winter - vegetarian recipes

winter vegetarian recipes

7 Squash Recipes You Absolutely Need to Make This Fall

October 14 2019 Meatless Monday 

7 Squash Recipes You Absolutely Need to Make This FallSquash come in many different shapes and sizes, with each possessing their own unique composition, color, taste, and nutritional profile. Some are ideal for savory sides, salads, and appetizers (squash blossoms, chayote, pumpkin); others are destined for a long, slow roast in the oven (acorn, butternut, delicata), while a select few can even replace our favorite carbohydrate -- noodles (spaghetti squash, zucchini). But what these recipes all share in common is that they are the perfect accompaniment or star of your Meatless Monday menu. So whether youre a loyal Meatless Monday fan or a new adopter, weve compiled a list of some undeniably dynamite seasonal squash recipes that will have you running/­­driving/­­rollerblading to the nearest farmers market.     Spicy Spaghetti Squash Ramen with Homemade Vegan Kombu Dashi Swapping spaghetti squash for ramen noodles adds extra veggies to this flavorful dish, which also features crispy pan-fried tofu, caramelized onions, broccoli, mushrooms and fresh ginger.     Pomegranate-Smashed Butternut Squash Need something festive for the changing of the seasons? Pairing the tart pop of pomegranate seeds with the inherent creaminess of butternut squash makes for a dish fit for any holiday table.     Butternut Squash and Apple Veggie Burgers Your grill may be closed for the season, but that doesnt mean you cant enjoy a delicious meatless burger! These baked burgers combine the sweet and savory flavors of autumn produce for a comforting seasonal dish.     Golden Pepper and Parmesan Zucchini Pasta No gluten is required to create this luscious bowl of pasta. Strips of zucchini replace traditional noodles, while diced golden peppers are used instead of the classic canned tomato. The result is a burst of light and bright flavors.     Roasted Delicata Squash Boats Delicata squash is just as its name suggests; its delicate exterior makes for a tender and creamy bite that is both rustic and decadent. These roasted delicata squash boats are the perfect vehicle for tender mushrooms and hearty stalks of kale.       Maple Date Pumpkin Porridge Coziness in a bowl. Hot cereal is simmered with cinnamon, dates, and maple syrup for a combination of flavors that just scream autumn. Pumpkins earthiness is a great match for the porridge grain farina. This breakfast will undoubtedly keep you full until lunch.     Butternut Squash Spinach Alfredo If you think youre looking at an ooey gooey cheese sauce, look again! That luscious coating is made from a combination of butternut squash, olive oil, onion, garlic, lemon juice, and a dash of dried sage. This one is truly an Alfredo fit for fall.     Invite your friends and family to try the flavors of fall with these plant-based recipes. If youre looking for other meatless recipe inspiration, check out our recipe gallery. Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post 7 Squash Recipes You Absolutely Need to Make This Fall appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Instant Pot Apple Cider Recipe (stove-top option)

October 8 2019 Vegan Richa 

Instant Pot Apple Cider Recipe (stove-top option)Easy Instant Pot Apple Cider Recipe. 7 Ingredients. Serve this spiced apple cider warm or cold. Stove-top option. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free pressure cooker Homemade Mulled Apple Cider drink.  Jump to Recipe Spiced Drinks are what I crave in the cooler fall and winter months. This Apple Cider fits right in. Just 7 Ingredients!Put everything in an Instant Pot pressure cooker, pressure cook, strain and done! I love the cider warm, but it is also amazing served chilled with ice. This homemade apple cider also stores well. Refrigerate for upto 5 days or freeze. Lets whip up a batch of this cider! Make it spiked with some rum, whiskey, wine or tequila. Change up the fruits with seasonal fruits for variation.Continue reading: Instant Pot Apple Cider Recipe (stove-top option)The post Instant Pot Apple Cider Recipe (stove-top option) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons

October 4 2019 My New Roots 

Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons Hey friends! Im coming in hot, to drop this stellar soup recipe on you, while the weather is still fine and early fall produce is at its peak. The bell peppers in my region are bountiful and beautiful, and because I am the biggest sucker for roasted pepper anything, I came up with this dish to celebrate a seasonal favourite. But first, can we take a moment and please talk about how I just invented giant croutons? I think it might be my personal opportunity to break the internet. How is this not a thing yet?! Sure, I guess you could look at the cheese toast on French onion soup and say that is a giant crouton, but in my opinion, its merely an open-faced grilled cheese sandwich. Pfff. Not even close to this. My crouton is a cube of sourdough (important shape-distinction), kissed with garlicky oil and seared to toasty, golden perfection. The outsides are caramelized and crisp, while the center is fluffy, creamy and studded with nooks and crannies for the soup to slide in to. Guh. Too good to be true! Honestly guys, Im pretty proud of this. But I also need you to know that this soup is darn good too, even without the crouton. The recipe is loosely based on the North African Sun-dried Tomato Soup in my second cookbook, except I left out many of the warming spices, which felt prematurely winter-y. Its still t-shirt weather here, so the ginger and cinnamon had to go. Plus, I doubled the pepper count, added a teeny splash of balsamic (to round out the flavor), and made it bisque-y without the cream. Guess what I used?! Lentils!! Mic drop. But instead of bulking it up and putting the soup on legume-overload, I was conservative in my approach and just used half a cup. This made the soup rich and creamy without the cream, but in a very hush, hush way, so that you literally have no idea that theyre there. But their presence can be felt, because this soup is the real meal deal, not just a bowl of blended up veggies that will leave you hungry again in 20 minutes. With the bonus lentils, youre getting way more protein and fiber that youd normally expect from a pepper soup, and they will fill you up, and keep you energized for hours. This suddenly feels very infomercial-y. Did I mention there is a giant crouton? Moving on! Lets talk about peppers because they are in the nightshade family and that is a hot topic, if I ever heard one. Nightshade vegetables are a part of the Solanaceae family, and include tomatoes, peppers (and chilies), eggplant /­­ aubergine, and all potatoes except for sweet potatoes and yams. Originally cultivated in South America, nightshade vegetables were brought to Europe and Asia by Spanish explorers. Their name supposedly comes from the fact that they grow at night (as opposed to mushrooms, which grow in the shade). You may have heard rumors that Nightshade vegetables are toxic, that they can cause inflammation or that theyre linked to autoimmune disorders. While it is true that edible nightshades contain high levels of glycoalkaloids, specifically solanine, which at very high levels is toxic, it only seems to trigger reactions in individuals who are sensitive to it. Those with pre-existing inflammatory conditions may experience worsening of their symptoms when they consume these foods, but an elimination diet would be the only way to determine if nightshades are in fact, causing the issues. For people who do not suffer from chronic inflammatory ailments, enjoying ratatouille, a pizza, or a baked potato is likely just fine, and certainly not going to cause you to get these conditions. As far as autoimmunity is concerned, alkaloids from edible nightshades have been shown to irritate the gut, since solanine is effectively natural insecticide produced by this plant family. Gut irritation can contribute to intestinal permeability, which can set off an autoimmune reaction when proteins that should remain in the digestive tract leak into the bloodstream. The level of irritation depends on the amount consumed, and how sensitive the individual is. The highest amounts of solanine are found in green potatoes, and sprouted potatoes, but we should avoid eating those anyway.   Lets review: if you have an autoimmune disorder, leaky gut, or you exhibit symptoms of discomfort (digestive or otherwise) after consuming nightshades, try eliminating them from your diet for at least 6 weeks and see if you notice a difference. Then, re-introduce them one at a time and be aware of how you feel within a 24-hour period after eating them. If you dont have these issues, dont worry about it! There is absolutely no reason to limit your intake of these highly nutritious vegetables if they seem to do your body good. Bell peppers contain an astounding amount of vitamin C, high levels of A, and B6, with very good levels of folate, fiber, and vitamin E. They also provide flavonoids, and carotenoids. Remember to buy bell peppers that have fully ripened - anything other than the greens ones, which are typically unripe red, orange, yellow, or purple peppers. Their nutrient profile will be at its peak, and the natural sugars will be fully developed, easing their digestion. Let’s get to the recipe! If youre really pressed for time, skip roasting the peppers in the oven, and just dice them up, and add them to the pot along with the garlic in step 3. The overall flavour will be less rich, but still incredibly delicious. When Im in a crunch, Ill pull this move and have dinner on the table in 30 minutes. If you want to change things up, try orange or yellow peppers instead of the red ones. As far as sun-dried tomatoes go, I like organic, dried ones, instead of the oil-packed ones, but either would work here. With the canned tomatoes, go for whole, since they tend to be of higher quality than the diced ones. Lets talk bread. If you have access to a bakery where they make the real thing (sourdough), please use that. If you dont, find an unsliced loaf at your supermarket; bonus points if its made with wholegrain flour, organic, yeast-free, or all of the above. The bread should be cut into cubes with the serving bowl size in mind (youll want to see some of the soup around it), but if you have a huge bowl, go crazy and make that crouton as gargantuan as you want! And dont throw the offcuts away - I put them in the toaster and slathered them with hummus for my son. He was stoked about the oddly-shaped chunks.       Print recipe     Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons Makes 8 cups /­­ 2 litres /­­ Serves 4 Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee, divided 2 medium yellow onions, diced 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 large garlic cloves, minced 2 tsp. ground cumin 2 tsp. ground coriander 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. hot smoked paprika (depending on how spicy you like it) 4 large red bell peppers (stems, seeds, and ribs removed) 5 - 7 cups /­­ 1 1/­­4 – 1 3/­­4 liters vegetable broth 1 14.5-oz. /­­ 400ml can whole tomatoes 1/­­2 cup /­­ 45g sun-dried tomatoes, roughly chopped 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100g dried red lentils, soaked for 1 – 8 hours, if possible 2 tsp. balsamic vinegar Directions: 1. If you have time, soak the lentils in water overnight, or for up to 8 hours. Drain and rinse very well. If youre starting from dried, that is okay too, just give them a very good wash and drain before using. 2. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Prepare the peppers by cutting each of them in half, scooping out the seeds, and rubbing with a little coconut oil. Place peppers cut-side down on a parchment-lined baking sheet and place in the oven. Roast for 25-30 minutes until the skins are totally wrinkled and charred in places. 3. In a large stockpot, melt the remaining coconut oil over medium heat. Add the onions and salt and stir to coat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions soften and begin to slightly caramelize, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic, cumin, coriander, and smoked paprika, and cook until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Add a little broth to the pot if the mixture becomes dry. 4. Add the whole tomatoes and their juices along with the sun-dried tomatoes, lentils, and the rest of the broth. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, and break up the whole tomatoes with your spoon. Simmer, covered for 15 minutes. Stir once or twice during cooking to prevent sticking. 5. The peppers should be done by now, so take them out of the oven, transfer all of them to a bowl with a lid or plate over the opening, making sure there are no gaps (this technique steams the peppers so that the skins will just slip right off, without using plastic wrap). Once cool enough to handle, remove the skins from the peppers, and place the peeled peppers in a blender. 6. Remove the soup from the heat and take off the lid to let cool just for a minute. Transfer to the blender, and blend on high until completely smooth. Add balsamic vinegar, and broth or water to thin, until your desired consistency is reached. Season to taste. Transfer back to the pot and keep warm. 7. Make the croutons (recipe below). 8. To serve, ladle the soup into bowls, top with fresh herbs, edible flowers, a drizzle of good olive oil, and of course place one giant crouton in the middle of each bowl. Enjoy! Giant Croutons Make as many as you want! Ingredients: 1 loaf of good bread (wholegrain sourdough is preferred) 2 Tbsp. expeller-pressed coconut oil (the unscented kind - very important!) or ghee, divided 1 clove of garlic, finely minced flaky salt, to taste Directions: 1. Cut the bread into 2 1/­­2 (6cm) slices - mine weighed 1.25 oz /­­ 35g per piece. Cut off the edges and make a cube (save the off-cuts for snacks). 2. Spread a little coconut oil on each side. 3. Heat remaining coconut oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and sauté for a few minutes, just until the garlic is starting to turn golden. 4. Lower the heat to medium-low, and add the bread cube. Rub each side in the oil to coat with some of the garlic and sprinkle lightly with salt. Let cook on each of the six sides for a couple of minutes until golden brown. Remove from heat and enjoy immediately. I hope that wherever you are on this earth, youre enjoying the seasons shifting and embracing the changes that come with that. When I started writing this post, it was a very hot day, and now, just 48 hours later, I can feel a significant shift in temperature and weather. Here we go, fall! Im happy youre here. Big thanks to my friends at Foragers Farms for letting me crash the greenhouse at the crack of dawn to get these pics. Love to all, happy fall! Sarah B The post Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons appeared first on My New Roots.

Cozy Pantry Stew

September 29 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Cozy Pantry Stew Hello friends! We’re back from a little hiatus having to do with my wedding. I married my love of many years under the September full moon in upstate NY, and it was such a fun party. The wedding took all of our time and energy, since we did everything we could ourselves together with friends and family. That’s why it’s been extra quiet around here. I’m sharing a few wedding photos at the bottom of this post, but otherwise it’s back to regular programming around here! We’re excited to cook with all the fall produce popping up right now and have a few digital cookbook projects in the works for the coming months. We missed this space and YOU. On to this life saver of a stew. I don’t know if this is the case for you, but in our house, when we say we have nothing to eat, most of the time it’s not really true. That type of talk usually comes from laziness or not being in the mood for whatever ingredients we do have on hand. Both my husband and I are avid home cooks and generally obsessed with good food, so we have a well-stocked pantry. This year, we’ve been trying to be more mindful of those ‘nothing-to-eat moments’ and have been cooking more from the pantry. The results always save us money and end up tasting more nourishing than any takeout ever would. This stew is something that we make all the time, using pantry staples and odds and ends from the fridge. It’s flavorful, soul-warming, and so easy. Scrapping together meals out of seemingly nothing is one of my favorite ways to cook – I love anything having to do with economy in the kitchen. (Tamar Adler’s An Everlasting Meal is one of my favorite books). It’s like a game and so endlessly satisfying when that meal appears out of ‘thin air.’ I know everyone’s pantries are vastly different, but if you’re a vegan/­­vegetarian-inclined cook, I have a hunch that you’ll have at least some of these ingredients on hand. I love keeping red lentils around because they cook almost instantly and taste great – these make up the base of our stew. Then come the aromatics. Dig up those unused carrots and celery out of the crisper (soak them in cold water for a few hours if they’re really limp) and find an onion (or an unused half of one!), shallots, or leeks. That classic trio of onion, celery, and carrots help build great flavor for soup like nothing else does. Then, see if you have some leftover white wine in the fridge and grab a few cloves of garlic. Wine gives this stew that extra something and truly takes it to the next level. If you don’t have an open bottle, you could also open one to cook with and enjoy with dinner. Any other extras are up to you and your pantry/­­fridge. When it comes to spices, dried herbs are great, as well as turmeric, but you could also add coriander, cumin, or even curry. The stew pictured here has cherry tomatoes and sweet potato. Tomatoes add umami and I wouldn’t skip them, but if you don’t have fresh ones, you could add a little bit of canned tomatoes or even tomato paste. Sweet potato is totally optional, but use it here if you have one, or a regular potato, squash, or even cauliflower. At the end, wilt in some greens and finish the stew off with lemon juice for brightness. Add any garnish you like or have, like yogurt, herbs, or pan-fried mushrooms (as pictured), and you’re done! The description is long because I wanted to lay out our logic, but the stew itself comes together very quickly. Hope you’ll give this one a try

Sweet and Savory Nuts and Pretzels

September 13 2019 VegKitchen 

Sweet and Savory Nuts and Pretzels This tasty mix featuring pretzels, nuts, and dried cranberries in a sweet and savory glaze is an easy snack or appetizer to make for the winter holiday season. It’s also good for munching on while watching movies or sports. This makes about 5 cups. The post Sweet and Savory Nuts and Pretzels appeared first on VegKitchen.

Meal Plan Mini: Creamy Black Bean Bowls, Cauliflower Tacos, Raspberry Brownies

June 19 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Meal Plan Mini: Creamy Black Bean Bowls, Cauliflower Tacos, Raspberry Brownies So happy to come out with another mini meal plan! This series is one of my absolute favorite things to work on. It definitely takes a lot of planning and energy, but making interconnected recipes that flow into each other is endlessly inspiring and satisfying. This kind of work reminds me that home cooking doesn’t need to be complicated to be good, that leftovers are a true gift, and that food waste is not a necessary part of life (though it’s so hard to avoid!). This mini is even more fun than usual, since it includes a wholesome treat recipe among the savory ones. The whole thing is centered around black beans – a magical ingredient that will make its way into tacos, bowls, and brownies. As usual, we walk you through some simple prep steps and provide a shopping list for all the ingredients. If you enjoy this mini, check out this more wintery black bean meal plan we did a few months ago, as well as all our meal plans. Let’s get started :) Menu - Creamy Black Bean Bowls - Refried Black Bean and Cauliflower Tacos - Black Bean Raspberry Brownie Bites *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free, see the recipes for serving sizes Shopping List (Print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan mini. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Add whatever other ingredients you’ll need for the week here, if doing shopping for the whole week. Produce - 1 1/­­2 yellow onions - 1 medium red onion - 1 head of garlic (7 cloves) - 2 jalapeno peppers - 2 limes - 1 very large or 2 small heads of cauliflower - pint of cherry tomatoes - about 4 avocados - about 6 oz fresh or frozen raspberries - 1 bunch cilantro - 1 bunch scallions Bulk and Spices - 3 cups dry black beans - 2 cups rice of choice or quinoa - 1 cup untoasted cashews - 2 tablespoons ground flax seeds - black pepper - smoked paprika - chili powder - cumin seeds or ground cumin - bay leaves Staples - sea salt - olive oil or other cooking oil of choice - coconut oil - brown rice vinegar or apple cider vinegar - tahini or other nut butter - vanilla extract - cocoa powder - coconut sugar - baking powder - hot sauce (optional) Other - corn tortillas or other tortillas of choice Basic Prep 1) Cook the beans and make the Creamy Black Beans Pot of Black Beans + Creamy Black Beans   Print inspired by the Mama Eats Ebook Ingredients 3 cups dry black beans sea salt 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 yellow onion - sliced in half 1 jalape?o - slit down the side 5 cloves of garlic - smashed and peeled 2 teaspoons smoked paprika 2 teaspoons chili powder 1½ teaspoons ground cumin freshly ground black pepper 2 bay leaves juice from 1 lime Instructions Soak the beans overnight or up to 24 hours in plenty of purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar. Drain and rinse the beans. Place them in a large soup pot and cover them with purified water by about 2. Add a generous pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 30 minutes. Taste for doneness. If the beans are not completely soft, continue to cook until fully done. Salt at the last 10 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, remove 1½ cups of the beans to an airtight container and refrigerate until ready to make the brownies. Heat the olive oil in a medium skillet over medium heat. Add the onion halves, face down, and the jalape?o. Let sit on the heat for about 4-5 minutes, flipping the jalape?o halfway through, until the vegetables are slightly charred. Add the garlic cloves and let them get fragrant for about 30 seconds to 1 minute. Remove some water from the pot with the cooked beans, so that the beans are just covered by the water (by about 1). Add the charred onion, jalape?o, garlic, and the oil from the pan to the pot. Add the paprika, chili, cumin, another generous pinch of salt, black pepper, and bay leaves, mixing everything in. Bring the beans up to a very strong simmer over medium heat. Let simmer, with the lid askew, for 30-45 minutes, until the bean liquid has reduced and become creamy, and until the beans are buttery soft. The liquid will thicken more once it cools. Turn off the heat and mix in the lime juice. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Remove the jalape?o, onion, and bay leaves. Remove 2 cups of the creamy beans to an airtight container, catching some of the liquid but not too much. These will be used for the Refried Black Bean Cauliflower Tacos (recipe below), so keep them refrigerated until ready to make the recipe. Use the rest of the creamy beans in the Creamy Black Bean Bowls (recipe below). 3.5.3226     2) Cook the Rice or Quinoa Pot of Rice or Quinoa   Print Serves: 6 cups Ingredients 2 cups rice of choice or quinoa sea salt freshly ground black pepper (optional) olive oil (optional) brown rice vinegar (optional) Instructions Cook the rice or quinoa according to the instructions on the package (if your rice came in a package), or any other cooking method you prefer, like in a rice cooker, etc. We like to cook our rice with a generous pinch of salt, a grind of black pepper, a glug of olive oil, and a small splash of brown rice vinegar, which makes it infinitely more flavorful. Use in the Creamy Black Bean Bowls (recipe below). 3.5.3226   3) Make the Quick Pickled Onions Quick Pickled Onions   Print adapted from Simply Vibrant Ingredients ½ cup brown rice vinegar or apple cider vinegar 1 cup warm purified water 1½ teaspoons sea salt 1 medium red onion - thinly sliced Instructions Combine the vinegar, water and salt in a large glass jar. Close the jar and shake to dissolve the salt. Add the onion and shake once again to mix. Let the onions marinate at room temperature for at least 1 hour. The onions will become more flavorful as more time passes. Store refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 1 week. 3.5.3226   4) Make the Cilantro Jalape?o Crema Cilantro Jalape?o Crema   Print Serves: about 1½ cups Ingredients 1 cup untoasted cashews - soaked in water for at least 15 minutes ½ cup purified water juice from 1 lime ¼ - ½ of a jalape?o handful of cilantro (tender stems included) sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the cashews. Place them in an upright blender, along with the purified water, lime juice, jalape?o, cilantro, and sea salt to taste. Blend on high until smooth, adding small splashes of water if the sauce seems too thick. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Keep refrigerated in an airtight container. 3.5.3226   5) Roast the Cauliflower Roasted Cauliflower   Print Ingredients 1 very large or 2 small heads of cauliflower - chopped into bite-sized florets olive oil or other cooking oil of choice sea salt freshly ground black pepper ½ teaspoon cumin seeds 6 scallions - sliced into ½ pieces Instructions Preheat oven too 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2 parchment-lined baking sheets. Distribute the cauliflower between the baking sheets, drizzle with oil and sprinkle with salt, pepper, and cumin seeds. Mix to coat. Place in the oven and roast for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes, flip the cauliflower on both trays and add the scallions, mixing them into the cauliflower. Roast for 10-15 more minutes, or until the cauliflower is very soft and caramelized and the scallions are slightly charred. 3.5.3226     Recipes These bowls are all about the creamy black beans, which make the best case for cooking beans from scratch. They turn out so velvety and flavorful, and you can change up the spices and aromatics based on your preferences. They’re delicious simply served over something starchy like rice or quinoa. But a few of our punchy, colorful toppings from prep day take them to that completely next level. Best part? These bowls come together in no time since you’ve done all the prep. Creamy Black Bean Bowls   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients about 5 cups creamy black beans (recipe above) about 6 cups cooked rice or quinoa (recipe above) quick pickled onions (recipe above) cilantro jalape?o crema (recipe above) other topping suggestions cubed avocado sliced cherry tomatoes fresh cilantro leaves sliced green onion Instructions Serve the warm creamy black beans in individually portioned bowls, over warmed rice/­­quinoa, topped with quick pickled onions, crema, avocado, tomatoes, cilantro, and/­­or green onion. 3.5.3226   We’re so obsessed with these tacos! They repurpose the creamy black beans in a refried bean scenario, which gives them a totally new life. In addition, the tortillas get loaded up with our roasted cauliflower and scallions, quick pickled onions, crema, tomatoes, cilantro, and/­­or any other toppings you like on your tacos. The result is a perfectly filling and flavorful package that we crave constantly. Refried Black Bean and Cauliflower Tacos   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the refried beans olive oil or other cooking oil of choice ½ yellow onion - diced sea salt ½ teaspoon chili powder 1 teaspoon smoked paprika freshly ground black pepper 2 cloves of garlic - minced 2 cups creamy black beans (from above) for the tacos refried black beans (recipe above) warmed corn tortillas or other tortillas of choice warmed roasted cauliflower and scallions (recipe above) cilantro jalape?o crema (recipe above) quick pickled onions (recipe above) cubed avocado sliced cherry tomatoes fresh cilantro leaves hot sauce (optional) Instructions to make the refried beans Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and a pinch of sea salt, and sauté until translucent, about 7 minutes. Add the chili powder, smoked paprika, black pepper, and garlic, and mix everything in for about 30 seconds, until fragrant. Mix in the beans and let them warm through. Mash the beans with a potato masher or a fork right in the skillet, until most of them are mashed, with some whole pieces remaining throughout. Cook for an additional 2 minutes, adding small splashes of water if the beans seem too dry. Taste for salt and adjust when needed. Serve warm in the tacos. to make the tacos Spread a generous amount of black beans in the bottom of each tortilla. Top with the roasted cauliflower and scallions, dollops of crema, quick pickled onions, avocado, tomatoes, cilantro, and hot sauce, if using. Enjoy right away. 3.5.3226   We consider these brownies to be in the snacking category as opposed to being a full-on dessert. They still feel like a treat, but definitely not your most decadent treat in the world. They’re great for lunch boxes, and it’s always a good idea to keep a batch in the freezer for a wholesome dessert option. The raspberries are pretty crucial here. They contribute to the moistness of the brownies, and their tart berry flavor just goes so perfectly with the chocolatey brownies. Black Bean Raspberry Brownie Bites   Print Serves: 12 brownies Ingredients 2 tablespoons ground flax seeds 1½ cups plain cooked black beans (from recipe above) 3 tablespoons soft coconut oil, plus more for oiling the tin 2 tablespoons tahini, almond butter, or other nut butter of choice 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 3/­­4 cup cocoa powder ½ cup + 2 tablespoons coconut sugar 1 1/­­2 teaspoons baking powder pinch of sea salt about 6 oz fresh raspberries (or frozen but not thawed) Instructions Preheat oven to 350°F (175° C). Prepare a 12 hole muffin tin by oiling each hole with soft coconut oil. In a small bowl, combine the ground flax with 6 tablespoons of water. Whisk together and let sit while you prepare the rest of the ingredients. In a large bowl, mash the black beans until smooth. Add the oil, tahini/­­nut butter, vanilla, cocoa, sugar, baking powder, and salt to the bowl. Mix everything together until smooth. Fold in the flax mixture, which should be thickened to a raw egg-like consistency at this point. Carefully fold in the raspberries. You can also do all this mashing and mixing in a food processor if you prefer. Distribute the brownie mixture in the oiled muffin tin, patting it down into the muffin holes somewhat evenly. I like to use slightly dampened hands for this, but you can also use a wetted spoon. Place in the oven and bake for 25-30 minutes, until the brownies are dry to the touch on the outside and fudgy on the inside. Let cool for at least 15 minutes before removing the brownies from the pan. Keep refrigerated or frozen in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226 The post Meal Plan Mini: Creamy Black Bean Bowls, Cauliflower Tacos, Raspberry Brownies appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Have a Meatless May with these 9 Seasonal Recipes

April 29 2019 Meatless Monday 

Have a Meatless May with these 9 Seasonal RecipesSpring is in full swing! Tree buds are beginning to blossom and the produce aisle is overflowing with seasonal crunchy, colorful offerings that had been hibernating all winter. This season is packed with tasty ingredients for impeccable, meatless recipes. Colorful cauliflower hummus, a vibrant spring pasta and a veggie-packed vegan quiche are just some of the stars of this weeks recipe roundup. Theres no better way to celebrate the seasons changing than by cooking up something fresh and in season, dont you think? Roast Purple Cauliflower Hummus from Habits of a Modern Hippie Green Spring Pasta from Parsnips and Pastries Chili Lime Jackfruit Tacos from Simply Healthyish Vegan Quiche from Happy Kitchen.Rocks Cucumber, Avocado & Sweet Pea Chilled Summer Soup from Mango Tomato Rhubarb Almond Bars from Robin Asbell Fresh Green Smoothie from Picky Diet Pasta Primavera from Su’s Healthy Living Asian Green Bean Salad from The Quotable Kitchen Invite your friends and family to join you in a celebration of spring with these plant-based recipes. If youre looking for other meatless recipe inspiration,  check out our recipe gallery . Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Have a Meatless May with these 9 Seasonal Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Lemony Spring Risotto

March 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

This vegan lemony spring risotto recipe is the perfect dish to bridge the gap between the warm comfort foods of winter and the light, fresh flavors of spring. This recipe comes to us from The Healthy Voyager . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 12  ounces  asparagus 1  cup  peas 1  quart  vegetable stock or vegan chicken bouillon stock - 2 cups water 1  tablespoon  olive oil 1  medium leek,  thinly sliced 2  cloves  garlic,  finely minced Salt and pepper 1 1/­­2  cups  Arborio rice 1  cup  dry white wine 1  tablespoon  fresh lemon juice 2  teaspoons  lemon zest 2  tablespoons  fresh, chopped parsley 1/­­3 cup vegan parmesan cheese  (about 1/­­3 cup)   1. Trim the ends from the asparagus. Cut the remaining stalks into 1-inch pieces. 2. Bring a medium pot of salted water to a boil and add the asparagus. Cook until crisp tender, 3-4 minutes. If using fresh peas, add the peas along with the asparagus. If using frozen peas, add them during the last minute. 3. Transfer the vegetables to a bowl of ice water. Drain the vegetables and set aside. 4. Heat the stock along with water in a large saucepan. Add the trimmings from the asparagus and leek and the parsley stems to add flavor to the stock. Bring to a simmer and then keep warm on low heat while you make the risotto. 5. Heat the oil in a large, wide sauté pan over medium heat. Add the leeks and garlic and season them with salt and pepper. Cook until leeks are partially softened, 4-5 minutes. 6. Add the rice and stir to coat all of the grains with the oil. Cook 1-2 minutes to lightly toast the rice and then add the wine. Cook a few minutes until the wine is reduced, stirring occasionally. 7. Add the warm stock, a few ladles at a time, stirring the rice frequently. Each time the liquid is almost completely absorbed, add some more stock. Continue adding the liquid in this manner, stirring often, to develop the starch in the rice. It should take about 20 minutes for the rice to cook once you start adding the liquid. 8. When the rice is done, it will be plump and al dente- tender but still firm to the bite. At this point, lower the heat and stir in the lemon juice and zest, asparagus, peas, parsley, parmesan cheese, 1 teaspoon salt and 1/­­4 teaspoon pepper. 9. Stir to combine all ingredients well. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper as needed. Garnish with parsley and lemon zest. Serve hot. The post Lemony Spring Risotto appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Blueberry Muffins (during a mandatory evacuation: crochet a mandala, knit a sweater)

March 17 2019 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Blueberry Muffins (during a mandatory evacuation: crochet a mandala, knit a sweater) I began baking like a fiend this week. Remarkably, everything I've cooked/­­baked or attempted to do in lieu of checking myself into some place for a "respite" has turned out to be exactly what I needed to function just one minute longer, one hour longer, then an afternoon and finally an evening longer. Because that's how I'm operating here: in moments--with really good food. I stumbled across this recipe for blueberry muffins in a mad search for a morning treat for the workers in the yard and DH and me (because who doesn't love blueberry muffins?). I have dozens of amazing blueberry muffin recipes throughout my collection. But the need to seek and find just the right recipe was urgent and a nice Google distraction. Trusty King Arthur Flour was the answer to my prayers. I landed on the Famous Department Store Blueberry Muffin recipe. If you've got five minutes, cupcake liners and blueberries (frozen are fine), I highly recommend you give these a shot. Mine were made with a flax egg and vegan butter--that's all the substitution needed to re-create the recipe. I know I'll be making these again, possibly adding lemon zest next time, and subbing some whole wheat flour in the mix as well--making a gluten free version would work well, too. It's quite a forgiving recipe: so simple, plain and lovely. If you'd like a taller muffin, you can always up the baking powder by a 1/­­8-1/­­4 teaspoon. My kitchen once again became my sanctuary.  Vegan Blueberry Muffins  *Adapted from Famous Department Store Blueberry Muffin Recipe by King Arthur  2 cups all-purpose flour 2 1/­­4 t. baking power 1/­­4 t. salt (I adjusted down the amt. with salted vegan butter) 1/­­2 cup vegan butter 1 cup sugar 4 t. ground flax seed with 4 T. water and 2 t. EVOO (flax egg subbing for 2 eggs) 1 t. vanilla extract 1/­­2 cup almond milk 2 cups frozen blueberries  *a little sugar for sprinkling on top of muffins before baking Preheat oven to 375. Prepare muffin tin lined with cupcake wrappers, spray wrappers with nonstick spray. Measure out flour, salt and baking soda in bowl and sift together. Set aside. In medium bowl, mix butter for about two minutes. Add sugar, mixing until light and fluffy--about a minute longer. Add vanilla and flax egg, then mix a bit more. Then add flour and milk alternately mixing lightly after each addition--just until the dry flour is mixed in. Then fold in the blueberries. Fill cupcake liners about 3/­­4 full with batter, then sprinkle about a 1/­­2 teaspoon of sugar on top. Bake for 30-40 minutes. *I found baking for a little longer yielded a nice golden brown top. I used a toothpick to test if batter was baked through.   So why all this baking urgency, kitchen therapy? Well, last week this happened: continued treatment for winter poison ivy outbreak, major demolition of yard, my sister scheduled for surgery in a week...oh and there was the mandatory evacuation of our home IMMEDIATELY owing to our gas line being hit during yard excavation--(not owing to our crew, rather something to do with "marking" of line). With barely enough time to spare to grab my purse, phone and two Great Pyrenees--knocking on neighbor's doors to warn them of potential doom--again with TWO seventy pound white Thunder Wolves on my wrists--it's a miracle I've made it to Sunday. ALL this while DH went about calmly managing the entire surreal afternoon as the fire department, gas, water and line inspectors arrived. (Wonder how I held up? Picture exactly what I've described here, sprinkle in screaming, crying, blaming and more crying. Okay, so I'm not exactly Mother Teresa during a crisis.) It's all I could do to keep my heart from simply stopping in my chest. Alas, the crisis was averted, things repaired and life returned to somewhat normal conditions. Above--as the demolition began. Below, the calm after the "evacuate" storm: Dr. Thyme checking on the progress with the workers. I was inside at this point--rocking back in forth in a chair chanting some illegible crap about "There's no place like home...there's no place like home." So yes, there be baking happening. All through this, I'm trying to remain calm. Lending positive affirmations to my sister who is about to face a really tough trial (as if she hasn't faced enough already).  It's been one thing after another.  Luckily I have friends (dear, dear friends) who've received texts with probably too-long-while-also-trying-not-to-be-overly-dramatic explanations of all that's transpired. Then there's been two- and three-hour phone conversations with these women and my sister as well. Truthfully, everyone I know has A LOT happening, but I don't know what I'd do without them. I guess we've hit the age in life where the proverbial sh*t hits the fan fairly regularly. But honestly, enough already. "Pass the muffins, please!" Helping along the way are my needlework projects--working with my hands while my mind tries to make order out of chaos.  Projects I've found incredibly blissful. The Sunny Spread blanket. Using my stash yarn for this. It's a mandala with a square finish. Such a calm one-mandala-at-a-time escape. I'll need to make about 25 of these to create a nice throw.  Oh boy do I have a long way to go, but my Great Love Cardigan will be SO lovely when it's finished. I can't wait. I've been working on this while listening to an audiobook: Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens.  This is the Adirondack Wrap crochet project. It's very relaxing to work on. Three triangles sewn together for final assembly. I just love it in my Mandala yarn. 

Bali Butter

March 12 2019 My New Roots 

Bali Butter I miss Bali. Or maybe I just miss the warmth, the sun, the vibrancy, the life bursting forth from every nook and cranny. I miss living outside, I miss my eyes being assaulted by colours, and layers upon layers of wild sounds, but hey, its March in Ontario and this is a familiar feeling. Are you feeling it too? A couple weeks ago when I was in the depths of yet another snowstorm, feeling like spring may never come, I came up with this recipe to remedy my winter woes. Its called Bali Butter - and its the most delicious thing to cross my lips since I could see grass outside my window. A rich combination of cashews, coconut, and cacao, blended together with coconut sugar and salt, its like the nut butter of DREAMS in all of its salty-sweet-crunchy-chocolatey glory. And I am really excited to share this one with you, wherever you and no matter what season youre experiencing. What does one do with Bali Butter, you ask? Let me tell you, it goes on all. the. things. Pancakes, waffles, smoothie bowls, toast, rice cakes, ice cream, fruit salad, porridge, yogurt, and fingers! You can stuff dates with Bali Butter, stick them in the fridge and have something delicious on hand to satisfy those salty-sweet-fat cravings too. Slice a banana lengthwise, slather Bali Butter in the middle and sandwich it together again. I even like it with carrot sticks. No joke. I chose to use coconut sugar in my Bali Butter because its one of the main sweeteners used on the island and you can easily find it everywhere. Some of you may be curious about using liquid sweetener as an alternative, but the problem with using something like maple syrup or honey, is that it causes the nut butter to seize up. Fat is hydrophobic (translation: its afraid of water) and will stiffen when it comes into contact with anything that contains it. Using a solid sweetener, like coconut sugar, avoids this problem and keeps the finished product relaxed and runny. If you dont want to use coconut sugar and you dont mind a less-spreadable version of Bali Butter, sweeten it with whatever you have on hand. I think Ive talked about all of these ingredients respectively, but for the heck of it, lets recap why theyre awesome! Coconut - Once a maligned food for its saturated fat content, coconut has taken center stage in the wellness world, as scientific research has confirmed that the type of fat in coconut integrates differently in the body, compared to other saturated fats. MCTs (medium-chain-triglycerides) are a type of fat that can be broken down quickly and used as fuel, instead of being stored, so its prefect for people who enjoy an active lifestyle. Coconut also contains a surprising amount of protein, about 14% by weight, and impressive amounts of manganese.   Cashews - Contrary to popular belief, cashews have a lower fat content than most nuts. And 66% of their fats are heart-healthy, monounsaturated fats, like those found in olive oil. Cashews are an excellent source of copper, and a good source of magnesium, phosphorus, and zinc. They also contain good amounts of fiber, so that they keep you feeling full for longer.  Cacao - One of the best sources of magnesium found in nature, in addition to containing high amounts calcium, zinc, iron, copper, sulfur, and potassium, cacao is a nutritional powerhouse. It also contains many chemical compounds that enhance physical and mental well-being, including alkaloids, proteins, magnesium, beta-carotene, leucine, linoleic acid, lipase, lysine, and some neurotransmitters such as dopamine and anandamide - which explains why eating chocolate makes you feel so darn good! Coconut sugar - Sometimes called coconut palm sugar, this incredibly delicious sweetener is high in minerals, such as potassium, magnesium, zinc and iron. It is happily low glycemic, ranking 35 on the GI scale, compared to agave at 42, honey at 55, cane sugar at 68. This is due to coconut sugars composition of long-chain saccharides, which are absorbed by the body at a slower rate than something like refined white sugar. Coconut sugar also contains amino acids, which are thought to slow down the rate at which the sugar is absorbed into the bloodstream, acting as a buffer of sorts.  Some notes on the recipe. Its very important that you make coconut butter to start, as it creates the liquid base to help the get the cashews going in the food processor. Once youve made the coconut-cashew butter, feel free to stop there (it tastes incredible on its own), or go all the way as I have and add the cacao, coconut sugar and salt. I like to leave my Bali Butter out of the fridge, since it remains liquid and spreadable at room temperature. If you refrigerate it, Bali Butter with harden completely. You can roll it into balls and make yourself some pretty delicious little energy bites when its in this state, but its impossible to drizzle when chilled.   If youre into smooth nut butters, simply leave the cacao nibs out of the equation. They arent necessary for any other purpose than crunch, which I personally feel is essential, but I wont judge anyone for skipping them. Even though youre obviously crazy     Print recipe     Bali Butter  Makes 3 cups /­­ 750ml Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 375g raw cashews 3 cups /­­ 240g unsweetened desiccated coconut   3/­­4 tsp. large flake sea salt (I used Maldon) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 23g raw cacao powder 3 Tbsp. coconut sugar 3 Tbsp. cacao nibs seeds from 1 vanilla bean Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 325°F /­­ 160°C. Spread cashews out evenly on a rimmed baking sheet and place in the preheated oven. Toast for about 10 minutes, keeping an eye on them so that they dont burn! Remove from oven and let cool. 2. While the cashews are in the oven, toast the coconut in a dry skillet over medium heat, stirring often, until slightly golden. Remove from heat and set aside. Depending on the size of your skillet, you may want to work in batches. 3. Place the coconut in a food processor. Blend on high, scraping down the sides every so often, until the coconut is creamy and smooth (this make take up to 10 minutes, depending on the strength of your food processor - be patient!). 4. Add the cashews to the food processor and blend on high until creamy and smooth. Add the remaining ingredients and blend on high. Taste and adjust saltiness /­­ sweetness /­­ chocolate levels to suit your taste. 5. Store Bali Butter in an airtight glass container at room temperature (out of the fridge) for one month. The post Bali Butter appeared first on My New Roots.

7 Meatless Monday Soup Recipes to Keep You Warm Until Spring

February 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

7 Meatless Monday Soup Recipes to Keep You Warm Until SpringSpring is still a month away so theres plenty of time to enjoy hearty winter soups that make this season delicious. To help you celebrate the last few weeks of winter, weve gathered some of our favorite winter soup recipes that include seasonal vegetables, such as root vegetables, squash and parsnips. Enjoy these tasty plant-based recipes from our Meatless Monday recipe gallery as we count down the days until spring arrives. Sweet Potato and White Bean Soup from Healthy with Nedi Oven-Roasted Pea Soup with Mint and Mascarpone Dressing from Fabio Viviani Curried Butternut Velvet Soup from She’s Cooking Mediterranean Vegetable Noodle Soup from Tofu ‘n Sproutz Carrot Soup with Parsnip Chips from MyRecipes.com Red Onion Soup with Shiitake Broth from Jackie Newgent, RDN Hearty White Bean & Millet Soup from Bean A Foodie Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post 7 Meatless Monday Soup Recipes to Keep You Warm Until Spring appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Driving Across America While Vegan

February 21 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

How far has the Veganization of America Come? In late 2017, my husband was offered a job in San Diego, which not only meant no more suffering through cold DC winters but, almost as good, a 3000-mile road trip to get his car across the country! We would leave from our home just outside DC in Bethesda, Maryland, an area that has become vegan-friendly over the years, and drive first to Buffalo, New York, for a short visit with his family, and then drive through a number of states that might not be as vegan-friendly. Taking the southernmost route, south from Buffalo to Nashville, Tennessee and then due west on 1-40, I was curious to see firsthand how far the availability of vegan food had progressed (or not) as we crossed the middle of the country. Would vegan food be harder to find along our route? This article is about our experience finding vegan food choices. Our secret weapon for locating restaurants where we could find vegan food, no matter where we were, would be the HappyCow app. For anyone not familiar with HappyCow, I encourage you to download it. I still use it all the time, even living in […] The post Driving Across America While Vegan appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta

February 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Cinnamon, citrus, maple, mushroom, chickpea, almond, garlic and rosemary sing in this creamy, yet hearty-textured pasta. With all the light citrus and cinnamon flavors this pasta can be easily served for brunch, lunch or dinner. This recipe comes to us from Kathy of Healthy. Happy. Life. Serves 8 For the butternut squash sauce: - 2 cups frozen butternut squash cubes, frozen - 1 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed - 1 teaspoon garlic powder - 1 tablespoons maple syrup - 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - dash of salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon black pepper - 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast* For the chickpeas: - 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, to coat the skillet - 1/­­2 small white onion, diced - 1 15 ounce can chickpeas, drained - 1 large portobello mushroom, diced - 1/­­8 teaspoon cinnamon - 1 tablespoon lemon juice - 1 cup roasted, unsalted almonds, slivered To complete the Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta: - 1 pound orecchiette pasta, cooked - additional nutritional yeast, for tossing the cooked pasta* - a little extra olive oil, for tossing the cooked pasta - 1 orange, sliced into segments - 1 teaspoon orange zest *optional. Found in health food stores of the health food section of some grocery stores. To make the Butternut Squash Sauce: Place the frozen, cubed butternut squash in a skillet over medium high heat. Season with the rosemary, garlic powder, maple syrup, olive oil, salt, pepper, nutritional yeast, orange juice and orange zest. Cook for 3-5 minutes, working the seasonings into the squash with a fork, until the squash has softened into a lightly mashed mixture. Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat and begin cooking the orecchiette according the package directions. To make the chickpeas: Place the olive oil and chopped onion in a skillet over medium-high heat. Cook the onions for 4-5 minutes, or until they become translucent. Add the chickpeas and diced Portobello mushroom to the pan and season with the cinnamon and lemon juice. Cook for another 4-5 minutes, or until the chickpeas begin to brown and the Portobellos begin to become tender. Add the almonds and sauté for just 1 minute more. To complete the Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta: Drain the orecchiette when it has completed cooking. Toss the cooked pasta with a few dashes extra virgin olive oil and nutritional yeast, if using. Toss the pasta with the butternut squash sauce until fully coated. Fold in the chickpeas. Serve in a bowl with fresh orange slices and a dash of orange zest on top. The post Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Candied Chocolate Dipped Citron + Video

January 31 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Candied Chocolate Dipped Citron + Video I’m constantly amazed by the fact that nature gives us the exact things we need during each given season. Citrus season might be my favorite fruit season, just because it’s such a ray of sunshine in the midst of winter bleakness. The contrast between the quiet darkness of this time of year and the bright, juicy, sweet citruses that spring up at the stores is especially intense. Our grocery store is exploding with all kinds of citrus varieties, more than I can count on my two hands. I couldn’t resist getting a few citrons, since they smelled amazing, and I had never tried them before. I knew that they have a really thick rind (they are mostly rind really), which is great for candying. After doing some research, I also learned that citron is one of the original citrus fruit, from which a lot of the other household citruses were developed. So, to celebrate this year’s citrus season, I made some candied, chocolate-dipped citron. The process will make your kitchen smell amazing, and the result is such a unique and delicious treat, with a perfect balance of sweetness, bitterness, and citrusy zing. I also made a ‘day of eating’ video, which takes you through the whole candying process, as well as a day of plant-based meals. All the recipes and things mentioned in the video are linked below :) Video links: Magic Moisturizer Gua Sha Routine Shortcut Steel Cut Oats Pasta e Ceci (Chickpea Noodle Soup) Candied Chocolate Dipped Citron   Print adapted from David Lebovitz Serves: about 1½ cups Ingredients 2 citrons 1½ cup maple syrup or a mixture of maple syrup and honey (not vegan) 1 cup water, plus more for blanching the citron pieces ½ - ¾ cup chocolate chips Instructions Wash and dry the citrons. Cut out any flesh and seeds (you can juice the flesh and use the juice in your water, in salad dressing, or as an acidic finish to any savory dish), then cut the rind into strips. Put the rind strips in a medium pot, cover with water, and blanch the citron pieces in simmering water for 30 minutes, until translucent. Drain the citrons and return to the same pot. Add the maple syrup/­­honey (if using) and water. Bring the mixture up to a boil, stirring a few times. Turn the heat down to establish a strong simmer, and simmer until the syrup reduces, almost completely. You should be left with candied citron strips, covered in a thin layer of syrup. This will take about an hour or more. Let cool for about 15 minutes. Transfer the strips to a wire drying rack to let any excess syrup drain off. Meanwhile, melt the chocolate chips on a double boiler. Dip each citron strip into the chocolate, so that its about half way covered. Transfer back to the drying rack. Once youve dipped all the citron strips in the chocolate, transfer the whole rack to the refrigerator to let the chocolate harden. Keep the candied citron refrigerated in an airtight container. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Rose and Lavender Parfait and a Breakfast with Friends Chocolate Avocado Truffles and Concord Grape Sorbet Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats Clementine Fudge Cake .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Candied Chocolate Dipped Citron + Video appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chocolate Granola Clusters from 5-Ingredient Vegan

September 24 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Chocolate Granola Clusters from 5-Ingredient Vegan When I heard my friend and fellow vegan cookbook author, Nava Atlas, had come out with her first cookbook in five years, I was excited to participate in the blog tour for the book.  Especially so, since this book, 5-Ingredient Vegan:175 Simple, Plant-Based Recipes for Delicious, Healthy Meals in Minutes consists of my favorite kind of recipes: FAST and EASY! Nava has developed these delicious recipes especially for people who are busy and dont want to spend a lot of time in the kitchen, but still want to enjoy delicious vegan food. As these recipes show, with a few well-chosen ingredients, a simple meal can be just as delicious as a more elaborate one, with the added convenience of getting easy 5-ingredient plant-based meals on the table quickly. For this post, I chose an easy-peasy dessert recipe for Chocolate Granola Clusters. I love this recipe not only because its simple, quick, and delicious, but also because its made with ingredients I always have on hand.  As Nava says, Sometimes, when Im making a fairly elaborate meal (and for me, elaborate is a relative term) for company, I lose momentum when it comes to dessert. Thats when I turn to this clever dessert that results my culinary genius proclaimed by guests. This needs just ten minutes of prep, no machines, and no baking -- just a short time in the fridge to re-solidify the chocolate.  I hope you enjoy this recipe (and Navas new book) as much as I do!   Chocolate Granola Clusters Serve with pears or apples in fall, oranges in winter, strawberries in spring, and raspberries in summer.  Reprinted with permission from 5-Ingredient Vegan (C) 2019 by Nava Atlas, Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. Photo by Hannah Kaminsky.   1 cup vegan chocolate chips 2 tablespoons vanilla or plain nondairy milk 1 1/­­2 cups granola (see note)   To cook on the stovetop: Combine the chocolate chips and nondairy milk in the top of a double boiler or in a bowl perched over a saucepan in which water is gently boiling. Cook over very low heat until the chocolate is melted, stirring often. Remove from the heat and stir in most of the granola, reserving a little for topping. To cook in the microwave: Combine the chocolate chips and nondairy milk in a microwave-safe bowl. Start with 45 seconds, stir, and add 15 seconds at a time until the chocolate is melted. Stir in most of the granola, reserving a little for topping. Line a large plate with wax paper or baking parchment. Spread the chocolate mixture onto it fairly evenly, to a thickness of no more than half an inch. Sprinkle the reserved granola over the top. Refrigerate for an hour or so, or until the chocolate has completely solidified. Break the mass into bite-sized chunks, and arrange on an attractive platter to serve. Store any not eaten at once in a covered container in the refrigerator, where theyll keep for at least a week. Note: Use a variety of granola that has a nice mixture of oats, seeds, nuts, and dried fruits. Its best to use granola thats fresh and crisp for better texture.   The post Chocolate Granola Clusters from 5-Ingredient Vegan appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites

August 15 2019 My New Roots 

Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites This post is a long time coming! And Im so excited to finally be sharing my bedroom with you all. Weve now been in our home for a year and a bit, and although its (still!) not complete, were enjoying working on the finishing details here and there. Honestly, I dont think we will ever be done, and that is okay. This entire experience has made me way more patient, realistic, and Ive learned to set my expectations super low on every project so that instead of being disappointed, Im often positively surprised! We moved with just boxes, zero furniture, and essentially had to start over in that department. That meant a new bed, a new mattress and all new linens, since we decided to make the jump from a queen size mattress to a king (literally one of the best life decisions, ever). My husband and I are both DIY-ers, and serious thrift store shoppers, and we knew that we wanted to build a bed ourselves, then find the rest of bedroom furniture second-hand. The one place where we knew we wanted to really take our time considering was a mattress and the bedding. If you read this blog, you probably care about your health to some degree. Like me, you may prioritize buying organic produce, splurge on environmentally-conscious clothing, and look to sustainable skincare and beauty products. But have you ever thought about your bedroom environment? We spend a third of our life in bed (at least we should), so its just as important to consider the things that we interact with in our homes, not just what goes in and on our bodies. In fact, the greatest exposure to chemicals you can have in a day, could be while youre sleeping. When I started looking into buying a mattress, I found the options were totally overwhelming. And with so many retailers moving to online platforms and selling directly to consumers, prices have been slashed considerably, and the deals are tempting. Mattresses are one of those things that seem pretty innocuous, and maybe even a place to save a few bucks. But dig a little deeper and youll see that the thing you spend so much time on, is not the thing you should spending less money on, as youll be paying for cheaper materials with your health. Modern, conventional mattresses are made with a laundry list of harmful substances that can be affecting you and your family. One of the most offensive ingredients found in conventional mattresses is memory foam made from polyurethane; a highly flammable, petroleum-based material. Polyurethane foam emits Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) that can cause eye, nose and throat irritation, headaches, nausea, and can also damage the liver, kidneys and central nervous system, according to the Environmental Protection Agency and the Occupational Health and Safety Administration. Un-ironically referred to as solid gasoline, polyurethane foam is typically wrapped in or treated with fire retardant chemicals to meet the Federal and State flammability standards in the US, otherwise it would be totally unsafe. Which brings me to the second thing to watch out for in mattresses, and that is chemical fire-retardants (CFRs). These are compounds added to the materials in a mattress to protect you, and they are an inexpensive way to meet safety standards. The issue is that CFRs do not fully bind to materials, and are released into the air through the mattress, then build up in the body causing some people lifelong health issues.   Formaldehyde, antimony, boric acid, and halogenated flame retardants are some of the most damaging CFRs found in modern mattresses, and the frustrating thing is that companies are not required to disclose which ones they are using. Unless a mattress company is explicitly eliminating these chemicals from their production and using a natural material alternative, they are likely using one of the harmful chemicals listed above. I looked at a number of organic /­­ natural mattress companies in my research, and the one that stood out to me was Naturepedic. They are made with certified organic cotton, wool, and latex. For heavy-duty support without any health or allergy concerns, Naturepedic only uses the highest quality innersprings available made from recycled steel.. , and steel, with Naturepedic ensured  the purity of every material used, along with fair labour practices. I reached out to Naturepedic, to see if they would be open to me trying a mattress out and blogging about it. They agreed, and sent me their EOS  (Ergonomic Organic Sleep) mattress that allows for fully customized layers for finding the exact right amount of firmness (you can even choose different support styles from your sleep partner, or swap out the layers down the line in case your preferences change). Id never heard of anything like that before, and though it was so brilliant! I went to the showroom in Toronto to try out the mattress in person, which was very helpful, but you can also just order online if you know what kind of consistency you like. The mattress components were delivered to my door, and it was easy to assemble, as everything gets zipped into a giant, certified organic cotton casing. After spending the last twelve months on this bed, I can confirm that its been the best year of sleep in my entire life (even post-child, haha!). Besides the fact that I love going to bed knowing that I am breathing completely clean air, and that the materials that went into the mattress were made with a deep commitment to protecting the environment, its simply the most supportive and comfortable mattress Ive ever tried. Period. I cannot recommend this mattress enough! The other thing to consider when outfitting your bedroom is the bedding itself. Because we come into direct, skin-to-product contact with these textiles, its essential to choose something non-toxic. Most bedding on the market is made with cotton, one of the most chemical-laden crops grown. According to Pesticide Action Network North America, Conventionally grown cotton uses more insecticides than any other single crop and epitomizes the worst effects of chemically dependent agriculture. Each year cotton producers around the world use nearly $2.6 billion worth of pesticides -- more than 10 per cent of the worlds pesticides and nearly 25 per cent of the worlds insecticides. If youre going to sleep in cotton, choose organic whenever you can. Linen is a great alternative material because it is a much lower impact material on the environment, and requires very little intervention to be grown. Coyuchi is a brand recommended to me by my dear friend Elenore, who has the highest standards I know of Coyuchis textile line is not only 100% organic, but also consciously processed, meaning that they use low-impact dyes for colour that is kind to the planet and our sensitive skin. Coyuchi offered to send me some bedding to try out and I was instantly obsessed. Their textiles are beyond delicious, super soft, and incredibly comfortable. For a duvet cover, I chose the Crystal Cove pattern in white. I loved this choice since its reversible - a textured weave that looks cozy in the winter, and a crinkled cotton underside, which I like to face up in the summer. I also love their Topanga Matelasse blanket, shown here in warm stripe, which is also reversible (super convenient if you want to change up the look of your bedding with a quick flip!). For winter, their Cloud Brushed flannel sheets are super luxurious, and especially enjoyable its very hard to find organic flannel! Words cannot describe the feeling of slipping into these on a chilly night. The giant back pillows in the bed are also from Coyuchi, and are perfect if you have an open-frame bed without a headboard. I like to sit up and read in bed, and these pillows are firm enough to act as a headboard itself. When youre shopping for any kind of textile (bedding, furniture, or clothing), the most important mark to look for is the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) certification. GOTS is recognized as the world’s leading processing standard for textiles made from organic fibers. It defines high-level environmental criteria along the entire organic textiles supply chain and requires compliance with social criteria as well. Unlike most textile and mattress companies, both Coyuchi and Naturepedic are GOTS certified and adhere to their strict standards for agriculture and labour. Okay, lets get to the recipe! I experimented with these breakfast bites for a long time. At first, I was blending up cashews to make flour, but that got expensive, and ultimately I wanted the recipe to be allergen-free (so the nuts had to go!). As an alternative, I opted for hemp seeds, which worked beautifully. Its easy to make your own hemp flour in a food processor in a few seconds. Ive been using it baked goods lately and love how moist and tender the results are! I used strawberries and rhubarb for these nuggets of joy, but since were moving into stone fruit season, Ill soon be switching it up and using peaches, plums, pluots, apricots, and cherries in their place. Any fruit will work as long as its not super moist (like melons). Raspberries, blueberries, and blackberries would be lovely here too. Simply use 1 cup of chopped fresh fruit in any combination that tickles your fancy. To change up the flavour even more, add orange zest, warm spices like cinnamon and cardamom, or even some cacao powder for a chocolate version. Yum! I really wanted to make a successful vegan version of these, so I tried using banana in place of the egg. The results were decent, but a little too moist. If I made these again, I would use the banana plus a tablespoon of ground flax seeds. If any of you do that, please let me know in the comments!     Print recipe     Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites Makes 12 Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 215g hemp seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35g arrowroot 1/­­4 tsp. flaky salt, plus more for garnish, if desired 1 tsp. baking powder 1 egg (or 1 ripe banana, mashed) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml pure maple syrup 2 tsp. vanilla extract (or 1/­­2 tsp. vanilla powder) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g chopped strawberries 1/­­2 cup /­­ 60g chopped rhubarb (2-3 slim stalks) expeller-pressed coconut oil for greasing (or use muffin liners Directions: 1. Lightly grease a 12-cup muffin tin with coconut oil. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. 2. Wash the strawberries and rhubarb well. Slice the rhubarb into small discs, and cut the strawberries into small chunks. Reserve 3 strawberries for topping the breakfast bites, if desired (remove greens, then slice them top to bottom). Set fruit aside.  3. In a food processor, blend hemp seeds until theyre a fine powder (dont go too far or youll end up with hemp seed butter!). Add the arrowroot, salt and baking powder and pulse a few times to combine. 4. In a medium bowl, whisk the egg or banana, maple syrup, and vanilla extract together. Add the hemp seed flour blend, and stir to combine. Fold in the rhubarb and strawberries. 5.  Spoon a heaping tablespoon of the batter into each prepared muffin tin. If desired, place a slice of strawberry on top of each bite. Set in the oven and bake for 25-30 minutes, until lightly golden. 6. Remove from the oven and let cool completely. 7. Enjoy! Store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for five days. Aside from getting the chemicals out of your space, here are five other ways to improve the health of your bedroom, and your sleep! Add plants - having a couple of living things in your sleeping space keeps the air clean and fresh. Snake plants, areca palms, aloe vera and orchids are especially helpful, since they absorb CO2 at night, even when they are not photosynthesizing.  Consider airflow - keeping a window cracked at night is a good way to get some fresh air while you sleep. If its noisy outside, keep your window open during the day to ensure full air exchange, and close it right before bed. It’s very important to keep the air in your space fresh and moving. Salt rock lamps - these are said to purify the air by omitting negative ions. I cannot confirm this in any way, but I can confirm that the light they give off is incredibly soothing and helps me wind down at the end of the day. Overhead lighting is very stimulating (and let’s be honest, not overly sexy). Keep the devices out - dont work in bed, and avoid using your phone before snoozing. Blue light from screens inhibits our bodys ability to make melatonin, our sleep-wake hormone. If you choose to keep your phone in your room overnight, set it to airplane mode while you sleep so youre not exposing yourself to radiation from EMFs (Electromagnetic Field).  Beeswax candles - yes, its cozy to burn candles before bed, but paraffin candles pollute the air, full stop. Soy is a better alternative, but beeswax is my favourite since it actually helps purify the air by omitting negative ions, and removing dust and dander. Show me your Hemp Breakfast Bites on Instagram: #mnrbreakfastbites Special thanks to my dear friend Sara for taking these photos of me (and putting up with my awkwardness for at least two hours!). http:/­­/­­matandsara.com/­­ The post Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites appeared first on My New Roots.

9 Plant-Based Recipes to Enjoy this Spring

April 30 2019 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

9 Plant-Based Recipes to Enjoy this Spring Spring is here, and along with it a plethora of fresh produce. After a winter of root vegetables and soups, I always look forward to enjoying some vegan recipes that are a little lighter, a little cooler, a little crisper. So I turn to recipes like these nine plant-based dishes to bring on the freshness of spring.(...) Read the rest of 9 Plant-Based Recipes to Enjoy this Spring (246 words) (C) svoisin for FatFree Vegan Kitchen, 2019. | Permalink | No comment Post tags: Asparagus The post 9 Plant-Based Recipes to Enjoy this Spring appeared first on FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

Silky Sweet Potatoes with Cucumber Tahini Ranch, Green Veg and Chickpeas

April 13 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Silky Sweet Potatoes with Cucumber Tahini Ranch, Green Veg and Chickpeas Do you ever use your steamer? My $10 bamboo steamer is one of my favorite kitchen tools. I love how quick the steaming process is – generally much faster than roasting or even sautéing in some cases. I also really like how steaming imparts moisture onto ingredients, so they come out hydrated and silky smooth. Some people think steamed veg is boring because there’s no oil or seasoning, but you can liberally oil and salt your steamed goods after they are done. This little meal mostly comes together in the steamer. You steam the sweet potatoes until they are soft and custardy, throw in the broccoli and kale in the last few minutes of cooking the potatoes, and serve everything with a liberal slather of our cucumber tahini ranch and crispy chickpeas. We have a tahini tzatziki recipe in our cookbook, and this ranch is sort of reminiscent of that. It’s an addictive sauce that’s amazing on pretty much everything. We made this whole meal on our Instagram Stories if you’d like to see the process (look for it later today). Below you’ll find some links for things we’ve been into lately. Wishing you a great weekend :) Mama Eats Plants E-Cookbook – We love everything that Amanda does, and have been so excited for her ebook to come out. It’s everything we ever wanted and more: delicious, cozy plant-based recipes, low waste organization tips, beautiful writing and photos. Highly recommended if you’re in need of some inspiration in the kitchen and beyond. Green Kitchen Stories New Website – Everyone’s favorite vegetarian bloggers just launched their new website and it’s so beautiful. We love watching their stunning cooking videos over and over :) Bon Appetit Youtube Channel – Speaking of cooking videos, we love watching Bon Appetit’s test kitchen videos. The editing is perfect, the hosts are full of charm, and the videos are always packed with little tricks and tips that will most definitely improve your cooking. This one of Brad Leone and Samin Nosrat making focaccia is solid gold. How I Built This – We’ve been binge-listening to this entrepreneur-centred NPR podcast. It’s fun to hear how some now giant companies got started out of thin air. Some favorite episodes include: Alice Waters, Yvon Chouinard. Our Planet on Netflix – As heart-breaking as it is awe-inspiring, this is a nature documentary that really stops you in your tracks and gets you to reconsider your impact, beyond your day to day life. I definitely cried through the whole first episode. Asparagus Fries on YumUnviverse – Plant-based cooking goddess Heather made the asparagus fries from our cookbook and shot the most beautiful video of the process. Can’t wait to make these with the first of the asparagus soon. Silky Sweet Potatoes with Cucumber Tahini Ranch, Green Veg and Chickpeas   Print Serves: 2 as a main or 4 as a side Ingredients for the cucumber tahini ranch ¼ cup tahini zest from 1 large lemon, divided juice from 1 large lemon 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1-inch piece of cucumber - shredded 3-4 sprigs of dill - chopped 2 scallions - sliced sea salt and freshly ground black pepper - to taste apple cider vinegar and water - for thinning for the vegetables and chickpeas 2 medium sweet potatoes - halved olive oil 1 15 oz can chickpeas or 1½ cups cooked chickpeas sea salt 1 teaspoon nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 2 stalks of broccoli - cut into florets 4-5 leaves Lacinato kale - stemmed and torn lemon zest (reserved from the ranch) red pepper flakes Instructions to make the cucumber tahini ranch In a medium bowl, combine the tahini, half of the lemon zest (reserve the rest for later), lemon juice, olive oil, maple syrup, mustard, nutritional yeast, and garlic powder, and mix until you have a smooth paste. Add the cucumber, dill, scallions, salt and black pepper to taste, mixing everything in. Your ranch will be pretty thick at this point, so thin it out with splashes of apple cider vinegar and water, until you have a glossy, creamy sauce. Taste for acidity, salt, and pepper, and adjust if needed. This ranch will last refrigerated in an air-tight container for 3-4 days. to make the vegetables and chickpeas Set a tiered bamboo steamer or steaming basked over a pot with boiling water. Place the sweet potatoes into the steamer, cover, and steam for 35-40 minutes, or until the potatoes are fork-tender and custardy. While the sweet potatoes are cooking, prepare the crispy chickpeas. Drain and dry off your chickpeas really well with a kitchen towel, lightly rubbing them to get as many as you can out of their skins. This will prevent the chickpeas from popping in the pan. Warm a generous pour of olive oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add the chickpeas and fry, stirring occasionally, for about 15 minutes, until golden and crispy. Transfer the chickpeas to a bowl and mix in some salt to taste, as well as the nutritional yeast and smoked paprika. Do not wash the pan, but wipe it off if theres any burnt bits. In the last 5 minutes of the sweet potato steaming time, add the broccoli and kale to the same steaming basket or add another tier to your bamboo steamer and add the green vegetables to that. Cover and steam for 5 minutes, until the broccoli is bright green and the kale is slightly softened. While the broccoli and kale are steaming, warm a bit more olive oil in the same pan you used for the chickpeas, over medium low heat. Add the reserved lemon zest (from the ranch recipe) and a pinch of red pepper flakes and let the oil infuse until the vegetables are done. Once the vegetables are done steaming, add the broccoli and kale to the pan with the infused oil, add a pinch of salt, and toss to coat. Serve the steamed sweet potatoes with a pinch of salt, a good slather of the ranch, topped with the green vegetables and chickpeas, and liberally drenched in more ranch. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 This post contains Amazon Affiliate links. The post Silky Sweet Potatoes with Cucumber Tahini Ranch, Green Veg and Chickpeas appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder

March 23 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder We’re very ready for spring and all of its tender, green produce, but unfortunately it’s still very much soup weather around here. I think that soups are such lifesavers for busy people. They’re simple to make, hard to mess up, and can be customized millions of ways. You can make a giant soup for the week and have warming, wholesome meals right at your fingertips when you don’t have the energy to cook. They’re easy to bring to go in a mason jar or thermos. It’s also great to freeze some soup, which will always be appreciated later, in the midst hangry emergencies. We had two goals for this chowder – we wanted it to be creamy, filling, and comforting, but also light and a bit different from the squash and root vegetable soups that are always around in the winter. Just a little nod to spring :) The creaminess in this chowder comes from blended roasted cauliflower, mushrooms, and chickpeas. There’s no cashews or any nut-based products, since we wanted to go for a lighter soup. I think that cauliflower works so well in creating both a chowder-like consistency and flavor here, while the roasted mushrooms bring an extra depth of flavor. There are also green peas for more springy vibes, along with a base of mirepoix (onion, carrot, celery), and smoked paprika. When it comes to creamy soups, we still love having some chunky texture present, so we leave some of the cauliflower, mushrooms, and chickpeas whole here. The chowder just tastes more like a meal this way, but it could definitely also serve as a side in smaller portions. We’ll be showing the step-by-step process for preparing this chowder on our Instagram Stories later today, and we’ll also save it in our Highlights. Hope you try this one and have a great weekend :) Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients olive oil toasted sesame oil (optional) 1 yellow onion - chopped 1 medium carrot - cubed 1 stick of celery - sliced sea salt 3 cloves of garlic - minced 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon nutritional yeast (optional) ¾ cup dried chickpeas - soaked overnight or up to 24 hours 8 cups purified water 2 bay leaves 1 large head of cauliflower - cut into bite-sized florets 10 oz crimini mushrooms - cut into quarters or eighths for bigger mushrooms freshly ground black pepper 1 cup frozen peas juice from 1 lemon fresh herbs - for garnish Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Warm a soup pot over medium heat. Add a generous drizzle of olive oil and sesame oil, if using. Add the onion, carrot, and celery to the pot, along with a pinch of salt. Cook the vegetables for about 10 minutes, until soft. Add the garlic, smoked paprika, and nutritional yeast, if using, and stir around for about 30 seconds to 1 minute, until fragrant. Drain and thoroughly rinse the chickpeas and add them to the pot, stirring to coat. Add the water and bay leaves, bring the liquid up to a simmer and cook, with the pot lid askew, for 30 minutes. Taste a few chickpeas after the 30 minutes, they should be cooked and creamy inside. If the chickpeas are not yet done, cook them longer. This process can take up to an hour or even longer with some older chickpeas. Generously salt the chickpea broth towards the end of the chickpea cooking time. While the chickpeas are cooking, prepare two rimmed, parchment paper-covered baking trays. Place the cauliflower on one of the trays and the mushrooms - on the other one. Drizzle both the cauliflower and mushrooms with olive oil (or other roasting oil of choice), sprinkle with salt and pepper, and stir. Place both trays in the preheated oven and roast for 30-40 minutes, stirring halfway, until the cauliflower is soft and caramelized. The mushrooms will release water while roasting, so thats why using a rimmed baking tray helps. Once the chickpeas are cooked and the vegetables are roasted, add the cauliflower and mushrooms to the pot with the chickpeas, stirring to combine. Add about half of the soup to an upright blender, making sure to catch plenty of chickpeas, cauliflower, and mushrooms for creaminess. Blend until smooth and return the blended liquid to the soup pot, mixing everything together. Bring the soup back up to a boil and simmer for 5 more minutes for the flavors to merge. Turn off the heat and stir in the peas, which will thaw immediately in the hot soup. Stir in the lemon juice. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the chowder, garnished with fresh herbs, a drizzle of sesame oil or olive oil, and with a side of toasted sourdough bread or croutons. Enjoy! Notes You can also make this soup with canned chickpeas! Just use one to two 15 ounce cans of chickpeas and less water (start with about 5-6 cups). Since the chickpeas are cooked, you dont have to simmer them for 30 minutes. Otherwise, proceed as written out in the recipe. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Berry Creamsicles with White Chocolate Drizzle - Ice Cream Sunday Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bites Babamesco Dip .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Recipe | Pesto Pizza with Roasted Red Peppers, Cremini Mushrooms & Asparagus

March 15 2019 Oh My Veggies 

It’s no secret: I’m excited about spring. Super excited! While the weather and sunshine and longer days are nice, it’s the gardening that I’m really psyched about. Last summer was our first as homeowners and I was finally able to grow a variety of herbs to cook with mere steps from my kitchen. Oh yes, the community garden plot I had was nice, but it’s just not the same as being able to open the door, grab some basil, and start cooking. I grew two Genovese basil plants last year; I was worried they wouldn’t be enough, but they ended up being more than I could possibly use. (This year, I’ve planted two Genovese basil plants again and also holy basil and lemon basil–so get ready for a lot of basil recipes soon!) As I usually do at the end of summer, I decided to make a big batch of pesto and freeze it in mini muffin tins to use through the winter. I can’t count how many hectic nights that my frozen pesto saved the day. Working late? Thaw some pesto and throw it into pasta! Got everything you need to make pizza except the sauce? Use pesto instead! […]

Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Soup (and my gardener's lament: winter poison ivy!)

March 3 2019 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Soup (and my gardener's lament: winter poison ivy!) Dear Soup, Thank you for always reminding me there are better days ahead. Soups are mainstays around here, especially with snow on the ground and temps hovering in low twenties to single digits tonight, plus more cold on the horizon this week. And poison ivy. (Yup.) I've probably made six batches of this already this winter. It involves a food processor and a soup pot. That's it. Comes together in approximately five minutes and is satisfying, warm and delicious. Here's my take on this soup, which was originally inspired by this. Here's how I made my Vegan Pasta e Fagioli: 4 carrots 1 leek 6 cloves garlic 1 celery stalk 1/­­2 onion sliced thin 2 bay leaves 1/­­2 head of cabbage 1 can of cannellini beans (drained, rinsed) 1 can diced tomatoes 1/­­3 cup ditalini pasta (cooked in separate pot, then added to soup just before serving) 2 T. nutritional yeast 1 qt. veggie stock olive oil thyme oregano red pepper flakes salt & pepper to taste Add chopped veggies--carrots, leeks, garlic to food processor, pulse about ten times. Prep the soup pot with the olive oil over medium heat, add chopped veg. Cook till just tender. Add remaining ingredients and broth and seasonings, salt and pepper. Cover and let simmer two hours over low heat. Serve with a side of your best homemade bread. (Mine is Jim Lahey's --I made the ciabatta version). After a visit with the folks at Urgent Care yesterday for a infernal outbreak of poison ivy, I am now awaiting an agonizing three weeks for this painful mess to clear up. Or longer. Why does Mother Earth require such an evil, toxic plant? What purpose does it serve? I've been struck by this havoc on only a handful of times in my life because I am so gawdawful afraid. Sounds impossible. But trust me when I tell you: only to me, the Master Gardener, and in winter no less. And above is the culprit.  Our home is undergoing a transformation of sorts in a few weeks which will finally rid us of these old railroad timbers and be replaced with a more substantial wall of stone. (That will hopefully outlive us and beyond.)  So I found myself outside on a warm-ish day earlier last week in a bit of a snit over the demise of some cherished plants I couldn't bear to loose. I've spent fifteen years tending and planting, so obviously there are plants I want to keep. Out with the shovel and buckets and pots. Everything's dormant, ground was soft, sun was out: perfect. Until later that night when I woke with what I imagined to be some sort of bug bite. Then to the next afternoon when my arm reached up to scratch my wrist (pulling the long sleeve back and discovering to my horror what really had happened). OMG. WTH? Could this be? . . . is this? Noooooo!  And then began the seven stages of grief: shock, denial, guilt, anger and bargaining, depression and loneliness to reconstruction (the UC visit) and finally acceptance. Yes, I accept that I have the rash of the spring and summertime, of gardeners, campers, hikers and landscapers, the poisonous fury of: Leaves of Three Let it Be! Ah, but what about the roots?  I had come in contact with said dormant plant--through the roots. I had oh-so carefully lifted plants and divided, setting each clump aside. Gloves and long sleeves. I have replayed this moment back through my mind a hundred times: as I reached under one of my plants, I must have accidentally, on an exposed part of my wrist, come in contact with the worst plant root on the planet, unbeknownst to me.  I am more allergic than most and so, this lovely little visitor and its prescribed remedy dosed out (the horrid steroid treatment) is, well. It's hell. The rash has traveled from my left wrist, up my right arm, to my abdomen, and leg. There's a perfect dot-to-dot landscape you can follow if you wanted. I can see the entry at every point. It's like an incredibly cruel irony and one I will face with tears, determination, agitation and regret. As for the remainder of the plants. They'll be destined for demolition. 

Recipe | Butternut Squash, Lentil & Kale Salad with Tahini Dressing

February 22 2019 Oh My Veggies 

On Friday, the weather was beautiful and the sun was shining and I felt excited and hopeful that spring was almost here. I even tweeted this: I know it's mid-February, but it looks like spring outside. Hooray for sun! — Oh My Veggies (@ohmyveggies) February 15, 2013 ...and then about 20 minutes later, I got a winter weather alert on my phone. And, indeed, we got about an inch of snow on Saturday. I think Chris and I are now true North Carolinians because, when looking out the window at the (pitiful!) accumulation of snow, we decided it was best to stay off the roads and hunker down for the day. How soon I’ve forgotten the days of schlepping around campus at the University of Wisconsin in blizzard conditions or being unable to open the balcony door in our apartment because several feet of snow had sealed it shut. This Butternut Squash, Lentil & Kale Salad was supposed to be my farewell to winter post. I was going to vow to you that you wouldn’t see another kale or winter squash recipe on my blog until next fall rolls around. But after this weekend, I’m thinking it’s more fitting to […]

Show Your Heart Some Love for Valentine’s Day

February 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Show Your Heart Some Love for Valentine’s DayThis week is Valentines Day, a good time to express your love for your heart and all it does for you. Celebrate by cooking up a heart-friendly meal for Meatless Monday. By choosing not to eat or serve meat just one day a week, you are giving a valentine to your loved ones every Monday, or 52 times a year. This simple gesture of adding more plant-based foods to your diet can have profound health benefits for your heart. Research has found meals rich in fruits, vegetables, and legumes contain natural antioxidants that actually benefit cardio-health. Add some wow factor to Valentines Day, and every Monday, with plant-based dishes for the people you love. To everyone around the world, Happy Valentines Day! My Heart Beets Salad by Apron Strings Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta by Healthy. Happy. Life. Quinoa Kale Risotto with Pistachios by Sharon Palmer, the Plant-Powered Dietitian   Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post Show Your Heart Some Love for Valentine’s Day appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool

February 9 2019 My New Roots 

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool   When we committed to going to the ocean, I immediately felt the thrilling sensation that washes over me when I stand at the intersection of land meeting water. I smelled brine and dampness. I saw certain patterns and colours; light sand against dark water, wet stones, seaweed, driftwood, and feathers. This was the second recipe I created for the dreamy on-location photoshoot with Christiann Koepke back in October (you can see the first one here). The inspiration for this dish came first in fact, fast and furiously. Just thinking about the seaside brought this recipe to me in a wave of total inspiration. I wanted the ingredients to reflect the elements in this environment, and for the final result to be a visual meeting of land and sea. Now Im not super into “fake meat”, but there is something undeniably satisfying about tricking someone into thinking a vegetable is flesh. Tee hee. Plus, Rene Redzepi does it all the time, so maybe it puts me in the cool cooking club too? Yes? Anyway, I knew something on the plate had to look like seafood, and I had my sights set on scallops. In my first cookbook, I made “scallops” out of leeks, and wanted to try something different, so going through the rolodex of tube-shaped white veggies in my mind, I fell upon king oyster mushroom stems. Naturally. Browned in ghee and well-seasoned, I knew that these morsels would look exactly like mollusks, and taste deceptively meaty. A pool of herbaceous, vibrant green pesto, would be the land, and the perfect resting place for my mushroom medallions. I combined flat-leaf parsley and spinach to create a bright yet balanced sauce that complimented - rather than overwhelmed - the rest of the dish. But with all this creaminess, I knew that I also needed to include something for textural contrast, so toasted hazelnuts became the beach stones, along with fried capers, which added a bite of seaside brine. This dish is surprisingly easy to make, and it is the prefect main to serve for family and friends that you want to spoil a little. It looks impressive, but its a cinch to get on the table without gluing you to the stove. The pesto can be made a week in advance (although the fresher, the better), so that the only thing you need to do before serving is cook the mushroom and capers, and warm the pesto a little. I love cooking the capers and mushrooms in ghee (recipe here) because its just so darn delicious, but the pesto is vegan and if you want the entire meal to be so, simply swap out the ghee for expeller-pressed coconut oil, which is refined for high heat cooking and has no tropical aroma. Beta-glucan Goodness Edible mushrooms are both medical and nutritional dynamos. Collectively, they not only provide us with plant-based protein, vitamin D, and a whole host of minerals, but most excitingly a group of polysaccharides called beta-glucans. These complex, hemicellulose sugar molecules enhance the functioning of the immune system by activating immune cell response and stimulating the production of white blood cells. These compounds also effectively mobilize immune stem cells in your bone marrow, and exhibit anti-tumor properties, so theyre often used supplementally in cancer treatment protocols. Beta-glucans help to lower cholesterol, as this type of fiber forms a viscous gel during digestion, which grabs a hold of excess dietary cholesterol, prevents absorption by moving it through your digestive tract, and eliminates it. Through your poop! This same gel also slows down your digestion, which in turn stabilizes blood sugar, and minimizes the release of insulin. King oyster mushrooms are of course a good source of beta-glucans, but you can get them in other places too: barley, oats, sorghum, mushrooms like shiitake, reishi and maitake, as well as seaweed, algae, and dates.   I wouldn’t put king oyster mushrooms in the “specialty” category of fungi, but I also know that theyre not available at every grocery store, so if you cant find them, substitute with any other kind of mushroom you like and forgo the whole scallop charade. The dish will still turn out delicious, I promise. If you want to change up the herb in the pesto, try basil instead of flat-leaf parsley. Cilantro could also be delicious, but potentially overwhelming, so use more spinach in that case. And instead of hazelnuts in the pesto and garnish, try almonds, pecans or walnuts. Yummm. I like to serve this with a big hunk of crusty bread on the side to mop up any leftover pesto in the bowl. It also helps to have some good olive oil and flaky salt around for this situation, just sayin. If youd prefer the grain route, steamed brown rice, quinoa, or millet could be a decent accompaniment too. And if you want to go completely grain-free, roasted sweet potato, winter squash, or pumpkin would be totally lovely.     Print recipe     King Oyster Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 lb. /­­ 500g king oyster mushrooms (choose ones with fat stems) a generous amount of ghee (or expeller-pressed coconut oil) fine + flaky salt 1 jar brined capers (about 1/­­3 cup /­­ 55g) a handful of toasted hazelnuts, roughly chopped, for garnish 1 batch Parsley-Spinach Pesto (recipe follows) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish a few leaves of parsley, for garnish Directions: 1. Remove any dirt or debris from the mushrooms with your hands, or small soft brush. (do not use water!). Slice the stems into enough rounds so that each person has 5 or 6. Keep the caps for another dish. 2. Drain the capers and pat them dry with a clean tea towel or paper towel. Heat about a tablespoon of ghee (or coconut oil) in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the capers and fry until split and crisp - about 2-3 minutes. Remove from pan and set aside. 3. Add more ghee (or coconut oil) to the same skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add the sliced mushroom stems, a sprinkle of flaky salt, and cook on one side until golden, about 5-7 minutes. Then flip and cook on the other side until golden. Work in batches or use separate skillets - if you crowd the mushrooms they will steam each other and get soggy. That is not what were after! 4. While youre cooking the mushrooms, place the pesto in a small saucepan, add a touch of water to thin, if desired, and warm over low-medium heat. Do not boil! 5. To serve, place about 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml of the warm pesto in the bottom of a dish, spreading it out to make an indent in the center. Place 5 or 6 mushroom stems in the pesto, then top with the fried capers and toasted hazelnuts. Drizzle with olive oil and a few grinds of black pepper. Garnish with parsley and serve immediately. Parsley-Spinach Pesto Makes about 2 1/­­4 cups Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 150g hazelnuts 1 fat clove garlic 2 cups /­­ 35g flat-leaf parsley, lightly packed (tender stems only) 2 cups /­­ 65g baby spinach, lightly packed zest of 1 organic lemon 1/­­3 cup/­­ 80ml freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 2 lemons) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml cold-pressed olive oil 1/­­2 cup /­­ 35g nutritional yeast 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water, more if needed Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place hazelnuts on baking sheet. Toast in oven for 12-15 minutes or until fragrant and lightly toasted. Remove and set aside. Once cool, remove skins by rubbing the hazelnuts together in your hands. Set aside. 2. Remove any tough stems from the parsley. Roughly chop the leaves and tender stems (this prevents the parsley from bruising in the food processor). 3. Place garlic in the food processor and pulse to mince. Add the hazelnuts, parsley, spinach, lemon zest and juice, olive oil, nutritional yeast, and salt. Pulse for 30 seconds, then add the water and pulse again until its thick, but spreadable. Remove lid and scrape. Repeat until reaches desired consistency (I like mine a little chunky, but its up to you!). Store leftovers in an airtight glass container in the fridge for up to one week. We’re home from Bali now, settling back into life in the cold Canadian winter. It feels good to be here, especially after a satisfying few weeks in the sunshine, hosting two glorious retreats. Now it’s time to ground and focus on the year ahead. I’m very excited for 2019 – so many exciting things to share with you, just on the horizon. I hope you’re all well out there, and enjoying a vibrant start to the new year. Sending love and gratitude out to you all, always. xo, Sarah B The post Mushroom “Scallops” in a Warm Pesto Pool appeared first on My New Roots.

Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera

January 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera Cortney Herrera is the artisan distiller and founder of the holistic skincare company Wildcare, located in the Pacific Northwest. We’ve been crushing hard on Cortney’s creations, like her expertly distilled hydrosols and face masks full of the most unique, glow-promoting ingredients, and we’re so excited to share this wisdom-packed interview. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Structure of certain things like eating & sleeping times has always made me feel the most supported. I am a triple virgo so by nature I crave a solid routine around the everyday basics. With that said, its freeing to just rehash it all and recreate a functional flow if I feel like Im too caught up in our pattern. Now that I have a baby (hes 1!) as much as I want things to be regimented for us all to thrive,  its necessary to play with flexibility for the unexpected too, so Ive shifted a bit more towards that direction. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. We sleep with our curtains open so that each morning we wake up to natural light. We just moved back to Oregon from sunny CA, so this is especially crucial for me here in the Pacific Northwest to feel more stable during the darker winter months. Our baby almost always wakes us up around 7am and usually starts babbling, so well take him out of his crib and have a little cuddle time. If hes not out on a job, my husband Alex will get him ready for the day and then Ill make us a morning beverage (usually tea with mushroom powder and coconut manna, and honey) and either one of us will cook a simple breakfast for the family (tortilla with an egg, handful of parsley or cilantro and a fermented veggie). We both work from home so we each hop on our computers shortly after while switching off with who is playing with baby Oso. One thing I am firm on is giving myself a facial massage for 5-10 minutes after I wash up. My skin loves it, but more importantly its a nice form of meditation to have that little moment of space to zen out a bit. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I opt for a magnesium bath, face mask (I like our creamy Soft Focus Mask at night), sometimes a chocolate and always a cup of tea – lately its a blend of lemon balm, chamomile, oatstraw and raspberry leaf. If time gets the best of me, Ill have a mug of hot water with magnesium powder to relax before bed. Im also really big on lists (virgo) so I usually write a new one before bed every night for all different things like shopping lists, distillation lists, who I need to email back more urgently, recipes I want to make.... everything thats been floating around in my mind that day so Im more freed up before bed. I watch a little Netflix and laugh, and then get in bed around 11. I like the Headspace app as a guided 5-10 minute meditation to center my breathing when I lay down. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Outdoor explorations! We aim to weave one day trip into each week, usually within an hour of home, and drive to a mountain, forest, or river to breathe clean air & explore without much of a plan or direction in mind. Having this free-flowing space contrary to our routines during the week creates lots of room for spontaneity…and sometimes we hit a dead-end, but thats all part of the fun of experimenting and not having a plan! Balance is key. If we dont have time to physically drive to a big open landscape that weekend because of work, well take walks in the neighborhood or a smaller visit to a nearby park (there are parks everywhere in Portland!). I like to be present and check in with myself as I move…how does the sun or mist feel on my skin, what scents are in the air, what does this leaf feel like in my hand.... All of these little check-ins help me feel more grounded and connected. Sustenance -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I stopped drinking coffee and caffeinated tea about 8 or so years ago to curb my anxiety – its helped tremendously! My favorite go-to drinks for energy & focus are roasted dandelion tea, fresh juice we make at home (the greener, the better), or chocolate milk with walnut milk and raw cacao! For the most part good quality chocolate has always mellowed me out actually – I think its the magnesium. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? I like to opt for something that will satisfy a sweet tooth without the crash or sugar spike like incorporating dates, honey or maple with healthy fats that sustain my energy. Lately Ive been making these very simple almond butter cookies. The recipe is: 1 cup almond butter (any nut butter will do!), 1 egg, 1/­­2 Tbs of virgin coconut oil, a couple spoons of coconut sugar, a pinch of himalayan salt and any spices that appeal (cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla bean etc). Roll into balls, smoosh with a fork and bake for 10 minutes! -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? My sister Ash (Black Sage Botanicals) makes delicious oxymels – vinegar based tinctures with infused organic and foraged herbs and honey. Im in love with her Tulsi Oxymel made with rose and pomegranate vinegar. It feels heart-opening and nurturing! Im pretty regimented on taking Vitamin D, a DHA fish oil, and iron with nettles along with various flower essences dependent on what my emotional state is calling for. Water is the main tool for me I need to remember, all day every day!!!!! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I aim to get out at least a couple times a week on an adventure and walk, usually finding a new forest to explore here in the northwest. Its been the single best thing for me in releasing any anxiety or stress from the week. I also am just getting back into yoga, focusing on the balance between movement + stillness. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I see beauty in nourishing and embracing every facet of our unique selves so much that the joy and loving energy we hold for our own bodies and spirit inherently radiates to those around us. I think when we allow ourselves to really connect with others, be vulnerable, be authentic, be blissful, be curious, beauty is an energy thats more magnetic than visually stimulating. I find a lot of rocks beautiful because I take time to notice their expressive nature. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? My approach is all about balance supported by nature and ancient rituals. Cold-pressed oils, raw honey, herb infusions, powdered herbs....focusing on the balance between humans and the natural world – how we care for botanicals and how they may care for us. I like to look at skincare the same way I look at the food I eat; when I feel happy about the ingredients I apply on my skin, my skin feels happy too. Its all about respecting and caring for ingredients so we create more harmony as we utilize them. My favorite tools are oil + water, in the form of our face oil and hydrosols. It may sound counterintuitive for those two to go hand in hand yet its what our skin is essentially made of and vital for nourished skin + optimal function. After cleansing, Ill mist a hydrosol (during winter I choose Empress Cypress or Rosemary Bay) and follow with SunRoot Solar Serum. Ill take about 5-10 minutes for a facial massage and then follow with another generous mist of Hydrosol. My skin glows!! -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water mainly. Eating lots of healthy fats like coconut oil/­­manna, ghee, avocado. The fish oil and vitamin d every day along with eating a lot of fermented foods and drinking the roasted dandelion tea I mentioned earlier (hormone balancing = skin balancing). The more we can do to support the gut and liver especially, the happier our skin is! I love incorporating raw honey and bee pollen in my rituals. Our Bee Rosy Mask actually has ground bee pollen in it and makes my skin feel like a spring flower. As for my hair, I like to use our skin soother Rosemary Bay Hydrosol to keep my scalp healthy. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? As a mama & business owner, there is always stress – good stress and real earth-shaking stress. The beauty/­­wellness business is pretty idealized – its HARD work and creating boundaries to minimize stress and prioritize your own personal wellness can be easily misplaced. Some things that usually help me release are talking it out with my sisters, breathing deep with a tall glass of water, embracing quietness, saying no when I need to, saying yes when I want to, putting my hands in dirt to work in the garden, and going on a walk. The past year I also started writing more regularly. Oddly enough a lot of it started flowing on my instagram which has led me to a beautiful community of friends that Ill message with on and off. On some more wild days, my husband and I will just run to the living room, turn up the music and just go crazy dancing for 10 minutes and then go back to work. This often helps the most with little stressors, especially seeing baby Oso laughing at us. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I make elderberry syrup every winter and take a spoon everyday when Im run down. Magnesium baths, herbal steams, foot soaks, rest, water, raw honey, and garlic. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Something that always helps me is doing something for myself first thing in the morning, so I dont end up too busy and putting it off later. That usually takes shape as a face massage. At the end of the day when Im laying in bed, I almost always do a self-check in and think of one nice thing I did for myself that day. If I forgot to physically do something, Ill say a few affirmations to myself. Im also quite excited to be starting therapy again and EMDR this month. I honestly am really eager to get back into it and work through some heavy triggers and blockages. I think thats one of the nicest things I could do for myself right now. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Allowing myself space to slow down & connect. Wildcare has been buzzing since conception. We were featured in Vogue the first month we opened, and from there it just became an everyday hustle to stay caught up – a challenge Im incredibly grateful for. Last year I had my first baby, and he arrived to our surprise 2 months early via an emergency cesarean. He remained in the NICU for a month while my husband and I went home as baby and I each had to separately heal. I felt broken, and at first, I jumped right back into work as soon as I had more movement to distract from much of the emotional pain I had experienced. A few months later when he was home, business was great but there was this moment I knew I needed to stop everything, reflect and be present with what I was feeling and with our baby. I closed the shop for a few weeks, and decided to stop taking on new retail partners for pretty much the remainder of 2018. Being transparent and open with those around me – even our customers about what I was going through, has been the biggest change Ive made. Slowing down, bridging that connection of my voice + products, being present and prioritizing the same amount of care for myself that I give others has allowed me to feel more honest with myself. Still a huge work in progress yet this practice continues to reveal a community of supporters that wouldnt have been there unless I was vulnerable. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I feel like inspiration finds me within the energy of the landscapes I’m immersed in. Right now its walking on the soft mossy forest floor in Oregon, hypnotized by rushing rivers and gazing up at towering Fir trees and dancing leaves. I really trust in the natural relationship of quiet down time vs the times Im energized with new ideas, and think its important to allow things to reveal themselves naturally as a connection is made. These visuals, scent memories, and feelings from nature always wind their way into my dreams even years later and lead me to formulas and product names so its best for me to just to go with the flow. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a distiller and starting Wildcare? My sisters and I grew up strongly influenced with our moms skin care rituals who worked as a makeup artist for film & tv, amongst other things. As kids, we would concoct foot soaks using pine needles and flowers we would collect on afternoon walks, and hair masks with eggs and mayonnaise! These DIY projects have always stayed with me. My formal schooling was both in Culinary and Herbal disciplines – a foundation that propelled my special focus on care – internal & external. There was an afternoon in particular where I had focused all my energy on exploring a better remedy to comfort my eczema flare-ups. When I noticed all the Rosemary that was growing in our yard near a little Bay tree I intuitively crafted my first Wildcare product, The Skin Soother Rosemary + Bay Hydrosol using a makeshift distillation system out of kitchen pots & pans. I remember I actually cried at the moment I saw the first hydrosol emerge…I really felt lucky to be in the presence of such an ancient form of alchemy. After obsessively spraying this camphorous green-smelling mist for a few weeks & seeing my skins improved health, this artful practice of distilling was something I fully got behind. I spent a year doing playful and careful experimentations, making hydrosols for family and friends. There was one night I even dreamt about filling a table full of tiny amber bottles with aromatic liquid and then a month or so later, I sprung up from a dream and shouted Wildcare! to my husband. Wildcare was born shortly after that in the end of 2015. -- At Wildcare, you make your own hydrosols and advocate their healing properties. Can you tell us a little bit about what they are and why they are so effective? Hydrosols are the subtly aromatic waters from distilled plant material. A copper still is placed over fire, holding spring water (we hand-collect from a local Oregon spring!) & fresh plant material. Inside the still, steam rises & passes through the plant in the form of vapor, carrying vital nutrients, plant acids & suspended particles of the plants essential oils. As the vapor cools, it condenses back into a liquid state and emerges in the form of aromatic water (now a Hydrosol) along with its essential oil counterpart. Our distillations have about an 8 hour duration depending on the plant utilized, a very slow & thoughtful process that requires a focused presence from the distiller. The majority of the essential oil will rise to the top, leaving the Hydrosol with about 0.1% micro-particles of essential oil, making it a very gentle mist without the same safety concerns that essential oils carry. When you purchase a pure Hydrosol, note that it will read as 100% distillate or floral water – without the addition of other ingredients or essential oils. More on the distillation process here. -- What are some of your best-sellers? 100% SunRoot Solar Serum, but more on that below! Our best selling Hydrosols of the season have been the skin soother Rosemary Bay, awakening Palo Santo, and Empress Cypress (a personal favorite!). From our face and body line, Soft Focus Mask has been flying off the shelves. Its a gentle and creamy clay based mask with brightening pearl powder, soothing organic coconut milk, and pineapple extract to even out lackluster skin. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? SunRoot Solar Serum is a product Ive worked on for 2+ years and was just released! After working so long on this formula, its been the most rewarding experience to see so many glowing reviews pour in. Im overwhelmed in the best possible way. It features a 4-week infusion of organic artichoke leaf in this incredibly beautiful Jojoba oil that Im sourcing directly from a farmer here in the US. He is self-taught and does all his cold-pressing by hand! Artichoke leaf is a powerhouse in healing sun damage, scarring and repairing tissue. Its combined with warming turmeric root, and juicy fruit oils like Sea buckthorn, Rose hip and Raspberry Seed. To extend even more beauty and peace of mind, its a 90+% certified organic formula! I am also in the middle of a complete rebrand, designed by artist Morgan Ritter (my younger sister!), with SunRoot as the first look of Wildcares new visual identity. The bottles are entirely covered with my actual tiny handwriting thats been screen-printed, echoing my commitment to being a maker – literally being a conduit, like water. Its a bold gesture to avoid a standardized typeface and is unlike what is commonly seen in the market, as we intend for this design to be a personal, embodied approach to commerce. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Its been a challenge as a nurturer however Ive been practicing treating myself more, creating stronger boundaries around my own personal time so that I can give more too. My affirmations since going through what I did last year have been The nurturer deserves to be nourished. I am deserving of nourishment. I am deserving of my own care. Simple pleasures like tinkering around in the kitchen and baking something experimental, even a chiropractic care visit from my favorite Luna Wellness practitioner, Megan makes me feel extra supported. Every so often Ive been treating myself to a facial from any one of a few dear friends here in Portland too. Allowing myself this space has been crucial to be able to lovingly care for child and have peace of mind. -- Standout book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art: Book - Aromatic Medicine by Patrice de Bonneval & Cathy Skipper Song/­­Album -Papa Celestin ragtime music, bought it at Mississippi Records :-) Movie - Stargate (I just saw Hackers for the 1st time and that was cool, ha ha ha) Piece of Art - STOOL WITH WHEELS (ALL THE WORLD’S PAIN, YET THERE ARE MOVEMENTS) by Morgan Ritter from her show The Cat House Settlements -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Dena Nakhle Birch – She is my friend/­­angel/­­naturopathic doctor based out of Santa Barbara, CA. A brilliant healer with one of the biggest hearts I know. Erica Chidi Cohen – her friendship and book Nurture was incredibly supportive to me after my birthing experience. Neva Osterloh – the sweetest woman offering loving forms of care through her Portland skincare studio. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Gabrielle Russomagno Self-Care Interview Series: Rocio Graves Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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