wine vinegar - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Cuban-Inspired Black Beans and Rice

Chocolate-Coated Marshmallow Treats

Easy Vegan Chocolate Fudge Recipe

Marinated White Bean Salad










wine vinegar vegetarian recipes

Marinated White Bean Salad

yesterday 15:12 Golubka Kitchen 

Marinated White Bean Salad We have a marinated zucchini recipe in the blog archives that’s a favorite to which we keep coming back to every year, and this white bean salad definitely has its roots there. Zucchini can be surprisingly delicious raw, especially when you show it a little love like we do here – salting it to rid it of excess liquid, so that it can fully take on the flavors of the marinade. The texture of raw marinated zucchini is also great – snappy but soft at the same time. In this salad, we combine the raw zucchini with white beans, tomato, and herbs, drenching everything in a very simple marinade. The result is so refreshing and delicious in its simplicity. I’ve been making some variation of it pretty much every week this summer. You can very easily customize this recipe to your needs: use other beans or lentils, add any number of fresh summer vegetables, swap out the basil for another herb, add spices to the marinade, etc. Hope you’ll give it a try! Marinated White Bean Salad   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients 2 medium zucchini (about 12 oz total) - mandolined or thinly sliced sea salt 1 small shallot - minced zest and juice from 1 lemon 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar pinch red pepper flakes freshly ground black pepper ⅓ cup olive oil 2½ cups cooked white beans (about 2 15 oz cans) 1 large or 2 medium tomatoes - cut into chunks or cubed a few handfuls of basil or other fresh herbs of choice - sliced or chopped Instructions Put the zucchini in a colander, sprinkle generously with salt, and mix well to coat. Place the colander over a bowl to catch the water released by the zucchini and set aside to drain for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, in the bottom of the bowl in which youll be mixing the salad, combine the shallot, lemon zest and juice, vinegar, red pepper flakes, salt and black pepper to taste, whisk to combine. Stream in the olive oil while whisking, until emulsified. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Gently squeeze the zucchini by pressing on it in the colander, to wring out any remaining water. Rinse it well to wash off the salt. Put the zucchini on a clean kitchen towel and pat dry. Add the zucchini to the bowl with the dressing, along with the beans, tomato, herbs, and another pinch of salt, mix well. Taste for seasonings once again and adjust if needed. Place the salad in the refrigerator to marinate for a few hours or overnight before serving. Enjoy cold. Notes I used baby zucchini here, thats why they look like cucumbers! 3.5.3226 The post Marinated White Bean Salad appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Gazpacho with Spicy Red Lentils

July 22 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Gazpacho with Spicy Red Lentils A thing I learned this year that I can’t believe I didn’t know before is that traditional Andalusian gazpacho recipes include bread, which gets blended (originally pounded in a mortar and pestle) into the soup. Making gazpacho this way was definitely a revelation, since it comes out so silky, rich, and astoundingly flavorful considering the modest amount of ingredients involved. There’s a seemingly never-ending heat wave happening where we are, and cold soups are all I want. To make the gazpacho into a little more of a meal, I often serve it with a few spoonfuls of red lentils, which I generally prepare on the spicy and salty side. They sort of take the place of croutons in my mind, though more nourishing and flavorful. A bowl like that, garnished with basil and maybe some yogurt is so perfectly satisfying on a summer night. I hope you’ll enjoy it as well! P.S. For a variation on this theme, check out our Red Lentil Gazpacho from a few years ago. Gazpacho with Spicy Red Lentils   Print Serves: 4 as a side Ingredients for the gazpacho about 6 small-medium tomatoes (1½-2 lbs) - cored and quartered 1 red bell pepper - seeded and roughly chopped 3-4 slices day old bread - crust removed (about 4-5 oz without crust) 1 clove garlic - roughly chopped ⅓ cup olive oil 1 tablespoon + ½ teaspoon red wine vinegar small handful of basil, plus more for serving sea salt freshly ground black pepper for the spicy red lentils olive oil 1 small yellow onion - diced sea salt 1 clove garlic - minced ¼-1/­­2 teaspoon red pepper flakes (or to taste) ¼ teaspoon smoked paprika ½ cup red lentils Instructions to make the gazpacho Combine the tomatoes, bell pepper, bread, garlic, olive oil, vinegar, basil, salt and pepper to taste in an upright blender. Blend until very smooth. If all your ingredients dont fit in the blender, quickly pulse up just the vegetables, which will make room for the rest of the ingredients. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Optionally, strain the gazpacho through a fine mesh strainer for an extra silky texture. Transfer the soup to a container, cover and put in the refrigerator to cool very well for at least 2 hours or overnight. Serve cold as is or garnished with yogurt, basil, and/­­or the spicy red lentils. to make the spicy red lentils Heat a medium pot over medium heat and add enough olive oil to lightly coat the bottom. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and saute for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic, red pepper flakes, and smoked paprika and saute for another minute, until fragrant. Add the lentils, 1½ cups of water, and more salt to taste. Bring to a simmer. Simmer, covered, for 15-20 minutes, stirring periodically, until the lentils are cooked through but still al dente in parts. Let cool a bit and either serve the lentils on the gazpacho warm, at room temperature, or cold out of the refrigerator - all three ways taste great. Notes You can use the crust left over from the bread to make croutons. 3.5.3226 The post Gazpacho with Spicy Red Lentils appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Potato, Lentil, and Zucchini Salad

June 24 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Potato, Lentil, and Zucchini Salad We make potato salads pretty much every week in the summer. To me, they are the perfect food – satisfying, packable for the beach or picnics, and the recipe is easy to change according to what we have on hand. Today’s recipe has been our favorite version as of late. I love adding French lentils to a potato salad to make it more satiating/­­into a complete meal if needed, plus their flavor and texture is great. Another thing I like to include is a green vegetable: asparagus, green beans, or zucchini like in this recipe. For the dressing, I think that a mustardy vinaigrette is always a great move for most potato dishes, and we make a simple one for this salad. Hope you’ll give this version a try this summer! Potato, Lentil, and Zucchini Salad   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients ½ cup French lentils sea salt 1½ lbs yellow baby potatoes or fingerling potatoes - halved or quartered 1 medium zucchini - sliced into half moons 1 shallot - minced 1½ tablespoons Dijon mustard (or half Dijon and half grainy mustard) zest and juice from 1 lemon 2 teaspoons red wine vinegar freshly ground black pepper 3 tablespoons olive oil a few large handfuls of dill and/­­or other herbs of choice - chopped Instructions Add the lentils to a medium saucepan, cover them with about 1 inch of water and salt well. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce to a simmer and simmer for 15-20 minutes, or until tender but not mushy. Add the potatoes to a soup pot, cover with water, salt well, and bring to a boil over high heat. Boil the potatoes for 15-20 minutes, until tender. Add the zucchini to the pot with the potatoes at about the last 3 minutes of cooking, to quickly blanch it. Drain the lentils and potatoes/­­zucchini once cooked (you can drain everything into one colander). While the lentils and potatoes are cooking, prepare a big bowl for the potato salad. In the bottom of the bowl, combine the shallot, mustard, lemon zest and juice, vinegar, a generous pinch of salt, and plenty of black pepper, whisk to combine. Stream in the olive oil while whisking, until emulsified. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Add the drained lentils, potatoes, and zucchini to the bowl with the dressing and mix to combine. Let cool for a few minutes, then mix in the herbs. Serve right away or refrigerate in an airtight container until ready to serve. 3.5.3226 New Ebook! This ebook is a collection of straightforward, plant-based recipes for busy people who love to cook. Each recipe was developed to be weeknight-friendly, with shorter cooking times and easier prep. Whole, plant foods are featured prominently throughout the ebook and make up the bulk of these vibrant, weeknight meals. Click Here to Buy   The post Potato, Lentil, and Zucchini Salad appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

High-Vibe Condiment Classics

May 23 2020 My New Roots 

High-Vibe Condiment Classics Summer is fast-approaching (at last!) and I dont know about you, but to me this means grilling, eating outside, and enjoying all of the classic, warm-weather treats. But wait! Did you know that there are all kinds of funky ingredients hiding in the most innocuous places, like your ketchup, mustard and relish?! We shouldnt have to forgo these truly classic condiments just because were walking on the whole foods path. No way! So I decided to do a high-vibe makeover all of the condiments that youd find at a barbecue, picnic, or baseball game: ketchup, mustard, honey mustard, Dijon, relish, mayo and secret sauce, without any refined ingredients, colours, or preservatives. They are entirely vegan (except for the honey mustard), and taste absolutely incredible.  Making your own condiments from scratch is empowering, and you too will see that by whisking up your very own mustard, or blending your very own ketchup that you are incredibly capable in the kitchen! Its a serious delight to realize that youre not only qualified to make things you thought you needed to buy, but that youre also doing yourself a giant favour in cutting questionable ingredients out of your life. When I was a kid, I loved hotdogs with mustard and relish (not ketchup, that was for burgers). The vinegary tang of the yellow mustard with the sweetness of pickle relish perfectly offset the salty squishiness of a microwaved wiener. This was a typical Saturday lunch, with doughnuts for dessert, all washed down with a giant glass of milk. I wanted to recreate that nostalgia, minus pretty much everything else. The flavours bring me back to simple times and simple food. But simple food is not always so simple. Have you read the ingredients on a squeeze bottle of relish lately? Its a complicated collection of chemicals that I certainly wouldnt want in my body. High-fructose corn syrup, natural flavour, and food colouring are just a few of the ingredients that plague most tasty toppings. Food additives are everywhere, especially in shelf-stable products. If youre not going to refrigerate something or preserve it properly, it has to have things in it to prevent it from spoiling. It also has to look appealing and taste good, even after months (or years!) on a grocery store shelf. That is why it is so important to read labels and be discerning about what you choose to buy. This is not to say that these additives are inherently harmful, but they are far from natural, and Im a believer in eating as close to the earth as possible! Luckily my condiments are not only based on whole foods, but they taste amazing and are actually good for you.    Here is a small list of the food additives to watch out for and avoid, if possible. Remember to check the packages of your other summer favourites, like chips, salad dressings, sparkling beverages, soda and juice, ice cream, popsicles, and frozen yogurt.  High Fructose Corn Syrup Sometimes labeled HFCS, this highly-refined artificial sweetener has become the number one source of calories in North America. It is found in almost all processed foods, since it is cheap to make, shelf-stable, super sweet, and highly addictive. Excessive consumption has been linked to obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Watch out for it in condiments, salad dressing, bread, candy, soda, yogurt, breakfast cereals, even canned vegetables and fruit.  Natural Flavours This is a sneaky term meant to throw you off. When you see these words on an ingredient list, they refer to a naturally-derived flavouring agent that has to be extracted from plant or animal sources, designed to enhance the taste of food. Conversely, artificial flavours are synthetically created, with their original sources being manmade chemicals. Natural flavours however, are still made in laboratories by food chemists who can add any numbers of chemicals, including preservatives, solvents and other substances, which are defined as incidental additives, to what they are creating. Food manufacturers are not required to disclose whether these additives come from natural or synthetic sources, and as long as the original flavouring comes from plant or animal material, they can be classified as natural. The point is, natural flavours dont appear to be any healthier than artificial flavours, and they can still contain ingredients that may cause reactions in sensitive individuals, especially children. To avoid them, cut back on packaged products and stick to the real-deal whole foods!  Food Dyes /­­ Colours To make food look bright, fresh, and especially appealing to children, food manufacturers add dyes to obvious things like candy, sports drinks and baked goods, but also not-so-obvious things like condiments (!), pickles, cereals, salad dressing, yogurt, and chocolate milk. Some of these dyes are approved for use in certain countries, while others have banned them, making it challenging for consumers to navigate. The safety of food dyes is controversial, especially in regards to children. Studies have linked them to hyperactivity in sensitive kids, and they may cause allergic reactions in some people. Because most food dyes are found in unhealthy processed foods, its easy to avoid them if youre sticking to a more natural diet.  Hydrogenated /­­ Partially Hydrogenated Oils You know when the World Health Organization plans on eliminating these fats from the global food supply, they must be pretty problematic. Created by forcing hydrogen gas into vegetable fats under extremely high pressure to turn liquid into solid, hydrogenation creates trans fats, which increases the amount of LDL cholesterol, lowers HDL cholesterol, therefore significantly increasing the risk of coronary heart disease. Whats more is that these fats are pro-inflammatory. Although their use has been banned in several countries, trans fats still lurk in many processed foods.  As long as there is less than .5% per serving, it isnt required in to be listed in the ingredients or nutritional information. The best way to avoid them is by cutting out processed foods, especially margarine, coffee creamer, chips and crackers, frozen pizza, fast foods, baked goods, and microwave popcorn.   Health Claims – these are put on the front of the box to lure you in, and can include buzz words like natural, whole grain, low-fat, no added sugar, organic, light, low calorie, gluten-free, and enriched. Terms like these should be a red flag for you, so read the entire label, including the ingredient list, the serving size, the amount and types of sweetener and fat used. Think critically and be selective – if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.  The bottom line?! Stick to whole, or minimally-processed foods and ingredients as often as possible. Its better for you, and your family to make your own from scratch whenever possible. Not to mention, its fun to brag to everyone that youre a condiment master, a yogurt wizard, or a salad dressing whisperer.  I had so much FUN with these recipes! It was a blast to brainstorm which condiments I would attempt to health-ify, experiment with, and eventually master to make them all easy-to-make and delicious. My condiments wont last years in the fridge, but all of them passed the two-week mark with flying colours (all of them natural, of course). As long as youre using clean utensils to scoop out your servings, you shouldnt have a problem keeping these toppings around for a few weeks – ya know, if you can ration them for that long!  Yellow Mustard This was in fact my first attempt at making yellow mustard and it proved to be ridiculously easy! I think Id built it up in my head to be some complicated project, but wow was I mistaken. Just a few simple ingredients, and a little stovetop whisking will get you the brightest, tangiest, most beautiful ballpark mustard of your dreams! I must warn you, from one condiment-master to another, that the bubbling mixture gets darn hot and tends to splatter when its cooking. To avoid scalding yourself, use the pot lid as s shield (insert laughing emoji here).      Print recipe     Yellow Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients:  1 cup /­­ 250ml cold water 3/­­4 cup dry mustard powder 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 tsp. ground turmeric 1/­­2 tsp. garlic powder 1/­­8 tsp. ground paprika 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar Directions: 1. In a small saucepan, whisk together water, dry mustard, salt, turmeric, garlic, and paprika until smooth. Cook the mixture over medium-low to low heat, stirring often, until it bubbles down to a thick paste, 30 to 45 minutes. 2. Whisk the apple cider vinegar into the mustard mixture and continue to cook until its thickened to the desired consistency – this can take between 5 and 15 minutes depending on how thick you like it.  3. Let the mustard cool to room temperature. Transfer the mustard to an airtight glass jar or container, and refrigerate for up to 3 months.  Honey Mustard Depending on how sweet you like your honey mustard, its just the above yellow mustard recipe with as much honey stirred in as you like! I added two tablespoons and it was perfect for me, but if you want even more, got for it. I recommend avoiding very runny honey, since this will loosen the mustard. Instead, opt for something on the thicker side to maintain the consistency. If youre vegan, brown rice or date syrup would be the best choices, since they are more viscous than maple syrup, for example. I love this on sandwiches with lots of fresh veggies and sprouts!     Print recipe     Honey Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients: 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 Tbsp. raw honey Directions: 1. Combine the mustard and the honey. Taste and add more honey if desired. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 months.  Grainy Dijon Mustard This style of Dijon is a whole-seed one, which is my favourite because of the great texture and colour variations. Its spicy and complex, and will only get better with time. Keep in mind that this recipe is in two stages, the first one requiring you to soak your mustard seeds the night before you plan on blending.      Print recipe     Grainy Dijon Mustard Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml  Ingredients: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g yellow mustard seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g black mustard seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. ground mustard 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml white wine vinegar 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml apple cider vinegar 2 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 tsp. sea salt Directions: 1. Combine all ingredients and refrigerate overnight (for 12-24 hours) to allow the mustard seeds to soften and absorb the flavours. 2. Place mixture in blender and mix on high for a minute or two, until the seeds have broken and the mustard thickens. 3. Transfer contents to a clean jar and enjoy! Dijon will keep for about one month in the refrigerator. Sweet Pickle Relish This was the most anticipated condiment to try and make myself, since its one of my favourites, but also one of the worst offenders for additives. I successfully recreated that gorgeous tang, and succulent texture of commercial relish that I loved so much as a kid. The taste of this one is off the charts! My recipe uses coconut sugar instead of refined sugar and syrups, so the colour is a little darker and browner than the conventional types, but I dont think youll notice – and you certainly wont miss the food colouring!     Print recipe     Sweet Pickle Relish Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 340g finely diced cucumber 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g finely diced yellow onion 1 tsp. salt, divided  1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar  1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g coconut sugar 1/­­4 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. yellow mustard seeds 1 tsp. dried dill 1/­­4 tsp. turmeric 1/­­4 red bell pepper, finely diced 1 tsp. arrowroot, dissolved in 2 tsp. water Directions: 1. Toss the cucumber and onion with 3/­­4 teaspoon of salt in a sieve set over a bowl, and let drain for about 3 hours. Next, press the ingredients against side of sieve to release as much liquid as possible, then discard liquid from bowl.  2. Bring the vinegar, coconut sugar, and remaining 1/­­4 teaspoon of salt to a boil in a small saucepan, stirring until sugar has dissolved, then simmer until reduced to about a 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml (just eyeball it), about 3 to 4 minutes. Add the garlic, mustard, dill, and turmeric, stir until fragrant, about 1-2 minutes. 3. Add the drained cucumber and onion mixture, plus diced red bell pepper, and simmer, stirring for about 2 minutes. Make the arrowroot slurry, then whisk it into the relish. Simmer, stirring, 2-3 minutes until noticeably thickened. Turn off the heat and transfer relish to a glass jar or storage container and leave uncovered until it cools to room temperature, then put in the fridge. The relish will keep for up to a month in the fridge.  Tomato Ketchup This ketchup was an old blog post that I revisited and revised. I used to make this recipe in the oven, but my new method eliminates the need to crank up the heat when its probably the last thing you want to do. Instead, the whole thing is made on the stove, then blitzed up in the blender. Its deeply spiced and complex, so much more interesting than store-bought ketchup. The first time I made the new version, I used a good portion of it for a soup base, then added more to a dip – both were delicious, so if you have leftovers, put it to use in an unexpected place. Its tasty with everything!      Print recipe     Tomato Ketchup Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil (expeller-pressed, flavour neutral)  3 star whole anise (make sure they are whole to remove easily!) 3 bay leaves 1 tsp. ground coriander pinch of chili flakes  1 large onion, chopped  3/­­4 tsp. sea salt  1/­­4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 3 cloves garlic, minced 2.2 lbs. /­­ 1 kg tomatoes  2 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 Tbsp. maple syrup  Directions: 1. Melt the coconut oil in a medium stockpot, then add the star anise, bay leaves, coriander, and chili flakes. Cook until fragrant about 2 minutes, then add the onions, salt and pepper, and cook until slightly browned, about 10 mins. Next add the add garlic, cook for 1-2 minutes, then add balsamic vinegar, scraping any stuck bits off the bottom of the pot. Add tomatoes and their juices, then bring to a simmer.  2. Cook on low heat for about 60 mins or until reduced and starting to caramelize on the bottom of the pot.  3. Turn off heat and remove bay and anise, add maple syrup. Let cool slightly and transfer to a blender, blend until smooth. Taste, and adjust seasoning to suit your taste.  4. Let cool to room temperature, then transfer to an airtight glass container and store in the fridge. Keeps for about one month.   Aquafaba Mayonnaise This was the most exciting discovery to make: vegan mayo using aquafaba! Aqua faba translates to bean water and its the cooking liquid from chickpeas. Although any can of chickpeas will have this, I make my own, since there are no additives or chemicals that have leached from the can itself. If you cook your own chickpeas from dried, you have aquafaba. Although I wouldnt normally consume large amounts of aquafaba, in this case its used in such a small amount that I think its fine. Plus, did I mention it makes vegan mayo?! The results are so unbelievably shocking and delightful that Im a convert, even though I eat eggs! I highly suggest using the most neutral-tasting olive oil you can find for this recipe. Since it makes up the majority of the flavour of the mayonnaise, a strong-tasting olive oil will overpower the delicate nature of this condiment. I used the one from Pineapple Collaborative, which works perfectly. I also tried avocado oil, grapeseed, and sunflower, but didnt like the results as much as mild olive oil. Its up to you! You can really use whatever you have on hand, just keep in mind that it will really dictate the taste of the final result.      Print recipe     Aquafaba Mayonnaise Makes about 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3 Tbsp. aquafaba 1/­­4 tsp. Dijon mustard 1/­­4 tsp. fine salt 1 1/­­2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml mild olive oil (or other light-tasting oil) Directions: 1. Place the aquafaba in the bottom of a wide-mouth jar. Add the mustard, salt, lemon juice, vinegar, and the olive oil. Allow a minute for the oil to separate into a distinct layer. 2. Insert an immersion blender all the way to the bottom of the jar. (Note: this will not work with an upright blender) Start the blending process on medium speed and do not lift the blender until the mixture has thickened and turned white at the bottom of the jar. Only then, slowly move the blender up, waiting for the oil to incorporate as you go, until you get the texture of mayonnaise. Use immediately; refrigerate leftovers in a tightly sealed jar for up to 1 month. The mayonnaise will thicken slightly once cooled in the fridge. Smoky Secret Sauce This is the creamy, tangy, and perfectly seasoned sauce that most famously adorns the Big Mac burger from McDonalds. Whats best about my version is that it has zero secrets...nothing weird to hide here! I had the most fun with this recipe, since it required a number of the condiments that Id already made as ingredients. I did deviate a tad from the original and added smoked paprika, since I love the added dimension of smoke flavour to anything thats going on grilled food, but Ive also found this to be a stellar salad dressing, especially for chop-style salads that have chunky, less delicate ingredients. I hope you find some fun things to slather it on this summer. Its lip-smakingly tasty!      Print recipe     Smoky Secret Sauce Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml aquafaba mayonnaise (recipe above) 1 tablespoon yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish (recipe above) 1 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 teaspoon white wine vinegar 1/­­2 teaspoon paprika 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (not traditional, but delicious!) 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon onion powder Directions: 1. Fold all ingredients together in a small bowl or jar. Enjoy immediately, and store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for 2-3 weeks.    As a bonus, Ive included this stellar recipe for carrot hot dogs – since youll need a high-vibe wiener to put your condiments on! Hahaaa! I realize that carrot hot dogs are pretty 2018, but Id never tried them before and it was a very amusing undertaking. I looked at a number of recipes online and my version is a mash-up of the ones that sounded the most delicious. My method is also much easier and faster than other versions Ive seen, since its just a braise on the stove and a quick grill (no marinating, steaming, roasting, etc).  The important thing to keep in mind for this recipe, is that the amount of time you braise the carrots for,Im  will be dictated by the girth of the carrots. Mine were more sausage-sized (approx 1.5 or 3.5-3.75 cm) than a typical hot dog wiener, and a 20-minute simmer was the perfect amount. If your carrots are smaller, Id go down to 15 minutes. Insert a sharp knife to check on the doneness after 10 minutes or so, and take them out when they are tender, but way before they get mushy. Remember that youre also going to be grilling them for 10 minutes so they will cook even more, and you dont want them too soft. The final result should be tender all the way through, but shouldnt fall apart in your mouth.     Print recipe     Carrot Hot Dogs Serves 8 Ingredients: 8 large hot dog-sized carrots 8 hot dog buns 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml tamari 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml apple cider vinegar  1 cup /­­ 250ml vegetable broth or 1 tsp. vegetable bullion powder + 1 cup water 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 2 Tbsp. coconut oil (preferably expeller-pressed, flavour neutral) 1 Tbsp. liquid smoke 2 tsp. yellow mustard 1 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. paprika 1/­­2 tsp. onion powder 1/­­2 tsp. ground black pepperWash and peel carrots. Round the edges of the carrot to look more like wieners, if desired.  Direcitons: 1. Whisk all marinade ingredients together in a large stockpot with a lid. Add the peeled carrots and bring to a boil, reduce to a gentle simmer, and cook with the lid on for about 20 minutes (less if your carrots are on the thin side, see headnote). Remove from heat and turn on the grill.  2. Grill the carrots over medium-high, turning every couple of minutes, basting them with the remaining braising liquid if desired. Cook until slightly charred and fragrant, 10 minutes total. Grill or toast the buns. Place a carrot on each bun and enjoy with all of the condiments! I wish you all an incredible summer ahead! I recognize that this season is going to look very different from years past, but as long as were all healthy and the sun is shining, weve got it pretty good. Stay safe out there, and keep fuelling your body with the whole foods it needs to thrive and feel alive!  All love and happy condiment-making, Sarah B The post High-Vibe Condiment Classics appeared first on My New Roots.

Classic St. Patrick’s Day Dishes Made Plant-based

March 16 2020 Meatless Monday 

Classic St. Patrick’s Day Dishes Made Plant-basedFor many Americans, St. Patricks Day is a day to celebrate Irish culture -- the traditions, the people, and the cuisine. Youre likely familiar with many of the iconic dishes: shepherds pie, soda bread, braised cabbage, potatoes colcannon, corned beef, etc., but you may not be aware that many classic St. Patricks Day recipes can be made completely plant-based -- yes, even corned beef. Dont believe us? Read on to see how you can make Meatless Monday versions of your favorite St. Patricks Day dishes. Braised Cabbage Cabbage is a humble ingredient, but when gently braised it becomes nice and tender. Cook in butter (non-dairy), vegetable stock, dry wine, and apple cider vinegar for a flavorful side dish. Add a little sugar and carroway seeds for a livelier dish. For the Braised Cabbage recipe, click here. Meaty Mushroom Stew with Garlic Mashed Potatoes Straight from The Meatless Monday Cookbook , this recipe uses cremini and shiitake mushrooms and tamari to recreate the rich umami flavor iconic of traditional slow-cooked Irish stews. Pair the stew with a topping of garlic mashed potatoes and dinner is set. For the Meaty Mushroom Stew recipe, click here. Orange Cranberry Scone The scone is a welcomed reprieve from all of that rich St. Patricks Day food. This recipe is completely plant-based, utilizing coconut oil and coconut milk in place of dairy. Adding pumpkin spice, maple syrup, and orange zest to the sweet scone glaze makes this recipe perfect for any holiday. For the Orange Cranberry Scone recipe, click here.   Potatoes Colcannon A classic Irish side dish, colcannon is a marriage of creamy mashed potatoes and crispy green cabbage. Although traditional recipes call for butter and cream, colcannon can easily be made plant-based by swapping out the butter and heavy cream for plant-based alternatives. For the Potatoes Colcannon recipe, click here .   Shepherds Pie This completely plant-based version of Shepherds Pie can serve as the centerpiece of a St. Patricks Day feast. A smooth, creamy potato topping covers a hearty filling of lentils, cremini mushrooms, and diced veggies. For the Vegan Shepherds Pie recipe, click here. Soda Bread A variety of cuisines have their own version of soda bread, which gets its name from the use of sodium bicarbonate as a leavening agent rather than traditional yeast. This version uses plant-based milk and dairy-free butter to achieve a firm but delicate texture. For the Vegan Irish Soda Bread recipe, click here . Plant-based Corned Beef Yes, it is possible to make corned beef meatless. This recipe uses a seitan-substitute that is heavily spiced and mixed with a homemade beet puree. The loaf is then rubbed with spices and submerged in a slow-cooker brine with mushrooms, garlic, all spice, mustard, beet puree, and white wine vinegar. For the Vegan Corned Beef recipe, click here .   Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation.   The post Classic St. Patrick’s Day Dishes Made Plant-based appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Savory Tomato and Onion Jam

September 4 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Savory Tomato and Onion Jam We’ve been making this lush, jammy spread on repeat lately. It’s been such a hit! This is a more low-maintenance version of a true jam that lasts a long time. This one comes together with more speed, doesn’t require too much sugar, and is meant to be enjoyed within a week or so (we think you won’t have a problem with this!). The reasonable amount the recipe makes reflects that as well. It’s no secret that things on toast make for the easiest, laziest, and most satisfying weeknight meals. This savory jam, spread over toast with a layer of cashew cheese (we’ve been loving Treeline) has been just that for us – a comforting weeknight lifesaver for a particularly busy time in the life. We hope it will be the same for you :) This jam looks like it’s all about the tomatoes, but it’s really about the marriage of slowly cooked, sweet red onion and the umami bomb that are late summer tomatoes. Both are cooked gently on the stovetop, melding their flavors and caramelizing until thick, glossy, and sweet. Punchy white wine vinegar and a little bit of coconut sugar help take all the flavors to their peak, but in the end it’s really all about these two magical vegetables. Here’s to late summer, its still vibrant produce, longer shadows, cooler evenings, and balmy days

Super Green Gazpacho

July 3 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Super Green Gazpacho Stopping by with another refreshing recipe today. The weather’s been extra balmy lately, and somehow, icy cold smoothies have become my main source of fuel over the past week or so. Gazpacho and/­­or other chilled and pureed summer soups are basically like savory smoothies, so they fit right in! This green gazpacho recipe is such a favorite. I make variations on it all season long, always with the intention of fitting all of the green summer goodness into the blender. The result is such feel-good food that offers the best relief from the heat. This gazpacho is packed with produce, which on its own would make for a lovely, light soup. Here, the produce is accompanied by pumpkin seeds to make the gazpacho more complete and satisfying. When whirled up in the blender, the pumpkin seeds turn into a pumpkin seed milk, which contributes to the fat content and overall creaminess of the soup. Hope you’ll give this a try one day this summer :) Super Green Gazpacho   Print Serves: 2-4 Ingredients ½ cup pumpkin seeds - soaked overnight 1 avocado - pitted and peeled 1 green bell pepper - seeded and roughly chopped 1 jalape?o or serrano pepper - seeded 1-2 cloves of garlic - roughly chopped ½ of a small white onion - roughly chopped 4 baby/­­Persian cucumbers - roughly chopped 1 packed cup basil and cilantro leaves, plus more for serving juice from 1 lime 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar ¼ teaspoon cayenne or chili pepper (optional) sea salt - to taste ½ cup purified water, plus more if needed dairy-free plain yogurt - for serving Instructions Drain and rinse the pumpkin seeds very well. Combine all the ingredients, except the yogurt, in a high-speed blender. Blend on high until very smooth. Add more water if the soup seems too thick, until you achieve your desired consistency. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Optionally, strain the soup through a fine mesh strainer. This makes it a bit smoother, but its good either way. Transfer the soup to an airtight container and refrigerate for at least an hour, until its well chilled. Serve, garnished with basil and cilantro, and topped with dollops of yogurt. Notes If you dont have time to chill the gazpacho, you can serve it with a few ice cubes per bowl, which will cool it down right away. 3.5.3226 The post Super Green Gazpacho appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Panzanella

June 17 2019 Meatless Monday 

This classic Florentine salad of bread and tomatoes is ideal for a light summer meal. Until the twentieth century the salad was based on onions rather than tomatoes, but its evolution takes advantage of tomatoes when they’re at their best. This recipe come to us from The Meat Free Monday Cookbook by our friends at Meat Free Monday. Foreword by Paul, Stella and Mary McCartney. Published by Kyle Books. Photography by Tara Fisher. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox!   Serves 4 -  1/­­2 loaf ciabatta - 6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - 2 garlic cloves, 1 peeled, 1 crushed -  1/­­2 teaspoon dried oregano - 2 tablespoons good-quality red wine vinegar - 2 tablespoons freshly chopped flatleaf parsley - 1 tablespoon baby capers, drained - 6 plum tomatoes, roughly chopped - 1 small red onion, finely sliced -  1/­­2 cucumber, deseeded and cut into chunks - 2 celery stalks, finely sliced - 12 fresh basil leaves, ripped - 50g stoned black olives, halved - salt and freshly ground black   Cut the ciabatta in half and brush the cut sides with a little extra virgin olive oil. Heat a ridged grill pan or normal grill and toast the ciabatta until crisp and golden. Rub the peeled garlic clove over the cut sides of the bread, tear the bread into rough chunks and set aside. In a small bowl whisk together 5 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, the crushed garlic clove and the red wine vinegar. Season well with salt and freshly ground black pepper and add the freshly chopped flatleaf parsley. In a large bowl, mix together the bread and baby capers, plum tomatoes, sliced onion, cucumber, sliced celery, basil leaves, and black olives, and toss with the dressing. Season to taste. The post Panzanella appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Tomato Cobbler

December 17 2018 Meatless Monday 

A savory cobbler is the perfect winter dish! Its comforting and packed with familiar tomatoes, which boast just the vitamin C boost you may need during the cold months! This recipe comes to us from Colavita.   Serves 4 - For the tomato base: -  - 1 medium size vidalia onion - 1 tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil - 3 garlic cloves, minced - 2 packs of diced tomatoes - 1 pint cherry or grape tomatoes - 1 tbsp aged white wine vinegar - 1 tbsp brown sugar - 1 tsp kosher salt - 1/­­2 tsp ground black pepper - 1 tsp fresh thyme leaves plus a few sprigs for garnish   - For the biscuits: -  - 1-3/­­4 cups all-purpose flour - 2/­­3 cup polenta - 2 tbsp granulated sugar - 1 tbsp baking powder - 1/­­2 tsp kosher salt -  1/­­4 cup + 2 tbsp Olive Oil - 1-1/­­2 cups buttermilk - 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese   For the cobbler:   Chop half the amount of cherry tomatoes in half. Sauté the onion in a large oven-safe skillet over medium heat for 5-6 minutes or until tender. Add all the tomatoes to the skillet (chopped, whole and diced) along with the minced garlic. Cook for 10 minutes, until the whole tomatoes burst and reduce. Add the vinegar, brown sugar, salt, pepper and thyme leaves. Mix well. Set aside while you prepare the biscuit dough.   For the biscuits:   Place the flour, polenta, sugar, baking powder and salt in a large bowl. Mix thoroughly. Add the buttermilk, olive oil, and shredded cheese and mix just until it comes together. Do not over mix the dough. Use an ice-cream scoop to scoop out the biscuit dough and place on top of the tomato mixture. Place the biscuits about 1-2 inches apart because they will spread. Bake for about 35 minutes or until the biscuits are golden brown and the tomato mixture is bubbling. Let sit for 10-15 minutes and serve warm. Garnish with extra sprigs of thyme. Enjoy!   The post Tomato Cobbler appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale and Lentils

November 6 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale and Lentils More than just a sandwich, this is better described as a warm and wintery mushroom and kale salad on top of a slice of freshly baked sourdough bread and it is every ounce as heavenly as it sounds. But before we talk more, let’s watch a movie. We have been taking an involuntary break from making our youtube videos as we have been finishing up our next book, but we are back with a bunch of new videos now. We are starting off with this sandwich this week and have a few more in the upcoming weeks. If you’ve been following my stories on instagram, you might have noticed that we’ve been picking up a new (but old) love for baking rye sourdough bread. It’s been years since we baked bread more regularly and I remember giving up the last time after having killed our third starter. Apparently (luckily), we are better at keeping children alive than sourdough starters and plants. Anyway, I felt a streak of boldness and got back on it again a few weeks back. Instead of making our own starter, we asked if we could buy a rye starter from a sourdough bakery close to us. They handed us a paper cup with a wobbly and bubbly starter and we went home and started baking. It’s been alive for a month now and whenever we are not baking, we simply let it sleep in the fridge. Many sourdough breads are complicated stories involving a checklist with tasks. This is a simpler method where we bake the bread in a crockpot to help it develop a thick crust and soft centre. Its a version of the classic No-Knead Bread but with sourdough bread and the addition of rye flour to give it more tang. The dough is more moist than traditional bread doughs and needs longer proofing time so it develops its tangy sourdough flavor. We use 30/­­70 per cent rye/­­wheat ratio. We have been experimenting with various ratios but find that this is optimal for a bread that can rise well and still provide a lot of rye character. We have been using the bread for lunch sandwiches and this mushroom sandwich is our very favorite at the moment. It’s very very simple, you just fry mushrooms in a pan with a bit of garlic, fold down kale and cooked lentils and add a little vinegar to balance the flavors. We serve it with a herby vegan spread between the bread and the topping that we make from Zeta BreOliv, capers and parsley. BreOliv is a spreadable olive oil that can be used instead of butter. It is made from just olive oil, shea oil, water and salt. This recipe is sponsored by Zeta and you can find the recipe in Swedish on their site. And the English version below. Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale & Lentils Makes 4 slices BreOliv Herb Spread 4 tbsp Zeta BreOliv 1 tbsp capers 1 small bunch parsley Mushroom Topping 2 tbsp Olive Oil 300 g /­­ 11 ounces (3 cups) mixed mushrooms 1 clove garlic 1 tbsp white wine vinegar 2 large kale leaves, stalk discarded 1 cup /­­ 100 g cooked lentils salt & black pepper To serve 4 slices sourdough bread (see recipe below) - Make the herb spread by chopping capers and parsley and stirring it together with Zeta BreOliv In a bowl. - Clean and divide the mushrooms into large bits. Peel and crush the garlic. - Heat a large skillet with olive oil. - Add mushroom and garlic and let sizzle for a few minutes. Then add white wine vinegar. - Chop the kale and rinse the lentils and stir them into the pan. Let saute until the kale has softened. - Taste and season with salt and pepper. - Cut a few slices bread and add a layer of the herb spread. Top with the mushroom and kale mixture and a grind of black pepper. Rye Sourdough Makes 1 loaf Before we make this bread we feed the starter a few hours ahead so it’s alive and kicking. 100 ml (1/­­3 cup) rye sourdough starter 400 ml (1 1/­­2 cup) water 1 1 /­­2 tsp salt 330 g (2 1/­­3 cups) organic all purpose flour 170 g (1 1/­­2 cup)  organic rye flour 6-8 green olives - Stir together sourdough, water and salt in a large bowl, and the two flours in a separate bowl. - Chop the olives coarsely. - Fold the olives and the flour mixture into the sourdough liquid and use a wooden spoon to stir it into a sticky dough. Sprinkle over more flour if needed. You can also dip your hands in flour and use them if you prefer. The dough is ready when it can be shaped to a ball that is smooth on the outside and sticky on the inside. - Cover the bowl with plastic and leave in room temperature for 12 hours (can be more or less depending on how warm your room is. - It should have expanded at this point and be very sticky and bubbly. Fold it out on a floured table. Sprinkle extra flour on top and pull and fold the dough around itself a few times. It will be pretty sticky. - Flour a proofing basket or bowl and transfer the dough to it with the folds and ends facing upwards and the smoother (dont worry if its not super smooth) facing down. - Leave to proof for two more hours. - Set the oven to 250°C/­­500°F and place a Dutch oven with lid in the oven. - Use oven mittens to remove the hot Dutch oven. Sprinkle the bottom with flour and carefully flip out the dough into it. - Put the lid back on, place in the oven and let back for 30 minutes. Remove the lid, lower the temp to 230°C/­­450°F and let bake for 20 more minutes. - The bread is ready when it has a neice crust and a hollow sound when tapped on. - Let cool wrapped in a cloth before you slice it and it will stay moister. This post is sponsored by Zeta. All words and opinions are our own.

Authentic Gaspacho Soup

September 22 2018 VegKitchen 

Authentic Gaspacho Soup An authentic gazpacho, prepared according to the Spanish method--perfect on hot summer days! This typical dish is nothing less than a cold soup made from tomatoes and peppers. It is spicy and seasoned with sea salt. Its a simple recipe, refreshing, nutritious and not expensive to make. The recipe is basic and open to any addition or removal of ingredients according to your preferences. Prep Time: 20 minutes Servings: 8 Ingredients cold water as needed 50 ml of extra virgin olive oil 25 ml of red wine vinegar salt to taste 1 kg of tomatoes 1 garlic clove, peeled 1 onion, chopped, 2 cucumbers in sections, 2 chopped green peppers, Preparation Dip the tomatoes in a pot of boiling water for 30 seconds. Remove and steep into a bowl of ice water to stop cooking. Let stand for a minute, then peel the tomatoes. Remove the hard part of the core. In the blender bowl, combine tomatoes, chopped onion, chopped cucumber, chopped pepper, clove garlic, olive oil, red wine vinegar, and a little salt; reserve a little of the chopped cucumber, chopped pepper and chopped onion for presentation. Reduce to a smooth puree. Use the amount of water needed to […] The post Authentic Gaspacho Soup appeared first on VegKitchen.

Grapefruit Radicchio Salad

December 25 2017 Meatless Monday 

Pecans are candied in a skillet with caramelized sugar, then seasoned slightly savory with smoked paprika and salt. These salty sweet nuts are the perfect accent to sit atop this salad of hearty cabbage, spicy radicchio and tart grapefruit. This recipe comes to us from Amy of Cooking with Amy. Serves 4 - 1/­­4 cup pecans, chopped - 2 teaspoons sugar - 1/­­8 teaspoon smoked paprika - a pinch of salt - 2 cups radicchio, shredded - 1 cup Napa cabbage, shredded - 1 grapefruit - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 1 teaspoon white wine vinegar Toss the pecans with the sugar and 1 teaspoon of water in a small bowl. Transfer the pecans to a small frying pan over medium-high heat. Cook, stirring constantly, for 2-3 minutes, or until the sugar gets very brown. Take the pan off of heat and sprinkle with the smoked paprika and a pinch of salt. Stir well, taking care to ensure the nuts are separated, and let the pecans cool in the pan. Toss the radicchio and cabbage together in a medium sized bowl. Peel the grapefruit with a knife. Cut between the membranes to remove only the segments and drop the grapefruit segments into the bowl. Squeeze the remaining grapefruit juice from the membranes and peel onto the cabbage and grapefruit segments. Add the olive oil and vinegar to the cabbage and grapefruit, taking care to toss to ensure the dressing is evenly distributed. Divide the salad into 4 servings, top with the candied pecans and enjoy! The post Grapefruit Radicchio Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Chimichurri Roasted Vegetables

November 27 2017 Meatless Monday 

Cauliflower is roasted golden in the oven while bell peppers are sautéed sweet and fragrant with zucchini on the stove. Parsley, garlic and red wine vinegar make a vibrant chimichurri sauce to sprinkle over this delectable vegetable medley. Serves 6 For the chimichurri sauce: - 1 bunch parsley, stems removed - 1 clove garlic - 2 teaspoons red wine vinegar - 1/­­2-1 teaspoon red pepper flakes - 1/­­2 teaspoon black pepper - 1/­­3 cup olive oil For the vegetables: - a drizzle olive oil, for preparing the veggies - 1 head cauliflower, broken into small florets - 1 medium zucchini, sliced - 1 cup bell peppers, sliced To make the chimichurri sauce: Place the parsley, garlic, red wine vinegar, red pepper flakes, black pepper and olive oil into a blender or food processor. Blend until thoroughly combined. Transfer to a bowl and set aside. To complete the Chimichurri Roasted Vegetables: Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Toss the cauliflower florets with a drizzle of olive oil, until the cauliflower is coated. Place the olive oil coated cauliflower florets onto a baking sheet. Roast the cauliflower in the oven for 1 hour, or until the florets begin to turn golden brown. 15 minutes before the cauliflower florets have completed roasting, prepare a large skillet with a light coating of olive oil. Place the sliced zucchini and bell peppers into the skillet over medium heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes, or until the bell peppers become sweet, soft and fragrant. Divide the cauliflower and sautéed zucchini and peppers into 4 portions. Drizzle with chimichurri sauce to taste, and enjoy! The post Chimichurri Roasted Vegetables appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Green Potato Salad

July 4 2017 Veganpassion 

Green Potato Salad The last weeks I've been traveling for the PLANT BASED INSTITUTE between Munich and Berlin. I don't get to enjoy my balcony that often. On my first free evening I took the chance to have a wonderful BBQ with my friends enjoying the weather. Everyone cooks the dish they want and we really don't want to miss a traditional german potato salad. I like it most with some greens in it. The recipe is from my new book VEGIONAL What do you like most for a BBQ evening? If you like, comment below and maybe the next recipe will be your wish! Makes 4-6 portions. Preparation time: 40 minutes For the remoulade: 100 ml soy milk (you will need soy milk because of it's lecithin) 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar 1/­­2 tsp. mustard salt, black pepper 1 onion 2 small pickles 1 bunch of fresh herbs of your choice (chives, parsley, tarragon, chervil) For the salad: 4,4 lbs waxy potatoes  10 oz frozen green peas 1 small zucchini 5,2 oz smoked tofu 3 spring onions 2 pickles homemade remoulade 3 tbsp. white wine sugar smoked salt, black pepper Mix soy drink and vinegar in a blender until the soy drink builds flakes. Blend at medium speed and add oil until you reached favoured consistency. Flavor with mustard, salt and pepper. While blending the mixture is a little warm and it will get thicker when it cools off. Cut onion and pickles into small cubes, chop the herbs and stir all in.  Cook potatoes in salted water for about 20 minutes. Then drain potatoes and let them cool off. Cut beans into pieces and leave to cook with the peas in some salted water. Darin afterwards. Peel the potatoes (or not) and cut them in slices. Put them in a salad bowl. Cut small cubes of zucchini and smoked tofu, slice spring onions and add to the potatoes. Also add beans and peas. Chop pickles and stir with remoulade and vinegar. Add the dressing to the salad and mix everything. If you like add smoked salt and pepper. 

Versatile Fennel Salad

May 6 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Versatile Fennel Salad The first warm spring days always have me craving fresh, raw, crunchy produce that I tend to overlook when it’s cold outside. Fennel is probably my number one vegetable in that category, so we’ve been having a lot of fennel salads, which got me thinking about fennel’s practicality. It tends to be sturdier and last longer than delicate salad greens, so even if you don’t have greens, you can still make a bomb salad with a bulb of fennel. This version is incredibly delicious and so much greater than the sum of its parts, plus it can be customized endlessly. The bulk of this salad is made up of melt-in-your-mouth wisps of fennel (achieved easily with a mandoline) and white beans (making for a beautiful, monochrome plate). There is a ‘cheesy,’ peppery cashew dust that gets stirred throughout and sprinkled on top of the salad, bringing some subtle umami and fattiness that usually comes in the form of grated cheese. The dressing is simple – zesty and garlicky, made with ingredients you likely have in your pantry. To customize, you can use other kinds of beans, or add in delicate greens like arugula or herbs, and/­­or citrus segments. Rustic, homemade croutons would also be really good in this salad. You can experiment endlessly. Hope you’ll give it a try! Versatile Fennel Salad   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients 1 clove garlic - grated or minced 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar pinch red pepper flakes zest of 1 lemon juice of half a lemon 1 tablespoon olive oil sea salt scant ¼ cup cashews ½ teaspoon nutritional yeast freshly ground black pepper 1 large fennel bulb (or 2 small) - stems cut off, fronds reserved ½ cup cooked white beans Instructions Combine the garlic, vinegar, red pepper flakes, lemon zest, and lemon juice in the bottom of a salad bowl, whisk to combine. Stream in the olive oil while whisking, until emulsified. Add a generous pinch of salt to taste and adjust if needed. Set aside. Grind the cashews in a mortar and pestle until mostly fine. Add the nutritional yeast, a generous amount of both black pepper and salt right to the mortar bowl, and mix to combine. Place the fennel on a mandoline stem side down, root facing up (see photo) and slice very thinly right into the bowl with the dressing. Cut the fennel in half through the root if it doesnt fit on your mandoline and proceed to slicing. Avoid the tough core by rotating the fennel when slicing, at the end. Add the white beans, reserved fennel fronds, and about half of the cashew dust to the bowl, and mix to combine. Serve right away, finished with more cashew dust. Notes To customize this recipe, you can use other kinds of beans, or add in delicate greens like arugula or herbs, and/­­or citrus segments. Rustic, homemade croutons would also be really good here. 3.5.3226 The post Versatile Fennel Salad appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Tofu au Vin

January 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

This meatless take of the French classic Coq au Vin slowly simmers tofu with pearl onions, mushroom, red wine and vegetable broth. The veggie version cuts hours off the cooking time so you’ll be sitting down to dinner just a half hour after you’ve started cooking. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings. Serves 6 - 3 tablespoons canola oil, divided - 2 cups frozen pearl onions, thawed - 3 medium carrots, peeled and diced - 3 cloves garlic, minced - 2 bay leaves - 3 cups red wine* - 3 cups low-sodium vegetable broth - 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce - 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar - 1 14 ounce package extra firm tofu, cut into 1/­­2 inch cubes - 4 tablespoons corn starch, divided - 12 ounces mushrooms, chopped - salt and pepper, to taste - 1/­­2 cup Italian parsley, diced as a garnish *3 cups vegetable broth mixed with 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar can be substituted for the red wine. Heat 1 tablespoon of the canola oil in a large pan over medium high heat. Add the onions, carrots and garlic. Saute for 3-5 minutes, or until lightly browned. Add in bay leaves, wine, broth and soy sauce to the pan. Reduce heat so that liquid is slowly simmering. Simmer for about 20 minutes, stirring frequently, until carrots and onions are soft and liquid has reduced by half. Once sauce is reduced season with salt and pepper to taste. Add 2 tablespoons of the cornstarch into 1/­­2 cup of water and mix until combined. Stir in the cornstarch mixture to the pan to thicken the sauce. Toss tofu cubes in the remaining 2 tablespoons cornstarch and a little salt and pepper until they are all evenly coated. Heat the 2 remaining tablespoons of olive oil over medium-high heat. Sauté coated tofu cubes, turning them occasionally with a spatula, for about 3 to 5 minutes, or until they are crispy browned on all the sides. Remove and set aside in a serving bowl. Add mushrooms to pan and sauté them 5-7 minutes, or until mushrooms are browned and softened. Add red wine sauce and mushrooms to tofu in the serving bowl. Sprinkle with parsley and enjoy!     The post Tofu au Vin appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Easy Chilled Beet Soup

August 2 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Easy Chilled Beet Soup This soup tastes like you’re eating the garden in the best possible way. In Russia, we call it svekolnik, but similar recipes can be found in other Eastern European countries like Lithuania, Poland, etc. It tastes incredibly refreshing and life-giving, and the preparation couldn’t be simpler, with only 7 core ingredients. For beet skeptics, this chilled approach might be your key to enjoying beets, since their flavor is quite mild here. The mandatory dollop of yogurt or sour cream (we love coconut yogurt here) takes everything to the next level, so make sure not to skip it :) The cool thing about this soup is that it uses the entire beet, tops and greens included. You don’t have to have the tops to make it, but if your beets come with bushy tops, don’t throw them away. It’s no secret that beet tops are incredibly nutritious, so that contributes to the whole life-giving, garden feel of this dish. Typically, svekolnik recipes call for eggs, but since we keep things plant-based around here, we’ve come up with two delicious alternatives. I’ve been making this soup with white beans all summer long, and they fit in perfectly, so that’s one of them. And then recently, it occurred to me that silken tofu has a similar texture to egg whites and could be delicious in this recipe, like it usually is in Japanese cold tofu dishes. It worked – tofu is totally tasty and texturally perfect here, and, like the beans, it adds extra protein and makes the soup more satiating. We hope you’ll give this beet soup a try sometime this summer. Wishing you a beautiful weekend :) Easy Chilled Beet Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 5 medium beets, tops included if present sea salt freshly ground black pepper 16 oz silken tofu or white beans juice from 2 small lemons 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar 4-6 small cucumbers, like Persian - cubed dill/­­parsley/­­green onion - chopped yogurt or cashew sour cream/­­other sour cream of choice - for serving Instructions Separate the beets from their tops, if present. Wash and scrub the beets clean and place them in a soup pot. Separate the beet stems from the leaves, setting the leaves aside until ready to serve the soup. Finely chop the stems and place them in the soup pot. Cover the beets and stems with water by about 2. Season with salt and pepper - this water will become your broth. Bring up to a boil and boil for 20-25 minutes, until the beets are tender throughout. Carefully remove the beets from the broth with a slotted spoon or tongs, leaving the stems in the pot. Let the beets cool or run them under cold water, then peel off the skins. Grate the beets on a box grater or with the grater attachment of a food processor. Return the grated beets back to the pot with the broth. Add the tofu or beans to the pot, along with the lemon juice, vinegar, and another pinch of salt if needed. Put the pot in the refrigerator to chill completely for 2-4 hours or overnight. Once chilled, taste for salt, pepper, and vinegar, and adjust if needed. To serve, place about 1 small cubed cucumber in each bowl. Finely chop the beet greens and add a handful to each bowl. Pour the soup over the vegetables, making to sure to catch plenty of the grated beets and tofu/­­white beans. Garnish with lots of herbs and a mandatory dollop of yogurt or cashew sour cream. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 The post Easy Chilled Beet Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Paul McCartney’s Super Vegetable Salad

June 17 2019 Meatless Monday 

This is a fantastic salad that can accompany whatever you fancy -- here it’s served with tofu, but you could just as easily serve it with veggie burger or vegetarian sausages, as well as chips and new or mashed potatoes. You can also vary the steamed vegetables according to whats in season. This recipe comes to us from Sir Paul McCartney and our friends at Meat Free Monday . It’s featured in The Meat Free Monday Cookbook . Foreword by Paul, Stella and Mary McCartney. Published by Kyle Books. Photography by Tara Fisher. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 28 cherry tomatoes - 1 head of broccoli - 12 green beans, cut into 2cm lengths - 2 carrots, peeled and sliced into 2cm pieces - 1 head of lettuce -- I like Romaine - 3 spring onions, finely chopped - 100g polenta - a handful of chopped herbs of your choice - 250g tofu, cut into slices - olive oil for frying   - FOR THE DRESSING - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar - 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard (optional) - 1 teaspoon maple syrup (if you like a bit of sweetness)   Preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F) and roast the cherry tomatoes for 10 minutes. Cover the bottom of a pan with cold water and place a steamer above it. Put the broccoli, green beans and carrots in the steamer, turn the heat on quite high and steam for about 15 minutes, occasionally prodding the carrots with a fork to see if they are done. Some people like them slightly crunchy, others prefer them a little softer. While the vegetables are steaming, make a salad with the leaves and spring onions. Combine the polenta and herbs in a bowl. Heat some olive oil in a frying pan. Dip the tofu in the polenta mixture, then fry until golden. Whisk together the ingredients for the dressing, but only pour over at the last minute. Assemble your meal by first putting the salad on the plate, then the warm vegetables and finally the tofu. Pour over the dressing then add a little seasoning sauce such as Braggs or a sauce of your choice. The post Paul McCartney’s Super Vegetable Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Wonton Soup

February 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

This plant-based take on traditional wonton soup is perfect for those chilly nights when you just want to stay in and cozy up on the couch with a big bowl of comfort. You can add buckwheat noodles or you can keep it traditional with just the broth and wontons.   This recipe  comes from Ashley at Eat Figs, Not Pigs. Check out her blog  for more delicious recipes. Serves 6-8 Wontons Vegan friendly wonton or pot sticker wraps 1 cup boiling water 1 cup textured vegetable protein 2 teaspoons vegetarian chicken bouillon base or 1 vegetarian chicken bouillon cube 1/­­8 cup of vegetable or canola oil, optional 2 tbs tamari or soy sauce 2 tbs fresh chives, minced 2 tbs minced garlic 3 tsp powdered egg replacer + 4 tbs warm water, mixed together according to package directions. 1 tbs fresh ground ginger 1 tbs rice wine vinegar 1/­­4 tsp white sugar, optional 1/­­2 jalapeno, optional   Broth 1 tbs sesame oil 1 small white onion, chopped 2 tbs fresh ginger, mined 4-5 cloves fresh garlic, minced 8 teaspoons vegetarian chicken bouillon base 8 cups water Chili oil, optional Minced green onion, optional   Wontons Boil water and bouillon on high heat. Remove from heat and add dry TVP. Mix to combine and set aside to 10-15 minutes to rehydrate. After 10-15 minutes, add oil, soy sauce, chives, garlic, ginger, rice wine, sugar, jalapeno, and egg replacer, mixing to combine thoroughly. Taste mixture and season accordingly. In the middle of a wonton wrapper, add a heaping teaspoon of your vegan pork mixture. Using your finger, moisten the edges of the wonton wrapper with water. Once the edges are moist, fold in half to create a half moon shape (circle wrappers) or rectangle shape (square wrappers). With your fingers again, moisten the bottom corners of the folded wonton and fold in half where the bottom corners meet. Place wontons on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Continue this process until all the filling is gone and set aside. Broth In a pot on medium heat, add oil. Once oil is hot, add onion and ginger. Saute until onions are slightly translucent and fragrant, about 4-5 minutes. Add garlic and saute and additional 2-3 minutes. Add water and bouillon base, increase heat to high and bring to a boil. Once the broth starts boiling, reduce heat and simmer for about 15-20 minutes. While broth is simmering, fill a separate pot with water and bring to a boil. Add wontons and cook until they rise to the surface, about 2-3 minutes. Transfer wontons to a bowl with hot broth. Garnish with chili oil and green onions. Serve hot. The post Wonton Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa

November 7 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa We finally pulled together another meal plan! This ‘mini’ is very simple, seasonally-inspired, and will leave you with a bunch of nourishing food for the week. Everything starts out with a pot of black beans, a batch of roasted sweet potatoes, and a jar of homemade harissa (so easy to make, and such a flavor bomb ingredient!), which will then make their way into three interconnected savory meals and one snack. Ready? Menu - Roasted Sweet Potato and Black Bean Soup - No-Huevos Rancheros - Curried Cauliflower Rice and Beans - Harissa Black Bean Dip *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free, see the recipes for serving sizes Shopping List (Print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan mini. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Add whatever other ingredients you’ll need for the week here, if doing shopping for the whole week. Produce - 1 large head of garlic - 3 medium sweet potatoes - 3 large yellow onions - 1 large carrot - 2-4 celery ribs - 1 bunch kale (2 packed cups) - 3 limes - 2 lemons - 1 large bunch of cilantro - 2-3 avocados - 1/­­2 lb crimini mushrooms - 1 small head of red cabbage - 1 large head of cauliflower Bulk - 4 cups black beans - 2 cups Basmati rice - 3 large prunes Spices - black pepper - curry powder (1 tablespoon) - bay leaves - 8 dried chipotle chilis - whole caraway seeds - whole coriander seeds - whole cumin seeds - harissa paste – if not making your own Staples - neutral coconut oil or avocado oil - red wine vinegar - sea salt - tahini - kombu (optional) - balsamic vinegar (optional) Other - corn tortillas or other tortillas of choice - 8 sun-dried tomatoes Basic Prep 1) Cook the Black Beans Pot of Black Beans   Print Ingredients 4 cups black beans 2-3 garlic cloves - smashed 2-3 bay leaves 1 sheet of kombu (optional) sea salt Instructions Soak the beans overnight or up to 24 hours in plenty of purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar. Drain and rinse the beans. Place them in a large soup pot with plenty of purified water (about 10 cups). Add the garlic cloves, bay leaves and kombu, if using. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. Taste for doneness. If the beans are not completely soft and buttery inside, continue to cook until fully done. Salt at the last 10 minutes. Drain, saving the cooking liquid. Discard the bay leaves and kombu, if using. 3.5.3226   2) Cook the Rice Pot of Basmati Rice   Print Ingredients 2 cups basmati rice Instructions Cook 2 cups of basmati rice according to the instructions on the package (if your rice came in a package). Or cook the rice according the this method, or any other rice cooking method you prefer, like in a rice cooker, etc. You should end up with about 5-6 cups of cooked rice. 3.5.3226   3) Roast the Sweet Potatoes Roasted Sweet Potatoes   Print Ingredients 3 medium sweet potatoes avocado oil or other neutral oil of choice sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2 parchment paper-covered baking trays. Peel and cube two of the sweet potatoes and place them on the trays. Sprinkle with avocado oil, salt and pepper, toss to cover and spread into a single layer. Leave the third sweet potato whole, just scrub it and prick with a fork, and place on one of the baking trays. Roast the sweet potatoes for 20-30 minutes, until the cubed ones are soft and browned in places. Toss at half time. The whole sweet potato will take a little longer to bake. Cook it until its easily pierced with a knife. Store the potatoes in an airtight container in the refrigerator. 3.5.3226   4) Make the Harissa (you can also buy harissa paste) Harissa   Print Adapted from Vibrant Food Serves: about 1 cup Ingredients 8 dried chipotle chilis 8 sun-dried tomatoes 1 tablespoon whole caraway seeds 1 tablespoon whole coriander seeds 1 tablespoon whole cumin seeds 1 large garlic clove - minced ¼ cup olive oil juice from ½ lemon 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon sea salt Instructions Place the chipotle chilis and sun dried tomatoes in a medium bowl and cover with boiling water. Cover the bowl and let soften for about 30 minutes. Toast the caraway, coriander, and cumin seeds in a dry pan over medium heat until fragrant, about 2 minutes, stirring regularly. Grind the seeds using a spice grinder, dedicated coffee grinder, or mortar and pestle. Drain the chilis and sun-dried tomatoes. Remove the seeds and stems from the chilis (wear gloves to protect your hands if sensitive to spice). Place the chilis and sun-dried tomatoes in a food processor, add the toasted and ground spices, garlic, olive oil, lemon juice, vinegar, and salt. Process into a slightly chunky paste. Refrigerate in an air-tight container for up to 1 month. 3.5.3226   Recipes This soup is cozy and incredibly quick to put together once you’ve done all the prep. It gets its rich, earthy flavor from the black bean broth and harissa. Roasted sweet potatoes bring more depth and nourishment to the table, and kale provides a dose of dark leafy green magic. Roasted Sweet Potato and Black Bean Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 large carrot - sliced 2-4 celery ribs - sliced thin 3 large prunes - chopped sea salt 3 garlic cloves - minced 3 cups cooked beans (from above) 3 teaspoons harissa or more to taste (from above) 5-6 cups black bean broth (from above) 2 cups packed chopped kale leaves 2 cups roasted sweet potatoes (from above) splash of balsamic vinegar (optional) juice of 1 lime cilantro - for garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion, carrot, celery and prunes, and sauté for 8 minutes, until the vegetables are soft. Add salt and garlic, stir around for 1 minute. Add the beans, harissa and black bean broth, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 30 minutes, until all the vegetables are completely cooked. Add the kale, sweet potatoes, splash of balsamic vinegar, if using, and more black bean broth, if needed. Bring back to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for another 10 minutes. Add the lime juice. Taste for salt and spice and adjust if needed. Serve over the prepped rice, garnished with cilantro. This soup freezes very well. 3.5.3226   This huevos rancheros-inspired dish utilizes crimini mushrooms, together with the already prepped black beans, sweet potatoes, and harissa, to make a delicious topping for warm tortillas. Everything comes together in a flash, and it’s a meal that can be easily eaten for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. No-Huevos Rancheros   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt ½ lb crimini mushrooms - sliced 1½ cups cooked black beans (from above) harissa - to taste (from above) roasted sweet potatoes (from above) corn tortillas or other tortillas of choice - warmed or charred avocado - sliced or cubed shredded red cabbage - for garnish lime - for serving cilantro leaves - for garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add the onion and salt and sauté for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add mushrooms and sauté for 8-10 minutes, until all the liquid released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the beans, harissa, and prepped sweet potatoes (amount to taste), and stir to incorporate and warm everything through. Serve the mushrooms and beans over tortillas, topped avocado, shredded red cabbage, a squeeze of lime, and cilantro. 3.5.3226   This re-imagined rice and beans recipe gets its bright flavor from the addition of curry, which is always great at providing a shortcut to flavor. It’s also full of cruciferous goodness from cauliflower, a little zing from lime, and some serious freshness from the essential topping of cilantro. Curried Cauliflower Rice And Beans   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 large cauliflower - chopped into small florets sea salt 5 garlic cloves 1 tablespoon curry powder, or more to taste 3 cups cooked black beans (from above) 3 cups cooked basmati rice (from above) juice of 1 lime cilantro - to garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a large saucepan. Add the onion, cauliflower and salt, and sauté for about 15-20 minutes, until the cauliflower is soft. Splash some water in the pan if things begin to stick. Add garlic and curry powder, and stir around for 1 minute. Add the beans and rice, and stir to mix everything together until warmed through. Pour the lime juice over top and stir to incorporate. Serve, garnished with cilantro. 3.5.3226   A flavorful dip is a great thing to have on hand at all times. It saves the day during snacking emergencies, but can also be spread on sandwiches and dolloped into bowls. Homemade dips are usually cheaper, healthier, and more flavorful than store-bought ones, and they’re easy to make. All of that is definitely the case with this black bean dip, which is made with the remaining, prep day black beans and whole baked sweet potato. If you happen to have any chipotle in adobo, those are a great addition to this dip as well. Harissa Black Bean Dip   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients the rest of the cooked black beans (from above, about 4 cups) 1 whole roasted sweet potato (from above) - peeled ¼ cup tahini juice from 1 lemon harissa (from above) - to taste sea salt black bean broth (from above) - for thinning, if needed Instructions Combine the beans, sweet potato, tahini, lemon juice, harissa, and sea salt to taste in a food processor and blend until smooth. Add some black bean broth if necessary to thin the dip out. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve, garnished with more harissa, toasted sesame seeds, and a drizzle of good olive oil. This dip freezes well if you end up with leftovers. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sweet Potato and Kale Salad Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower Coconut-Ginger Eggplant Fried Rice Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Grilled Butternut Squash with Tabasco Glaze and Crunchy Spicy Seeds

October 8 2018 Meatless Monday 

This simple preparation of butternut squash is anything but. Grilling the squash develops its sweetness and adds a hint of smoky flavor, while a spicy-sweet glaze and cooling yogurt round out the flavors and the delightful crunch of the squashs seeds finish off the dish. This recipe comes to us from Stiltsville Fish Bar. Serves 4 For the Butternut Squash: 1 Whole Butternut Squash 2 tbsp. Honey 1 tbsp. Extra Virgin Olive Oil 1/­­2 tbsp. Salt 1/­­4 tbsp. Black Pepper 7 Fresh Thyme Sprigs, chopped   For the Crunchy Seeds: Reserved seeds from Butternut Squash 1 tsp. Extra Virgin Olive Oil 1/­­4 tsp. Tabasco 1/­­4 tsp. Salt   For the Tabasco Glaze: 2 tbsp. Honey 1 tbsp. Brown Sugar 1 tbsp. Tabasco 4 tbsp. Red Wine Vinegar   To Serve: 1 cup Fat-Free Greek Yogurt 3 tbsp. Tabasco Glaze   Preheat oven to 350° F. Then, cut squash in half down the center, length-ways, and scoop out the seeds and set to the side for toasting (recipe below). Trim ends off and cut 1-inch thick slices, creating half-moon shapes. Place in a large bowl and add honey, salt, pepper, thyme and olive oil. Toss until all pieces are coated well. Place on a sheet pan and roast for 30 to 40 minutes or until tender. Clean all the flesh off the squash seeds and place in a bowl with oil, Tabasco and salt. Toss all ingredients together well and toast in the oven for about 12 to 14 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from the oven and keep at room temperature until needed for garnish. In a small sauce pan, whisk together honey, Tabasco, brown sugar and vinegar over medium heat. Cook and reduce by half. Remove from heat and reserve at room temperature until needed. Turn on grill to high heat and lightly oil grill or spray with oil. Place roasted squash on grill and re-heat over the flame. Grill evenly on both sides. Smooth Greek yogurt evenly over a serving plate with the back of spoon. Stack the grilled butternut squash on top of each other, then drizzle Tabasco glaze on top of squash and sprinkle with toasted seeds. Garnish with fresh thyme. The post Grilled Butternut Squash with Tabasco Glaze and Crunchy Spicy Seeds appeared first on Meatless Monday.

English Garden Salad

August 7 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

English Garden SaladLittle gem lettuce has spoiled me for other types of lettuce--its everything we love about butter and romaine lettuce, all in one compact little head-- and it’s perfect for this English Garden Salad. If you cant find Little Gem lettuce, substitute another type of lettuce, such as Boston or Bibb. English Garden Salad Little gem lettuce has spoiled me for other types of lettuce--its everything we love about butter and romaine lettuce, all in one compact little head. If you cant find Little Gem lettuce, substitute another type of lettuce, such as Boston or Bibb. - 4 ounces thin asparagus or young green beans trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces - 1 cup green peas, fresh or frozen - 2 to 3 heads Little Gem lettuce or other tender lettuce, coarsely chopped (about 5 cups total) - 4 cherry or grape tomatoes, halved lengthwise - 1/­­2 English cucumber, thinly sliced - 4 red radishes, trimmed and thinly sliced - 1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon leaves - 1 tablespoon snipped fresh chives - 1 tablespoon torn small fresh mint leaves - 3 tablespoons olive oil - 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice or white wine vinegar - 1/­­4 teaspoon salt - 1/­­8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper - Pinch sugar - Steam the asparagus and peas over boiling water, using a steamer pot with a perforated insert until crisp-tender, 2 to 3 minute. Run cold water over the vegetables to stop the cooking process, then drain and pat dry. - Transfer the cooled vegetables to a large bowl. Add the lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, radishes, and fresh herbs. - In a small bowl, combine the oil, lemon juice, salt, pepper, and sugar. Drizzle over the salad and toss gently to combine. Serve immediately. This recipe is from Vegan Without Borders (C) Robin Robertson, 2014, Andrews McMeel Publishing, photo by Sara Remington.   The post English Garden Salad appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce

November 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce I love galette. It really is the lazy wo/­­man’s pie. I love that galette crust requires the least amount of fuss of all the crusts, and that the messier it looks, the better. I love that galette filling can be any good combination of vegetables, fruit and herbs, and that it can be as minimal or grand as one wants. This sweet potato version falls on the minimal side of the galette spectrum, yet it is completely lovely and delicious. There are layers of caramelized onions, thinly sliced sweet potato, and sage, all enveloped by a rustic spelt dough. We love to eat it with our favorite, magic green sauce, which is a savior for any leftover herbs in your refrigerator that are fated to end up in the trash or compost.  The green sauce is something I make every week. It’s sort of a cross between pesto and chimichurri, but made with pumpkin seeds as a more affordable alternative to pine nuts, and umami-fied with a bit of miso. You can make it with pretty much any herbs you have on hand. I usually make mine with parsley, but it also does well with the addition of cilantro, basil, tarragon, sage, and even rosemary. You can add in things like carrot or radish tops, too, which normally get thrown away, but are perfectly good to eat. I don’t discriminate against soft herb stems in this sauce either, and whirl them all in. For instance, if I’m using parsley leaves for a recipe, I’ll save the stems for this sauce instead of throwing them away. I’ll do the same with most other herbs. The sauce is a nice brightener for pretty much any savory dish. It’s great on toast, in pasta, on roasted vegetables, with eggs, and it’s absolutely delicious on this galette. I hope you’ll give it a try :) Sweet Potato Galette   Print Serves: two 7 galettes Ingredients for the filling 1 large yellow onion - halved and sliced lengthwise about 3 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil - divided 1 medium sweet potato - mandolined or thinly sliced into rounds sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons chopped sage leaves for the dough 1½ cups (150g) sprouted spelt flour or whole spelt flour, plus more for rolling the dough 1 teaspoon coconut sugar pinch of sea salt 3 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons hot purified water 1 tablespoon finely chopped sage Instructions to caramelize the onions Start by caramelizing the onions. Heat 1 tablespoon of coconut oil in a sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add the onions and sauté until translucent, for 3-5 minutes. Add a pinch of salt, turn down the heat to medium low and cook the onions, stirring periodically, for 30-40 minutes, until caramelized and golden brown. Make the dough while the onions are caramelizing. to make the dough While the onions are caramelizing, place the flour in a medium mixing bowl, add the sugar and salt, and mix with a fork to combine. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture, and pour in the oil. Pour the hot water over the oil, stirring with a fork and slowly incorporating the flour into the liquid. Add the chopped sage and mix it in. When all the flour has been incorporated, turn out the dough onto a floured surface and knead with your hands until smooth. Add more water, 1 teaspoon at a time, if the dough appears too dry. Take care not to add too much water, give the flour a chance to absorb the initial amount of water first. Divide the dough in half. Flatten each piece into a round disc, wrap them in plastic wrap or place into a floured bowl and cover with a damp kitchen towel. Let rest at room temperature for 30 minutes. to assemble and bake Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Line a large baking sheet or two medium baking sheets by covering them with parchment paper. Roll out the dough on a floured surface, one portion at a time, into ⅛-thick circular sheets, about 9 in diameter. Place one sheet of dough on the prepared baking sheet, keeping it to one side to make room for the second galette (if you are using two baking sheets, you dont have to worry about this). Brush the dough with the remaining melted coconut oil and sprinkle it with about ½ tablespoon of chopped sage. Arrange half of the caramelized onions in the center of the sheet of dough, followed by half of the sweet potato slices (arrange those in a spiral or any other pattern you prefer), leaving a 1-2 inch border of dough all around. Brush the sweet potato slices with melted coconut oil as you arrange them, in small sections, making sure that they are well oiled. Once arranged, generously sprinkle the sweet potato with sea salt and pepper, and another ½ tablespoon of chopped sage. Fold over the edges of the galette, working circularly, until the galette has a folded border. Brush the edges with melted coconut oil. Repeat this process with the second portion of the dough and remaining sweet potato and sage. Drizzle any leftover melted oil over the filling of both galettes. Trasnfer the baking sheet(s) to the oven and bake for about 45 minutes, until the potatoes are cooked through and golden. Remove the galettes from the oven, let them cool slightly, slice and serve with the magic green sauce (recipe below). 3.5.3226     Magic Green Sauce   Print Serves: about 1½ cups Ingredients 1 large or 2 small bunches of parsley - roughly chopped, including stems 7 or more sprigs of sage - roughly chopped, including stems ½ cup toasted pumpkin seeds 2 tablespoons lemon juice (from about half a lemon) ¼ cup olive oil 1 heaping tablespoon white miso generous pinch of red pepper flakes sea salt - to taste splash of red wine vinegar (optional) 1 clove garlic - roughly chopped (optional) Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a high-speed blender or a food processor until smooth. Keep the sauce refrigerated in an air-tight container, it will last for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Colour Wheel Wraps Peach and Raspberry Summer Tart and a Guest Post for Scandi Foodie Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso Caramel and Chocolate - Ice Cream Sund... Welcome Summer Multigrain Salad with Strawberries and Asparagus .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh

October 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Ally Walsh is a model and co-founder of Los Angeles-based organic coffee company, Canyon Coffee. Though we’ve never met, we love Ally’s easy-going approach to wellness, her beautiful instagram, and what her and her partner are doing over at Canyon. It’s an all-around girl crush :) In this interview, Ally tells us about her transition from a vegetarian diet to a feel-good, intuitive diet, the tonic she always takes before bed, the books she’s found to be instrumental to her well-being, exercise, beauty, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I love routine, but that probably has a lot do to with the fact that my schedule is constantly changing! I really enjoy my morning routine, waking up early and making coffee at home. But its always nice to switch things up and come back to that. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning.  I definitely try to ease into my morning. I used to grab my phone first thing when I woke up--now I keep it out of the bedroom. Instead, the first thing I do when I wake up (on a good day!) is sit upright and do a 20 minute meditation. To me, theres no better way to start off the day. Meditation is always followed by some Canyon Coffee. At home, I typically make a pour-over, which is another little opportunity to be mindful as I start my day. On a day off its so nice to sit outside on the porch with some friends and read and have coffee together. We get the New York Times delivered to our house on Sunday mornings and I could spend the whole day reading and relaxing outside in the sun. Its honestly one of my favorites things to do. If I’m shooting though, or out of town for a job, most days start early and end late. The schedule for modeling is often last minute--I sometimes dont know my schedule until the day or night before. In contrast, its nice to have Canyon, where I make my own schedule. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I make a glass of calm/­­magnesium before bed every night! I take that with me wherever I go--security always pull me aside at the airport to ask about what this white powder is ha :) Aside from magnesium, Ill sometimes make a warm tonic with some ashwaganda. And reading always helps me to fall asleep. I guess I wouldn’t call it a ritual, but I do love watching a show or movie before sleep, too. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast: I have a cup of black coffee and almond butter or avocado toast with gluten-free bread every morning. Im a creature of habit... I have my favorite go-tos, and Im happy eating them every day. If I have to work super early sometimes i like to make overnight chia seed oatmeal. Ill mix in some oats, chia seeds, almond milk, maca and flax seeds, and then in the morning top it off with some fruit and almond butter. Lunch:  Usually a salad with quinoa, avocado, kimchi, roasted seasonal vegetables, seeds, lemon and different oils like grapeseed, olive, and white wine vinegar. I would also be very happy with just roasted kabocha squash and pesto :) Snack: Cashews, pumpkin seeds, Dates and almond butter, green juice, avocado toast, and currently addicted to Honey Mamas Chocolate! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Well, it kind of comes with starting a coffee company ;) Some people are surprised to learn, though, that I only drink one cup of black coffee in the morning! Thats pretty much it. I cant do too much caffeine. Only on rare occasions, like when Im on vacation, will I have an afternoon espresso or cortado. I was in Copenhagen and Stockholm recently, and fell in love with oatmilk cortados! Definitely pushed my caffeine limit there! -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I honestly don’t! I love raw chocolate, but Im really sensitive to sugar! So Im kind of weird in that I really dont love sweets. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? In addition to magnesium at night (for sleep), Ill take ashwaganda at any time of the day for my adrenals, and probiotics daily. I feel such a difference when I take b12, too. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Yes. Yoga has been such an important practice to me, for years. I usually go to a class a couple times a week. I intersperse that with hiking in the Santa Monica mountains and walks on the beach. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I actually look forward to exercise. I dont really partake in any forms of exercise that arent enjoyable. For example, Ive never really gotten into spinning or boot camp-style workouts. I love getting out in nature for hikes, and I find an hour-and-a-half in the yoga studio to be very meditative. After a long work day, I really look forward to being able to do something nice for my body. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really think the most beautiful people are those that feel confident in their skin and are who they want to be--not what society expects them to be. Someone thats naturally comfortable in any setting. As a model, so much emphasis is put on the external, and thats important for a photograph or video. But in person, beauty really does come from within. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I think the most important thing for healthy skin is to eat and drink clean. Especially drinking lots of water. As for products, I use the most natural that I can find. I love Earth tu Face, True Botanicals, Osea and Linne! I use oils for moisturizing and just use water to wash my face in the morning. I love using Bodha and CAP Beauty rose water spray, too. Ill try to do a face mask once a week from Wildcare while taking a bath! Its very relaxing :) -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water! I also think getting a good night of sleep is just as important! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Stay hydrated. My mom is 59 & has the most beautiful skin – not one wrinklel! And she swears by drinking lots of water! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Im trying to get better at this, but acupuncture has been a life saver! Its a place to relax and reset. I see Maria at Elysia Life Care and she is life-changing! I think getting into a regular routine of acupuncture and meditation can help so much with stress. After having a consistent routine with both, you start to notice things that used to stress you or make you upset no longer have the same power or effect on you. You can laugh it off, or just observe it and not be affected by it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Going on a walk always helps. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Lycopene vitamin C packets, lots of ginger and tea tree oil (usually just put it in my water!) -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? This has been a learning process for me, how to balance everything. Modeling, Canyon Coffee, relationship with my partner, my friends, and time for myself. Especially with starting a company with your partner, that start-up grind can be all-consuming because theres always more work you can do! So weve had to learn how to turn off- and make sure to make time for a date night! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? My goal is to maintain a state of love (as opposed to state of stress, or lack, or anger, etc.). I was lucky to learn from a qi gong master named George Falcon for a couple years before he passed, and I feel like his teachings provided me with tools to help stay in this mindset throughout the stressors and obstacles of daily life. One of the big ones is to take responsibility for our actions and state of being. Its easy for us to blame, to say he, she, or it made me feel this way. But really its our decision. Of course, we sometimes fall out of that consciousness of love. When Im not feeling well, my first step is to take a break. To meditate, listen to a recorded guided meditation of George, go on a walk or a hike. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Ive made different changes throughout my life that have been substantial in terms of my wellness. I stopped eating meat when I was 19, then introduced fish (mainly salmon!) back in years later. Acupuncture has perhaps been the most substantial in helping me maintain balance and wellness. All of these changes or decisions are really informed by just listening to my body. You can get caught up in the mindset and identity of, say, Im vegan. But its important to check in with yourself and ask, Am I feeling good? Is this helping live a balanced and vibrant life? If not, then its important to make a change! -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. So many books! If I had to pick two, Id say Anatomy of the Spirit by Caroline Myss and Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert. Anatomy really opened me to the power of our bodies to heal and self-nourishment. It helped me connect my mental and spiritual state to my health and well-being. Its a book you can go back to, re-read and continue to learn from over time. Big Magic was instrumental in motivating me to start Canyon Coffee. It made me feel like I had more to give, creatively, and pushed me to start something with a greater purpose. It brought clarity to the creative process for me, breaking it down in a way that makes it approachable and applicable to my own life. Its one of those books that really inspires you to follow your dreams, and what could be more important for self-nourishment? Knowlegde -- You run Canyon Coffee together with your boyfriend, Casey. What was your path to starting your own coffee company? Personally, I was feeling uninspired. I felt like I wasnt making the most of my creativity and talents. Ive always been grateful for my modeling career, but I had also always wanted to start something of my own, and I was feeling that itch. Casey and I had both fallen in love with coffee over the years... through making it at home together and visiting coffee shops in our travels and around LA. Casey actually started working in the coffee industry, and we became friends with a roaster, James. Eventually, our passion for it grew to the point that we had the thought: why not start our own company? It really was a natural culmination. The moment we decided we wanted to do it, we just never looked back. -- What is your process when choosing beans for Canyon Coffee? Are there certain growing practices, flavor profiles, or geographical locations that are important to you? The universal practice of tasting different beans is called cupping. It involves preparing small roasted samples of different beans exactly the same way and trying them at the same time. For Canyon, our parameters narrow down our options. We usually decide on a country first, and then see what organic, seasonal beans grown at high altitudes are available through the network of importers near us in California. Then we order samples, cup, and choose the bean that smells and tastes best to us. High altitude is important because the elevation makes the coffee plant grow slower and put more energy into producing cherries. The slow growth results in cherries (and coffee beans) that are much more flavorful and vibrant. To start Canyon, we focused on Latin American coffees and wanted to find amazing-tasting beans in the chocolatey /­­ caramel flavor profile. We went with beans from Guatemala and Colombia first, because theyre known for these flavor profiles and they have great infrastructure for small coffee producers to process and export their beans. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love going to the movies :) And a nice dinner out before or after. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Anatomy of the Spirit .. anything from Krishnamurti & Ram Dass Song/­­Album – Paul Simon – Graceland, Feist – Let it Die, Lord Huron – Lonesome Dreams Movie – Beginners Piece of Art – Robert Lango Men In the Cities, Alfred Stieglitz’ Portraits of Georgia OKeeffe -- What are your favorite places to eat in LA? Gjusta/­­ Gjelina, Honey Hi, Amara Kitchen, Pace, Botanica, Necco, Destroyer, Erewhon -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Im actually in the process of moving out of my house right now! Were taking advantage of the end of our lease to do some traveling and try out living in some new neighborhoods. As a result, Im having to put a lot of my stuff in storage. Its been really nice to get rid of a lot of things and simplify to the essentials. But as far as traveling goes, I always have with me.. – new book and magazines – headphones – Jesse Kamm pants – Nikes – journal – Bodha rose water spray – probiotics – magnesium and ashwaganda  – sparkling water – ursa major rings – eye mask – almond butter packets -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Emily LAmi of Bodha, and Lacy Phillips at Free & Native! Both these women are a constant inspiration! You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Dijon Grilled Asparagus and Onions

May 29 2017 Meatless Monday 

Spring onions are grilled with asparagus spears for a smoky sweet flavor as well as a stunning presentation. Sliced shallots, white wine vinegar and Dijon mustard provide a savory contrast to season these delectable vegetables. This recipe comes to us from Kristina of Formerchef.com. Serves 8 For the Dijon vinaigrette: - 1/­­2 shallot, thinly sliced - 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar - 3 tablespoons olive oil - 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard - salt and pepper, to taste For the grilled asparagus and onions: - 1 pound asparagus spears, trimmed - 1 pound spring onions*, halved lengthwise - 1 tablespoon olive oil *Spring onions are sweet onion bulbs attached to greens found in farmers markets and the produce section of grocery stores in Spring and Summer.   To make the Dijon vinaigrette: Whisk the sliced shallot, vinegar, olive oil and Dijon mustard together in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper to taste. To complete the Dijon Grilled Asparagus & Onions: Preheat a grill to medium-high. Toss the trimmed asparagus and halved onions in a large bowl with the tablespoon of olive oil, taking care to ensure all ingredients are evenly coated. Place the asparagus spears and spring onions onto the heated grill, taking care to place the green portion of the spring onions on a cooler part of the grill. Grill, rotating every 2 minutes or so for about 6 minutes, or until the asparagus are tender. Plate the asparagus and onions on a large platter. Drizzle with the Dijon Vinaigrette, divide into 8 portions and enjoy! The post Dijon Grilled Asparagus and Onions appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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