whole grain - vegetarian recipes

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whole grain vegetarian recipes

Holiday Gift Ideas from Meatless Monday!

December 18 2017 Meatless Monday 

Holiday Gift Ideas from Meatless Monday!This holiday season, let Meatless Monday help you make your gift-giving a little bit easier. If you know someone who has been resolving to eat healthier or give something back to the planet, here are a few items to help them get started. Books: Reducetarian by Brian Kateman Perfect for someone who is hungry to find out more about why its a good idea to reduce meat consumption. Reducetarian contains over 70 essays by a group of experts and influential thinkers (including Meatless Monday founder Sid Lerner) who offer up several reasons why eating a more plant-based diet will save our health and the health of the planet. It also includes 40 meatless and reduced-meat recipes by Pat Crocker. MeatLess by Kristie Middleton As a senior food policy director at The Human Society of the United States, Middleton offers her expertise on reducing the amount of animal products you consume whether you are a passionate meat-lover or vegan-curious. MeatLess includes recipes, tips, swaps, and guidance on how to eat less meat and more plants. The Plant-Powered Diet by Sharon Palmer Palmers book encourages the shift towards plant-based meals by putting produce at the center of the plate. She shares a wealth of information about the benefits of whole grains, healthy fats, balanced nutrition, and seasoning with herbs and spices. Her book also debunks many common myths, asserting that its possible to get healthy food on the road and adequate protein from meatless meals. What the Fork Are You Eating? by Stefanie Sacks Long-time Meatless Monday friend Stephanie Sacks identifies the most offensive ingredients in our food and shows how we can cut (or at least minimize) them from our diets. The book is an overview of whats really in your food and contains an action plan with 50 delicious recipes. How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Completely Revised Tenth Anniversary Edition by Mark Bittman Mark Bittmans original How to Cook Everything Vegetarian was such a hit the first time around that the award-winning food writer decided it was time for an update. This fall, Bittman released a new edition which includes new recipes and information about the benefits of reducing meat consumption. 30-Minute Italian by Fabio Viviani The Top Chef Fan Favorite released a new cookbook this past spring that includes simple, meat-free meals with an Italian spin. If you know someone who wants to try Meatless Monday but is short on time, 30-Minute Italian is a great pick! PNW Veg by Kim O’Donnel As the author of two previously published vegetarian cookbooks, Kim ODonnel became curious about the bounty in her own backyard, the Pacific Northwest. While not a strict vegetarian herself, she was excited to find that it wasnt just easy to eat vegetarian in the land of the geoduck and the Dungeness crab, it was extraordinary. 28-Day Plant-Powered Health Reboot by Jessica Jones, MS, RD, CDE and Wendy Lopez, MS, RD Written by Registered Dietitians Jessica Jones and Wendy Lopez of the blog Food Heaven Made Easy, this new cookbook has four weeks of breakfasts, lunches, and dinners that are all purely plant-based. Made with health - and not dieting - in mind, Jones and Lopez outline a completely customizable menu of meals that put the focus on rebooting the body with balanced meals without animal proteins. Bowls of Goodness: Vibrant Vegetarian Recipes Full of Nourishment by Nina Olsson Food blogger Nina Olsson (Nourish Atelier) released Bowls of Goodness this year, a celebration of simple, delicious, and undeniably healthy meals in bowls, all of which are vegetarian. In addition to giving bowls a boost, Bowls of Goodness acknowledges the history of bowls tracing back to our most ancient human ancestors. And what better food to put in bowls than the healthiest, prettiest produce and grains? Love Thy Legumes by Sonali Suratkar Nutritionist and Johns Hopkins graduate Sonali Suratkar is using her first cookbook to celebrate legumes and educate people on how they may improve blood sugar, assist in weight loss, and ease the digestive system. With tons of recipes and beautiful pictures, Suratkar is sure to entice any reader curious about one of the healthiest plant-based food varieties! Read It Before You Eat It: Taking You from Label to Table by Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN If you ever wanted to take a registered dietary nutritionist with you when you went food shopping, this is the only book youll need. Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN provides easy-to-understand information about deciphering food labels and balancing your daily meals. When you go shopping for Meatless Monday, take this book with you to ensure that you only cook with the best ingredients. Delivery Services: Veestro While Veestro is a big hit with vegans and vegetarians, its hugely popular with people who still eat meat, making them an ideal delivery service for Meatless Monday. Introduce your friends and family to Veestro with a gift card so they can taste a new kind of fast dinner! HelloFresh Another health-focused delivery service with a vegetarian plan, HelloFresh is also offering gift cards so busy families looking for a plant-based change for dinner can try a meal before making a commitment to a subscription. GrubHub Do you know a takeout addict? Sometimes its great to have a prepared meal delivered fast. GrubHub provides easy delivery from vegetarian restaurants (and restaurants with vegetarian offerings). With a gift card, you can say Dinners on me on Meatless Monday. The post Holiday Gift Ideas from Meatless Monday! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

West African Vegetable Stew

October 31 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

West African Vegetable Stew This flavorful West African Vegetable Stew is especially good served over rice or couscous or with coarse whole grain bread. Like most stews, this one tastes even better the second day, so make it ahead. The crops of peanuts (or groundnuts), sweet potatoes (or yams), and okra can be found throughout western African countries, where stews such as this are often called groundnut stew. West African Vegetable Stew Brimming with vegetables, this flavorful stew is especially good served over rice or couscous or with coarse whole grain bread. - 1 tablespoon neutral vegetable oil or 1/­­4 cup water - 1 large yellow onion, chopped - 1 sweet potato, peeled and diced - 1 green bell pepper, chopped - 1 medium eggplant, diced - 1 cup sliced okra, fresh or frozen - 1 clove garlic, minced - 1 14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes, undrained - 1/­­2 cup peanut butter - 1 1/­­2 cups vegetable broth - 1/­­4 teaspoon cayenne, or to taste - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­8 teaspoon ground black pepper - Heat the oil or water in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, sweet potato, and bell pepper and cook for 5 minutes. Stir in the eggplant, okra, and garlic. Cover and cook 5 minutes longer, then stir in the tomatoes and cook for a few minutes. - In a small bowl, combine the peanut butter and broth, stirring until smooth. Stir the peanut butter mixture into the stew and season with cayenne, salt, and pepper. Simmer until the vegetables are tender, about 30 minutes. - For a thicker consistency, scoop out about 1 cup of the stew and puree it in a blender or food processor, then return it to the pot. From The Nut Butter Cookbook by Robin Robertson. (C)2014 Robin Robertson. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Lori Maffei.   The post West African Vegetable Stew appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Sweet Loren’s is the Perfect Dessert for Meatless Monday

September 11 2017 Meatless Monday 

Sweet Loren’s is the Perfect Dessert for Meatless MondayA healthy plant-based diet doesnt have to skip dessert! Loren Brill, founder of Sweet Lorens, built her cookie dough company on a healthy foundation. Her four all-natural cookie dough products contain no hydrogenated oils, no trans fats, no high fructose corn syrup, and no artificial flavors. What Sweet Lorens products do use are whole grains, natural sugar, and high-quality chocolate. Its a health-conscious way to treat yourself on Meatless Monday that wont sabotage your diet! Loren Brill The story of Sweet Lorens explains why Brill focused on using only the best ingredients in her products. After beating cancer, she became very conscious of the foods she ate and their ingredients. To ensure that her own products reflect her personal mission, she doesnt include anything she cant pronounce and sticks to simple, whole-food ingredients in her simple, clean recipes. Brill says: “At Sweet Loren’s, we are on a mission to change the way Americans bake and satisfy their sweet tooth. We’re excited to partner with Meatless Monday and promote our mission to eat better-tasting, better-for-you food while taking care of the Earth. I created a delicious dessert that will pair well with any meatless dinner.  Once a week, you can make a whole meal that is plant-based and completely indulgent!” Sweet Berry Crumble As an added bonus, Brill features additional ways to prepare her cookie dough if youre feeling more adventurous! Check out this video that uses Sweet Lorens new Gluten Free Chocolate Chunk cookie dough to make a guilt-free sweet berry crumble on Meatless Monday. Visit Sweet Lorens web site to see where you can find their products and dont forget to download their coupon for $1.00 off! The post Sweet Loren’s is the Perfect Dessert for Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Watermelon Panzanella

August 9 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Watermelon Panzanella Hey friends, this is Masha checking in with my (now annual) Woodstock, NY trip photos and a really good watermelon panzanella recipe that we cooked while there. My boyfriend and I went to Woodstock for the first time last summer and were completely enamored by its lush nature, chill swimming spots, and friendly small town vibe. We couldn’t wait to repeat the experience this year, and ended up staying at the same cottage in the woods for a weekend, which is perfect as far as we’re concerned. For our Saturday night dinner, we repeated the routine of shopping at Kingston Farmer’s Market in the morning and cooking dinner with all the bounty we found there at night. We made grilled pizzas and watermelon panzanella, and enjoyed the sweetest local blueberries together with Fruition chocolate for dessert. The panzanella turned out so lovely, and I couldn’t help but think how perfect it would be for any type of summer gathering or potluck. The inclusion of watermelon is a bit unexpected for panzanella, but it works so well in place of tomatoes and makes the salad extra cooling and hydrating. It’s also a pretty satisfying dish since it’s a bread salad, so it could be served as the prominent or only side at any summery event. I hope you’ll give it a try while August is in full swing! Below is a list of a few new-for-us places we visited and liked in Woodstock and around, but make sure to check out this post from last year for a more extensive list of things to do, if you’re looking to visit the area. Food Cucina – a modern Italian restaurant located in a beautiful farmhouse, serving dishes made with local and seasonal ingredients. I highly recommend getting a table on their wraparound porch, it’s stunning. Oriole 9 – a breakfast and lunch restaurant with an inspired menu and great specials. The coconut tofu hash was really good. Kimchee Harvest – sold at the Kingston Farmer’s Market on Saturdays. Really tasty kimchi made with unique ingredients. They have cucumber kimchi and rhubarb kimchi! I highly recommend getting the rhubarb one. Stuff to Do /­­ Visit High Falls Waterfall – a big waterfall with excellent swimming a bit downstream from the main fall, as well as cliff jumping. Zaborski Emporium – a huge, four story warehouse full of chaotically organized ‘architectural salvage.’ You kind of have to see it to believe it. A very impressive place to visit, especially if you are looking for a vintage door, sink, bathtub, stove, dishes, furniture and sooo much more. Candlestock – a shop full of every kind of candle and candle accessory imaginable. I’m especially into their beeswax candles. Tinker Toys – the coolest toy shop I’ve ever been too. Little to none of that bright-colored plastic, but a ton of educational games and toys for every age. It made shopping for Paloma’s birthday present a breeze. Watermelon Panzanella   Print Serves: 4-6 as a side Ingredients half of a small red onion - thinly sliced 2½ tablespoons apple cider vinegar - divided about 6 slices of crusty, whole grain sourdough bread - torn into bite-sized pieces 1/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil - divided 2 large garlic cloves - minced 1/­­2 teaspoon salt quarter of a medium-large watermelon - cubed 1 English cucumber - sliced into half-moons 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard handful of sprouts or microgreens handful of torn basil Instructions Place the onion into a small bowl and drizzle 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar over it. Set aside. Place the bread onto a covered baking tray, drizzle with 2 tablespoons of olive oil and sprinkle with the minced garlic and salt. Toast in the oven for 10-15 minutes, until the edges are golden. Combine the watermelon, cucumber and toasted bread in a large bowl. Whisk the remaining 1 1/­­2 tablespoons of the apple cider vinegar together with the Dijon mustard in a small bowl. Add the remaining 1/­­4 cup olive oil, whisking it until smooth. Pour the dressing over the salad and mix very well. Serve right away, garnished with sprouts/­­microgreens and basil. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Lemon Plum Salad with a Poppy Seed Dressing Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Spiced and Seeded Multigrain Loaf & A Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Watermelon Panzanella appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Step Up for Men’s Health Month this Meatless Monday

June 5 2017 Meatless Monday 

Step Up for Men’s Health Month this Meatless MondayWelcome to June: longer days, fresh garden veggies and Mens Health Month. If youre a man, this month is your yearly reminder to make sure youre healthy and fit. And if youre someone who cares about men, then this is your month to apply some friendly persuasion to make sure the guys in your life schedule a doctors appointment pronto - and maybe suggest a few changes to their eating habits. Lets dig in! Foods that Help Keep Men Healthy Show most men a juicy, fresh-grilled steak and watch their eyes light up. In fact, show some men a fast food drive-thru window and their mouths start watering. And its alright to treat yourself every now and again, but be warned. Overconsumption of meat (red and processed) as well as other unhealthy choices (fried foods, dairy and excessive alcohol drinking), can lead to serious health issues. These include heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, obesity and cancer. Now its no secret that fresh veggies, fruits, whole grains and nuts are a healthier way to go.  And you can always start with a few simple changes. For instance, begin with the classic fare thats always tasty and satisfying, but switch out the meat ingredient - like a hearty bean burrito or a rich meatless chili. Next, fire up that grill and serve some sizzling portabella mushrooms, roasted bell peppers and hot, juicy corn on the cob. And dont forget some zesty side dishes. How about a flavorful three bean salad drizzled with a tangy-sweet vinegar olive oil dressing? Before you know it, men will be eating healthier - and not missing the meat!   Wear Blue, Support Mens Health Mark your calendar. June 16th, the Friday before Fathers Day, is Wear BLUE Day. Break out your favorite blue jeans, blue shirt or stylish blue attire to show your support. Urge the men in your life to make healthy choices in diet, weight and exercise. And be sure they get checked out by a doctor for a clean bill of health. Lets make it a guys thing. And since were using blue to support Mens Health, heres one of our favorite blueberry recipes. Blueberry Oatmeal Muffins   The post Step Up for Men’s Health Month this Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mediterranean Diet Recipes -- Healthy and Delicious

May 18 2017 VegKitchen 

Mediterranean Diet Recipes -- Healthy and Delicious Healthy Mediterranean diet recipes are among the most delicious on the planet, filled with fresh produce and whole grains. And a great perk is that many classic dishes are naturally vegan -- not veganized -- making this group of cuisines perfect for the plant-based diet. The value of the Mediterranean diet has been borne out by […] The post Mediterranean Diet Recipes -- Healthy and Delicious appeared first on VegKitchen.

Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines

April 28 2017 My New Roots 

Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines Done is better than perfect. I cant tell you how many times I repeat this to myself on a daily basis, as a sort of mantra to soothe and convince the perfectionist inside me to just follow through. To just put it out there. I almost pushed publish on this blog post yesterday afternoon, but something was holding me back. Two things, in fact. First, the photos werent what I wanted them to be: they were on the boring side without a lot of colour, and not really inspiring. Second, the recipe itself just wasnt there. I was trying to make a vegan yogurt coating with coconut butter and although it was tasty, the texture was all wrong: chunky and gritty. Was it good enough? Probably. Would anyone have noticed what I saw as shortcomings? Probably not. But could I deal with it? Apparently, no. As I was putting the finishing touches on the post, it hit me like a bolt of lightening: I needed to use cashew butter to achieve the silky consistency I was after. Noooo! It was the solution I had been calling in, but to arrive at the witching hour just seemed cruel. How could I start all over at this point? Was I crazy to even try, considering I didnt know for sure that it would work out? With only minutes to make a decision, I hopped on my bike and cycled to the health food store. Again. Cursing myself, my brain, my ridiculous inability to know when to let go, and my insistence that what I put out in the world is my absolute best, really started to annoy me. I bought all the ingredients for the third time, raced home, and got to work. The cookies were the best theyd ever been. Perfect, in fact. But was it worth it? For anyone out there nodding their heads in recognition that they too, have these borderline masochistic tendencies to achieve an arbitrary portrait of perfection, may I ask what it is that drives us to create and then hold it all back if its not exactly what we imagined in our heads? Because nothing is perfect! When do we draw the line and just push publish? Is done really better than perfect? Because done for me it seems like settling for mediocrity a lot of the time. Even if its just a friggin cookie. Im not looking for answers here, just venting I suppose. But if you want to share your similar struggles, feel free in the comments. Its not often I open up or vent in this space, so maybe we can all throw a perfectionist party, and make sure to have these very perfect cookies on the table. Speaking of! Florentines are traditionally almond-centric biscuits, sometimes with the addition of dried fruit like cherries and orange zest, with a rich chocolate coating on the bottom. Because I really love dessert for breakfast, I was motivated to make a morning-appropriate version that wouldnt make me feel like a glutton. I chose to add some buckwheat to the mix since I love to start my day with whole grains, and swapped out the chocolate for a vanilla-cashew butter coating that I basically want to pour over my entire life. Like I mentioned, my original thought was to go with something yogurt-like, but once I made this saucy concoction, there was no need to pretend it was something else. Pure, divine, silky-smooth pleasure glaze! Ahem. I love these cookies because they are so simple to make with just a few ingredients, and incredibly fast. On my third testing, they were done - mixed, baked and glazed – in 20 minutes. If youre in a rush to get your treat fix, leave the cashew coating out of the equation, and youll still have a gorgeously tasty and satisfying little snack. As far as additions and flavours go, these wicked little morsels are kind of a blank slate. I made a couple batches with orange zest and one without. Personally, I really loved the citrusy warmth that the orange lends, and its nod to morning fodder, but you can also omit it for a more neutral taste. Instead, spice them up with cinnamon, cardamom, lemon zest, rose, lavender, coconut etc. I think adding cacao nibs would also be really delicious, as would dried blueberries, dried figs, or apricots. Whatever you choose to do, get ready to be very excited to get up in the morning. Couple these cookies with a turmeric latte, a piece of fruit and youll be good to go. Until 4 oclock when you want another one.     Print recipe     Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines Makes 12 Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 90g raw buckwheat groats 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70g slivered almonds (or sunflower seeds) 1/­­3 cup /­­ 45g almond meal 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup a couple pinches sea salt zest of 1 organic orange, optional Vanilla Cashew Coating: 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml cashew butter 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml coconut oil 1 Tbsp. pure maple syrup seeds from 1 vanilla bean pinch sea salt Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. Line a rimmed cookie sheet with baking paper. 2. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast buckwheat until golden, about 3 minutes. Transfer buckwheat to a mixing bowl to cool. In the same skillet toast the slivered almonds until golden, about 2 minutes. Transfer them to the bowl of buckwheat to cool, add the almond meal and stir to combine. 3. In the same skillet (no need to wash) over low heat, melt the coconut oil and add the orange zest, if using. Turn off the heat and whisk in the maple syrup and salt. Pour the liquid over the buckwheat and almond mixture and fold to combine. Do not wash the skillet. 4. Using a tablespoon measure, scoop out the florentine cookie mixture and set each one on the lined baking sheet with plenty of space in between (I baked these in 2 batches of six). Using the back of the spoon, flatten the cookies out a little. Place in the oven and bake for 7-10 minutes until the edges are golden and bubbly. Remove from oven and let cool for about 5 minutes. Transfer to a cooling rack and repeat with remaining mixture. 5. While the florentines are baking, make the cashew coating. Melt the coconut oil in the same skillet over low heat, then add the cashew butter and stir well to combine. Once melted, add the vanilla bean and maple syrup. Stir well and turn off the heat. 6. Once the florentines have cooled, make sure that the cashew coating is still liquid. Spoon a couple teaspoons on the bottom of each cookie and spread it as evenly as possible. Place on a lined baking sheet, coating side up in the fridge or freezer to set. Once firm, repeat with remaining coating, except this time place the coating side down on the lined baking sheet. Place in the fridge or freezer to set, then enjoy! Store leftovers in the fridge or freezer in a tightly sealed container for up to two weeks. Once I started editing the new photos for this post, I realized that the last batch of Florentines werent as golden, or as flat as the previous batches. I decided to let that one go. And Im very proud of that. *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Copenhagen! Just a reminder about my first two cookbook events in CPH this Spring. The first will be an intimate talk and demonstration at SLOW Copenhagen, and the second will be a magical, celebratory dinner in collaboration with the local, organic grocer and kitchen, Kost. Click on the images for more info and tickets! Cant wait to see you there.  The post Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines appeared first on My New Roots.

Green Skillet Pizza with Asparagus and Pesto

April 20 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Green Skillet Pizza with Asparagus and Pesto We enjoyed this pizza the other day, but wanted to hold off one more week before posting it here, until things got truly springy for most of you in the Northern hemisphere. Then some stuff didnt work out with this weeks scheduled recipe, so pizza it is. Im the type of person that has to have everything laid out ahead of time, and get overly stressed when things dont go according to plan. At the same time, I sometimes find it helpful to run into those plan-ruining situations, deal with them, and come out on the other side with the realization that none of it was as bad as I was making it out to be. Might as well exercise that muscle whenever we can, because how often do things in life actually go as planned? Just a note to self here, but thought it could serve as a nice reminder, in case someone out there is also dealing with a minor frustration and having trouble seeing any sort of bright side. To the pizza! One of my favorite weeknight-friendly recipes that weve ever posted is this lemony millet polenta from last spring. Its easy to make, requires some of the most affordable and modest ingredients, and the final result is outright delicious. I worked on a lot of alternative skillet pizza crust ideas for our second cookbook, ones made with vegetables and whole grains instead of flour, and since then, quick skillet pizzas have become a dinner staple in our house. When I was recently making the aforementioned millet polenta, I had the realization that, with some adjustments, the polenta would make for another great gluten-free skillet pizza crust. And it really did! The pizza is topped with a quick kale pesto, but you can use pretty much any pesto here, if you happen to have some on hand. Following the pesto, a mound of everything bright, fresh and springy – asparagus ribbons and tips, a ton of fresh greens and microgreens. Our fam has no problem consuming the whole thing in one sitting, but the leftovers keep well, in case you are more restrained. We also put together a step-by-step video (above), where you can see that the process is pretty quick and very satisfying. Enjoy :) Green Skillet Pizza with Asparagus and Pesto   Print Serves: one 9-10 inch pizza Ingredients for the crust 1 cup millet - soaked in purified water overnight 1 tablespoon ghee or neutral coconut oil, plus more for oiling the skillet juice of 1 lemon 3 cups warm vegetable broth sea salt 1 teaspoon garlic powder freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup ground flax seeds for the pesto ½ cup almonds - soaked in purified water overnight 1 garlic clove sea salt about 3 cups roughly chopped kale juice of ½ lemon ½ cup olive oil for the pizza 1 bunch asparagus sea salt freshly ground black pepper neutral coconut oil or olive oil for drizzling topping options fresh salad greens microgreens nutritional yeast hemp hearts Instructions to make the crust Drain and rinse the millet and place it in a food processor. Grind until partially broken down. In a medium saucepan, warm up the ghee/­­oil over medium heat. Add the millet and stir to coat. Add lemon juice and stir until absorbed, for about 30 seconds. Add the broth, salt, garlic powder and black pepper, and bring to a boil while stirring. Lower the heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Mix in the flax and simmer for another 10 minutes, until creamy. Stir frequently to prevent clumping. Oil a 9-10-inch cast iron skillet or another heavy bottomed oven-proof pan. Evenly spread the millet over the bottom to make the crust. Refrigerate for 30 minutes to let set. to make the pesto Drain and rinse the almonds, optionally slip them out of their skins and rinse again. Add the almonds, garlic and salt to a food processor and grind into rice-sized pieces. Add the kale and lemon, and grind into pesto. With the motor still running, slowly add in the oil through the funnel. to make the pizza Preheat oven to 450° F (230° C). Bake the millet crust for 20 minutes. Cut the tough ends off the asparagus sprigs and discard them. Shave the sprigs into ribbons with a veggie peeler. Reserve the leftover, unshaved parts and cut them into bite-sized pieces. Remove the crust from the oven and evenly spread the kale pesto over it (you may have some leftovers). Pile the asparagus ribbons and pieces on top of the pesto. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, drizzle with oil and place under the broiler, on the low setting, for another 10 minutes. Remove from the oven, and let cool slightly before topping with greens and microgreens, if using. Optionally, garnish with nutritional yeast and hemp hearts, slice and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Carrot Cake (vegan & gluten free)

April 6 2017 Veganpassion 

Carrot Cake (vegan & gluten free) Spring is spoiling us and I'm enjoying it to the fullest. Soon we'll be searching egg alternatives between the grasses because it's easter time *yaaay!!!* As a spring treat I created a carrot cake. Gluten free and without any refined sugars it's full of flavours: from buckwheat, to hazelnuts, carrot, bananas and caramelized coconut sugar! What a celebration :-) The cake consists of a biscuit and a coconut cream and it's prepared very quick. If you don't like coconut you can use vegan whip cream if you like and garnish it with hazelnuts. Makes one cake with 18 cm diameter. For the biscuit: 1/­­3 cup + 1 tbsp. rice whole grain flour 1/­­3 cup buckwheat flour 1/­­4 cup hazelnuts, grounded 1 tbsp. starch 4 tbsp. coconut sugar 1 pinch xanthan or tapioca starch 1 tsp. bicarb each 1 pinch cinnamon and vanilla 1 banana 1 small carrot 2 tbsp. + 2 tsp. plant based baking oil 1/­­2 cup dairy free milk 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar 2 tbsp. maple sirup Preheat oven to 338°F (170°C) air circulation. In a mixing bowl, mix together rice whole grain flour, buckwheat flour, hazelnuts, starch, coconut sugar, xanthan and bicarb. Add vanilla and cinnamon. Mash the banana with a fork and grate the carrot. Add banana, carrot with oil, dairy free milk, vinegar and maple sirup to the flour mixture and mix until the dough is smooth. Mix with a egg beater but not to long so the dough stays fluffy. Grease a springform and fill in the dough. Bake at 338°F air circulation for 25-30 minutes. Take the form out of the oven and let it cool off. For the coconut cream: 2 cans of coconut milk (refrigerated for at least 8! hours) or 3/­­4 cup + 1 tbsp. whip cream 2-4 tbsp. maple sirup 1 pack stabilizer for whipping cream coconnut chips. hazelnuts daisys Take the coconut milk out of the refrigerator and take the fatty cream from the top. You can use to coconut water to create some delicious Currys. Take the stabilizer for whip cream and cream it with a mixer. Fold in the maple sirup. Take the biscuit out of the springform carefully and cut it in two small flan cases. Use the lower one and put it on a cooling rack and spread 2-3 tbsp cream ob it. Put the second flan case on top and spread the rest of the cream on it and around it. Garnish the cake with coconut chips, hazelnuts and daisys. The cake can be stored in the fridge for 3-4 days. Have lots of fun with baking and enjoy!

Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways

March 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Quick Blender Pancakes, Three WaysThis post was created in partnership with Revol. So excited to share this recent discovery with you today. If you follow us on instagram, you may have seen me posting an abnormal number of pancake photos recently. That would be because Ive been cooking some variation of blender pancakes almost every morning for the past couple of weeks. Seriously obsessed. Blender pancakes start out with whole grains instead of flour, which get soaked overnight in purified water. Soaking not only softens the grains and makes them more blend-able, but also awakens the life within each individual grain and rids them of phytic acid, making them more bioavailable and easier to digest. You could use a number of grains here, but I find raw buckwheat to be the perfect neutral base. Buckwheat is also incredibly nutritious, and is actually not a grain at all, but a fruit/­­berry of the buckwheat plant (related to rhubarb!). In the morning, simply combine your soaked grains with a liquid and other add-ins in a blender, whirl everything into a smooth batter and you are ready to fry up your pancakes. Its all super quick, easy and so tasty, and there is a lot of room to get creative, too. The whole process kind of reminds me of making a smoothie because the flavor combo possibilities are endless, and because you can just throw a bunch of ingredients into the blender and expect totally delicious results (almost) every time. I offer three of my favorite flavor combinations here, two sweet and one savory. The orange, sweet potato pancakes are subtly sweetened with maple syrup and jazzed up with spices. They are hearty, warming, and very kid-friendly. The green ones are flavored with matcha and studded with sesame seeds that add tiny pops of crunch throughout. Matcha is the star in this variation, youll be able to taste its lovely, grassy and sweet notes very well. The pink, savory pancakes, combine beet with spices, ginger and greens, making them a great option for those who favor a non-sugary breakfast. I love them with our avocado mayo, but you can employ pretty much any one of your favorite, creamy sauces as an accompaniment. Whichever variation you try, you will love how easily they come together and how forgiving the recipes are in terms of add-ins. I know by now youve noticed the beautiful plates/­­cups /­­enamel board in the photos. They are from Revol, a French cookware and bakeware brand with a newly launched website. They sent me a few items of my choice from their Color Lab and Crumple collections, and I was blown away by the quality of their wares. The half-glazed dinner plates are handmade in France and feel incredibly sturdy. They stack up perfectly when you store them in the cupboard and are just a true pleasure to eat off of. I couldnt resist the pink crumple cups because they are adorable, and because I was missing vessels of that size in my kitchen. They are the ideal size for espresso or cappuccino, if thats your thing, but I will be using them for my occasional morning ginger-turmeric shots. The little cheese plate/­­presentation board is hand-dipped in enamel, and will make for a perfect snack board at any get-together. All the pieces are refined and minimal, yet they still feel warm and welcoming, and you can definitely sense the hand in all of them. Everything is oven and dishwasher safe, too, so there’s a perfect balance of beauty and utility. Spiced Sweet Potato Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 12 pancakes Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato coconut oil for roasting sweet potato and frying ¾ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight 1 tablespoon sesame tahini or other nut/­­seed butter 1 cup almond milk or water 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar ½ teaspoon baking powder pinch of sea salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg 4 cardamom pods - green shells removed (optional) ½ teaspoon ground ginger (optional) 1 tablespoon maple syrup, plus more for serving 1 tablespoon ground flax or chia seeds (optional) 2 tablespoons hemp seeds (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 400°F (200° C). Prick the sweet potato with a fork several times and place it on a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Roast for 40-50 minutes or until tender throughout. Let cool, then peel. Alternatively, peel the sweet potato and roughly chop it into cubes. Place onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray and roast for 30-40 minutes, until tender. Mash the sweet potato pieces a bit with a fork when you are measuring out 1 cup of the flesh in the next step. Drain the buckwheat over a colander and rinse very well. Combine it with 1 cup sweet potato flesh, sesame tahini, almond milk/­­water, apple cider vinegar, baking powder, salt, spices and maple syrup in an upright blender, and blend until smooth. Add flax/­­chia and hemp seeds, if using, pulse to combine. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan and spread each one out slightly with the back of a spoon, into roughly a 4-inch pancake. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with fresh fruit, maple syrup/­­honey, yogurt and/­­or cacao nibs. These pancakes are best eaten fresh, but you can also reheat them on low temperature in the oven or toaster, in case you have leftovers. 3.5.3226 Matcha Sesame Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 8 pancakes Ingredients ½ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight ½ cup almond milk or water 1 teaspoon matcha powder 1-2 tablespoons maple syrup, plus more for serving 1 tablespoon sesame seeds (I used black) Instructions Drain the buckwheat over a colander and rinse very well. Combine it with almond milk/­­water, matcha, and maple syrup in an upright blender, and blend until smooth. Add sesame seeds and pulse on low to mix the seeds into the batter. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 more minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with more sesame seeds, coconut flakes, fresh fruit, maple syrup/­­honey, yogurt, etc. These pancakes are best eaten fresh, but you can also reheat them on low temperature in the oven or toaster, in case you have leftovers. 3.5.3226 Savory Beet Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 9 pancakes Ingredients ½ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight ½ cup whole sorghum groats or more buckwheat/­­barley/­­quinoa etc. - soaked in purified water overnight ½ small cooked beet 1 tablespoon sesame tahini ½ cup water 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon tamari or more to taste ½-inch piece ginger ¼ teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon cumin ⅛ teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon chia or flax seeds (optional) 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast (optional) 1 tablespoon dulse (optional) large handful chopped spinach/­­kale leaves or small handful sliced scallions avocado mayo - for serving (optional) Instructions Drain and rinse the buckwheat and sorghum very well. Combine the grains with the beet, sesame tahini, water, apple cider vinegar, tamari, ginger, baking powder, smoked paprika, cumin, red pepper flakes, and chia/­­flax, nutritional yeast, dulse, if using, in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Add chopped spinach/­­kale/­­scallions and pulse to mix in. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan and spread each one out slightly with the back of a spoon, into roughly a 4-inch pancake. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with avocado mayo/­­plain yogurt/­­any sauce of choice and more sliced scallions. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Ziti with Chipotle Lentil Tomato Sauce

March 10 2017 Vegan Richa 

Ziti with Chipotle Lentil Tomato Sauce25 Minute Weeknight Pasta. Ziti with Chipotle Lentil Tomato Sauce. Smoky Chipotle and lentils in the pasta sauce make it a flavorful and filling meal. Vegan Soyfree Recipe. Easily glutenfree with GF pasta. This weeknight Pasta is a breeze to put together. Cook the pasta of choice, simmer the sauce and lentils all together with herbs and a chipotle chili pepper in adobo sauce(smoky and hot!). Toss and serve. You can add some seasonal veggies to this pasta like some garlic roasted asparagus, carrots, or roasted brussels. And yes that’s mint in the photos, it should be basil   Serve this with some gf garlic rolls or whole grain rolls.  and Definitely make a double batch! Whats your favorite weekday red sauce pasta?Continue reading: Ziti with Chipotle Lentil Tomato SauceThe post Ziti with Chipotle Lentil Tomato Sauce appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Soft Whole Wheat Dinner Rolls with Tanzhong starter

February 27 2017 Vegan Richa 

Soft Whole Wheat Dinner Rolls with Tanzhong starterSoft Whole Wheat Dinner Rolls. Moist and soft Whole wheat Rolls 100% Whole grain rolls with Tangzhong starter. Use as Wheat Buns for Burgers or Sliders. Vegan Whole Grain Dinner Rolls. Soy-free Palm Oil-free Recipe These rolls are 100% Whole grain and so soft and do not taste like cardboard or dirt! Based off my 100% Whole wheat bread, the rolls have additional help in moisture from the tangzhong (roux), Tangzong starter breads or milk breads are often the softest breads. Tangzhong along with the sponge are the secret to perfectly moist Whole Grain Rolls.  The flavor of these rolls is very dependent on the whole grain flour used. Often the flour goes rancid or is starting to go rancid depending on when the grains were processed. Breads with combination of whole and all purpose/­­white flour have a milder flavor. In all whole grain baked goods that are sweet or savory, the flavors take over the whole grain flavor and work well. In a bread that is just whole grain flour, water and yeast, the grain flavor comes through very strong. It is the least strong in freshly baked bread and gets stronger (bitter or rancid) as it sits. You can also use aquafaba for additional moisture in these. These rolls are best served fresh and warm.  These rolls can be made ahead (refrigerated or frozen, then thawed and baked). For soft Gluten-free dinner rolls, see these. I generally use some whole grain spelt with the wheat or a combination of regular whole wheat which is red wheat flour, and white whole wheat which is flour of winter white wheat. Combination flours help with the flavor and texture. It looks like a long process, but its mostly rest and rise time and bake time with just 15- 20 mins active.  Continue reading: Soft Whole Wheat Dinner Rolls with Tanzhong starterThe post Soft Whole Wheat Dinner Rolls with Tanzhong starter appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Curcuma Semolina with Berries

December 20 2016 Veganpassion 

Curcuma Semolina with Berries Hey guys! While preparing my christmas menus I want to introduce you to this delightful dessert: a curcuma-pumpkin semolina with red berries. The title is a little bit long that's why I call it curcuma semolina with berries. It tastes fantastic and it's suitable for breakfast as well because it ist all natural and without any refinded sugar. It is made out of whole grain semolia. I wish you lots of fun with cooking this dessert and maybe it fits perfect into the choice of your christmas menu. Makes 4 portions. Ingredients: 250 g hokkaido pumpkin (220 g seedless) 100 ml orange juice 100 ml non-dairy-milk (almond milk) 600 ml non dairy-milk (almond milk) 150 g whole spelt semolina 1 heaped tsp. curcuma latte (spice mixture) 80-100 g maple sirup 2 tbsp. cocoa A pinch of cinnamon, vanilla and salt 200 g mixed red berries 1 pomegranate Remove seeds from hokkaido pumpkin and cut it in small pieces. Let it cook in orange juice with closed lid for about 10 minutes until it is done. Mash it up with 100 ml non-dairy-milk. Then add more milk and semolina and let it cook for 2-5 minutes and stir up meanwhile. Add curcuma, maple sirup and spices. Split semolina pudding in half and add cocoa to one half. Spice and sweeten it some more if you like. Put both semolina pudding halfs in a glass and put in layers on top of the other. Serve with pomegranate and berries.

6 Delicious Heart-Healthy Foods

September 29 2016 VegKitchen 

6 Delicious Heart-Healthy Foods Contributed by Sameer Ather, MD, PhD. Heart disease and stroke affect men and women alike all over the world, deadlier than all cancers combined - according to the latest findings in the medical field. Of course, such terrible illnesses can be prevented if we cut down smoking and drinking alcohol and if we manage to get enough sleep.

Creamy, Garlicky Fettuccine with Roasted Green Vegetables

July 6 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Creamy, Garlicky Fettuccine with Roasted Green Vegetables Here’s a true weeknight dinner scenario. I found some leftover raw broccoli and green beans while cleaning out the fridge the other day, and decided to roast them up to extend their shelf life and work them into salads and bowls throughout the week. I love how roasting transforms both of those vegetables from something quite boring to savory and special. The very next day, they made it into this very easy, creamy green pasta that I spontaneously threw together. It exceeded my expectations and got my eight year old devouring both green beans and broccoli, which is a huge triumph in my book. She was even impressed enough to suggest that I share the recipe on the blog, so here I am :) Paloma is a pretty good eater as far as kids her age go. She eats most leafy salads, loves to munch on raw carrots and apples, and could easily devour a certain teff polenta of mine for breakfast, lunch and dinner. When it comes to things like broccoli and green beans (and mushrooms!) though, she is your typical, picky eight year old. If anything of the sort makes it onto her plate, she begins the meal with diplomatic negotiations about how she will eat this, but not that, and what sort of dessert she will be getting as a reward. We do have a rule that she has to try everything before refusing it, which is what got her with this pasta. In this recipe, the noodles are cooked in a creamy mixture of coconut milk and veggie broth, and jazzed up with some garlic and miso, while the caramelized, roasted vegetables get mixed in and slathered in all that creamy goodness as well. This preparation makes the otherwise tame green veggies into something irresistible, as proven by my kid’s enthusiasm. It’s also just a really great, easily customizable weeknight recipe. The roasted green beans and broccoli can be replaced by any other roasted vegetables, and you can play around with the addition of other types of greens, herbs and spices. I hope you’ll give this one a try :) Creamy, Garlicky Fettuccine with Roasted Vegetables   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the vegetables 1 small head of broccoli - cut into florets about 8 oz green beans - strings removed, if present 3 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or other oil of choice 3 garlic cloves - minced sea salt freshly ground black pepper for the pasta 1 13.5 oz can unsweetened Thai coconut milk or 1½ cups almond milk 2 cups vegetable broth sea salt freshly ground black pepper pinch of red pepper flakes 10 oz whole grain fettuccine 2 tablespoons miso paste 2 tablespoons vegetable broth or coconut/­­almond milk about 3 cups spinach (optional) 2-3 garlic cloves - minced juice of ½ lemon 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast (optional) handful parsley leaves - chopped handful basil leaves - torn (optional) Instructions to roast the vegetables Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Line a rimmed baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper and place the broccoli and green beans on the sheet. Drizzle the vegetables with the oil, sprinkle with minced garlic, salt and pepper, and toss with your hands, making sure to coat the vegetables thoroughly with the oil. Roast for 20 minutes, or until soft and golden in places, turning the baking sheet at half time. to cook the pasta While the vegetables are roasting, combine the milk, vegetable broth, salt, pepper and red pepper flakes in a wide saucepan and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Add the pasta and simmer until al dente, according to the time on the package. Add more broth/­­milk if needed. While the pasta is cooking, combine 2 tablespoons each miso paste and veggie broth/­­milk in a small bowl and mix until smooth. When the pasta is done, remove it from the heat and mix in the spinach to wilt it, if using. Add in the miso mixture, garlic, lemon juice and nutritional yeast, if using, and stir to incorporate. Mix in the roasted vegetables and herbs. Enjoy right away. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones

May 25 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones This post was created in partnership with Bob’s Red Mill. When I was writing my first cookbook four years ago, I was completely infatuated with developing gluten-free baking recipes and baking almost every day. More than that, I was really into making my own flours (by blending whole grains in my Blendtec), and mixing my own gluten-free flour blends. I am one of those crazy people that enjoys making everything from scratch, but I also did all of those things out of necessity, since there were no high-quality gluten-free flour blends out on the market. Things have really changed since then! Health food stores are now flooded with all kinds of exotic flours and flour blends, which makes me a little less compelled to make my own. I still do from time to time, but I feel comforted by the fact that I can pick up a gluten-free flour blend in the store and whip up some tasty scones without getting messy with the blender and tons of jars. I should add that I don’t have a gluten sensitivity, but a few people I like to share scones with do, and I also just really love the challenge that gluten-free baking presents. I’ve been baking with Bob’s Red Mill 1 to 1 Gluten Free Baking Flour and can confidently say that it’s the best pre-mixed gluten-free flour blend I’ve tried. The blend was formulated to substitute wheat flour in baking recipes in exact amounts, which makes it super easy to use if you ever want to try your hand at a gluten-free version of your favorite recipe. These blueberry lemon scones are my favorite thing I’ve made with the flour so far. I’ve tested three batches, and each one has disappeared within a day, with the help of friends and family. They are a true crowd pleaser, and make for a satisfying little breakfast or dessert. Slightly crisp on the outside and nice and crumbly inside, with pockets of blueberries, and a sweet and tangy lemon ‘glaze.’ There’s a lovely zing from lemon zest throughout, and they are pretty low maintenance in terms of preparation, as scones should be. I hope you’ll give them a try :) Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones   Print Serves: 8 scones Ingredients for the scones ½ cup unsweetened almond milk ½ tablespoon apple cider vinegar ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons gluten free rolled oats 1½ cups 1 to 1 gluten free flour blend ¼ cup plus 1 tablespoon coconut sugar, plus more for sprinkling on top 2 teaspoons baking powder pinch of sea salt zest of 2 organic lemons, divided ¼ cup neutral coconut oil - scoopable, at room temperature ½ cup pistachios - chopped, plus more for garnish 1½ cup fresh or frozen (not thawed) blueberries ¼ cup aquafaba (water from a can of chickpeas or other beans) 1 teaspoon vanilla extract for the glaze ¼ cup cashew butter 1½ tablespoons maple syrup or honey ¼ teaspoon turmeric - for color juice of 1 lemon Instructions to make the scones Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a baking sheet by covering it with a piece of parchment paper. Combine the almond milk and apple cider vinegar in a small bowl and set aside to make a vegan buttermilk. Pulse the rolled oats several times in a high speed blender or food processor to grind them partially. Combine the oats with the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt and ⅔ the amount of the lemon zest in a medium bowl, toss to mix thoroughly. Add coconut oil and work it into the flour mixture with a fork until mostly mixed in, with some small clumps remaining. Add the pistachios and blueberries, toss to combine. Make a well in the center, add the buttermilk, aquafaba and vanilla, and mix to combine. Take care not to overwork the batter. Transfer the batter to a floured surface and use your hands to form a disk about 1-inch thick. Cut into 8 wedges with a floured knife. Transfer the wedges onto the prepared baking sheet with a spatula or a pie server. Sprinkle some coconut sugar on top of each scone. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until the edges are golden and crispy. Let cool and drizzle with the glaze (recipe follows), sprinkle with the rest of the lemon zest and pistachios. to make the glaze In a small bowl, combine the cashew butter with the maple syrup and turmeric, mix until smooth. Add lemon juice and whisk until shiny and smooth, add more lemon juice or water if the glaze seems too thick. Drizzle over the scones and enjoy. Notes I learned from Minimalist Baker that coconut oil works best in vegan scones when its not in a frozen or a liquid state, but in between those two and scoopable, the way its sold in grocery stores from. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Asparagus Protein Pancakes

May 3 2017 Veganpassion 

Asparagus Protein Pancakes Have you guys ever tried asparagus with pancakes? Delicious! To it a light and creamy sauce....yumm! I'm really into flours from different legumes.Green pea flour, red lentil flour or chickpea flour are so good in a sponge mixture. You can get a nutty taste with pumpkin seeds flour. Try it out! Makes 4 Portions. Preparation time: 30 miuntes For the pancakes: 1 1/­­2 cup legumes flour 1 1/­­2 cup whole spelt flour 1 tsp. baking soda salt 2 1/­­2 cup water oil for baking In a mixing bowl mix both flours, baking powder and salt. Stir in the water and let it stand for 10 minutes. For the veggies: 17 oz asparagus 10 oz champignon 1/­­2 leek 2 tbsp oil salt, pepper, nutmeg Peel off the lower thrid of the asparagus and cut off a size of a thumb. Cook it for 10-12 minutes. Cut the champignons and leek in slices. Heat oil in a pan and roast the veggies and spice it. For the creme: 2 tbsp oil 2 tbsp whole grain flour 1 1/­­2 + 2 tbsp oat milk 1 tbsp apple vinegar salt, pepper, nutmeg a bunch of lemon balm Heat the oil in a pot and stir in flour. While stiring add half of the oat milk. Chop the lemon balm and stir into the sauce. Add the other half of the sauce and spice it. Serve pancakes, veggies and cream and enjoy!

12 Best Brown Rice Recipes

April 27 2017 VegKitchen 

12 Best Brown Rice Recipes VegKitchen readers love brown rice for its versatility, and its superior nutrition profile as compared to white rice. And while there are more whole grains to choose from today -- quinoa, farro, spelt, and others -- brown rice seems to hold its own as a favorite staple. It’s inexpensive (especially bought in bulk) and so […] The post 12 Best Brown Rice Recipes appeared first on VegKitchen.

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus

April 7 2017 My New Roots 

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus The first job I landed after moving to Copenhagen, was working as a chef in a little cafe. After a few weeks of consistently not burning lasagna and under seasoning everything, I was asked if I was interested in cooking on a few episodes on a local, public TV station. The producers suggested I choose a few dishes that I love, and filmed me in a friends kitchen, since mine was too small. My husband gently warned me beforehand that Danes dont respond well to overly-enthusiastic, hyperbolic Americans, so I faked it and was awkwardly not myself as I spoke lukewarmly about whole grains and beans, fermented things and dark leafy greens. The first recipe I made on the show was sprouted hummus, and although the recipe turned out well, I felt like a fraud. Because above all things, sprouts were, and still are, my true love. The show was on at 2 or 3 in the morning, and because I didnt have a television, I never actually saw it on air. Instead, I watched it on my computer on a borrowed CD, long after it had been on TV. Much to my dismay, the producers titled the show Cooking with Sareh, which still baffles me considering the fact that my name is spelled the exact same way in Danish. The program was poorly edited, badly lit, awkward in every sense, and in my attempts to come off as cool and nonchalant, I seemed utterly bored as I fondled chickpea sprouts - something that otherwise would get me pretty riled up. On the whole, this experience was totally mortifying, except for one small, redeeming factor. I was suddenly being recognized at work in the café, and on the bike paths of Christiania: hey sprout girl! theyd call at me. Its you! I didnt make your hummus, but your show is great, sprout girl, theyd say. If there was any consolation, this was it. I was Sprout Girl. So in case you missed my break out performance on Cooking with Sareh, and my reined-in, lackluster pitch about sprouts, here it is again. Because I am Sprout Girl forever and always. Sprouting is like any other kitchen endeavour: it seems pretty daunting until you actually do it, then youre left wondering what took you so long to try – a real facepalm moment. With simple equipment that you most likely have in your cupboard, and seeds that you already have in your pantry, its a fun and empowering practice that brings you one step closer to your food. Sprouts are so nutritious because they are life potential, ignited. When we soak a seed, we end its dormancy, and awaken the nutrition inside it needed to grow a plant which will in turn make more seeds and more plants. When we eat a sprout, we eat this potential! Pound for pound, sprouts have the largest amount of nutrients of any food. Did you get that? This is a big deal! And its all because sprouting increases vitamin content significantly, especially vitamin A, Bs, C and E, along with boosting calcium, iron, selenium, and zinc. The quality of protein and carbohydrates improves, as the sprouting process begins to break down the complex proteins and starches into amino acids, peptides, and simple carbohydrates needed by the seed to grow. At the same time, anti-nutrients such as phytic acid, protease and amylase inhibitors are neutralized. This makes a sprout very easy to digest with highly absorbable nutrients. Who is responsible for this influx of awesomeness? Its enzymes! Enzymes are compounds found in raw plants that are needed for nearly every biochemical process that takes place in our body, and something many of our modern diets are lacking. Sprouts are virtually loaded with them. There are up to 100 times more enzymes in sprouts than uncooked fruits and veggies! Enzymes are also what sets living food apart from raw food. Yes, raw foods still offer us enzymes, but eating a food that is alive guantees more enzymes, and in fact more nutrients altogether. As soon as a food is picked, it begins losing its nutrients. Imagine how much vitamin C is left in that orange, which has traveled hundreds, if not thousands of kilometers to get to your plate, and spent weeks, if not months in a storage facility before being dropped off at your local grocer. Sprouts are the remedy to this, pulsating with life and life-giving nutrients, and pretty much the freshest food you can eat outside of a garden. Sprouts are also incredibly low in calories, yet deliciously filling due to their high fiber and water content. A fantastic food to binge on, especially if youre trying to elbow out some of the other stuff from your diet. I love the versatility of sprouts, not only are there so many varieties, but they can be used in so many ways. Like this hummus for example! You can also go classic and top your sandwiches with sprouts, or fold them into grain salads, puree them into soups and even smoothies. I also love freshening up cooked dishes, like stir-fries, curries and pizzas with sprouts. Their crunch and earthy brightness are a welcoming balance to heavier, richer meals. If youre on a budget, sprouts are a sweet deal. Because the amount of food you sprout triples or quadruples in size, youll end up with way more to eat than you started with for the same price. Its kind of magical. Whats more, is that properly stored sprouts can last over a month, and some varieties up to 70 days. If youre prone to tossing away spoiled produce, sprouts will save you money, big time. Sprouting can take place anywhere you have access to fresh, clean water twice a day. Ive sprouted on road trips, beach holidays, visiting the in-laws...all over the place! And the groovy thing about taking your show on the road is that you can convince other people to get sprouting too. And sprouts are not just great for our health, but also the planet. Consider the fact that youre growing a garden right in your kitchen, using your own energy to make the magic happen. Its hyper-local food at its best! No chemicals or pesticides during the growing process, or fossil fuels for transportation. Could sprouts be the perfect food?! The answer is yes. But I may be a little biased. I am the Sprout Girl, after all. If you are concerned about mold or bacteria contamination, please understand that commercially-grown sprouts are propagated in an ideal environment for pathogens to proliferate. Just one more reason to grow your own sprouts at home where you can be sure of proper hygiene and care. Make sure that your jar or sprouting container is thoroughly clean, that youre rinsing your sprouts with cool water twice daily, and that your sprouts have plenty of airflow. After I drain my sprouts, I make sure that the seeds /­­ sprouts arent blocking the entire opening of the jar (see photo). If you follow these tips, you shouldnt have any problems. Scoring Seeds You can sprout just about anything, but the cheapest and easiest things are found in the bulk bin of your health food store! Lentils, beans, chickpeas, rice, buckwheat, wheat are all widely available and inexpensive. Its imperative that you choose organically-grown ingredients, as conventionally grown seeds are often irradiated, making them difficult, or even impossible to germinate. You can also purchase seeds online, especially the more specialty ones, like alfalfa, radish, onion, broccoli etc. Finding Equipment There are plenty of sprouting apparatuses that you can buy, but if youre just starting out, use a jar! I bet you already have one. – 1 sterilized, large-mouth, quart-sized glass jar with an airtight lid – small piece of cheesecloth – rubber band – a bowl or dish rack How to Sprout There are countless resources on this topic online, and even whole books written about sprouting, so I am presenting you with a very simple, yet rather foolproof technique. If you want to learn more (which I encourage you to do!) here’s a great place to learn about different methods, applications, as well as help and advice: Sprout People     Print recipe     Simple Sprouting Day 1 1. Prep (night) Take a quick glance at the seeds as you put them into the sterilized soaking container. Remove any stones, cracked /­­ damaged seeds, and rinse well. 2. Soak (night) A general rule is covering the seeds with 2-3 times the amount of water (e.g. 1 cup seeds : 2-3 cups water). Use pure, filtered, unchlorinated water. Skim off any seeds that are floating. Let sit for 8-12 hours. Day 2 1. Drain (morning) Put a piece of cheesecloth over the mouth of the jar and secure it with a rubber band. Drain the seeds letting all the water run out. 2. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 3. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 3 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 4 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) 3. Enjoy (night) Your sprouts are ready! The tail should be at least the length of the seed itself (if it is not quite there yet, continue with the rinsing and draining process until it is. Some seeds take a couple more days). If youre not going to eat all the sprouts right away, make sure you let the sprouts drain for at least 8 hours after their last rinse before you put them in the fridge. Never store wet sprouts, as they will spoil quickly. Store sprouts in the sprouting jar with an airtight lid for one month, or more.     Print recipe     Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus Makes 4 cups Ingredients: 2 cloves garlic 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml tahini 1/­­2 tsp. fine salt, to taste 2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (optional) zest of 1 lemon 4 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 4 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 4 cups /­­ 500g sprouted chickpeas (start with 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 300g dried chickpeas) Directions: 1. Pulse the garlic in the food processor until minced. Add all other ingredients, except for the sprouted chickpea and blend until you have a paste. Add the chickpeas and blend on high until as smooth as possible. Season to taste and adjust more salt /­­ spice if desired. To achieve an even smoother consistency, scoop hummus into a high-speed blender and blend on high for an additional 10-15 seconds. Serve immediately and store leftovers in an airtight container for up to five days. I hope that this process seems simple enough for you to try. I promise that once you start sprouting, you won’t be able to stop! It’s so easy, fun, and connecting – not to mention delicious. Good luck and happy sprouting, dear friends! xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Copenhagen! I am thrilled to announce my first two cookbook events in CPH this Spring. The first will be an intimate talk and demonstration at SLOW Copenhagen, and the second will be a magical, celebratory dinner in collaboration with the local, organic grocer and kitchen, Kost. Click on the images for more info and tickets! Can’t wait to see you there.    The post It’s Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

Live Longer — Fruits and Veggies Proven to Add More Life

March 27 2017 Meatless Monday 

Live Longer — Fruits and Veggies Proven to Add More LifeMarch is National Nutrition Month. So each week this month, were highlighting how certain foods can help improve specific health conditions. This is the fourth and final article in the series. Please share with friends and family who may be interested. Youve heard it many times from many different sources: doctors, talk shows, magazine articles, you name it. The way to stay healthy is to exercise regularly, watch your weight, get enough sleep and eat a sensible diet. But what if, just by choosing the right foods to eat, you could actually live longer? Thats not science fiction. Thats science fact. According to a study published in the Journal of American Medical Association, diets with a high intake of animal protein (meat) were positively associated with cardiovascular mortality. This means death caused by heart attack, heart disease or stroke. Furthermore, this danger is even greater for individuals with at least one lifestyle risk factor, such as smoking, obesity, high blood pressure or high cholesterol. And the size of this study was remarkably comprehensive, - over 130,000 people from all walks of life participated. Eating more plants - vegetables, whole grains and legumes - and fewer animal products can help you live a longer, healthier life, said Rebecca Ramsing, sr. program officer, Food Communities & Public Health Program at Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future. Taking meat off your plate a few days a week can make a long-lasting impact! On a brighter note, the study also indicates that diets with a high intake of plant-based protein - instead of meat - result in less deaths due to cardiovascular issues. This finding suggests the importance of the protein source you choose to eat regularly. In other words, people who choose more fruits, veggies, grains and nuts tend to be healthier and live longer. With this good news in mind, weve picked out one of our favorite recipes to help you savor all life has to offer. Bon appétit. Roasted Spring Veggie Couscous The post Live Longer — Fruits and Veggies Proven to Add More Life appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Nutty Forbidden Rice, Roasted Beet & Kale Salad

March 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

Forbidden Rice, an ancient grain that was once exclusively eaten by Chinese Emperors, has long been praised for its health and longevity benefits. This recipe features this nutty-flavored rice that is also packed with antioxidants known as anthocyanins. This recipe comes to us from Eve of The Garden of Eating. Serves 4 For the salad: - 1 lb beets -  2/­­3 cup uncooked black rice - 1 1/­­3 cup water -  1/­­2 cup pecans, roughly chopped - 1 bunch kale, washed and dried, ribs removed, chopped or shredded For the dressing: - 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar - 2 teaspoons olive oil - 1 tablespoon whole grain mustard - 1 clove garlic, pressed or minced - 1 teaspoon dried thyme - 2 teaspoons sea salt - Several grinds of black pepper and more to taste   Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Rinse the beets (no need to peel them) and position them on a sheet or two of tinfoil (you want a tight package so they end up kind of steaming in there), drizzle with olive oil and wrap them up well. Roast them for at least an hour and 15 minutes – depending on how large they are, it may take closer to two hours for them to cook all the way through – you can test by removing them and poking with a fork – they’re done when the fork sinks easily all the way into the middle of the largest beet. Remove and let cool until you can handle them without burning yourself. Remove the skins – they should slip off with ease and cut off the top and tail. Cut them into bite-sized chunks and set aside. Add the rice and water to a medium-sized pot with a tight-fitting lid, bring to a boil then reduce the heat to low, cover and simmer for 40 or so minutes. Fluff the rice. While the rice is cooking, make the dressing, mixing all the ingredients together well with a fork or a whisk. If you have a jar with a tight-fitting lid, you can also just cover it and shake well. Place the chopped kale, diced beets and rice in a pretty bowl that’s large enough to mix them all together in comfortably, drizzle the dressing over all and stir well to coat everything. Cover and put in the fridge to “stew” for a while – at least an hour and more is better. Toast the pecans for a few minutes until they’re nicely browned and crunchy. I toast mine on a sheet of recycled tinfoil in the toaster oven at 300 for about 5-6 minutes, shaking once to toast them evenly. When you’re ready to serve, top the salad with the pecans and toss well.   The post Nutty Forbidden Rice, Roasted Beet & Kale Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Celebrate National Nutrition Month with Meatless Monday!

March 6 2017 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate National Nutrition Month with Meatless Monday!March is always one of our favorite times to sit down at the table. Its National Nutrition Month , where good food and food thats good for you are served on the same plate. This year, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends that you Put Your Best Fork Forward, encouraging parents to teach healthy eating habits to their children. At Meatless Monday, we couldnt agree more. The academy also suggests filling half your plate with fruits and vegetables. Of course, we believe in filling the whole plate with tasty veggies, fruits, nuts and whole grains. In fact, the nutrients in particular foods can actually help with certain health issues. So in celebration of National Nutrition Month, were going to spotlight specific foods each week that have a direct link in helping to reduce the risk of a chronic preventable disease. First up: Whole grains!   Heart Disease - Leading Cause of Death Among Women You may remember hearing about this last month during the American Heart Associations Wear Red event. Its a serious health issue . Cardiovascular disease is listed as the underlying cause of nearly 801,000 deaths in the U.S. each year (about one of every three).   Whole Grains and Veggies Lower the Risk of Heart Disease In a research study , health experts concluded an inverse association between dietary whole grains and cardiovascular disease. In other words, by eating more whole grains, you have less risk of developing heart disease. In a separate study , experts found that a higher consumption of fruit and vegetables is linked to a lower risk of all causes of death, particularly heart disease. Long story, short, whole grains and veggies are definitely heart smart.   Eat Healthy - and Tasty Turns out you can have the best of both worlds: nutritious, flavorful veggies and wholesome tasty whole grains. See some of our favorite recipes below: Sweet Potato Sorghum Salad   Tahini Quinoa Bean Salad   Barley Fried Rice The post Celebrate National Nutrition Month with Meatless Monday! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Soft Whole Wheat Dinner Rolls

February 27 2017 Vegan Richa 

Soft Whole Wheat Dinner RollsSoft Whole Wheat Dinner Rolls. Moist and soft Whole wheat Rolls 100% Whole grain rolls. Use as Wheat Buns for Burgers or Sliders. Vegan Whole Grain Dinner Rolls. Soy-free Palm Oil-free Recipe These rolls are 100% Whole grain and so soft and do not taste like cardboard or dirt! Based off my 100% Whole wheat bread, the rolls have additional help in moisture from the tangzhong (roux), Tangzong starter breads or milk breads are often the softest breads. Tangzhong along with the sponge are the secret to perfectly moist Whole Grain Rolls.  The flavor of these rolls is very dependent on the whole grain flour used. Often the flour goes rancid or is starting to go rancid depending on when the grains were processed. Breads with combination of whole and all purpose/­­white flour have a milder flavor. In all whole grain baked goods that are sweet or savory, the flavors take over the whole grain flavor and work well. In a bread that is just whole grain flour, water and yeast, the grain flavor comes through very strong. It is the least strong in freshly baked bread and gets stronger (bitter or rancid) as it sits. You can also use aquafaba for additional moisture in these. These rolls are best served fresh and warm.  These rolls can be made ahead (refrigerated or frozen, then thawed and baked). For soft Gluten-free dinner rolls, see these. I generally use some whole grain spelt with the wheat or a combination of regular whole wheat which is red wheat flour, and white whole wheat which is flour of winter white wheat. Combination flours help with the flavor and texture. It looks like a long process, but its mostly rest and rise time and bake time with just 15- 20 mins active.  Continue reading: Soft Whole Wheat Dinner RollsThe post Soft Whole Wheat Dinner Rolls appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba

November 2 2016 My New Roots 

Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba Danes are not big pumpkin eaters. Carrots, sure. Cabbage, indeed. Potatoes, definitely. But even though they seem to have caught on to the Halloween jack-o-lantern carving thing, actually consuming pumpkins is not high on their list. Just last week I was at the grocery store and saw a display of huge spaghetti squash on clearance, being promoted as autumn decorations.  Pfff, what?! I scooped up as many as I could (I mean, they were less than two bucks a pop) and I excitedly starting telling the cashier about the wild and crazy deal in the produce aisle, all the amazing things you could do with this gourd, and how it turns into freakin noodles. She raised an eyebrow, but was largely unimpressed. Maintaining conviction, I awkwardly carried my bushel of spaghetti squash to my bike, but not before telling two random customers on the way out as well. Just trying to spread the word, people! So aside from decorative (and reminder: totally edible) spaghetti squash, there is really only one proper pumpkin here in Denmark, and that is the Hokkaido. These spherical, bright orange beauties are available at most grocery stores, and for good reason: they are a very delicious and super versatile variety. They are yummy roasted, stuffed, baked, blended into dips, or in soups and stews. I dig them because you can eat the skin, which gives a serious boost of carotenes and fibre. Hokkaido pumpkins can also be called Kuri squash, and similar varieties include red Kabocha, Hubbard and Ambercup. As a PSA to Denmark, I would love to suggest growing these or other varieties of pumpkin since every single type has something special to offer, besides a being a decoration that is. Anyway, on to the recipe! As soon as the one-and-only pumpkin hit the stores a couple weeks back, I made this soup. Craving something creamy and soothing to combat autumn drizzle, I blended the steamed pumpkin with ginger and miso for the most luscious of broths, made even more satisfying with the addition of soba noodles. A few nights later I made it again and added even more goodies: spring onion, seaweed, toasted sesame and sautéed shiitake mushrooms. So. Good. I am obsessed with the combination of the sweet pumpkin and savoury miso, especially with the spicy warmth of the ginger to bring it all together. I also love the consistency of the soup, which is thinner than most of the purées I make. Its really more broth-like, and coats the soba in the perfect way. Unbelievably comforting on a chilly fall night, this dish will be on heavy rotation here this season, and I hope in your home as well. Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba comes together in under 30 minutes, so its the perfect weeknight dinner. Plus, it is made mostly with pantry staples, so all you need to pick up at the store is a pumpkin! If you want to make this meal even faster, you can skip the toppings altogether, as the soup on its own is totally delicious, and can be made in under 20 minutes. It also freezes well, so make a double batch and store half in the freezer for your next there-is-nothing-to-eat emergency. You can thank me later. Miso delicious! Most people are familiar with miso from Japanese restaurants where miso soup is served, but beyond that I think Westerners greatly under utilize this miraculous umami gift from the gods! It is a consistent condiment in my kitchen repertoire and most times when I use it in something Ive served to guests, they often ask why the dish tastes so special. The answer is miso. Miso is a Japanese word meaning fermented beans. Traditionally, miso is made from soybeans and is found in the form of a thick paste. The process of making miso involves soaking cooking, and mashing soybeans, then finally inoculating the mix with koji (a specific mold spore) and salt. This mixture is transferred to a crock or barrel where it is left to ferment for months or years. Miso comes in various colours, depending on whether or not other legumes or grains were used in the fermentation process, and the length of fermentation. White, yellow, red, brown and dark brown miso are some of the shades youll see in the store. In general, lighter miso tends to be sweeter and milder, while darker miso leans towards the saltier and pungent. I generally keep two kinds in my fridge, since they taste so incredibly different. This recipe calls for light miso, and I really stress using this variety since a dark miso would be far too rich and overwhelming. I prefer to use dark miso in things like gravies and sauces. Either way though, miso is an explosive umami bomb that will add tons of complex, satisfying flavour to many of your favourite foods. Because of this six taste, miso gives plant-based foods that umph that it can be lacking. When buying miso, look for an organic or non-GMO product that is raw /­­ unpasteurized. Unpasteurized miso will always come in the form of a paste, whereas the instant miso soup that you can find on the dry goods shelf is likely pasteurized and therefore not as health-promoting. If your miso comes packaged in plastic, transfer it to an airtight clean glass jar or ceramic crock when you get home, and store it in the fridge for up to a year. Unpasteurized miso is full of live cultures and for that reason it should never be boiled. If you read this recipe through, youll see that I only add the miso at the end when the soup is in the blender. This is to ensure that we preserve all of those delicate nutrients and precious enzymes that would be destroyed with high heat. If you are going to reheat this soup, make sure to do so gently and stir constantly to avoid scorching. Some notes on the recipe ingredients: if you absolutely cannot find light miso, a simple vegetable stock or bullion can be used in its place. But it’s worth tracking down. Soba noodles can be found at Asian supermarkets, health food stores, and gourmet foods shops. Make sure to look for noodles that are 100% buckwheat flour, as many brands of soba will add wheat flour to act as a binder, and keep in mind that these will not be gluten-free. Some people also find the taste of pure soba noodles off-putting since buckwheat can taste very strong, but I love it! Finicky kids (and adults) may prefer the milder-flavour of brown rice noodles, or even whole grain pasta.     Print recipe     Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba Serves 4 as a main, 6 as a side Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 medium yellow onion 3/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 3 cloves garlic 1 medium, 2 lb /­­ 1kg Hokkaido pumpkin (or other favourite hard winter squash) 3 – 4 cups /­­ 750ml - 1 liter water 3 – 4 Tbsp. white or light miso 1 Tbsp. minced fresh ginger 175g /­­ 6oz. soba noodles (100% buckwheat) toppings: spring onion sesame seeds sautéed shiitake mushrooms seaweed, optional (I used oarweed, but any sea vegetable is good!) Directions: 1. Roughly chop onions, mince garlic. Wash the pumpkin well (as youll be eating the skin), and chop into chunks. 2. In a large stockpot, melt the coconut oil. Add the onions and salt, stir to coat and cook for about 10 minutes until the onions are just starting to caramelize. Add garlic and cook for about a minute until fragrant. 3. Add the pumpkin and stir to coat. Add 3 cups /­­ 750ml of water, cover, bring to a boil, and reduce to simmer for about 15 minutes, until the pumpkin is tender. 4. While the soup is cooking, prepare the toppings: Bring a pot of salted water to the boil. Cook soba noodles according to package directions, drain and lightly rinse. Slice spring onion, lightly toast sesame seeds in a dry skillet over medium heat, about 2-3 minutes. Sauté mushrooms in a lightly oiled skillet over high heat for 5-7 minutes. 5. Transfer the soup to a blender and blend on high until completely smooth. Add more water if necessary - youre looking for a creamy consistency, but it should not be thick like a paste. I like the soup to be on the thinner side for this dish. Add the miso, ginger and blend again until smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning as desired. Transfer soup back to the pot and keep warm (reheat if necessary, but try not to boil). 6. Ladle soup into bowls, top with soba, spring onion, sesame seeds, mushrooms and crumble the seaweed over top. Serve immediately and enjoy. This soup is wildly tasty and saisfying, and will probably make you look forward to cooler temperatures and nights spent in. I hope you all are having a lovely fall so far. Sending big love and cozy moments to you all, Sarah B. Show me your soups on Instagram: #MNRpupmkinmisobroth The post Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba appeared first on My New Roots.

Mini Mushroom Burgers

September 26 2016 Meatless Monday 

When grilling season hits, one of lifes simple pleasures is to throw a portabella mushroom on the grill and let it absorb those delicious smoky flavors. These mushroom sliders so cute they use a dinner roll for a bun! This recipe comes to us from our friends at The Mushroom Council. Serves 4 - 2 portabella mushrooms, stems removed - 1/­­4 cup light balsamic vinaigrette - salt and freshly ground black pepper - 8 small high-fiber whole grain dinner rolls - 8 slices red onion - 8 slices tomato Place the portabellas and vinaigrette in a large zip top bag. Zip and lightly rub the vinaigrette into the mushrooms. Let marinate for at least 30 minutes. Prepare the grill or a grill pan with a light layer of nonstick cooking spray. Line a plate with a layer of paper towels. Remove the mushrooms from the bag, drain and season with salt and pepper on both sides. Heat the grill to medium and place the mushrooms gill side down. Cook for 4 minutes, flip and repeat on the other side for about 4 minutes more, or until the both mushrooms are almost cooked through. Transfer the mushrooms to the paper lined plate, gill side down. Cut each mushroom into quarters and place each quarter on the bottom half of the dinner rolls. Top each with tomato, onion and the remaining dinner roll half and enjoy. The post Mini Mushroom Burgers appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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