermelon, mango or papaya, or even some kind of iced and very hydrating smoothie or drink. The heat brings out those strong cravings for all things hydrating, juicy, and cooling, and I’m pretty sure I’m not alone in this. For something more substantial and nourishing, but still in line with all the aforementioned requirements for a hot summer day meal, there is this Tropical Soba. Papaya is one of my favorite tropical fruit. Of course, we didn’t have anything like it when I was growing up in Russia, so when I moved to Florida and tried papaya for the first time, I was blown away by its buttery consistency and complex, unfamiliar flavor. I was also pleasantly surprised by all its sunny health benefits – papaya is anti-inflammatory due to a wealth of vitamin C and beta-carotene, and some special enzymes, and contains other good stuff like potassium, magnesium, copper, fiber and folate, etc. (the list is quite long). I had a very similar story with mangoes, being completely overjoyed the first time I tried one. So when both of these fruit come into season, they sneak into all kinds of meals around here. Soba noodles are on high rotation in our house as well. Paloma, being in her very picky eater stage, will accept some kind of soba bowl any time of day, which I’m ok with, as the protein-rich buckwheat in soba makes the noodles filling and nutritious. For her, I tend to buy the 100% buckwheat soba, just to pack in as many extra goodies as I can into her meal, but I also like wheat/­­buckwheat blend soba, which tends to be more affordable. This recipe basically combines everything we want to eat at the moment. Nourishing, chilled soba noodles are the base, accompanied by sweet and luscious pieces of papaya and mango, jicama for a nice crunch, a sprinkle of desiccated coconut for some bite, basil, cilantro and mint for that herbal freshness, all dressed with a creamy coconut milk and lime sauce. A tropical dream in a bowl really. I hope you get around to making it sometime this summer :) Tropical Soba   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 large, ripe mango - peeled and sliced into bite-sized pieces ½ medium papaya - peeled and sliced into bite-sized pieces 1 small or ½ large jicama - peeled and cut into small cubes basil, mint, cilantro - to taste juice of 2 large limes - divided 1 8 oz package of soba noodles (I used these) sea salt Thai chili paste/­­sriracha - to taste (optional) 1 can light coconut milk unsweetened desiccated coconut - for garnish Instructions Combine mango, papaya, jicama and herbs in a large bowl. Squeeze juice of 1 lime over the mixture, toss to coat. Cook soba noodles in well salted water, according to instructions on the package, take care not to overcook. Drain over a colander, rinse briefly with cold water and shake off any excess water. Add soba to the bowl with the fruit, toss gently and squeeze juice from the second lime over the dish. Add a little squeeze of chili paste, if using, followed by coconut milk. Toss to coat well. You can add more coconut milk to make the dish soupier, if desired. Distribute between bowls or serving plates, garnish with desiccated coconut and more herbs. 3.5.3208   You might also like... Raw Rutabaga and Crispy Sage Pizza No Noodle Pad Thai Raw Caramelized Vegetables in Crispy Coconut Cups Raw Thanksgiving .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Tropical Soba appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Taco Collard Green Rolls

May 25 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Taco Collard Green Rolls This is a meal that came together with the leftover ingredients from an intense four day cookbook photoshoot – it turned out so nicely that we thought it would be worth sharing here. Masha and I live far away from each other, I’m in Florida and she’s in NYC, so when we get together to work on photos, we really have to make the time count. For the cookbook, we will make and photograph many recipes a day, which, at the end of it all, leaves us with a complete war zone of a refrigerator. The next week or so is spent freezing things that can be frozen, giving away the food to any and all willing friends, and worrying about letting the leftover ingredients go to waste. This time around, we worked on a few Mexican-inspired recipes and ended up with a tight selection of extra ingredients that would make for a great bunch of tacos. Specifically, there were chipotle-roasted sweet potatoes, black beans, fresh corn, red cabbage, jalape?o, avocado, and a ton of cilantro. Ah, but there was also half a bunch of robust collard green leaves – you know where I’m going with this. For the sauce, I modified my garlic cream recipe a little by adding chipotle for spice and to fit it in with the theme. I love the idea of collard green rolls and will often throw together some version of these with whichever fresh ingredients I have on hand, mostly for a quick solo lunch. Sometimes, when I’m craving something extra green and crunchy, I will just use raw collard leaves as wraps, but most of the time, I give them a quick blanch. I like how pliable they get, and how their flavor becomes a little more background and less of that in-your-face dark green kind of taste that raw collard greens have. The blanched leaves will also keep well for a few days in the refrigerator, if you want to wrap as you go. These rolls travel well and would stand up to being brought to work for lunch or to an outdoor picnic. I took a few on the plane back to Florida and was a very content traveler, despite a bumpy flight. Enjoy! Taco Collard Green Rolls   Print Serves: 5-7 rolls Ingredients for the chipotle-lime cream 1 cup cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours ½ cup purified water 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon tamari 1 garlic clove 1 tablespoon lime juice ½ teaspoon ground chipotle spice for the taco rolls 1 medium sweet potato - peeled and cut into ½ - ¾ inch thick sticks (cubed in the photo, as it was already roasted for a different recipe) 1/­­2 tablespoon neutral coconut oil - melted sea salt - to taste ground chipotle - to taste, for sprinkling 1 cup cooked black beans kernels of 1 corn ear or 1 cup frozen and thawed corn about 1 cup cherry tomatoes - quartered 1/­­4 red onion - finely chopped 1 jalapeno - seeded and finely chopped about 1 cup cilantro leaves 1 large or 2 small limes - juice 1 tablespoon olive oil 5-7 collard green leaves ½ small red cabbage - thinly shredded ¼ English cucumber - sliced into ½-inch sticks 1 avocado - sliced into wedges Instructions to make the chipotle-lime cream Drain and rinse cashews and place them into an upright blender. Add the rest of ingredients and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated for up to 5 days. to make the taco rolls Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Arrange sweet potato sticks on a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Add oil, sprinkle with salt and ground chipotle. Roast for 20-30 minutes, until soft. Combine beans, corn kernels, tomatoes, onion, jalapeno and cilantro leaves in a medium bowl. Sprinkle with salt, add squeeze juice of lime, and drizzle with olive oil. Toss to combine. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Holding collard leaves by their stems, submerge 2-3 leaves at a time into the boiling water for about 30 seconds, then rinse under cold water. Dry the leaves and shave down the thicker bottom parts of the stems. Working with one leaf at a time, arrange a small handful of shredded cabbage in the middle, perpendicularly to the stem, top with 1-2 cucumber pieces, 2 avocado slices, 1-2 roasted sweet potato sticks, and black bean relish. Fold the lowest end of the leaf over the filling, followed by the sides, then roll tightly. Serve whole or cut in half, with chipotle-lime cream. Store refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Banana Toffee Tart

May 13 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Banana Toffee Tart As part of my recipe development process, I do a lot of research, whether related to ingredients or techniques. One of my favorite things to look into are cuisines that I am not closely familiar with. It’s always exciting to think about the flavor combination treasures to be found in parts of the world, that I haven’t been fortunate to know. Toffee banana is one of those – I made a note of it some time ago and recently got around to playing with the idea. Toffee bananas are a classic Chinese dessert, which consists of deep-fried bananas, generously topped with toffee and garnished with sesame seeds. You’ll see that the tart I came up with has very little to do with the original idea, but it’s those kinds of things – recipe titles, ingredient pairings, or even color combinations, that often give me a push to come up with new dishes that I’m excited about. The thought of cooking whole bananas has always intrigued me, but my fear was that the already sweet fruit would become unbearably saccharine. This tart turned everything around for me – the cooked bananas are sweet of course, but they also get a heavenly, creme br?lée-like caramel crust and become even more buttery and tender. Under the layer of the transformed, cardamom-kissed bananas in this tart is a slather of date ‘toffee.’ You couldn’t find a more perfect ingredient than dates for creating a healthy and whole-food based toffee. They have it all – the thick, rich texture, the sweetness, the caramel color. The spelt crust is my go-to quick tart crust – it’s unsweetened and with a touch of salt, making a perfect bed for the decadent filling. Together, everything combines into an impressive whole. I’ve made this tart a couple of times, and it’s been hugely popular with my friends. I get requests to re-make it more than anything else I’ve been cooking lately. And I want to say a few words about the elegant plum-tree spatula in the photos. It was sent to me by a reader, Violet, who has an online shop, where she sells wooden fruit tree wares, hand-carved by her father. I was incredibly touched to receive a few of their items in the mail all the way from Europe, pictured below. Each piece has character, warmth, beauty and utility. The pricing is very fair too, especially considering the unique quality of each ware. Head over to Whole Grain Homes – perhaps you’ll find a beautiful piece for your own kitchen. Enjoy the weekend. Banana Toffee Tart   Print Serves: one 9-inch tart Ingredients for the crust 1 1/­­2 cup sprouted/­­whole spelt flour ¼ teaspoon salt 1/­­2 cup neutral coconut oil - chilled, plus more for oiling the pan 4-5 tablespoons purified icy-cold water for the date toffee 10 large, soft dates - pitted ½ cup almond butter 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1 tablespoon coconut oil - soft, at room temperature 1 tablespoon vanilla extract pinch of sea salt ½ teaspoon cinnamon for the bananas 6 small bananas - cut in half lengthwise 5 cardamom pods - green shells removed, freshly ground 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil 1 tablespoon coconut sugar Instructions to make the crust Place flour and salt into a food processor. Cut oil into small pieces and add to the flour. Pulse until mixture resembles sand. Add 4 tablespoons cold water and pulse to combine. Test the mixture by pressing it between your fingers - it should come together. If not, add more water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until it sticks between your fingers. Oil a 9-inch tart pan thoroughly. Press the dough against the bottom of the pan into the even crust, starting in the middle and working up the sides. Prick with a fork several times and let chill in the refrigerator for 1 hour. Preheat oven to 350° F (180° C). Cover the crust with a piece of parchment paper and place baking beans inside. Bake blind for 20 minutes. Let cool. to make the date toffee Place all the ingredients into a food processor and blend until smooth. Spoon toffee inside the crust and even out with a spoon. to cook the bananas and bake the tart Pre-heat oven to 400° F (200° C). In a spacious pan, warm oil over medium heat. Add bananas, cut side down, followed by cardamom. Cook for 2-3 minutes, until lightly golden, flip carefully and cook the other side for 1 more minute. Arrange banana slices on top of the toffee inside the crust. Sprinkle with coconut sugar. Bake for 30-40 minutes, until the crust is golden and bananas are caramelized. Let cool before slicing. 3.5.3208   You might also like... White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart Petite Slaw of Celeriac, Broccoli Sprouts, Meyer Lemon & Thyme by ... Ramp Flatbread Pizza with Garlic Cream Quinoa Collard Wraps from the Sprouted Kitchen Cookbook .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; }

Ramp Flatbread Pizza with Garlic Cream

April 19 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Ramp Flatbread Pizza with Garlic Cream From a cultural standpoint, it’s always interesting to see a vegetable going in and out of style (remember that Portlandia skit?) Kale was a big one and is still kicking, and, to me, it seems like turmeric root might be the veggie of the moment. And of course, there are ramps – the tender, mildly oniony wild leeks that pop up for a short time in the spring. They’ve been in very popular demand for the past couple of years, so much so it turns out, that there are even concerns of over-harvesting. I grew up with a different kind of culture of demand for wild foods, one based on complete necessity. If one had to search for any positive consequences of the Soviet Union food deficit, a forced benefit was that it enabled people to see the land as a source of nourishment. During my childhood, foraging and growing your own food was completely mainstream. If you wanted to taste a tomato in the winter, you grew and pickled it in the summer, otherwise you would not have any tomatoes until the next season. Early spring was defined by trips to the woods to forage for ramps and morel mushrooms. I remember the forest floor still being very damp from the recently melted snow. There wasn’t much green sprouting yet, which made it easier to locate the cheerful, bright tops of ramps. We gathered them very young, with their leaves just peaking out through the carpet of last year’s fallen leaves. At home, we tucked the ramps into sterile jars and pickled them to enjoy during the year ahead. Since ramps are a treat that we only get to taste once or twice a year, I like to make a meal that centers around them and highlights all their vitamin-loaded spring energy. This flatbread pizza is one of those, and a very simple solution to enjoying that bunch of ramps you picked up at the market. The spelt flatbread dough recipe I provide here is one of my favorites – basic, made up of few ingredients, but easy to roll and a great blank slate for any toppings. When roasted, ramps become soft and tender inside, with a slight crisp to their leaves, and full of that bright flavor we all crave during this time of year. I’ve also included an optional recipe for vegan garlic creme, which you can drizzle across the pizza, but feel welcome to garnish with cr?me fraîche/­­any cheese of choice, or enjoy plain. Ramp Flatbread Pizza with Garlic Cream makes two 10-12-inch pizzas for the garlic cream 1 cup cashews – soaked for 2-4 hours 1/­­2 cup purified water 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon tamari 1 tablespoon mustard 1 garlic clove 1 tablespoon lemon juice for the dough 3/­­4 cup water – warm 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 2 tablespoons soft neutral coconut oil or other vegetable oil 1/­­2 teaspoon baking soda sea salt – to taste 2 cups sprouted or whole spelt flour for the pizza 1 large bunch ramps 1 tablespoon soft neutral coconut oil or olive oil – divided sea salt – to taste freshly ground black pepper – to taste pinch red pepper flakes 1 garlic clove – minced baby arugula, microgreens – for serving (optional) to make the garlic cream Drain and rinse cashews. Place all of the ingredients into an upright blender and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated. to make the dough 1. Place flour into a medium mixing bowl. Add salt, coconut oil and baking soda. Pour apple cider vinegar over baking soda and let it bubble.  2. Pour in warm water gradually, mixing it in with a fork. Knead with your hands to end up with a soft and slightly sticky dough. Divide into 2 equal parts, cover and leave to rest while preparing ramps. to make the pizza 1. Preheat oven to 395° F (200° C). 2. Cut off and discard the very ends of each ramp, getting rid of any roots and soil. Wash and dry the ramps thoroughly. Separate green leaves from white stems/­­bulbs with a knife. Place white parts into a bowl, drizzle with 1/­­2 oil, salt and pepper, and toss to coat. 3. Prepare a parchment paper-covered tray large enough to hold two flatbreads, or two trays. Spread one piece of dough at a time over the parchment paper with oiled hands into a 10-12-inch crust, about 1/­­8-inch in thickness. Alternatively, use a rolling pin. 4. Divide white stems between in two parts and scatter them evenly over the crusts. Bake for 10 minutes. 5. Meanwhile, drizzle the leaves with the rest of the oil, salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes, toss to coat. Equally distribute minced garlic clove over the two crusts. Arrange oiled leaves over the two crusts in layers. Bake for additional 10 minutes, until ramps are just wilted, soft, and a bit crispy at some edges. 6. Let cool slightly. Drizzle with garlic cream (optional), slice and serve garnished with fresh arugula and/­­or microgreens.

Beet Tahini Snack Bars

April 4 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Beet Tahini Snack Bars Every weekend, I try to make time for preparing snacks for the week, along with a few other essentials like a big batch of green juice, homemade almond milk, a pot of grains or beans, some kind of sprouted seed or legume, and a sauce to top quick salads and bowls. I don’t always have time to check all those items off my list, but having a head start on things like that helps immensely when it comes to sticking to healthy, homemade meals throughout the week. I made these beet snack bars last weekend, and they’ve been great to have throughout a busy week to give to Paloma, and as an emergency snack or meal replacement for my husband and I. Aside from preparing for a big cookbook photoshoot next weekend, I’ve been watching the figure skating championship in Boston. Both my parents were athletes, and I grew up in a household that very closely followed most sports. Ever since I was a little kid, I’ve loved to watch ice skating, and that love has not faded one bit. A few of my favorite skaters took the pedestal, and I’ve been left a happy fan. These bars are chewy in texture, with juicy pockets of raisins and a nice crunch from cacao nibs. Beet, tahini and almond butter make them filling and nourishing, and cacao nibs contribute energizing properties. Paloma likes them, mostly due to how colorful they are – and the drizzle of chocolate on top does not hurt. I’ll go ahead and put these bars into the kid-approved category as well. Enjoy! Beet Tahini Snack Bars 1 small beet – baked, steamed or boiled, and peeled 1/­­2 cup soft dates – pitted 1/­­3 cup unsweetened canned coconut milk 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 tablespoons brown rice syrup or maple syrup, optional 2 1/­­2 cups regular rolled oats – coarsely ground in a food processor 2 cups barley puffs, quinoa puffs or other whole grain puffs 1/­­2 cup sesame tahini 1/­­2 cup almond butter handful cacao nibs 1/­­2 cup raisins pinch sea salt melted dark chocolate for drizzling (I use these dairy free chocolate chips) 1. Blend beet, dates, coconut milk, vanilla extract and syrup in a blender until smooth. 2. Combine oats, puffs, sesame tahini, almond butter, cacao nibs, raisins, salt, and beet mixture in a large bowl. Mix to combine thoroughly. 3. Line an 8″ x 8″ baking dish with parchment paper, extending the paper up the sides of the dish. Distribute the mixture into the dish in a flat, even layer. Place into the freezer to firm up, for at least 1 hour. Take out of the freezer and remove the firm block out of the baking dish, using the extended ends of the parchment paper. Place onto a cutting board and cut into bars of your desired shape. Drizzle with melted chocolate. 4. Keep in the freezer, in an air-tight container (the bars will never be frozen solid). Remove from the freezer a few minutes before eating.

Curry Coconut Ice Cream

March 5 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Curry Coconut Ice Cream It’s been a long time since I first thought of making curry ice cream, and I finally got around to it this winter. I thought this was a good time to share it, for those of you in seasonal climates, feeling the first signs of spring among the remaining chill of winter. You might associate ice cream with balmy weather, but the many spices in this recipe provide an earthy, invigorating, and overall warming effect. I have a friend who’s lived most of her life convinced that she strongly dislikes Indian cuisine, especially any dishes having to do with curry. Things have changed for her recently, after taste testing many curry-centric dishes in my kitchen, which I have, somewhat strategically, asked her to try. For better or for worse, I’m the type of person, who often makes it their goal to get people to like whole food-based ingredients they have rejected. That might be one of the reasons I have this blog! To end the story, my friend has grown to not just like, but love curry, and she now frequently makes it at home. She has also turned out to be the number one fan of this ice-cream, so this one’s for her. This story might be proof of the theory that any type of food can be delicious if made from scratch, with the right ingredients and attention. It also reminds me to keep trying foods I think I dislike, in hopes of developing a taste for them. This ice-cream was a big hit among those who tried it. The mingling of sweet and savory, creamy and spicy makes for a bold and complex flavor. And you might be thinking this same thing at this point – it would be interesting to try making curry ice cream with no sweetener, to serve next to savory dishes. I will certainly be doing that one day soon. Curry Coconut Ice Cream Note: If you are looking for a trusted source for buying your spices, Mountain Rose Herbs is an excellent online herb and spice shop, stocking all the freshest, organic spices you will need for this recipe and beyond. 1 cinnamon stick 1 star anise 1 tablespoon coriander seeds 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 2 whole cloves 3 green cardamom pods 2 black peppercorns 2 cups coconut milk 2 teaspoons turmeric powder 1-inch fresh ginger root – peeled, sliced and crushed with a knife 1/­­4 cup plus 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1/­­2 teaspoon xanathan gum or 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder 1. Toast whole dried spices in a medium, heavy-bottom sauce pan over medium low heat for 2-3 minutes, or until fragrant. Coarsely crush spices in a mortar and pestle or coffee grinder. Return to the pan, add coconut milk, turmeric and ginger. Bring to a boil over medium heat, lower the heat to a slow simmer and cook for 20 minutes, partially covered. Remove from heat and let cool. 2. If you have a high-speed blender such as Blendtech or Vitamix, pour milk with spices into the blender, add maple syrup and xanathan gum/­­arrowroot powder and blend until smooth. If you have a regular blender, strain the milk and discard spices. Add strained milk into the blender with maple syrup and xanathan gum/­­arrowroot powder and blend to combine. 3. Place the mixture in the refrigerator and let chill thoroughly, preferably overnight. Churn in an ice-cream machine for 20-25 minutes or according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Scoop into a container and freeze for at least 4 hours. When the ice-cream becomes hard, let it soften at room temperature for 10-15 minutes before serving.

White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart

February 6 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart Recently, I’ve been working on developing very light, very mildly sweetened, mousse-like dessert recipes for the new cookbook, and this White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart is an example of my experiments. I have a weakness for anything soufflé or custard-like, and I’ve grown quite sensitive to the overly sweet treats that monopolize our world, so this tart turned out to be the dessert of my dreams. It’s blood orange season and I can never miss the opportunity to take advantage of the fruit’s photogenic nature. In addition, I just got my hands on a fresh batch of the most fragrant raw cacao butter. Being that orange and cacao is one of the most heavenly pairings known to man, I had to combine the two. Irish moss will always be my number one thickener of choice, but because it’s so difficult to find for so many readers, I’ve decided to familiarize myself with the more widely available option – agar-agar. Agar is another sea vegetable based thickener, available in most health food stores, and I use it in this recipe to achieve a mousse-like consistency. The texture of the mousse is very light and airy, accompanied by the intoxicating aroma of cocoa and subtle notes of citrus. Blood orange juice contributes the most gentle pale pink color, one that makes me stop and stare for a little too long. You’ll love the crust as well – it’s tender, buttery (with no addition of butter), and thin – all to go along with the delicate nature of the filling. Enjoy! White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart makes 1 9-inch tart Notes: 1) I highly recommend using homemade almond milk here, as it is one of the few and main ingredients. Homemade almond milk is much creamier than its store-bought counterparts, and the creaminess is important to the texture of the mousse. 2) You can choose to omit the crust and serve the filling on its own, distributed between ramekins, as shown in the photo above. for the crust 1 tablespoon ground chia seeds 3-4 tablespoons ice cold water, divided 1/­­2 cup coconut oilcold and solid, plus more for oiling the springform – at room temperature 3/­­4 cup oat flour (I use ground rolled oats) 1/­­2 cup almond flour 1/­­4 cup tapioca flour 2 tablespoons coconut sugar pinch sea salt for the filling 3 cups homemade almond milk 1/­­3 cup maple syrup pinch sea salt 3 tablespoons agar-agar 2 1/­­2 oz raw cocoa butter – shredded zest of 2 blood oranges 1 cup blood orange juice 1/­­2 tablespoon vanilla extract – optional to make the crust 1. Combine chia and 1 tablespoon cold water into a paste in a small bowl, keep refrigerated. Prepare a 9-inch springform by covering the bottom with parchment paper and generously oiling the parchment and the sides of the form with coconut oil. 2. Combine all the flours, coconut sugar and salt in a food processor, pulse to mix. Add refrigerated chia paste, pulse to incorporate. Cut coconut oil into cubes, add to the flours and keep pulsing until the mixture resembles sand. 3. Add 2 tablespoons cold water and process until the mixture comes together when pressed with fingers. Add 1 more tablespoon of water if necessary. Take care to not overproces. 4. Press the crust mixture against the bottom and sides of the form evenly, leaving about 1/­­2 inch of the sides uncovered at the top. The crust will be very thin to be to compliment the airy and delicate blood orange mousse. Refrigerate the crust for 30 minutes. 5. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350 F. After 30 minutes in the fridge, cover the crust with parchment paper, weight it down with baking beans and blind bake crust for 20 minutes. Remove beans and paper and bake for another 15 minutes, until golden. Let cool. to make the filling 1. Combine almond milk, maple syrup, salt and agar-agar in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil, whisking frequently. Lower heat to a slow simmer and cook partially covered for 5 minutes, whisking periodically, until agar flakes dissolve. 2. Remove from heat and add shredded cacao butter. Cover and let melt for about 5 minutes. 3. Add milk and cacao mixture to a blender, together with blood orange juice and vanilla. Blend to combine, for about 20 seconds. Taste and add more maple syrup, if needed. Add orange zest and pulse a few times. 4. Pour the mixture into a large heat proof bowl and let cool for about 30 minutes, whisking occasionally. When cool, pour mixture into the baked crust and refrigerate until completely set. 5. Carefully remove the spring form. Decorate tart with orange slices and/­­or zest. Slice one piece of the tart at a a time and serve immediately.

Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange Miso Glaze & A New Cookbook!

December 20 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange Miso Glaze & A New Cookbook! My reason for posting this festive cake today is not only a holiday related one. I’m very excited to finally announce that Masha and I working on our second cookbook, scheduled to come out in the Fall of 2017, published by Roost Books. The working title is Simply Vibrant, which quite accurately describes what the book will be all about. Like in The Vibrant Table, the recipes in this book will focus on healthful, whole foods ingredients, with a new key element of simplicity. This time around, I’m giving lots of thought to practicality, quick preparation and accessible ingredients, all under the umbrella of seasonality. We have lots of hard work ahead – you can always follow along with the trials and errors on Instagram, #simplyvibrantcookbook. Now it’s time to celebrate with cake! This cake started with a craving I had for one of my favorite childhood treats, the rum baba. When I was a kid in Russia, I would often buy the sweet, raisin studded, glazed pastry on my walk home from school. To this day, I go crazy for any baked goods that contain raisins. This cake has all of the properties of the rum baba and more. The batter is based on spelt dough with pear and sweet potato puree, which makes it very moist. Adding to that, the raisins are plumpened through soaking in rum or orange juice. The finishing touch is a glaze that I’m quite proud of – Miso and Orange Glaze, enough said. Wishing Happy Holidays to you and your family, cheers to 2016! I created this recipe as part of a healthy recipe package for Food & Wine online, see the detailed recipe here.

Squash Noodle Soup with Healing Turmeric-Ginger Broth, Roasted Carrots and Beluga Lentils

November 4 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Squash Noodle Soup with Healing Turmeric-Ginger Broth, Roasted Carrots and Beluga Lentils I recently came back from a short stay in NYC with Masha (older daughter and Golubka photographer), where I was happy to get a glimpse of autumn with its turning trees and crisp air. Fall is something I miss a lot after being a resident of almost seasonless Florida for so many years. All the falling leaves and a minor sniffle got me thinking about comforting soups, which are the best answer to being under the weather or any general cravings for warming, healing food. This soup is simple in preparation, but full of powerful flavors and anti-inflammatory properties. I started with a play on chicken noodle soup, the classic ‘get well’ food, by using roasted spaghetti squash in place of noodles and making a nutritious broth. The broth is infused with the best of the best – turmeric, ginger, garlic, lemongrass and plenty of lemon. The sweetness of roasted carrots balances out the tartness and spiciness of the broth. Puy lentils complete the soup with body and substance. If you can get your hands on kaffir lime leaves, which can be found frozen at Asian markets, do not hesitate to include them, you’ll be in for a real treat. I created this recipe as part of a healthy recipe package for Food & Wine online, see the detailed recipe here.

Daikon Radish Pasta With Corn and Tomatoes in Creamy Coconut Sauce

August 9 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Daikon Radish Pasta With Corn and Tomatoes in Creamy Coconut Sauce Paloma and I made it back home after our nearly two month stay Russia. We spent some quality time with family and friends in my home town, where Paloma took a few classes and got a chance to polish up her swimming, gymnastics and piano skills. The teaching style in Russia is quite different than back home – a lot is asked from the children, and the teachers are quite serious. Paloma didn’t seem to mind and actually had a few important breakthroughs. After all that hard work we thoroughly enjoyed our time in Sochi, swimming in the beautiful waters of the Black Sea (more on Sochi in the next post), hiking in the Caucasus Mountains and wandering around the Moscow center. Back home in Florida, we still have a bit of time before school begins, to look at the hundreds of pictures we took and share the adventures with our friends over here. I keep a little dish of multicolored glass, polished by the sea, speckled pebbles and shells close by on the counter, to keep reminding myself of the most magical moments of this summer. Below are a few favorite photos from our travels, starting with the said pebbles. Caucasus Mountains in the summer. One of the dozens of the ornate subway stations in Moscow. Perlov Tea House, a beautiful tea shop and a historic building in Moscow. One of Stalin’s high rises captured from the Moscow River. It always takes me some time to adjust to the food here when coming back from the other side of the Atlantic. After eating all the juicy berries, wild mushrooms and my mother’s delicious Russian cooking, it’s hard to find things to be flavorful here, at least for the first couple of weeks. I do crave lots of vegetables and big salads. This simple daikon pasta was the first dish I cooked back home, satisfying my veggie cravings. In two months without many eastern flavors, I forgot how delicious ginger and coconut milk are. The corn is also sweeter here in my opinion. This was my first attempt at cooking vegetable noodles like pasta – boiled in a pot of salted water – a method I’ve been curious about for a while. I loved the resulting neutral flavor and the noodle texture did resemble very delicate angel hair. Daikon Radish Pasta with Corn and Tomatoes in Creamy Coconut Sauce 1 medium to large daikon radish 2 ears of corn 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 tablespoon sesame oil 1 tablespoon minced ginger 2 teaspoons sriracha 1 tablespoon lime juice sea salt 1 cup canned unsweetened coconut milk 2 tablespoons tamari 1 tablespoon smooth almond butter 1-2 handfulls heirloom cherry tomatoes – quartered handful of basil leaves – torn microgreens to garnish – optional 1. Cut kernels off the corn ears and set aside. 1. Set a medium pot with salted water over high heat. Peel and cut daikon into noodles, using a juliene peeler, veggie peeler or mandoline. When the water begins to boil, add daikon noodles and cook for 3 minutes. Drain and set aside. 2. Warm coconut and sesame oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add ginger, sriracha, lime juice, pinch of salt and corn, saute for 3-5 minutes. 3. Add coconut milk, tamari and almond butter, stirring to incorporate until creamy and hot. Add daikon pasta, cook for another 3 minutes, letting all the flavors combine. 4. Turn the heat off, add tomatoes and basil. Serve immediately.

Mango, Jicama and Grilled Corn Tacos

June 28 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Mango, Jicama and Grilled Corn Tacos Paloma and I made it to my hometown in the Southwest of Russia, where we are thoroughly enjoying our stay at grandma’s house. Because I don’t get to visit here very often, my days are completely packed with family, friends, daily trips to the market, nature walks, and all sorts of leftover business. This time, we added a kitchen renovation to the mix, along with piano and swimming lessons for Paloma. The days fly by, and I’m always caught by surprise when the night falls and it’s time for bed. As usual, we’re indulging in my mom’s home cooked delicacies and consume the local berry harvest by the kilo. The most abundant crops right now, which we have no access to in Florida, are sour cherries, black, red and white currants, wild strawberries and mulberries. We walk around with berry-stained hands and wouldn’t have it any other way. I prepared this recipe in Florida, right before we left, where a very hot summer was in full swing, making me want to stay away from the oven as much as possible. I craved crunchy raw vegetables like kohlrabi and jicama, along with chilled watermelon and ripe mango, which often replaced my lunch. I came up with this easy salad – a combination of jicama, mango, avocado and grilled corn with loads of cilantro and lime juice. It’s a quick and refreshing dish on its own and even more filling and delicious when served in a taco shell. Lastly, I have a bit of housekeeping to discuss. If you haven’t signed up for our newsletter, you can do so here. We recently changed the format to a better looking one, and along with recipe updates, the newsletters will include seasonal ingredient highlights and any other Golubka Kitchen related news. And for the French readers, the translation for the Rhubarb Raspberry Fizz from Sarah Kieffer’s guest post is up here. Mango, Jicama and Grilled Corn Tacos serves 4-6 2 ears of corngrilled 1 medium jicama – sliced into cubes or small matchsticks 2 ripe, sweet mangos – cut into small cubes ground chipotle – to taste (optional) 1-2 limes 1 bunch cilantro 1-2 ripe but firm avocados – cubed your favorite taco shells hot sauce of choice Cut kernels off grilled corn ears. Combine corn kernels,  jicama and mango in a large bowl, add chipotle, if using. Squeeze lime juice over. Add cilantro leaves and mix gently. Distrribute the salad between taco shells, top with abocado slices, sprinkle with more lime juice, cilantro leaves and your favorite hot sauce. Serve right away.

Matcha Lime Bars

May 29 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Matcha Lime Bars To this day, the recipe for the gluten free Lemon Bars with Pistachio Crust from our book gets brought up most often by my family and friends. During the beginning stages of work on the book, Paloma liked to play a game of flipping through our working binder with recipe photos, much like through a menu in a restaurant, pointing out what she would like to eat that day. The Lemon Bars were pointed out by her little fingers time and time again. A friend of mine, who has been devotedly cooking through the book, has made many variations of these bars, once even turning them into a chocolate-citrus birthday cake. Needless to say, they are a hit. With so many new amazing cookbooks coming out, it’s been a while since I’ve cooked from my own book. Recently I began craving this dessert, with the tart silkiness of lemon mousse against the tender pistachio shortbread, and decided to make a variation on the original recipe. I substituted lime for lemon and added matcha for its beautiful color and lovely, mild flavor and undeniable health benefits. Since I haven’t cooked from my own finished, written recipes in a while, I was pleasantly reassured by how smoothly the process went, thanks to my editor and many hours of meticulous work and recipe testing. I like to use whole leaf Irish moss or vegan gelatin for the mousse, both work great. The amazing translator for the French edition of the book was kind enough to adapt the recipe using agar-agar for our French readers as well. Paloma and I are getting ready to travel to Russia for the summer. We are both very excited to see family and friends, drive to the mountains, take a few train rides, and spend a some time swimming in the Black Sea. I’m thinking about sneaking a few of these bars with us on the plane to brighten up the long flight to Moscow. Gluten Free Matcha Lime Bars (adapted from The Vibrant Table) makes 18 large or 36 small bars for the pistachio and millet shortbread 1/­­2 cup (80g) raw pistachio nuts or other nuts – walnuts, pecans, etc. 6 tablespoons almond butter or other nut/­­seed butter (pumpkin seed butter would work great here) 2 tablespoons ghee at room temperature or coconut oil, melted 1/­­4 cup honey or maple syrup 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/­­2 cup (90 g) brown rice flour 1/­­4 cup (45 g) millet flour 3 tablespoons tapioca starch pinch of sea salt for the matcha lime mousse 3/­­4 cup (135g) white chocolate chips (I use these vegan ones) or chopped white chocolate 2 teaspoons vegan gelatin or 1 ounce (30g) dried Irish moss 1/­­2 cup (75g) raw cashews – soaked for 4 hours 3/­­4 cup unsweetened almond milk, preferably homemade zest of 2 limes or lemons 1/­­2 cup freshly squeezed lime or lemon juice 1 1/­­2 tablespoons honey or maple syrup 1 teaspoon coconut oil 2 tablespoons matcha powder, plus more for dusting on top 2 strawberries – thinly sliced, optional to prepare and bake the shortbread 1. Place pistachios in the freezer for 10-15 minutes. Mix almond butter, ghee/­­coconut oil with honey and vanilla until creamy. In a food processor, grind the pistachios into a meal, taking care to not turn them into butter. Combine the ground pistachios, flours, tapioca starch, and salt in a large bowl, then add the cream. Mix with a spoon until just mixed, then knead the mixture into a sticky dough with your hands. 2. Line an 8 x 8-inch baking pan with a piece of parchment paper, extending it up all sides. Press dough into the bottom of the pan in an even layer, pricking the finished layer several times with a fork. Refrigerate for 30 minutes. 3. Preheat the oven to 350F (180C). 4. Remove the pan from refrigerator and bake crust for 10-12 minutes, until the edges are slightly golden. Remove from the oven and let cool. to make the matcha lime mousse 1. Slowly melt white chocolate in a double boiler over low heat. Drain and rinse cashews. 2. This step varies according to the thickener you are using: Vegan gelatin - Bring the almond milk to a boil in a small saucepan. Add vegan gelatin and whisk until dissolved. Pour into a high-speed blender, add melted chocolate, cashews, lime or lemon zest and juice, honey, coconut oil and matcha powder. Blend until very smooth. Irish moss - Rinse Irish moss under cool water to remove as much salt and debris as you can. Place in a large bowl and soak in plenty of hot water for at least 10 minutes. Irish moss will expand significantly, so make sure that it’s completely covered with water, add more throughout if needed. Drain and rinse Irish moss again, making sure it’s completely clean. Place into a high-speed blender together with melted white chocolate, cashews, almond milk, lime zest and juice, honey, coconut oil and matcha powder. Blend until very smooth. 3. For both thickeners: Pour the mixture into a medium bowl. Let sit in the refrigerator, stirring occasionally, until the mousse begins to thicken but is still pourable. to assemble 1. Pour or spoon the mousse over the cooled shortbread, still in the pan. Smooth the surface with a spoon if needed. Optionally, decorate with sliced strawberries. Refrigerate overnight. 2. Remove the pan from the refrigerator. Holding the ends of the parchment paper, lift the matcha bars out of the pan and carefully transfer the whole bars onto a large cutting board. Using a very sharp knife, cut into desired shape and size pieces. Wipe the knife clean after each cut. Dust with more matcha powder through a fine mesh strainer. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container, layer parchment paper between the bars if you’re storing them on top of each other to keep from sticking.

Eggless Sprouted Mung Bean Pasta, Spring Style

April 20 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Eggless Sprouted Mung Bean Pasta, Spring Style Chances are, you’re familiar with mung bean noodles, some clear and some ghostly white, that can be found in abundance at Asian markets. I’ve always been fascinated with the simplicity of their ingredients list, which typically includes only mung beans and water. Making pasta at home has become somewhat of a hobby for me over this past winter, and I was determined to nail down this healthy, protein-rich mung bean version. The first attempt, which involved just grounding mung beans into flour without sprouting them, resulted in pasta with too beany of a taste that I wasn’t satisfied with. I noticed long ago that sprouting grains and garbanzo beans improves the taste of the resulting flour, so I decided to sprout the mung beans for this pasta as well. My next attempt, made of sprouted flour, was much better and mild tasting, but included eggs, and I didn’t care for the texture. When I was ready to give up the idea, I bumped into the possibility of using psyllium husks as a binder in gluten free pasta. I gave them a try and it turned out absolutely amazing – a nicely pliable, flavorful, freshly-made pasta, that is very light and gentle on your stomach, and quite easy to make once your flour is ready. I haven’t tried this yet, but I’m pretty sure that other types of gluten free flours such as quinoa, buckwheat, etc. will work great in this recipe as well. It may seem like a lot of work to make such flour at home, but in reality what you will mostly have to do is wait until beans sprout and dry. If the process is not for you, however, there are several companies that make sprouted flours and my latest favorite is Blue Mountain Organics. Our local health food store carries and array of their flours and they are not only delicious, but also less expensive than regular flour. For this post, I prepared the pasta with peas and spinach to celebrate spring, but it will work well with your favorite homemade tomato sauce or any other pasta toppings. Happy Spring! Sprouted Mung Bean Pasta adapted from here Serves 6-8 1 tablespoon psyllium husk powder 1 cup sifted sprouted mung bean flour (see below), plus more for rolling out pasta 1/­­3 cup tapioca flour 1/­­4 teaspoon salt, plus more for salting water 2 tablespoons coconut oil – 1 tablespoon melted, divided 3-4 cups baby spinach leaves 2 cups fresh or frozen peas splash of canned coconut milk – optional freshly ground black pepper grated Parmesan – optional 1. Mix together psyllium husk powder and 4 tablespoons filtered water in a small bowl. Let thicken while mixing together dry ingredients. 2. Combine flours and salt in a large bowl, mix to combine. Make a well in the center, add 1 tablespoon melted coconut oil, gelled psyllium husk and 4 tablespoons of water. Stir to combine with a fork as much as you can. The mixture will appear dry, but don’t add more water at this point. Begin working with your hands, mixing and kneading the mixture into slightly sticky (but not wet) dough. Add more water, one tablespoon at a time, if you find that it’s absolutely necessary, or more flour if dough seems too wet. 3. Divide the dough into 4 equal parts, keep them wrapped to prevent drying. 4. Working with one portion at a time, roll out on a well floured surface into a paper thin thickness. Cut it into pasta of any desired shape using a pizza cutter or a sharp knife. Sprinkle with more flour to prevent from sticking (the same sprouted mung bean flour or brown rice flour will work great for rolling and dusting). 5. Divide the pasta into two equal portions. Bring a large pot of well-salted water to a boil and cook one portion of fresh pasta at a time for 2 minutes, until al-dente. 6. Meanwhile, heat the remaining coconut oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add half of the spinach, sprinkle with salt and stir to coat. Drain pasta reserving about 1/­­4 cup of cooking liquid. Add pasta, 2 tablespoons of reserved liquid and splash of coconut milk (if using) to the pan with spinach, stir until spinach is wilted, for a minute or so. Add half of the peas, sprinkle with freshly ground black pepper, stir them in and remove from heat. 7. Serve immediately with freshly grated Parmesan if desired. Note: You can continue cooking the other portions of pasta in the same manner or keep the remaining dough wrapped in plastic and refrigerated for up to 2 days. Remove from refridgerator to warm up 15 minutes prior to rolling.  Sprouted Mung Bean Flour 1. Rinse 2 cups of mung beans and place them in a large bowl covered with filtered water, soak overnight. 2. Drain and rinse again, cover with wet kitchen towel and leave to sprout. You should see white tails in 24-48 hours. Make sure to rinse every 8 hours and keep the towel damp. For the purpose of this flour, sprouts don’t need to be large and thick – tiny white tails will be sufficient. 3. When you are satisfied with the look of your sprouts, rinse them thoroughly, drain well and shake off water excess as much as possible. If you have a dehydrator, spread sprouted beans on mesh screen covered trays and dehydrate at 115 F until completely dry. 4. Alternatively, spread on a dry kitchen towel or paper towels and let dry for 24 hours, change towels to dry ones after the first 8 hours. Spread on a baking sheet and continue to dry in the oven at the lowest temperature for a couple of hours, until completely dry. 5. Grind into flour using a high speed blender, mill or coffee grinder (in batches). Sift through a fine mesh strainer.

Roasted Root Vegetable, Red Rice and Lentil Stew

March 15 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Root Vegetable, Red Rice and Lentil Stew Spring is in the air, I can tell by the volume of the birds outside my window, which gets louder every morning. Daylight savings was a great help – having that extra hour of light in the evenings feels amazing and allows me to be much more productive towards the end of the day. Soon there will be peas, favas, rhubarb and asparagus. For the time being though, while winter produce is on its way out and spring produce is not quite ready, there are root vegetables. We’ve been eating variations on this stew for the last couple of weeks, and this version is one of my favorites. It is a hearty one-pot meal that is very simple in preparation. This dish speaks of both winter and spring, when the earthiness of roasted carrots, parsnips and sweet potatoes is combined with the bright notes of lime juice, ginger, turmeric, cardamom and coconut milk. Red rice and lentils bring substance to the dish, and spinach delivers a good dose of green. Enjoy! Roasted Root Vegetable, Red Rice and Lentil Stew serves 6 3 medium carrots 2 medium parsnips 2 small sweet potatoes or 1/­­2 small winter squash 3 tablespoons coconut oil – divided few sprigs thyme sea salt and freshly ground black pepper – to taste 2 teaspoons cumin seeds – freshly ground 4 green cardamom pods – seeds crushed in mortar and pestle 1 tablespoon turmeric powder large pinch red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon chopped fresh ginger root 1 small red chili pepper – sliced (optional) 1 large yellow onion – chopped 3/­­4 cup red rice such as Ruby Red or Bhutan – rinsed under cold water handful kaffir lime leaves – bruised with the back of a knife (optional) 1/­­2 cup green lentils – preferably soaked 1 14 oz can Thai coconut milk 1 large or 2 small limes – zest and juice, plus more for serving 4 cups packed chopped spinach leaves or baby spinach 1. Preheat oven to 425 F. Peel and chop vegetables into bite-sized pieces. Toss them in a bowl or right on the baking tray with 1 tablespoon coconut oil and thyme leaves, sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast in a single layer for 20-30 minutes, stirring at halftime, until soft and caramelized. 2. Meanwhile, warm the remaining 2 tablespoons of coconut oil in a medium heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Add spices, ginger, and chili if using, stir around for about a minute, until fragrant. Add onion and saute for about 7 minutes, until translucent. 2. Add rice, big pinch of salt and kaffir lime leaves, if using, stir to mix. Add 4 cups filtered water. Increase the heat, bring to a boil and decrease to a light simmer. Cook, covered, for 15 minutes. 3. Drain and rinse lentils and add them to the pot with rice with a pinch of salt. Cover and simmer for another 15 minutes. Test lentils for doneness, if you did not soak your lentils, they might need to be cooked a little longer, cover and simmer for another couple of minutes until lentils are cooked. Add roasted vegetables, coconut milk, zest and juice of lime and another pinch of salt. Stir to mix and let simmer for a couple of minutes for flavors to mingle. 4. Remove from heat and stir in spinach to wilt. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust as needed. Serve immediately with more lime juice squeezed over.

Black Rice Salad with Curried Chickpeas, Squash and Swiss Chard

February 22 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Black Rice Salad with Curried Chickpeas, Squash and Swiss Chard I’ve been on a forbidden black rice kick this winter. I love its pleasant texture, mild flavor and sweet aroma, and it also makes for some very pretty meals. We’ve been living off of variations of this salad for our lunches, but this version, with curried chickpeas, toasted pine nuts, squash or sweet potato and chard is my favorite. This recipe utilizes chard stems as well as leaves – I always think it’s a shame when recipes instruct to discard the stems, especially when they are as beautiful as on this rainbow chard I picked up. The key is to cook the stems a little longer than the leaves, so that they are soft and not too chewy. For this recipe, I made my own curry spice mix from Amy Chaplin’s book, and I cannot recommend this enough. Homemade curry tastes worlds better than any store bought curry mix ever will. It’s just a matter of toasting, grinding and mixing fresh spices (a fun process if you ask me) and is completely worth the extra effort. I developed this recipe for Natural Vitality, a line of premium quality natural supplements, see the recipe here.

Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad

January 31 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad This winter I rediscovered parsnips and have been roasting them weekly, unable to get enough of their unique, sweet flavor. Pomelo (the citrus) is in season right now, and Paloma (the daughter) and I like to play a game of who can find the biggest one at the Asian market. Some of them come almost as big as her head! The earthy and grounded flavors of parsnips combine well with the bright and juicy pomelo in this salad, but feel free to use grapefruit or orange to get a similar effect if you don’t have access to a pomelo. Walnuts and raisins toasted and plumped in spicy coconut oil add a nice finish, full of warming flavors, perfect for winter. This salad is very simple to prepare, and the parsnips make it filling enough for a light lunch or dinner. Enjoy! Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad 3 large parsnips – scrubbed clean, cored, cut lengthwise into long wedges coconut oil sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 1/­­4 teaspoon to 1 teaspoon paprika, depending on how hot your paprika is 2 handfulls walnuts – roughly chopped 2 handful raisins 1 pomelo – segmented 4 cups baby spinach 1. Preheat oven to 400F (200C). Add 1tablespoon of melted coconut oil to parsnips, toss to coat thoroughly. Arrange them on a baking sheet, sprinkle with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Bake for 20 minutes, or until soft, flip at half time. 2. In a large bowl or in individual serving plates, combine sp