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Zucchini Lentil Pakoras

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Zucchini Lentil Pakoras

February 25 2021 Manjula's kitchen 

Zucchini Lentil Pakoras (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Zucchini Lentil Pakoras .wprm-recipe-rating .wprm-rating-star.wprm-rating-star-full svg * { fill: #343434; } As pakoras are one of the most welcoming snacks all over India. It is a popular street food. Everyone has their own favorites and there are countless recipes. Pakoras are a very comforting snack especially when it is cold, and it is raining. Here, we are experiencing both and I am wishing for pakoras with a hot cup of chai, blanket and a good TV show or movie. In a particular magazine, I saw a fusion pakora recipe. Instead of using traditional beasn batter, the chef had used red lentil batter. Several times, I have used moong dal batter, but I never even thought about using red lentil. I was ready to give it a try with another pakora recipe using lentil batter. I made some changes and added chopped ginger that added a nice kick to the pakoras. They turned out to be mouthwatering appetizers: crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. These pakoras are addicting! These work as a tasty pairing with your afternoon tea or a spicy delicious snack before any meal. These pakoras have a different crispness but are very delightful. Give these pakoras a try and enjoy! These Pakoras are also vegan and gluten-free. This recipe will serve 4. Course Appetizer Cuisine Indian Prep Time 10 minutes Cook Time 15 minutes Total Time 25 minutes Servings 4 people Ingredients1 cup red lentils washed masoor dal 1 zucchini medium sized, cut into thick rounds 2 Tbsp green chili chopped 2 Tbsp ginger finely chopped 2 Tbsp cilantro chopped 1 1/­­2 tsp salt adjust to taste 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder Pinch of baking soda 2 Tbsp corn starch InstructionsSoak red lentil at least for 1hours or more. Pet dry zucchini slices and keep aside. Blend dal to smooth batter, using just enough water needed to blend. To make Pakora batter add corn starch, salt, chili powder and salt together, mix it well, whipping for few seconds. Add all the other ingredients to the batter, ginger, green chili, cilantro and mix all the ingredient well. Batter should be consistency of pancake mix, if needed add little water. Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium-high heat. The frying pan should have about 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put one drop of batter in the oil. The batter should come up but not change color right away. Dip the zucchini slices into the batter one at a time, making sure it is covered by the batter completely. Then, slowly drop into the frying pan. Fry the pakoras in small batches, not overlapping. The pakoras will take about 4-5 minutes to cook. Turn them occasionally. Fry the pakoras until both sides are golden brown. If the oil is too hot, the pakoras will brown too fast and not get crispy. Left over batter, place about one tablespoon of batter into the oil. Fry the pakoras in small batches until golden-brown. The crispy, delicious pakoras are now ready to serve. I like to serve these both pakoras side by side. NotesServing Suggestions - Serve with Peanut chutney, Rhubarb Chutney, Mint Chutney - my favorite is taking 1 tablespoon mint chutney and mix with 1/­­4 cup of yogurt. The post Zucchini Lentil Pakoras appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Spicy Black Bean and Sweet Potato Soup

February 24 2021 Golubka Kitchen 

Spicy Black Bean and Sweet Potato Soup It’s still very much soup season over here. We’ve gotten more snow in the past month than we’ve had all winter, and having some soup simmering away on the stove while it’s snowing is just the best. This spicy black bean and sweet potato one is both creamy and chunky, since we blend some of the ingredients up and leave other ones whole. Texturally varied soups like that are my favorite. The savoriness of the black beans and onions in the soup interacts really well with the warming spices, and the subtle sweetness of the (sweet) potato. As always, simple soups like this do really well with toppings to elevate both flavor and appearance. In this case, cilantro, quick pickled radishes or onions, avocado, yogurt/­­cashew crema, and toasted pumpkin seeds are all great topping options to consider. Hope you’ll give this soup a try! Spicy Black Bean and Sweet Potato Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 15 oz cans (3 cups) black beans, drained, divided 1 bunch cilantro, stems and leaves roughly separated 1 chipotle in adobo + 1 tablespoon adobo sauce (from the same can) juice from 2 limes, divided sea salt avocado oil or other cooking oil of choice 1 large yellow onion, diced 2 teaspoons ground cumin 2 teaspoons ground coriander ½ teaspoon smoked paprika 5 garlic cloves, minced 1 medium-large sweet potato (about 1 lb), sliced into ½ thick quarter rounds a few handfuls baby spinach topping suggestions/­­ideas cilantro leaves quick pickled radishes or red onions avocado yogurt or cashew crema toasted pumpkin seeds Instructions In an upright blender, combine 1 can of beans, cilantro stems, chipotle in adobo and adobo sauce, juice from 1 lime, a pinch of salt, and 1½ cups of water. Blend until smooth and set aside for now. Heat a large pot over medium heat and add enough oil to generously coat the bottom. Add the onion, cumin, coriander, paprika, and a pinch of salt. Saute until the onion is soft and translucent, about 7 minutes. Add the garlic and stir around for another 30 seconds, until fragrant. Add the sweet potato and the remaining can of black beans, stir to coat in the spices. Add the blended black bean mixture to the pot, along with 2 more cups of water, and plenty more salt to taste, to season the soup. Mix and bring to a simmer. Simmer, covered, for 25-30 minutes, until the sweet potato is cooked through. Turn off the heat, wilt in the spinach and add the juice of 1 remaining lime. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the soup warm, garnished with cilantro leaves, pickled radishes/­­onions, avocado, and/­­or yogurt or cashew crema. Notes -Chipotle in adobo sauce can be found in most grocery stores in the U.S. near the canned beans or in international sections. Its such a great, flavor building ingredient, thats definitely worth seeking out. -Our recipes for quick pickled radishes and quick pickled red onions are linked within the recipe. Both make for a delicious accompaniment to this soup. 3.5.3226 The post Spicy Black Bean and Sweet Potato Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Apple Pie Baked Oatmeal

January 23 2021 Vegan Richa 

Apple Pie Baked OatmealThis Vegan Apple Pie Baked Oatmeal features a layer of baked oatmeal with crunchy nuts, chia seeds, and warming spices topped with delicious homemade apple pie filling.  Plenty of cinnamon and some maple syrup for sweetness make this baked oatmeal perfect for a cozy morning. Vegan Glutenfree, can be made without Nuts. Apple Pie meets Baked Oatmeal!  A warm, comforting way to start the day, especially served warm topped with a dollop of vegan yogurt or coconut whip and paired with a hot cup of fresh-brewed coffee.  A nice change from your regular bowl of oatmeal. Its so satisfying to eat a slice of baked oatmeal – hearty enough to be breakfast all on its own but is also a delightful afternoon snack and a perfect addition to any brunch spread. Im all about those dessert-for-breakfast creations these days. Have you checked out my Banana Bread Baked Oatmeal? AndCarrot Cake Baked Oatmeal! So delicious! The texture of the baked oatmeal is like moist oat bars witb all the flavor from the spices and texture from nuts and seeds! The best thing about this recipe? The aroma of the vegan apple pie baked oatmeal wafting through your house as it bakes – it is absolutely heavenly! This vegan apple pie baked oatmeal has the warm cinnamon-scented apple pie filling goodness of your favorite Thanksgiving dessert, but instead of a pie crust, it is served on wholesome baked oatmeal. The oatmeal bake is made with rolled oats, pecans, coconut and sweetened only with maple syrup. This vegan oatmeal bake recipe is filled with fiber to keep you full until lunch. MORE OATMEAL OPTIONS - Banana Bread Baked Oatmeal GF - Peanut butter and Jelly Baked Oatmeal. GF - Pumpkin Baked Oatmeal No Oil GF - Carrot Cake Baked Oatmeal GF - Samoa Cookie Overnight Oats with date caramel GF - Golden Steel cut Oats GF - Savory Spiced Oats Hash GF Apple pie anything just brings joy and I was so excited to turn this All American dessert into a healthy wholesome breakfast recipe.Continue reading: Apple Pie Baked OatmealThe post Apple Pie Baked Oatmeal appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Palak Kadhi (Spinach Ki Kadhi)

January 21 2021 Manjula's kitchen 

Palak Kadhi (Spinach Ki Kadhi) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Palak Kadhi, Spinach Ki Kadhi .wprm-recipe-rating .wprm-rating-star.wprm-rating-star-full svg * { fill: #343434; } Palak Kadhi is a tasty side dish. It is spinach cooked with yogurt and besan (gram flour) and mildly spiced. I think Kadhi is one of the most enjoyed dishes all over India. Kadhi is made in so many ways in different parts of the country. One main ingredient remains the same: besan. At my house, kadhi was made thick and with dumplings. In Gujarat, Kadhi is made very watery and taste like sweet and sour soup. I enjoy the dishes which are made using besan. Palak Kadhi has become a comfort side dish for us. It is easy to make and can be served with any meal. This recipe will serve 2. Course Side Dish Cuisine Indian Prep Time 5 minutes Cook Time 30 minutes Total Time 35 minutes Servings 2 people Ingredients2 Tbsp besan gram flour 1/­­2 cup yogurt curd or dahi 1 cup spinach leaves finely chopped, palak 2 Tbsp oil 1 whole red chilies sabut lal mirch 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds jeera 1/­­4 tsp fenugreek seeds mathi dana 1/­­8 tsp asafetida hing 1/­­4 tsp turmeric haldi 1/­­4 tsp red chili powder lal mirch 1/­­2 tsp salt namak InstructionsMix besan, turmeric with yogurt until smooth, this should be lump free. Add 2 cups of water slowly and mix well. Heat the oil in a saucepan. Test the heat by adding one cumin seed to the oil. If the cumin seeds crack right away, the oil is ready. Add cumin seeds and asafetida. When the cumin seeds crack, turn off the heat and add fenugreek seeds, and whole red chili. Stir for a few seconds, add red chili powder. Add spinach and stir for a minute. Add the yogurt mixture and turn the heat to medium. Keep stirring until the kadhi comes to a boil. Add salt. Turn the heat to medium low. Let the kadhi cook for about 20-35 minutes, stir occasionally. If needed to adjust thickness, add more water. Kadhi should be a pourable consistency. NotesIf you like Kadhi, you will enjoy other versions of Kadhi also: - Kadhi Pakoras - Sindhi Kadhi - Gatte Ki Kadhi - Kachori with Kadhi The post Palak Kadhi (Spinach Ki Kadhi) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Raspberry Rugalech

December 23 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Raspberry Rugalech Makes 4 dozen cookies Photo by Joshua Foo Probably the most iconic of the Jewish cookies, rugelach is the cookie that most has us pressing our faces up against the glass at the local bakery. If you didn’t go to Hebrew School, definitely google the pronunciation! They are rich and buttery, a little tangy from yogurt, nutty, sweet and cinnamony all at once. Theyre so fun to roll, and smell glorious while they bake. And, like, I know this make four dozen but you will be surprised to find that its actually just one serving. If you like, you can melt some chocolate chips and drizzle over cookies once cooled. Who doesnt love a chocolate raspberry combo? Recipes originally published in The Superfun Times Vegan Holiday Cookbook. Photo by Joshua Foo. Cookies rolled by Mississippi Vegan. Ingredients For the dough: 2 cups all-purpose flour 1/­­4 teaspoon salt 3/­­4 cup refined coconut oil, softened 3 tablespoons unsweetened applesauce 1 cup plain unsweetened vegan yogurt (I recommend coconut, cashew or soy) For the filling: 1/­­2 cup granulated sugar 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon 1 cup finely chopped walnuts 1/­­2 cup seedless raspberry jam, maybe a little more Directions In a very large mixing bowl, sift together the flour and salt, then add the coconut oil in small clumps. Use a pastry cutter or your fingers to cut the oil into the flour until crumbs have formed and look like small peas. Add the applesauce and yogurt and mix to form a stiff dough. Divide the dough into four equal parts, then form 4 discs. Wrap each disk with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 2 hours. Now make the walnut cinnamon crumbs. In a food processor, pulse together the sugar, cinnamon, sugar and walnuts until it is in tiny crumbs. On a lightly floured surface with plenty of space, roll a disc disk into a 9-inch circle. Sprinkle a thin layer of raspberry jam over on the dough, leaving about 1/­­2 an inch of space at the edges. Now sprinkle on a layer of walnut cinnamon crumbs, again leaving space at the edges. Use a pizza cutter to cut each round into 12 wedges, like a pizza pie. Roll each triangle, from the bottom (large) sidebase up to the point, to form the rugelach. Place the rolled rugelach on the prepared baking sheet and place the sheet in the fridge while you continue to prepare each disc. When all the cookies are formed, let them chill for another 15 minutes in the fridge. In the meantime, preheat the oven to 350° F. Bake for 18 to 22 minutes, until lightly browned and a little puffy, 18 to 22 minutes. The sugar should appear lightly caramelized and melty. Transfer to wire racks to cool completely.

Millet Soup (Bajra Raab)

December 4 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Millet Soup (Bajra Raab) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Millet Soup (Bajra Raab) Millet Soup! Lately, I have been experimenting with some different recipes that are both healthy and delicious. I decided to try a recipe for "Millet Soup", which is a traditional warm soup in Rajasthan and Gujarat, and this soup is known Bajra Raab. Millet is gluten free and full of many nutrients. It is also super easy to make. It is amazing how a bowl of hot soup can be so filling and comforting, especially as the days get colder and darker. The main ingredients in this soup are millet flour, yogurt, and some spices to enhance the flavor. Enjoy! This recipe will serve 2. Course Soup Cuisine Indian Prep Time 5 minutes Cook Time 10 minutes Total Time 15 minutes Servings 2 people Ingredients2 Tbsp millet flour bajra 2 tsp oil divided 1/­­2 cup yogurt 1/­­4 tsp mustard seeds rai 1/­­4 tsp cumin seeds jeera 1/­­8 tsp turmeric haldi 1/­­2 tsp ginger finely shredded 8 curry leaves 1 Tbsp cilantro finely chopped 1 tsp green chili thinly sliced optional. 1/­­8 tsp black pepper 3/­­4 tsp salt 2 1/­­2 cup of water InstructionsIn a small pan over low medium heat add 1 teaspoon of oil with millet flour and dry roast for about 2 minutes, the flour will have a light aroma, turn off the heat, and remove roasted flour from pan. Note: millet flour should be at room temperature before adding to yogurt. Take yogurt in a bowl and add the water slowly to make lump free batter. Heat 1 teaspoon of oil in a saucepan over low medium heat, oil should be moderately hot add mustard seed and cumin seeds as seeds crack add turmeric, curry leaves, ginger and cilantro and stir. Add yogurt mix, keep stirring till it comes to a boil. Lower the heat and add millet flour, stir making sure no lumps. Let it boil for about five minutes stir occasionally. Add salt, black pepper and green chilies, let it cook for 2-3 minutes. Serve Millet Soup hot. NotesYou will also like to see the recipes for Carrot Ginger Soup, Sindhi Kadhi, Stir-Fry Cabbage salad. The post Millet Soup (Bajra Raab) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

5 Vegetarian Swaps to Boost Nutrition in Sweet Treats

November 23 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Choose Whole Grains Theres a reason the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend to make at least 50% of your grains whole: theyre packed with essential vitamins and minerals that keep your body running at its peak! When gearing up to bake that family favorite sugar cookie or bread loaf, consider swapping half of the all-purpose flour for a whole-wheat flour until you can make the full switch (this Healthy Chocolate Chunk Pumpkin Loaf is a great recipe to start with!) Traditionally, when you start small like this its an easy way to slowly get your pallet to adjust to the change while boosting the fiber of the entire slice (or cookie) too! If youre gluten-free, consider using a recipe that calls for gluten-free oat flour or almond flour (like these Healthy Pumpkin Muffins) so you also reap the benefits of the fiber. Amp Up Those Omegas with Walnuts Pumpkin, pecan, or apple pie calling your name this season? Consider swapping out that white flour and butter crust for a delicious (and nutritious) walnut-based crust. Walnuts pack 2.5 grams of the plant-based version of the omega-3 fatty acid known as alpha-linoleic acid (ALA), in addition to 4 grams of protein and 2 grams of fiber in a one-ounce portion. While many name brands have begun selling their own walnut crusts in the baking section at your local market, they often contain flour and butter in small amounts to help hold the crust together. Not a deal-breaker if youre tight on time, but defeats the purpose of the swap if youre trying to keep this treat gluten-free and vegan. Consider making your own (check out a simple recipe idea here) by pulsing walnuts with a date paste or syrup in your food processor, then shaping into a pie crust and freezing until ready to bake. Related: 7 Tips for Shaking Sugar Think natural When It Comes to Sugar Its no secret most people eat WAY more added sugar than recommended (for reference, on average Americans eat about 17 teaspoons of added sugar a day when the recommendation is closer to 12 teaspoons or below for a 2000 calorie diet!) And friends, beware, coconut sugar, maple syrup, honey, and good ole cane sugar are ALL just different types of added sugars (one isnt better than the other.) To help satisfy that sweet tooth, consider using the natural sugars found in sweet fruits and vegetables, like apples, dates, and sweet potatoes, in your baked goods. Depending on the type of recipe youre making, you should be able to reduce the added sugar by at least a third when you sub in unsweetened applesauce (like these Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bars do!) Note you will also need to modify the fat amount (like the oil or butter used) so the texture continues to be the same. Boost Fiber with Beans Chocolate is abundant this season and for good reason: its delicious and its packed with flavonoids. But what if you took that decadent chocolate and brought it up a notch to boost the fiber and create a decadent dark chocolate dip to serve alongside graham crackers, gingerbread, or fresh fruit? Youd be the hostess with the most-ess for sure! Begin by pureeing a cup of beans alongside melted dark chocolate or dark cocoa powder, dates for natural sweetness, and your favorite nut or seed butter of choice. Blend until its a smooth, hummus-like consistency and enjoy! (Use this Sweet Hummus Recipe as your guide.) Power Up with Protein Cream pies and bundt cakes are certainly popular around the holiday season, but that doesnt mean you cant do over the dairy! Swapping in a portion of reduced-fat Greek or skyr yogurt for sour cream helps to boost the protein while minimizing the saturated fat of your treat. If youre still not a big fan of Greek yogurt, then ease into it by starting small with the swap, with roughly a third used in place of the sour cream. In no time youll be adjusted and making the full swap, pinky promise! (Try this Butterscotch Cheesecake Pie for a nice addition to your menu this year!) The post 5 Vegetarian Swaps to Boost Nutrition in Sweet Treats appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

7 Tips for Shaking Sugar

November 7 2020 Vegetarian Times 

1. Rethink breakfast and afternoon treats Many people who decide to eat less sugar face two immediate challenges: what to eat for breakfast and finding a non-sweet afternoon treat, says Amy Chaplin, author of Whole Food Cooking Every Day (2020, Artisan/­­Workman Publishing Co., Inc.) which includes many sugar-free recipes. For breakfast, Chaplin suggests making your own muesli or granola using yakon syrup, a natural sweetener that is low on the glycemic index (GI) scale (meaning it doesnt bombard your body with sugar because it is digested slowly). Other options: tofu scrambles and steel-cut oatmeal. For snacks, go for apple slices with peanut butter, plain yogurt with blueberries or carrots and hummus. Instead of soda or fruit juices, drink chilled sparkling water with a slice of lemon or herbal teas. 2. Know what you are eating There are at least 200 other names for sugar on food labels, says Uma Naidoo, MD, director of Nutritional and Lifestyle Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital and author of This Is Your Brain on Food (2020 Little Brown Spark/­­Hachette). Fructose, dextrose and maltose are just a few. And look for added sugars Dr. Naidoo advises. Foods like ketchup, pasta sauces and salad dressings often have more added sugars than sweet foods where you expect sugar. 3. Mind your carbs Choose to eat complex carbs that are low on the GI scale such as apples, oranges, bran cereals and black beans, which are slowly digested, and skip simple carbs such as potatoes, French fries, white rice, white pasta and refined breakfast cereals which are high on the scale. 4. Try new ingredients When cooking, use naturally sweet ingredients in place of sugar. I like using freshly squeezed orange juice, berries and berry powders, beet juice powder, vanilla, coconut butter or dried coconut flakes, says Chaplin. Medjool dates are another good choice, and spices such as cinnamon add extra flavor. Related: 8 Way to Improve Your Gut Health & Mood 5. Be fruit-wise Because fruit contains fiber and nutrients, it is digested slowly and its sugar is absorbed slowly too. Still, its wise to limit fruit. I prefer lower glycemic fruit such as blueberries, blackberries, strawberries and Bing cherries. These options contain less fructose, the natural sugar in fruit, says Dr. Naidoo. Two to three servings of fruit eaten throughout the day should be OK for most people, she adds, unless you are diabetic or have fructose intolerance in which case you should consult with your doctor. 6. Remember why its important Sweet cravings are hard to resist. Sugar-laden foods increase serotonin in the brain and make you feel good, explains Dr. Naidoo. The calming effect of serotonin may often be felt shortly after eating a candy bar, cake, or other foods high in simple carbs--this is a reason why these foods can be so addictive. Remind yourself that consuming too much sugar can raise the risk of life-threatening illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease when overwhelmed with a craving for a sugary sweet, 7. Enjoy dessert! Dont deprive yourself of luscious desserts. Start to replace those sugary treats with healthier options that still taste good, says Dr. Naidoo. Another option is to switch to baking with erythritol--sold as Swerve--in recipes, says Dr. Naidoo. Even when using artificial sweeteners, however, moderation is key. She also suggests making your own fruit-based ice cream. Amy Chaplins new cookbook features fruit-based desserts such as Berry Chia Pudding--A crowd pleaser for sure! Chaplin says. Click here for the recipe. The post 7 Tips for Shaking Sugar appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Gazpacho with Spicy Red Lentils

July 22 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Gazpacho with Spicy Red Lentils A thing I learned this year that I can’t believe I didn’t know before is that traditional Andalusian gazpacho recipes include bread, which gets blended (originally pounded in a mortar and pestle) into the soup. Making gazpacho this way was definitely a revelation, since it comes out so silky, rich, and astoundingly flavorful considering the modest amount of ingredients involved. There’s a seemingly never-ending heat wave happening where we are, and cold soups are all I want. To make the gazpacho into a little more of a meal, I often serve it with a few spoonfuls of red lentils, which I generally prepare on the spicy and salty side. They sort of take the place of croutons in my mind, though more nourishing and flavorful. A bowl like that, garnished with basil and maybe some yogurt is so perfectly satisfying on a summer night. I hope you’ll enjoy it as well! P.S. For a variation on this theme, check out our Red Lentil Gazpacho from a few years ago. Gazpacho with Spicy Red Lentils   Print Serves: 4 as a side Ingredients for the gazpacho about 6 small-medium tomatoes (1½-2 lbs) - cored and quartered 1 red bell pepper - seeded and roughly chopped 3-4 slices day old bread - crust removed (about 4-5 oz without crust) 1 clove garlic - roughly chopped ⅓ cup olive oil 1 tablespoon + ½ teaspoon red wine vinegar small handful of basil, plus more for serving sea salt freshly ground black pepper for the spicy red lentils olive oil 1 small yellow onion - diced sea salt 1 clove garlic - minced ¼-1/­­2 teaspoon red pepper flakes (or to taste) ¼ teaspoon smoked paprika ½ cup red lentils Instructions to make the gazpacho Combine the tomatoes, bell pepper, bread, garlic, olive oil, vinegar, basil, salt and pepper to taste in an upright blender. Blend until very smooth. If all your ingredients dont fit in the blender, quickly pulse up just the vegetables, which will make room for the rest of the ingredients. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Optionally, strain the gazpacho through a fine mesh strainer for an extra silky texture. Transfer the soup to a container, cover and put in the refrigerator to cool very well for at least 2 hours or overnight. Serve cold as is or garnished with yogurt, basil, and/­­or the spicy red lentils. to make the spicy red lentils Heat a medium pot over medium heat and add enough olive oil to lightly coat the bottom. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and saute for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic, red pepper flakes, and smoked paprika and saute for another minute, until fragrant. Add the lentils, 1½ cups of water, and more salt to taste. Bring to a simmer. Simmer, covered, for 15-20 minutes, stirring periodically, until the lentils are cooked through but still al dente in parts. Let cool a bit and either serve the lentils on the gazpacho warm, at room temperature, or cold out of the refrigerator - all three ways taste great. Notes You can use the crust left over from the bread to make croutons. 3.5.3226 The post Gazpacho with Spicy Red Lentils appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

High-Vibe Condiment Classics

May 23 2020 My New Roots 

High-Vibe Condiment Classics Summer is fast-approaching (at last!) and I dont know about you, but to me this means grilling, eating outside, and enjoying all of the classic, warm-weather treats. But wait! Did you know that there are all kinds of funky ingredients hiding in the most innocuous places, like your ketchup, mustard and relish?! We shouldnt have to forgo these truly classic condiments just because were walking on the whole foods path. No way! So I decided to do a high-vibe makeover all of the condiments that youd find at a barbecue, picnic, or baseball game: ketchup, mustard, honey mustard, Dijon, relish, mayo and secret sauce, without any refined ingredients, colours, or preservatives. They are entirely vegan (except for the honey mustard), and taste absolutely incredible.  Making your own condiments from scratch is empowering, and you too will see that by whisking up your very own mustard, or blending your very own ketchup that you are incredibly capable in the kitchen! Its a serious delight to realize that youre not only qualified to make things you thought you needed to buy, but that youre also doing yourself a giant favour in cutting questionable ingredients out of your life. When I was a kid, I loved hotdogs with mustard and relish (not ketchup, that was for burgers). The vinegary tang of the yellow mustard with the sweetness of pickle relish perfectly offset the salty squishiness of a microwaved wiener. This was a typical Saturday lunch, with doughnuts for dessert, all washed down with a giant glass of milk. I wanted to recreate that nostalgia, minus pretty much everything else. The flavours bring me back to simple times and simple food. But simple food is not always so simple. Have you read the ingredients on a squeeze bottle of relish lately? Its a complicated collection of chemicals that I certainly wouldnt want in my body. High-fructose corn syrup, natural flavour, and food colouring are just a few of the ingredients that plague most tasty toppings. Food additives are everywhere, especially in shelf-stable products. If youre not going to refrigerate something or preserve it properly, it has to have things in it to prevent it from spoiling. It also has to look appealing and taste good, even after months (or years!) on a grocery store shelf. That is why it is so important to read labels and be discerning about what you choose to buy. This is not to say that these additives are inherently harmful, but they are far from natural, and Im a believer in eating as close to the earth as possible! Luckily my condiments are not only based on whole foods, but they taste amazing and are actually good for you.    Here is a small list of the food additives to watch out for and avoid, if possible. Remember to check the packages of your other summer favourites, like chips, salad dressings, sparkling beverages, soda and juice, ice cream, popsicles, and frozen yogurt.  High Fructose Corn Syrup Sometimes labeled HFCS, this highly-refined artificial sweetener has become the number one source of calories in North America. It is found in almost all processed foods, since it is cheap to make, shelf-stable, super sweet, and highly addictive. Excessive consumption has been linked to obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Watch out for it in condiments, salad dressing, bread, candy, soda, yogurt, breakfast cereals, even canned vegetables and fruit.  Natural Flavours This is a sneaky term meant to throw you off. When you see these words on an ingredient list, they refer to a naturally-derived flavouring agent that has to be extracted from plant or animal sources, designed to enhance the taste of food. Conversely, artificial flavours are synthetically created, with their original sources being manmade chemicals. Natural flavours however, are still made in laboratories by food chemists who can add any numbers of chemicals, including preservatives, solvents and other substances, which are defined as incidental additives, to what they are creating. Food manufacturers are not required to disclose whether these additives come from natural or synthetic sources, and as long as the original flavouring comes from plant or animal material, they can be classified as natural. The point is, natural flavours dont appear to be any healthier than artificial flavours, and they can still contain ingredients that may cause reactions in sensitive individuals, especially children. To avoid them, cut back on packaged products and stick to the real-deal whole foods!  Food Dyes /­­ Colours To make food look bright, fresh, and especially appealing to children, food manufacturers add dyes to obvious things like candy, sports drinks and baked goods, but also not-so-obvious things like condiments (!), pickles, cereals, salad dressing, yogurt, and chocolate milk. Some of these dyes are approved for use in certain countries, while others have banned them, making it challenging for consumers to navigate. The safety of food dyes is controversial, especially in regards to children. Studies have linked them to hyperactivity in sensitive kids, and they may cause allergic reactions in some people. Because most food dyes are found in unhealthy processed foods, its easy to avoid them if youre sticking to a more natural diet.  Hydrogenated /­­ Partially Hydrogenated Oils You know when the World Health Organization plans on eliminating these fats from the global food supply, they must be pretty problematic. Created by forcing hydrogen gas into vegetable fats under extremely high pressure to turn liquid into solid, hydrogenation creates trans fats, which increases the amount of LDL cholesterol, lowers HDL cholesterol, therefore significantly increasing the risk of coronary heart disease. Whats more is that these fats are pro-inflammatory. Although their use has been banned in several countries, trans fats still lurk in many processed foods.  As long as there is less than .5% per serving, it isnt required in to be listed in the ingredients or nutritional information. The best way to avoid them is by cutting out processed foods, especially margarine, coffee creamer, chips and crackers, frozen pizza, fast foods, baked goods, and microwave popcorn.   Health Claims – these are put on the front of the box to lure you in, and can include buzz words like natural, whole grain, low-fat, no added sugar, organic, light, low calorie, gluten-free, and enriched. Terms like these should be a red flag for you, so read the entire label, including the ingredient list, the serving size, the amount and types of sweetener and fat used. Think critically and be selective – if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.  The bottom line?! Stick to whole, or minimally-processed foods and ingredients as often as possible. Its better for you, and your family to make your own from scratch whenever possible. Not to mention, its fun to brag to everyone that youre a condiment master, a yogurt wizard, or a salad dressing whisperer.  I had so much FUN with these recipes! It was a blast to brainstorm which condiments I would attempt to health-ify, experiment with, and eventually master to make them all easy-to-make and delicious. My condiments wont last years in the fridge, but all of them passed the two-week mark with flying colours (all of them natural, of course). As long as youre using clean utensils to scoop out your servings, you shouldnt have a problem keeping these toppings around for a few weeks – ya know, if you can ration them for that long!  Yellow Mustard This was in fact my first attempt at making yellow mustard and it proved to be ridiculously easy! I think Id built it up in my head to be some complicated project, but wow was I mistaken. Just a few simple ingredients, and a little stovetop whisking will get you the brightest, tangiest, most beautiful ballpark mustard of your dreams! I must warn you, from one condiment-master to another, that the bubbling mixture gets darn hot and tends to splatter when its cooking. To avoid scalding yourself, use the pot lid as s shield (insert laughing emoji here).      Print recipe     Yellow Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients:  1 cup /­­ 250ml cold water 3/­­4 cup dry mustard powder 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 tsp. ground turmeric 1/­­2 tsp. garlic powder 1/­­8 tsp. ground paprika 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar Directions: 1. In a small saucepan, whisk together water, dry mustard, salt, turmeric, garlic, and paprika until smooth. Cook the mixture over medium-low to low heat, stirring often, until it bubbles down to a thick paste, 30 to 45 minutes. 2. Whisk the apple cider vinegar into the mustard mixture and continue to cook until its thickened to the desired consistency – this can take between 5 and 15 minutes depending on how thick you like it.  3. Let the mustard cool to room temperature. Transfer the mustard to an airtight glass jar or container, and refrigerate for up to 3 months.  Honey Mustard Depending on how sweet you like your honey mustard, its just the above yellow mustard recipe with as much honey stirred in as you like! I added two tablespoons and it was perfect for me, but if you want even more, got for it. I recommend avoiding very runny honey, since this will loosen the mustard. Instead, opt for something on the thicker side to maintain the consistency. If youre vegan, brown rice or date syrup would be the best choices, since they are more viscous than maple syrup, for example. I love this on sandwiches with lots of fresh veggies and sprouts!     Print recipe     Honey Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients: 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 Tbsp. raw honey Directions: 1. Combine the mustard and the honey. Taste and add more honey if desired. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 months.  Grainy Dijon Mustard This style of Dijon is a whole-seed one, which is my favourite because of the great texture and colour variations. Its spicy and complex, and will only get better with time. Keep in mind that this recipe is in two stages, the first one requiring you to soak your mustard seeds the night before you plan on blending.      Print recipe     Grainy Dijon Mustard Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml  Ingredients: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g yellow mustard seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g black mustard seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. ground mustard 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml white wine vinegar 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml apple cider vinegar 2 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 tsp. sea salt Directions: 1. Combine all ingredients and refrigerate overnight (for 12-24 hours) to allow the mustard seeds to soften and absorb the flavours. 2. Place mixture in blender and mix on high for a minute or two, until the seeds have broken and the mustard thickens. 3. Transfer contents to a clean jar and enjoy! Dijon will keep for about one month in the refrigerator. Sweet Pickle Relish This was the most anticipated condiment to try and make myself, since its one of my favourites, but also one of the worst offenders for additives. I successfully recreated that gorgeous tang, and succulent texture of commercial relish that I loved so much as a kid. The taste of this one is off the charts! My recipe uses coconut sugar instead of refined sugar and syrups, so the colour is a little darker and browner than the conventional types, but I dont think youll notice – and you certainly wont miss the food colouring!     Print recipe     Sweet Pickle Relish Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 340g finely diced cucumber 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g finely diced yellow onion 1 tsp. salt, divided  1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar  1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g coconut sugar 1/­­4 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. yellow mustard seeds 1 tsp. dried dill 1/­­4 tsp. turmeric 1/­­4 red bell pepper, finely diced 1 tsp. arrowroot, dissolved in 2 tsp. water Directions: 1. Toss the cucumber and onion with 3/­­4 teaspoon of salt in a sieve set over a bowl, and let drain for about 3 hours. Next, press the ingredients against side of sieve to release as much liquid as possible, then discard liquid from bowl.  2. Bring the vinegar, coconut sugar, and remaining 1/­­4 teaspoon of salt to a boil in a small saucepan, stirring until sugar has dissolved, then simmer until reduced to about a 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml (just eyeball it), about 3 to 4 minutes. Add the garlic, mustard, dill, and turmeric, stir until fragrant, about 1-2 minutes. 3. Add the drained cucumber and onion mixture, plus diced red bell pepper, and simmer, stirring for about 2 minutes. Make the arrowroot slurry, then whisk it into the relish. Simmer, stirring, 2-3 minutes until noticeably thickened. Turn off the heat and transfer relish to a glass jar or storage container and leave uncovered until it cools to room temperature, then put in the fridge. The relish will keep for up to a month in the fridge.  Tomato Ketchup This ketchup was an old blog post that I revisited and revised. I used to make this recipe in the oven, but my new method eliminates the need to crank up the heat when its probably the last thing you want to do. Instead, the whole thing is made on the stove, then blitzed up in the blender. Its deeply spiced and complex, so much more interesting than store-bought ketchup. The first time I made the new version, I used a good portion of it for a soup base, then added more to a dip – both were delicious, so if you have leftovers, put it to use in an unexpected place. Its tasty with everything!      Print recipe     Tomato Ketchup Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil (expeller-pressed, flavour neutral)  3 star whole anise (make sure they are whole to remove easily!) 3 bay leaves 1 tsp. ground coriander pinch of chili flakes  1 large onion, chopped  3/­­4 tsp. sea salt  1/­­4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 3 cloves garlic, minced 2.2 lbs. /­­ 1 kg tomatoes  2 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 Tbsp. maple syrup  Directions: 1. Melt the coconut oil in a medium stockpot, then add the star anise, bay leaves, coriander, and chili flakes. Cook until fragrant about 2 minutes, then add the onions, salt and pepper, and cook until slightly browned, about 10 mins. Next add the add garlic, cook for 1-2 minutes, then add balsamic vinegar, scraping any stuck bits off the bottom of the pot. Add tomatoes and their juices, then bring to a simmer.  2. Cook on low heat for about 60 mins or until reduced and starting to caramelize on the bottom of the pot.  3. Turn off heat and remove bay and anise, add maple syrup. Let cool slightly and transfer to a blender, blend until smooth. Taste, and adjust seasoning to suit your taste.  4. Let cool to room temperature, then transfer to an airtight glass container and store in the fridge. Keeps for about one month.   Aquafaba Mayonnaise This was the most exciting discovery to make: vegan mayo using aquafaba! Aqua faba translates to bean water and its the cooking liquid from chickpeas. Although any can of chickpeas will have this, I make my own, since there are no additives or chemicals that have leached from the can itself. If you cook your own chickpeas from dried, you have aquafaba. Although I wouldnt normally consume large amounts of aquafaba, in this case its used in such a small amount that I think its fine. Plus, did I mention it makes vegan mayo?! The results are so unbelievably shocking and delightful that Im a convert, even though I eat eggs! I highly suggest using the most neutral-tasting olive oil you can find for this recipe. Since it makes up the majority of the flavour of the mayonnaise, a strong-tasting olive oil will overpower the delicate nature of this condiment. I used the one from Pineapple Collaborative, which works perfectly. I also tried avocado oil, grapeseed, and sunflower, but didnt like the results as much as mild olive oil. Its up to you! You can really use whatever you have on hand, just keep in mind that it will really dictate the taste of the final result.      Print recipe     Aquafaba Mayonnaise Makes about 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3 Tbsp. aquafaba 1/­­4 tsp. Dijon mustard 1/­­4 tsp. fine salt 1 1/­­2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml mild olive oil (or other light-tasting oil) Directions: 1. Place the aquafaba in the bottom of a wide-mouth jar. Add the mustard, salt, lemon juice, vinegar, and the olive oil. Allow a minute for the oil to separate into a distinct layer. 2. Insert an immersion blender all the way to the bottom of the jar. (Note: this will not work with an upright blender) Start the blending process on medium speed and do not lift the blender until the mixture has thickened and turned white at the bottom of the jar. Only then, slowly move the blender up, waiting for the oil to incorporate as you go, until you get the texture of mayonnaise. Use immediately; refrigerate leftovers in a tightly sealed jar for up to 1 month. The mayonnaise will thicken slightly once cooled in the fridge. Smoky Secret Sauce This is the creamy, tangy, and perfectly seasoned sauce that most famously adorns the Big Mac burger from McDonalds. Whats best about my version is that it has zero secrets...nothing weird to hide here! I had the most fun with this recipe, since it required a number of the condiments that Id already made as ingredients. I did deviate a tad from the original and added smoked paprika, since I love the added dimension of smoke flavour to anything thats going on grilled food, but Ive also found this to be a stellar salad dressing, especially for chop-style salads that have chunky, less delicate ingredients. I hope you find some fun things to slather it on this summer. Its lip-smakingly tasty!      Print recipe     Smoky Secret Sauce Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml aquafaba mayonnaise (recipe above) 1 tablespoon yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish (recipe above) 1 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 teaspoon white wine vinegar 1/­­2 teaspoon paprika 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (not traditional, but delicious!) 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon onion powder Directions: 1. Fold all ingredients together in a small bowl or jar. Enjoy immediately, and store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for 2-3 weeks.    As a bonus, Ive included this stellar recipe for carrot hot dogs – since youll need a high-vibe wiener to put your condiments on! Hahaaa! I realize that carrot hot dogs are pretty 2018, but Id never tried them before and it was a very amusing undertaking. I looked at a number of recipes online and my version is a mash-up of the ones that sounded the most delicious. My method is also much easier and faster than other versions Ive seen, since its just a braise on the stove and a quick grill (no marinating, steaming, roasting, etc).  The important thing to keep in mind for this recipe, is that the amount of time you braise the carrots for,Im  will be dictated by the girth of the carrots. Mine were more sausage-sized (approx 1.5 or 3.5-3.75 cm) than a typical hot dog wiener, and a 20-minute simmer was the perfect amount. If your carrots are smaller, Id go down to 15 minutes. Insert a sharp knife to check on the doneness after 10 minutes or so, and take them out when they are tender, but way before they get mushy. Remember that youre also going to be grilling them for 10 minutes so they will cook even more, and you dont want them too soft. The final result should be tender all the way through, but shouldnt fall apart in your mouth.     Print recipe     Carrot Hot Dogs Serves 8 Ingredients: 8 large hot dog-sized carrots 8 hot dog buns 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml tamari 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml apple cider vinegar  1 cup /­­ 250ml vegetable broth or 1 tsp. vegetable bullion powder + 1 cup water 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 2 Tbsp. coconut oil (preferably expeller-pressed, flavour neutral) 1 Tbsp. liquid smoke 2 tsp. yellow mustard 1 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. paprika 1/­­2 tsp. onion powder 1/­­2 tsp. ground black pepperWash and peel carrots. Round the edges of the carrot to look more like wieners, if desired.  Direcitons: 1. Whisk all marinade ingredients together in a large stockpot with a lid. Add the peeled carrots and bring to a boil, reduce to a gentle simmer, and cook with the lid on for about 20 minutes (less if your carrots are on the thin side, see headnote). Remove from heat and turn on the grill.  2. Grill the carrots over medium-high, turning every couple of minutes, basting them with the remaining braising liquid if desired. Cook until slightly charred and fragrant, 10 minutes total. Grill or toast the buns. Place a carrot on each bun and enjoy with all of the condiments! I wish you all an incredible summer ahead! I recognize that this season is going to look very different from years past, but as long as were all healthy and the sun is shining, weve got it pretty good. Stay safe out there, and keep fuelling your body with the whole foods it needs to thrive and feel alive!  All love and happy condiment-making, Sarah B The post High-Vibe Condiment Classics appeared first on My New Roots.

Recipe | Cauliflower Hummus Burgers with Mint Tzatziki

May 4 2020 Oh My Veggies 

I finally made some veggie burgers for the blog. But they’re not burger-y burgers. They’re hummus burgers. I wanted something with the flavors of hummus, in burger form. And because I like a little texture in my burgers, I didn’t want to use actual hummus. So instead, I smashed some chickpeas and cauliflower together with tahini, lemon juice, garlic and olive oil. The first time I made this, I did it without the cauliflower and it just didn’t work out. The burgers needed a little more moisture, so I thought I’d experiment by adding steamed cauliflower the next time around. The cauliflower doesn’t take away from the hummus flavor, but it makes the burgers less crumbly and adds some veggie goodness to the patties. Chobani sent me some samples of their Greek yogurt (thanks, Chobani!), so I figured the appropriate topping for hummus burgers was tzatziki. Traditionally, dill is used in tzatziki sauce, but since my dill is pretty pathetic right now, I used mint instead. I’m not big on yogurt unless it’s in something and I feel the same way about tzatziki--it’s great on these burgers, but a little too much for me on its own. (But I guess […]

Rava Uttapam (Instant Sooji Uttapam)

April 13 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Rava Uttapam (Instant Sooji Uttapam) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Rava Uttapam (Instant Sooji Uttapam) I have been wanting to do a video it should be easy and more versatile, ingredients maybe you have in your pantry. Utttapam a South Indian popular dish. Traditionally Uttapam is made with rice and lentil batter, which can be a long process, soaking, grinding then fermenting the batter. Rava Uttappam, on the other hand is instant and easy to make, with a variety of vegetables of your choice. It tastes delicious also can be served for breakfast, as a snack or for dinner. Rava Uttapam will be enjoyed by all ages. Uttapam is like a thick Dosa or Spicy pancake topped with vegetables. If you are serving this as a traditional Uttapam serve this with sambar and coconut chutney. But Rava Uttapam can be served with any chutney or condiment. Many times, I prefer this as a light dinner and enjoy with sprinkling samber powder, giving a traditional touch. The other reason I wanted to do this recipe as I said before I wanted to do the recipe more versatile you can use this batter for making Idli, because Rava Idli can be used for making so many recipes. I have many related recipes on my website like Masala Idli, Idli Manchurian. This recipe will serve 4. Course Breakfast, Snack Cuisine Indian Keyword Appetizers, Bhartia Khana, Bread Uttapam, Coconut Chutney, Halwa, Healthy, Homemade, Idli, Jain Food, Mandir Food, No Garlic, No Onion, Quick And Easy, Rava Dosa, Samber, Savory Pancake, Sheera, Snack, South Indian Cuisine, Swami Narayan, Vegetarian, Video Recipe Prep Time 20 minutes Cook Time 10 minutes Servings 4 people Ingredients1 cup sooji coarse, semolina 1/­­2 cup yogurt curd, dahai 1/­­2 cup cabbage finely chopped 1 cup bell pepper finely chopped (capsicum, shimala mirch) 1 cup tomatoes finely chopped, remove the seeds 1 Tbsp cilantro finely chopped 1 Tbsp green chili finely chopped 2 tsp ginger shredded, adrak 1 tsp salt 1 tsp ENO fruit salt For Seasoning1 Tbsp oil 1/­­4 tsp cumin seeds jeera 1/­­4 tsp mustard seeds rai Also need2 Tbsp oil to cooking InstructionsIn a bowl mix sooji, salt, green chili, ginger, cilantro, cabbage, yogurt, and add water as needed batter should be little thicker than dosa batter. In a small bowl heat the oil over medium heat, oil should be moderately hot, add cumin seeds and mustard seeds as seeds crack add to the batter, mix it well. Let the batter set aside for at least 15 minutes. Add Eno Fruit Salt to the batter just before you are ready to make Uttapam and mix well. The mixture will begin light and foaming. Heat the skillet over medium heat and lightly grease the skillet. Pour about 2 large spoons of batter and spread consistency should be of thick then dosa. Sprinkle about 2 tablespoons of bell pepper and tomatoes press it lightly into the batter. Pour about 1 teaspoon of oil around uttapam and cover it and let it cook for about 2 minutes and turn them over, uttapam should be golden brown from bottom making crisper, and top should be cooked well but not brown. Uttapam should be cooked over low medium heat. Uttapam is ready to serve. I like to sprinkle lightly samber powder to add extra flavor. NotesServing suggestions - You can serve the Rava Uttapam with sambar, coconut chutney or your choice of condiment. Additional Notes - Adding tomatoes and bell pepper gives a traditional look to Uttapam. - I add green chilies and cilantro in the batter to keep the colors better. - You can choose your choice of vegetables like shredded carrots, finely chopped green beans, corn, finely chopped spinach (these are the veggies I have tried). - Do not cook on high heat, uttapam will not cook through. - If I am making Uttapam to serve as a starter I make the uttapam in small sizes, otherwise make it in about 7-inch diameter. What size you want to make it is your choice. The post Rava Uttapam (Instant Sooji Uttapam) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go Bad

March 30 2020 Meatless Monday 

Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go BadEvery food item will eventually go bad, but there are many food staples that offer a terrific value, can be prepared in big batches, and have an incredibly long shelf-life. Some of these ingredients can serve as the centerpiece of a meal, like potatoes, beans, and pasta, while others act as supporting actors, providing quick bursts of flavor to ordinary dishes. Best of all, many of these foods are completely plant-based and rich in many of the essential vitamins and minerals necessary for a healthy body. Our list of plant-based ingredients all have a shelf life of over two months (when stored properly) and are relatively inexpensive. But most importantly, these pantry staples give you the opportunity to get in the kitchen and experiment with flavors and ingredients that you may have overlooked in the past. And Meatless Mondays are always a great opportunity to start a new healthy ritual. Beans Often sold for less than a dollar a can, beans are the ultimate plant-based protein. With so many different types to choose from -- kidney, black, pinto, cannellini, pigeon peas, butter beans -- the recipe possibilities are endless. Make a stew, vegetable chili , bean salad, or these black bean meatless balls with zucchini noodles . Diced Tomatoes (canned) Take a simple stew, stir-fry, or sauce to the next level with a can of diced tomatoes. At only a buck a can, diced tomatoes will become your new secret weapon in the kitchen. Try adding them to this boldly-seasoned spicy chickpea ragout. Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Toss them into a blender, soup pot or sauté pan to add some nutrients and heft to your mid-week meals. When stored properly, frozen fruits and vegetables will last years (but please dont make them wait that long). Some frozen vegetables -- spinach, collards, broccoli rabe -- should be thawed and drained before cooking, while others like broccoli, peas, and peppers can be thrown into a hot pan as-is and easily transformed into a garlic-ginger fried rice. Granola A bag of granola wont run you much more than $4.00, depending on the brand, but it will impart an invaluable crunch to yogurt and oatmeal. Many manufacturers sell granola with a shelf life of up to six months, but it should be good to eat it even past that point (although it might not retain its full crunch). Lentils (dry) At $1.50 per pound, a bag of dried lentils is one of the best bargains in the grocery store. Besides an almost indefinite shelf life, the lentil contains a laundry-list of essential minerals like iron, folate, and manganese, is packed with protein, and is a great source of fiber. If youve never before cooked with dried lentils, start with a simple stew or this easy French lentil salad with cherry tomatoes. Onions When stored in the refrigerator, onions can last for up to two months (sometimes longer). Theyre pretty cheap, too, costing only around $1.00 – $1.50 per pound. Sear on the stove top for a smoky, charred flavor or cook them low-and-slow to unlock their natural, caramel-like sweetness and sprinkle them over this sweet potato caramelized onion stew. Oatmeal Think of oatmeal as a blank canvas. Costing less than a quarter per serving, let your imagination run wild when it comes to cooking breakfast. Mix in everything from peanut butter, jam, nuts, seeds, or even savory spices. Dried oatmeal can last longer than a year when properly stored. Use oatmeal in this vanilla almond milk oatmeal or try using it to make dessert, like this apple cranberry oatmeal bread. Pasta Costing only $1.00 per box, your pantry should be loaded with pasta, but we recommend going beyond the standard semolina/­­durum wheat flour varieties and experiment with pastas made from whole grains, vegetables, lentils, and chickpeas. Try some unique flavor combinations to keep things interesting, like this recipe for green tea pesto pasta . Peanut Butter Whether you like it creamy or crunchy, peanut is the ideal pantry staple . A serving of peanut butter is packed with protein and healthy fats, both of which will keep you feeling nice and satiated. Peanut butter has a shelf life of more than a year (unopened), and many brands of sell for less than $2.00 a jar. Polenta (corn meal) Polenta is made by mixing cornmeal (dried, ground corn) with either water or milk. Inexpensive and versatile, polenta can serve as the foundation of any number of meals, pairing especially well with tomato sauce, like in this recipe for Italian white beans with kale and polenta.  Potatoes These starchy staples dont last forever, but when stored in a cool dark space they can last for between 2 - 3 months. At around .50 cents per pound, the potato is an excellent source of fiber, nutrients, and calories; they can add creaminess to soups or serve as a vessel for a delicious stuffed potatoes primavera . Rice Whether its white, brown, or wild, rice costs less than a quarter per serving. Rice can serve as an accompanying carbohydrate or act as the main meal. For a new take on everyones favorite grain, try this vegetarian biryani or meatless brown rice jambalaya . Salsa Jarred salsa is an excellent (and convenient) alternative to fresh varieties. Add a tablespoon to anything bean burritos and taco bowls to spicy puttanesca pasta and gallo pinto ; mash some together with a ripe avocado and youve got a quick-and-easy guacamole. Soy Sauce Drizzle soy sauce into your stir fry, salad, sautéed vegetable, or tomato sauce for a boost of salty umami flavor. You can also use it liberally in this yummy Asian noodle bowl with spicy almond sauce . Soy sauce can cost as little as $2.00 a bottle and can last nearly two years after opening when stored in the refrigerator. Sweet Potatoes The sweet potato is natures candy; slice it down the middle and heat in the microwave for five minutes and out comes tasting reminiscent of a sugary soufflé. If you want to try making a dish that requires a little more technique, cook up this spicy and aromatic sweet potato chana or a coconut milk sweet potato white bean soup . Vegetable Broth/­­ Bouillon A box of vegetable broth is a staple of any kitchen, but you can expand your soup selection by adding some chickn bouillon cubes to your pantry. Add some beans, frozen vegetables, and seasonings and you have a clean and simple dinner for around $1.00 per serving, or add some flour, nut-milk, and noodles for a creamy vegetable noodle soup . Curious about what other plant-based ingredients you should be storing in your pantry? Check out our list of 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients . The post Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go Bad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

vendakkai mor kulambu recipe | vendakkai mor kuzhambu | okra yogurt gravy

March 11 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

vendakkai mor kulambu recipe | vendakkai mor kuzhambu | okra yogurt gravyvendakkai mor kulambu recipe | vendakkai mor kuzhambu | okra yogurt gravy with step by step photo and video recipe. kulambu a popular south indian creamy sambar recipe known for its sour and spice taste it has to offer. it is typically served and made with leftover curd or yogurt, which are generally sour in taste. one such simple and easy kulambu variation is vendakkai mor kulambu recipe, which has the additional crispiness from the fried okra. The post vendakkai mor kulambu recipe | vendakkai mor kuzhambu | okra yogurt gravy appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Methi Bajra Paratha (Millet Gluten Free and Vegan Bread)

December 24 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Methi Bajra Paratha (Millet Gluten Free and Vegan Bread) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Methi Bajra Paratha Parathas always have been a family-favorite treat. Lately I have been trying to make gluten-free breads. A combination of bajra and besan with methi parathas taste delicious. These spicy Methi Bajra Parathas have a biscuit texture, which makes it very enjoyable. They also pair well with gravy-based dishes like Mixed Dal, Aloo Tamatar or you can serve with plain yogurt. You can enjoy these as a proper meal, or even as a great on-the-go lunch! I also enjoy these parathas with just hot cup of chai. This recipe will serve 2, and make 4 Parathas. Course Breakfast Cuisine Indian Prep Time 10 minutes Cook Time 10 minutes Total Time 20 minutes Servings 2 people Ingredients 1/­­2 cup millet flour bajra atta 1/­­2 cup besan 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds jeera 1/­­2 tsp salt 1 tsp chili flakes 1/­­4 tsp turmeric haldi 1/­­8 tsp asafetida hing 1 Tbsp sesame seeds til 1 Tbsp oil 1/­­4 cup fenugreek leaves option is using dry leaves 1/­­2 cup hot water use as needed Also Need4 tsp oil to cook the parathas InstructionsMix all the ingredients for paratha together, millet flour, besan. Cumin, salt, chili flakes, turmeric, asafetida, sesame seeds, oil, and fenugreek leaves. Notes: if you dont have fresh fenugreek leaves use dry methi known as Kasuri Methi. Make the dough using hot water, you will need about 1/­­2 cup of water. Dough should be firm and pliable. Notes: dough should be prepare just before making paratha. Dived the dough into 4 equal parts, oil your palm and roll them between your palms, to make them round petites. Heat the skillet on medium high heat. To test, sprinkle a couple of drops of water on the skillet. The water should sizzle right away. Roll the paratha in about 6 circle, roll them between two pieces of plastic that makes the rolling easy, I am using zip log bag. Place the methi bajra paratha over the skillet. When start to change color, flip it over. You will notice some golden-brown spots. After a few seconds, spread one teaspoon of oil on the aratha. Flip it again and lightly press the with a spatula. Flip again and press with the spatula making sure the paratha is golden-brown on both sides. Repeat same process for the remaining. NotesServing suggestions: - Masala Lauki Ki Sabji - Matar With Spicy Gravy - Spinach raita The post Methi Bajra Paratha (Millet Gluten Free and Vegan Bread) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Vegan Almond Coconut Granola

December 7 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Almond Coconut GranolaThis Homemade Baked Almond Coconut Granola is super easy to make and so delicious with the perfect amount of sweetness and the ultimate crunch from nuts, chia seeds and rolled oats! You will want to sprinkle it on everything! Vegan Glutenfree So much better than store-bought granola mixes. Homemade granola – I just LOVE that it is so easy to make and so customizable. You can make it plain, or add in all your favorite dried fruits, nuts, seeds, chocolate chips, spices, etc. This vegan recipe for crunchy coconut almond granola has just about everything I love: crunchy granola with big flakes of coconut and whole almonds mixed in.  I also add some chia seeds and assorted nuts for extra crunch. The “glue” that holds this vegan baked granola together is a blend of coconut oil, maple syrup, almond butter, coconut sugar and a dash of cinnamon too. So this is basically refined sugar-free and provides a rounder, more caramel-y sweetness than storebought granola. Youll pour the wet ingredients over the dry granola ingredients to make it all sticky, and allow for it to bake up all nice and crunchy! Take your time here  -as it bakes youll get those nice big clusters of granola throughout. Did I mention that it will make your kitchen smell amazing? MORE GRANOLA FROM THE BLOG - Date Caramel Granola  - no Oil- no refined sugar - Sunbutter or pb Granola Bars - Maple pecan Cardamom granola  - Lentil Cranberry Granola - candied pecans  - Sriracha Orange Quinoa Peanut Granola - Quinoa Chivda - savory  Indian Trail mix Lately, my favorite way to enjoy this coconut almond granola is on a bowl of coconut yogurt – my favorite breakfast these days! It’s just so crunchy and tasty with the perfect amount of sweetness. Also a wonderful snack. Of course, you can also just enjoy it with your favorite plant-based milk like a bowl of cereal – maybe with chopped up fruit on top. But honestly, it is so good I could just eat it by the handful.Continue reading: Vegan Almond Coconut GranolaThe post Vegan Almond Coconut Granola appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Kamal Kakdi Ki Chaat (Spicy Lotus Root Appetizer)

November 26 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Kamal Kakdi Ki Chaat (Spicy Lotus Root Appetizer) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Kamal Kakdi Ki Chaat Kamal Kakdi Chaat is a truly unique and tasty dish. I wanted to make something new and delicious but also healthy and easy to make. kamal kakdi, is an edible lotus root that has a crunchy texture and slightly sweet taste. After doing some research, I was surprised at how much nutrients kamal kakdi has. I was excited to try out a spicy chat recipe using it. An added plus is that this recipe requires no frying and is a nice healthy savory snack. My family really enjoyed this new dish! Hope you give this recipe a try and enjoy! This recipe will serve 6. Course Chaat Cuisine Indian Prep Time 5 minutes Cook Time 5 minutes Total Time 10 minutes Servings 6 people Ingredients2 cup sliced lotus stem I am using frozen, Kamal Kakdi 1 Tbsp oil 1 Tbsp ginger thinly sliced, adrak 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds jeera 1/­­2 tsp salt 1/­­4 tsp black pepper kali mirch 1 tsp green chili finely chopped, Hari mirch 1/­­2 tsp lemon juice Also Need for Serving 1/­­2 cup whipped yogurt for serving 2 Tbsp tamarind chutney please add the link check the recipe Instructionspressure cook the Kamal Kakdi in an instant pot for five minutes in two cups of water. I also drained the water. Kamal Kakdi should be tender. Notes: you can also, use the pressure cooker and cook at the same time, or you can also cook in a pot for 20 minutes. Drain the water and pat dry. In a frying pan heat the oil over low medium heat. Add the oil, oil should be just warm add sliced ginger. Stir fry for about 2 minutes and take it out in a bowl. I will use this ginger later for garnishing. Note: I feel adding ginger later it gives a nice kick to chaat. Use the same pan and it already has some left-over oil. Oil should be moderately hot, add cumin seeds. As cumin seeds crack add kamal kakdi, stir and sprinkle salt and black pepper. Stir fry for one minute add about 1 teaspoon of chopped green chiles and lemon juice stir fry for about 2 minutes, turn off the heat. Kamal Kakdi is ready to be served. Plating the chaat, drizzle yogurt over kamal kakdi also drizzle tamarind chutney. And finish it off with some green chilies and roasted ginger. NotesServing suggestions: You can also serve this kamal kakdi as is as a masla kamal kakdi, sprinkle little chaat masala. You will also enjoy the recipes for, Bread Pudding With Chocolate Sauce, Sabudana (Tapioca) Bhel, Dahi Puri Chaat The post Kamal Kakdi Ki Chaat (Spicy Lotus Root Appetizer) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet

November 19 2020 Vegetarian Times 

With the new year just weeks away, the media is honing in on the top nutrition trends we can expect to see in 2021, and to no surprise increasing plant-protein remains at the top. Whether youre eating more plant-based for sustainability, health, or just because, rest assured there are a variety of whole food options you can choose from to meet your protein needs. But, before you head straight into the freezer department at your local grocer to pick up the latest faux meat product, lets take a look at 10 whole food sources of plant-based protein you may just want to toss into your cart instead! Reader beware, you may end up saving a few bucks once you realize how convenient and affordable many of these options are. Lentils Just one cup of cooked lentils provides nearly 18 grams of plant-protein and 16 grams of fiber for just 225 calories. Lentils also contain many important nutrients, like iron, potassium, zinc and choline (a nutrient that 90% of Americans arent getting enough of!) Plus, theyre budget-friendly with a 16-ounce bag of dried lentils coming in at just $2.99.  Registered Dietitian Kim Rose of www.kimrosedietitian.com recommends making a pot of seasoned lentils on the weekends. Divide them into individual 1 cup servings, and then add them to different meals throughout the week!  Youll find me turning lentils into meatballs, or for a really quick fix, adding a little bar-b-que sauce to them to make tasty, vegan sloppy joes. Hummus This plant-based spread can be made from a variety of beans and legumes, not just the traditional garbanzo bean you may think! Depending on the bean used, the protein content will vary slightly, but a standard 1/­­4 cup serving (or about 70 grams by weight) has roughly 6 grams of protein for just 180 calories. Plus, it often packs heart-healthy unsaturated fatty acids that help keep you fuller for longer too! Brynn McDowell, Registered Dietitian and cookbook author of The Mediterranean Diet Made Easy recommends using hummus in place of mayo on sandwiches or spreading it on bagels or toast! She suggests thinning it out and using it as a creamy salad dressing to add more plant-based protein to meals. Pistachios Pistachios are a good source of plant-based protein with a 1-ounce serving of the nut (shelled) providing 6 grams of it! Plus, they pack dietary fiber, potassium, and antioxidants that help keep your body in tip-top shape. While the shelled variety tends to be a tad pricier, you can still pick up a 10-ounce in-shell bag for about $5.49 at most markets. Lauren Manaker, Registered Dietitian, and author of Fueling Male Fertility, recommends to use shelled pistachios as a salad topped in place of grilled chicken or shrimp. The plant-based protein boost that also gives you fiber and healthy fats for staying power. You can also toss pistachios in trail mixes and in oatmeal as a topping for added nutrition and crunch! Related: Healthy Late-Night Snacks Chickpeas One of the most common forms of plant-based protein on the market is the good ole chickpea (aka, the garbanzo bean!) With nearly 7.5 grams of protein, 6.5 grams of fiber, and 3.7 mg of iron in just 1/­­2 cup serving of cooked chickpeas, its a great way to increase the total nutrient density of your diet. The best part: a pound of chickpeas (dried) often comes in at less than $3.00! NYC-based Registered Dietitian, Natalie Rizzo, MS, RD, is a big fan of adding chickpeas to both meals and snacks! From grain bowls to veggie burgers, or roasted as a protein-filled snack, chickpeas offer a convenient and affordable plant-based protein to nearly every diet. Edamame (Soybeans) Edamame is the immature form of the soybean that is often eaten from the shell (or shelled) alongside traditional Asian dishes. Regardless of the form of soybean you eat, they can easily be incorporated into a balanced diet with two servings being a reasonable goal for adults. A half-cup of shelled edamame packs nearly 9.5 grams of plant-based protein and 4 grams of fiber, as well as iron, potassium, folate, and choline! Sarah Koszyk, Sports Nutritionist and author of 25 Anti-Aging Smoothies for Revitalizing, Glowing Skin, recommends pureeing edamame in a hummus, dip, or pesto. Spread the edamame purees on a sandwich or wrap, add it to a burrito, or toss it with a salad, pasta, or rice dish. If youre looking to venture into the other forms of soybeans (like tofu), Registered Dietitian Sylvia Klinger of Hispanic Food Communications suggests blending silken tofu with oil, spices and herbs makes for a delicious high protein dressing, or adding a soy-based curd to pancakes to boost the protein there as well! Tempeh Tempeh is a fermented product made from soybeans in addition to some whole grains, seasonings and other flavorings. A 4-ounce serving of this soy-based protein packs nearly 20 grams of protein, in addition to a host of nutrition benefits. For starters, tempeh is filled with nutrients like manganese, magnesium, phosphorus and B vitamins in addition to its role as a probiotic. Jenna Braddock, Florida based at MakeHealthyEasy.com recommends spending a little bit of time prepping it to make the perfect dish! Braddock suggests crumbling the tempeh, then marinating it and finishing with a sear in a hot pan to add instant protein to salads, wraps, bowls and tacos. Pill Nuts Pronounced peel-y, this nut is native to the pili tree often found in Northern Australia and the Philippines. While lower in protein comparatively speaking per serving size (a 1/­­4 cup serving provides 3 grams in comparison to some of the other nuts), it packs a nutritional punch in that it contains essential amino acids the human body needs. This nut is harder to find at local markets, and you will need to likely shop online and be willing to spend about $16.99 for a one-pound bag. Maya Feller, nationally recognized nutrition expert and author of The Southern Comfort Food Diabetes Cookbook, recommends enjoying this mildly flavored nut in yogurt form (yes, brands are now popping up incorporating this nut into their yogurts!) smothered over a stack of pancakes or in their raw form as a crunchy snack. Hemp Seeds Three tablespoons of hulled hemp seeds provide nearly 10 grams of plant-based protein to your meal for just 170 calories. Plus, theyre full of iron and unsaturated fats while offering a great nut-free alternative for crunch. While a bit more pricey than other seeds (a 12-ounce bag is roughly $12.99), theyre an easy addition to boost plant-protein on simple foods. Plant-based sports dietitian, Kelly Jones of kellyjonesnutrition.com recommends adding them to oatmeal, sprinkling them onto pancakes, using as a topper for soups and salads, and incorporating into homemade energy bites! Lupini Beans Lupini beans are a staple of the Mediterranean diet and making a name for themselves in the US due to their high protein content. In just a 1/­­2 cup cooked serving of the bean it packs nearly 13 grams of plant-based protein. But, where it packs in protein it lacks in fiber, with that same 1/­­2 cup serving providing only 2 grams. Found traditionally in the jarred food section of the market, there are a few ways you can cook with them! Amy Gorin, a plant-based registered dietitian and owner of Plant-Based Eats recommends draining and rinsing the beans as you would do with any other canned beans. Then, use them in your favorite dishes, like her delicious plant-based lupini salad! Quinoa One of the only whole grains that is a complete source of protein (containing all 9 essential amino acids), this is an excellent (and affordable) gluten-free, plant-based protein addition to nearly any diet! One cup of cooked quinoa contains nearly 8 grams of protein for just 220 calories (plus nearly 5 grams of fiber.) Quinoa also contains many important B vitamins as well as potassium and antioxidants. Registered Dietitian Tamara Hoffman of Unbeetable Nutrition and Wellness recommends adding quinoa to your taco Tuesday menus with a spicy Mexican seasoning or sauteing it into your stir-fry dishes with a soy sauce. The post 10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

WORLD 2.0 vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

November 2 2020 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

WORLD 2.0 vegan cookbook on Kickstarter Visit Kickstarter to pre-order: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2TE62bO  My first book has been a bestseller for almost eight years, but ever since the sequels came out, I’ve wanted to go back and massively upgrade the visuals on the original book: to re-do the cover artwork and re-shoot most of the food photos. After publishing 5 other books and spending additional years in the kitchens of the world, I knew I could improve the recipes, add outstanding dishes that didn’t make it into the first versions, and bring more culinary authenticity and cultural awareness to the entire book. The newly updated, re-photographed and freshly illustrated edition of The Lotus and the Artichoke – Vegan Recipes from World Adventures is my classic, first journey in the world of vegan cookbooks reimagined and upgraded. Its my tribute to powerful memories, awesome individuals, and fantastic meals that Ive made, found, and shared with countless others like you. I’ve wanted to re-create my first cookbook for years, but the opportunity didn’t really arise until the surprises and challenges that have been this monster of a year, 2020. Yasai Izakaya Genki, Tokyo 2019 You see, I’d planned to return to Japan and continue my adventures from late 2019. Ultimately, now, Id be wrapping up The Lotus and the Artichoke – JAPAN. But when Corona hit, not only did it cancel nearly all my events and most of my income, like for so many people, lockdowns and border closures meant drastic changes not just daily life but to our travel plans as well. The struggle to return to a form of life that is more predictable and free has been different for all of us. As life has become more routine and restricted, our travels have been more in our minds and through the eyes of others-- through art, music, video and social media. A big part of my own escape these last months has been getting into the kitchen and diving back into my first cookbook - revisiting the intense dishes, unforgettable places and global flavors that shaped my life and projects over the last eight years. Ive cooked for the family, for friends, and for neighbors. Hopefully opportunities for more lunch and dinner parties and big cooking events will shape up soon! updated world map & photo collage for WORLD 2.0 edition NEW in Vegan Recipes from World Adventures 2.0: - brand NEW cover art & illustration! - NEW introduction & kitchen info! - more travel stories! - 8+ totally NEW recipes (not found in earlier editions!)  - 70+ newly photographed dishes!  - 100+ updated & improved recipes!  - better recipe names with respect to cultures & inspirations - 8+ additional pages of adventures & travels! As with all 6 of my cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed and designed this book myself. The Lotus and the Artichoke is the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. - My fully updated and re-envisioned first cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide -  224 pages with 100+ recipes and over 90 full-page color photos  - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by my travels and culinary adventures in over 50 countries.  - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients  - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Palak Paneer – North Indian spinach with tofu paneer Pad Thai – rice noodles with tofu, crushed peanuts & lime Omelette *NEW RECIPE* Mombasa Red Curry – with sweet potatoes & tofu Buka – Nigerian stew & Jollof – Senegalese rice *NEW RECIPES* Koshary – Egyptian pasta, lentils & rice with red sauce & fried onions *NEW RECIPE* Mini Meat Pies – made with lentils & vegetables Lasagna – with smoked tofu, cashew cheese, zucchini & mushrooms Recipes in Vegan Recipes from World Adventures 2.0 AMERICAS -  Salade a la Montréal arugula, pears, walnuts & lemon dressing -  Lower East Side Salad avocado and tomatoes on quinoa & carrot ginger dressing -  Jersey Summer Salad spinach, tomatoes, mushrooms, walnuts & raspberry dressing -  Pancakes American breakfast classic -  Waffles *NEW*  -  French Toast another American breakfast classic -  Tofu Scramble with mixed vegetables -  Omelette *NEW*  -  North End Pasta Spaghetti & Vegan Meatballs with red sauce -  Ithaca Mac & Cheeze baked casserole -  TLT Tempeh Lettuce Tomato sandwich -  Black Bean Burgers 90’s style classic burgers -  Three Bean Chili with assorted vegetables -  Mango Pear Crumble with ginger & cinnamon -  Roasted Walnut Brownies double chocolate delight -  Oatmeal Cranberry Walnut Cookies American classic -  Guacamole Latin American avocado dip -  Salsa Latin American spicy tomato dip ASIA -  Cold Sesame Noodles Chinese dim-sum classic -  Wontons Chinese steamed dumplings with soy ginger dipping sauce -  Congee savory rice porridge *NEW*  -  Horenso Goma-ae Japanese chilled sesame spinach -  Miso Soup Japanese classic with tofu -  Teriyaki Tempeh Japanese stir-fry with vegetables -  General Tsos Chicken Cantonese classic -  Sesame Ginger Tofu Chinese fusion -  Tom Kha Thai coconut soup with tofu & vegetables -  Pad Thai rice noodles with tofu, crushed peanuts & lime -  Pad Horapa Makua Thai stir-fry with eggplant, basil, tofu & cashews -  Bai Cha Cambodian fried rice with smoked tofu & vegetables -  Gói Cuôn Vietnamese fresh spring rolls with ginger peanut sauce -  Pho Vietnamese noodle soup with smoked tofu & vegetables -  Banh Mi Vietnamese seitan sandwich -  Mirza Ghasemi Persian eggplant -  Gajar Masala grated carrots with pineapple, dates & cashews -  Aloo Raita Indian potatoes and cucumbers in yogurt -  Poha Indian flattened rice with potatoes & spices -  Gobi Tikka Indian baked marinated cauliflower -  Pakoras Indian spinach fritters with apple tamarind chutney -  Masoor Dal North Indian red lentils -  Chole Bhature Indian chickpeas with fried flatbread -  Hyderabadi Biryani South Indian rice dish -  Dhokla South Indian savory steamed chickpea cake -  Masala Dosa South Indian cr?pe with spicy potato filling -  Sambar South Indian vegetable & lentil stew -  Coconut Coriander Chutney South Indian condiment -  Paneer Makhani North Indian tomato curry with tofu paneer -  Mutter Paneer North Indian peas with tofu paneer -  Palak Paneer North Indian spinach with tofu paneer -  Navratan Korma North Indian creamy vegetable curry -  Vegetable Jalfrezi North Indian spicy mixed vegetables -  Dal Makhani North Indian creamy bean curry -  Sindhi Bhindi Masala North Indian okra -  Bengan Bhartha North Indian eggplant -  Chilli Paneer Indo-Chinese tofu paneer -  Vegetable Manchurian Indo-Chinese dumplings -  Halva Indian semolina sweet -  Saffron Mango Lassi Indian yogurt shake -  Naan North Indian flatbread -  Nariyal Chaval South Asian coconut rice -  Haldi Chaval North Indian golden rice with turmeric -  Jeera Chaval North Indian rice with cumin seeds AFRICA -  Plasas & Fufu Gambian spinach peanut stew with mashed cassava -  Koshary Egyptian pasta, lentils & rice with red sauce & fried onions *NEW* -  Tanjine Moroccan stew with couscous *NEW* -  Mombasa Red Curry with sweet potatoes & tofu -  Ful Medames North African spicy bean dip *NEW* -  Hummus North African & Middle Eastern chickpea spread -  Buka Nigerian stew mushrooms and soy meats *NEW* -  Jollof Senegalese seasoned rice *NEW* EUROPE -  Endive Sprout Boats with sesame soy dressing -  Field Greens & Seared Apples with chickpea ginger parsley dressing -  Borscht Russian beet soup -  Blintzes Russian-Ukrainian cr?pes -  Gazpacho cold tomato & cucumber soup -  Carrot Ginger Zucchini Soup classic & creamy -  Roasted Root Vegetables with rosemary & spices -  Rotkohl German stewed red cabbage -  Kartoffelpuffer German potato pancakes with homemade applesauce -  Semmelknödel Bavarian bread dumplings -  Auflauf German zucchini & potato casserole -  Zwiebelkuchen German baked flatbread with onions & smoked tofu -  Schnitzel Austrian-style breaded bean cutlets -  Käsespätzle Swiss-German noodles with leeks & cheeze sauce -  Tofu Mushroom Stroganoff with fresh herbs -  Quiche French savory pie -  Cashew Mushroom Risotto with sun-dried tomatoes -  Lasagna with smoked tofu, zucchini & mushrooms -  Tempeh Stuffed Mushrooms with garlic & herbs -  Stuffed Peppers with tomato rice & smoked tofu -  Spinach & White Beans with sun-dried tomatoes & herbs -  Vegan Meat Pies with lentils & vegetables -  Turkish Bulgar Pilaf with Tofu-Feta & fresh herbs -  Grah Balkan bean stew with seitan -  Gibanica Balkan cheese pie -  Bratäpfel baked apples stuffed with dates, figs & walnuts -  Apfelstrudel Austrian-German apple pastry -  Lebkuchen traditional German Christmas cookies -  Tarte au Citron French lemon pie -  Mandeltorte German-Swedish almond pie Dal Makhani – North Indian creamy bean curry Masala Dosa – South Indian cr?pe with spicy potato filling, sambar & coconut chutney Pad Horapa Makua – Thai stir-fry with eggplant, basil, tofu & cashews Borscht – Russian beet soup Blintzes – Russian-Ukrainian tofu cheese cr?pes with jam Beaner Schnitzel – Austrian-style breaded bean cutlets Käsespätzle – Swiss-German noodles with leeks & cashew cheese sauce Pasta Famiglia – Spaghetti & Vegan Meatballs with red sauce Teriyaki Tempeh – Japanese stir-fry with vegetables Hyderabadi Biryani – South Indian rice with vegetables Chilli Paneer – Indo-Chinese spicy stir-fry with tofu paneer Vegetable Manchurian – Indo-Chinese dumplings The Lotus and the Artichoke – World Adventures from World Adventures 2.0, my updated, re-photographed & illustrated original cookbook is only available for pre-order on Kickstarter for 21 days!

Vegetable Biryani (Instant Pot)

June 5 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Vegetable Biryani (Instant Pot) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Vegetable Biryani (Instant Pot) This next recipe is due to many of you requesting I do a tasty and delicious recipe using the Instant Pot. I decided to try a recipe for "Vegetable Biryani". I have been a little hesitant to do recipes using the Instant Pot. Maybe it's because I have been cooking for so long and I'm set in my habits, or maybe it's my age! I will say I have loved using my Instant Pot more as a pressure cooker and love using it for that purpose! I make lentils and legumes using the Instant Pot and think it's great. Once I use the Instant Pot more and get used to the timings, I think it will allow me to give more precise times for my recipes. Vegetable Biryani is a complete, satisfying, one-dish meal. My mother would often say this dish is a fancy name for vegetable pulao. However, I think it is more than that. The secret behind this flavorful Vegetable Biryani is a spice mixture that creates the perfect balance of flavors. Basmati rice with a mix of fresh vegetables combined with this spice mixture turns into a dish of perfection! If you follow my steps, you'll see I try to make this recipe as simple as possible. Vegetable Biryani also makes a great lunch box meal. Make sure to check out the footnotes to see how you can make this dish vegan. Hope you enjoy! This recipe will serve 3 Course Main Course Cuisine Indian Keyword Bhojan, Bondi Raita, cooking shows, Cooking Video, Delicacy, delicious, Desi Khana, Gluten Free, Gourmet food, Homemade, Instant Pot, Jain Cooking, Khana, Lunch Box, Mint Lassi, One Pot Meal, Onion Garlic Free Cooking, Recipe videos, Rice Dish, Sattvic Food, Swaminarayan Prep Time 10 minutes Cook Time 30 minutes Total Time 40 minutes Servings 3 people Ingredients1 cup long grain rice I preferred Basmati Rice 3 Tbsp Milk 1 pinch Saffron Kesar few strands 2 Tbsp oil or ghee 1/­­4 cup cashews 15 Raisins 1 Tbsp ginger thinly sliced 2 cup mixed vegetables cubed potatoes, carrots, bell pepper, green beans cut into 1-inch pieces, cauliflower florets 1/­­4 cup Plain Yogurt whisked 1/­­4 cup Mint leaves Pudhina finely chopped 1 1/­­4 cup Water Spices3 whole Green Cardamom Elaichi 6 Cloves Laung 8 Black Peppercorns 1 inch long cinnamon stick Dalchini 2 Bay leaf Tej Patta 1 tsp Cumin seeds Jeera 1 tsp coriander powder 1 tsp fennel seed powder 1 tsp red chili powder adjust to taste 1/­­4 tsp Turmeric Haldi 1 tsp Salt adjust to taste InstructionsIn warm milk soak the saffron and keep aside. Soak the rice for about 10 minutes, then drain the water and keep aside. Use the instant pot on sauté mode add ghee after half a minute add cashews and raisins and sauté lightly roast them for about 1 minutes. Add all the whole spices and sauté for 30 seconds, they will become aromatic. Add all the dry spices, coriander powder, fennel seed powder, turmeric, red chili powder and salt stir for few seconds, add vegetables and yogurt mix it well, cleaning sides and making sure vegetable mix spread evenly in the pot. Next spread the rice evenly over the veggies. Spread the mint leaves evenly over rice. Sprinkle saffron milk on top of the rice. Add the water for cooking on top of the rice. Rice should be just immersed under water. You are layering the ingredients do not stir in between the steps. Close the lid with vent in sealing position. Change the instant pot setting to pressure cook mode. Secure the lid, close the pressure valve and cook for 9 minutes at high pressure. After the instant pot beeps, on the instant pot panel you will notice keep warm mode. Cancel the keep warm mode and wait until it releases the pressure and open the pot, that will take about 12 minutes. Open the pot and fluff the rice gently with a fork. NotesServe hot with Plain yogurt, Spinach Raita, and my favorite is Salted Mint Lassi Making Vegan: This is a easy recipe to make vegan, soak saffron in water instead of milk and yogurt you can replace with vegan yogurt or tomato puree. The post Vegetable Biryani (Instant Pot) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Eggless Cake Recipes – 25 Simple Cakes without eggs + Baking Tips

May 22 2020 Vegan Richa 

Eggless Cake Recipes – 25 Simple Cakes without eggs + Baking TipsA collection of the best easy eggless cake recipes. Forget boxed mixes and try any of these simple cake recipes instead. When you’ve been having a bad day, you know what can instantly cheer you up? A slice of cake! Now, most cakes rely on eggs to create that fluffy, cloud-like texture that we are looking for. They are usually added to make the batter smoother with more stable air bubbles that give the cake structure and that airy fluffy consistency. Additionally, eggs also help in binding the other ingredients together. The good news is that you can easily replicate the same spongy texture without the use of eggs. Eggs can be replaced with mashed bananas, applesauce, vinegar with baking soda, yogurt, and sometimes even silken tofu. Eggless cakes can be tricky to nail, but they don’t always have to be fussy or complicated.  All you need is a good recipe. Here are some easy and best ones I have ever made. Many of the regular cakes have Glutenfree options in recipe notes and there are some exclusively  Glutenfree cakes listed as well!Continue reading: Eggless Cake Recipes – 25 Simple Cakes without eggs + Baking TipsThe post Eggless Cake Recipes – 25 Simple Cakes without eggs + Baking Tips appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Punjabi Samosa

April 29 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Punjabi Samosa (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Punjabi Samosa Samosas are probably the most popular Indian snack, and street food. Samosas when paired with cilantro chutney are simply out of this world. I think they are universally loved and hard to resist. I have made variations and minor changes to my samosa recipe over the years. Check out my new and improved recipe for this family favorite! This recipe will serve 4. Course Appetizer Cuisine Indian Keyword Chaat, Cilantro Chutney, Cocktail Samosa, Cooking Video, delicious, Delicious Aloo Samosa, Gulab Jamuns, Homemade, Jain Food, jalebi, Khana, Kid Friendly, No Garlic, No Onion, Popular Snack, Potato Pastry, Potato Pattie, Punjabi Style, Puri, Satvik, Street Food, Stuffed Puri, Swaminarayan, Tamarind Chutney, Vegan, Veshno Cooking, Yogurt Prep Time 10 minutes Cook Time 30 minutes Total Time 40 minutes Servings 4 people IngredientsFor Crust1 cup all-purpose flour plain flour, maida 1 Tbsp fine sooji samolina 1/­­2 tsp salt 1 1/­­2 Tbsp oil 2 drops of lemon juice 1/­­4 cup water Adjust as needed For the Filling3 medium size potatoes boiled, peeled and chopped into small pieces, will make about 2 cups 1/­­2 cup green peas I am using frozen peas 1 1/­­2 Tbsp oil 1 tsp cumin seeds jeera 1 Tbsp coriander powder dhania 1 Tbsp green chilies chopped 2 Tbsp cilantro chopped, hara dhania 1/­­4 tsp red chili powder 1/­­2 tsp garam masala 1 tsp mango powder amchoor 1 tsp salt InstructionsMaking the DoughMix the flour, sooji, salt, oil and 2 drops pf lemon juice, mix it well rubbing with your fingers. Note: lemon juice should be just 2 drops, we are not adding to flavor, lemon is added to give the crispness. Add the water slowly, to make stiff dough and knead well. Cover the dough and let it sit for at least fifteen minutes. Making the FillingHeat the oil in a frying pan on medium high heat. Test the heat by adding one cumin seed to the oil; if it cracks right away oil is ready. Add cumin seeds as cumin seeds crack, add green peas, and turn heat to medium and stir until tender. Add all the spices coriander powder, green chilies, mango powder, garam masala, cilantro and salt mix it well. Add the potatoes and stir-fry for about 4 minutes. Potato mix should not be very dry. Add more salt or amchur according to taste. Let the filling cool to room temperature. Making SamosaTake 2 Tbsps of water and keep aside. Knead the dough again well. Divide the dough into 5 equal parts and make into balls. Roll each ball into 6-inch diameter circles, circle will not be very clean, that is fine. Cut each circle in half. Spread the water lightly all along the edge of one semicircle. Pick this semicircle up with both hands and fold it into a cone shape. Pinch the side of this cone so that it is completely sealed. Fill the cone with about 2 Tbsps of filling, do not over fill. Press this filling down with your fingers. Now close the top of this cone into a triangle shape, pinching the top edge so that it is completely sealed. Continue filling the rest of the samosas. Heat about 1 inch of the oil in a frying pan on low medium heat. To check if oil is hot enough place a small piece of dough in oil and dough should sizzle and come to the surface slowly. Place the samosas in the frying pan a few at a time. After samosas are floating on top of the oil turn them slowly. Fry the samosas until the samosas turn a light golden-brown color on all sides, this should take about 10 to 12 minutes. If you use a high heat, the samosa crust will be soft and not crispy. NotesTips - Do not over boil the potatoes. - Be careful not to poke the potatoes multiple times while they are cooking, as they will absorb the water. - Drain immediately and keep aside until cool off. - If the filled samosas sit for too long, they will dry. To avoid this, cover with a damp cloth. You will also enjoy Gulab Jamun, Jalebi, Aloo Tikki, Khasta Kachori Suggestions - Samosa can be prepared ahead of time and can be freeze for a month. - Before freezing, fry them enough until samosa changes the color to light gold brown. - After samosas are on room temperature bag them in zip lock bags and freeze them. - To use frozen samosas, take out as many you need and fry them on medium heat, make sure do not defrost the samosa before frying. The post Punjabi Samosa appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

10 Recipes for When You’re Craving a Snack, Munchy, or Quick Bite

April 13 2020 Meatless Monday 

10 Recipes for When You’re Craving a Snack, Munchy, or Quick Bite Sometimes our snack cravings cannot be satisfied with prepackaged crackers or chips or granola bars. In these situations, our mouths demand something more: something fresh or familiar or homemade. Thats why weve compiled a list of our favorite easy-to-make snacks and quick bites. These plant-based recipes offer new versions of classic dishes, many of which are better for your body and overall health. Let baked apple donuts, cauliflower Buffalo bites, and polenta fries provide a temporary escape from the packaged, the frozen, and the processed. This Monday, try experimenting with the snacks and bites below. Apple Donuts Everyone appreciates a freshly baked donut. Whip these up in 30 minutes or less. For the Apple Donuts recipe, click here .     Baked Zucchini Fries No deep-fryer required for these better-for-you veggie fries. This recipe can be made completely plant-based by swapping out the egg, cheese and yogurt with plant-based equivalents. For the Baked Zucchini Fries recipe, click here . Banana Sticky Rice Pull out one of these packets of banana-stuffed coconut sticky rice for a fragrant and fun plant-based snack. The texture of these banana sticky rice pouches are simply divine. For the Banana Sticky Rice recipe, click here . Cauliflower Buffalo Wing Bites We often find ourselves digging through our shelves or refrigerator looking for just a bite. Well, look no further than these super-simple hot-and-spicy cauliflower Buffalo wing bites. For the Cauliflower Buffalo Wing Bites recipe, click here . Cinnamon Ginger Apple Chips Easy as slice, boil, bake. Sprinkle the chips with your favorite seasonings (we recommend ginger, cinnamon, and curry powder) and pop in the oven until crisp. For the Cinnamon Ginger Apple Chips, click here .   Mediterranean Nachos A healthy spin on the everyones favorite junk food, these Mediterranean nachos are loaded with vegetables and fresh herbs. Swap out the fried tortilla chips for some baked whole-wheat pita wedges. For the Mediterranean Nachos recipe, click here . Polenta Basil Fries Create a luxurious alternative to French fries with these simple yet elegant polenta fries. Buy premade polenta (or easily make your own with cornmeal), cut into fry-like sticks, toss with olive oil, fresh basil, salt, and pepper, and bake. All you need is your favorite marinara sauce, and youre ready to start dipping. For the Baked Polenta Basil Fries recipe, click here . Quinoa Chili Fries Chili fries are delicious, but they have a saucy reputation. Clean them up by swapping out meaty chili for a lighter, yet equally flavorful, blend of quinoa, poblano peppers, and beans. For the Quinoa Chili Fries recipe, click here .   Spicy Jalape?o Cashew Cheese Dip This one requires a little bit of foresight: soak cashews the night before and then pop all the ingredients -- cashews, garlic, lemon juice, jalape?os -- into a food processor and blend till creamy. Transfer to a microwave dish, give a quick zap, and voila. Quicker prep tip: soak the cashews in a bowl of very hot water for 20 minutes and use high speed blender. Spicy Jalape?o Cashew Cheese Dip recipe, click here . Three-Ingredient Scallion Pancakes Flour, water, scallions, thats all you need to make these take-out grade scallion pancakes. Blend together a dipping sauce by combining soy sauce, rice vinegar, sesame oil, a dash of honey or agave, and some red pepper flakes. For the Three-Ingredient Scallion Pancakes recipe, click here .     Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post 10 Recipes for When You’re Craving a Snack, Munchy, or Quick Bite appeared first on Meatless Monday.

bhapa doi recipe | steamed yogurt pudding | bengali yogurt sweet recipe

March 27 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

bhapa doi recipe | steamed yogurt pudding | bengali yogurt sweet recipebhapa doi recipe | steamed yogurt pudding | bengali yogurt sweet recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. bengali cuisine is known for its creamy and satisfying dessert recipes made with milk or with milk products. most of these desserts are made with milk by evaporating it or by curdling it. but there are some bengali dessert made with curd or yogurt and bhapa doi recipe is one such simple creamy dessert recipes. The post bhapa doi recipe | steamed yogurt pudding | bengali yogurt sweet recipe appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday Menu

February 24 2020 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday MenuThis week, in honor of Mardi Gras, were celebrating Healthy-Fat Tuesday with a list of foods and ingredients rich in healthy fats. Fats are complex and often misunderstood nutrients. Despite their often-misleading name, fats play an important role in healthy balanced diets and their consumption doesnt necessarily lead to weight gain. Saturated and unsaturated are the two major categories of dietary fats. Saturated fats are typically solid at room temperature and are predominately found in red and processed meats, whole milk and whole-milk dairy products, cheese, and baked goods. Although fine in moderation, the USDA Dietary Guidelines recommend limiting saturated fat to under 10 percent of your daily caloric intake. Unsaturated fats come from vegetables, nuts, seeds, and fish, and are labeled as good fats because their consumption is associated with lower rates of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Try incorporating these foods and ingredients into your weekly Meatless Monday menu. Avocado With 77 percent of calories from fat, this pretty green fruit is actually one of the fattiest plant foods on Earth. Avocado is rich in oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid associated with reduced inflammation. Easily add some to your diet with this recipe for Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast. Canola Oil Derived from the rapeseed, canola oil has a similar nutritional profile to olive oil but contains a slightly lower percentage of saturated fat. Its one of the most versatile cooking oils, which makes it excellent for frying and medium-heat cooking. It can also be used as the base for salad dressings, sauces, and marinades. Flaxseeds Flaxseeds are high in fiber and protein, but theyre also one of the richest sources of plant-based omega-3 fatty acids -- polyunsaturated fats that are associated with benefits for heart health. Hemp Seeds While technically categorized as a nut, the hemp seed is nutrient-dense and a terrific source of both omega-6 and omega-3 essential fatty acids. Try adding a scoop to smoothies, muffins, or chia pudding. Olive Oil Although it contains small levels of saturated fat, olive oil is predominately composed of a monounsaturated fat called oleic acid. Studies link oleic acid to lower levels of inflammation, but the health benefits of olive oil range from a reduced risk of stroke and heart disease to weight loss. Peanuts An easy and accessible snack, a little pouch of peanuts can instantly cure your hunger pangs. Peanuts are so satiating because of their high-fat content. Classified as an oilseed rather than a nut, the peanut is nearly 50 percent fat, most of which is mono- and polyunsaturated. Try adding some to this hot and spicy Peanut Noodle. Tahini Made from pulverized sesame seeds, tahini -- along with chickpeas -- is one of the main ingredients in hummus. Sesame seeds are made up of 80 percent mono- and polyunsaturated fats, which research shows can help lower cholesterol levels. Tahini makes the perfect dressing for roasted vegetables or this Curry Carrot Salad. Walnuts Like most nuts, walnuts contain good fats, but they are also an important vegetarian source of omega-3 fatty acids. Research shows that omega-3 plays a critical role in reducing oxidative stress in the brain and can even help with the development and function of the central nervous system. Eat them roasted or blend them up with lentils to make the perfect plant-based meatball.   Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday Menu appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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