wok - vegetarian recipes

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wok vegetarian recipes

Spicy Bok Choy with Noodles and Peanuts

December 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

Wilted bok choy and peanuts fill a flavorful, savory broth alongside chewy noodles for a hearty one-dish meal. Look for fresh rice noodles in the pasta or Asian food section of most grocery stores. This recipe comes to us from Sharon Palmer, The Plant-Powered Dietitian. Serves 4 - 1 teaspoon sesame oil - 1 tablespoon peanut oil - 1 red onion, sliced - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 1 tablespoon peanut butter - 3 tablespoons soy ginger dressing - 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce - 2 tablespoons orange juice - red pepper flakes, to taste - 1 (12 ounces) package fresh rice noodles - 6 (6-ounce) heads baby bok choy - 1/­­4 cup peanuts Place the oils in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the onion and garlic and sauté for about 5 minutes, or until the vegetables soften and become fragrant. Add the peanut butter, dressing, soy sauce, orange juice, red pepper flakes and 1-1/­­2 cups water to the skillet. Stir until bubbly and smooth. Cover and cook while you prepare the noodles. Bring a medium pot of water to a boil over medium-high heat and cook the rice noodles according to package directions. Drain and rinse with water. Transfer the cooked noodles to the skillet and stir to combine. Add the bok choy and peanuts to the pan and let cook for 1 minute, or until the bok choy is slightly wilted. Enjoy! The post Spicy Bok Choy with Noodles and Peanuts appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Aloo Gobi

December 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

Chunks of potato and cauliflower soak up the rich flavors of toasted cumin, turmeric and dried coriander in this traditional dish. Try serving this curry with basmati rice or the flatbread naan for a quintessential Indian feast. This recipe comes to us from Prerna of Indian Simmer. Serves 2 - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 1 teaspoon cumin seeds - or - 1 teaspoon mustard seeds - 1/­­4 onion, chopped - 2 tablespoons dried coriander - 1 teaspoons red pepper powder - I teaspoon turmeric - 1 teaspoon curry powder - 1 medium cauliflower, cut into bite sized florets - 1 potatoes, peeled and cut into 1 inch cubes - 1 tablespoon cilantro, chopped Place the oil in a medium wok or frying pan over medium-high heat. Add the cumin or mustard seeds and cook for 1-3 minutes, or until they start popping. When the seeds pop, add the onion. Cook for 3-5 minutes, or until the it turns golden. Season the onion with the dried coriander, red pepper powder, turmeric and curry powder, taking care to stir and ensure all spices are evenly distributed. Add the cauliflower florets and potato cubes. Stir, cover with a lid and turn heat down to medium low. Cook, stirring occasionally, for about 12-15 minutes or until the potatoes and cauliflower are al dente. Uncover, stir and cook 4-7 minutes more, or until the vegetables are fully cooked. Divide into 2 portions, sprinkle with cilantro and enjoy! The post Aloo Gobi appeared first on Meatless Monday.

(Jalapeno) Sauerkraut

November 4 2017 Vegan Dad 

(Jalapeno) Sauerkraut I feared fermenting veggies for a long time. What if I give my family food poisoning? How will I know if something is fermented properly? Isnt it all too complicated? But now that I took the plunge, I wish I had done so earlier. This recipe, even though it has 8 steps, is utterly simplicity and produces a tender, tangy, and flavourful kraut. A chopped jalape?o only deepens the flavour without adding too much heat. Add two if you want more zip. Im not a big fan of veggie dogs, but with a homemade bun and this kraut, I would eat them any day. INGREDIENTS - 1 head of cabbage - 2-3 tbsp coarse salt (like pickling or kosher salt)--more as needed - 1 chopped jalapeno pepper (including seeds)--optional METHOD 1. Remove 2-3 outer leaves from the cabbage. 2. Core cabbage, and slice very thinly (a food processor works wonders here). 3. Woking in batches if necessary, place cabbage (and jalape?o, if using) in a large non-reactive bowl and sprinkle with salt. Start mashing/­­squeezing the cabbage with your hands, or use a wooden sauerkraut pounder. This will force liquid from the cabbage. The cabbage will start to go translucent, and you should get a good amount of liquid from it. If not, use a little more salt. 4. Transfer the cabbage to a large glass jar. I use a big 56 oz jar. Tamp down the cabbage (here is where the sauerkraut pounder really comes in handy) so that the liquid covers the cabbage. 5. Cover the cabbage with the leaves your removed in step 1. Rip the leaves into small pieces if necessary. Fully cover the cabbage right to the edges of the jar. Use a knife to tuck the edges down a bit so that pieces of cabbage dont float tup during the ferment (see pic above). 6. Tamp the cabbage leaves down so that they are submerged. 7. Place a smaller jar (or something non-reactive) on top of the leaves. It needs to reach the top of the bigger jar. Place the canning lid on upside down (i.e. rubber seal up), and then tighten on the metal ring. The idea here is to keep the kraut and leaves compressed and submerged throughout the ferment. The upside down lid will allow gas to escape during the ferment. 8. Place somewhere away from sunlight and direct heat (coolish room temp is great). Ferment away! I think 1.5 weeks makes for the perfect kraut. It will bubble and foam--this is what you want to see. Check every few days: remove the lid and take a sniff. It should not smell rotten or unpleasant. To my nose, kraut that has not fermented long enough has a slightly metallic air to it which mellows out after about 10 or 11 days. Remove the cabbage leaves from the top and enjoy! Refrigerate until used up.

Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh

October 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Ally Walsh is a model and co-founder of Los Angeles-based organic coffee company, Canyon Coffee. Though we’ve never met, we love Ally’s easy-going approach to wellness, her beautiful instagram, and what her and her partner are doing over at Canyon. It’s an all-around girl crush :) In this interview, Ally tells us about her transition from a vegetarian diet to a feel-good, intuitive diet, the tonic she always takes before bed, the books she’s found to be instrumental to her well-being, exercise, beauty, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I love routine, but that probably has a lot do to with the fact that my schedule is constantly changing! I really enjoy my morning routine, waking up early and making coffee at home. But its always nice to switch things up and come back to that. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning.  I definitely try to ease into my morning. I used to grab my phone first thing when I woke up--now I keep it out of the bedroom. Instead, the first thing I do when I wake up (on a good day!) is sit upright and do a 20 minute meditation. To me, theres no better way to start off the day. Meditation is always followed by some Canyon Coffee. At home, I typically make a pour-over, which is another little opportunity to be mindful as I start my day. On a day off its so nice to sit outside on the porch with some friends and read and have coffee together. We get the New York Times delivered to our house on Sunday mornings and I could spend the whole day reading and relaxing outside in the sun. Its honestly one of my favorites things to do. If I’m shooting though, or out of town for a job, most days start early and end late. The schedule for modeling is often last minute--I sometimes dont know my schedule until the day or night before. In contrast, its nice to have Canyon, where I make my own schedule. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I make a glass of calm/­­magnesium before bed every night! I take that with me wherever I go--security always pull me aside at the airport to ask about what this white powder is ha :) Aside from magnesium, Ill sometimes make a warm tonic with some ashwaganda. And reading always helps me to fall asleep. I guess I wouldn’t call it a ritual, but I do love watching a show or movie before sleep, too. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast: I have a cup of black coffee and almond butter or avocado toast with gluten-free bread every morning. Im a creature of habit... I have my favorite go-tos, and Im happy eating them every day. If I have to work super early sometimes i like to make overnight chia seed oatmeal. Ill mix in some oats, chia seeds, almond milk, maca and flax seeds, and then in the morning top it off with some fruit and almond butter. Lunch:  Usually a salad with quinoa, avocado, kimchi, roasted seasonal vegetables, seeds, lemon and different oils like grapeseed, olive, and white wine vinegar. I would also be very happy with just roasted kabocha squash and pesto :) Snack: Cashews, pumpkin seeds, Dates and almond butter, green juice, avocado toast, and currently addicted to Honey Mamas Chocolate! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Well, it kind of comes with starting a coffee company ;) Some people are surprised to learn, though, that I only drink one cup of black coffee in the morning! Thats pretty much it. I cant do too much caffeine. Only on rare occasions, like when Im on vacation, will I have an afternoon espresso or cortado. I was in Copenhagen and Stockholm recently, and fell in love with oatmilk cortados! Definitely pushed my caffeine limit there! -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I honestly don’t! I love raw chocolate, but Im really sensitive to sugar! So Im kind of weird in that I really dont love sweets. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? In addition to magnesium at night (for sleep), Ill take ashwaganda at any time of the day for my adrenals, and probiotics daily. I feel such a difference when I take b12, too. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Yes. Yoga has been such an important practice to me, for years. I usually go to a class a couple times a week. I intersperse that with hiking in the Santa Monica mountains and walks on the beach. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I actually look forward to exercise. I dont really partake in any forms of exercise that arent enjoyable. For example, Ive never really gotten into spinning or boot camp-style workouts. I love getting out in nature for hikes, and I find an hour-and-a-half in the yoga studio to be very meditative. After a long work day, I really look forward to being able to do something nice for my body. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really think the most beautiful people are those that feel confident in their skin and are who they want to be--not what society expects them to be. Someone thats naturally comfortable in any setting. As a model, so much emphasis is put on the external, and thats important for a photograph or video. But in person, beauty really does come from within. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I think the most important thing for healthy skin is to eat and drink clean. Especially drinking lots of water. As for products, I use the most natural that I can find. I love Earth tu Face, True Botanicals, Osea and Linne! I use oils for moisturizing and just use water to wash my face in the morning. I love using Bodha and CAP Beauty rose water spray, too. Ill try to do a face mask once a week from Wildcare while taking a bath! Its very relaxing :) -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water! I also think getting a good night of sleep is just as important! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Stay hydrated. My mom is 59 & has the most beautiful skin – not one wrinklel! And she swears by drinking lots of water! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Im trying to get better at this, but acupuncture has been a life saver! Its a place to relax and reset. I see Maria at Elysia Life Care and she is life-changing! I think getting into a regular routine of acupuncture and meditation can help so much with stress. After having a consistent routine with both, you start to notice things that used to stress you or make you upset no longer have the same power or effect on you. You can laugh it off, or just observe it and not be affected by it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Going on a walk always helps. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Lycopene vitamin C packets, lots of ginger and tea tree oil (usually just put it in my water!) -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? This has been a learning process for me, how to balance everything. Modeling, Canyon Coffee, relationship with my partner, my friends, and time for myself. Especially with starting a company with your partner, that start-up grind can be all-consuming because theres always more work you can do! So weve had to learn how to turn off- and make sure to make time for a date night! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? My goal is to maintain a state of love (as opposed to state of stress, or lack, or anger, etc.). I was lucky to learn from a qi gong master named George Falcon for a couple years before he passed, and I feel like his teachings provided me with tools to help stay in this mindset throughout the stressors and obstacles of daily life. One of the big ones is to take responsibility for our actions and state of being. Its easy for us to blame, to say he, she, or it made me feel this way. But really its our decision. Of course, we sometimes fall out of that consciousness of love. When Im not feeling well, my first step is to take a break. To meditate, listen to a recorded guided meditation of George, go on a walk or a hike. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Ive made different changes throughout my life that have been substantial in terms of my wellness. I stopped eating meat when I was 19, then introduced fish (mainly salmon!) back in years later. Acupuncture has perhaps been the most substantial in helping me maintain balance and wellness. All of these changes or decisions are really informed by just listening to my body. You can get caught up in the mindset and identity of, say, Im vegan. But its important to check in with yourself and ask, Am I feeling good? Is this helping live a balanced and vibrant life? If not, then its important to make a change! -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. So many books! If I had to pick two, Id say Anatomy of the Spirit by Caroline Myss and Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert. Anatomy really opened me to the power of our bodies to heal and self-nourishment. It helped me connect my mental and spiritual state to my health and well-being. Its a book you can go back to, re-read and continue to learn from over time. Big Magic was instrumental in motivating me to start Canyon Coffee. It made me feel like I had more to give, creatively, and pushed me to start something with a greater purpose. It brought clarity to the creative process for me, breaking it down in a way that makes it approachable and applicable to my own life. Its one of those books that really inspires you to follow your dreams, and what could be more important for self-nourishment? Knowlegde -- You run Canyon Coffee together with your boyfriend, Casey. What was your path to starting your own coffee company? Personally, I was feeling uninspired. I felt like I wasnt making the most of my creativity and talents. Ive always been grateful for my modeling career, but I had also always wanted to start something of my own, and I was feeling that itch. Casey and I had both fallen in love with coffee over the years... through making it at home together and visiting coffee shops in our travels and around LA. Casey actually started working in the coffee industry, and we became friends with a roaster, James. Eventually, our passion for it grew to the point that we had the thought: why not start our own company? It really was a natural culmination. The moment we decided we wanted to do it, we just never looked back. -- What is your process when choosing beans for Canyon Coffee? Are there certain growing practices, flavor profiles, or geographical locations that are important to you? The universal practice of tasting different beans is called cupping. It involves preparing small roasted samples of different beans exactly the same way and trying them at the same time. For Canyon, our parameters narrow down our options. We usually decide on a country first, and then see what organic, seasonal beans grown at high altitudes are available through the network of importers near us in California. Then we order samples, cup, and choose the bean that smells and tastes best to us. High altitude is important because the elevation makes the coffee plant grow slower and put more energy into producing cherries. The slow growth results in cherries (and coffee beans) that are much more flavorful and vibrant. To start Canyon, we focused on Latin American coffees and wanted to find amazing-tasting beans in the chocolatey /­­ caramel flavor profile. We went with beans from Guatemala and Colombia first, because theyre known for these flavor profiles and they have great infrastructure for small coffee producers to process and export their beans. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love going to the movies :) And a nice dinner out before or after. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Anatomy of the Spirit .. anything from Krishnamurti & Ram Dass Song/­­Album – Paul Simon – Graceland, Feist – Let it Die, Lord Huron – Lonesome Dreams Movie – Beginners Piece of Art – Robert Lango Men In the Cities, Alfred Stieglitz’ Portraits of Georgia OKeeffe -- What are your favorite places to eat in LA? Gjusta/­­ Gjelina, Honey Hi, Amara Kitchen, Pace, Botanica, Necco, Destroyer, Erewhon -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Im actually in the process of moving out of my house right now! Were taking advantage of the end of our lease to do some traveling and try out living in some new neighborhoods. As a result, Im having to put a lot of my stuff in storage. Its been really nice to get rid of a lot of things and simplify to the essentials. But as far as traveling goes, I always have with me.. – new book and magazines – headphones – Jesse Kamm pants – Nikes – journal – Bodha rose water spray – probiotics – magnesium and ashwaganda  – sparkling water – ursa major rings – eye mask – almond butter packets -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Emily LAmi of Bodha, and Lacy Phillips at Free & Native! Both these women are a constant inspiration! You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Kale & Mushroom Tortilla

October 15 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Kale & Mushroom Tortilla I tried to write this post late last night after all kids had been tucked to bed. I was sitting down in our couch with my laptop on my knee and a bar of dark chocolate, a jar of salted almonds and a glass of water within reach. I was ready to do this. The next thing I remember is Isac’s hand pulling my hair three hours later. A dream had woken him up and he wanted me to come sleep next to him. I took a quick look at my computer and realized I had written zero words. So, new try today. This time I’m sitting at an outside cafe in broad daylight so I’ll hopefully not fall asleep here. Today’s recipe is an autumnal approach on tortilla. You know that potato and egg cake that is sold on the counter in literally every corner shop, cafe and tapas bar in Spain. It’s a great snack and super popular with our kids whenever we are in Barcelona so we have started making it at home as well. It’s easy to get lost in the Spanish tortilla vs Italian frittata discussion. When I previewed the first version of this recipe on Instagram, I already received some comments that “this isn’t a Spanish tortilla”. Well of course not. It’s a Swedish tortilla. Seriously though, I realize that we have bent this recipe quite far - adding kale and mushrooms to it and changing the cooking method a bit - but it is still tastes like a tortilla to me. It’s more potato based than a frittata and slightly firmer so that it can be cut out into triangles, eaten with your hands either warm or cold. We finish it off in the oven rather than flipping it (which apparently is the Italian way of doing it rather than the Spanish) but it’s just because we are lazy and it works so well. And semantics aside, the most important part is that it tastes really good. It also has a rather short ingredient list and has become another one of our last minute dinner solutions. First time we made this autumn version was a few weeks ago after I had scored a huge bag of funnel chanterelles at the market. After having made this stew on the first night and a version of this sandwich for lunch the day after, the bag was still half full. So we added them to a dinner tortilla. Just adding a few more vegetables to a simple tortilla turns it into dinner rather than just a snack. Especially if served with a side salad. These mushrooms are cheaper than chanterelles and usually easier to find in the forest. But if you can’t find them, just use regular chanterelles or any another mushroom. Here are a few tips and tricks that we use when making tortilla. o Don’t bother peeling the potatoes. If you use fresh and scrubbed potatoes, keeping the peal on. Not only does it save time, but also makes your tortilla more rustic. Dicing the potatoes instead of slicing it also helps making it more rustic. o Traditionally in a tortilla, the onion is first sautéed for 20 minutes and then the potatoes are fried in LOTS of olive oil for another 20-30 minutes but we prefer precooking the diced potatoes in water instead (while the onion is sautéing). It saves time and we can reduce the amount of oil. If you have precooked potatoes leftover in the fridge, they are perfect for this dish. o We make this with butter instead of olive oil because it’s more heat resistant and it brings out the best flavor in mushrooms. But you can of course use any oil of preference. o Fry the mushrooms on a low/­­medium heat. Don’t crowd the pan and always listen for the sizzle. If you cant hear them sizzling, the temperature is too low. o Luise has developed an intolerance against garlic (especially raw) so we have kept it out of this recipe, but I bet it could be good along with the mushrooms and kale. o If you don’t like kale, try it with spinach. Or use the same method with another range of vegetables. o Feta cheese is also really good in this combination. Just crumble it into the egg mixture. or before placing it in the oven. o We finish the tortilla in the oven because it’s easier, but you can flip it by sliding the half-cooked frittata onto a plate. It will still be some liquid in the middle so you need to be careful doing this. Than you place the saucepan over the frittata (and plate) and simply flip it upside down while holding the plate as a lid so it falls down into the sauce pan. And then fry it for a few more minutes on that side. Kale & Mushroom Tortilla Makes approx 8 serving 1 onion  350 g /­­ 2 1/­­2 cups firm potatoes, diced 5 tbsp butter or oil 2 cups /­­ 100 g Funnel chanterelles (or any other mushroom) 2 leaves /­­ 30 g kale, stems removed 1 large handful fresh parsley  6-8 eggs (depending on the size) salt and pepper Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Add water to a medium size saucepan and bring to a boil. Peel and chop the onions. Scrub and dice the potatoes into 1-2 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch cubes. Heat 1 tbsp butter in an ovenproof frying pan. Sauté the onions on low heat for about 10-15 minutes until soft, translucent and smells sweet, stir occasionally. Meanwhile add the potatoes to the boiling salted water and cook for about 13-15 minutes on medium heat, they should be almost done. Drain the cooking water and add the potatoes to the saucepan with onions, along with one more tablespoon butter. Sauté for a few minutes more to give the potatoes some flavor and color. Pour the onion and potatoes into a separate bowl and put the saucepan back on the heat. Clean the mushrooms, slice them into desired size and add to the pan along with a knob of butter. Fry the mushrooms on low/­­medium heat (you should here them sizzling without burning) for 5-6 minutes or until they have released some moisture and started caramelizing. Rinse the kale, chop finely and add it to the pan along with fresh parsley. Let wilt down for a few minutes. Salt generously and then pour into the bowl with potatoes. Wipe the saucepan clean and put it back on the heat along with a knob of butter. Beat the eggs with salt and pepper. Pour the vegetables into the egg mixture and then tip it into the warm saucepan (it’s essential that the pan is warm and buttered. Let it fry for about two minutes (preferably with a lid or a plate on top) and then place the pan in the oven (without lid) and switch on the broiler. After about 10 minutes it should be firm, golden and ready. Wait a few minutes for it to cool down and then run a spatula around the edges to make sure it comes off easily. Cut into triangles and serve with a side salad. It can also be stored in the fridge for a couple of days. PS! Look at these two photos of Luise and Noah, taken exactly one year apart.

Fried Brown Rice with Vegetables

May 22 2017 Meatless Monday 

Fried rice gets a bad reputation for being to greasy, carb-y and lacking in veggies, but when you make your own quick version at home, it can become a healthy, veggie-loaded meatless meal! This recipe was developed by Alexandra Shytsman of The New Baguette and is featured in her free Weeknight Cooking E-book. Serves 4-6 - 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon coconut oil OR cold-pressed organic canola oil - 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil - 2 medium garlic cloves, minced - 1 tablespoon minced ginger - Pinch of hot red pepper flakes - 1 medium yellow onion, cut into small dice - 1 large carrot, peeled and cut into small dice - 1 bell pepper, cut into small dice - 1 cup frozen edamame OR peas - 3 cups cooked brown rice, cold from the fridge* - 3 tablespoons soy sauce, divided - 1 egg - 2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds - 2 scallions, chopped Heat coconut and sesame oils in a wok or large non-stick skillet over high heat. Add garlic, ginger and pepper flakes, and cook for 1 minute. Add onion, carrot and pepper and cook until vegetables are just starting to brown, about 3 minutes, tossing occasionally. Mix in edamame or peas and cook for another minute. Add rice and stir to incorporate evenly. Cook until rice is heated through and starting to brown, 2-3 minutes, stirring occasionally. In a small bowl, beat the egg with 1 tablespoon soy sauce. Push the rice mixture to one side of the skillet and pour beaten egg onto opposite side. Stir the egg continuously until it is scrambled. Season rice mixture with remaining 2 tablespoons soy sauce, and toss everything in the skillet together to combine evenly. Garnish with sesame seeds and scallions. *To cook perfectly fluffy brown rice, bring 2 cups of water to a boil in a small pot, and season with 1/­­4 teaspoon salt. Turn heat down to low, add 1 cup of rice, cover tightly with a lid, and simmer until all water is absorbed, 15-20 minutes – do not stir rice while cooking. Turn heat off and let rice stand covered for another 10 minutes to steam. Fluff with a fork before serving/­­using. The post Fried Brown Rice with Vegetables appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway

May 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway My first experience with South Indian fare was in Toronto, in a buzzing, cafeteria-style restaurant that looked like a food court in any American mall, but instead of fast food, the offering consisted of the most mind-blowing, bold-flavored South Indian dishes that weren’t like anything I’d ever tasted before. That ended up being one of the most memorable meals of my life. Since then, I’ve continued to seek out restaurants that specialized in South Indian cuisine, but rarely considered trying my hand at any of the dishes at home. Chitra Agrawal’s debut cookbook Vibrant India changed all of that for me. Chitra has spent years documenting her family’s traditionally vegetarian South Indian recipes on her blog, as well as adapting them to use the local, seasonal produce that she comes across in Brooklyn, where she lives. Her cookbook is a stunning collection of modern recipes, which honor her mother’s South Indian heritage, rooted in the ayurvedic tradition. The cookbook truly opens up a whole new world of cooking to those of us used to a more Western approach to food (and we are giving away a copy, see below :D ). In a her intro, Chitra explains the difference between North and South Indian cooking, and chances are, the Indian food you’ve tried likely originated in the North – think naan, samosas and curries. Cuisine from the South is generally characterized by the use of lentils, rice and specific spice mixtures in dishes like dosa and sambar – delicious stuff that doesn’t get nearly as much attention in the West. The book is filled with Chitra’s super comprehensive explanations of Indian cooking techniques like tempering spices, etc., which takes the intimidation factor out of the recipes. Turns out, making flavorful and authentically rooted South Indian dishes at home is totally doable. I’ve already made the Dosa, Lemony Lentil Soup, Banana, Coconut and Cardamom Ice Cream, as well as a few of the rices, and each one came out explosive in flavor, as well nourishing to the core. One of my favorite chapters turned out to be the Rice and Bread chapter, which offers a ton of ideas on preparing rice to be enjoyed as a main dish. Who would have thought that basmati rice could be so flavorful and substantial?! There are recipes for Lemon Peanut Rice, Fragrant Eggplant and Green Pepper Rice, Coconut Rice with Cashews, and Yogurt Rice with Pomegranate and Mint, but my favorite one of all turned out to be the Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios, which I’m sharing here. Chitra talks about often getting a hefty bunch of dill from her farm share and not knowing what to do with the volume, which sparked the idea for this recipe that uses up plenty of dill. The result is rice so fragrant that it’s nothing short of heavenly. Chitra explains that she aims to achieve a balance of sweet, sour, bitter, spicy, and savory flavors in her recipes, which is what I mean when I describe her dishes as explosive, and that very much applies to this rice recipe as well. Other chapters within the book include Breakfast and Light Meals, Salads and Yogurts, Stir-Fries and Curries, Soups, Stews and Lentils, Festive Bites and Snacks,  Sweets and Drinks, Chutneys and Pickles – basically a ton of deliciousness packed into a beautiful cookbook. Well done, Chitra! In case you are wondering, the book does call for specialty Indian ingredients that you might not be able to find at your mainstream supermarket. However, if you enjoy cooking and learning about new ingredients, it’s SO worth seeking out a local Indian market in your area. I rely on our nearby Indian market for stocking up on ghee, fresh spices, rice and a variety of lentils, all at an affordable price. All the ingredients are also available online. Giveaway: To enter to win a copy of Vibrant India, leave a comment here letting us know if you would be interested in seeing weekly plant-based meal plans, complete with recipes and shopping lists as a new series on this site. We are thinking of starting up a conversation about meal prep, and would love to gauge your interest! The winner will be selected at random on Wednesday, May 24th. Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the turmeric rice 1 cup basmati rice (makes about 4 cups cooked) ⅛ teaspoon turmeric powder for the lime and dill rice with pistachios 4 cups cooked turmeric rice 2 tablespoons mild-flavored oil such as canola (I used coconut) ½ teaspoon black mustard seeds pinch of asafetida (hing) powder 1 teaspoon chana dal 1 teaspoon urad dal 5 fresh curry leaves 1 dried red chile, broken in half 1 large shallot or ½ medium yellow onion - finely chopped small bunch of dill - tough stalks removed, chopped ½ to ¾ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon sambar powder (optional) ¼ cup shelled pistachios - lightly toasted and coarsely chopped juice of half a lime (about 1½ tablespoons), plus more as needed serving options raita or plain yogurt hot pickle or Brooklyn Delhi (Chitras company!) achaar Instructions to make the turmeric rice Wash the rice in several changes of water until the water runs clear. Soak the rice in water, generously covered, for at least 30 minutes. Drain thoroughly, using a fine-mesh sieve. Place rice and 1¾ cups water in a medium saucepan. Mix in the turmeric powder. Place the saucepan over high heat and bring to a boil. Once the water is boiling, cover the saucepan and turn the heat to the lowest setting on your stove. Cook until the rice in tender and there is no water left in the pan, about 15 minutes. Turn off the heat. Remove the saucepan from the stove and leave it covered for 10 minutes, to allow the grains to separate. Fluff with a fork. to make the lime and dill rice with pistachios Coat the bottom of a wok (I used a large sauté pan w/­­ a lid) with the oil and place over medium heat. When the oil is hot and shimmering, add one black mustard seed. When the seed sizzles and pops, add the rest of the mustard seeds and asafetida. Keep a lid handy to cover the pan while the mustard seeds are popping. When the popping starts to subside (a few seconds), immediately add the chana dal and urad dal. Stir to coat with oil, and turn the heat to medium-low. Continue to stir the dals so they evenly roast, until they turn a reddish golden brown and smell nutty, less than a minute. Rub the curry leaves between you fingers a little to release their natural oils, and drop them and the dried red chile into the oil. Cover immediately, as moisture from the curry leaves will cause the oil to spatter. Then stir to evenly coat everything with oil, a few seconds. Add the shallot to the wok and fry over medium heat until softened, less than a minute. Add the dill, ¼ teaspoon of the salt, and a couple tablespoons of water. Turn the heat to medium-low, cover, and cook for 10 to 15 minutes. Stir from time to time. When cooked, the dill should be darker in color and not have as strong a flavor as raw dill. Add the sambar powder. Fry for another minute. Stir in the cooked rice and season with ¼ to ½ teaspoon salt. Stir-fry for 1 to 2 minutes. Mix in the pistachios, reserving a few for garnish. Turn off the heat. Stir in the lime juice and garnish with the reserved pistachios. Taste for salt and adjust as needed. Serve hot with yogurt and hot pickle. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways Summer Vegetable Saute Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Nasi Goreng

March 23 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Nasi Goreng I couldn’t even tell you how many times I had Nasi Goreng while I was in Malaysia. It was definitely often. Like, really often. Not only is this traditional vegetable fried rice dish usually totally delicious, it’s also usually easy to find and (with little to no effort) a great vegan option. Pretty much everywhere I went in the five weeks in Malaysia, this dish was on the menu or easy to order at almost any restaurant. Especially out of the big cities and in the countryside - and particularly on the islands and beaches - this is a vegan/­­vegetarian stand-by that is never hard to find. (By the way, based on my travels, this is true for most of Southeast Asia, including Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar… but the dish is found under other names and with local flavors.) This becomes an almost daily meal, if vegan options are limited. On Pulau Pangkor, there were two food places (more shacks than restaurants) that served fantastic Nasi Goreng and vegetable fried rice. And in Borneo, staying in the Permai rainforest, the local restaurant and the nearby food court had vegetable fried rice, or Nasi Goreng. There were also many breakfast or lunch buffets at hotels and restaurants that had rice dishes like this. Contrarily, when in Penang and Kuala Lumpur I was usually so blown away by other vegan choices that I didn’t eat Nasi Goreng as often. Nasi Goreng’s flavors and textures forge powerful memories for anyone who’s been to Malaysia or Indonesia - or even just a Malaysian or Indonesian restaurant - whether vegan, vegetarian, or neither. Just as with so many classic recipes - from region to region and family to family this dish is made a million different ways. This is mine… inspired by so many excellent meals on my adventures. When I created this recipe for the Malaysia cookbook, I made sure to hit all the best, unique flavors in a good Nasi Goreng: Fresh galangal root (or ginger), lime juice, spicy chili, and a thin, tangy sauce provided by the mix of Shoyu soy sauce, vinegar, and citrus zest. I also round out the savory flavors with some sweetness. Traditionally in Malaysia, this dish would be served with just a bit of chopped vegetables (and way more rice). For my recipe, I’ve got a lot of the good stuff, included the crumbled tofu - which, by the way, replaces scrambled egg - sometimes found in traditional Nasi Goreng. By the way, I have many similar recipes inspired by other travels and other countries and cuisines - including: Cambodian Fried Rice, Mexican Magic Rice, and Vegetable Fried Rice from my World, Mexico, and Sri Lanka vegan cookbooks. After you’ve tried my Nasi Goreng, check out the other recipes and decide which country’s classic fried rice is your favorite. Nasi Goreng traditional vegetable fried rice recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA available in English & German serves 2 to 3 /­­ time 40 min + - 3.5 oz (100 g) firm tofu - 1 cup (190 g) broken jasmine rice or short grain brown rice - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - 1 2/­­3 cup (400 ml) water - 1 cup (100 g) chinese cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli or bok choy finely chopped - 1 medium (90 g) carrot finely chopped or sliced - 2-3 Tbs oil - 1 tsp sesame oil optional - 3 (50 g) spring onions chopped, separated into white ends and greens - 1 or 2 cloves garlic finely chopped - 1 large red chili finely chopped optional - 1/­­2 in. (1 cm) fresh galangal or ginger finely chopped - 1 tsp coriander ground - 1/­­2 tsp black pepper ground - 2 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu) - 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice or 2 tsp rice vinegar - 1 tsp lime zest or lemon zest optional - 1 tsp sugar or agave syrup - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - lime slices for garnish - Cut tofu in slabs, wrap in clean kitchen towel. Weight with heavy cutting boards to press out excess moisture. Let sit 20 min. Unwrap tofu and crumble into a bowl. - Wash and drain rice thoroughly. - Bring water to boil in a small pot. Add rice and salt. Stir. Return to boil. Reduce heat to low and cover. Simmer 12 to 20 min as needed. After water is absorbed, remove from heat. Fluff rice with a fork. Cover and let sit and cool, ideally an hour or more. - Heat oil in a large wok or frying pan on medium high. Add chopped spring onion ends, garlic, chili (if using), galangal (or ginger), ground coriander, and black pepper. Fry, stirring constantly, until lightly browned, 2-3 min. - Add chopped carrots. Fry, stirring constantly, 2-3 min. Add crumbled tofu. Mix well. Fry, stirring regularly, until tofu begins to turn golden brown, 3-5 min. Add chopped cabbage (or other vegetables). Fry, stirring constantly, until vegetables start to soften, 4-5 min. - Whisk soy sauce, lime (or lemon) juice, zest, sugar (or agave syrup), and sea salt in a small bowl. - Add cooked rice to frying vegetables. Mix well. Add soy sauce mix and spring onions greens. Combine well. Fry, stirring constantly until liquid has been absorbed and rice and vegetables are moderately browned, 5-7 min. Remove from heat. Cover until ready to serve. - Serve with lime slices. vegan recipe for Nasi Goreng from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA The post Nasi Goreng appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Penang Laksa

March 13 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Penang Laksa Incredibly, I’d been in Malaysia for almost two weeks before I got to try Laksa, the legendary noodle soup. Even before the trip, I’d read about the intensely loved, powerful and fiery, somewhat-sour soup in food blogs and food guides to Malaysia. I’d checked out plenty of recipes and seen lots of super tasty photos. Once I got to Malaysia, whenever I asked locals what dishes I had to try, I heard again and again: Laksa! Okay, great, but where? And the answer was: Penang! Penang was hands-down my favorite place to eat on the Malaysia trip. (Singapore was a fairly close second. Penang was just more artsy, soulful, and real). I collected maps with locations of the best street food in Georgetown (Penang) and scoured the web and my travel guides for addresses of must-try vegetarian restaurants. On my second day in town, I had lunch at the vegan restaurant Sushi Kitchen, and met the chef/­­owner, who made a list for me of Must-See places and dishes. That night I went to Luk Yea Yan, a vegetarian Chinese restaurant known for fantastic flavors and inexpensive eats. I ordered up the Laksa soup. Three minutes later my oversized bowl of hot, steaming, bright red soup arrived - with countless ingredients and toppings piled up to the rim. There were at least three kinds of noodles, tofu cubes, soya and seitan chunks, numerous vegetables, about four kinds of fresh herbs - and balanced on top: a soup spoon with a thick, red curry paste on it. I’d read about this… Traditionally Laksa is usually served with a generous spoonful of rempeh - spicy red curry paste for you to stir in to the hot red broth yourself. I knew what to do. I did it. A half dozen flavors immediately exploded in my mouth: tamarind, chili, lime, pineapple, cilantro, mint. This was followed by a second wave of flavors: an army of vegetables, tofu, and seitan slices. I slurped down the noodles and paddled pieces of everything with my chopsticks into my hungry jaws. I had to take a break a few times to catch my breath and cool the spice alarm with generous draws on my lemon iced tea. When I was done, my forehead was light with perspiration and my lips and tongue were tingling and alive. There was never a doubt whatsoever that I would include a vegan recipe for Penang Laksa in my new Malaysia cookbook. Several weeks later (after having tried vegan Laksa soup at least three other times in Malaysia) I was back in my kitchen in Germany and set to work. It took a few attempts to master the recipe, each try better than the last. And then I had it: my own epic Laksa recipe! Since then, I’ve made it probably ten more times, including for several dinner parties large and small, and plenty of times for lunch. It’s best on cold, cloudy days to fire up your mood and open you up! But I’ve also made it lots of other times, even in the summer, well… just because it’s so awesome and is always a dish guests talk about long after the meal. Penang Laksa classic Malaysian noodle soup recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA serves 2 to 3 /­­ time 45 min - 5 oz (150 g) seitan sliced - 3.5 oz (100 g) smoked tofu sliced - 1/­­3 cup (45 g) pineapple chopped - 1 Tbs vegetable oil  - 1 Tbs soy sauce or Vegan Fish Sauce - 7 oz (200 g) udon noodles (cooked) - 2 1/­­2 cups (600 ml) water  - 2/­­3 cup (150 ml) coconut milk  - 1 kefir lime leaf or 1 tsp lime zest  - fresh mint leaves chopped - fresh coriander leaves chopped - fresh thai basil leaves chopped - bean sprouts for garnish laksa spice paste: - 4 candlenuts or 2 Tbs cashews soaked 20 min in hot water, drained - 1 stalk lemongrass chopped - 1/­­2-1 large red chili chopped - 2 cloves garlic chopped - 1 shallot chopped - 3/­­4 in (2 cm) fresh galangal or ginger chopped - 1/­­2 tsp paprika ground (more as desired, for red color) - 1/­­2 tsp fennel seed ground - 1/­­2 tsp coriander ground - 2 tsp coconut sugar or agave syrup  - 3/­­4 tsp sea salt  - 1 tsp tamarind paste (seedless) - 2 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice  - 2 Tbs vegetable oil  - If using dried Udon: Cook, rinse, and drain 3.5 oz (100 g) noodles according to package instructions. - Blend spice paste ingredients in a small food processor until smooth. - Heat 1 Tbs oil a large pot or wok on medium high heat. Add sliced seitan and smoked tofu. Fry, turning regularly until edges are browned and crispy, 3-5 min. - Stir in chopped pineapple. Continue to stir-fry, 2-3 min. Add soy sauce (or Vegan Fish Sauce). Fry 2-3 min. Transfer to a plate or bowl. - Return pot or wok to medium high heat. Fry blended spice paste until it darkens and oil starts to separate, stirring constantly, 3-5 min. - Gradually stir in water, coconut milk and kefir lime leaf (or lime zest). Bring to simmer. Add cooked udon noodles. Return to simmer. Cook until noodles have slightly softened, 3-5 min. - Stir in fried seitan, tofu, and pineapple. Turn off heat. Cover until ready to serve. - Portion soup and noodles into bowls. Garnish with chopped herbs and bean sprouts. Serve. Panang Laksa vegan recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA (available as printed cookbook & ebook - in English & German) The post Penang Laksa appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

How to Use Less Energy When You Cook

March 10 2017 VegKitchen 

How to Use Less Energy When You Cook Trying to use less energy when you cook is an admirable goal. Energy efficient cooking reduces emissions and it can help save money in the household budget.

Mint Chocolate Power Bars

January 3 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Mint Chocolate Power Bars By placing two pillows under my left elbow, I can hold sleeping baby Gabriel with one arm and type this text on the laptop that is balancing on my right leg with the other hand. It’s brilliant! I can even reach that bowl of soaked oats with raisins, apple and crunchy peanut butter that stands there on the sofa table. Okay, maybe not brilliant. This balancing act is pretty tricky actually. And I suspect that my left arm will starting to go numb soon. I should probably focus on my son and just wait for Luise to get back from the shower. But I did promise 192 people on instagram that I would post this recipe today and I’ve already spent an hour tucking the other two kids to bed so I feel like I really need to do this now or I’ll be starting the year by breaking a promise. Therefore I am currently writing this post one-handed - sitting in a patchwork plaided sofa in a cute little airbnb apartment in Copenhagen that we’re renting for a few days - chewing on a peanut butter covered apple with a chubby little cherub snoring in my other hand. And Luise thinks I’m bad at multi tasking. Ha! Before we left, I prepared a batch of power bars for the car-ride down. When they don’t serve as car snacks, we use them as quick energy fuel at home whenever we or the kids are in need of a treat. A chocolate bar (or two) in my gym bag also makes a pretty compelling argument for dragging my tired daddy-of-three body to the gym. The bars rarely last long in our freezer. Lately, I have been completely hooked on this chocolate and mint combo. Combining fresh mint flavour with rich chocolate always seemed weird to me, but all of a sudden I have changed my mind. It’s brilliant and for some reason extra perfect as workout fuel. This recipe is based on the Hemp Bars in our first book but a little simpler and fresher in flavour. We top them with cacao nibs which not only make them look great but also adds a nice crunch to their texture. I asked Isac to assist me when I made these but he was pretty useless. When asked to pit the dates, he placed the dates in his mouth and the stones in the food processor (which nearly ruined the food processor). He also kept insisting that the cacao nibs were bombs that exploded into the bars, leaving giant craters after them. So if you think the bars look uneven, this little hooligan is to blame. By the way, I’m not writing one-handed anymore. Halfway along this post, I spilled some oats on Gabriel’s head so he woke up. Luise is nursing him now (and most probably also piercing an imaginary voodoo doll with my face on it with a thousand needles). I am not saying that I spilled on him on purpose, but it did make it a whole lot easier to write this text. Yup that was it. First post of the year. Giant craters, crying babies, voodoo dolls and eating chocolate at the gym. And I’m only 44 minutes late for my deadline. Not a bad start. Mint Chocolate Power Bars Makes approx. 18 bars  You can add a few tablespoons protein powder of choice (instead of the desiccated coconut) if you are making them as workout bars. Nuts can of course also be used instead of the seeds, if preferred. 150 g /­­ 1 cup mixed pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds, toasted if preferred 50 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup desiccated coconut, unsweetened 4 tbsp chia seeds 3 tbsp cacao powder 50 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup rolled oats 2 pinches sea salt 4 tbsp virgin coconut oil 200 g soft fresh dates (roughly 16 dates /­­ 1 packed cup), pitted 5 tbsp nut butter of choice (we love using a combination of tahini and cashew butter but peanut butter also works great) a few drops peppermint oil (or 2-3 tsp dried mint leaves, crushed) Topping 60 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup raw cacao nibs Line a 16 x 22 cm baking tin with parchment paper. Add the seeds, coconut, chia seeds, cacao powder, oats and salt to a food processor and pulse on high speed until coarsely crumbly. Pour into a bowl and add coconut oil, dates, nut butter, mint (oil or dried leaves) to the food processor. Run on high speed until entirely smooth and sticky. Add the seed and cacao crumbles and pulse quickly until mixed together. Help out with a spatula in case the mixture isnt combined. Taste and add more mint flavour or salt if needed, then pulse a few more times. Transfer to the baking tin and, using the palm of your hand or the back of a spoon (coated in coconut oil), press the mixture down very firmly to create an even and compact bar (roughly 2 cm high). Scatter the cacao nibs on top and use a spatula to press them down slightly into the mixture. Let set in the freezer for approx. 15-30 minutes before cutting into approx. 18 bars. Store the bars in an airtight container in the freezer and they will keep for a few months. You can wrap them in baking paper to make them more portable. Thaw them ever so slightly before serving. NB: For a nut-free alternative, replace the nut butter with a seed butter of choice.

Acai Banana Cake raw

December 23 2016 Veganpassion 

Acai Banana Cake raw Healthy and colorful cakes are the best combo. That's why I made this raw cake out of bananas and acai berries. The sweetness comes from the banana. To push it a little bit I have added some agave sirup and stevia. I could eat the cake the whole time. It is my all time favourite cake and it's very easy to make. The better your blender is the better your cream will get. The effort on a raw cake is not that high. You soak in cashew nuts over night and put the cake in the frige for a couple of hours. The actual preparation time is less than half hour. Makes 1 springform pan (18 cm diameter) For the cake base: 100 g almonds 30 g dates 1 tbsp. water For the base blend almonds, dates and water in a mixer. Don't blend too much. Keep it a little crunchy. Dab the springform pan with some oil and deposit clear film. Put in the almond mixture and press it on. For the creme: 200 g cashews 1 big ripe banana 2 tbsp. lemon juice 120 g coconut cream 100 g coconut butter 1 tsp. vanilla 50 g agave sirup 2 tsp. acai powder 1/­­2 tsp. curcuma powder Soak in cashews over night or at least 4 hours. Pour the water off and wash the cashews. Blend cashews, banana, lemon juice, coconut cream, coconut butter, vanilla, agave sirup to a fine cream. Split the cream. Mix 2/­­3 of it with acai powder and 1/­­3 with curcuma powder. Put 4/­­5 of the acai cream into the springform pan and layer the curcuma cream on top. Use the rest of the acai cream and put it in a decorating tube. Decorate the cake and use a toothpick to create a pattern. Bash the springform on your worktop to remove air wholes. Put it in the fridge over night or at least 4 hours. Enjoy!

Pumpkin and Kale with Creamy Polenta

October 17 2016 Meatless Monday 

Forget canned pumpkin! Truly eat with the seasons with this cool-weather recipe, which features whole pumpkin, leeks and hearty kale over a bed of comforting polenta. Top it off with a homemade basil dressing for a spectacular plant-based meal. This recipe comes to us from Elena of Happy Kitchen. Rocks. Serves 4 - For pumpkin and kale with creamy polenta: - 1 1/­­2 cup polenta - 4 1/­­2 cups water - 1/­­2 cup grated Parmesan (optional) - 1/­­2 small pumpkin - 1 small red chili pepper - 4 sprigs fresh thyme - vegetable oil - 1 clove garlic chopped - 7 oz curly kale chopped, veins removed - 1/­­3 leek sliced - black pepper - salt - 4 oz mozzarella (optional) - For the dressing: - 5 tablespoons olive oil - 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar - 1 teaspoon lemon juice - 1 teaspoon Demerara sugar (optional) - 2 tablespoons freshly chopped basil - black pepper - salt - 4 tablespoons pomegranate seeds (to serve) In a pot, bring water with a tablespoon of salt to a boil. Gradually add polenta, cover with a lid and reduce the heat to low. Cook for 10 minutes, stirring frequently. Remove from the heat, add parmesan (optional),cover and let rest for 15 minutes. Meanwhile, slice the pumpkin. Heat a lug of vegetable oil in a large pan or wok over medium high heat. Add pumpkin and cook until the pumpkin it is soft, about 8 minutes. Chop red chili pepper and thyme leaves and add them before the pumpkin is ready. Transfer to a plate and put the pan or wok back on the stove. Add a bit of oil to the pan and once it’s hot, add garlic and kale. Add a pinch of salt and black pepper and cook until soft, about 4 minutes. Transfer to a plate. Add leek slices and cook until soft and slightly golden, about 4 minutes. Make the dressing: combine olive oil, balsamic vinegar, lemon juice, Demerara sugar (optional), chopped basil, a pinch of salt and black pepper. Arrange polenta, pumpkin, kale and leek on two plates. Add sliced mozzarella (optional). Serve with balsamic dressing and pomegranate seeds. Enjoy! The post Pumpkin and Kale with Creamy Polenta appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Spiced and Seeded Multigrain Loaf & A Giveaway

September 15 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Spiced and Seeded Multigrain Loaf & A GiveawayBefore I tell you about this bread, I want to mention that we are hosting an amazing giveaway for one KoMo grain mill this week, so be sure to read on for the details – it’s a beauty! I have a friend who inspires me to no end (hi Ira!). When she comes over, we sit at my kitchen table for hours, exchanging stories and drinking way too many cups of tea. My husband is always amazed – what can we possibly be discussing for that long? Ira formally studied Ayurveda and has an amazing wealth of knowledge when it comes to a good wellness routine, so there’s one answer to his question. We can go on and on about things like oil pulling, abhyanga, herbs, Tibetan rites, and food, always food. She is one of those cooks who is just naturally really good at it. As in, every one of her ‘recipes’ sounds as if she threw a bunch of things together, always eyeing and never measuring, but the result is devastatingly delicious every time. The idea for this bread comes from this magician of a friend, who prepares something similar weekly. It falls into the category of soda breads, which is a lower maintenance breed of bread that rises with the help of baking soda instead of yeast. The approach here was to make a ‘complete’ loaf of bread, full of freshly ground flours, grains, seeds, nuts, and aromatic spices. It’s not a traditional loaf, being more dense, nutritious and filling than your basic sourdough – one slice goes a long way. I feel okay about making a simple sandwich with it for my eight year old’s school lunch, knowing that she will stay full throughout classes and an after school activity after eating it. It’s special and it’s powerful. Make it, and you will have a dependable accompaniment to any one of your meals throughout the week. This week, we are hosting one of the most exciting giveaways we’ve ever done. It’s for one KoMo grain mill from Pleasant Hill Grain – a beautiful, electric stone-grinding appliance for dry grains and beans, which I used/­­talked about in last week’s recipe. I utilized it to grind the wheat and rye for this bread, and baking with the super-fresh flours it produced was such a pleasure. I talked in depth about the benefits of stone grinding in my previous post, but basically, stone grinding preserves all of the grain’s nutrition and produces the most delicious flour. The mill itself is almost a museum-worthy object, skillfully crafted in Austria. I truly can’t wait for one of you to get a hold of this beauty. To enter the giveaway, Pleasant Hill Grain asks that you like their Facebook page, visit their website and leave a comment here with the product(s) you like from their offering – they will appreciate your feedback. The giveaway is for U.S. 48 Contiguous States only and open until 9/­­22/­­16. Good luck ;) Spiced and Seeded Multigrain Loaf   Print Serves: 1 loaf Ingredients 2 cups sprouted/­­whole spelt flour 1/­­2 cup rye flour 1/­­4 cup corn grits/­­polenta 1/­­4 cup steel cut oats ½ cup mixed chopped nuts and seeds (ex: walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, sunflower, pumpkin, sesame, chia and poppy seeds), plus more for garnish 1/­­4 cup coconut sugar 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 tablespoon coriander seeds - freshly ground 1 tablespoon cumin seeds - freshly ground 5 cardamom pods - freshly ground 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ cup millet - soaked overnight 1 1/­­3 cups plain kefir or yogurt neutral coconut oil or other vegetable oil for oiling the baking surface Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Combine spelt and rye flours, corn grits, steel cut oats, nuts and seeds, sugar, salt, baking soda and spices in a large bowl. Drain and rinse millet and set aside. Make a well in the center of the flour mix and pour kefir/­­yogurt in, then add the millet. Mix by gradually incorporating flour into the kefir in a circular motion. You should end up with a very soft dough thats not too sticky. Turn the dough onto a well-floured working surface and gently roll into the flour. Shape into a round loaf. Place the loaf onto a well-oiled baking surface - a cast-iron pan or tray. Alternatively, put the dough into a well-oiled or lined loaf pan. Slice the top surface of the bread a couple times and sprinkle with nuts and seeds of choice. Bake for 40-45 minutes, until the crust is golden. The base of the bread should sound hollow when you tap on it. Notes If you dont have rye flour, use 2 1/­­2 cups sprouted/­­whole spelt flour. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Raw Summer Snack Basket Sprouted Sourdough Bread for Fermentation Week Raw Onion Bread Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange Miso Glaze & A New Cookbook! .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Spiced and Seeded Multigrain Loaf & A Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Kale, Mushroom & Potato Tortilla

October 15 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Kale, Mushroom & Potato Tortilla I tried to write this post late last night after all kids had been tucked to bed. I was sitting in our couch with my laptop on my knee and a bar of dark chocolate, a jar of salted almonds and a glass of water within reach. I was ready to do this. The next thing I remember is Isac’s hand pulling my hair three hours later. A dream had woken him up and he wanted me to come sleep next to him. I took a quick look at my computer and realized I had written zero words. So, new try today. This time I’m sitting at an outside cafe in broad daylight so I’ll hopefully not fall asleep here. Today’s recipe is an autumnal approach on tortilla. You know that potato and egg cake that is sold on the counter of literally every corner shop, cafe and tapas bar in Spain. It’s a great snack and super popular with our kids whenever we are in Barcelona so we have started making it at home as well. It’s easy to get lost in the Spanish tortilla vs Italian frittata discussion. When I previewed the first version of this recipe on Instagram, I already received some comments that “this isn’t a Spanish tortilla”. Well of course not. It’s a Swedish tortilla. Seriously though, I realize that we have bent this recipe quite far - adding kale and mushrooms to it and changing the cooking method a bit - but it is still tastes like a tortilla to me. It’s more potato based than a frittata and slightly firmer so that it can be cut out into triangles and eaten with your hands either warm or cold. We finish it in the oven rather than flipping it (which apparently is more common for a frittata) but it’s just because we are lazy and it’s the easiest method. And semantics aside, the most important part is that it tastes really good, has a short ingredient list and has quickly become one of our favorite last minute dinner solutions. First time we made this autumn version was a few weeks ago after I had scored a huge bag of funnel chanterelles at the market. After having made this stew on the first night and a version of this sandwich for lunch the day after, their were still mushrooms left in the bag. So we added them to a dinner tortilla. It’s amazing how you can turn a simple tortilla into a dinner just by adding some more vegetables to it. Especially if you also serve it with a side salad. These particular mushrooms are cheaper than chanterelles and usually easier to find in large quantities in the forest. But if you can’t find them, just use regular chanterelles or any another mushroom. Here are a few tips and tricks that we use when making tortilla. o Don’t bother peeling the potatoes. If you use fresh and scrubbed potatoes, keeping the peal on not only saves time, but also makes your tortilla more rustic looking. Dicing the potatoes instead of slicing it also improves the rustic look. o Traditionally in a tortilla, the onion is first sautéed for 15 minutes and then the potatoes are fried in LOTS of olive oil for another 20-30 minutes but we prefer precooking the diced potatoes in water instead (while the onion is sautéing). It saves time and calls for less oil. If you have precooked potatoes leftover in the fridge, they are perfect for this dish. o We actually prefer making this with butter instead of olive oil because it’s more heat resistant and it brings out the best flavor in mushrooms. But you can of course use any oil of preference. o Fry the mushrooms on a low/­­medium heat. Don’t crowd the pan and always listen for the sizzle. If you cant hear them sizzling, the temperature is too low. o Luise has developed an intolerance against garlic (especially raw) so we have kept it out of this recipe, but I bet it could be good along with the mushrooms and kale. o If you don’t like kale, try it with spinach. Or use the same method with other vegetables. o Feta cheese is also really good in this combination. Just crumble it into the egg mixture. o We finish the tortilla in the oven because it’s easier, but you can flip it by sliding the half-cooked frittata onto a plate. It will still be some liquid in the middle so you need to be careful doing this. Than you place the saucepan over the frittata (and plate) and simply flip it upside down while holding the plate as a lid so it falls down into the sauce pan. And then fry it for a few more minutes on that side. Kale, Mushroom & Potato Tortilla Makes approx 8 slices 1 onion  350 g /­­ 2 1/­­2 cups firm potatoes, diced 5 tbsp butter or oil 2 cups /­­ 100 g Funnel chanterelles (or any other mushroom) 2 leaves /­­ 30 g kale, stems removed 1 large handful fresh parsley  6-8 eggs (depending on the size) salt and pepper Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Add water to a medium size saucepan along with salt and bring to a boil. Peel and chop the onions. Scrub and dice the potatoes into 1-2 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch cubes. Heat 1 tbsp butter in an ovenproof frying pan. Sauté the onions on low heat for about 10-15 minutes until soft and translucent, stir occasionally. Meanwhile add the potatoes to the boiling water and cook for about 13-15 minutes on medium heat, they should be just done. Drain the cooking water and add the potatoes to the saucepan with onions, along with one more tablespoon butter and a little salt. Sauté for a few minutes more to give the potatoes some flavor and color. Pour the onion and potatoes into a separate bowl and put the saucepan back on the heat. Clean the mushrooms, slice them into desired size and add to the pan along with a knob of butter. Fry the mushrooms on low/­­medium heat for 5-6 minutes or until they have released some moisture and started caramelizing. Rinse the kale, chop finely and add it to the pan along with fresh parsley. Let wilt down for a few minutes. Add salt and then pour into the bowl with potatoes. Wipe the saucepan clean and put it back on the heat along with a knob of butter. Crack the eggs in a bowl, add salt and pepper and whisk. Pour the vegetables into the egg mixture and then tip it into the warm saucepan (it’s essential that the pan is warm and buttered for the tortilla not to stick to it). Let it fry for about two minutes (preferably with a lid or a plate on top) and then place the pan in the oven (without lid) and switch on the broiler. After about 10 minutes it should be firm, golden and ready. Wait a few minutes for it to cool down and then run a spatula around the edges to make sure it comes off easily. Cut into triangles and serve with a side salad. It can also be stored in the fridge for a couple of days. PS! Look at these two photos of Luise and Noah, taken exactly one year apart.

Five Things Im No Longer Skeptical About Going Vegan (Plus GIVEAWAY)

July 24 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

When I went vegan it was overnight. I pretty much went to bed with chicken wing sauce on my fingers and woke up pressing tofu. In fact, my whole vegan saga is the subject of the new book The Skeptical Vegan (Skyhorse Press) coming out at the end of July. (Make sure to read through to the end for a GIVEAWAY!) I was the last person on the planet that youd expect to go vegan. I was a known omnivore with strong leanings toward carnivore. If it wasnt beef, it was chicken. If it wasnt chicken, it was pork. Once a year it was turkey. On Friday it was fish. I ate shark, octopus, conch, lamb, goat, deer, duck, goose, squirrel, bison, and even bear. If it could be killed, butchered, baked, or barbecued, there is a very good chance I ate it at one point in my life. For the record, and in case this book winds up in the hands of the FBI, I never ate an eagle. At least not a bald one. I had a lifelong love affair with meat and we were never breaking up. Then, one day, I woke up vegan. It wasnt easy at […] The post Five Things Im No Longer Skeptical About Going Vegan (Plus GIVEAWAY) appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Strawberry Guacamole

May 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Strawberry Guacamole Earlier this spring, I talked a little bit about what an explosive strawberry season we experienced this year. I couldn’t keep myself away from our nearby organic strawberry farm, and as a result ended up with lots of berries that needed to find a home in one dish or another, since my freezer can only fit so much. I made this pie, a cobbler, and sprinkled the berries over everything from morning bowls to salads. I also remembered that strawberries work surprisingly well in guacamole, as proven to me by a friend years ago. I love how every family seems to have their own specific guacamole recipe, and my friend came from a clever bunch that dealt with an influx of home-grown strawberries by enjoying them in guacamole. I can’t say enough about how much the combination of creamy avocado, sharp red onion, cilantro, jalape?o, and lime benefits from the juicy, sweet bursts of strawberries. It’s heaven. I could easily eat a bowl all to myself. Give this guac a try one hot day this summer with some good chips and a glass of something cold and fizzy, you won’t regret it! There is a quick step-by-step video above and weekend links below. Sunday hugs to you, friends :) Fields Of Study – currently participating in this four day online meditation workshop for anxiety and stress, and can’t say enough about it. There’s breath work, reading, exercises, and recorded guided meditations, as well as all kinds of practical tips on the use of minerals, flower remedies, etc. as tools for grounding and stress relief. My Place – liking this video series on Nowness The Hippies Have Won – yay Dear Sugar – a new-to-me podcast I’ve been enjoying The Planted One – a seriously inspiring meal-planning instagram Excited to get my hands on these books – Just the Essentials, The Wellness Project Strawberry Guacamole   Print Serves: 4-ish Ingredients 2 large, ripe but firm hass avocados 2 cups strawberries - hulled, sliced in half or quartered 1 cup cilantro leaves ¼ small red onion - finely chopped 1 small jalapeno - seeded and minced juice from 1 large or 2 small limes sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste Instructions Cut the avocados in half vertically and remove their pits. Scoop the avocado flesh into a medium bowl, using a spoon. Mash with the avocado with a fork. Add the strawberries, cilantro, onion, jalape?o, lime juice, salt and pepper to taste. Mix until well combined. Serve with your favorite tortilla chips. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Ramp Flatbread Pizza with Garlic Cream Pear Cranberry Chai Baked Latkes with Beet and Avocado Salad Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Strawberry Guacamole appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Rainbow Pad Thai

March 23 2017 Meatless Monday 

The theme of the 2017 Careers through Culinary Arts Program (C-CAP) Meatless Monday Recipe Contest was Oodles of Noodles and it challenged teen chefs to create innovative, meatless noodle recipes. This recipe is the Virginia regional winner and comes from Cashé Clark of Virginia Beach Technical and Career Center. Serves 6 - For the Pad Thai: - 8 oz pad Thai noodles - 2 medium-sized carrots, spiralized - 1 zucchini, spiralized - 1 red pepper, julienned -  1/­­2 yellow onion, julienned -  1/­­2 cup red cabbage, thinly sliced -  1/­­2 cup fresh bean sprouts - 1 tablespoon sesame oil - 1 tablespoon vegetable oil - 2 large eggs beaten -  1/­­2 cup peanuts, shelled, unsalted, and dry roasted -  1/­­4 cup fresh basil, chopped - 2 limes(optional), wedged into 4 pieces - For the Sauce: - 6 tablespoons vegan fish sauce (recipe below) - 6 tablespoons light brown sugar -  1/­­4 cup white vinegar - 2 tablespoons soy sauce - 2 tablespoons sambal oelek (chili paste) - For the Vegan Fish Sauce: -  1/­­2 cup shredded wakame seaweed - 2 cups water - 2 large cloves garlic, crushed but not peeled - 1 teaspoon black peppercorn - 1/­­3 cup mushroom soy sauce - 1 teaspoon red miso paste To Prepare the Pad Thai Place uncooked noodles into a large bowl of cold water to soak for 15 minutes or until tender. Put all ingredients for the sauce in bowl and stir until all ingredients are combined. Combine carrots, zucchini, red peppers, yellow onion, red cabbage, and bean sprouts in a large bowl and set aside. Heat sesame oil over medium high heat in a large wok, add vegetables and stir fry for five minutes or until tender crisp. Transfer vegetables into a large bowl and set aside. Drain the noodles. Set aside. Add vegetable oil to wok, add reserved noodles to hot wok and stir fry quickly, for a minute or two using tongs to toss. Add the sauce and stir fry for two minutes, or until the sauce begins to thicken and stick to the noodles. Push the noodles aside in the wok. Pour the eggs into the wok on the cleared side and let sit for about 30 seconds. Toss well with the tongs. The egg mixture will stick to the noodles and everything will start getting sticky Add in the vegetables, toss together and remove from heat. Stir in peanuts and herbs. Serve immediately with lime; if desired. To Prepare the Vegan Fish Sauce Combine wakame, garlic, peppercorns, and water in a medium sauce pot and bring to a boil. Lower heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Strain and return the liquid back to the pot. Add soy sauce, bring back to a boil and cook until mixture is reduced and almost unbearably salty. Remove from heat and stir in miso. The post Rainbow Pad Thai appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Nasi Lemak

March 15 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Nasi Lemak In the five weeks that I spent exploring Malaysia, Singapore, and Borneo there were a few dishes that I just had to try whenever I had the chance. Nasi Lemak is a national favorite - and one of my favorites, too! The name technically means “fatty rice” but “creamy rice” sounds a least a little bit better. Traditionally, as with this recipe, Nasi Lemak is rice cooked in creamy, coconut milk - often along with fresh herbs and spices such as pandan (which you can replace with bay leaves if that’s what you’ve got.) The bright yellow hue comes from turmeric. Though it’s a breakfast dish, it can be eaten at any time of the day, and many variations cross firmly into Savory Culinary Territory. I eat this all times of the day: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Snack, whatever! I tried Nasi Lemak in lots of places: Kuala Lampur, Penang, Malacca, and Singapore. Inspired by those dishes and their accompaniments - and my own imagination, I’ve created a complete meal set: Coconut Pandan Rice served with stir-fried Lemongrass Ginger Tofu, crunchy, charred Spicy Nuts, and a delicious sweet-chili sauce known as Sambal Belacan. These are actually four different recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA which I’ve put together in this one post. You can of course substitute or simplify the dishes for a less involved meal set designed how you like it. Nasi Lemak is equally awesome even when it’s just served with the fresh cucumber, lime slices, and nuts. I love going all out and doing the Lemongrass Tofu cubes, too. Also, I find the hot, spicy Samabal Belecan completes the dish fantastically. How to eat it? Mix it up and eat it with your hands! Serve this meal set up on a banana leaf, wash your hands, mix everything together, and dive in… wild and forkless. (By the way, frozen banana leaves are often available at your local Asian import grocery shop. Just thaw them, rinse them, and eat off of them.) If you prefer a more modern approach: Make it all, arrange it perfectly on plates, eat it with a fork and spoon. It’s up to you! Nasi Lemak Malaysian Coconut Pandan Rice with Lemongrass Ginger Tofu, Spicy Nuts & Sambal Belacan recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA serves 3 to 4 /­­ time 60 min Coconut Pandan Rice: - 2 cups (375 g) broken jasmine rice or basmati rice - 1 2/­­3 cup (400 ml) water - 1 2/­­3 cup (400 ml) coconut milk - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric ground - 2 pandan leaves or bay leaves - fried onions for garnish - 1/­­2 small cucumber sliced - lime slices for garnish - Rinse and drain rice thoroughly. - Bring water and coconut milk to low boil in a medium pot with good lid. Stir in rice, salt, turmeric, and pandan (or bay leaves). Return to simmer. Cover and steam until most liquid is absorbed, 12-15 min. Remove from heat. Stir a few times. Cover and let sit 10 min. Remove and discard leaves before serving. - Garnish with fried onions, cucumber, and lime slices. Lemongrass Ginger Tofu: - 14 oz (400 g) firm tofu cut in cubes or strips - 1 1/­­2 cups (200 g) pineapple chopped - 1 Tbs oil - 2 shallots finely chopped - 2 cloves garlic finely chopped - 2 stalks lemongrass finely chopped - 3/­­4 in (2 cm) fresh ginger finely chopped - 1 tsp coriander ground - 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice - 1 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu) - 1/­­4 tsp sea salt - fresh coriander or parsley leaves chopped, for garnish - Cut tofu in slabs and wrap in clean kitchen towel. Weight with a heavy cutting board and press out extra moisture, 15-20 min. Unwrap and cut in cubes or strips. - Heat oil in a large frying pan or wok on medium high heat. Add chopped shallots, garlic, lemongrass, ginger, and ground coriander. Fry, stirring constantly, until shallots being to soften and brown, 2-3 min. - Add tofu cubes. Mix well. Fry, stirring regularly, until tofu cubes are golden brown and crispy on the edges, 5-8 min. - Add chopped pineapple, lime (or lemon) juice, soy sauce, and salt. Fry, stirring regularly, another 5-10 min. Remove from heat. Spicy Nuts: - 1/­­2 cup (50 g) peanuts - 1/­­2 cup (50 g) cashews - 1/­­2 tsp chili powder or paprika ground - 2 tsp coconut sugar - 1/­­4 tsp sea salt - Heat a medium frying pan on medium heat. Dry roast peanuts and cashews, stirring regularly, until light golden brown and dark spots begin to appear, 4-7 min. Do not burn. - Add chili powder (or paprika), sugar and salt. Mix well. Continue to cook another 2-3 min, stirring constantly, until sugar has melted and nuts are well coated. Remove from heat. Allow to cool. Sambal Belacan: - 2-3 Tbs vegetable oil - 5 large (90 g) red chilies chopped - 2 cloves garlic chopped - 1 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu) - 1 Tbs rice vinegar - 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice - 1 Tbs coconut sugar - 1/­­4 tsp sea salt - Blend all ingredients in a small food processor or blender until smooth, adding more oil (or some water) as needed. - Heat a small frying pan on medium heat. Add blended spice paste to pan and fry, stirring regularly, until sauce darkens, thickens, and oil separates, 8-12 min. vegan recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA (available as printed cookbook & ebook in English & German) The post Nasi Lemak appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Thai Potato Ginger Curry

March 13 2017 Meatless Monday 

Coriander, ginger and garlic are stir-fried first, which deepens the taste of this classic Thai red curry. Tomatoes, potatoes, onions and spinach take on the full flavor of the aromatically spiced sauce. This recipe comes to us from DanniBeth of Vegan Miss Adventures in the Kitchen. Serves 4 - 4 tomatoes - 2 tablespoons vegetable oil - 2 onions, cut into thick wedges - 1 inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and finely chopped - 1 garlic clove, chopped - 2 tablespoons ground coriander - 1 pound potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks - 2 1/­­2 cups low sodium vegetable stock - 1 tablespoons red curry paste - 8 ounces spinach leaves Bring a medium pot of water to a boil over high heat. Fill a medium bowl full of cold water. Put the tomatoes in a heatproof bowl and cover with boiling water. Leave for 2-3 minutes then plunge into the cold water to loosen the skins. Peel off the skins of the tomatoes. Cut each tomato into quarters. Remove and discard the seeds and central core of each tomato. Set tomato pieces aside. Preheat a wok over medium-high heat. When the wok is heated add the vegetable oil. Stir fry the onions, ginger and garlic in the vegetable oil for 2-3 minutes, or until seasonings begin to soften. Add the coriander and potatoes to the wok and stir-fry for 2-3 minutes. Add the stock and curry paste and bring to a boil, stirring occasionally. Reduce the heat and simmer gently for 10-15 minutes, or until the potatoes are tender. Add the spinach and the tomato quarters to the wok. Cook, stirring, for 1 minute, or until the spinach has wilted. Serve atop cooked rice to soak up the curry sauce. The post Thai Potato Ginger Curry appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Peanut Noodles

February 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

This flavorful peanut noodle dish is not only packed with plant protein, but veggies and enticing aromatic herbs, too. This recipe comes to us from our friends at Pondicheri and is featured as a Meatless Monday special in the restaurant’s New York and Houston locations. Serves 4 - 4 cups /­­ 225 g Chinese thin rice noodles - 3 Tbsp sesame oil - 3-4 cloves garlic, chopped - 2 small carrots, julienned - 1 red bell pepper, thinly sliced - 1 stalk celery, thinly sliced on the bias - 1 small red onion, thinly sliced - 2 in /­­ 5 cm piece ginger, julienned - 2 tsp black pepper - 2 tsp salt - 4 Tbsp Shaoxing cooking wine or rice wine vinegar - Zest & juice from 1 orange - 2 Tbsp ketchup manis [Indonesian soy sauce] - 1 tsp Sichuan peppercorns, ground - 2 Tbsp sambhal olek [Indonesian chili sauce] - 2 Tbsp peanut butter - 2 cups /­­ 135 g spinach leaves, sliced - 1 cup /­­ 340 g purple cabbage, sliced - 2 Tbsp chopped cilantro - 2 Tbsp toasted & chopped peanuts Pour boiling water over the noodles & let them soak for 3-4 minutes. Drain & set aside. In a large wok or sauté pan, heat up the sesame oil & add the garlic. Almost immediately, add the julienned carrots & cook for 4-5 minutes, frequently stirring. Add the red bell peppers & cook for another minute. Turn up the heat & cook, stirring on high for 2-3 minutes. Add the celery, red onions, ginger, black pepper & salt. Cook for just under another minute & add the cooking wine, orange juice with zest, ketchup manis, peppercorns, sambhal olek & peanut butter. Continue cooking at high heat for 2-3 or until the sauce around the vegetables is bubbly. Add the noodles, spinach, cabbage, cilantro & peanuts. Toss to mix, turn the heat off & serve immediately. The post Peanut Noodles appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Raw Acai Banana Cake

December 23 2016 Veganpassion 

Raw Acai Banana Cake Healthy and colorful cakes are simply the best! That's why I made this raw cake out of bananas and acai berries. The sweetness comes from the banana. To push it a little bit I have added some agave sirup and stevia. I could eat the cake the whole time. It is my all time favourite cake and it's very easy to make. The better your blender is the better your cream will get. The effort on a raw cake is not that high. You soak in cashew nuts over night and put the cake in the frige for a couple of hours. The actual preparation time is less than half hour. Makes 1 springform pan (18 cm diameter) For the cake base: 100 g almonds 30 g dates 1 tbsp. water For the base blend almonds, dates and water in a mixer. Don't blend too much. Keep it a little crunchy. Dab the springform pan with some oil and deposit clear film. Put in the almond mixture and press it on. For the creme: 200 g cashews 1 big ripe banana 2 tbsp. lemon juice 120 g coconut cream 100 g coconut butter 1 tsp. vanilla 50 g agave sirup 2 tsp. acai powder 1/­­2 tsp. curcuma powder Soak in cashews over night or at least 4 hours. Pour the water off and wash the cashews. Blend cashews, banana, lemon juice, coconut cream, coconut butter, vanilla, agave sirup to a fine cream. Split the cream. Mix 2/­­3 of it with acai powder and 1/­­3 with curcuma powder. Put 4/­­5 of the acai cream into the springform pan and layer the curcuma cream on top. Use the rest of the acai cream and put it in a decorating tube. Decorate the cake and use a toothpick to create a pattern. Bash the springform on your worktop to remove air wholes. Put it in the fridge over night or at least 4 hours. Enjoy!

Thai Tofu Pumpkin Curry

October 31 2016 Meatless Monday 

Green beans, bell peppers and chunks of pumpkin are seasoned sweet and spicy with chilis, curry paste and coconut water. Kaffir lime leaves and Thai basils herbal notes add depth to the flavor of this curry, finished off with a bright squeeze of lime. This recipe comes to us from Ashley of Ashleyz Sprout. Serves 4 - 2 tablespoons canola oil - 3 tablespoons red or yellow curry paste* - 1-2 Thai chilis*, minced - 1 can coconut water* - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons sugar - 3 kaffir lime leaves* - 1/­­2 cup green beans, cut into 1-inch pieces - 1/­­4 cup bell pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces - 1/­­4 cup Fresno peppers, cut into 1-inch pieces - 1/­­2 8 ounce block extra-firm tofu, cubed - 3/­­4 cup pumpkin, peeled and cubed - 1 cup low sodium vegetable broth - 1/­­2 cup Thai basil leaves* - 1 lime, cut into wedges *Found in Asian markets or the Asian section of some grocery stores. Place the oil into a large wok over medium-high heat. Season with the curry paste and Thai chilis. Cook for 1-2 minutes, or until the spices become fragrant. Whisk the coconut water, sugar and lime leaves into the wok. Cook for 2-3 minutes more. Add the green beans, bell peppers, Fresno peppers, tofu, pumpkin and vegetable stock to the wok. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium and cook, stirring occasionally, for about 25 minutes, or until the vegetables are cooked through. Add the Thai basil to the wok. Stir and remove from heat. Divide into 4 portions, top with a squeeze of lime and enjoy! The post Thai Tofu Pumpkin Curry appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mushroom Fried Rice

September 26 2016 Meatless Monday 

Turn this classic takeout dish into a satisfying, home-cooked Monday night meal. This fried rice features three (three!) different types of mushrooms and is packed with even more veggies, not grease and salt. This recipe comes to us from Stefanie of Sarcastic Cooking. Serves 4-6 - 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil - 4 ounces shitake mushrooms, stems removed and chopped - 6 ounces portabella mushrooms, stemmed and chopped - 4 ounces button mushrooms, chopped - 1/­­3 cup diced yellow onion - 2 carrots, peeled and grated - 2 teaspoons chili garlic sauce - 1 tablespoons low sodium soy sauce - 3-4 cups cooked white/­­brown rice, cooked according to instructions on packaging - 2 large eggs - 4 green onions, chopped - salt and pepper to taste Add olive oil to a large skillet or wok. Allow the oil to heat up for a minute or two over a medium flame. Add all the mushrooms. Stir to evenly coat in oil. Sautee mushrooms for 10 minutes until golden and crispy on the edges. Add the onion and carrot. Sautee an additional three to five minutes until onions become translucent. Remove the vegetables from the pan. Add to a plate and keep off to the side for later. Reduce the heat to low. Add the two eggs to a small mixing bowl and beat. Add in a little pinch of salt and pepper. Pour the eggs into the hot pan and scramble. Cook until firm. Remove egg and add it to the plate with the veggies off to the side. Add chili garlic sauce and soy sauce to the pan, whisk to combine. Mix in the rice. Add in the cooked egg and mushrooms. Stir to make sure the flavors are evenly distributed. Lastly, mix in the green onions, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve with additional soy sauce and hot sauce. The post Mushroom Fried Rice appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegetable Hakka Noodles (Chow Mein)

March 31 2016 Manjula's kitchen 

Vegetable Hakka Noodles (Chow Mein) Vegetable Hakka noodles are also more commonly known as Vegetable Chow Mein. This is a popular Indo-Chinese dish. Vegetable hakka noodles consists of stir fry noodles with a variety of vegetables. This is a quick and easy recipe to make. Hakka noodles is a delicious and flavorful dish and very popular with street vendors. This also makes a great one-dish meal. Recipe will serve 2. Ingredients: - About 4oz. whole wheat noodles - 2 tablespoons oil - 2 cups cabbage thinly sliced - 1/­­2 cup carrots grated or thinly sliced - 1 cup bell pepper thinly sliced, use the different color bell pepper, capsic - 1/­­2 cup finely chopped French green beans - 1 tablespoon ginger finely chopped - 1 tablespoon rice vinegar - 3 tablespoons soy sauce - 2 tablespoons chili sauce, adjust to taste - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt Method - Cook noodles according to the package instructions. Drain the cooked noodles in a colander, and rinse them with cold water. Set aside. - Heat oil in a wide pan or wok on medium high heat, first sauté the green beans, and ginger for about 1 minutes. - Traditionally vegetables are tossed while cooking, I find it is easier just to stir fry - Add grated carrots, shredded cabbage and sliced bell pepper. Stir fry for about two minutes, do not overcook the vegetables. Vegetables should have some crunch. - Add noodles, salt, soy sauce, vinegar, and chili sauce, toss them together and stir-fry them for about a minute. - Hakka noodles are ready. Enjoy! also check the recipes for Gobi (Cauliflower) Manchurian, Sweet and Sour Tofu, The post Vegetable Hakka Noodles (Chow Mein) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.


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