yeast - vegetarian recipes

yeast vegetarian recipes

Easy Vegan Pesto

July 17 2019 Vegan Richa 

Easy Vegan PestoEasy and Delicious Vegan Pesto. Use with pasta, salads, over pizza, over garlic bread, roasted veggies, sandwiches, lasagna, wraps! Nut-free option. Vegan gluten-free soy-free Recipe. Jump to Recipe When there is abundance of fresh herbs, dont let them sit and spoil. Make a flavorful and easy pesto and use or freeze! A good pesto adds refreshing flavor to a simple pasta meal. It can be used in other ways too. Add to roasted veggie sandwiches, Grilled cheese sandwiches, pasta salad, grilled flatbreads/­­pizza, serve with lasagna soup and what not! This easy pesto has just a few ingredients, fresh herbs, some nuts and seeds, flavors from salt, garlic lemon and cheesy flavor from nutritional yeast(which can easily be omitted). Just process in a food processor and done!Continue reading: Easy Vegan PestoThe post Easy Vegan Pesto appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Celebrate National Mac and Cheese Day!

July 10 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Celebrate National Mac and Cheese Day! Did you know July 14 is National Mac and Cheese Day? I cant think of a better way to celebrate this classic comfort food that to enjoy some delicious vegan mac and cheese. In honor of this special day, Im sharing one of my favorite recipes from my upcoming book, Vegan Mac & Cheese. In the coming weeks, Ill be providing sneak peeks of whats inside the book.  For now, enjoy this recipe for Buffalo Cauliflower Mac and celebrate National Mac and Cheese Day. And, in case you missed it....when you pre-order Vegan Mac & Cheese on Amazon, my publisher will send you free bonus recipes. Buffalo Cauliflower Mac Buffalo cauliflower has been making the rounds, so it should come as no surprise that it turns up in a mac uncheese. The cheesy, saucy macaroni is a perfect foil for the spicy hot cauliflower. Sauce: 1 large russet potato, cut into 1-inch (2.5 cm) chunks 1 large carrot, cut into 1-inch (2.5 cm) chunks 21/­­2 cups (600 ml) vegetable broth 2/­­3 cup (40 g) nutritional yeast 2 tablespoons (30 ml) tamari 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon salt Cauliflower: 1 head cauliflower, cored and cut into bite-size pieces Olive oil cooking spray 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon salt 1/­­3 cup (80 ml) hot pepper sauce, preferably Frank’s RedHot 4 tablespoons (56 g) vegan butter, melted 1 tablespoon (15 ml) apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon paprika Macaroni: 16 ounces (454 g) elbow macaroni, or other small pasta shape   Sauce: In a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, combine the potato, carrot, and vegetable broth. Bring to a boil and cook for 15 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender when pierced with a fork. Carefully transfer the mixture to a blender or food processor. Add the nutritional yeast, tamari, onion powder, and garlic powder, and salt. Blend until the sauce is smooth. Tasste and add more salt if needed. Set aside. Cauliflower: Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Arrange the cauliflower in a single layer on the prepared pan. Spray the cauliflower with cooking spray, then and sprinkle with the garlic powder and salt. Roast for 20 minutes, then transfer to a large bowl and add the hot sauce, butter, vinegar, and paprika. Stir well to coat. Return the cauliflower to the baking sheet and arrange it in a single layer. Bake for 10 minutes longer. Macaroni: Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Add the pasta and cook according to the package directions until al dente. Cook the macaroni in a pot of boiling salted water until it is al dente. Drain well and return it to the pot. Stir in the reserved sauce and place the pot over low heat. Cook over low heat for a few minutes to heat through. Stir in the buffalo cauliflower and gently stir to combine. Serve hot. The post Celebrate National Mac and Cheese Day! appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegan Gluten free Cinnamon Rolls Grainfree No Yeast

June 25 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Gluten free Cinnamon Rolls Grainfree No YeastAmazing Fluffy Vegan Gluten free Cinnamon Rolls. These Grain free Cinnamon Rolls use almond flour and have no yeast, so no rising time. Vegan Soyfree Recipe. No added yeast Jump to Recipe It is time to make some cinnamon rolls! That need just 1 Bowl and are free of gluten, grain, and yeast! Gluten-free + Vegan Baking is always tricky. There are many flours and flour combinations and each add different textures, flavors and behavior to the final dish. Gluten free flours also tend to dry really quickly, so using them in directly in a regular flour recipe doesnt always work. Methods and recipes can completely change with gluten or grain free baking. For these cinnamon rolls, I use almond flour and coconut flour with a bit of starch. Starch is the binder and the coconut flour keeps the dough dry enough to help make it easier to roll.  The delicate dough is steamed rather than baked. Baking will dry them out into crispier rolls with biscuity edges. These rolls are not going to be as chewy and fluffy as a regular flour roll, but are fluffy enough when made right. The almond flour adds it owns flavor. These rolls are best served fresh right out of the steamer, when they are at their fluffiest and freshest flavor. If you make these, let me know how they turned out! See below for the need for each ingredient and substitution options.Continue reading: Vegan Gluten free Cinnamon Rolls Grainfree No YeastThe post Vegan Gluten free Cinnamon Rolls Grainfree No Yeast appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Gluten free Cinnamon Rolls Grainfree

June 25 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Gluten free Cinnamon Rolls GrainfreeAmazing Fluffy Vegan Gluten free Cinnamon Rolls. These Grain free Cinnamon Rolls use almond flour and have no yeast, so no rising time. Vegan Soyfree Recipe. No added yeast Jump to Recipe It is time to make some cinnamon rolls! That need just 1 Bowl and are free of gluten, grain, and yeast! Gluten-free + Vegan Baking is always tricky. There are many flours and flour combinations and each add different textures, flavors and behavior to the final dish. Gluten free flours also tend to dry really quickly, so using them in directly in a regular flour recipe doesnt always work. Methods and recipes can completely change with gluten or grain free baking. For these cinnamon rolls, I use almond flour and coconut flour with a bit of starch. Starch is the binder and the coconut flour keeps the dough dry enough to help make it easier to roll.  The delicate dough is steamed rather than baked. Baking will dry it out into a crispier roll with biscuity edges. These rolls are not going to be as chewy and fluffy as a regular flour roll, but are fluffy enough when made right. The almond flour adds it owns flavor. These rolls are best served fresh right out of the steamer, when they are at their fluffiest and freshest flavor. If you make these, let me know how they turned out! See below for the need for each ingredient and substitution options.Continue reading: Vegan Gluten free Cinnamon Rolls GrainfreeThe post Vegan Gluten free Cinnamon Rolls Grainfree appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Brioche Bagels

June 12 2019 Vegan Dad 

Brioche Bagels I recently saw brioche bagels at the grocery store and, quite frankly, they looked terrible. I was pretty sure I could make a vegan version that was so much better than whatever Loblaws was peddling. I was right! These are tender and absolutely delicious toasted with jam, or as a sandwich. They are the perfect addition to any brunch or lunch. The recipe is a Reinhart adaptation and mashup. You can also make two 1 lb sandwich loaves if that is more your thing.  INGREDIENTS Makes 8 large bagels Sponge - 2.25 oz bread flour - 8 g instant yeast - 4 fl oz lukewarm plain soy milk Dough - 2 oz cooked sweet potato - 4.5 fl oz plain soy milk (cold), or aquafaba* - 14.75 oz bread flour - 1 oz sugar - 1.25 tsp (10 g) salt (or generous .25 tsp (4 g) if using salted butter) - 4 oz vegan butter, at room temperature** Poaching Liquid - enough water the fill your pot about 1.5 high - 1 tbsp baking soda - 1 tbsp brown sugar * I did not find any difference between soy milk or aquafaba in a blind taste test. **You need a butter that will firm up when cold. I used home-made and Melt with great results. METHOD 1. Whisk together the sponge ingredients in a stand mixer bowl until smooth. Cover and let rise for 45 mins. 2. Blend together sweet potato and milk (or aquafaba) with an immersion blender in a small container (I use a pyrex 1 cup liquid measuring cup) until very smooth. Whisk into the sponge. 3. Add the flour, sugar, and salt, Use the dough hook to bring the ingredients together into a rough dough. Make sure all the ingredients are incorporated. Let rest for 5 mins. 4. With the dough hook running on medium speed, add the vegan butter about 2 tbsp at a time, waiting for it to be incorporated into the dough before adding more. The dough will start out tough but will soften as it takes on more fat. 5. Once the butter is incorporated, knead the dough for 5-7 mins, or until smooth.  6. Shape into a ball, place in a lightly oiled bowl, cover, and let rise for 60 mins.  7. Divide the dough into 8 equal pieces. Shape each piece into a ball.  8. Line a large baking sheet with lightly oiled parchment paper. 9. Pinch though the centre of the ball with your thumb and forefinger, then shape into a ring. (I find this method best because the final bagel is delicate and this allows it to withstand the poaching process without breaking apart).  10. Place the shaped dough rings on the prepared sheet, mist with oil, cover with plastic wrap, and immediately refrigerate for 8 hours, or overnight. The bagels will have risen and firmed up in the cold. 11. When you are ready to bake, preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Get the poaching liquid simmering in a large pot.  12. Add as many bagels as will comfortably fit in your pot (usually four), top side down (they should float). Poach for no more than 30 seconds, then flip over. Poach for no more than 30 seconds more, then transfer back to the prepared baking sheet. Repeat with remaining bagels. 13. Bake for 8 mins, then rotate the pan. If the bottoms of the bagels are browning too much, you can at this time place the baking sheet on top of an empty baking sheet to insulate the bottom. Bake for another 6-8 mins until golden.  14. Let cool and serve!

Potato and Fennel Hash Skillet

June 8 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Potato and Fennel Hash Skillet This potato and fennel hash skillet meal makes for a very special breakfast/­­brunch, but it also works nicely as a wholesome lunch or dinner. And the leftovers taste like a really special potato salad! So it’s pretty versatile. We’re obsessed with the combination of potatoes and fennel. Potato fennel soup is a staple (maybe we should share that recipe too?), and our love for that pairing definitely doesn’t stop there. Fennel is a polarizing vegetable, but I think that mostly has to do with its crunchy, anise-forward raw form. Cooked fennel takes on a completely new life – it’s sweet and silky, with a toned down anise flavor. If you’ve never tried it, you’re in for a serious treat :) We’ll be making this whole dish on our Instagram stories later today, so you can see exactly how it comes together. The main chunk of time is dedicated to getting the fennel and potatoes golden and crispy. From there on out it’s just about topping it with all your favorite things. The caramelized fennel provides a beautiful sweetness, and the bell pepper gives this hash a crucial dose of juiciness. We included beans and spinach to make this a complete meal, but you could also omit them if you’re looking for a hash to accompany other, more filling breakfast dishes. Wishing you a nice weekend and hope you’ll give this a try

Pea Alfredo Pasta

May 15 2019 VegKitchen 

Pea Alfredo Pasta Discover this fully vegan recipe for fettuccine with alfredo sauce and peas without delay. You will be surprised to discover that the cheese is replaced here by nutritional yeast. As for the creamy alfredo sauce, it is made with vegetable broth and plant based milk. The post Pea Alfredo Pasta appeared first on VegKitchen.

Legendary Layer Bean Dip - Vegan, Grain-free

April 26 2019 My New Roots 

Legendary Layer Bean Dip - Vegan, Grain-free     Dips are my favourite food group. Yes, food group. If I ever got a tattoo, it would probably say something like: pass the hummus. I was recently hosting a party-for-no-reason, and like most of my get togethers they involve a lot of food. But I didnt feel like making a fallback dip, like tzatziki, or baba ganoush. No. I felt like leveling up and creating something I hadnt tried to before. Something with BIG DIP ENERGY – a chunky, spicy, creamy, and above all impressive layer dip. Id cooked pinto beans the night before, had a little tin of chipotle chilies kicking around the pantry, and I knew that if I cut a couple corners, this thing would come together so Id still have time to tizz myself up before the guests arrived. My childhood memories of layer dip involve many cans and jars of processed food being dumped into a large bowl, but the current-reality-holistic-nutritionist version definitely involves making every single one of those things from scratch. Mama dont have time for that! So I simplified things by cutting out the guacamole (dont yell at me like that - add it if you want to!), and using jarred salsa. Everything else was homemade, but came together quickly and easily.       First, I sautéed the pre-cooked pinto beans with onions, garlic, spices, and the chipotle peppers. While that was on the stove, I whipped up the hemp seed queso (no soaking required!). And the salsa got an upgrade with some fresh, chopped cherry tomatoes. This is such an easy hack btw, since it makes the salsa taste more alive and juicy, while giving it a lot more texture, which I personally dig. All it takes after that is mushing the beans up a bit in the pan, which you can do with a bean masher, or an immersion blender, if you dont want to haul out yet another large piece of equipment. Then layer away! All in all, this took me about 20 minutes, start to finish, and the party people hung around this bowl like it was the last dip on planet earth. The delicious, creamy cheese sauce is a riff off my cashew queso, but in the interest of keeping this allergen-free, I used hemp seeds instead. I love this change-up, since its less expensive, and contains way more omega-3 fats and protein. You can dial up the heat here if you like, but because both the salsa and the bean layer have quite a kick to them, I kept the queso pretty mild. Did I mention that this is delicious on its own next to a platter of veggie sticks?! Or chips. Lets be honest.          Pinto Bean Dreams Just look at those beautiful beans! Dont they look gorgeous in all of their tone-on-tone mottled-ness? Pinto actually means painted in Spanish, and when you take a close look at pinto beans you can clearly see how theyve earned their moniker. Their speckles fade when cooking, and turn a lovely pale pink colour. They also gain a super creamy interior that is perfect in soups and stews, but also dips. Pintos, like all beans, are a mixture of protein and complex carbohydrates, making them incredibly filling, but wont spike blood sugar levels. Pinto beans are low in calories and fat, but contain the highest amount of fiber out of all the legumes (wow!). Key nutrients in pinto beans include potassium to maintain normal blood pressure, calcium for supporting muscle and nerve function, iron to enhance oxygen transport, and zinc for skin health.  Like all beans, pintos can cause an increase in intestinal gas (burps! farts! abdominal discomfort!), due to the oligosaccharides in the beans fermenting in the lower intestine. Because these starchy molecules live in the skin of the beans, a simple soak in water overnight usually does the trick. The soaking process will help leach out many of these fermenting properties, which is why it is so important to discard the soaking water and then boil them in fresh water. Adding a strip of kombu seaweed to the pot will further help to reduce the gas-producing potential of pinto beans (and all legumes), acting like a sponge to absorb those raffinose sugar toot culprits. Try these two tricks to reduce your toilet tunes, and stay social!          I used a clear glass bowl to serve the dip in so that they layers are visible, and it was not until after pouring in two layers did I have the idea to put cilantro stems up on the sides of it. Doh! But knowing it would be #worthit, I painstakingly scooped out the beans and salsa trying to keep everything separate, cleaned the bowl, and started over. I lightly brushed the tiniest amount of olive oil on the leaves to act as glue, then pressed them to the walls of bowl. This is completely unnecessary, but it makes the dip look less monotone and more enticing in my opinion – green always does it! This step takes an extra two minutes and adds a decorative touch, but its your call. Maybe you need those two minutes to tizz yourself up?  If you want to change up the recipe, try using black beans or kidney beans in place of the pintos. If you want to add another layer to this already boss situation, go on and add the guac! I was just trying to keep things a little easier for yall.  And if youd like to make your own salsa, I have a stellar raw recipe right here. Lastly, I want to add that my bowl for this was roughly 1 1/­­2 quarts /­­ litres capacity, and everything it fit perfectly. I would only suggest sizing up if you don’t have this exact container size.         Print recipe     Legendary Layer Bean Dip Serves 8-10 Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil (or ghee) 1 medium yellow onion, diced 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 clove garlic, minced 2 tsp. ground cumin 1 tsp. dried Mexican oregano (substitute with regular oregano) 1/­­2 tsp. ground sweet paprika 3 cups /­­ 500g cooked pinto beans (about 2 cans) 1/­­2 can chipotle peppers in adobo sauce (use more or less to suit your taste) water as needed 1 small bunch cilantro, washed and dried 1 pint /­­ 280g cherry tomatoes, divided 1 green onion, sliced (white and green part) 1 small jar (15.5 oz. /­­ 415ml) store bought salsa, mild medium or hot, depending on your tastes 1 cup /­­ 145g hulled hemp seeds 1 medium red bell pepper, seeds removed and roughly chopped 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 Tbsp. nutritional yeast 2-3 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice, to taste 1/­­2 clove garlic 1 small piece fresh turmeric, chopped (substitute with 1/­­2 tsp. dried) ground cayenne, to taste 3 Tbsp. water, if needed Directions: 1. Melt oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onions, salt, and stir to combine. Cook until lightly caramelized (about 10 minutes), then add the garlic and cook for a couple minutes until fragrant. Stir in cumin, oregano and paprika, cook for 2 minutes, then add the beans and chipotles in adobo (use as much or as little as you like). Cover and cook on low heat while you make the queso. If the pot becomes dry, add a little water and stir. 2. To make the queso, put all ingredients, except water, in a high-speed blender or food processor and blend until smooth and creamy. If needed, add water one tablespoon at a time until the desired consistency is reached. If you want a thick cream, use less water, for a thinner sauce, use more. (You will not achieve a perfectly smooth sauce with a food processor, but it is still delicious!). 3. Slice the cherry tomatoes into quarters. Add half of them to the salsa and stir to combine. Save the other half for later. 4. Smash the beans with a bean masher, potato masher, immersion blender, or put them into your high-speed blender (remove the queso first, but dont worry about cleaning it). The goal is to get the beans creamy, but not perfectly smooth. Add water if necessary, and season to taste.  5. Pick out a few stems of the most attractive cilantro, brush them with a little olive oil and stick them to the inside wall of the bowl (this step is optional). Chop the remaining cilantro and set aside. 6. Combine the remaining cherry tomatoes and combine them with the sliced spring onion. Sprinkle with a little salt, and fold to combine.  7. To assemble the dip, Spread the bean layer in the bottom first, followed by the salsa and finally the hemp queso. Top with the chopped cilantro, and finally the fresh tomato mix. Serve with whatever you like to dip! Party on!      Hope you’re all doing well out there. If you are experiencing any semblance of Spring weather where you are, please send some my way. K thanks. Happy dipping! xo, Sarah B The post Legendary Layer Bean Dip – Vegan, Grain-free appeared first on My New Roots.

Eggplant Pesto “Meatballs”

April 15 2019 Meatless Monday 

Who said meatballs must be made with meat? Hearty eggplant is one of the best vegetable substitutes for making meat-less meatballs because of its meaty texture and high fiber content. These plant-based Eggplant Pesto Meatballs have a similar texture to your traditional Italian recipe, but the eggplant in our recipe gives these balls a more tender and silky consistency and a flavor that makes it easy to forget that you are not eating beef. This recipe comes to us from Triad to Wellness . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Makes 40 meatballs (5 servings) - Eggplant mixture 1 1/­­2  tbsp  olive oil 1  medium  onion  chopped 2  garlic cloves  minced 1 1/­­4  pounds  eggplant  unpeeled and cut into 1″ cubes 3/­­4  cup  water 1/­­4  tsp  salt 1/­­2  tsp  pepper 1  cup  panko bread crumbs red pepper flakes  optional - Cashew Pesto 2  garlic cloves,  minced 1 cup  raw cashews,  soaked overnight or boiled for 20 minutes until soft 2  tbsp  pine nuts 2  tbsp  water 2  tbsp  lemon juice 1/­­4  cup  nutritional yeast 1/­­4  tsp  sea salt   Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Place 1/­­2 tablespoon olive oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium high heat. Add onion and saute until translucent about 3 minutes. Add garlic until lightly browned, remaining olive oil, and eggplant, and brown on both sides. Add water, season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally until eggplant is soft. Remove from heat, transfer to a heat proof bowl, and set aside. In a food processor, add garlic, cashews, pine nuts, nutritional yeast, sea salt, and water. Process until smooth. Add basil, lemon juice, and olive oil while processing. Mix until smooth and set aside. In the bowl, mash eggplant into small pieces with the back of a wooden spoon or potato masher. Add the cashew pesto and mix well. Lastly, add the breadcrumbs and red pepper flakes and stir until well combined. Roll eggplant meatless balls in about 2-inch diameter approximately 1 1/­­2 tablespoon of mixture. Transfer to parchment lined baking sheet and bake until browned (about 25 minutes) turning once so the eggplant pesto “meatballs are browned on both sides. Serve over zucchini noodles or your choice of pasta with tomato sauce. The post Eggplant Pesto “Meatballs” appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese

April 3 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese This might be our favorite recipe so far this year! We were craving bolognese, but were also mindful of the fact that it’s spring, which generally has people cooking lighter, greener fare. So we compromised and came up with a vegetable-packed bolognese that doesn’t depend on canned tomatoes. Instead, we start with fresh cherry tomatoes, bell pepper, zucchini, and tons of basil. Tempeh and mushrooms bring savoriness and meatiness, while some pantry staples help build the deep flavors that you’d generally expect from bolognese. The result is super flavorful and amazing on pasta, but it also feels lighter and more spring-appropriate than your traditional bolognese. We’ll be showing how to make this recipe step-by-step on our Instagram Stories later today, so check that out if you’re interested in trying it :) If you’re doubtful about including zucchini in bolognese, give it a chance! When roasted, it has a nice, meaty texture that goes perfectly with the mushrooms and tempeh. In addition to that, some of the zucchini gets blended into the sauce, which makes the whole thing super creamy. This recipe is also great for tempeh skeptics. The tempeh just takes on the flavors of the sauce and aromatics here and contributes a meaty bite, without any other foreign flavors. We’re having a bit of a tempeh obsession right now and it’s so good in this dish. That’s pretty much it! Hope you try this one and thanks so much for all your comments on last week’s giveaway. Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients 8 oz tempeh 2 tablespoons tamari 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar ⅓ cup cashews ⅓ cup sun dried tomatoes (dry, not oil-packed) 10 oz cherry tomatoes - halved 2 zucchini - cut in half lengthwise 1 red bell pepper - cored and quartered 1 lb crimini mushrooms - quartered sea salt freshly ground black pepper avocado oil or other roasting oil of choice 1 yellow onion - chopped 3 cloves of garlic - minced 1 tablespoon tomato paste splash of red wine (optional) ¼ cup nutritional yeast 12 oz pasta or more - for serving 1 bunch of basil - chopped, plus more for garnish Instructions In a bowl, crumble the tempeh and drizzle with the tamari and balsamic, toss to coat. Soak the cashews and sun dried tomatoes in hot water. Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2 parchment paper-covered baking trays. Arrange the tomatoes, zucchini, bell pepper, and mushrooms on the trays. Sprinkle everything with salt and pepper, drizzle with oil, and mix to coat. Place the trays in the oven and roast for 35-45 minutes, until all the vegetables are soft and all the liquid thats been released by the mushrooms cooks off. Meanwhile, heat oil to a large pan set over medium heat (if you dont have a large pan, consider using a soup pot here). Add the onion and sauté for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the marinated tempeh, stir once, and then let sit without stirring for a good 3-4 minutes, so that it thoroughly browns. Stir and sauté for another 3-4 minutes, until completely browned. Stir in the garlic at the end. Add the tomato paste and a splash of wine, if using, and stir to coat. Once the vegetables are done roasting, in an upright blender, combine 1 roasted zucchini half, all of the bell pepper, all the tomatoes, about ⅓ of the amount of the mushrooms, the drained cashews and sun dried tomatoes, nutritional yeast, and about 3 cups of water or broth. Blend until smooth, taste for salt and adjust if needed. Cube the remaining roasted zucchini. Add the sauce to the pan with the tempeh, along with the cubed zucchini and remaining mushrooms and bring up to a simmer. Let the sauce reduce for 10-15 minutes. Meanwhile, cook the pasta. Once the sauce is done cooking, stir in the basil. Serve the bolognese over pasta, garnished with more basil. Notes This bolognese keeps really well, so we suggest cooking as much pasta as youre planning on eating that day and serving it with the sauce bit by bit. That way, you can enjoy properly cooked, al dente pasta every time. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Salsa-Style Nectarine Panzanella from Cook Share Eat Vegan Mediterranean Dolma Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette Simple Mango Gazpacho .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Next Level Lemon Miso Potatoes

March 14 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Next Level Lemon Miso Potatoes These potatoes are extra in every way. They take extra ingredients, extra work, and come out extra flavorful as a result. Simple roasted potatoes are already really good and don’t need changing, but I like to look at these lemon-miso ones as a category of their own. They’re for that time when you’re craving something indulgent, when you’re up for a fun kitchen project, and when you want to try out something new. They’re next level! The key to the flavor here is the marinade. The potatoes get par-boiled and marinated in a garlicky lemon-miso sauce. They are then slowly roasted in the marinade until they’re soft and creamy on the inside and golden and crispy on the outside. Pretty sure it’s impossible not to finish the whole batch in one sitting! Hope you give them a try, and if you’re interested in the step-by-step prep, check out our Instagram Stories later today (and highlights if you’re not reading this the day of). Sending you lots of love .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Next Level Lemon Miso Potatoes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Soup (and my gardener's lament: winter poison ivy!)

March 3 2019 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Soup (and my gardener's lament: winter poison ivy!) Dear Soup, Thank you for always reminding me there are better days ahead. Soups are mainstays around here, especially with snow on the ground and temps hovering in low twenties to single digits tonight, plus more cold on the horizon this week. And poison ivy. (Yup.) I've probably made six batches of this already this winter. It involves a food processor and a soup pot. That's it. Comes together in approximately five minutes and is satisfying, warm and delicious. Here's my take on this soup, which was originally inspired by this. Here's how I made my Vegan Pasta e Fagioli: 4 carrots 1 leek 6 cloves garlic 1 celery stalk 1/­­2 onion sliced thin 2 bay leaves 1/­­2 head of cabbage 1 can of cannellini beans (drained, rinsed) 1 can diced tomatoes 1/­­3 cup ditalini pasta (cooked in separate pot, then added to soup just before serving) 2 T. nutritional yeast 1 qt. veggie stock olive oil thyme oregano red pepper flakes salt & pepper to taste Add chopped veggies--carrots, leeks, garlic to food processor, pulse about ten times. Prep the soup pot with the olive oil over medium heat, add chopped veg. Cook till just tender. Add remaining ingredients and broth and seasonings, salt and pepper. Cover and let simmer two hours over low heat. Serve with a side of your best homemade bread. (Mine is Jim Lahey's --I made the ciabatta version). After a visit with the folks at Urgent Care yesterday for a infernal outbreak of poison ivy, I am now awaiting an agonizing three weeks for this painful mess to clear up. Or longer. Why does Mother Earth require such an evil, toxic plant? What purpose does it serve? I've been struck by this havoc on only a handful of times in my life because I am so gawdawful afraid. Sounds impossible. But trust me when I tell you: only to me, the Master Gardener, and in winter no less. And above is the culprit.  Our home is undergoing a transformation of sorts in a few weeks which will finally rid us of these old railroad timbers and be replaced with a more substantial wall of stone. (That will hopefully outlive us and beyond.)  So I found myself outside on a warm-ish day earlier last week in a bit of a snit over the demise of some cherished plants I couldn't bear to loose. I've spent fifteen years tending and planting, so obviously there are plants I want to keep. Out with the shovel and buckets and pots. Everything's dormant, ground was soft, sun was out: perfect. Until later that night when I woke with what I imagined to be some sort of bug bite. Then to the next afternoon when my arm reached up to scratch my wrist (pulling the long sleeve back and discovering to my horror what really had happened). OMG. WTH? Could this be? . . . is this? Noooooo!  And then began the seven stages of grief: shock, denial, guilt, anger and bargaining, depression and loneliness to reconstruction (the UC visit) and finally acceptance. Yes, I accept that I have the rash of the spring and summertime, of gardeners, campers, hikers and landscapers, the poisonous fury of: Leaves of Three Let it Be! Ah, but what about the roots?  I had come in contact with said dormant plant--through the roots. I had oh-so carefully lifted plants and divided, setting each clump aside. Gloves and long sleeves. I have replayed this moment back through my mind a hundred times: as I reached under one of my plants, I must have accidentally, on an exposed part of my wrist, come in contact with the worst plant root on the planet, unbeknownst to me.  I am more allergic than most and so, this lovely little visitor and its prescribed remedy dosed out (the horrid steroid treatment) is, well. It's hell. The rash has traveled from my left wrist, up my right arm, to my abdomen, and leg. There's a perfect dot-to-dot landscape you can follow if you wanted. I can see the entry at every point. It's like an incredibly cruel irony and one I will face with tears, determination, agitation and regret. As for the remainder of the plants. They'll be destined for demolition. 

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool

February 9 2019 My New Roots 

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool   When we committed to going to the ocean, I immediately felt the thrilling sensation that washes over me when I stand at the intersection of land meeting water. I smelled brine and dampness. I saw certain patterns and colours; light sand against dark water, wet stones, seaweed, driftwood, and feathers. This was the second recipe I created for the dreamy on-location photoshoot with Christiann Koepke back in October (you can see the first one here). The inspiration for this dish came first in fact, fast and furiously. Just thinking about the seaside brought this recipe to me in a wave of total inspiration. I wanted the ingredients to reflect the elements in this environment, and for the final result to be a visual meeting of land and sea. Now Im not super into “fake meat”, but there is something undeniably satisfying about tricking someone into thinking a vegetable is flesh. Tee hee. Plus, Rene Redzepi does it all the time, so maybe it puts me in the cool cooking club too? Yes? Anyway, I knew something on the plate had to look like seafood, and I had my sights set on scallops. In my first cookbook, I made “scallops” out of leeks, and wanted to try something different, so going through the rolodex of tube-shaped white veggies in my mind, I fell upon king oyster mushroom stems. Naturally. Browned in ghee and well-seasoned, I knew that these morsels would look exactly like mollusks, and taste deceptively meaty. A pool of herbaceous, vibrant green pesto, would be the land, and the perfect resting place for my mushroom medallions. I combined flat-leaf parsley and spinach to create a bright yet balanced sauce that complimented - rather than overwhelmed - the rest of the dish. But with all this creaminess, I knew that I also needed to include something for textural contrast, so toasted hazelnuts became the beach stones, along with fried capers, which added a bite of seaside brine. This dish is surprisingly easy to make, and it is the prefect main to serve for family and friends that you want to spoil a little. It looks impressive, but its a cinch to get on the table without gluing you to the stove. The pesto can be made a week in advance (although the fresher, the better), so that the only thing you need to do before serving is cook the mushroom and capers, and warm the pesto a little. I love cooking the capers and mushrooms in ghee (recipe here) because its just so darn delicious, but the pesto is vegan and if you want the entire meal to be so, simply swap out the ghee for expeller-pressed coconut oil, which is refined for high heat cooking and has no tropical aroma. Beta-glucan Goodness Edible mushrooms are both medical and nutritional dynamos. Collectively, they not only provide us with plant-based protein, vitamin D, and a whole host of minerals, but most excitingly a group of polysaccharides called beta-glucans. These complex, hemicellulose sugar molecules enhance the functioning of the immune system by activating immune cell response and stimulating the production of white blood cells. These compounds also effectively mobilize immune stem cells in your bone marrow, and exhibit anti-tumor properties, so theyre often used supplementally in cancer treatment protocols. Beta-glucans help to lower cholesterol, as this type of fiber forms a viscous gel during digestion, which grabs a hold of excess dietary cholesterol, prevents absorption by moving it through your digestive tract, and eliminates it. Through your poop! This same gel also slows down your digestion, which in turn stabilizes blood sugar, and minimizes the release of insulin. King oyster mushrooms are of course a good source of beta-glucans, but you can get them in other places too: barley, oats, sorghum, mushrooms like shiitake, reishi and maitake, as well as seaweed, algae, and dates.   I wouldn’t put king oyster mushrooms in the “specialty” category of fungi, but I also know that theyre not available at every grocery store, so if you cant find them, substitute with any other kind of mushroom you like and forgo the whole scallop charade. The dish will still turn out delicious, I promise. If you want to change up the herb in the pesto, try basil instead of flat-leaf parsley. Cilantro could also be delicious, but potentially overwhelming, so use more spinach in that case. And instead of hazelnuts in the pesto and garnish, try almonds, pecans or walnuts. Yummm. I like to serve this with a big hunk of crusty bread on the side to mop up any leftover pesto in the bowl. It also helps to have some good olive oil and flaky salt around for this situation, just sayin. If youd prefer the grain route, steamed brown rice, quinoa, or millet could be a decent accompaniment too. And if you want to go completely grain-free, roasted sweet potato, winter squash, or pumpkin would be totally lovely.     Print recipe     King Oyster Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 lb. /­­ 500g king oyster mushrooms (choose ones with fat stems) a generous amount of ghee (or expeller-pressed coconut oil) fine + flaky salt 1 jar brined capers (about 1/­­3 cup /­­ 55g) a handful of toasted hazelnuts, roughly chopped, for garnish 1 batch Parsley-Spinach Pesto (recipe follows) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish a few leaves of parsley, for garnish Directions: 1. Remove any dirt or debris from the mushrooms with your hands, or small soft brush. (do not use water!). Slice the stems into enough rounds so that each person has 5 or 6. Keep the caps for another dish. 2. Drain the capers and pat them dry with a clean tea towel or paper towel. Heat about a tablespoon of ghee (or coconut oil) in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the capers and fry until split and crisp - about 2-3 minutes. Remove from pan and set aside. 3. Add more ghee (or coconut oil) to the same skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add the sliced mushroom stems, a sprinkle of flaky salt, and cook on one side until golden, about 5-7 minutes. Then flip and cook on the other side until golden. Work in batches or use separate skillets - if you crowd the mushrooms they will steam each other and get soggy. That is not what were after! 4. While youre cooking the mushrooms, place the pesto in a small saucepan, add a touch of water to thin, if desired, and warm over low-medium heat. Do not boil! 5. To serve, place about 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml of the warm pesto in the bottom of a dish, spreading it out to make an indent in the center. Place 5 or 6 mushroom stems in the pesto, then top with the fried capers and toasted hazelnuts. Drizzle with olive oil and a few grinds of black pepper. Garnish with parsley and serve immediately. Parsley-Spinach Pesto Makes about 2 1/­­4 cups Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 150g hazelnuts 1 fat clove garlic 2 cups /­­ 35g flat-leaf parsley, lightly packed (tender stems only) 2 cups /­­ 65g baby spinach, lightly packed zest of 1 organic lemon 1/­­3 cup/­­ 80ml freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 2 lemons) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml cold-pressed olive oil 1/­­2 cup /­­ 35g nutritional yeast 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water, more if needed Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place hazelnuts on baking sheet. Toast in oven for 12-15 minutes or until fragrant and lightly toasted. Remove and set aside. Once cool, remove skins by rubbing the hazelnuts together in your hands. Set aside. 2. Remove any tough stems from the parsley. Roughly chop the leaves and tender stems (this prevents the parsley from bruising in the food processor). 3. Place garlic in the food processor and pulse to mince. Add the hazelnuts, parsley, spinach, lemon zest and juice, olive oil, nutritional yeast, and salt. Pulse for 30 seconds, then add the water and pulse again until its thick, but spreadable. Remove lid and scrape. Repeat until reaches desired consistency (I like mine a little chunky, but its up to you!). Store leftovers in an airtight glass container in the fridge for up to one week. We’re home from Bali now, settling back into life in the cold Canadian winter. It feels good to be here, especially after a satisfying few weeks in the sunshine, hosting two glorious retreats. Now it’s time to ground and focus on the year ahead. I’m very excited for 2019 – so many exciting things to share with you, just on the horizon. I hope you’re all well out there, and enjoying a vibrant start to the new year. Sending love and gratitude out to you all, always. xo, Sarah B The post Mushroom “Scallops” in a Warm Pesto Pool appeared first on My New Roots.

Spicy Tomato Queso Dip

February 1 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Spicy Tomato Queso Dip Just in time for the Super Bowl, here is one of my all-time favorite dips: Spicy Tomato Queso Dip (photo by Melissa Chapman) from Fresh from the Vegan Slow Cooker. I usually make this in a smaller (1 to 2 quart) slow cooker, but its an easy recipe to double or triple for a crowd and make it in a 3 to 4 quart slow cooker. In addition to being a great dip, its also great in nachos, a vegan Philly Cheesesteak, burritos, and even as the cheese sauce in mac and cheese. Spicy Tomato Queso Dip This is a quick and delicious dip that assembles easily. It also lends itself to variations such as the addition of crumbled vegan chorizo or cooked black beans. This recipe is from Fresh from the Vegan Slow Cooker by Robin Robertson (C) 2012. Slow cooker size: 1 1/­­2 quart Cooking Time: 2 hours on Low One 14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes with green chilies, drained 1/­­2 cup nutritional yeast 3 tablespoons oat flour 1 teaspoon prepared yellow mustard 1 teaspoon onion powder 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cumin 1/­­2 teaspoon chili powder 1/­­2 teaspoon salt 1 cup nondairy milk 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice Puree the tomatoes in a blender or food processor until smooth. Add the remaining ingredients, except the nondairy milk and lemon juice, and blend until smooth. Transfer the mixture to a lightly oiled 1 1/­­2 quart slow cooker. Stir in the nondairy milk until well incorporated. Cover and set the cooker on Low and cook, stirring occasionally, for 2 hours, or until the mixture is thick and hot. If the mixture isnt thickening after 2 hours, turn it up to High, remove the lid, and cook uncovered for 20 to 30 minutes longer. When ready to serve, spoon about 1/­­3 cup of the queso into a small bowl, stir in the lemon juice, then stir back into the slow cooker. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Makes about 2 cups The post Spicy Tomato Queso Dip appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Creamy and Rich Vegan Alfredo Sauce for Fettucine

June 24 2019 VegKitchen 

It is hard to believe that something that can be whipped up in a matter of minutes can be so good, but it really is!  Makes enough for 1 pound of pasta. With additional nutritional yeast, this can be used as a cheese sauce for lasagna. The post Creamy and Rich Vegan Alfredo Sauce for Fettucine appeared first on VegKitchen.

Scrambled Tofu Florentine

June 10 2019 Meatless Monday 

Onion and tofu crumbles are seasoned with thyme, paprika and turmeric for a savory smoky taste. Lemon juice and sliced radishes infuse this fragrant scramble with tart flavors and a refreshing crunch. This recipe comes to us from Meg of Yoga Saves the Day. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 medium onion, chopped - 1 teaspoon dried thyme - 1 teaspoon ground paprika - 1 teaspoon ground turmeric - 1 bunch spinach, washed well and chopped - 1 pound firm tofu, drained and crumbled - salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste -  1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast* - Juice of 1/­­2 lemon - 4 radishes*, sliced for garnish *Optional.   Place the oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion and sauté for 4-6 minutes, or until the onion becomes soft. Season with thyme, paprika and turmeric. Stir to coat the onion evenly. Cook for 1 minute more, or until the spices become fragrant. Add the spinach and toss until coated. Cover and cook for 3 minutes, or until the spinach has wilted. Uncover and stir in the crumbled tofu. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Turn the heat down to medium and cook for 8 minutes more. Add the lemon juice and nutritional yeast, if using. Stir well, taking care not to mash the tofu. Taste for seasoning and adjust to preference. Serve the tofu scramble on plates in 4 equal portions. Garnish with sliced radishes, if using, and enjoy! The post Scrambled Tofu Florentine appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Artichoke-Spinach Dip

May 30 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Artichoke-Spinach Dip Artichoke-Spinach Dip I love anything with artichokes: grilled fresh baby artichokes are the beyond compare.  When I can’t get fresh artichokes, I satisfy my craving with frozen, jarred, or canned.  I like to put marinated artichoke hearts in salads and that the creamy and delicious artichoke-spinach dip is a longtime favorite.  In fact, Im such a fan of that dip that Ive developed a few other ways to use it such as a pasta sauce, or as a tasty filling for palmiers. First, the dip itself.  Sometimes I make it with a homemade cashew cream cheese (see Veganize It!), but more often than not, I opt for saving time and use a commercial vegan cream cheese.  The dip is quick and easy to make and can be made ahead of when you need it.  You can pop it in the oven just before serving time or do what I usually do:  heat it in a small slow cooker. Artichoke-Spinach Dip 1 (10-ounce) bag baby spinach, lightly steamed, then squeezed dry 1 cup vegan cream cheese 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast 3/­­4 teaspoon onion powder 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder 3/­­4 teaspoon salt 1/­­4 teaspoon ground black pepper 2 (12 -ounce) jars marinated artichoke hearts, well drained and blotted dry Preheat the oven to 400 degrees °F. Lightly steam or microwave the spinach for 1 minute or until wilted.  Allow to cool. Combine the cream cheese, lemon juice, nutritional yeast, onion powder, garlic powder, salt, and pepper in a food processor. Blend until very smooth. When the spinach is cool enough to handle, squeeze any liquid from it and add it to the mixture in the food processor.  Add the artichokes and pulse to combine, leaving some texture. Do not over-process. Transfer to an ovenproof baking dish, and bake uncovered for 15 minutes, or until hot. Remove from the oven and let cool slightly. Serve with toasted French bread slices or your favorite crackers. Makes about 3 cups Slow Cooker Variation:  Instead of baking in the oven, transfer the dip to a small (1 quart) slow cooker and cook on High for about 2 hours, or until hot.  As a pasta sauce: To transform this dip into a great pasta sauce, simply thin it out with your favorite unsweetened plant milk until its the perfect consistency.  Then, add a little more onion powder, maybe some more nutritional yeast, and a little extra salt and pepper.  Heat until warm and toss with freshly cooked pasta.  Palmier filling: Another favorite way to enjoy the creamy goodness of artichoke-spinach dip is to use it as a filling for these light and flaky palmiers, made with vegan puff pastry, available in the freezer case of most supermarkets.  Best of all, these palmiers freeze well, so if you only need enough for a few people, you can freeze the second roll (unsliced) and thaw when needed. Artichoke-Spinach Palmiers  1 recipe Spinach-Artichoke Dip (see above) 1 package frozen puff pastry, thawed (Pepperidge Farm brand is vegan) Unfold one sheet of puff pastry onto a flat work surface. Spread half of the artichoke-spinach mixture onto the pastry sheet, spreading to within 1/­­2 inch of the edges. Roll up one long side of the dough to the middle of the dough, then roll up the other side of the dough so the two rolls meet in the center. Repeat with the remaining dough sheet and filling mixture. Refrigerate for 45 minutes. Preheat the oven to 400°F. Using a serrated knife, cut each roll into slices, slightly less than 1/­­2-inch thick. Place each slice, cut-side down, on parchment-lined baking sheets, allowing about 1-inch of space in between each slice.  Use a metal spatula to flatten the palmiers to 1/­­4-inch thickness.  Bake for 20 minutes or until golden brown. Serve warm.   The post Artichoke-Spinach Dip appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegan Quiche

April 29 2019 Meatless Monday 

This quiche is vegan and soy-free, with a cheesy filling complementing a whole grain crust and crunchy asparagus or seasonal veggies of your choice. It’s also easy to prepare, taking 40 minutes to make from start to finish. This recipe comes to us from Happy Kitchen.Rocks . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - For the crust: - 260 grams or 2 cups whole wheat flour - 1 tsp. sea salt - 1/­­3 c. olive oil - 0.4 cup (100ml) cold water   - For the filling: - 1 cup raw cashews soaked in water over night (if time is limited, one hour of soaking is sufficient) - 2/­­3 cup water - 1 tsp Marmite or nutritional yeast - 2 cloves garlic - 1 tbsp lemon juice - 1/­­2 tsp nutmeg - a pinch cayenne - 2 tbsp freshly chopped herbs (consider oregano and thyme) - salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste - 7 spears asparagus (or veggie of your choice)   Prepare the crust: 1. Preheat the oven to 350 °F. 2. Combine whole wheat flour, salt, olive oil and water in a medium mixing bowl. 3. Knead until the dough forms a ball. Roll it and transfer to a rectangular quiche or tart pan. (You can use 10 x8 in., 14 x 6 in, 12 x 12 in. or even round-shaped ones.) 4. Bake for 15 minutes. Make the filling: 5. Place soaked cashews, garlic, water, lemon juice, nutmeg and a pinch of cayenne in the bowl of your food processor or blender. 6. Pulse until smooth and silky to achieve consistency of a thin hummus. Add more water if needed. 7. Add chopped herbs, salt and black pepper to taste. Prepare your veggies: 8. Trim ends of asparagus and blanche in salted boiling water for 5 minutes. (This way you will pre-cook the thickest parts of your stems while the tops will be nice and crunchy.) 9. If using other vegetables (except for dried tomatoes), pre-cook by stir-frying or steaming. Assemble the quiche: 10. Spread the filling over the crust. Arrange asparagus on top and gently press it, so that it’s half drown in the filling. 11. Bake for 20 minutes or until he top is golden. The middle should be a little unset. If a firmer texture is desired, increase baking time to 30 minutes. 12. Let it cool and enjoy! The post Vegan Quiche appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Gluten free Naan Vegan Grainfree

April 24 2019 Vegan Richa 

Gluten free Naan Vegan GrainfreeVegan Gluten free Naan Flatbread. Grain-free Naan Recipe. No Yeast. 6 Main Ingredients,  1 Bowl, and 20 Minutes. Serve with curries or slice and serve with dips or add to bowls. Soyfree Nutfree options.  Jump to Recipe We always need a good, fluffy, soft Naan flatbread to serve with curries, soups, stews or dips. My favorite Naan is obviously the one with gluten. But this one today is totally gluten-free! This Gluten free Naan has no grain, no yeast, no egg, no nuts, no need to sit and rise, no need to roll out. They are super quick and simple! They need 1 Bowl, 6 Main ingredients and are ready within 30 mins. Just whisk the batter, spread on parchment lined sheet, add toppings and bake! These flatbreads are soft and pliable when warm and will tend to dry out or get more cakey as they sit. Cover and store. I prefer the baked version, but you can make them on a cast iron skillet as well. See notes. To reheat, slice and grill or warm on a skillet or in a microwave. They also are great to serve with dips. Top with different seeds of choice and serve with creamy bean dips for a protein filled snack. These Naans are a slightly modified version of the chickpea Naans from my Indian Kitchen cookbook. That book is a treasure of amazing recipes! Continue reading: Gluten free Naan Vegan GrainfreeThe post Gluten free Naan Vegan Grainfree appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Silky Sweet Potatoes with Cucumber Tahini Ranch, Green Veg and Chickpeas

April 13 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Silky Sweet Potatoes with Cucumber Tahini Ranch, Green Veg and Chickpeas Do you ever use your steamer? My $10 bamboo steamer is one of my favorite kitchen tools. I love how quick the steaming process is – generally much faster than roasting or even sautéing in some cases. I also really like how steaming imparts moisture onto ingredients, so they come out hydrated and silky smooth. Some people think steamed veg is boring because there’s no oil or seasoning, but you can liberally oil and salt your steamed goods after they are done. This little meal mostly comes together in the steamer. You steam the sweet potatoes until they are soft and custardy, throw in the broccoli and kale in the last few minutes of cooking the potatoes, and serve everything with a liberal slather of our cucumber tahini ranch and crispy chickpeas. We have a tahini tzatziki recipe in our cookbook, and this ranch is sort of reminiscent of that. It’s an addictive sauce that’s amazing on pretty much everything. We made this whole meal on our Instagram Stories if you’d like to see the process (look for it later today). Below you’ll find some links for things we’ve been into lately. Wishing you a great weekend :) Mama Eats Plants E-Cookbook – We love everything that Amanda does, and have been so excited for her ebook to come out. It’s everything we ever wanted and more: delicious, cozy plant-based recipes, low waste organization tips, beautiful writing and photos. Highly recommended if you’re in need of some inspiration in the kitchen and beyond. Green Kitchen Stories New Website – Everyone’s favorite vegetarian bloggers just launched their new website and it’s so beautiful. We love watching their stunning cooking videos over and over :) Bon Appetit Youtube Channel – Speaking of cooking videos, we love watching Bon Appetit’s test kitchen videos. The editing is perfect, the hosts are full of charm, and the videos are always packed with little tricks and tips that will most definitely improve your cooking. This one of Brad Leone and Samin Nosrat making focaccia is solid gold. How I Built This – We’ve been binge-listening to this entrepreneur-centred NPR podcast. It’s fun to hear how some now giant companies got started out of thin air. Some favorite episodes include: Alice Waters, Yvon Chouinard. Our Planet on Netflix – As heart-breaking as it is awe-inspiring, this is a nature documentary that really stops you in your tracks and gets you to reconsider your impact, beyond your day to day life. I definitely cried through the whole first episode. Asparagus Fries on YumUnviverse – Plant-based cooking goddess Heather made the asparagus fries from our cookbook and shot the most beautiful video of the process. Can’t wait to make these with the first of the asparagus soon. Silky Sweet Potatoes with Cucumber Tahini Ranch, Green Veg and Chickpeas   Print Serves: 2 as a main or 4 as a side Ingredients for the cucumber tahini ranch ¼ cup tahini zest from 1 large lemon, divided juice from 1 large lemon 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1-inch piece of cucumber - shredded 3-4 sprigs of dill - chopped 2 scallions - sliced sea salt and freshly ground black pepper - to taste apple cider vinegar and water - for thinning for the vegetables and chickpeas 2 medium sweet potatoes - halved olive oil 1 15 oz can chickpeas or 1½ cups cooked chickpeas sea salt 1 teaspoon nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 2 stalks of broccoli - cut into florets 4-5 leaves Lacinato kale - stemmed and torn lemon zest (reserved from the ranch) red pepper flakes Instructions to make the cucumber tahini ranch In a medium bowl, combine the tahini, half of the lemon zest (reserve the rest for later), lemon juice, olive oil, maple syrup, mustard, nutritional yeast, and garlic powder, and mix until you have a smooth paste. Add the cucumber, dill, scallions, salt and black pepper to taste, mixing everything in. Your ranch will be pretty thick at this point, so thin it out with splashes of apple cider vinegar and water, until you have a glossy, creamy sauce. Taste for acidity, salt, and pepper, and adjust if needed. This ranch will last refrigerated in an air-tight container for 3-4 days. to make the vegetables and chickpeas Set a tiered bamboo steamer or steaming basked over a pot with boiling water. Place the sweet potatoes into the steamer, cover, and steam for 35-40 minutes, or until the potatoes are fork-tender and custardy. While the sweet potatoes are cooking, prepare the crispy chickpeas. Drain and dry off your chickpeas really well with a kitchen towel, lightly rubbing them to get as many as you can out of their skins. This will prevent the chickpeas from popping in the pan. Warm a generous pour of olive oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add the chickpeas and fry, stirring occasionally, for about 15 minutes, until golden and crispy. Transfer the chickpeas to a bowl and mix in some salt to taste, as well as the nutritional yeast and smoked paprika. Do not wash the pan, but wipe it off if theres any burnt bits. In the last 5 minutes of the sweet potato steaming time, add the broccoli and kale to the same steaming basket or add another tier to your bamboo steamer and add the green vegetables to that. Cover and steam for 5 minutes, until the broccoli is bright green and the kale is slightly softened. While the broccoli and kale are steaming, warm a bit more olive oil in the same pan you used for the chickpeas, over medium low heat. Add the reserved lemon zest (from the ranch recipe) and a pinch of red pepper flakes and let the oil infuse until the vegetables are done. Once the vegetables are done steaming, add the broccoli and kale to the pan with the infused oil, add a pinch of salt, and toss to coat. Serve the steamed sweet potatoes with a pinch of salt, a good slather of the ranch, topped with the green vegetables and chickpeas, and liberally drenched in more ranch. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 This post contains Amazon Affiliate links. The post Silky Sweet Potatoes with Cucumber Tahini Ranch, Green Veg and Chickpeas appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder

March 23 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder We’re very ready for spring and all of its tender, green produce, but unfortunately it’s still very much soup weather around here. I think that soups are such lifesavers for busy people. They’re simple to make, hard to mess up, and can be customized millions of ways. You can make a giant soup for the week and have warming, wholesome meals right at your fingertips when you don’t have the energy to cook. They’re easy to bring to go in a mason jar or thermos. It’s also great to freeze some soup, which will always be appreciated later, in the midst hangry emergencies. We had two goals for this chowder – we wanted it to be creamy, filling, and comforting, but also light and a bit different from the squash and root vegetable soups that are always around in the winter. Just a little nod to spring :) The creaminess in this chowder comes from blended roasted cauliflower, mushrooms, and chickpeas. There’s no cashews or any nut-based products, since we wanted to go for a lighter soup. I think that cauliflower works so well in creating both a chowder-like consistency and flavor here, while the roasted mushrooms bring an extra depth of flavor. There are also green peas for more springy vibes, along with a base of mirepoix (onion, carrot, celery), and smoked paprika. When it comes to creamy soups, we still love having some chunky texture present, so we leave some of the cauliflower, mushrooms, and chickpeas whole here. The chowder just tastes more like a meal this way, but it could definitely also serve as a side in smaller portions. We’ll be showing the step-by-step process for preparing this chowder on our Instagram Stories later today, and we’ll also save it in our Highlights. Hope you try this one and have a great weekend :) Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients olive oil toasted sesame oil (optional) 1 yellow onion - chopped 1 medium carrot - cubed 1 stick of celery - sliced sea salt 3 cloves of garlic - minced 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon nutritional yeast (optional) ¾ cup dried chickpeas - soaked overnight or up to 24 hours 8 cups purified water 2 bay leaves 1 large head of cauliflower - cut into bite-sized florets 10 oz crimini mushrooms - cut into quarters or eighths for bigger mushrooms freshly ground black pepper 1 cup frozen peas juice from 1 lemon fresh herbs - for garnish Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Warm a soup pot over medium heat. Add a generous drizzle of olive oil and sesame oil, if using. Add the onion, carrot, and celery to the pot, along with a pinch of salt. Cook the vegetables for about 10 minutes, until soft. Add the garlic, smoked paprika, and nutritional yeast, if using, and stir around for about 30 seconds to 1 minute, until fragrant. Drain and thoroughly rinse the chickpeas and add them to the pot, stirring to coat. Add the water and bay leaves, bring the liquid up to a simmer and cook, with the pot lid askew, for 30 minutes. Taste a few chickpeas after the 30 minutes, they should be cooked and creamy inside. If the chickpeas are not yet done, cook them longer. This process can take up to an hour or even longer with some older chickpeas. Generously salt the chickpea broth towards the end of the chickpea cooking time. While the chickpeas are cooking, prepare two rimmed, parchment paper-covered baking trays. Place the cauliflower on one of the trays and the mushrooms - on the other one. Drizzle both the cauliflower and mushrooms with olive oil (or other roasting oil of choice), sprinkle with salt and pepper, and stir. Place both trays in the preheated oven and roast for 30-40 minutes, stirring halfway, until the cauliflower is soft and caramelized. The mushrooms will release water while roasting, so thats why using a rimmed baking tray helps. Once the chickpeas are cooked and the vegetables are roasted, add the cauliflower and mushrooms to the pot with the chickpeas, stirring to combine. Add about half of the soup to an upright blender, making sure to catch plenty of chickpeas, cauliflower, and mushrooms for creaminess. Blend until smooth and return the blended liquid to the soup pot, mixing everything together. Bring the soup back up to a boil and simmer for 5 more minutes for the flavors to merge. Turn off the heat and stir in the peas, which will thaw immediately in the hot soup. Stir in the lemon juice. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the chowder, garnished with fresh herbs, a drizzle of sesame oil or olive oil, and with a side of toasted sourdough bread or croutons. Enjoy! Notes You can also make this soup with canned chickpeas! Just use one to two 15 ounce cans of chickpeas and less water (start with about 5-6 cups). Since the chickpeas are cooked, you dont have to simmer them for 30 minutes. Otherwise, proceed as written out in the recipe. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Berry Creamsicles with White Chocolate Drizzle - Ice Cream Sunday Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bites Babamesco Dip .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew – Abruzzo Inspired

March 7 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew – Abruzzo Inspired We’re continuing with our series of Abruzzo-inspired, plant-based meals today (all our previous recipes are linked below). We love this style of cooking, because it’s focused on an elegant kind of simplicity that really lets every single ingredient shine. Italians tend to take the integrity of their ingredients really seriously, which we experienced first-hand everywhere we ate and cooked in Abruzzo. That obsession with quality ingredients really comes through in the amazing flavor of seemingly very basic dishes. This golden, warming stew was inspired by a seriously unforgettable cabbage and potato stew we tried in Abruzzo. We added our own spin to it – white beans and mushrooms – but the core stayed the same. It’s got just the type of soul-warming energy that we want in our kitchens and on our stoves during a decidedly un-spring like, snowy March. There are still spots open for our retreat in Abruzzo this coming October! You can read all about our past retreat here, complete with photos and testimonials. This time around, we will be focusing on re-centering and relaxation, together with exploring beautiful Abruzzo. We are super excited to have an on-site yoga/­­meditation instructor and an on-site acupuncture physician, both offering daily services. We’ll be hosting a bunch of fun workshops like medicinal jams, vegan cheese, meal planning, and homemade skincare (wink wink Magic Moisturizer). Also: visits to an olive grove, winery, and a family truffle plantation. You can see our whole sample itinerary here, and book here! Click Here to book our Abruzzo Retreat! This stew is all about the combination of the fragrant, golden broth and the rustic, chunky pieces of variously textured veg. There’s tender, silky cabbage, carby goodness from the potatoes, and meatiness from the mushrooms and white beans. Onion, carrots and garlic establish a solid flavor base, and the addition of nutritional yeast, mustard, red pepper flakes, and lemon brings even more depth and a kick of zing and spice. We are crazy about this recipe. You can also watch us making this stew step-by-step later today on our Instagram Stories (it will be saved to our highlights as well). Hope you give it a try! For more of our Abruzzo-inspired recipes, check these out: Pasta e Ceci, The Simplest Lentil Soup, Ciabotta, Rhubarb Jam Cookies. And all scenery photos in this post are from our past retreat in Abruzzo this fall. Click Here to book our Abruzzo Retreat! Having the opportunity to explore a lesser known region of Italy to find its hidden gems in the Culinary arts was such an enriching experience! Getting to see first hand how the people in these areas live, visiting locals in their homes... From truffle hunting to tasting oil from 600 year old olive groves... Wild foraging for greens & making pasta in an Italian womans kitchen.... Not the typical trip to Italy. It was a delightful & delicious experience! - Rachel, Alabama I loved the retreat. It was well managed, we had the best food, awesome accommodation, great people, perfectly sized travel group and great tour guides. I had looked very much forward to this retreat and it was even better than I imagined. You created an amazing experience, with wonderful and very unique accommodations, the best meals I have ever had, set in a beautiful landscape, off the beaten path. The silence was palpable and so welcome to step out of the noisy and hectic lifestyle most of us have these days. I seriously consider joining you again, so I can have more of those meals, go back to the medieval village of Santo Stefano and the unique scattered hotel. We also had an awesome group, which made it even more special! - Claudia, Massachusetts It was a trip of a lifetime. Abruzzo could not have been more beautiful! I loved the diversity of the land, the hiking, cooking and loved loved loved the food. I also was glad that it was not a large group...I liked the intimacy of the smaller number of participants. It truly was a remarkable 6 days and you all were so kind, knowledgeable and pleasant to be with. - Helen, Michigan Thank you for the wonderful trip. It was so much more than I thought it would be. A deep dive into the food, culture and people of Abruzzo. I had experiences that I could never have on my own. I thought we were a good mix of ages, interests and countries. Diversity makes things so interesting. - Maudia, Michigan Ive been to Italy before but never like this! We visited magical places that Id never know about on my own: Santo Stefano with its fairytale charm, the beautiful truffle plantation, ancient olive grove, a winery located right in a family homes basement... Every single one was a unique, unforgettable experience. Thank you! - Katya, Sochi Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients olive oil 1 medium onion - diced 2 large carrots - finely cubed sea salt 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast generous pinch of red pepper flakes 3 cloves of garlic - minced 4 oz shiitake mushrooms - stems removed, sliced 1 lb any starchy potatoes of choice - cut into 1 chunks freshly ground black pepper 1½ tablespoons Dijon or grainy mustard 2 bay leaves 7 cups water or veggie broth/­­broth from cooking the white beans 1 small Nappa or white cabbage - cored and cut into 1 chunks 2½-3 cups cooked white beans juice from 1 lemon handful of parsley - chopped, for serving Instructions Heat up a soup pot over medium heat and add some olive oil for sautéing. Add the onion and carrots, along with some salt and pepper, and sauté for about 8-10 minutes, until the onion and carrots are soft. Add the nutritional yeast, red pepper flakes, garlic, shiitake, and another pinch of salt. Stir and cook for another 8 minutes, or until the mushrooms are cooked through and any liquid that they release is evaporated. Add the potatoes, black pepper, mustard, and another pinch of salt, and give everything a stir. Add the bay leaves and water/­­broth and bring up to a simmer. Be mindful to use less salt if you are using a salted broth or more salt if using water. Using a wooden spoon or spatula, deglaze any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Simmer, partially covered, for 20-25 minutes, until the potatoes are tender. Add the cabbage and white beans, and bring the stew back up to a simmer. Simmer, partially covered, for another 15 minutes, until the cabbage is silky and tender. Turn off the heat. Add the lemon juice and stir it in. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the stew, garnished with parsley and a drizzle of olive oil. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn Black Sesame and Ginger Ice Cream Roasted Pepper Lasagna Simple Mango Gazpacho .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew – Abruzzo Inspired appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta

February 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Cinnamon, citrus, maple, mushroom, chickpea, almond, garlic and rosemary sing in this creamy, yet hearty-textured pasta. With all the light citrus and cinnamon flavors this pasta can be easily served for brunch, lunch or dinner. This recipe comes to us from Kathy of Healthy. Happy. Life. Serves 8 For the butternut squash sauce: - 2 cups frozen butternut squash cubes, frozen - 1 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed - 1 teaspoon garlic powder - 1 tablespoons maple syrup - 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - dash of salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon black pepper - 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast* For the chickpeas: - 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, to coat the skillet - 1/­­2 small white onion, diced - 1 15 ounce can chickpeas, drained - 1 large portobello mushroom, diced - 1/­­8 teaspoon cinnamon - 1 tablespoon lemon juice - 1 cup roasted, unsalted almonds, slivered To complete the Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta: - 1 pound orecchiette pasta, cooked - additional nutritional yeast, for tossing the cooked pasta* - a little extra olive oil, for tossing the cooked pasta - 1 orange, sliced into segments - 1 teaspoon orange zest *optional. Found in health food stores of the health food section of some grocery stores. To make the Butternut Squash Sauce: Place the frozen, cubed butternut squash in a skillet over medium high heat. Season with the rosemary, garlic powder, maple syrup, olive oil, salt, pepper, nutritional yeast, orange juice and orange zest. Cook for 3-5 minutes, working the seasonings into the squash with a fork, until the squash has softened into a lightly mashed mixture. Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat and begin cooking the orecchiette according the package directions. To make the chickpeas: Place the olive oil and chopped onion in a skillet over medium-high heat. Cook the onions for 4-5 minutes, or until they become translucent. Add the chickpeas and diced Portobello mushroom to the pan and season with the cinnamon and lemon juice. Cook for another 4-5 minutes, or until the chickpeas begin to brown and the Portobellos begin to become tender. Add the almonds and sauté for just 1 minute more. To complete the Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta: Drain the orecchiette when it has completed cooking. Toss the cooked pasta with a few dashes extra virgin olive oil and nutritional yeast, if using. Toss the pasta with the butternut squash sauce until fully coated. Fold in the chickpeas. Serve in a bowl with fresh orange slices and a dash of orange zest on top. The post Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta appeared first on Meatless Monday.

tawa pizza recipe | veg pizza on tawa without yeast | pizza without oven

February 8 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

tawa pizza recipe | veg pizza on tawa without yeast | pizza without oventawa pizza recipe | veg pizza on tawa without yeast | pizza without oven in a step by step photo and video recipe. pizza recipe is a common and popular snack or meal recipe across the globe. in india it does have a huge audience base and usually craves for this dish as a snack or perhaps as a light meal. in addition, most of the indian kitchens may lack the traditional oven and this recipe fills a gap as the pizza is made with a pan on a cooktop. The post tawa pizza recipe | veg pizza on tawa without yeast | pizza without oven appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

vellayappam recipe | kerala style kalappam | how to make vellayappam

January 30 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

vellayappam recipe | kerala style kalappam | how to make vellayappamvellayappam recipe | kerala style kalappam | how to make vellayappam with step by step photo and video recipe. dosa or idli recipes are common across india and can be made in myriad ways. generally the basic combination of rice and urad dal makes the most of the dosa varities. but in kerala there is another variety of dosa made with just rice and yeast or todi known as appapm or also known as vellayappam. The post vellayappam recipe | kerala style kalappam | how to make vellayappam appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.


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