yeast - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Homemade Everything Bagel Seasoning and How to Use It

Custard cake recipe | eggless custard cream cake | custard powder cake

Vegetarian Slow Cooker Lentil Sloppy Joes with Spaghetti Squash

Chocolate Pomegranate Granola Bites










yeast vegetarian recipes

Vegan Sweet Potato Rolls – Soft Herb Dinner Rolls

November 15 2018 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Sweet Potato Rolls – Soft Herb Dinner RollsVegan Sweet Potato Rolls – Soft Herb Dinner Rolls. 7 Ingredients, Freezer friendly. 1 Bowl, No Added sugar, almost No Knead. Melt in your mouth sweet potato bread rolls. Vegan Soyfree Nutfree Palm Oil-free Recipe   Jump to Recipe  These Super Soft dinner rolls are what fresh bread dreams are made of. There is a triple moisture action going on here. Yeast rising slowly with just a bit of flour, the sweet potato, and then another rise. All of these together allow for amazing moisture retention in the bread. And to top it all, you don’t even need to knead it much! Just mix to bring everything together into a somewhat dough and everything will work out! You can use pumpkin puree, butternut puree or mashed potatoes(thin them slightly with non dairy milk to a pumpkin puree consistency), in these rolls. Super versatile and delicious as is. For sweeter rolls, omit the herbs and add some sugar/­­sweetener. These are lightly herbed and lightly savory just like regular dinner rolls.  These rolls need just 7 Ingredients, 1 Bowl, are almost no knead, have No Added Sugar, and can be made without Oil! Continue reading: Vegan Sweet Potato Rolls – Soft Herb Dinner RollsThe post Vegan Sweet Potato Rolls – Soft Herb Dinner Rolls appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Lentil Pâté

November 10 2018 VegKitchen 

Mystify your family by serving this delicious veggie pâté with lentils. A delicious source of protein for breakfast or dinner, serve them on bread or crackers with a touch of mustard--satisfaction guaranteed! Save Print Lentil Pâté Serves: 2 cups   Ingredients 1 tablespoon of olive oil 1 onion, chopped 2 clove garlic, minced 2 tablespoons of nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon of tamari 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/­­2 teaspoon ground clove 1/­­4 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1 cup dried green lentils, rinsed salt and pepper, to taste 3 cups of vegetable broth chopped fresh parsley, to taste Instructions In a saucepan over medium heat, heat oil and add onion and garlic. Sauté for about 4 minutes or until onion is tender. Add yeast, tamari, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and lentils. Season to taste, mix well, and cook for about 5 minutes. Add the vegetable broth. Bring to a boil, reduce to low heat, and simmer uncovered for about 25 minutes or until the lentils are tender. Stir regularly while cooking. In a food processor or hand blender, reduce the mixture to a smooth, even purée. Transfer the mixture to an airtight container and allow to cool in the refrigerator for 1 hour. When ready […] The article Lentil Pâté appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Baked Apple Cider Donuts

November 2 2018 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Baked Apple Cider DonutsBaked Apple Cider Donuts. These Cider donuts have amazing spiced flavor with concentrated cider. Perfect for fall. Vegan Soyfree Recipe. Nutfree Refined Sugar-Free Oilfree Glutenfree option  Jump to Recipe   These Apple Cider Donuts are perfect for fall or any time of the year for that matter. The key to all the fall flavor is reducing the cider! Apple Cider gets cooked for a bit to concentrate all that amazing flavor of apples and spices. Concentrated cider, flour, more spices all baked into a flavorful spiced donut! Toss in cinnamon sugar or drizzle icing of choice. These will be a hit with everyone. 15 mins of Active time, no refined sugar! The donut batter does not use yeast, so it can also be baked into regular size muffins or mini muffins as well. Add some finely chopped apples to the batter, top with a streusel and they are ready for to go breakfast. Lets make these! Continue reading: Vegan Baked Apple Cider DonutsThe post Vegan Baked Apple Cider Donuts appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Flavored Popcorn Recipes and Ideas

October 29 2018 VegKitchen 

Flavored Popcorn Recipes and Ideas Here are flavoring ideas for embellishing freshly made popcorn. These recipes make enough to flavor a 10-cup batch (from about 1/­­2 cup kernels). If you air-pop or use fat-free microwave popcorn, you might like to drizzle 2 tablespoons or so of melted Earth Balance or coconut oil into the popcorn just before adding the seasonings. My favorite way to pop corn is in an Old Fashioned Popcorn Popper like the one made by Jacob Bromwell. Very low-tech, but it seems to bring out the best flavor from the popcorn. I like to start with 2 tablespoons or so safflower or organic virgin coconut oil per 1/­­2 cup of kernels. Savory flavorings Add salt to these mixes, or not, as preferred, and increase or decrease the amount of seasonings suggested here to your taste. CHILI-SPICED POPCORN: Combine 1 teaspoon chili powder, 1/­­2 teaspoon paprika, and 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cumin. Sprinkle over hot popcorn and toss well. PIZZA-FLAVORED POPCORN: Combine 1 teaspoon dried oregano or Italian seasoning, 2 teaspoons tomato powder, and 1/­­4 teaspoon dried hot red pepper flakes. HERB-AND-SPICE POPCORN: Simply sprinkle hot popcorn with a teaspoon or two of your favorite seasoning blend, like Mrs. Dash or Spike. NUTRITIONAL YEAST AND/­­OR […] The article Flavored Popcorn Recipes and Ideas appeared first on VegKitchen.

Italian Eggplant Casserole with Cashew-Tofu Ricotta

October 22 2018 VegKitchen 

Italian Eggplant Casserole with Cashew-Tofu Ricotta This is my healthy, gluten-free substitute for eggplant parmigiana. Not frying the eggplant saves time and calories, and both of those can be at a premium. Its very saucy and perfect over pasta. Recipe from The Vegan Slow Cooker* by Kathy Hester, reprinted by permission of the author. Photo by Cara Lyons of Cara’s Cravings. Serves: 8 For the Cashew-Tofu Ricotta: 1/­­2 cup cashews 1/­­2 cup nutritional yeast (*use gluten-free) 3 cloves garlic 1 package (15 ounces) firm tofu 1/­­2 cup unsweetened nondairy milk 1/­­2 to 1 teaspoon salt (to taste) Pepper, to taste Remaining ingredients: 1 large eggplant, thinly sliced 1 jar (25 ounces) marinara sauce, store bought or homemade Cooked pasta (*use gluten-free pasta), for serving The night before: To make the ricotta: In a food processor or blender, combine all the ricotta ingredients. Blend until smooth and creamy. Store the ricotta and the sliced eggplant in separate containers in the fridge. In the morning: Oil the crock of your slow cooker and pour in one-third of the marinara sauce. Top with half of the eggplant, half of the ricotta, and another one-third of the sauce. Repeat the layers once more, then top with the remaining sauce. Cook on […] The post Italian Eggplant Casserole with Cashew-Tofu Ricotta appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Parmesan

October 20 2018 VegKitchen 

Vegan Parmesan Here is a recipe that will replace Parmesan cheese. Fast and very easy to make, this vegan parmesan does not contain any products of animal origin. The taste is, of course, different from the traditional Parmesan, but once you get used to it there is no way you will put cow’s milk cheese on your pasta. This vegetable Parmesan is really delicious and you can use it on all your preparations. I added in some sesame seeds (rich in calcium) and yeast powder (naturally rich in vitamins B1, B2, B5, B6, B9, PP, magnesium, zinc, phosphorus, protein and fiber, source of iron and vitamin B12).   Save Print Vegan Parmesan Prep time:  10 mins Total time:  10 mins   Servings: 1 cup Ingredients 1 cup of cashews 4 tablespoons yeast 1 pinch of pink Himalayan salt, otherwise your usual salt 1 pinch of white pepper Instructions Add all the ingredients to a blender or a food processor Pulse and mix at regular intervals for a few seconds and not continuously. You must get a powder. Keep your Parmesan in a glass jar that you can close. Leave it in the fridge. To use on all dishes, instead of Parmesan! 3.3.3077 […] The post Vegan Parmesan appeared first on VegKitchen.

Lebanese Lavash Bread

September 14 2018 VegKitchen 

Lebanese Lavash Bread Large, flexible Lebanese lavash bread is made from a strong, yeasted wheat dough. It’s used for scooping or wrapping up vegetables and dips. You can bake them either on a sheet in a hot oven or on top of the stove, draped over an inverted wok or on a griddle if the breads are small enough to fit. As with pita, the yeast in this dough contributes to its flavor and texture; the bread doesnt rise when baked. From Breadtime: A Down-to-Earth Cookbook for Bakers and Bread Lovers* by Susan Jane Cheney. Makes: 6 (12-inch) breads Preparation Time: About 1 1/­­2 hours to prepare and roll out the dough; 2 1/­­2 to 4 1/­­2 hours for rising; 30 to 40 seconds to bake each bread. 1/­­4 teaspoon active dry yeast 1/­­2 cup lukewarm spring water 1 1/­­4 to 1 1/­­2 cups whole wheat bread flour 1/­­2 teaspoon sea salt In a medium-sized mixing bowl, sprinkle the yeast over the warm water. Sprinkle in a teaspoon of flour, cover, and set in a draft-free spot for a few minutes to proof the yeast. Stir in one-half cup of the flour to form a batter. Cover and set it aside for about thirty minutes, until a […] The post Lebanese Lavash Bread appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Herb Frittata (Kuku Sabzi)

September 5 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Herb Frittata (Kuku Sabzi) I have a subscription to Bon Appétit, and I haven’t been able to get this Persian frittata recipe out of my head ever since I saw it in one of their issues this past year (there’s also a video of Andy Baraghani expertly making it here). The frittata is called kuku sabzi and is often served during Persian New Year that is celebrated on spring equinox, welcoming spring with the abundance of herbs in the dish. I’m obsessed with any food that requires a ton of herbs, and this frittata is loaded with parsley, dill, and cilantro. I also like making vegan ‘frittatas’ with chickpea flour, since I’m completely in love with socca, and chickpea frittatas are like socca x 100. Since this vegan version of kuku sabzi is taken out of context and tradition, I thought we could add our own spin on the meaning here. Instead of a welcome-spring dish, it can be a farewell-summer one. Herbs are still abundant at the farmer’s market where I live, and I see them as such a gift of summer. At the same time, I’m noticing all these subtle signs of fall creeping in. The days seem a tiny bit shorter, there’s often a chill in the air in the evenings, and some trees are already beginning to yellow. This time of year is so abundant, but also very fleeting, which makes it even more beautiful and worth savoring. So let’s load up on local, sun-fed herbs while we can. Since fresh herbs are so readily available to many of us, we might take them for granted as a commonplace food. In truth, herbs are our everyday superfoods. Just think of the intense flavor that they provide – that intensity also signals their concentrated, nutritional power. I live in a city with windows that never get sun, but one of my biggest intentions is to soon live somewhere where I can have an herb garden (and beyond). Sprinkling fresh herbs on everything is a always a great idea, but this recipe really packs them in at 4 1/­­2 cups! Just a reminder that if you have a high-speed blender or grain mill, you don’t have to buy chickpea flour. You can just grind up dried chickpeas, which will also save you a few bucks. All in all, this recipe is pretty easy. The biggest effort you’ll have to make is chopping up all of the herbs and veggies. The rest is basically just mix and bake. I served this frittata with market cucumbers and sun gold tomatoes, topped with the tzatziki sauce from Simply Vibrant. You can also eat it on its own, or topped with coconut yogurt or cashew cream. Hope you enjoy this one :) Vegan Herb Frittata (Kuku Sabzi)   Print Serves: 1 9-10 frittata Ingredients 2 cups chickpea flour 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon sea salt 1 teaspoon turmeric powder pinch of red pepper flakes a few grinds of black pepper 3 tablespoons avocado, olive, or neutral coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pans 2½ cups purified water 1 onion - finely chopped 1 large leek - thinly sliced into half-moons 2 garlic cloves - minced 1½ cups chopped cilantro 1½ cups chopped parsley 1½ cups chopped dill Instructions Preheat oven to 500° F (260° C). Prepare a 9-10 pie or tart dish by oiling it well. In a large bowl, mix together the chickpea flour, nutritional yeast, sea salt, turmeric, red pepper flakes and black pepper with a fork. Gradually pour in the oil and water, whisking them in as you pour. Mix until smooth and let sit while preparing the vegetables. Heat a glug of oil in a medium sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onion and leeks along with a pinch of salt, and cook, stirring occasionally for 10 minutes, or until soft and cooked through. Add the garlic and cook for another minute, until fragrant. Add the sautéed vegetables to the bowl with the batter, along with the cilantro, parsley, and dill. Fold everything in, making sure that the ingredients are dispersed well throughout the thick batter. Transfer the batter to the oiled pie/­­tart dish, patting it down with a spoon to form an even layer. Bake for 2o minutes. Open the oven door slightly to let any steam escape and proceed to bake for another 10 minutes, or until the top of the frittata is solid to the touch and nicely browned. Let cool, slice, and serve with yogurt or your favorite creamy sauce. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes Peach and Zucchini Smoothie Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Vegan Herb Frittata (Kuku Sabzi) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chickpea Flour Omelets

July 31 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Chickpea Flour OmeletsInspired by the Indian chickpea pancakes, these chickpea flour omelets are amazingly versatile, depending on how you season them. You can add ingredients to cook within the omelet, as is done in an Italian frittata, or you can make a filling to fold inside, like a traditional French omelet. The omelets are also delicious topped with a spoonful of vegan hollandaise or cheesy sauce. Chickpea Flour Omelets Inspired by the Indian chickpea pancakes, these chickpea flour omelets are amazingly versatile, depending on how you season them. You can add ingredients to cook within the omelet, as is done in an Italian frittata, or you can make a filling to fold inside, like a traditional French omelet. The omelets are also delicious topped with a spoonful of vegan hollandaise or cheesy sauce. - 1 cup cold water - 1 cup chickpea flour - 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast - 1 tablespoon lemon juice or dry white wine - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon baking powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon mustard powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground black pepper - 1/­­4 teaspoon turmeric - 1/­­2 cup finely chopped scallions ((green onions)) - 3 tablespoons minced fresh parsley or other fresh herb of choice - 4 teaspoons grapeseed oil or cooking oil spray - In a bowl, food processor, or blender, combine the water, chickpea flour, nutritional yeast, lemon juice, salt, garlic powder, baking powder, mustard powder, black pepper, and turmeric and whisk or blend until smooth. Stir in the scallions and parsley. Allow to stand and thicken for 5 to 10 minutes. The mixture should resemble pancake batter. If it is too thick, add a little more water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the batter is pourable. - Add 1 teaspoon of oil to an 8-inch nonstick skillet or spray it with cooking spray. Heat over medium heat. When the skillet is hot, pour or ladle about 1/­­3 cup of the batter into the hot skillet and move the skillet to spread it evenly in the pan. Cover tightly and cook until the bottom is lightly browned and there are little holes on top, about 4 minutes. Carefully loosen it with a very thin spatula. Flip and cook for another 3 minutes. Transfer the omelet to an ovenproof platter, cover, and keep warm in the oven while you cook the remaining omelets. Continue to made more omelets until all of the batter and filling are used. Serve hot. Loaded Frittata (Variation) Preheat the oven to 400°F. Add 1 cup total of the following ingredients (in any combination) to the omelet mixture: - Chopped pitted Kalamata olives - Soft, minced sun-dried tomatoes - Chopped roasted red bell pepper - Sautéed chopped spinach or thinly sliced zucchini - Sautéed sliced mushrooms - Shredded vegan cheese Transfer the omelet mixture to an oiled ovenproof skillet or pie plate and smooth it evenly into the pan. Bake for about 30 minutes or until firm and lightly browned along the edges. Remove from the oven and let sit for 5 to 10 minutes before serving. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by William and Susan Brinson.     The post Chickpea Flour Omelets appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Injera

June 20 2018 Vegan Dad 

Injera The key to injera is getting comfortable with fermentation. Just like sourdough bread, injera gets its flavour from wild (as opposed to commercial) yeast. But unlike sourdough, this recipe is much easier to prepare. A few days out on the counter and this batter will be happily bubbling away and ready to be made into Ethiopian flatbread.  Its a great introduction into the world of fermentation! The bread is gluten free but still rolls just like a crepe and is durable enough to scoop up whatever tasty stew you make.  INGREDIENTS Makes one dozen - 3 cups teff flour - 4 cups water - 1 tsp baking powder - 1/­­2 tsp salt METHOD 1. Mix together teff flour and water. Pour into a large, clean glass or ceramic container (I use a 56 oz canning jar). Keep in mind that the batter will expand by 1/­­3 or more, so make sure you container is big enough. Secure a piece of cloth over the mouth of the container so everything can breathe--I put a cloth napkin over the mouth of the canning jar and secure it with the metal ring. 2. Let the batter sit for 2 to 3 days, stirring 3 times a day, until better begin to bubble and rise. 3. Once the batter is bubbly, stir in the baking powder and salt. 4. Let the batter sit while you heat a 10 non-stick pan over medium to med-hi heat. 5. Lightly oil the pan. Pour 1/­­2 cup of batter into the pan and tilt to coat (thin batter with water if necessary). Cook until the injera has bubbles all over, then cover with a lid so the injera can steam for 2-3 minutes. Regulate the heat so the bread does not burn. 6. Remove the injera to a cooling rack and roll it while warm. Cover with a towel to keep warm. Repeat with the remaining batter. 

A Lesson in Artisan Bread Baking with Flea Market Find: Pyrex Bowls

March 19 2018 Vegan Thyme 

A Lesson in Artisan Bread Baking with Flea Market Find: Pyrex Bowls I had a spur-of-the moment notion yesterday driven by the need to get my hands on some old kitchen ware needed for a bread recipe. I asked dear husband if he'd like to accompany me to a flea market (third weekends of every month in Belleville, Illinois--in case you find yourself in the same predicament). I hadn't shared with him my motive just yet, but he was game. Out the door in fifteen and there we were were at the flea market on Sunday. My goal: Pyrex. Before I launch into the whole Hunt for Pyrex Sunday, let me tell you why it happened. I've tinkered with bread baking for over ten years now. There isn't a lot I haven't tried. Okay, maybe no croissants. But still. I even went the GF route for a bit. I'm lucky enough to still be able to tolerate bread and all its gluten glory. But not too much.   I came across  Bread Toast Crumbs by Alexandra Stafford this weekend and began reading through both book and blog. I discovered that all last year this was the IT bread recipe and bread book on FB and social media. (You can find the recipe for the basic bread on her blog.) I had no idea. How had I missed this? I worked around books all day! I was out of the loop on all things bread and it broke my heart a little to be honest.  Alexandra's no-knead method of baking same day bread reminded me of my Jim Lahey no-knead obsession. Only with her mother's recipe (acquired after many years of asking--she goes into this in her book), the task of bread baking occurs same day with similar results. One quaint difference in baking these marvelous little miracles was her use of pint and a half sized Pyrex bowls my mother used to have. . . EVERYWHERE! Immediately I looked through all of the many bowls I had on hand to find that just perfect Pyrex dish. I had three. None in the size I wanted for the recipe for an artisan boule.  I began my bread mixing at 3:30 in the afternoon. I wanted to try the flax seed and quinoa loaf, made with a bit of olive oil and the requisite instant yeast. The loaves surpassed my expectation. The addition of the flax and quinoa made for a healthier tasting dinner bread vs a plain AP flour loaf. The golden crust and wonderful light, moist crumb along with a good rise were delicious. The bread sliced up perfectly after a good twenty minute rest after baking. We ate half a loaf with dinner, then I sliced up the rest for toast this morning and froze the other loaf.  So now for the the Hunt for Pyrex Sunday antique expedition. At the flea market scanning over the hundreds of tables of everything you can imagine (we're big fans of American Pickers), we channeled our inner Mike, Frank and Danielle. DH and I split up. Me on a Pyrex mission, him on a wood working/­­tool mission. I hadn't traveled more than one aisle and I spotted them: my mother's Pyrex. (Well, not exactly, but yes. . . exactly!) I had to contain my thrill or I'd be paying out the waazoo. I looked at the bottoms and rims of the nest of one set and of a single of the 1.5 pint sized bowl sold separately because apparently it is from the "Pyrex Friendship" collection. Who knew? I wanted the set AND the single bowl because I needed two of the pint-sized for my bread. I wasn't paying the tagged price of course because: I'd watched Pickers! And yes, I researched asking prices online, which I must say shocked me to my core. Honestly, where have I been? These things are like gold apparently. I must have seemed a little too eager because I was hugging the entire set against my body as other shoppers lurked around this vendor's table. I said, "You have a very good eye." Trying to butter her up. I added, "I remember this set. . . what would you take for these, plus the little one?" She went high. I went no. I said another number. She stuck to her price (which was still lower than ticket--so at least I felt somewhat satisfied on price wrangling). Then I spotted another Pyrex piece, a measuring cup--asked to "bundle"--what price might I get? I wasn't t bluffing anyone here. She flexed a bit more, but not too much. However, I added before I handed over my cash, I'd not be back if I found a better deal elsewhere. She said, Good luck, you won't. Hmm. Okay then: deal.  DH found a rock breaking tool for a song on his journey. We toured the rest of the flea market and the vendor I bought my Pyrex from was right--the other sets were not nearly as good in price nor in appearance than the one I found. She and I talked a bit more. I explained the whole bread thing, Pyrex baking. She seemed to not have heard about this, but was definitely interested in learning more, asking me again what the name of the cookbook was. I was happy to share. In her booth was another awesome bread baking find in cast iron cookware. I had it already but made sure to tell her that she would have no problem selling it if another bread baker came along seeking the perfect no-knead bread vessel.   I'll tell you one thing, I love my set. I love them so much. I have a hunch why. These were the food vessels of my youth. They have my mother etched all over them. Every dinner we had, there was trusty old Pyrex. They're now a part of the dinner table again and I couldn't be happier.

Sweet Potato Challah

December 17 2017 Vegan Dad 

Sweet Potato Challah Ive been meaning to post this recipe for ages. Sweet potato is my new favourite way to replace eggs in enriched bread dough recipes. It makes the final loaf nice and soft, and adds colour to the dough that     mimics the many egg yolks of non-vegan challah. This is a version of Peter Reinharts recipe from Artisan Breads Everyday, but I use a blender to incorporate the potato into the liquid ingredients. You can let the dough rise in the fridge, then shape and bake the next day as he calls for, but I usually just do everything in the same day because I dont have the time or the fridge space to follow his method. The recipe produces reliable results every time. Trust me: I make at least two recipes a week so the kids have buns for school lunches. Makes 2 loaves, or 16 buns INGREDIENTS All measurements are weight, not volume - 17oz warm water - 2.5 oz oil - 4 oz cooked sweet potato (see note* way below) - 3 oz sugar - 14 g instant yeast - 19 g salt - 2 lb 3 oz bread flour - soy milk for brushing METHOD 1. Place water, oil, sweet potato, sugar, yeast, and salt in a blender. Blend until smooth. 2. Add liquid to flour in a large bowl and bring into a dough. Knead until smooth.  3. Shape into a ball and let rise, covered, in a large oiled bowl until doubled in size.  4. From here, YouTube is your friend. Determine how many braids you want in your loaf (the pic above is a 6 braid) and find a video for how to braid it. Remember that the recipe makes two loaves. 5. Place braided loaves on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper (ideally both loaves on one big sheet). Brush with soy milk. 6. Leave to rise, uncovered, in a warm place until almost doubled in size (about 1 hour). Keep brushing with soy milk every 15 mins or so, to keep the dough from drying out and to build up layers of soy milk (this will give the loaf that glossy finish when baked).  7. While dough is rising, preheat oven to 350.  8. Bake for 20 mins, then rotate the pan and bake for another 15-20 mins, until the loaves are evenly browned and sound hollow when thumped on the bottom. A convection oven really helps get an evenly browned loaf.  A NOTE ON BUNS This is also my go to recipe for buns--it makes 16 buns that I do as a 4x 4 batch bake on a large sheet pan. Brush them with soy milk like the loaves, but bake at 400 for 15-17 mins, rotating the pan half way through. Or, space them apart, slash the tops before baking, and sprinkle with sesame seeds after the last brushing with soy milk (as pictured below). Or do hot dog/­­sausage buns.  *Note: I prick the skin of a sweet potato a few times with a fork, then cook it in the microwave on the potato setting. Its fast and makes for a sweet potato that is not too wet. 

Vegan Gluten free Cinnamon Roll Bread – Yeast-free

November 28 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Gluten free Cinnamon Roll Bread – Yeast-freeVegan Gluten free Cinnamon Roll Bread – Yeast-free Gluten-free Grain-free Cinnamon bread Recipe. Soft, fluffy and amazing. Batter of Besan(chickpea flour) swirled with Cinnamon Sugar . Can be nut-free.  When you cannot roll the batter, you make it into a swirled bread! This Soft and delicious bread is gluten-free, yeast-free, grain-free, but not taste-free. Never taste-free! A fluffy besan (brown chickpea flour) batter, and cinnamon sugar swirled in and baked for perfect Cinnamony, fluffy bites to start the morning. Serve warm with a drizzle of icing or vegan butter. The batter for this Cinnamon Roll bread uses besan (brown chickpea flour) and uses citric acid to add air to the batter before baking. The principle of using citric acid in gluten-free baking is similar to aquafaba, To add air to the batter before baking. This method is used in Indian snacks and baking since decades. You can possible used whipped up aquafaba instead in this recipe. Whipping up aquafaba is not my cup of tea (too much noise and too long a process). Nor is the canned liquid. Hello changing metabolism. This recipe is far quicker, takes 15 seconds and easier! No elbow grease required, no 15 minutes of whipping, just mix in 5 strokes and done! Whats there to not like?Continue reading: Vegan Gluten free Cinnamon Roll Bread – Yeast-freeThe post Vegan Gluten free Cinnamon Roll Bread – Yeast-free appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Video: Dr. Greger Interview – Vegan Myth or Fact / Top 5s

November 22 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Join HappyCow’s Ken Spector as he interviews physician/­­author/­­speaker Dr. Michael Greger of Nutritiononfacts.org about vegan myths or facts. Hear Dr. Greger’s answers to the following and more! Is food combining important? Does cold water shock our system and inhibit digestion? Does drinking while eating dilute saliva and inhibit digestion? Is exercise just after eating bad for us? Is stopping eating after 7PM and not eating again before 11AM optimal? Is nutritional yeast a neurotoxin, and should we be eating it? What vegan food is worse than lard? How much vitamin B12 should we take and what type? How much vitamin D3 is too much? How can you salt your food without concerning yourself about hypertension? Top 5 Foods Dr. Michael Greger Would Bring to Mars Top 5 Cancer Fighting Foods See our video highlights from the world’s first vegan ocean cruise here. For more information see: http:/­­/­­www.nutritionfacts.org http:/­­/­­www.vegancruises.eu/­­   Watch our video here:   The post Video: Dr. Greger Interview – Vegan Myth or Fact /­­ Top 5s appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Yeasted Guglhupf Cake

October 25 2018 seitan is my motor 

A couple of years ago I already posted a yeasted guglhupf cake recipe on this site. Back then I was of the… The post Yeasted Guglhupf Cake appeared first on seitan is my motor.

Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri

October 20 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri Sana on the left Sana Javeri Kadri is the founder of Diaspora Co., a radically different spice collective dedicated to equity, sustainable agriculture, and decolonization. We’ve been fortunate to try Diaspora’s heirloom, organic, single-origin turmeric powder, and let’s just say it’s going to be very hard to go back to enjoying any other powdered turmeric ever again. Sana lives between Mumbai and Oakland, California. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I crave routine and am most productive when Im following a routine. However, Im unable to do deep thinking work or larger creative work in the middle of a hectic routine, so I like to keep at least one day of the week wide open for creative projects and giving myself the time and space I need to create something important. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I have been trying really hard to wake up, spend as little time on my phone as possible and then make myself a nourishing drink and most importantly, make myself some breakfast. One of my worst habits is to wake up, get on my phone, start responding to emails and then quickly get changed for work and dive straight into a full workday without taking any time to nourish myself or check in with my body. It means that by 1pm Im starving, cranky and already tired for the day. The life changing power of breakfast is something Im still learning… -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My girlfriend and I try not to spend too much time on our phones before bed, or looking at a screen. She recently introduced a 20 mins of reading before bed practice that were trying to stick to, its my favorite way to wind down and Im committing to not responding to work emails at 10:45pm, even if its 11:15am in Mumbai and my team there is just getting fired up. Work in progress. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  My therapist guides me into mindfulness during our sessions every week because I often come in feeling stressed, frantic and a bit fragile. Shes always able to help me get back in touch with my body and begin to feel grounded again. At her urging, I handle all my stressful work calls or emails sitting outside in the sunshine, ideally with my bare feet in the ground. This practice of grounding has been particularly helpful to me in the past few months of managing a stressful season. I also recently downloaded the Headspace app, and just the five minutes everyday of meditation has made a huge difference to me. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – In Oakland – Bread srsly gluten free sourdough, crispy fried egg cooked in ghee topped with smoked paprika, turmeric and salt, sliced avocado or smoky pinto beans or sliced tomatoes or any veggie leftovers I can wrangle from the fridge, maybe a slice of bacon if Im wanting some extra fat. In Mumbai – a loaded crispy veggie dosa. Either way, I love hot and savory breakfast. The cold and sweet breakfast tradition isnt common in India so, cereal and granola with milk culture is something I find very odd about the United States. Lunch – Leftovers express. My girlfriend and I both work long hours, so our saving grace is prepping large meals a couple times a week and then subsisting on leftovers. Gluten-free pasta with canned early girls (I can 80 lb every summer so that we never have to buy store bought tomato sauce) with every vegetable in the fridge/­­our imperfect produce box and ground beef is a family classic. Rosie is always joking that my stomach doubles when it comes to pasta and shrinks for everything else. Shes not wrong. Snack – My favorite snack is stovetop popcorn. Growing up in Mumbai we never had a microwave, it was my parents most loathed kitchen appliance. So now Im following that tradition of never owning a microwave. My favorite stovetop popcorn is popped in ghee and then topped with nutritional yeast, turmeric, and salt. Its perfect. Dinner - My perfect dinner is khichdi (spiced rice and lentils cooked in ghee and heavy on the ginger, turmeric and cumin), thick full fat yogurt, masala okra, a little bit of pickle (Brooklyn Delhi achaars are divine) and a side of spicy amaranth battered fish. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I used to do caffeine, in a delicious ghee, turmeric, cardamom and coconut sugar concoction, but over time Ive stopped being able to handle it. It started to make my stomach hurt and made me anxious. So I now drink either matcha with rice milk and date syrup, or hot chocolate with hemp oil, coconut sugar and adaptogens if Im needing the extra nourishment. Some days, if Ive slept enough and rested enough, I do better on just water and breakfast, no extra boost needed. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? I had a notorious sweet tooth all the way until my early twenties – I couldnt be trusted with bars of chocolate and was known to sneak spoonfuls of cake first thing in the morning. However the older Ive gotten (Im still technically in the early twenties), sweets just give me a sugar crash and make me feel sluggish. As an avid lover of food, Id rather eat plenty of things that make me feel fantastic, than the things that make me feel terrible. Both Rosie and I have been surprised and how quickly our respective sweet tooths have disappeared since we started living together, and how easily weve been able to cut out sugar from our life once we could verbalize how terrible it made us feel. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I swear by cannabis tinctures. Im not big on cannabis in other ways, but I find cannabis to be the only way to really deal with chronic pain. Ive also started using Super Good Hemps Turmeric Full Spectrum Hemp Oil in my morning drinks, and I find that it has similar effects. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I used to weight lift and do Crossfit pretty intensely, but had a really awful injury in 2016. Since then, Ive really had to reframe my definition of exercise. Now, I consider it an extension of my healing process. Intense exercise just isnt possible for me in the same way, so I stick to swimming as often as I can (usually a couple times a week), doing Nike Training body weight workouts at home, and talking our dog for a long walk every evening. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I love exercise and do best when Im outside and moving my body. Rosie and I try to take our pup Lilly out for a hike at least once a week, and we notice how much more present are with each other and our work when weve exercised.  That being said, Im also an incredibly competitive person, so reframing exercise to no longer be an intensely competitive thing has been very hard for me. I find it difficult to work up the enthusiasm to go on a leisurely swim, without a team to train with, or a competition to work towards. Switching off my producing strategy is my biggest challenge. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Both! It took me a long time to love my face, acknowledge that it was beautiful despite not looking like everything I saw on magazines and on billboards. But that acceptance and love for my external beauty definitely came from tending to, and growing confidence in my inner beauty. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I grew up using raw honey as a face cleanser, handmade ayurvedic soaps for my body, and a mom who never used makeup. So that has informed a lot of my skincare today. My skincare guru is 300% Abena, the founder of Hanahana Beauty, I use her shea butter exfoliating body bar and swear by it, and I use Abenas recipe for a rose water, tea tree oil and jojoba oil soaked cotton pad as a cleanser morning and night, and it has been a complete game changer for getting my glow back. Ive also been using Curology, which is a custom dermatologist service, that is super affordable and came highly recommended by friends. They prescribed me their night cream, which has really taken care of my breakouts and blackheads. Im not usually big on using chemicals on my skin but have found Curology to be a minimalist option that really works. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Cutting out sugar and gluten entirely is the most obvious one – I break out as soon as I am eating sugar, so its first to go. I also use a turmeric, honey, hemp oil and cornmeal face mask every couple weeks that always makes me feel radiant. My dentist has noticed and commented on the huge difference in my teeth that shes seen since I stopped drinking coffee – theyre whiter than ever before and need much less cleaning, which for me is reason enough to skip the coffee. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Abenas DIY rose water, jojoba oil and tea tree oil cotton pads! I used to be a ardent fan of Thayers Rose Witch Hazel Toner but in my experience with skincare – once you go DIY, its impossible to go back :) That being said – I will admit to being a Glossier believer, I didnt use makeup until I discovered Glossier concealer and highlighter. Its so easy and lazy but it works so wonderfully. Stress, Etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Taking our pup out for a long walk by the water is a really grounding activity for me. I have no idea how I managed my stress before she moved in with us. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Honestly Im a spokesperson for not really managing my stress well. My partner often comes home to a fuming, off the hook Sana and it takes significant chatting, massaging and cuddling to work me out of the state that I can get into if Im very stressed.  Im an extrovert and a peoples person so being around people that I love is my best coping mechanism. That being said – I have to be careful not to emotionally dump onto my loved ones, just because theyre willing to be there for me. Ive definitely been guilty of that in the past. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? The first one is to make sure I get a really good nights sleep, and make sure Im not drinking alcohol, eating dairy or any processed food. Usually, managing my sleep and diet is the easiest way to kick a cold before it hits. If the cold cant be stopped, I usually start by accepting that my bodys way of asking for rest is by getting sick, and its important to just honor that and completely rest. Then – turmeric, ginger, honey tea all day long.  -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Ive been trying really hard to take weekends off, and any weekend that I succeed at that- the balance feels so much better. Honestly, as a young business owner, the hustle is so glamorized and romanticized. Youre told that now is your time to grind, and to get further in your career. Whilst this is true, Id also argue that now is the time to establish healthy boundaries and habits in your life so you learn how to maximize your productivity and your potential. Any day that I work a 16 hour day (which is too often), I know that I am not focusing on the bigger picture, and am actually sacrificing my long term goals as a business owner. Remembering that, and focusing on working more effectively, rather than working more, has been a huge step towards achieving healthier work life balance. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Therapy. Every week, no matter what. That perspective and process is something Im deeply committed to. Therapy rarely feels easy, but it is always in service of myself and my larger goals, so its the easiest way to feel on track. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Eating based on how it makes me feel, not how it sounds or tastes. As soon as I focused on how it made me feel, my taste buds changed, I lost weight, my skin issues cleared and I became a very healthy person, with remarkable ease. I know how obnoxious that sounds, Im sorry. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I fly home to India. I know this is incredibly privileged, and a bit excessive, but shuffling back and forth between two continents constantly gives me a broader perspective, and somehow – the psychology of taking an international flight is an incredibly cathartic and productive experience for me. I almost always come back from my trips to India with fresh eyes, new vision and a bigger picture. Thats true for all travel, in my opinion. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. The fundamental line of Crossfit – eat meat and vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch and no sugar. has influenced my self nourishment beyond any book or movie. I may not be a competitive Crossfit athlete any more but eating to nourish my body is so much more fulfilling than eating to nourish my cravings. Knowledge --  What was your path to starting Diaspora Co.? You can read a lot more about that here, but long story short – Ive been working in the food industry since I moved to the United States in 2012 and I quickly noticed that whilst the farm to table movement felt at its zenith in the Bay Area, it only applied to certain things. Spices and imported foods were somehow excluded from those quality standards. The idea for a new kind of import export company formed in November 2016, and in February 2017 I quit my job and embarked on seven months of research visiting farms, research institutions and markets across India. Diaspora Co. was formally launched as a direct trade sustainable food company with our first offering of turmeric in August 2017. Its been a total rollercoaster since then. --  Can you tell us about the kind of turmeric you sell and how it differs from most turmeric one can buy at a store today? Im biased, but Im also overly honest so I dont think it would be an exaggeration to say that we sell the worlds best turmeric. Historically, there hasnt ever been a quality standard for how to define the highest quality, beyond arguments and branding largely based in exoticism and the colonizer/­­savior mindset. It is the freshest, as in it was harvested in 2018 and is milled every 3 months, versus powders that can be up to five years old and still on a grocery store shelf, stale as ever. It is the most potent variety of turmeric out there, with a tested 4.7% curcumin content. It is a fragrant and exceptional heirloom rhizome variety that compares to other turmeric powders out there as an heirloom summer tomato would to a grocery store store tomato grown for storage not flavor. Finally, it is organically farmed in a spice agriculture landscape where pesticide overuse and residue is notorious. Phew! --  Can you tell us about your decision to pay your turmeric producer really well and about owning the fact that your product costs more because of this? I think part of our work is that what the industry considers paying our producer really well, we consider basic human dignity of paying a living wage and for the price of sustainability, flavor and honest work. If we didnt pay our partner farmers the prices that we do, they wouldnt have the power or the incentive to produce at the standard that they do. To me, this big word decolonizing really just means how are you going to empower the people around you who have historically been stripped of their power? Paying our farmers well is actually the easiest embodiment of our decolonizing mission. As for owning our higher prices – we simply couldnt exist without charging what we do. And ultimately, were dedicating to riding the fine line between being affordable to the home cook and being a leader of sustainability and supply chains and therefore being regarded as a luxury product. I have to believe that we can do both. Turmeric latte blends or turmeric centered businesses that dont want to pay our prices or wholesale from us because theyd like to continue to exploit their sources and maintain their ridiculously high margins, Im in this for the long game and their reckoning will come. It always does. Apologies if I sound cold and jaded, business is vicious and Ive had to steel parts of myself to tolerate it all. --  What are some of your favorite ways to use Diaspora Co. turmeric? Honestly, turmeric was so woven into the fabric of my childhood that it was invisible to me. We cooked with it, made beauty treatments with it, and we used it to mark life and death. So even now, my favorite way to use turmeric is still in simple Indian vegetable dishes – lightly cooked okra tossed in cumin, turmeric and salt is the definition of comfort for me, or a coconut milk turmeric chicken broth with squash and long beans. Comforting, vegetable heavy home cooking is how I innately know how to use turmeric. Lattes just arent for me. --  We love your photos! How did you become a photographer? When I was 14 and going through a really tough phase at school (bullying, puberty, the patriarchy et all), my parents taught me how to use their DSLR. Ive used photography as the lens through which I make sense of and connect with the world ever since. When my academic pursuits turned to food and agriculture in college, my lens turned to it too. In so many ways, I recognize that I was never particularly talented or the best or the brightest, I was always just a really solid worker, and entirely self motivated, and that meant that once I started photographing, I just never stopped, and now here we are. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Ive found that balancing my role as a business owner with my role as a photographer is what gives me the most joy professionally. So I have a couple exciting photo shoots planned for the coming months that will be a welcome respite to the chaos of holiday e-commerce. That, and I havent seen my girlfriend and pup in almost a month since Ive been in India and I miss them terribly, so very excited to come home to my two favorite living beings. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Were so lucky to live in Oakland, where eating out is an incredible experience, especially at a time where women chefs are absolutely excelling in their field. So eating delicious meals by our favorite local women chefs is my favorite treat – Cosecha Cafe (Mexican), Nyum Bai (Cambodian), Champa Garden (Laotian) and 20th Century Cafe (Eastern European) to name a few.  -- A book to feed the soul:  I just finished reading Yvon Chounards Let My People Go Surfing and its been so deeply inspiring to me. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Akwaeke Emezi, they are my favorite writer, a member of this third culture/­­diaspora/­­immigrant excellence interweb community and has navigated their self care so beautifully and visibly through the years. Id love to learn more from them. Photos by Sana Javeri Kadri, Sophie Peoples, Assad Keval /­­/­­ This post contains Amazon Affiliate Links You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Ashley Neese Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Amanda Forcella Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Smoky Chickpea Salad with Mango and Avocado

October 9 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Smoky Chickpea Salad with Mango and AvocadoToday is publication day for One-Dish Vegan Revised and Expanded Edition! To celebrate, I’m sharing my recipe for Smoky Chickpea Salad with Mango and Avocado from the book. Roasted chickpeas were a favorite snack of my grandmother, who first introduced me to the savory, protein-rich treat many years ago. These days you can find spin-offs of classic roasted chickpeas that feature various spice blends and sauces from curry to tamari. This one takes a smoky route. Once roasted, the chickpeas take on a lovely mahogany color and a deep smoky flavor that complements the other salad components. The luscious mango dressing can be made with your choice of Dijon mustard or sriracha sauce. Smoky Chickpea Salad with Mango and Avocado Roasted chickpeas were a favorite snack of my grandmother, who first introduced me to the savory, protein-rich treat many years ago. These days you can find spin-offs of classic roasted chickpeas that feature various spice blends and sauces from curry to tamari. This one takes a smoky route. Once roasted, the chickpeas take on a lovely mahogany color and a deep smoky flavor that complements the other salad components. The luscious mango dressing can be made with your choice of Dijon mustard or sriracha sauce. Smoky Chickpeas: - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) pure maple syrup - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) wheat-free tamari - 2 teaspoons liquid smoke - 2 teaspoons olive oil - 1 teaspoon nutritional yeast - 1 teaspoon smoked paprika -  1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder -  1/­­4 teaspoon freshly ground - black pepper -  1/­­4 teaspoon salt - 1 1/­­2 cups (246 g) cooked chickpeas or 1 can (15.5 ounces, or 440 g) of chick-peas, rinsed and drained Dressing: - 1 small mango pitted, peeled, and chopped - 3 tablespoons (45 ml) freshly squeezed lime juice - 1 to 2 tablespoons pure maple syrup - 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard or 1/­­2 teaspoon sriracha sauce -  1/­­2 teaspoon liquid smoke - Salt and freshly ground black pepper Salad: - 8 ounces (225 g) spinach or watercress (or a combination), thick stems removed - 1 ripe mango - 1 ripe Hass avocado - For the smoky chickpeas: Preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C, or gas mark 5). Line a shallow baking dish with parchment paper or spray it with nonstick cooking spray. - Place all of the chickpea ingredients in a bowl and toss to combine and coat the chickpeas. Transfer the chickpeas to the prepared baking dish and spread them out in a single layer. Bake for 30 minutes, stirring once about halfway through. The chickpeas should be lightly browned and nicely glazed. The chickpeas can be made in advance of the salad, if desired. Store in a tightly sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. - For the dressing: Combine the chopped mango, lime juice, agave, mustard, and liquid smoke in a high-speed blender or food processor. Blend until smooth, adding 1 to 3 tablespoons (15 to 45 ml) of water as needed to achieve the desired consistency. Season lightly with salt and pepper, blend again, and then taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. - For the salad: Place the greens in a large salad bowl or mound onto individual plates. Top with the chickpeas. Pit, peel, and dice the mango and avocado or use a small melon baller to scoop them into balls and then add them to the watercress and chickpeas. Drizzle the dressing onto the salad or serve the dressing on the side. From One-Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2018 Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc. Used with permission   The post Smoky Chickpea Salad with Mango and Avocado appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Baked Eggplant Fries

September 11 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Baked Eggplant FriesCrunchy and delicious, these Baked Eggplant Fries are a surefire way to make an eggplant lover out of just about anyone. And because theyre baked, not fried, theyre good for you too! Serve them as a side dish or enjoy them as a snack or appetizer. Dipping them in tzatziki sauce is a must. Baked Eggplant Fries Crunchy and delicious, these fries are a surefire way to make an eggplant lover out of just about anyone. And because theyre baked, not fried, theyre good for you too! Serve them as a side dish or enjoy them as a snack or appetizer. Dipping them in tzatziki sauce is a must. - One large eggplant, peeled and sliced vertically into 1/­­2-inch slices - 1/­­2 cup flour of choice ((all-purpose, rice, or chickpea are good choices)) - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper - 1/­­8 teaspoon cayenne - 1 cup plain unsweetened almond milk or other nondairy milk - 2 tablespoons ground flaxseed blended with 1/­­4 cup water in a blender until thick - 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice - 1 cup dry bread crumbs - 3 tablespoons nutritional yeast - 2 teaspoons dried oregano - 1 teaspoon dried basil - 1 teaspoon smoked paprika - Tzatziki Sauce, recipe follows, for serving - Cut the eggplant slices lengthwise into 1/­­2-inch strips. If the strips are too long, cut them in half. Set aside. Preheat the oven to 425°F. - In a shallow bowl, combine the flour, salt, pepper, and cayenne, and mix well. In a second shallow bowl, combine the almond milk and flaxseed mixture, stirring to blend. In a third shallow bowl, combine the bread crumbs, nutritional yeast, oregano, basil, and paprika. - Dredge the eggplant strips in the flour mixture, then dip them in the milk mixture, and then roll them in the breadcrumb mixture. Arrange the strips in a single layer on the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 15 minutes, then flip over and bake for about 10 minutes longer, or until golden brown and crispy. Sprinkle the hot fries with salt. Serve hot with a bowl of the sauce. This recipe is from Vegan Without Borders (C) Robin Robertson, 2014, Andrews McMeel Publishing, photo by Sara Remington.     Vegan Tzatziki Sauce The refreshing and flavorful sauce made with yogurt, cucumber, and seasonings is extremely versatile. Serve it with the Baked Eggplant Fries. Its also good as a dip for warm pita bread or crunch pita chips, or as a spread for sandwiches. - 3 cloves garlic (crushed) - 1/­­2 small cucumber (peeled, seeded, and quartered) - 1/­­4 cup vegan yogurt - 1/­­4 cup vegan sour cream - 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice - 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill (mint, or parsley) - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - In a food processor, combine the garlic and cucumber and process until finely minced. Add the yogurt, sour cream, lemon juice, dill, and salt and pepper to taste. Process until well blended, then transfer to a bowl. Taste to adjust the seasoning if needed. Cover and refrigerate until needed. This recipe is from Vegan Without Borders (C) Robin Robertson, 2014, Andrews McMeel Publishing, photo by Sara Remington. The post Baked Eggplant Fries appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Creamy Spinach Penne with Watermelon

August 11 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Creamy Spinach Penne with Watermelon Hi friends, hope you’ve had a great summer. We took a little break from the blog as we have been in Copenhagen and Barcelona. But we are back now with a great little dinner recipe. It’s a version of something we have been eating all summer. It has been record-breaking hot in Europe so pairing lukewarm buckwheat penne with juicy and crunchy watermelon has been feeling very right, very often.  Satisfying, simple and soothing. Our kids love this buckwheat penne and that also plays a part why it’s been on repeat. In fact, our little Noah (soon two years old!) starts crying if we serve him spaghetti or any other pasta: “Noooooh, [I want] my pasta“. In this version we are dressing (almost drenching) the pasta in a herby spinach, herb and almond milk sauce that is inspired by something we saw in Deliciously Ella’s feed a while back. Its very good, creamy and quick! We then stir in chickpeas and avocado and top everything with watermelon, feta cheese, almonds and heirloom tomatoes. It is a pretty awesome little dinner that can come together in 15 minutes if you are quick with the knife and good at multitasking. There are plenty of ways to spin this. o If you cannot find buckwheat penne you can of course use regular or whole wheat penne. o Vegans can just skip the cheese (and perhaps add in a little nutritional yeast for extra flavour). o Fresh or roasted corn could be a great addition when they are in season. o You can swap basil and mint for cilantro and parsley for a more Middle Eastern take. o If you are allergic to nuts, use oat milk or regular milk and swap the almonds for toasted sunflower seeds or pumpkin seeds. o For a wintery version of this, you can add in roasted broccoli and pomegranate seeds instead of watermelon. Buckwheat Penne with Creamy Spinach Sauce & Watermelon Serves 4 Buckwheat pasta penne for 4 persons (approx 400 g /­­14 oz) Creamy Spinach Sauce 1 onion 2 garlic cloves 1 tbsp olive oil 125 g /­­ 3 packed cups fresh spinach 400 ml /­­ 1 1/­­2  cups almond milk a good handful each of fresh basil and mint 1-2 tsp maple syrup 1 small lemon, juice a large pinch sea salt & pepper To Serve 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tin cooked chickpeas 1/­­2 watermelon 1 avocado 10 heirloom cherry tomatoes 15 toasted almonds 10 fresh mint 100 g feta cheese Boil salted water in a large saucepan, add the pasta and cook according to the instructions on the package. Meanwhile prepare the sauce. Peel and chop onion and garlic. Heat olive oil in a saucepan. Sauté onions and garlic on medium high heat until translucent and light brown. Then lower the heat, add spinach and let it wilt down, pour in almond milk and let simmer for a couple of minutes. Add the remaining ingredients, take it off the heat and use a stick (immersion) blender to mix it smooth. Taste to check that the flavours are balanced. You can add more lemon juice, herbs, salt or maple syrup if you prefer. When the pasta is ready, drain the water in a sieve, give it a quick rinse and transfer the pasta back to the saucepan along with a splash of olive oil. Pour the spinach sauce over the cooked pasta and stir to combine. Drain the chickpeas and cut the avocado into cubes and add them to the creamy pasta. Cut the watermelon into cubes, divide the tomatoes in halves, chop almonds and mint and crumble the feta cheese. Arrange all those ingredients on top of the creamy pasta penne. Serve and dive in!

Vegan Cheesy Steak-Out Sandwiches

July 24 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Cheesy Steak-Out Sandwiches If ever there was a recipe in need of veganizing, its the Philadelphia cheesesteak sandwich. The good news is, its easy to do and the result is fantastic. Made with thinly sliced Portobello mushrooms, onions, and bell peppers, these hearty Steak-Out Sandwiches are then topped with some creamy Cheesy Sauce, and enveloped in a crusty baguette. Note: Thinly sliced seitan may be substituted for the mushrooms. Cheesy Steak-Out Sandwiches If ever there was a recipe in need of veganizing, its the Philadelphia cheesesteak sandwich. The good news is, its easy to do and the result is fantastic. Made with thinly sliced Portobello mushrooms, onions, and bell peppers, this hearty sandwich is then topped with some creamy Cheesy Sauce, and enveloped in a crusty baguette. Note: Thinly sliced seitan may be substituted for the mushrooms. - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced - 6 Portobello mushroom caps, thinly sliced - 1 red bell pepper, seeded and thinly sliced - 1/­­3 cup ketchup - 1 tablespoon vegan Worcestershire sauce - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 3/­­4 cup Cheddary Sauce ((recipe follows)) - 1 French baguette, cut into quarters, each quarter sliced lengthwise - Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the bell pepper and mushroom slices and cook, stirring occasionally, to soften, about 5 minutes. Stir in the ketchup and Worcestershire sauce, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Continue to cook for 5 minutes longer, or until the vegetables are very soft. Spoon about half of the cheddary sauce onto the mushroom mixture and keep warm while you toast the bread. Divide the mushroom mixture among the baguette sections and top each with some of the remaining cheddary sauce. Serve hot. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by William and Susan Brinson.   Cheddary Sauce Use this creamy, flavorful sauce anytime you want to add an exclamation point to whatever youre serving. I use this sauce to make mac uncheese or as a topping for baked potatoes and steamed or roasted vegetables. With the addition of some spices and a little heat, it can also be used to top nachos and enchiladas. Even more remarkable, just omit the nondairy milk and add melted coconut oil and you have the makings of a fantastic cheddary cheese log. If not using beer or sherry, add an extra 1/­­2 teaspoon of miso past - 1 1/­­4 cups raw cashews, soaked in hot water for 4 hours, then well-drained - 1/­­3 cup nutritional yeast - 2 tablespoons jarred chopped pimientos or roasted red bell pepper, drained and blotted dry - 1 tablespoon beer, white wine, or dry sherry ( (optional, but recommended)) - 1 tablespoon rice vinegar - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons light-colored miso paste - 1 teaspoon salt -  1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika -  1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder -  1/­­2 teaspoon prepared yellow mustard -  1/­­4 teaspoon turmeric - 1 cup plain unsweetened almond milk - Combine all the ingredients in a high-speed blender. Process until the mixture is pureed and smooth, scraping down the sides as needed. The sauce is now ready to use in recipes. Use as is, or heat gently in a saucepan for a minute or two, if desired, stirring in a little more milk, if needed, for a thinner sauce. Store leftovers in the refrigerator in a tightly sealed container for up to 5 days Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. The post Vegan Cheesy Steak-Out Sandwiches appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Green Pancakes - Three Ways

May 10 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Pancakes - Three Ways We love green pancakes (aka spinach cr?pes) in our family and are constantly exploring more ways to incorporate them into various meals. We have got lots of examples and ideas in our cookbooks but here are three new favorites: 1. Add mustard, lentils, sliced tomato and cheese to you pancakes. Fold them up, bake them quickly until the cheese melts and serve with a fresh lentil and melon salad. 2. Fill them with sweet potato, spinach, feta, yogurt and zaatar. Then roll them up and slice them into picnic rolls. 3. Make a banana split pancake bowl with some whipped cream, yogurt, raspberries, nut butter and chocolate. We are sharing all of these recipes below. You can either make the pancakes from scratch or use fridge cold leftover pancakes for these recipes. They are not vegan but if you use our vegan chickpea pancakes as base, you can easily modify the fillings to suit a vegan diet. Hummus, pesto, ajvar or coconut yogurt are excellent creamy toppings on vegan pancakes instead of yogurt and cheese. The recipe for the batter comes from our Green Kitchen at Home cookbook and we have included it in the bottom of this post. They are the most easy flippable gluten free pancakes we know. Pancakes work as a quick dinner in our family as the batter literally takes 30 seconds to mix together so we can have the first pancakes on the table within 5 minutes (admittedly I don’t always let the batter rest even if I recommend it). Gruyere, Mustard & Lentil Pancake Melt Serves 4 as a lunch This is the pancake equivalent to melted cheese sandwiches. It’s a great way to give old pancakes new life. We love it with lots of mustard (obviously use less for kids) and a crunchy salad for balance. 4 green pancakes (see recipe below) 8 slices gruyere cheese (or another cheese) 4 large teaspoons mustard 8 cherry tomatoes 200 g /­­ 1 cup cooked lentils (store bought are fine) 1 bag mixed lettuce 1 avocado 1 galia melon (or other melon) 10 cm /­­ 4 inches cucumber olive oil balsamic vinegar salt & pepper Make the batter and fry the pancakes if you haven’t done so already. Place two slices cheese in the middle of each pancake. Spread a layer of mustard on the cheese, slice the tomatoes thinly and lay them on top of the mustard along with a small handful lentils. Fold the pancakes into quarters and place in a baking dish with a drizzle of olive oil on top. Bake at 200°C/­­400°F for 10-12 minutes or until the cheese has melted. Meanwhile, chop up lettuce, avocado, melon and cucumber and place in a salad bowl. Add the remaining lentils. Drizzle with olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper and toss. Serve the pancake warm with salad on the side. Sweet Potato & Za’atar Pancake Picnic Rolls Makes 20 rolls You can use almost any veggies in pancake rolls. Just make sure you have something creamy and sticky as base to bind them together. For a vegan version, use hummus instead of yogurt and tofu instead of feta cheese and sprinkle with nutritional yeast. Next time, we’ll add some crushed walnuts for crunch, pomegranate seeds for extra tanginess and maybe a couple of mint leaves for a fresh flavor twist. 4 green pancakes (see recipe below) 1 large sweet potato cinnamon 1 tbsp lemon juice 1 cup full-fat Turkish yogurt 200 g feta cheese 2 handfuls spinach, chopped 1 cup cooked chickpeas 2 tbsp za’atar (an awesome spice blend that you can find in Middle Eastern stores) 2 tsp chili flakes (optional) Set the oven at 200°C/­­400°F. Cut a sweet potato in half lengthwise, brush each cut side with a little oil and cinnamon. Place on a tray and bake for 40 minutes or until the flesh is soft and golden. If you haven’t prepared the batter and fried the pancakes, now is the time to do so. When the sweet potato is ready, use a fork to mash the flesh (you can mash it in its own skin to save some dishes). Squeeze over lemon juice and extra cinnamon while mashing. Spread out sweet potato mash on one half of each pancake and thick yogurt on the other half. Cut the feta cheese into 1 cm /­­ 1/­­3 inch thick sticks and place them in the centre of each pancake. Add a small handful chopped spinach, a couple of chickpeas, a generous drizzle za’atar and some chili flakes (if using). Roll up the pancakes as tightly as possible and slice into 2 inch /­­ 5 cm rolls. Sweet Pancake Banana Split Serves 4 4 green pancakes (see recipe below) 1 cup whipped cream 1 cup greek yogurt 4 bananas 1 cup raspberries 4 tbsp nut butter 4 tsp honey 30 g /­­ 1 oz dark chocolate 1 handful hemp seeds or slivered almonds Place each pancake in the bottom of a small bowl. Add dollops of whipped cream and yogurt. Cut the bananas into bite-sized pieces and spread out in the bowl. Add raspberries and drizzle with peanut butter and honey. Sprinkle with finely chopped dark chocolate, hemp seeds and top with a few mint leaves. Spinach Cr?pes (in our house they are know as Green Pancakes) Makes 10-14, depending on the size of your pan and thickness of your pancakes 5 eggs 150 g /­­ 1 cup rice flour (both light or wholegrain works, as does spelt flour) 500 ml /­­ 2 cups oat milk, or milk of choice a large handful spinach a small handful herbs (basil, mint or parsley) sea salt Crack the eggs into a blender or food processor. Add the rest of the ingredients and blend on high speed until smooth. Leave to rest for 20 minutes before starting to fry them (you can fry them right away but they will be a little harder to flip). For frying, add a little butter or coconut oil to a 20 cm /­­ 8 inch non-stick frying pan/­­skillet on medium heat. Once hot (this is important or else it will stick), whisk the batter then ladle 80 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup into the pan. Let fry for 1-2 minutes or until small bubbles form on the surface and the base is golden. Run a spatula around the edges to make sure it has detached from the pan, before carefully flipping it over and frying the other side for another minute. Transfer to a plate and repeat with the rest of the batter (you may need to reduce the heat slightly after the first cr?pes). To store the cr?pes, keep them in an air-tight wrap in the fridge and they will be good for 3-4 days.

English Muffins

February 24 2018 Vegan Dad 

English Muffins I love English muffins but I find making them from a batter to be a real pain. Its hard to get quality muffin rings here, its not easy to make them a consistent size, and it seems to take forever to make them. So, I reworked a Reinhart recipe by significantly upping the liquid and working the dough more like a ciabatta. The end result is a delicious muffin with some respectable air holes in the dough. Not as many as with a batter, but still pretty good. A stand mixer is essential here to get the gluten to develop properly. You also need a griddle, preferably one big enough to hold 8 muffins at a time so you can whip these off in three batches.  INGREDIENTS (by weight, except where indicated) Makes 24. Cut in half if needed.  - 1 oz apple cider vinegar - 27 fl oz soy milk at room temperature - 1 lb 14 oz bread flour - 22g sugar - 16g instant yeast - 16g salt - 1.5 oz vegetable shortening METHOD 1. Mix the vinegar into the soy milk, then add to the rest of the ingredients in bowl of a stand mixer. 2. Using the batter attachment, mix together until combined. Increase the speed to med-lo/­­med and keep mixing until the dough collects around the beater (this will take about 5-7 mins).  3. Switch to the dough hook. Knead the dough on med-lo/­­med speed until it no longer sticks to the sides of the bowl (this will take a few minutes). 4. Transfer to a large, well-oiled bowl. With oiled hands, stretch and fold the dough 2-3 times. Let rest for 5 mins and stretch and fold 2-3 times again. Cover and let rise at room temperature.  5. While dough is rising, oil enough baking sheets to hold 24 muffins. 6. When dough has doubled in size, shape into 2.5 oz balls. Use oiled hands as necessary, and try not to degas the dough. Place on the prepared sheets. 7. Cover dough with cling wrap. Place a empty cookie sheet on top of the dough. Gently press down to flatten the dough into pucks. Let the dough rise with the sheet on top. If the sheet is too heavy and seems to be flattening the dough, dont use it. Just keep pressing the dough down with your fingers throughout the rise to keep a puck shape.  8. While dough is rising, preheat the oven to 350 degrees, and get a griddle heating to around 350 degrees.  9. Working in batches, cook the muffins on the griddle for about 4 mins per side. These get a great rise on the griddle, so use your fingertips to press and keep them into a puck shape when they first go on the griddle. 10. Transfer to a baking sheet and bake in the oven for 8 mins. Transfer to a wire rack to cool. TIPS: 1. Make sure to pinch the balls of dough tightly to seal the dough together. You need the good dough ball integrity (if that makes any sense) to get these to rise correctly. 2. Dont let the dough get too warm or it will get really hard to work with. Room temperature all the way. 3. Dont let the dough over-rise when shaped into balls. You want to bake these on the way up, so dont let them double. WHAT IF I DONT HAVE A STAND MIXER?! Never fear! You can still make these. Its going to take some muscle but it can be done. To help you. here is a picture essay. First, make sure to dissolve the yeast in the liquid before adding it to the flour. Second, use a strong wooden spoon to bring the dough together. I actually prefer this spurtle because you can muscle through the dough without too much resistance. When it looks like this, let the dough rest for a few minutes. Then get back at it. The idea is to get the dough to gather around the spurtle in a ball. A vigorous circular motion will accomplish this. If you feel the gluten offering too much resistance, let the dough rest for a few minutes and then try again. It should pull away from the sides of the bowl and gather around the spurtle.  When you have a fairly smooth dough, transfer it to to a lightly floured surface. You want enough flour to keep the dough from sticking.  With the help of a pastry scraper, stretch and fold the dough like a letter. If you dont know what a letter is or how to fold one, ask your parents (or maybe even your grandparents).  Rotate the dough 90 degrees and stretch and fold a second time. Transfer the dough to a well-oiled bowl and turn to coat. With oiled hands, stretch and fold the dough  a third time. Let the dough rest for 5 mins. What you are doing is building a gluten structure, and you should feel the dough firm up as you stretch and fold. When you can shape the dough into a ball like what you see below, your stretching and folding is done. Just keep the dough and your hands oiled, and stretch and fold until you reach perfection. Then cover and let rise.  Good gluten structure will give you a good rise. Now its time to shape some balls of dough! I keep the dough on my fingertips, using my thumb to push the middle of the dough down while the fingers of my other hand bring the sides of the dough up. You should feel the bounciness of the gluten and a firm ball forms and firms up. If the dough gets too sticky, just lightly oil your hands. The key is to seal the dough into a tight ball. This will give you a good rise.  Let rise on a well-oiled piece of parchment per the recipe above.  A good griddle is your friend.  Flip and bake per the recipe above.

Vegan Gluten free Cinnamon Roll Bread – Yeast-free (no added yeast)

November 28 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Gluten free Cinnamon Roll Bread – Yeast-free (no added yeast)Vegan Gluten free Cinnamon Roll Bread – Yeast-free (No added yeast) Gluten-free Grain-free Cinnamon bread Recipe. Soft, fluffy and amazing. Batter of Besan (chickpea flour) swirled with Cinnamon Sugar. Can be nut-free.  When you cannot roll the batter, you make it into a swirled bread! This Soft and delicious bread is gluten-free, yeast-free, grain-free, but not taste-free. Never taste-free! A fluffy besan (brown chickpea flour) batter, and cinnamon sugar swirled in and baked for perfect Cinnamony, fluffy bites to start the morning. Serve warm with a drizzle of icing or vegan butter. The batter for this Cinnamon Roll bread uses besan (brown chickpea flour) and uses citric acid to add air to the batter before baking. The principle of using citric acid in gluten-free baking is similar to aquafaba, To add air to the batter before baking. This method is used in Indian snacks and baking since decades. You can possible used whipped up aquafaba instead in this recipe. Whipping up aquafaba is not my cup of tea (too much noise and too long a process). Nor is the canned liquid. Hello changing metabolism. This recipe is far quicker, takes 15 seconds and easier! No elbow grease required, no 15 minutes of whipping, just mix in 5 strokes and done! Whats there to not like? This recipe does not use any added yeast, but baking powder and citric acid for leavening. If you are sensitive to yeast, please check the other ingredients and use the versions that are safe for you. Vinegar uses yeast in the production process, and citric acid might as well. Use lemon juice and non yeast citric acid or all lemon juice like my gluten-free lemon donuts, Lets get to this amazing sticky bread.Continue reading: Vegan Gluten free Cinnamon Roll Bread – Yeast-free (no added yeast)The post Vegan Gluten free Cinnamon Roll Bread – Yeast-free (no added yeast) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Video: Dr. Michael Greger Interview – Vegan Myth or Fact / Top 5s

November 22 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Join HappyCow’s Ken Spector as he interviews physician/­­author/­­speaker Dr. Michael Greger of Nutritiononfacts.org about vegan myths or facts. Hear Dr. Greger’s answers to the following and more! Is food combining important? Does cold water shock our system and inhibit digestion? Does drinking while eating dilute saliva and inhibit digestion? Is exercise just after eating bad for us? Is stopping eating after 7PM and not eating again before 11AM optimal? Is nutritional yeast a neurotoxin, and should we be eating it? What vegan food is worse than lard? How much vitamin B12 should we take and what type? How much vitamin D3 is too much? How can you salt your food without concerning yourself about hypertension? Top 5 Foods Dr. Michael Greger Would Bring to Mars Top 5 Cancer Fighting Foods See our video highlights from the world’s first vegan ocean cruise here. For more information see: http:/­­/­­www.nutritionfacts.org http:/­­/­­www.vegancruises.eu/­­   Watch our video here:   The post Video: Dr. Michael Greger Interview – Vegan Myth or Fact /­­ Top 5s appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Vegan Cheesy Crackers

November 21 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Cheesy CrackersIts easy to find crackers without animal ingredients, unless of course, your favorite crackers happen to be the cheesy ones. Now you can make vegan Cheesy Crackers at home, complete with the delicious crunch and flavor you love but without the animal ingredients and additives.   Cheesy Crackers Now you can make vegan Cheesy Crackers at home, complete with the delicious crunch and flavor you love but without the animal ingredients and additives. - 1 cup all-purpose flour - 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast -  1/­­2 teaspoon baking powder -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt -  1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder -  1/­­4 teaspoon smoked paprika - ? teaspoon turmeric - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 tablespoon vegan butter - 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice - 5 to 6 tablespoons cold water, or more as needed - Preheat the oven to 350°F. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, nutritional yeast, baking powder, salt, garlic powder, smoked paprika, and turmeric. Mix well. Add the olive oil, butter, and lemon juice, mixing with a fork until the dough is fine and crumbly. Add the water a tablespoon at a time until the dough becomes cohesive. - Transfer the dough to a piece of parchment paper large enough to fit a large rimmed baking pan. (You can use a Silpat instead, if you have one.) Top the dough with another sheet of parchment paper and roll out the dough until thin, measuring about 11 x 13 inches. Transfer the parchment paper and rolled-out dough to a large rimmed baking sheet. Remove the top sheet of parchment paper and cut the rolled dough into 2-inch squares. If desired, remove any uneven pieces of dough from around the edges and press together into a small disk and roll it out to get more crackers that are a uniform size. (Otherwise, youll have a few partial crackers from around the end to nibble on!) - Bake for 15 to 17 minutes, or until the crackers are baked but not browned. The color should be golden. Cool completely on the baking sheet. These crackers keep well for a week in a sealed container at room temperature. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by William and Susan Brinson. Save Save The post Vegan Cheesy Crackers appeared first on Robin Robertson.


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