winter - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Pumpkin Spice Pancakes

Hung curd paratha recipe | dahi paneer paratha | aloo dahi paratha

Gooda Cheez (Vegan Gouda Cheese)

Eggless mayonnaise recipe – 4 flavours | veg mayonnaise | eggless mayo










winter vegetarian recipes

Pumpkin Spice Pancakes

September 15 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Pumpkin Spice Pancakes Makes 6 six-inch pancakes The most pumpkiniest pancakes Autumn is so bittersweet in the midwest. The bitter part: knowing In a few weeks youll be underdressed in your denim jacket no matter how many flannels youve got on. How all the therapeutic lamps in the world cant replace the feeling of a walk on the beach. And this winter there will be no escape as the pandemic rages on. But the sweet part, at least in the midwest right now: the earthy autumn breeze that somehow feels like it’s the beginning of something, the way it forces you into the moment, and really, the moment is all weve got. Well, except for Ive ALSO got a 6-pack of canned pumpkin puree and a bulk amount of Penzeys Pumpkin Spice. So I am going to make this pumpkin moment count. Today, with pancakes. Recipes Notes ~ If you have an allergy ok, use a different milk (obviously) but I have to admit that soy milk works best for me in pancakes! ~ This recipe uses 1/­­2 of a can of pumpkin puree. I did this so that it’s easy to double by simply just using the full can! I will also post some recipes for using the other 1/­­2 of the can, so stay tuned. ~ I have so many “alternative” flours that I got at the start of the pandemic and now need to use. If you don’t have spelt flour, AP flour will be just fine. Probably even better, honestly. Ingredients 1 3/­­4 cup unsweetened soy milk, divided 2 tablespoons ground flax seed 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 3/­­4 cup canned pumpkin puree 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 3 tablespoons pure maple syrup 1 1/­­2 cups spelt flour 1 tablespoon pumpkin pie spice 1 tablespoon baking powder 1/­­4 teaspoon baking soda 1/­­2 teaspoon salt Directions 1 – In a large mixing bowl, use a whisk to vigorously mix 1/­­2 cup of milk with the flax seeds and apple cider vinegar for about a minute. It should be thick and viscous. Add the remaining milk, pumpkin puree, olive oil and maple syrup and whisk until smooth.  2 – Sift in the flour, pumpkin pie spice, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Whisk until relatively smooth, some lumps are okay, be careful not to overmix. 3 – Let the batter rest for about 5 minutes. Preheat a large non-stick skillet over medium heat. Lightly spray the pan with cooking oil. Scoop scant 1/­­2 cups of batter into the pan, and then, you know, make pancakes.

Instant Pot Kitchari (Lightly Spiced Lentils and Rice)

September 8 2020 Vegan Richa 

Instant Pot Kitchari (Lightly Spiced Lentils and Rice)Learn how to make Kitchari in your Instant Pot – a traditional Indian recipe for basmati rice with red lentils or Mung Dal that is easy to digest, packed with fiber and warming spices! Perfect for the cold season. Jump to Recipe Meet Kitchari,  the ultimate Indian comfort food! Think of it as the Chicken Noodle Soup of India. Kitchari (pronounced kich-uh-ree) is a delicious, warming and super nourishing combination of split mung beans or quick-cooking lentils and white basmati rice with plenty of spices.  It’s the perfect soul-hugging food for rainy days when you’re a bit under the weather. The unique blend of spices used in kitchari not only adds flavor but is also wonderfully warming and balancing – perfect for fall and winter and just delicious. Kitchari can be made many different ways and has references dating back thousands of years. But despite its complex flavor, it’s so easy to make! You start by sauteeing the spices along with some onions, chili, ginger, and garlic to boost their fragrance and enhance their flavor! Then you add in your rice and dal, veggies, and some liquid. Cook it for 3 minutes in the Instant pot, let the steam release and you’re good to go.Continue reading: Instant Pot Kitchari (Lightly Spiced Lentils and Rice)The post Instant Pot Kitchari (Lightly Spiced Lentils and Rice) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Creamy Corn and Broccoli Soup

September 2 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Creamy Corn and Broccoli Soup Warm soups have regained their appeal over the last couple of weeks, with the changed, silvery light, cooler mornings and evenings, and earlier sunsets. This time of year is magical, as is any time when a seasonal shift is especially evident and new. The prospect of winter squash, warm drinks, and general coziness that fall brings still feels exciting, although it might be hard to believe once we’re in the depths of it. This soup has one foot in the summer, utilizing the sweetness of corn, and another in the fall, with its warmth and creaminess. We prepare a quick, flavorful broth using some aromatics, corn cobs, and spices, making sure to introduce plenty of savory ingredients to balance out the sweetness of the corn. We cook broccoli right in the broth and blitz everything up in a blender. The result is lovely, subtle, and packed with veggies. Hope you’ll give it a try! Creamy Corn and Broccoli Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients olive oil 4 ears of corn - kernels removed, cobs reserved sea salt 1 large yellow onion - diced 4 garlic cloves - minced ½ teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon dried thyme freshly ground black pepper ½ cup white wine 3 bay leaves 8 oz broccoli florets (from about 2 medium heads) ½ cup cashews chives or other herbs - for garnishing (optional) Instructions Heat a large pot over medium heat, add enough olive oil to lightly coat the bottom. Add the corn kernels and a pinch of salt. Saute until the corn is bright yellow and slightly caramelized, about 7 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl and set aside. Add more oil to coat the bottom of the pot. Add the onion and a pinch of salt, saute for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic, paprika, thyme, and black pepper to taste, saute for 1 more minute, until fragrant. Add the wine, bring it up to a simmer and let reduce for 5 minutes. Add the reserved corn cobs to the pot, along with the bay leaves, 6 cups of water, and more salt. Increase the heat to high, cover the pot, and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and simmer, covered, for 30 minutes. Remove the corn cobs and bay leaves from the broth, discard. Add the broccoli and cashews to the pot, bring it back up to a simmer, and simmer, covered, for another 5-7 minutes, until the broccoli is tender. Add about half of the sautéed corn kernels to the pot. Transfer the contents of the pot to an upright blender and blend on high until smooth. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. You might need to do this in batches. Return the blended soup back to the pot. Mix in the rest of the corn kernels. Serve the soup warm, garnished with chives or other herbs of choice and drizzled with olive oil. 3.5.3226 The post Creamy Corn and Broccoli Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

No Bake Vegan Snickerdoodle Bites

August 18 2020 Vegan Richa 

No Bake Vegan Snickerdoodle BitesThese healthy vegan snickerdoodle bites taste just like a holiday cookie but are actually good for you. Just 6 ingredients and 10 mins.  The perfect easy and kid-friendly snack for anyone in need for some energy on-the-go! Grain-free option included. Jump to Recipe These Vegan Snickerdoodle Energy Bites are the perfect thing to have on hand anytime. But especially around fall and winter when youre really craving a holiday cookie but dont actually want to deal with 1, baking and 2, all the cookie-snacking consequences (hello sugar coma). Because these simple vegan snacks are made from wholesome plant-based ingredients only - no added refined sugar, gluten, or oil- they are a festive treat Im happy to enjoy anytime and kids love them too.Continue reading: No Bake Vegan Snickerdoodle BitesThe post No Bake Vegan Snickerdoodle Bites appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Pesto Quinoa & White Bean Cakes with Roasted Tomatoes

May 15 2020 Oh My Veggies 

Now that I have basil growing in the garden again, I’m on a quest to use up my frozen pesto because I’ll be able to make it fresh whenever I want to. If making a big batch of pesto and freezing it for fall and winter marks the end of summer for me, then frantically trying to use up that pesto is a sure sign of spring. It happens every year, like clockwork. It’s a good thing this recipe took a few tries to get right--I think I used half of my pesto supply perfecting it. The first time I made it, I only used cannelini beans. It was not good. I’ve realized that I only like cannelini beans as a component of a dish, not as the main ingredient. White bean cakes with just white beans, pesto, panko, and egg were definitely meh. So then I used half the beans and more ingredients each subsequent trial. Cheese! Why not? A zucchini? Of course! And then quinoa. Sometimes less is more, but sometimes more is more. And this is a more is more recipe. But even with more, it’s still not a lot. If you make this, don’t skip the […]

No Yeast Pizza Dough – Vegan

May 2 2020 Vegan Richa 

No Yeast Pizza Dough – VeganDon’t spend hours making pizza dough and try this easy vegan no-yeast pizza dough recipe for a quick pizza fix! Yeast-free Vegan Pizza Dough from scratch made out simple ingredients! Jump to Recipe Pizza lovers, this vegan no yeast pizza dough recipe is for you! Home is where the pizza is, right?  I LOVE me a slice of pizza and there are already all kinds of pizza recipes on the blog. Classic ones like Margherita, and pretty special ones such as BBQ Sweet Potato, some with regular crusts, some with tortilla crust or gluten-free crusts. Today, we add my new favorite quick fix for all those spontaneous pizza cravings! Yeast-free crust! Those of you who love homemade pizza as much as I do know that yeasted dough can take time and thats why I created this quick Vegan Pizza Dough Recipe that uses NO yeast! Aint nobody got time for that dough to rise until doubled in size, right? Especially in winter, when it takes hours. This is a great dough to get you in the kitchen with friends, your kids, and family making pizza from scratch. I guarantee you that you will get this into the oven in 15 minutes flat! Continue reading: No Yeast Pizza Dough – VeganThe post No Yeast Pizza Dough – Vegan appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Feed a Family with These 13 Big-Batch Plant-Based Recipes

April 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

Feed a Family with These 13 Big-Batch Plant-Based RecipesCooking is a joy, but making every meal from scratch can get tedious, not to mention time consuming. And thats where big-batch cooking comes in. Weve created a list of plant-based recipes that are well suited for families (and leftovers). To do this, we looked through our Meatless Monday recipe database to find dishes that dont require a lot of preparation, are easy to scale up, and are hearty, nutritious, and filling. Although not all the recipes listed below are main dishes, they can still be prepared in large quantities and can be used to accompany other meals as side dishes or mid-day snacks. From Moroccan split pea soup and roasted chimichurri vegetables to Thai pumpkin curry and green tea pesto pasta the options for bulk cooking are only limited by your imagination -- and maybe the size of your stock pot. This Monday, do yourself a favor and cook a batch thats big enough for leftovers.  Black Bean Sesame Veggie Hash This recipe is an opportunity to get creative. Add whatever vegetables you have on hand and cook them up in your biggest skillet with some soy sauce, scallions, garlic, and chile oil. For the Black Bean Sesame Veggie Hash recipe, click here .   Chimichurri Roasted Vegetables Pungent and flavorful, these roasted vegetables can be prepared in bulk. The aromatic parsley-based chimichurri sauce is easy to scale up as well. For the Chimichurri Roasted Vegetables recipe, click here .         Freekeh Pilaf Swapping out rice for freekeh -- an ancient grain made from roasted green durum wheat -- makes for a healthier and more textured version of this classic dish. As with any pilaf, the flavor is only as good as the broth you use to cook it in, so make sure to use a nice, flavorful vegetable stock when cooking. For the Freekeh Pilaf recipe, click here . Ginger Orzo Brussels Sprouts Salad Chunks of butternut squash and Brussels sprouts makes this fragrant and flavorful ginger orzo more of a main meal than a side dish. The recipe serves eight, so expect leftovers, which is a plus because the flavors become more pronounced after they spend a night in the refrigerator. For the Ginger Orzo Brussels Sprouts Salad, click here . Green Tea Pesto Pasta An exceptionally unique recipe, this green tea pesto pasta is perfect to make in big batches. You can also make extra sauce and keep it in a plastic container for when pasta cravings hit. Add any variety of vegetables -- cherry tomatoes, zucchini, broccoli -- to add some oomph to the meal. For the Green Tea Pesto Pasta recipe, click here . Lemon Ginger Peas Frozen peas are humble ingredients, but they can be wonderfully delicious. This dish is simple to prepare and can be made in large batches, depending on how many bags of frozen peas youre willing to store in your freezer. Experiment with different seasoning combinations to keep your taste buds guessing. For the Lemon Ginger Peas recipe, click here . Meatless Brown Rice Jambalaya This meat-free jambalaya is packed with smoke, heat, and creole flavor. The recipe feeds six and doesnt require much in terms of prep -- just sauté the aromatics, pour in the stock, beans and rice, bring to a boil, and simmer away until the rice is fluffy and tender. For the Meatless Brown Rice Jambalaya recipe, click here .     Moroccan Split Pea Soup No matter the season, a hearty cauldron of split pea soup can feed an army. Besides being incredibly affordable, split peas are easy to prepare and packed with protein and fiber. Moroccan-inspired seasonings add a refreshing punch of flavor to each spoonful. For the Moroccan Split Pea Soup recipe, click here . Quick and Easy Hummus Making your own hummus is so much more affordable than buying it prepackaged at the store. Double or triple this recipe (depending on the size of your food processor), and have delicious, creamy hummus available all week. For the Quick and Easy Hummus recipe, click here . Roasted Parsnip and Spinach Shepherds Pie Hello leftovers. Making a platter of this shepherds pie will feed a large family. Prep the platter the day before cooking and store in the refrigerator if you want an easy weeknight meal. For the Roasted Parsnip and Spinach Shepherds Pie recipe, click here . Thai Tofu Pumpkin Curry This recipe can easily be doubled if you want an extra few servings the following day. Although it calls for pumpkin, feel free to incorporate eggplant, extra tofu, or a bag of frozen spinach to add more heft to the dish. For the Thai Tofu Pumpkin Curry recipe, click here . Vegetarian Gumbo Gumbo gets its color and flavor from its roux -- a paste-like mixture of flour and fat. This recipe is rich, decadent, packed with vegetables, and easy to scale up. For the Vegetarian Gumbo recipe, click here . Zucchini Scallion Cakes As simple as making pancakes, you can whip up a few dozen of these lemony zucchini cakes in no time. For the Zucchini Scallion Cakes recipe, click here . Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Feed a Family with These 13 Big-Batch Plant-Based Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Chocolate Chunk Blondies (somehow I must've known it would come to this)

March 12 2020 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Chocolate Chunk Blondies (somehow I must've known it would come to this) I threw these blondies together as I prepped a big batch of black bean burgers to freeze for later. (Yes, I am food prepping.) Probably made over a dozen batches of these cookies over the past few months. As usual, I took a break from sugary carb-craving in February. Things are much different now. Even though the grass is beginning to green up and my daffodils are blooming, the urge to bake and soothe my soul with comfort foods normally reserved for dark, winter months has returned with a vengeance.  (As a news-obsessed individual, I'm sure you can guess why.) My cookbooks lining the kitchen walls are more precious to me than ever right now. I've collected hundreds over the decades. I drop into flea markets looking for Pyrex and instead find myself with a two-dollar cookbook I'd wanted years ago. One more for the collection. Call me crazy, but in my Marie Kondo cleaning frenzy last spring--very few cookbooks left this house. Very. Few. One of my old stand-by cookbooks, an Alice Medrich classic, stands the test of time.   Published in 2010, my dog-eared, taped-page and post-it noted guides indicate the cookbook's utility.  Here's my vegan version blondie--and don't bake these in an 8" square pan. Use instead a rectangle if you can. Mine is 10 x 6" pan I purchased for eight bucks at the grocery store. Once you add the batter to the pan, you may look at it and think: this cannot be right--there's barely enough batter to cover the bottom of the pan. Trust the recipe, they bake up beautifully. And after a night in the fridge, even better.  Vegan Blondies (adapted) 3/­­4 cup unbleached AP flour 1/­­4 cup whole wheat flour 1/­­2 t. baking powder 1/­­4 t. fine sea salt 1 stick vegan butter 3/­­4 cup light brown sugar 1 t. vanilla extract 2 T. ground flax, plus 3 T. water, 1 t. olive oil (vegan egg) 2/­­3 cup walnuts or pecans 1/­­2 cup chocolate chunks Preheat oven to 350. Line pan with parchment paper, lightly spray. Mix dry ingredients together, set aside. Place small saucepan over low heat, add butter and sugar and stir until butter melts and sugar is mostly dissolved. Remove from heat. Add vanilla extract and flax egg. Mix well. Add dry ingredients to butter mixture. Mix just until flour is mostly incorporated. Add half nuts and half chocolate. Spread batter in pan, then sprinkle remaining nuts and chocolate over. Bake for about 20 minutes or just until the sides begin to turn golden. Let cool completely, then cut into squares and store in fridge. With all the bleak AF stuff out in the world lately, my own version of self-care includes a nice vitamin rich juice first thing in the morning. I've had my juicer for a dozen or so years now. It's come in very handy lately (even though it sat literally unused for about eight of these). If you think, "Hey, nice blondie recipe, but then juicing...how's that work?" Um, resistance is futile. I will always have chocolate in my life in one form or another. This is my favorite juicing recipe: 1 beet 1 carrot 1 celery stick 1 knob ginger 1 granny smith apple juice of half a lemon When I can, I make enough for two small pints (one before I eat oatmeal for breakfast, another to drink later in the day--you know, around three in the afternoon when I'd rather scarf down a whole package of M&Ms). I've been a believer in juicing for ages...has it helped? I have no damned idea. It makes me feel good. So yes. It "helps". Also been intermittent fasting. So basically the day goes like this: Eat between nine and five. Stop.  Went to my local WM on Tuesday, just as a precaution, trying to get my hands on bleach cleaner. Wow. I happened to turn the corner and spotted an out of place single bottle left. I was like: "Thank you retail-eagle-eye for helping me spot the thing that wasn't like the other things."

Mushroom Bourguignon

February 6 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom Bourguignon This Mushroom Bourguignon is one of my favorite things to cook on a winter weekend. It’s so fun to put together (makes you feel a little bit like Julia Child), it fills the house with the most incredible, cozy smells, and the result is a savory, earthy dream. My husband and I cooked this for Valentine’s Day last year, and I shared the whole process on our Instagram stories. The amount of recipe requests I got afterwards had me thinking that I should write it up for the blog. Finally sharing it a whole year later! Make this with your love or friend, or just for yourself on Valentine’s day or any other day when you’ve got some time to cozy up in the kitchen. I think you will really love it. I find that this recipe does well with some time and care – it’s not really a weeknight type of deal, and that’s truly the fun of it. For one, I highly suggest making your own mushroom, veggie and miso broth for this stew. You can use store-bought broth and your Bourguignon will still be really delicious, but the homemade broth will take it to that next, next level. This dish is all about layers of deep flavors, and the broth is a true backbone of that. Making your own broth is also not hard at all – it’s just a matter of throwing things in the pot and letting them do their own thing. When I made the Mushroom Bourguignon pictured here, I made the broth in the morning, and it was there waiting for me when I started cooking the stew later in the day. No big deal. I love that this dish is made mostly with very straightforward, common, pantry and crisper-friendly ingredients, but the flavor is so special and so much greater than the sum of its parts. These kinds of recipes are always my favorites. You can see how this Bourguignon comes together step-by-step on our Instagram stories later today. Enjoy! Mushroom Bourguignon   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the mushroom bourguignon olive oil or avocado oil 1 lb crimini or other mushrooms of choice - stemmed if necessary, sliced sea salt 20 Cipollini or pearl onions 1 yellow onion - diced 2 medium carrots - sliced 2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves - chopped ½ teaspoon smoked paprika freshly ground black pepper 5 cloves garlic - minced 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 cup red wine 3½ cups mushroom veggie broth (recipe below) or store-bought broth, plus more if needed 2 bay leaves 1½ tablespoon all-purpose flour mashed or smashed potatoes - for serving parsley - for garnish for the mushroom veggie broth 1 oz dried porcini 1 large carrot 2-3 celery ribs 1 yellow onion - skin on 1 leek - white and green parts 5 cloves of garlic - smashed handful fresh thyme 1-2 pitted dates - for deeper flavor (optional) sea salt 1 tablespoon white miso Instructions to make the mushroom bourguignon Heat a soup pot over medium heat. Add enough oil to coat the bottom of the pot, letting it heat up. Add the mushrooms and begin browning. Stir once to coat the mushrooms in the oil, then let sit completely undisturbed. Depending on the variety of mushrooms youre using, they will likely release lots of water. Wait for the water to cook off almost completely before stirring, about 10 minutes, that way the mushrooms will brown properly. Stir, add a generous pinch of salt, and let the mushrooms cook for a few more minutes. Transfer the mushrooms to a bowl and set aside until later. Wipe the bottom of the pan if necessary and add another generous pour of oil. Add the Cipollini/­­pearl onions, stir to coat in the oil and let shimmer for the undersides to brown, about 2-3 minutes. Stir to flip and let brown for another 2-3 minutes. Add the yellow onion, carrots, thyme, smoked paprika, a generous pinch of salt, and lots of of black pepper. Sauté until the vegetables are soft, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and tomato paste, and sauté for 1 more minute. Add the cooked mushrooms back to the pot and stir to incorporate with the other ingredients. Add the wine to the pot, bring it up to a simmer and let simmer and reduce for 3-5 minutes. Add the broth, bay leaves, and another pinch of salt, making sure to add enough broth to achieve a chunky stew consistency. Bring the stew up to a simmer and simmer, covered, for 1 hour, adding more broth if necessary. Discard the bay leaves at the end. Put the flour in a small bowl. Take a small ladle-full of the broth from the stew and pour over the flour. Whisk together until smooth. Pour the slurry back into the stew, mix, and let simmer for another 5 minutes for the stew to thicken. Serve the Mushroom Bourguignon over mashed or smashed potatoes, garnished with parsley. to make the mushroom veggie broth Combine all the ingredients in a large pot with at least 10 cups of purified water. Salt well. Its not necessary to include all the vegetables listed, but the more you include, the more flavorful the broth. You can also include any other ingredients that you like in your veggie broth like peppercorns, bay leaf, etc. Bring up to a boil, reduce to a simmer and simmer, covered, for about 1 hour. Put the miso in a small bowl and pour a little bit of the broth over it. Whisk together until you have a smooth paste. Pour it back into the pot with the broth and mix well. You will have leftover broth after making the bourguignon. Its delicious to sip on its own or in any other stew or soup, and it freezes very well. Notes We used crimini and white beech mushrooms for the Mushroom Bourguignon pictured here. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom Bourguignon appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Moroccan Split Pea Soup

January 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

This Moroccan versions of split pea soup, called Bissara, is hearty, filling delicious, and a breeze to make. The steaming split pea puree, earthy garlic and spices, and rich olive oil are the perfect combination for an enriching and warming winter meal. This recipe comes to us from Safa of Moroccan Zest . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 1.5 cups dried split peas soaked for 2 hours (or more) and drained - 4 cups water - 2 medium-sized garlic cloves, peeled -  1/­­2 tsp salt adjust according to your taste -  1/­­2 tsp pepper powder - 2 tsp cumin powder - 2 tsp paprika powder - 1 pinch hot pepper powder optional - 3 tbsp olive oil extra virgin   Cook the split peas and garlic in water until tender (it should take approximately 8 minutes in a pressure cooker, 45 minutes in a saucepan and 8 hours in a slow cooker) Let the mixture (the split peas, garlic, and water) cool down, then pour in a blender. Add the spices. Blend until smooth. If the mixture is too thick, add more water and blend again. Pour the mixture back in the pan. Add the olive oil and heat for a few minutes. If the mixture is too liquid, cook until water evaporates and the soup has the right consistency for you. Serve hot with fresh bread and olives. Decorate with cumin and olive oil. The post Moroccan Split Pea Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Apple Custard Squares

January 16 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Apple Custard SquaresThese Vegan Apple Custard Squares have a shortbread like base topped with apples, then creamy custard and cinnamon sugar on top. Use a pie pan to make Apple Custard Pie. No added Oil. Vegan Soyfree Recipe. Jump to Recipe These custard bars came about when I had to use up some non dairy yogurt. The shortbready crust at the bottom is topped with apples and then topped with a tangy custard mixture which is sprinkled with cinnamon sugar and baked to make slices of custard bars with various flavors and textures! You can use just cashew cream for the custard layer as well. Add some lemon zest for fresh zesty flavor. Change up the flavors  to use winter spices such as gingerbread or pumpkin pie spice. Make this into a pie (use a pie pan and double the crust).Continue reading: Vegan Apple Custard SquaresThe post Vegan Apple Custard Squares appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Coconut Noodle Soup

January 2 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Coconut Noodle Soup Oh man is this the perfect recipe for getting back into the swing of things after the holidays! I think that we’re all ready for some deeply nourishing, veggie-heavy meals right about now. I recently made something similar to this noodle soup for dinner and shared it on IG Stories, and got so many inquiries about the recipe. So here it is but a little more intentional and less off the cuff (directly inspired by the Thai soup Tom Kha Gai). It’s seriously my favorite thing to eat right now – the balance of coziness from the noodles and coconut milk and the healthfulness from all the ginger, garlic, mushrooms, and veggies gets me every time. Don’t let the list of ingredients deter you, this soup is very easy to make. It’s all about building flavor in the broth, which starts with the power combo of onion, chili, garlic, and ginger. The broth gets finished off with a touch of coconut milk, which really rounds out its gingery and garlicky intensity and makes it perfectly creamy. It is SO GOOD – I could seriously drink it for every meal this January. We then cook some veggies and mushrooms directly in the broth and serve everything over noodles, garnished with tons of cilantro, scallions, squeezes of lime juice, and crushed nuts. We hope that you’ll give this a try, it’s a real winner! Coconut Noodle Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil or avocado oil 1 yellow onion - diced 1 small chili pepper - sliced and seeded if preferred sea salt 2 piece of ginger - minced or grated 6 garlic cloves - minced 4-5 kaffir lime leaves (optional but highly recommended) zest from 2 limes 4 cups (1 quart) low-sodium vegetable broth + 1 cup purified water (or 5 cups broth) 1 medium sweet potato or winter squash, or 2 medium carrots - cut in medium chunks 3.5 oz shiitake mushrooms - stemmed and sliced 1 teaspoon coconut sugar 1 13.5 oz can full-fat coconut milk juice from 1 lime, plus more lime slices for garnishing 8 oz vermicelli rice noodles or other noodles of choice green onion - sliced, for serving cilantro - for serving crushed cashews or peanuts - for serving (optional) chili flakes - for serving (optional) Instructions Heat the oil in a soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion, chili, and a pinch of salt, sauté for 8-10 minutes, until soft. Add the ginger and garlic and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the kaffir lime leaves, if using, lemon zest, vegetable broth, and water. Cover and bring to a boil. Add the sweet potato/­­squash/­­carrots and shiitake mushrooms, bring back up to a simmer and simmer, covered, for 10-15 minutes, until the sweet potato/­­squash/­­carrots are cooked through. Add the sugar and coconut milk. Bring back up to a boil and turn off the heat. Stir in the lime juice. Discard the kaffir lime leaves, if using. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Cook the noodles according to the instructions on the package. Distribute the noodles among bowls. Ladle the broth over the noodles, making sure to catch some vegetables and mushrooms when ladling. Garnish generously with green onion, cilantro, lime slices, crushed nuts and chili flakes, if using. Enjoy! Notes - If you are sensitive to spice, omit the chili pepper and flakes. - Kaffir lime leaves are a life-changingly delicious ingredient, and we really recommend seeking them out. Look for them at Asian/­­Indian markets - they are often sold frozen. You can also find them dried. - This recipe is highly customizable! You can add all kinds of veggies. Here are some ideas: -baby bok choy or spinach -zucchini -spiralized daikon radish -bell pepper -basil -other mushrooms like maitake or crimini, etc. 3.5.3226 Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post Coconut Noodle Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil

December 18 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil Every day, around 4pm, my husband and I start texting about dinner. If there aren’t any leftovers or a previously thought-through dinner plan, my most common proposition is ‘greens and beans?’ Those two are such staples and always leave us feeling really nourished. I have a million variations on the subject that I can throw together super quickly. Sometimes, for a quick and lazy lunch, I’ll just crisp up cooked chickpeas and kale in a pan with lots of salt and pepper and be totally satisfied. I always push off from there for our dinners, then add more vegetables, a sauce, a grain, crunchy toppings, etc. etc. I vary the kinds of greens and beans I use depending on season and mood, and what’s on hand. These one pot creamed beans and greens are my cozy, wintery version of our staple meal, and they definitely hit the spot every single time. The beans of choice here are white beans, since they are extra creamy in texture and go so well with lemon and pepper – both key ingredients. The green of choice is chard. I kind of think chard doesn’t get enough love? I love it because it wilts quickly, usually costs less than kale, and the stems are totally edible. The secret with the stems is cooking them first until they soften. Usually they’ll end up melting into a dish and become almost indistinguishable, but will still contribute some substance and extra plant power. If you use rainbow chard, the stems will give some of their color to whatever you’re cooking, so that’s fun as well. Chili oil is the component that takes this meal to that extra special place. I don’t recommend skipping it. We just quickly crisp up some red pepper flakes in olive oil and let it infuse while making the meal. A generous drizzle of that will really make everything sing. Hope you’re enjoying this sometimes crazy pre-holiday time! Let’s all remember to be nice to ourselves and stay warm and nourished. Sending you lots of love. One Pot Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the chili oil ¼ cup olive oil 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes pinch of sea salt for the creamed beans and greens avocado oil or olive oil 1 yellow onion - diced 1 medium-large bunch of chard - stems thinly sliced, leaves chopped sea salt freshly ground black pepper 5 cloves of garlic - minced a few 1 strips of lemon zest (from 1 lemon) 2 15 oz cans or 3½ cups cooked white beans 2 cups vegetable broth 2 bay leaves (optional) 1¼ cup oat milk or cashew milk juice from 1 lemon Instructions to make the chili oil Combine the oil and red pepper flakes in a saucepan over medium heat, cook, swirling, for 3-4 minutes until the pepper flakes are crispy. Add a pinch of salt. Set aside to infuse while making the beans and greens. to make the creamed beans and greens Heat oil over medium heat in a soup pot. Add the onion and chard stems, along with a pinch of salt and plenty of black pepper, and sauté for 10 minutes, or until the chard stems are very soft. Add the garlic and lemon zest, and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the beans, vegetable broth, bay leaves, if using, and another pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, establish a simmer and let simmer and reduce, uncovered, for 10 minutes. Remove the bay leaves and lemon zest strips (this should be easy, since they should float up to the top). Add the chard leaves and cover the pot for a few minutes for the leaves to wilt. Remove the lid and stir in the wilted leaves. Add the milk and bring everything back up to a boil, then turn off the heat. Stir in the lemon juice. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve warm, drizzled with the chili oil (recipe above). Notes We prefer to use original Oatly oat milk or homemade cashew milk (1 cup cashews, 3 cups water) in this recipe, it does best with something really creamy and rich. 3.5.3226   Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

6 of America’s Coziest Vegan Cafes

December 13 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

A plant-based breakfast is a hot commodity sought after by vegans. Not to mention somewhere cute, cozy, with caffeine. Perhaps a quiet atmosphere, a low-key work or study spot, with an ethical approach and friendly baristas… is all of that too much to ask? We don’t think so! Now that the winter months have settled upon us, let’s bring to light some of the top vegan-friendly cafes in and around the chillier cities in America. Waffle Frolic – Ithaca, NY For not being solely vegan, this menu is fun and clearly marked, giving you the option to thoroughly choose your waffle and any topping your heart desires! Want something sweet with your coffee? Grab a (vegan) waffle with (vegan) ice cream. Looking for savory? Snag a Waffle Dog (their version of a corn dog) – totally vegan, served with maple mustard, and only $5.00. Be sure to hit up this cozy location before you frolic off to view some waterfalls in the chilly upstate air (because Ithaca is gorges, after all)! Seed Cafe – Minneapolis, MN Are you looking for some of the best coffee in Minneapolis? Perhaps you’re more into the sweeter side of things, such as a […] The post 6 of America’s Coziest Vegan Cafes appeared first on HappyCow.

Bean, Pesto, and Quinoa Cakes with Roasted Tomatoes

May 15 2020 Oh My Veggies 

I got the idea for this Bean, Pesto, and Quinoa Cakes with Roasted Tomatoes recipe in a roundabout way. Now that I have basil growing in the garden again, I’m on a quest to use up my frozen pesto because I’ll be able to make it fresh whenever I want to. If making a big batch of pesto and freezing it for fall and winter marks the end of summer for me, then frantically trying to use up that pesto is a sure sign of spring. It happens every year, like clockwork. It’s a good thing this recipe took a few tries to get right--I think I used half of my pesto supply perfecting it. The first time I made it, I only used cannelini beans. It was not good. I’ve realized that I only like cannelini beans as a component of a dish, not as the main ingredient. White bean cakes with just white beans, pesto, panko, and egg were definitely meh. So then I used half the beans and more ingredients each subsequent trial. Cheese! Why not? A zucchini? Of course! And then quinoa. Sometimes less is more, but sometimes more is more. And this is a more […]

Granny Smith Apple Crumb Pie (Gluten-Free)

May 11 2020 VegKitchen 

Granny Smith Apple Crumb Pie (Gluten-Free) This delicious gluten-free apple pie is perfect for winter holiday fare. And because its so easy to make, its a nice way to lighten your load when youll be doing a lot of other cooking. Dates balance the tartness of Granny Smith apples beautifully, but you can make endless variations on this pie by choosing almost any fruit thats in season and pairing it with whatever dried fruit seems appealing. The post Granny Smith Apple Crumb Pie (Gluten-Free) appeared first on VegKitchen.

The Spring Supper Salad

April 23 2020 My New Roots 

The Spring Supper Salad Greetings, friends! For fun I am resurrecting one of the blog posts I wrote back in 2010 – a warm butter bean salad bowl, garlic-roasted carrots and wild rice. Why I am re-publishing a decade-old recipe? Well, for one I thought that there are a bunch of new followers around here who have never even seen this delight (hello, by the way)! Second, most of you who have been here since the beginning may have forgotten about it. Third, its the ideal pantry staple recipe. And lastly, because its very, very delicious. Creamy butter beans, golden garlic-y carrots coins, chewy wild rice, crisp and bright pickled onions, silky kale, and refreshing dill, all coming together with a lick-your-lips mustardy dressing that is divine on just about everything – this salad and beyond. I’ve also re-named it the Spring Supper Salad because it’s the perfect seasonal transition meal (yea baby, it’s definitely a meal) incorporating both winter and spring produce and flavours, as we make our way into the light of the upswing! Hooray! This recipe brings back so many memories for me. It was around this time that I had been working in restaurants in Copenhagen for about 3 years. I loved my job, and could hardly believe that someone actually paid me to spend all day in a hot, cramped kitchen, cooking a dozen new dishes every day without a menu or recipes – definitely still in the honeymoon phase. I felt confident in the food I was making, applying my deep understanding of nutrition to recipe development, and I used every day to push myself creatively, keenly aware of how fast I was learning and growing. I was certainly in the vortex, and it was a very exciting time of my life.  I started my shift around 8 am, and the majority of my dishes needed to be ready at 12 noon when we opened the doors for lunch. This is a relatively short window of time to pump out 200 servings of anything, but after some years, I developed short cuts that would deliver a lot of flavour in a hurry. One of these short cuts, was garlic oil – the first thing I would make after tying my apron strings, that would act as a marinade, a roasting medium, and a base for soups, stews, dressings and sauces for the entire day. In fact, I dont think that there were many dishes coming off of my station that didnt have garlic in them back then (such an easy way to make things taste good!). This oil sat on my bench and it got tossed into all the things, and all the people kept coming back for more.  One thing I loved using the garlic oil on, was winter veggies. I could toss them in said liquid gold, crank up the oven, and in half an hour, Id have a blistered, glistening pile of roasted rainbow roots to serve, only needing a squeeze of lemon juice and a smattering of fresh herbs to make it presentable. Who wouldnt want to dive into that?! Plus, it was cheap. Like most restaurants, we were always looking at the bottom line and how we could make even the most humble foods taste exquisite. Garlic oil was the ticket.  At the restaurant, my signature move was combining veggies, grains, and beans in exciting ways (which was very novel at the time!) so this dish emerged from a commercial ovens worth of garlic-roasted carrots needing a home. With some tender and creamy butter beans coming off the stove, and some day-old, steamed wild rice calling out to me from the fridge, this combination came together very organically, taking the varied textures, colours, and flavours into consideration.  The secret to this dish is the consistency of the garlic in the oil. Different from mincing garlic and adding it to oil, here you must must must grate it or blend it up together so it becomes almost paste-like. This way, the garlic goes everywhere the oil does, and evenly caramelizes into the most divine, delectable gold, thats mellow and sweet and roast-y. You will not hate it. Stop! Fiber time. Fiber is probably the least sexy and alluring of all the nutrients we hear about. Its all about Protein! Fat! And if you hear about carbohydrates, its probably something ignorant and unfair (I really hate jerks picking on macronutrients, back off!). Fiber seems pretty boring and something only your grandmother cares about, so why do you need to?   One reason that plant-rich diets are so health-sustaining, is not only due to their high fiber content, but their potential for fiber diversity. In the past, fiber has been broken down into two main categories: soluble and insoluble. Whats new and exciting in this field of research, is that we can see that fiber can be broken down into several more categories (viscous, non-viscous, non-starch polysaccharides, resistant starches etc.) each one bringing forth the potential for diversified food sources for our gut bacteria. In short, the greater the diversity of plants we eat, the greater the diversity of our microbiome.  Why does this matter? Because our gut is the foundation for our overall health. If weve got a wide range of troops on the front lines of our immune system, the better our chances are for not just surviving, but thriving. The fiber we eat also feeds our good bacteria, and specific types of fiber feed specific types of bacteria. Enjoy eating the widest variety of plants you can, to ensure that youre supporting the widest variety of good guys in your digestive system. They will repay you in spades Im tellin ya!  The foods with the highest amounts of fiber are beans and lentils, vegetables, fruits, grains, and nuts and seeds (remember that there is no fiber in animal-based foods). Different proportions of soluble, insoluble fiber, as well as viscous /­­ non-viscous fiber, and fermentable fiber can be found in all of these food groups, it is highly recommended that you eat from each of them. And instead of focusing on grams (the minimum daily recommended intake is a measly 25g, not that were talking about that…), we need to focus on diversity. Enjoy as many plant-based foods as you can, and experience the terrain of your body slowly begin to change. Everything comes back to the gut, and not just what you are eating, but what your gut-bacteria are eating too. With this dish, youll be feeding those good guys with fiber from six different plants! Talk about a solid mix. Beans, whole grains, 3 different veggies, plus herbs, add up to serious fiber diversity. Good, good, good fiberations! The fun thing about revisiting this recipe, was seeing if there was anything I would change this time around. I have learned so much and grown incredibly as a cook in the past ten years, so I was surprised that I didnt have many tweaks to make. The only two things I felt this salad needed was a dark leafy green and a pickle – classic Sarah B moves at this point! Since we still dont have any spring greens happening yet, I decided kale was the winner, and obviously it needed to be massaged! I turned the red onions in the original recipe into a quick pickle, as this is another indispensable kitchen technique that Ive learned since posting the first time around. This salad-meal has everything you need and crave from a single bowl: its super flavourful and filling, with all of the textures in the mix to satisfy your noshing desires. The elements can all be made separately, even on separate days, if it seems like too many things to cook at once for a single dish. If you go the rollover route, boil the beans and rice a day or so before (and make extra while youre at it, because meal prep is for winners), and pickle the onions up to a week ahead. The kale can be prepped /­­ massaged a day or so in advance, but the carrots should be roasted right before serving.  If you dont have butter beans, any white bean would work (navy, cannellini, Great Northern, or baby lima beans are some varieties) and if you want to switch up the grain, any kind of rice would work – even millet or quinoa would be delicious! Instead of carrots, use any root veg you have kicking around your crisper: beets, sweet potato, turnip, or winter squash would taste great in the garlic oil. And if dill isnt the herb of your dreams, try substituting it with flat-leaf parsley, cilantro, basil, or tarragon.      Print recipe     Butter Bean, Wild Rice, and Garlic-Roasted Carrot Salad Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup wild rice 1 cup dried butter beans 4-5 medium carrots 4 cloves garlic 2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 bunch fresh dill sea salt freshly ground black pepper a handful of quick-pickled red onion (recipe follows) 1 batch massaged kale (recipe follows) Dressing: 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard 1 Tbsp. maple syrup 2 Tbsp. raw apple cider vinegar 3 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil pinch of sea salt Directions: 1. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight. Drain, rinse well and cover with fresh water. Add a teaspoon of sea salt. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cook until beans are soft - about 45 minutes. 2. While the beans are cooking, rinse the wild rice well, drain, and put in a pot. Cover rice with 1.5 cups fresh water, add a couple pinches of sea salt, bring to a boil, and reduce to simmer. Cook until rice is chewy-tender - about 45 minutes. You will know the rice is done when the grains open up to reveal their purple-gray inner portion. 3. Preheat the oven to 400F. While the rice is cooking, wash the carrots and slice them on the diagonal into coins, place on a baking sheet. Grate the garlic with a microplane and combine it with the oil. Pour over carrots and toss to coat. Sprinkle with salt. Place in the oven and roast, turning them a few times over the course of 15-20 minutes. The carrots should be cooked but not mushy - al dente! 4. Make the dressing by combining all ingredients together, shake well. 5. Now all the elements come together: Drain and rinse beans in cool water to stop the cooking process. Pour dressing over warm beans and toss. Let sit for 5 minutes or so. Drain the rice if any water remains, cool slightly. Mix with beans. Toss in the carrots, scraping the pan to add garlic oil to the remainder of the ingredients. Throw in the massaged kale, as many pickled onions as you fancy, and an explosion of dill. Cracked black pepper too, if it’s calling to you. 6. Serve immediately and enjoy. Quick-Pickled Red Onion Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml raw apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water 2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 medium red onion, thinly sliced Directions: 1. Combine the vinegar, water, salt, and maple syrup in a large jar. Stir to dissolve the salt and syrup. Add the onions to the jar and put them in the fridge. Enjoy after at least 30 minutes, keeps for up to two weeks.  Massaged Kale Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 90g shredded curly or dino kale Juice of 1/­­2 lemon 2 tsp. extra virgin olive oil 2 pinches of fine sea salt, plus more as needed Directions: 1. In a large bowl, combine the shredded kale, lemon juice, olive oil, and salt. Using your hands, rub and squeeze the kale together as if you are giving it a massage, until the kale leaves are dark green and tender, about 2 minutes. Enjoy immediately in the salad, or store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for up to five days.  I really hope you enjoy this delicious and satisfying meal soon. These days are asking so much of us, and I continue to come back to the kitchen for grounding, clarity, and connection. There are no answers, just presence. And in that presence I find myself over a cutting board, being grateful for just what is front of me, slicing a carrot, then another, saying thank you for simple things. Love to you all. Stay well and safe out there. xo, Sarah B The post The Spring Supper Salad appeared first on My New Roots.

Quarantine Quesadillas and Stay-At-Home Menu Plan

March 28 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Quarantine Quesadillas and Stay-At-Home Menu Plan I hope you’re prepared for cooking during quarantine.  I know I am.  But I owe my preparedness in the path of hurricanes for many years.  Hurricane preparedness was so much a part of our lives, that we actually wrote a book about it!  And now, that the same kind of preparedness is helpful during these strange days of self-isolation. Even though we’re allowed to venture out for groceries, I prefer to keep my interactions with the outside world to a minimum.  That’s why we made one trip to the store last week and shopped for enough food to last a month. The canned and dried beans and pasta was the easy part. I also stocked the freezer with an extra supply of frozen spinach, collards, broccoli, and other green veggies because I knew the fresh, more delicate produce would be the first things we needed to use up. I then loaded up the fridge with plant milk, tofu, and lots of fresh produce. I planned menus that used the most delicate product first, so now, over a week since shopping, we’re nearly out of fresh greens — I have enough lettuce for about three more salads. But we still have a lot of other hardy veggies like cabbage, carrots, celery, winter squash, and of course, white and sweet potatoes.  I bought a lot of fruit that I’m keeping refrigerated to last longer, pulling out only what we’ll use in a day each morning. Here is a list of what I plan to cook in the weeks ahead using what I have on hand: Stay-at-home Menu Plan - Chili Mac & salad - Tacos - Pizza & salad - Hakka noodle stir-fry - Lentil soup - Stuffed kabocha squash - Shepherds Pie - Ramen bowls - Vegetable fried rice - Tofu tetrazzini with green beans - Saag with tofu and basmati rice - Enchiladas - Pasta Fagiole - Tofu scramble - 15-bean soup - Seitan Pot Roast with Cabbage, Carrots & Potatoes - Artichoke Mac UnCheese - Three bean pasta salad - Veggie Dogs w/­­sauerkraut - Chickpea salad wraps - Singapore mei fun - Hoppin John If you have a copy of my book Cook the Pantry or Vegan Unplugged, you’ll find lots of useful tips and recipes using pantry ingredients.  I’ll be sharing some of those recipes in the weeks ahead.  For now, I’ll leave you with the recipe from Cook the Pantry for Spinach and White Bean Quesadillas or as they are now known, Quarantine Quesadillas.  Stay safe! Spinach and White Bean Quesadillas aka “Quarantine Quesadillas” Frozen spinach and canned white beans combine with garlic and spices to make a delectable filling for these hearty quesadillas.  No cheese needed.  Serve with your favorite salsa. - 1 tablespoon olive oil (or 2 tablespoons water to water-saute) - 2 or 3 garlic cloves, pressed or minced - 10 ounces frozen chopped spinach, thawed and squeezed dry - Salt and ground black pepper - 1 (15.5-ounce) can white beans, drained and rinsed - 1 tablespoon lemon juice - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground coriander - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cumin - Large flour tortillas Heat the oil in a saucepan over medium heat.  Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, 30 seconds.  Add the spinach and season with salt and pepper to taste.  Add the beans, lemon juice, coriander, and cumin.  Cook, stirring, until the spinach is cooked and the flavors are blended, about 5 minutes.  Mash the beans well while cooking. Set aside. Place a large tortillas on a flat work surface. Spread a thin layer of the spinach mixture evenly over half of the tortilla. Fold the remaining half of the tortilla over the half with the filling and press gently to enclose and spread the filling close to the edges. Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Place the quesadilla in the hot skillet.  Flatten with a spatula and cook until lightly browned on the bottom, about 3 minutes. Flip the quesadillas and cook until the other side is golden brown.  Cut into wedges. Repeat with more tortillas and filling as desired. Serve hot with salsa. This recipe is from Cook the Pantry by Robin Robertson (C) 2015, published by Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Annie Oliverio. The post Quarantine Quesadillas and Stay-At-Home Menu Plan appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Recipe | Meyer Lemon & Basil Sorbet

February 21 2020 Oh My Veggies 

As a consumer, my weakness is novelty. Instead of growing red tomatoes, I grow purple ones; instead of listening to No Doubt in junior high, I was obsessed with Pavement. I’ve always been slightly contrarian by nature and I think my appreciation for all things new and different stems from that. When it comes to citrus fruit, this time of year is pretty good for novelty. I’m not much of a citrus eater the rest of the year, but winter is different. There’s Satsumas and Minneolas and Blood Oranges and they’re all readily available and affordable. And unlike regular oranges and tangerines, I like these kinds of citrus. When I saw Meyer lemons at the grocery store, I knew I wanted to try making a sorbet with them. Their deep yellow rind was so bright and cheerful and it made the regular lemons a few bins away look so boring and blah. The darker rind comes from the fact that Meyer lemons originated by crossing lemons with oranges. Although the appeal of Meyer lemons is that they’re sweeter and less acidic than regular lemons, I’ve found that they’re still a little too sour for my tastes. So yes, there’s lots […]

Soy and Maple-Glazed Winter Squash

January 24 2020 VegKitchen 

Soy and Maple-Glazed Winter Squash With a subtle hint of soy sauce and maple syrup, this is a simple recipe that makes roasted winter squash positively addictive. It’s a nice addition to everyday or holiday winter meals. Serves: The post Soy and Maple-Glazed Winter Squash appeared first on VegKitchen.

Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff

January 18 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff I really love January. To me, this month has a bright and sparkling clean feel to it. And even though the start of a new year is purely symbolic, it can be such great time to set some concrete intentions and start making lasting changes or small steps in a new direction. This year, much like the past few years, I’m inspired to simplify, minimize, and really think about the things that I bring into my life, and my impact as a consumer. In the past few years, we’ve tackled food waste and figured out a way to compost food scraps that’s sustainable for us. We’ve also done away with a lot of store-bought household products like paper towels and most single-purpose cleaning products, but there is still a lot of work to do in that area. Of course I find that cooking at home is always a top priority when it comes to simplifying in a sane way. Being prepared, having tried and true recipes and techniques under my sleeve, and having some trusted meal components stocked in the fridge or pantry always leads to less stress, less waste, and more enjoyment throughout the week. This Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff doesn’t have any particular ties to these January musings, beside the fact that it’s a cozy, wintery recipe that I’ll gladly plan to cook on any given week this winter. It’s a nostalgic flavor for us, since our family in Russia cooked it quite a bit, but we think that this plant-based version is even better than the original :) Below I’m sharing some of my plans, projects I’d like to tackle, and resources that I’ve found to be super inspiring when it comes to simplifying, minimizing my impact and beyond. Would love to hear yours! Goals: projects I’d like to tackle and a few (small but impactful) new habits I’d like to form this year – Stop buying single-purpose household cleaning products and make my own, super simple ones (key words: super simple). I already do this by making a 1 part vinegar, 1 part water all-purpose cleaner that I use on pretty much all surfaces. I sometimes infuse the vinegar with citrus peels for a week or add a few drops of essential oils for a more refreshing scent. That cleaner works really well for most things. But I’d like to make a few more site-specific mixes as well, since I sometimes panic and end up buying some shower cleaner I don’t actually need. Simply Living Well is an amazing resource for easy, home-care recipes. I’m going to make this shower spray, this floor cleaner, and this glass/­­window cleaner. All those recipes have really basic, interchangeable ingredients, which keeps them from being overwhelming. Please let me know if you have a favorite homemade laundry detergent recipe – still trying to figure that one out. – Repair things I have before buying new. I’ve always liked doing stuff with my hands, so for me this is an inherently relaxing activity that I’d like to make more time for. Right now, our linen duvet cover has decided to rip in many places at once, and instead of buying a new one, the plan is to mend it properly with tonal patches, which can look really cool. Julie O’Rourke has a super comprehensive darning and mending tutorial here in her IG stories (just flip through the doll-making part). Her whole account is super dreamy as well. – Make a pot of beans every single week. I’ve noticed that every time I make a big batch of beans, I end up thanking myself over and over again for all the easy meals I’ve made possible with that one step. I like to cook the beans with aromatics so that I also end up with a delicious broth that I can either eat with the beans or use later for soups, etc. Different kinds of beans yield such different flavor/­­cooking potential, so it’s easy to switch them up every week without getting bored. For example, I cook chickpeas with aromatics, then have them for dinner in their broth with greens and maybe other veggies wilted in. I freeze some of the broth to use later as veggie stock. I then eat the chickpeas as is in veggie bowls/­­salads, make hummus with them, marinate them, make crispy chickpeas, or make falafel/­­veggie burgers. You can of course do all of this with canned beans, but home-cooked ones are much tastier, more cost effective, less wasteful if you buy them in bulk, and the broth that you get from cooking them is super valuable! If I find that I can’t use up all of the beans, I just freeze them in their broth and again set my future self up for success. We have a lot of meal plans centered around whole pots of beans here. Inspiring Resources: – 75 Ways to Create a Low-Waste Home from Simply Living Well and Zero Waste, Plastic Free Alternatives Master List from Paris to Go are chock-full of ideas to slowly chip away at. – Jessie’s Produce Prep Ebook is such a wonderful guide to reducing food waste and enjoying the abundance of the plant food world. – Mama Eats Plants is the queen of low-waste living, vegan cooking, and a generally mindful lifestyle. – Live Planted is a great, short-format podcast about a practical approach to a low-waste lifestyle and much more. – This One Part Podcast interview with Kathryn Kellogg of Going Zero Waste is so full of positivity and details some actionable steps most of us can implement to decrease waste. Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 8 oz package tempeh - crumbled 2 teaspoons tamari 1 teaspoon maple syrup ½ cup cashews - soaked to soften if no high-speed blender 1 tablespoon white or chickpea miso 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 cup purified water sea salt black pepper avocado oil or other cooking oil of choice 1 yellow onion - diced 4 garlic cloves - minced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary 1 tablespoon tomato paste pinch of red pepper flakes (optional) 6 oz portobello mushroom caps (about 3 medium) - sliced into long strips ½ cup red wine 10-12 oz any pasta of choice fresh parsley - for serving (optional) Instructions Put the crumbled tempeh in a bowl. Pour the tamari and maple syrup over it, mix and let sit while making the cashew sauce. In an upright blender, combine the cashews, miso, mustard, apple cider vinegar, water, and salt and pepper to taste. Blend until very smooth. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Set aside. Heat some oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the tempeh and stir once to coat with the oil, then let sit uninterrupted for 2-3 minutes, until the undersides are browned. Mix and let sit again for another 3-5 minutes, until browned. Push the tempeh to one side of the pan, if your pan is large enough, or transfer back to a bowl and set aside until later. Add more oil to the pan. Add the onions and a pinch of salt, and sauté for 7-8 minutes, until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic, rosemary, tomato paste, and red pepper flakes, if using. Stir until the garlic is fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the mushrooms, along with another pinch of salt. Sauté until the mushrooms are browned and all the liquid that they release has evaporated, about 8-10 min. Mix the tempeh back in. Add the wine, bring it up to a simmer, and let reduce for about 3 minutes. Add the cashew sauce, stirring it and letting it warm through for a few minutes. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Meanwhile, cook the pasta al dente in well-salted water, according to the directions on the package. Reserve about 1 cup of starchy pasta water for thinning out the sauce. Drain the cooked pasta and add it to the pan with the stroganoff. Start mixing the pasta with the sauce, adding splashes of the starchy pasta water to thin out the sauce and to get it to stick to the pasta, as needed. Enjoy right away, garnished with parsley, if using. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

7 Snowy Escapes In The Swiss Alps

January 2 2020 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Whether you’re hitting the slopes or seeking a cozy retreat, we’ve got a list of the best getaways in the Swiss Alps this winter season! And we’ve included a (vegan) food guide to each location. Zermatt What To Do: Zermatt is the place to be in southern Switzerland for skiing, climbing, and hiking. Placed below the famous Matterhorn Peak, you’ll find shops and boutiques galore. Not a ski fan? Try your hand (or feet) at ice skating or curling, instead. A sweet spot for the adventurers and tourists alike, Zermatt’s got activities for all. Where To Eat: You can start with coffee and lovely views at Cup’s Italian Coffee House. A vegan pastry is usually available, along with non-dairy milks, smoothies, and yogurt. Stop skiing long enough for amazing Alps views and lunch at Trockener Steg. They offer a salad and pasta bar that’s sure to be navigated easily for vegan options. If you’re looking for a trendy place for dinner, try Geez – but be sure to ask for no fish sauce and to clarify that the vegetarian offerings be made vegan, if necessary. Bern What To Do: This highly populated Swiss city (over 1 million) is the capital […] The post 7 Snowy Escapes In The Swiss Alps appeared first on HappyCow.

Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly?

December 23 2019 Meatless Monday 

Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly?Despite the frigid temperatures and seemingly barren landscapes all around, the winter months can be surprisingly abundant. In fact, much of our most popular produce is actually in-season during this chilly time of year. Thats right, apples, beets, broccoli, cabbage, broccoli rabe, Brussels sprouts, carrots, cauliflower, celery, citrus fruits, fennel, garlic, leeks, mushrooms, onions, parsnips, pears, pomegranates, sweet potatoes, turnips, rutabagas, and radishes all fair pretty well in colder temperatures. But we dont. Thats why weve compiled a list of our warmest, most comforting meatless recipes -- all of which use seasonal winter produce -- to help you and your family stay toasty through the frosty months. Make them this Monday for a cozy start to the week. Carrot Soup with Parsnip Chips   Cauliflower and Chickpea Curry   Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts   Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes Red Onion Soup with Shiitake Broth Roasted Fennel with Tofu and Oranges Roasted Garlic Parsnip Spinach Shepherds Pie Vegetable Fritters with Green-Chile Coconut Chutney   Interested in adding more Meatless Monday recipes to your cooking repertoire? Click here to access our recipe archives full of easy-to-make meatless and plant-based dishes.   The post Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly? appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Anja Schwartz Rothe

December 15 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Anja Schwartz Rothe Anja Schwartz Rothe is an herbalist, gardener, medicine maker, and writer, based in New Yorks Hudson Valley. Anja is the alchemist behind Fat of the Land, a small batch herbal apothecary with a focus on cultivating connection to self, environment, and the cycles by which we live. We interviewed Anja about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, her work and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? A nice balance of both! I need to exist inside a structured, but flexible container. A little bit of routine allows me to make the most of my time, while feeling free and inspired. -- Do your routines change with the seasons? Definitely, it is one of the biggest factors that informs the way I live – acknowledging the seasonal shifts within and without and using that information to alter how I show up to take care of myself. -- What do your mornings look like? I dont like alarms, so I usually wake up naturally, somewhere between 6:30 and 8, depending on the time of year. Then I drink a bunch of water, sometimes with lemon and sometimes not. I try to get out in nature almost immediately. I live right next to a bird sanctuary on the Hudson River, so I bring a hot bevvie and do a long walk there. I always leave my phone at the house so I have a chance to really check in with myself, do some breathing, and connect before the day starts. After that, its breakfast and usually emails. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I usually wash my face and do some facial gua sha. Its so relaxing and helps me unwind. Then, I have little ritual of turning down the house, where I close the curtains, turn off the lights, and say goodnight to everything. It sounds like a small detail, but its a gesture I really like, acknowledging the animacy of the home energies, thanking them, and setting it all to rest for the day. In my bedroom, I try to keep good sleep hygiene, which for me means low technology and minimal artificial lighting. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice? Honestly, I think my whole life is a mindfulness practice. Isnt that what mindfulness is all about, practicing showing up in the mundane of the day-to-day in the fullest capacity? Sustenance -- Describe your typical or favorite meal for each of these: Breakfast – Usually some combination of eggs and ferments. In the summer, hard-boiled with smoked salmon and sauerkraut. Right now, Im on a scallion and ginger congee kick – a simple Chinese rice porridge served with a soft boiled egg and miso. Its so good. Lunch – Sometimes an open-face sandwich or leftovers from the night before. Lately, Ive been working through lunch and having an early dinner. Snack – Fruit and chocolate. Its apples, pears, and citrus right now. Dinner – Currently: soup and sourdough bread with lots of ghee. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I make myself a matcha latte with oat milk and a couple droppers of our brain tincture almost every day. On weekends, I might have a cup of coffee and I sometimes do a mushroom tea/­­dandy blend/­­cacao mixture as an afternoon pick me up. I really try not to have too much caffeine though, it makes me a bit of a mess and dehydrates me way too much, always trying to find that balance. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your basket? Its pretty broken up between farmers markets, the local food shop, and the co-op in the next city over. In the summer, primarily farmers markets for that good good fruit and veg. Right now, my staples are eggs, potatoes, citrus, oatly, broccoli, and cauliflower. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? Definitely. I like to keep my kitchen stocked with what I call hippie treats and lots of fruit. I dont buy a lot of packaged food, which means if I want to have sweets in the house I have to prepare them myself. I love baking, and will usually make a treat at least once a week – recently, its been sticky apple ginger date cake and berry crisps from a stocked freezer of gleaned summer berries. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do, but with much variability. In the past, I’ve been really into running, yoga, and rock climbing — and these things come back in waves. In the summer, I’m cycling a lot, and right now I’m getting back into my ephemeral winter gym flow. Sometimes, my exercise is just doing squats in the kitchen while waiting for the kettle to boil. Thats actually my favorite kind. Beauty -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I definitely subscribe to the less is more skincare model. I wash with just warm water, am very liberal with hydrosols, and then use a serum and/­­or balm. I make all my own hydrosols in my garden during the summer and offer some of them in the apothecary. Im currently really loving Dragon Balm by Apis Apotheca, a farm and skincare line run by my friend Aviva, who really knows her shit. Most days I also do a quick little gua sha facial massage afterwards – I always see instant results and it feels too good. -- Do you have any beauty tricks that you’ve found to be especially useful? Drinking lots of water and herbal infusions. My present go-to is nettle, raspberry leaf, goji berry, and fresh ginger root. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress? Big Calm tincture in every pocket, purse, and drawer. I lean heavily on nervines and deep breathing. Getting outside is also really important — and socializing! -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? To be honest, I havent gotten so much as a cold in more than ten years! I owe this mostly to a naturally strong constitution, but also a pretty large emphasis on tonic, preventative medicine and lifestyle. Cooking with medicines, like infused vinegars, dank broths, and elderberry syrup, are big, but getting enough rest is the biggest. Im constantly doing micro check-ins throughout the day to see how I can best give myself what I need to prevent burnout, fatigue, and illness. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? Theyre so fluid in my life. I enjoy the hell out of the work I do, and I’d probably be doing most of it even if it wasnt my job, but Im also pretty good at allowing myself to turn off when I’m tired and not place undue expectations on myself all the time. I find allowing myself to take frequent mini vacations is the most helpful — getting out of my environment is the only thing that really turns off my work brain, plus it brings in a fresh influx of new inspiration and perspective. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming an herbalist? My first job in high school was at the local health food store. There were a couple older women who worked there and would walk me through the vitamin and bulk aisles, teaching me all about the different herbs and supplements. This was a sort of epiphany for me, viewing plants in this way. I then studied anthropology in university, focusing mostly on traditional sustenance and healing practices. After finishing school, I knew I needed to immerse myself in plant medicine, so I enrolled in an herbal medicine program in Appalachia. -- How do you approach foraging the ingredients for your apothecary and seasonal wellness boxes? Do you have a plan in mind for each season or is it more about going with the flow? I definitely have a plan in mind, but I usually have to surrender it while remaining open to new inspiration. It can be a challenge to have expectations for a season, nature doesnt really work that way, and thats been both a constant source of inspiration for me, as well as a lesson in boundaries and respect. I could be inspired to make one thing, but if its not a particularly fecund year for a certain plant, I have to cede to that. Making things from intuition and by listening to the seasons and cycles is probably not the best business model, but its the only way I want to work with plant medicine. -- What are some offerings youre working on currently? Im getting ready to re-release a little book I wrote last year, Always Coming Home: a guide to seasonal wellness, with some edits and new content. Im also refining the 2020 Seasonal Wellness Box subscription that will soon be available. -- How were you able to grow a business with your interests and loves in mind? Its been a very slow chipping away for me to remain really clear on the things that matter and the things that dont in growing my business. It turns out, remaining true to creating medicine that is intimate, small batch, and well cared for is much more important than being able to mass produce things or being on every shelf in the country. I want my values to be foremost and my business to be second. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Going full hibernation this January. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Put my legs up the wall, get a massage, go hiking with a friend, sweat, travel, in the summer I go swimming multiple times of day in various bodies of running water, thats my favorite. -- We love the Catskills so much. What are some of your favorite places to visit in the area? Montgomery Place farm stand for all your fruit and veg needs, there are so many great trails in the mountains, Colgate Lake for a swim, Talbott and Arding picnic at the Saugerties lighthouse for lunch and Lil Debs Oasis for dinner. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Im reading The Overstory by Richard Powers right now, and it is SO GOOD. A vignette of short stories written about trees and so much more. Song/­­Album – Hildegard von Bingen forever. Movie – Fantastic Fungi! Just saw and highly recommend, mushrooms will save the world. Piece of Art – All things Andrew Wyeth. Photos by Jenn Morse, Gabrielle Greenberg and Anja herself. The post Anja Schwartz Rothe appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Cranberry Spaghetti Squash

December 9 2019 VegKitchen 

Cranberry Spaghetti Squash Served in its shell, this simple spaghetti squash preparation makes a dramatic presentation when part of an everyday winter meal. It’s festive enough to serve as a holiday side dish at the Thanksgiving or Christmas table as well. For more servings, simply double the recipe. The post Cranberry Spaghetti Squash appeared first on VegKitchen.


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