wheat - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Aloo palak recipe | palak aloo recipe | aloo palak gravy recipe

Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2

Vegan Chicken And Waffle Sticks

Momos soup recipe | momo jhol achar | paneer momo dumpling soup










wheat vegetarian recipes

Vegan Gyro (With Homemade Seitan) And Tzatziki Sauce

July 13 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Gyros are a classic Mediterranean dish that, unfortunately, uses meat. But that doesnt mean it cant be veganized! Seitan (a vegetable meat made from vital wheat gluten) is the perfect substitute for the meat used in gyros, and it is so easy to make! Mindful Bitez explains how to make your own flavorful seitan right at home so you can have vegan gyros any time you like! Just serve up your sliced seitan in a warm pita with fresh veggies and tzatziki sauce. For the full recipe, including the sauce, click here. The post Vegan Gyro (With Homemade Seitan) And Tzatziki Sauce appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

daliya recipe | vegetable dalia khichdi recipe | broken wheat recipe

July 13 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

daliya recipe | vegetable dalia khichdi recipe | broken wheat recipedaliya recipe | vegetable dalia khichdi recipe | broken wheat recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. there are several recipes prepared from broken wheat which includes soup, bread, pilafs or pulav and even khichdi from the indian cuisine. Continue reading daliya recipe | vegetable dalia khichdi recipe | broken wheat recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Bánh M? Tostadas

July 11 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Bánh M? Tostadas East meets West in this tasty fusion combo. Tostada means toasted in Spanish and is the name of a Mexican dish in which a toasted tortilla is the base for other ingredients that top it. Bánh m? is a popular Vietnamese sandwich that features crisp pickled vegetables, fragrant cilantro, chiles, and zesty hoisin and sriracha sauces. In this iteration, bánh m? ingredients find themselves on toasted tortillas instead of in a baguette to make Bánh M? Tostadas. Corn tortillas are usually used for tostadas, although wheat tortillas may be used if you prefer. Bánh M? Tostadas - 1 large carrot, shredded - 1/­­2 English cucumber, peeled, seeded, and chopped - 2 cups finely shredded cabbage - 1 cup fresh cilantro leaves - 1 to 2 tablespoons chopped pickled jalape?o chiles ((optional)) - 1 teaspoon dark (toasted) sesame oil - 1 tablespoon neutral vegetable oil - 2 garlic cloves, minced - 1/­­4 cup minced scallions - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger - 1 (8-ounce) package baked tofu, cut into thin strips - 3 tablespoons soy sauce - 3 tablespoons hoisin sauce - 2 tablespoons rice vinegar - 1 to 2 teaspoons sriracha sauce - 1 teaspoon sugar Tostada shells: - 4 to 6 corn or flour tortillas - 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil Toppings: - In a large bowl, combine the carrot, cucumber, cabbage, cilantro, and jalape?os, if using. Drizzle on the sesame oil and toss gently to combine. Set aside. - Heat the vegetable oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic, scallions, and ginger and cook for 1 minute. Add the tofu and 1 tablespoon of the soy sauce and mix well to coat the tofu. Set aside to cool. - In a small bowl, combine the remaining 2 tablespoons soy sauce, the hoisin, vinegar, sriracha, and sugar, stirring well to blend. Tostada shells: - Preheat the oven to 400°F. Arrange the tortillas in a single layer on two baking sheets. Brush both sides of each tortilla with oil. Bake for 5 minutes on one side, then flip the tortillas over and bake for 2 to 3 minutes longer, until crispy. Watch carefully so they dont burn. To assemble: - Evenly divide the tofu among the tostada shells. Top each with some of the vegetable mixture, then the sauce. Serve immediately. Excerpted from 100 BEST VEGAN RECIPES, (C) 2016 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by Lucy Schaeffer. The post Bánh M? Tostadas appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Cherry Tomato Cobbler

July 10 2017 Meatless Monday 

This easy-going cobbler puts little tomatoes front and center on the dance floor with a tangle of sweet fresh onions. This recipe comes to us from Kim O’Donnel‘s new book PNW Veg. KITCHEN NOTES: Like any fruit cobbler (after all, the tomato is botanically a fruit), there will be some residual juice at the bottom of the dish. You could spoon this juice over the biscuits or coat the tomatoes in a tablespoon of flour before adding to the pie plate to slow the juicy flow. No buttermilk? Substitute 3/­­4 cup milk and 2 teaspoons lemon juice or white vinegar, stirred together. (c) 2017 by Kim ODonnel. All rights reserved. Excerpted from PNW Veg by permission of Sasquatch Books. Serves 6 - 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, well chilled - 2 cups thinly sliced Walla Walla or yellow onion (from about ?1 large onion) - 1 teaspoon fine sea salt -  1/­­2 teaspoon ground black pepper - 2 pounds cherry tomatoes (about 2 pints), stemmed - 1 cup all-purpose or white wheat flour - 2 teaspoons baking powder - 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves, finely chopped (or 1/­­2 teaspoon dried) - 1 cup grated sharp cheddar cheese - 3/­­4 cup buttermilk - A few dashes of Tabasco or favorite mild hot sauce Measure out 2 tablespoons of the butter, then return the rest to the refrigerator until ready to make the topping. Place the butter in a 9-or10-inch skillet and melt over medium heat, tilting the pan to coat. Add the onion and turn with a wooden spoon or pair of tongs until well coated. Cook until very soft, about 20 minutes, adjusting the heat as needed to avoid burning. Season with 1/­­4 teaspoon of the salt and 1/­­4 teaspoon of the pepper. Transfer the onions and any residual butter to a 9-or 9 1/­­2 -inch pie plate and spread around until the bottom of the pan is covered. Slice the tomatoes as needed (larger cherry tomatoes will cook more evenly if cut in half). Layer the tomatoes on top of the onions. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Meanwhile, make the biscuit topping. In a large bowl, stir together the flour, baking powder, thyme, and the remaining 3/­­4 teaspoon salt and 1/­­4 teaspoon pepper. Cut the remaining 4 tablespoons cold butter into small dice. With your hands, cut in the butter with the tips of your fingers until the mixture looks like fluffy sand. You should not be able to see clumps of butter. (You can also use a food processor, pulsing briefly to incorporate.) Stir in the cheese. Make a well in the center of the flour, then add the buttermilk and hot sauce. With a wooden spoon or rubber spatula, gently stir the batter until it just comes together; it will be wet and sticky. With a tablespoon, drop the batter all over the tomatoes, gently spreading until the fruit is thoroughly covered. (Dont worry if you miss a spot; the batter spreads during baking.) Place the pie plate on a sheet pan and bake for 50 to 55 minutes. The topping should be golden brown and firm to the touch, and the filling should be actively bubbling. Let cool for about 15 minutes before serving warm or at room temperature. Store in the refrigerator for up to 2 days (if it lasts that long!). Reheats well. The post Cherry Tomato Cobbler appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Banana French Toast with Caramelized Bananas

June 30 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Banana French Toast with Caramelized BananasVegan Banana French Toast. Vegan French Toast with Caramelized bananas. Banana and non dairy milk make up the french toast batter. Cooked French toast is served with caramelized Bananas, maple and vegan butter. Vegan Nut-free Recipe.  This French toast is easy, amazing and delicious breakfast or snack. Hearty Bread is soaked in a batter of banana and nondairy milk, cooked to golden. Sliced banana is caramelized with coconut sugar and served over the warm french toast with maple and seasonal fruit. You want to use a rustic bread or a stale bread for best results. Regular sandwich bread can get too soggy. Check with a trial slice to see how long to soak the slice for the best results based on your bread and pan. Soak longer if the french toast is overly dry in the middle. Soak for just a second if the bread tends to absorb a lot of the batter and turns out soggy. You can also let the slices air dry for 15 minutes before using.  I like to use my home made wheat or white breads and not overly chewy sourdough from our local bakery to make these vegan french toasts.Continue reading: Vegan Banana French Toast with Caramelized BananasThe post Vegan Banana French Toast with Caramelized Bananas appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Sweet-and-Sour Soba Noodles with Asparagus

June 26 2017 VegKitchen 

Sweet-and-Sour Soba Noodles with Asparagus Sweet-and-sour soba noodles embellished with with asparagus and fresh tomatoes makes a lovely spring or early summer dinner dish. Serve with a simple tofu dish such as Sweet and Savory Sautéd Tofu, and a platter of raw veggies. Photos by Hannah Kaminsky. Serves: 4 to 6 8-ounce package soba (buckwheat) noodles 1 tablespoon safflower or […] The post Sweet-and-Sour Soba Noodles with Asparagus appeared first on VegKitchen.

Grillable Veggie Burger – Black Bean Sunflower Seed Burger

June 6 2017 Vegan Richa 

Grillable Veggie Burger – Black Bean Sunflower Seed BurgerGrillable Veggie Burger. No Nuts. Easy Sunflower Seed Black Bean Burger with Veggies and spices. Pan fry, Bake or Grill. Serve with BBQ Sauce and other fix ins. Vegan Burger Recipe. Gluten-free option. Nut-free. Soy-free option It is time to fire up the grill and flip some veggie burgers. These hearty burgers are made up of black beans, brown rice, sunflower seeds and amazing seasoning. You can grill or pan fry the patties. Veggie burgers can be overly squishy (too many beans, too much moisture), or too crumbly (not enough binding, big unmashed ingredients such as whole beans or large chunks of onions, peppers, veggies). Both these issues can be solved with vital wheat gluten in the patties. I don’t like the texture of the patty with vital wheat gluten, so in these burgers just the right balance of cooked grains, beans and some breadcrumbs work well to make a sturdy grillable patty. With any veggie burger, mash the ingredients well and pack them well for sturdier results.  Black beans work really well in these burgers. You can also use kidney beans. The toasted sunflower seeds make these hearty. Whole coriander seeds, smoked paprika and lemon add complex flavors. These patties are a must make.  See 35+ Veggie Burger options here, no fake meats! Which beans/­­lentils are your favorite in a veggie burger?Continue reading: Grillable Veggie Burger – Black Bean Sunflower Seed BurgerThe post Grillable Veggie Burger – Black Bean Sunflower Seed Burger appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Rotimatic – Roti (Indian flatbread) Automated

May 28 2017 Vegan Richa 

Rotimatic – Roti (Indian flatbread) Automated This post is sponsored by Rotimatic. Rotis are an important part of an Indian home cooked meal in many regions in India. Freshly made flatbread served with the dals, veggie sides, and curries. Rotis are the carrier of all the amazing food. Rotis, also called Chapati, phulka, rotli, vary in terms of thickness and some additions to the dough. In general, the flatbreads served are made of whole wheat dough (called atta), they are rolled out into thin flatbreads that are cooked on a hot griddle or tava and puffed either on the tava or on the flame. Often the rotis will puff up fully to make a balloon filled with hot air.  Back home in India, Mom has her Roti making oiled out and scheduled perfectly so there were always fresh rotis during meals. She also had helpers to roll them out, cook and serve on occasion. In my house here, we generally end up eating premade rotis from the Indian store. The whole process of making a smooth dough, rolling the dough out and standing for the half hour to make them on a hot tava used to be just about achievable on some days before I had balance issues, and then it just wasn’t possible.  Rotimatic is a robot that kneads, rolls out, cooks and serves fresh rotis, Its a neat white box where you fill up the flour, water and oil containers and press a few buttons. A few minutes later, you get hot roti flatbreads!  And it obviously became a sensation when the prototype rolled out a few years back. Everyone wanted this machine to reduce the hours and effort spent everyday to make rotis. Continue reading: Rotimatic – Roti (Indian flatbread) AutomatedThe post Rotimatic – Roti (Indian flatbread) Automated appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Jalapeno Cheese Paratha

May 19 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Jalapeno Cheese Paratha Jalapeno Cheese Paratha is a whole wheat flat bread filled with a combination of grated cheese. This is not only delicious, but also a great breakfast option. Jalapeno Cheese Paratha can be served like cheese bagels or bread. This recipe will make 6 parathas and will serve 3. For Dough - 1 cup whole wheat flour (chapatti atta) - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­2 cup water For Filling - 2 cup grated mix cheese (I am using mix cheese, Cheddar, Colby and Monterey Jack) - 1/­­4 cup jalapeno (finely chopped, adjust to your taste) Making the Dough - Mix flour, and salt, in a bowl add the water as needed to make soft dough. Knead the dough for about one minutes on a lightly greased surface to make soft, and pliable dough. Set aside for at least ten minutes. Making the Filling - Cheese and Jalapeno pepper mix it well and divide in 6 equal parts and roll them. Set aside. Making the Parathas - Divide the dough into six equal parts and form into balls. - Roll dough ball into a 3 circle. Place a cheese ball in the center. Pull the edges of the dough to wrap it around the cheese filling. Repeat to make all six balls. Let the filled balls settle three to four minutes. Note, this help rolling the paratha. - Meanwhile heat the heavy skillet on medium heat until moderately hot. To test, sprinkle water on the skillet. If the water sizzles right away, the skillet is ready. - Press the filled ball lightly on dry whole wheat flour from both sides. - Using a rolling pin, roll the balls lightly to make six-inch circles, keeping the sealed side of the balls on top. If the dough sticks to the rolling pin or rolling surface, lightly dust the parathas with dry flour. - Place the paratha on the skillet. When the paratha start to change color, and begins to puff up, flip it over. You will notice some golden-brown spots. - After a few seconds, flip the paratha and press with a spatula making sure the paratha is golden-brown on both sides. Repeat for the remaining parathas. - Parathas can be kept unrefrigerated for up to two days wrapped in aluminum foil or in a covered container. For later use, parathas can be refrigerated for about a week. Re-heat using a skillet or oven. Adjust the pepper to your taste, you can use any hot chilies I also like to use Serrano chili. For my grand kids, I make them with cheese only. Serving Suggestion - Jalapeno Cheese Paratha, is best for the breakfast and serve it with butter or cream cheese. - Cheese parathas are also good for sandwiches with lettuce and slice of tomatoes. The post Jalapeno Cheese Paratha appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

poori recipe | how to make puffy puri | milk poori recipe

May 10 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

poori recipe | how to make puffy puri | milk poori recipepoori recipe | how to make puffy poori | milk poori recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. while it mainly enjoyed as a breakfast dish, it is also served during ceremonial and other religional rituals. traditionally soft pooris are prepared from atta flour or wheat flour, however these days it is also prepared from plain flour or maida. having said that, in this post lets learn to make soft milk based poori recipe. Continue reading poori recipe | how to make puffy puri | milk poori recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Dahi Bhindi (Okra with Yogurt Gravy)

April 27 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Dahi Bhindi Dahi Bhindi is a great way to enjoy okra in tangy creamy sauce. Dahi Bhindi is simply delicious, and easy to make. This goes well with Jeera (Cumin) Rice, or roti-paratha. - 40 medium size okra (bhindi) (after cutting them in half it should be about 2 cups.) - 3 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable oil) - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­4 tsp mustard seeds (rai) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 1 Tbsp besan (gram flour) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1 tsp Red Chili Powder - 1/­­4 tsp Turmeric Powder - 1 cup yogurt (dahi, curd) - 1 cup water (approximately) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - Wash and pat dry the okra and cut both ends, and cut them in about 1 inch pieces. I have used about 35 medium size okra after cutting, they are about 2 cups. - Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a frying pan over medium heat and stir fry the okra till they are tender. This should take about 7-8 minutes. - Take them out in a bowl and use the same pan for making gravy. - Heat 1 tablespoon oil, over medium heat. After oil is moderately hot add the cumin seeds, mustard seeds and asafetida as the seeds crack, turn down the heat to low. - Add the besan and stir fry for about 1 minute until it has light aroma, and is golden brown in color. Besan gives the thickness to gravy. - Add yogurt, turmeric, chili powder and coriander powder. Mix it well. And cook until the spice mix come together, and you should be able to see the oil leaving the sides of spice mix. This should take about 2-3 minutes. - Spice mix is ready add about 1/­­2 cup of water and salt, bring it to boil. Add okra and let it cook for 3-4 minutes, on low heat. Enjoy with plain white rice or any Indian flat bread, like Roti, Paratha, Puri     The post Dahi Bhindi (Okra with Yogurt Gravy) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

methi paratha recipe | methi ka paratha | fenugreek paratha recipe

April 26 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

methi paratha recipe | methi ka paratha | fenugreek paratha recipemethi paratha recipe | methi ka paratha | fenugreek paratha recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. this is unique paratha recipe as the leaves are not literally stuffed to the wheat balls and are mixed to the dough. later it is rolled flat like chapathi and fired similar to any other parathas. hence it is also popularly known as methi roti or methi chapathi. Continue reading methi paratha recipe | methi ka paratha | fenugreek paratha recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegan Lamb Roast With Pomegranate Molasses

April 13 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

This vegan lamb roast from Awkward In The Kitchen is the perfect addition to your holiday brunch or dinner! She uses wheat gluten to create the fake meat, and marinades […] The post Vegan Lamb Roast With Pomegranate Molasses appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Carrot Cake (vegan & gluten free)

April 6 2017 Veganpassion 

Carrot Cake (vegan & gluten free) Spring is spoiling us and I'm enjoying it to the fullest. Soon we'll be searching egg alternatives between the grasses because it's easter time *yaaay!!!* As a spring treat I created a carrot cake. Gluten free and without any refined sugars it's full of flavours: from buckwheat, to hazelnuts, carrot, bananas and caramelized coconut sugar! What a celebration :-) The cake consists of a biscuit and a coconut cream and it's prepared very quick. If you don't like coconut you can use vegan whip cream if you like and garnish it with hazelnuts. Makes one cake with 18 cm diameter. For the biscuit: 1/­­3 cup + 1 tbsp. rice whole grain flour 1/­­3 cup buckwheat flour 1/­­4 cup hazelnuts, grounded 1 tbsp. starch 4 tbsp. coconut sugar 1 pinch xanthan or tapioca starch 1 tsp. bicarb each 1 pinch cinnamon and vanilla 1 banana 1 small carrot 2 tbsp. + 2 tsp. plant based baking oil 1/­­2 cup dairy free milk 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar 2 tbsp. maple sirup Preheat oven to 338°F (170°C) air circulation. In a mixing bowl, mix together rice whole grain flour, buckwheat flour, hazelnuts, starch, coconut sugar, xanthan and bicarb. Add vanilla and cinnamon. Mash the banana with a fork and grate the carrot. Add banana, carrot with oil, dairy free milk, vinegar and maple sirup to the flour mixture and mix until the dough is smooth. Mix with a egg beater but not to long so the dough stays fluffy. Grease a springform and fill in the dough. Bake at 338°F air circulation for 25-30 minutes. Take the form out of the oven and let it cool off. For the coconut cream: 2 cans of coconut milk (refrigerated for at least 8! hours) or 3/­­4 cup + 1 tbsp. whip cream 2-4 tbsp. maple sirup 1 pack stabilizer for whipping cream coconnut chips. hazelnuts daisys Take the coconut milk out of the refrigerator and take the fatty cream from the top. You can use to coconut water to create some delicious Currys. Take the stabilizer for whip cream and cream it with a mixer. Fold in the maple sirup. Take the biscuit out of the springform carefully and cut it in two small flan cases. Use the lower one and put it on a cooling rack and spread 2-3 tbsp cream ob it. Put the second flan case on top and spread the rest of the cream on it and around it. Garnish the cake with coconut chips, hazelnuts and daisys. The cake can be stored in the fridge for 3-4 days. Have lots of fun with baking and enjoy!

INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

July 7 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

INDIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterMy newest cookbook, The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the the INDIA cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2uGbsog My new INDIA cookbook has been years in the making - with recipes, stories, artwork & photographs inspired by 8 trips to my most favourite country. It’s a culinary love story of my favorite cuisine - based on a total of nearly two years in India and 25 years of devotion to Indian cooking. My first trip to India was in 2001: mostly North India and Nepal. I spent 4 months on that journey, then another 6 weeks in South India in 2006. I visited twice more, in 2009 & 2010, followed by living and working for a year (as an art teacher) in Central India, returning to Berlin in 2011. In Autumn 2016 & Spring 2017, I went back to India to taste and explore the last regions (and cuisines) of India still waiting for me. I traveled across Kashmir & Ladakh, trekking through mountain villages and exploring towns and cities, staying mostly with families and cooking together in their kitchens. Then I went deep into the Northeast: West Bengal, Assam, Sikkim, and Nagaland. I even met with world famous chefs at their restaurants - and homes - for incredible eats and great times in the kitchen. Now I’m back in Berlin, recreating the culinary wonders of the Indian subcontinent in my own kitchen. As with my previous 4 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. It’s a labor of love and the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. I’m back on Kickstarter for my 5th international cookbook project. You can join the crowdfunding which makes everything possible. It’s an adventure in itself, complete with backer-only updates, behind the scenes sneak peaks, exclusive travel videos & stories, recipe testing groups, and more. Pre-order a signed copy of The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA (including worldwide shipping, stickers & e-book for EUR25!) My INDIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 5th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 192 pages with 90+ recipes and over 70 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by 8 trips /­­ 21+ months of travel around India and over 25 years vegan cooking experience - Total variety of regional cuisines: Rajasthani, Gujarati, Punjabi, Kashmiri, Sindhi, Maharashtrian, Tamil, Kerelan, Karnatakan, Goan, Hyderbadi, Bengali, Assamese, Sikkimese, Ladakhi, Tibetan, Nepali - Indian classics & family favorites, timeless treats, new culinary wonders, mind-blowing mega-metropolitan snacks, fabulous village feasts, scrumptious street food, and insanely delicious desserts - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and awesome cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Shahi Bengan – Roasted Stuffed Eggplant Gobi Pakoras – Batter-fried Cauliflower Saag Paneer – Spinach & Fried Tofu Cubes Pani Puri – Street Food Favorite Aloo Paratha – Grilled Potato-Stuffed Flatbreads Shahi Paneer – fried tofu cubes in creamy tomato sauce Seitan Vindaloo – Goan Tangy Curry Samosas! Fried Potato-Stuffed Pastries Gajur Halava – Bengali Carrot Pudding Gulab Jamuns – Doughballs in Rose Syrup Berry Halava – Fruity Semolina Dessert Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA: - Garam Masala, Sambar Masala, Chaat Masala & Panch Puran - Tamarind Ginger, Pineapple, Tomato, Coconut, Chili & Bhang Chutneys - Aam Achar – Mango Pickle - Amitar Khar – Assamese papaya starter - Handvo – Gujurati zucchini cake - Uttapam – South Indian rice & lentil pancakes with tomatoes - Idly Paper Dosa – Karnatakan crispy rice & lentil crepes - Rava Dosa – Tamil semolina crepes - Dahi Vada Chaat – lentil cakes with yogurt & chutney - Hariali Paneer Tikka – Punjabi tofu skewers with spices & herbs - Gobi Pakora – batter-fried cauliflower - Mirchi Vada – Rajasthani batter-fried chillies - Aloo Tikka – spicy, fried potato cakes - Samosa – vegetable-stuffed fried pastry - Pani Puri – potato-stuffed fried pastry with tamarind spice water - Pav Bhaji - spicy vegetable mash with fresh baked buns - Momos – Tibetan vegetable dumplings - Shapaley – Tibetan vegetable pies - Kolkota Kathi Roll – spicy soymeat & shredded cabbage wrap - Sambar Bandhgobi Rolls – stuffed cabbage leaves - Aloo Dum – Kashmiri tomato potato curry - Shahi Tamatar – roasted stuffed tomatoes - Shahi Bengan – roasted stuffed eggplant - Shahi Mirch – roasted stuffed peppers - Shahi Paneer – tofu cubes in creamy, tomato curry - Paneer Jalfrezi – spicy tofu cubes - Saag Paneer – spinach & tofu cubes - Mutter Paneer - peas & tofu cubes - Xaak – Assamese greens, potatoes & cherry tomatoes - Bengan Bhartha – Kashmiri roasted aubergine - Malai Kofta – potato dumplings in creamy tomato curry - Bindi Aloo Tawa Masala – spicy stir-fried okra & potatoes - Khumb Kaju Makhani – Rajasthani cashew mushroom curry - Shukto – Bengali eggplant, potato & plantains - Pumpkin Posto – Bengali squash in creamy poppy seed curry - Seitan Vindaloo – Goan tangy curry - Black Sesame Seitan – Assamese spicy curry - Tamatar Pitika – Assamese tomatoes with herbs & spices - Aloo Pitika – Assamese potatoes with herbs & spices - Bol Tenga – Assames lentil dumplings in tangy curry - Mas Tenga – Assamese tangy jackfruit curry - Chupke – Tibetan dumpling soup - Tarka Dal – Punjabi lentil curry - Chana Masala – spicy chickpeas - Rajma - Kashmiri red kidney bean curry - Lobia Palak – black-eyed peas with lemon & spinach - Golden Rice - with turmeric & spices - Chana Pulao – rice with chickpeas - Pulihora – Tamil tamarind rice with peanuts & spices - Classic Biryani – Kashmiri rice dish with vegetables, nuts & spices - Jackfruit Biryani – Tamil coconut rice dish with spicy jackfruit - Tupula Bhaat – Assamese sticky rice steamed in banana leaves - Aloo Paratha – grilled flatbread stuffed with potatoes - Tibetan Bread – fried breakfast snack - Makki Roti – grilled cornbread - Roti – wholewheat grilled flatbread - Garlic Naan – traditional baked flatbread - Poori – deep-fried flatbreads - Date Ladoo – date & nut sweets - Besan Ladoo – chickpea sweet - Gajur Halava – spiced carrot pudding - Berry Halava – strawberry & blueberry semolina sweet - Mysore Pak – traditional sweet squares - Gulab Jamun – deep-fried dough balls in rose syrup - Rasmalai – cheese balls in saffron mango milk - Jalebi – fried, syrupy sweet - Peda – lemon cashew creamy sweet - Kheer – Kashmiri rice pudding with cardamom, nuts & raisins - Mishti Doi - Bengali sweet curd - Shrikand - Maharashtran yogurt dessert - Pista Kulfi – pistachio ice cream - Pitha – Bengali sesame & date pastry - Narikol Ladoo – Assamese shredded coconut balls - Kadala Parippu – Keralan sweet chana dal dessert - Ginger Chai – spiced black tea - Kahwa – Kashmiri green tea with almond & saffron - Badam Dudh – almond milk with cardamom & cinnamon - Anjoor Kaju Dudh – cashew shake with fig & date - Strawberry Mint Lassi – yogurt smoothie The post INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Potato Soup (Aloo Ki Kadhi)

June 30 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Potato Soup (Aloo Ki Kadhi) Potato soup is very comforting and delicious. At my home this was known as Aloo Ki Kadhi. This soup was served with Puri which is an Indian whole wheat fried bread. Potato Soup is mildly flavored and easy to make. - 1/­­2 potato (boiled, peeled and mashed) - 1/­­2 cup yogurt - 1 cup potatoes (boiled peeled and cut into small pieces) - 2 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable oil) - 1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1 Tbsp all-purpose flour (maida or plain flour) - 1/­­4 tsp fenugreek seeds (dana mathi) - 1/­­4 tsp black pepper (kali mirch) - 1 bay leave (tajpat) - 1 dry red chili broken into 2 pieces - 2 tsp ginger paste - 1 tsp salt - 1/­­4 tsp garam masala - 2 Tbsp finely chopped cilantro (hara dhania) - Mix mashed potatoes, yogurt, ginger juice, and black pepper well add about 1 cup of water and make a smooth batter. Set aside. - Heat the oil in a saucepan over medium high heat. Oil should be moderately hot, when you add the cumin seeds they should crack right of way. Add cumin seeds as they crack add fenugreek seeds, and all-purpose flour, stir for 1-2 minutes until all-purpose flour become very light brown. - Add red chili and bay leave, brake in 2 pieces, stir and add yogurt mix and mix it well. Turn the heat to low medium. - Add potatoes and about 2 cups of water and let it cook for about 5 minutes. Stir occasionally. Add salt, garam masala and cilantro, lower the heat to low and let it cook for 2 more minutes. - Adjust the thickness of the soup to your taste. - Potato soup is ready. Enjoy! This is best served with Puri (puffed fried bread). The post Potato Soup (Aloo Ki Kadhi) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

wheat momos recipe | veg wheat momos recipe | atta momos recipe

June 24 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

wheat momos recipe | veg wheat momos recipe | atta momos recipewheat momos recipe | veg wheat momos recipe | wheat momo recipe with step by step photo and video. while momos recipe is a popular street food of india served and sold in every corner of street. however momos recipe is a delicacy from nepal and tibet region which is typically stuffed with combination of veggies and meat. perhaps due to the migrating communities of south asian has helped to make it a popular healthy snack. Continue reading wheat momos recipe | veg wheat momos recipe | atta momos recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Strawberry Cardamom Milk

June 4 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Strawberry Cardamom Milk I didn’t grow up drinking strawberry milk and thus have no nostalgic connection to it, nor did I have any particular interest in making it, until I ended up with way too many strawberries this past spring. I might sound like a broken record to some of you, but for a bit of context, it’s worth mentioning (once again) that this year’s strawberry season yielded the craziest, dreamiest berries I’ve ever eaten in Florida or anywhere else in the world. I couldn’t stay away from the strawberry farm until my freezer could no longer fit the copious amounts of strawberries I was freezing. We consumed bowls and bowls of fresh strawberries with breakfast, lunch and dinner, but I also cooked with them a bunch (see some of the results here and here). I kind of ran out of recipe ideas towards the end there, so I decided to give this whole strawberry milk deal a try. Boy was I wrong to wait this long, this stuff is heaven. Refreshing, delicious and totally worth the little bit of effort. The method here is a bit more intentional than just blending some strawberries with milk, and yields a truly special little drink. I think spices are extremely important in cooking but especially in plant-based cooking, where building flavor is a bit more of a challenge. A dash of spice can really elevate a dish to the next level, and that’s where the cardamom comes in. The magical, slightly spicy and citrusy flavor of cardamom goes so well with the syrupy macerated strawberries and makes this milk that much more interesting. If you don’t have any cardamom though, this drink will still be delicious without it. There is a step-by-step video above, which shows you how to make almond milk as well as how to flavor it with strawberries. Consider giving this recipe a whirl some day soon when you get your hands on some jammy berries. Enjoy your Sunday :) Strawberry Cardamom Milk   Print Serves: about 3½ cups Ingredients for the almond milk 1 cup raw almonds - soaked in purified water overnight 3 cups purified water for the strawberry cardamom milk about 3 cups sliced strawberries ⅓ cup raw sugar 3 cups unsweetened almond milk 5 cardamom pods - green shells removed, seeds ground in a mortar and pestle Instructions to make the almond milk Drain and rinse the almonds. Place them in a blender along with the water and blend on high speed until completely broken down. Working in batches, strain the milk into a bowl through a nut milk bag. Discard the strained pulp or save for future use in granola, baking, etc. Transfer the milk to a clean bottle or jar and keep refrigerated for up to 3 days. to make the strawberry milk Place the strawberries in a medium bowl and pour the sugar over them. Toss and let macerate until the strawberries yield their syrupy juice, for at least 1 hour or overnight (the longer the better). Puree the strawberries together with their syrup in an upright blender until smooth. Strain the puree through a fine mesh strainer for the silkiest strawberry milk, this step is optional. Combine the almond milk, strawberry puree and freshly ground cardamom in an upright blender and blend until well combined and frothy. Pour the milk into a bottle or jar and chill very well the refrigerator. Enjoy cold. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sweet Potato Buckwheat Snack Bars with Cardamom Tahini Hot Chocolate Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho Spiced Hot Chocolate and a Cookbook of Our Own .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Strawberry Cardamom Milk appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones

May 25 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones This post was created in partnership with Bob’s Red Mill. When I was writing my first cookbook four years ago, I was completely infatuated with developing gluten-free baking recipes and baking almost every day. More than that, I was really into making my own flours (by blending whole grains in my Blendtec), and mixing my own gluten-free flour blends. I am one of those crazy people that enjoys making everything from scratch, but I also did all of those things out of necessity, since there were no high-quality gluten-free flour blends out on the market. Things have really changed since then! Health food stores are now flooded with all kinds of exotic flours and flour blends, which makes me a little less compelled to make my own. I still do from time to time, but I feel comforted by the fact that I can pick up a gluten-free flour blend in the store and whip up some tasty scones without getting messy with the blender and tons of jars. I should add that I don’t have a gluten sensitivity, but a few people I like to share scones with do, and I also just really love the challenge that gluten-free baking presents. I’ve been baking with Bob’s Red Mill 1 to 1 Gluten Free Baking Flour and can confidently say that it’s the best pre-mixed gluten-free flour blend I’ve tried. The blend was formulated to substitute wheat flour in baking recipes in exact amounts, which makes it super easy to use if you ever want to try your hand at a gluten-free version of your favorite recipe. These blueberry lemon scones are my favorite thing I’ve made with the flour so far. I’ve tested three batches, and each one has disappeared within a day, with the help of friends and family. They are a true crowd pleaser, and make for a satisfying little breakfast or dessert. Slightly crisp on the outside and nice and crumbly inside, with pockets of blueberries, and a sweet and tangy lemon ‘glaze.’ There’s a lovely zing from lemon zest throughout, and they are pretty low maintenance in terms of preparation, as scones should be. I hope you’ll give them a try :) Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones   Print Serves: 8 scones Ingredients for the scones ½ cup unsweetened almond milk ½ tablespoon apple cider vinegar ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons gluten free rolled oats 1½ cups 1 to 1 gluten free flour blend ¼ cup plus 1 tablespoon coconut sugar, plus more for sprinkling on top 2 teaspoons baking powder pinch of sea salt zest of 2 organic lemons, divided ¼ cup neutral coconut oil - scoopable, at room temperature ½ cup pistachios - chopped, plus more for garnish 1½ cup fresh or frozen (not thawed) blueberries ¼ cup aquafaba (water from a can of chickpeas or other beans) 1 teaspoon vanilla extract for the glaze ¼ cup cashew butter 1½ tablespoons maple syrup or honey ¼ teaspoon turmeric - for color juice of 1 lemon Instructions to make the scones Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a baking sheet by covering it with a piece of parchment paper. Combine the almond milk and apple cider vinegar in a small bowl and set aside to make a vegan buttermilk. Pulse the rolled oats several times in a high speed blender or food processor to grind them partially. Combine the oats with the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt and ⅔ the amount of the lemon zest in a medium bowl, toss to mix thoroughly. Add coconut oil and work it into the flour mixture with a fork until mostly mixed in, with some small clumps remaining. Add the pistachios and blueberries, toss to combine. Make a well in the center, add the buttermilk, aquafaba and vanilla, and mix to combine. Take care not to overwork the batter. Transfer the batter to a floured surface and use your hands to form a disk about 1-inch thick. Cut into 8 wedges with a floured knife. Transfer the wedges onto the prepared baking sheet with a spatula or a pie server. Sprinkle some coconut sugar on top of each scone. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until the edges are golden and crispy. Let cool and drizzle with the glaze (recipe follows), sprinkle with the rest of the lemon zest and pistachios. to make the glaze In a small bowl, combine the cashew butter with the maple syrup and turmeric, mix until smooth. Add lemon juice and whisk until shiny and smooth, add more lemon juice or water if the glaze seems too thick. Drizzle over the scones and enjoy. Notes I learned from Minimalist Baker that coconut oil works best in vegan scones when its not in a frozen or a liquid state, but in between those two and scoopable, the way its sold in grocery stores from. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Roasted Eggplant and Pepper Pizza on a Buckwheat Crust Raw Chocolate Layer Cakes with Black Cherry and Orange Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette Pink Peppercorn Cookies from Small Plates and Sweet Treats .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

biscuit recipe | atta biscuits recipe | wheat biscuits recipe

May 11 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

biscuit recipe | atta biscuits recipe | wheat biscuits recipebiscuit recipe | atta biscuits recipe | wheat biscuits recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. an ideal and healthy snacks which can be part of tiffin box for kids and for adults too. there are several varieties and variations to biscuit recipe and it can be either prepared from wheat, plain flour or even with oats. further it can also be extended by adding chocolate, jam, nuts and even ginger and cumin. Continue reading biscuit recipe | atta biscuits recipe | wheat biscuits recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines

April 28 2017 My New Roots 

Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines Done is better than perfect. I cant tell you how many times I repeat this to myself on a daily basis, as a sort of mantra to soothe and convince the perfectionist inside me to just follow through. To just put it out there. I almost pushed publish on this blog post yesterday afternoon, but something was holding me back. Two things, in fact. First, the photos werent what I wanted them to be: they were on the boring side without a lot of colour, and not really inspiring. Second, the recipe itself just wasnt there. I was trying to make a vegan yogurt coating with coconut butter and although it was tasty, the texture was all wrong: chunky and gritty. Was it good enough? Probably. Would anyone have noticed what I saw as shortcomings? Probably not. But could I deal with it? Apparently, no. As I was putting the finishing touches on the post, it hit me like a bolt of lightening: I needed to use cashew butter to achieve the silky consistency I was after. Noooo! It was the solution I had been calling in, but to arrive at the witching hour just seemed cruel. How could I start all over at this point? Was I crazy to even try, considering I didnt know for sure that it would work out? With only minutes to make a decision, I hopped on my bike and cycled to the health food store. Again. Cursing myself, my brain, my ridiculous inability to know when to let go, and my insistence that what I put out in the world is my absolute best, really started to annoy me. I bought all the ingredients for the third time, raced home, and got to work. The cookies were the best theyd ever been. Perfect, in fact. But was it worth it? For anyone out there nodding their heads in recognition that they too, have these borderline masochistic tendencies to achieve an arbitrary portrait of perfection, may I ask what it is that drives us to create and then hold it all back if its not exactly what we imagined in our heads? Because nothing is perfect! When do we draw the line and just push publish? Is done really better than perfect? Because done for me it seems like settling for mediocrity a lot of the time. Even if its just a friggin cookie. Im not looking for answers here, just venting I suppose. But if you want to share your similar struggles, feel free in the comments. Its not often I open up or vent in this space, so maybe we can all throw a perfectionist party, and make sure to have these very perfect cookies on the table. Speaking of! Florentines are traditionally almond-centric biscuits, sometimes with the addition of dried fruit like cherries and orange zest, with a rich chocolate coating on the bottom. Because I really love dessert for breakfast, I was motivated to make a morning-appropriate version that wouldnt make me feel like a glutton. I chose to add some buckwheat to the mix since I love to start my day with whole grains, and swapped out the chocolate for a vanilla-cashew butter coating that I basically want to pour over my entire life. Like I mentioned, my original thought was to go with something yogurt-like, but once I made this saucy concoction, there was no need to pretend it was something else. Pure, divine, silky-smooth pleasure glaze! Ahem. I love these cookies because they are so simple to make with just a few ingredients, and incredibly fast. On my third testing, they were done - mixed, baked and glazed – in 20 minutes. If youre in a rush to get your treat fix, leave the cashew coating out of the equation, and youll still have a gorgeously tasty and satisfying little snack. As far as additions and flavours go, these wicked little morsels are kind of a blank slate. I made a couple batches with orange zest and one without. Personally, I really loved the citrusy warmth that the orange lends, and its nod to morning fodder, but you can also omit it for a more neutral taste. Instead, spice them up with cinnamon, cardamom, lemon zest, rose, lavender, coconut etc. I think adding cacao nibs would also be really delicious, as would dried blueberries, dried figs, or apricots. Whatever you choose to do, get ready to be very excited to get up in the morning. Couple these cookies with a turmeric latte, a piece of fruit and youll be good to go. Until 4 oclock when you want another one.     Print recipe     Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines Makes 12 Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 90g raw buckwheat groats 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70g slivered almonds (or sunflower seeds) 1/­­3 cup /­­ 45g almond meal 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup a couple pinches sea salt zest of 1 organic orange, optional Vanilla Cashew Coating: 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml cashew butter 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml coconut oil 1 Tbsp. pure maple syrup seeds from 1 vanilla bean pinch sea salt Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. Line a rimmed cookie sheet with baking paper. 2. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast buckwheat until golden, about 3 minutes. Transfer buckwheat to a mixing bowl to cool. In the same skillet toast the slivered almonds until golden, about 2 minutes. Transfer them to the bowl of buckwheat to cool, add the almond meal and stir to combine. 3. In the same skillet (no need to wash) over low heat, melt the coconut oil and add the orange zest, if using. Turn off the heat and whisk in the maple syrup and salt. Pour the liquid over the buckwheat and almond mixture and fold to combine. Do not wash the skillet. 4. Using a tablespoon measure, scoop out the florentine cookie mixture and set each one on the lined baking sheet with plenty of space in between (I baked these in 2 batches of six). Using the back of the spoon, flatten the cookies out a little. Place in the oven and bake for 7-10 minutes until the edges are golden and bubbly. Remove from oven and let cool for about 5 minutes. Transfer to a cooling rack and repeat with remaining mixture. 5. While the florentines are baking, make the cashew coating. Melt the coconut oil in the same skillet over low heat, then add the cashew butter and stir well to combine. Once melted, add the vanilla bean and maple syrup. Stir well and turn off the heat. 6. Once the florentines have cooled, make sure that the cashew coating is still liquid. Spoon a couple teaspoons on the bottom of each cookie and spread it as evenly as possible. Place on a lined baking sheet, coating side up in the fridge or freezer to set. Once firm, repeat with remaining coating, except this time place the coating side down on the lined baking sheet. Place in the fridge or freezer to set, then enjoy! Store leftovers in the fridge or freezer in a tightly sealed container for up to two weeks. Once I started editing the new photos for this post, I realized that the last batch of Florentines werent as golden, or as flat as the previous batches. I decided to let that one go. And Im very proud of that. *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Copenhagen! Just a reminder about my first two cookbook events in CPH this Spring. The first will be an intimate talk and demonstration at SLOW Copenhagen, and the second will be a magical, celebratory dinner in collaboration with the local, organic grocer and kitchen, Kost. Click on the images for more info and tickets! Cant wait to see you there.  The post Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines appeared first on My New Roots.

Green Pea Falafel Bowl

April 26 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Pea Falafel Bowl One of the first recipes we posted on the blog was baked herb & pistachio falafels. That was back in the days when we didn’t have three monsters tearing down the house. When I still had an old-fashioned job. And when baking a falafel instead of deep-frying it felt like a fresh new idea. Elsa once asked me if grandma’s older sister was alive when the dinosaurs lived on earth. I told her no (while simultaneously typing a message with a ton of dinosaur emojis to my mom). That is roughly how long ago that falafel recipe feels like. Dinosaur age. So much has happened since then. I still think it’s a good recipe and today’s falafel recipe has much of the same qualities. They are simple, baked, packed with fresh herbs and hold together excellently. If you don’t serve it with the mint yogurt, it is also vegan. We subbed the pistachios with some pumpkin seeds/­­pepitas this time and replaced half of the chickpeas with green peas to make them more suited for spring. It also gives them a slightly sweet tone and less dry than your average falafel (which is one of our favorite features with this recipe). We serve them in a bowl with roasted carrots, cinnamon spiked quinoa, beetroot hummus and a splash of mint yogurt instead of wrapping them up in lettuce or bread. We think of it as a spring-y Moroccan falafel bowl. I won’t claim that this is a dead-simple recipe (as it involves cooking, mixing and baking), but I at least find it comforting that the carrots, beetroot and falafels all are baked simultaneously in the oven. Before we jump to the recipe, we wanted to share the updated schedule for our little Green Kitchen At Home US book tour. And also this short video about the book that we did the other day. As we mentioned in our last post, we are coming to the US next week for some press activities. Both Luise and I will be in New York and then I’ll continue on my own to SF and LA. We are only doing a few public events and are very much hoping to see some of you there. New York > 1 May Our cooking class at Sur La Table is sold out but we will have a mingle, book signing and Q&A at CAP Beauty on 1 May, 7 pm. Entrance is free, you get to try some tasters from the book and we’ll both be there to chat. All you need to do is RSVP here.  San Francisco & Los Angeles > 3-5 May I’ll be at Credo Beauty in San Francisco on 3 May, 2-4 pm, signing books and chatting with you all about food, photography, kids and whatnot. I will also be doing the same in their Los Angeles store on 4 May, 5-7 pm. Free entrance, just RSVP to both events here. I’ll also be teaching a hands-on cooking class at Sur La Table in Los Angeles. There are still a few tickets available - so go get them here! For those of you who’s been asking, we will also be coming to London in June and Amsterdam after the summer. Enough about that. Let’s start cooking! Recipe notes o Falafel purists use soaked chickpeas instead of cooked. Cooked is however much quicker and works just fine. We also find that it’s easier on our digestion. o You don’t have to roast the beetroot for the hummus but can simply grate raw beetroot before mixing it. But since we’re using the oven anyway for the other parts of the bowl, we roast them to give the hummus a rounder flavor. Green Pea Falafel Bowl Serves 4 Falafels 1 cup /­­ 150 g green peas, fresh or frozen (thawed) 1 cup /­­ 150 g cooked chickpeas 2 small shallots, peeled and coarsely chopped 1-2 cloves garlic, peeled 2 tbsp buckwheat flour or potato starch 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 3 stalks fresh mint, leaves picked 3 stalks parsley, stems discarded 1 tbsp lemon juice 1 tsp ground cumin 1 tsp flaky sea salt 1-2 tbsp olive oil Beetroot Hummus 200 g raw beetroots 1 cup /­­ 150 g cooked white beans  3 tbsp light tahini (sesame paste) 4 tbsp lemon juice 3 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil 1 tsp ground cumin 1 clove garlic, peeled 1 tsp flaky sea salt Cinnamon Quinoa 1 cup uncooked Quinoa pinch flaky sea salt 1/­­2 tsp ground cinnamon 1 small handfull raisins (we used green raisins with a smoky flavor) To serve 4 carrots, peeled and cut into thick sticks (bake together with the beetroot) 2 avocados, sliced 4 handfuls mache lettuce 1/­­2 cucumber, sliced 12 radishes, sliced 1 cup plain yogurt a bunch fresh mint leaves, chopped a handful toasted almonds, chopped sesame seeds Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F fan mode (this is because we’re doing two plates simultaneously). Add all falafel ingredients (except the oil) to a food processor and pulse until mixed but not pureed. With moist hands, shape 16 mini falafel patties (roughly 1 generous tablespoon per falafel). Pour a little olive oil into the palm of your hand and then place each falafel in it, smoothing out the falafel and at the same time coating it in oil. Refill with oil for every fourth falafel. Place them on a baking tray covered with baking paper. Bake in the oven for 20 minutes, turning them after half the time. Peel the beets and cut in quarters. Place on a baking tray together with the prepared carrots (from the To serve list) and place in the oven (this can be done simultaneously as the falafel tray) for about 20 minutes or until baked through and soft. Let cool slightly and then place the beets (set the the carrots aside for serving) in a food processor (or bowl if using a stick blender) with the rest of the ingredients and mix for at least 2 minutes until very smooth. Taste and adjust the flavors to you liking. Prepare the quinoa while the vegetables are in the oven: Place rinsed quinoa in a saucepan, add 2 cups water, salt and cinnamon and bring to a boil. Lower the heat immediately and simmer for about 12-15 minutes. Stir in raisins and set aside. Stir together yogurt and a handful chopped mint leaves, set aside. Arrange all serving ingredients in bowls and top with beetroot hummus, quinoa and pea falafels. Sprinkle with almonds, sesame seeds and mint. Enjoy! PS! If you have already received our new book through online orders, we’d be super grateful if you could leave a short review of it on Amazon. Thank you! 

Freekeh Pilaf

April 17 2017 Meatless Monday 

Freekeh is an ancient grain that is newly becoming more popular. It’s made from roasted green durum wheat and is often compared to quinoa due to its high protein content. This pilaf recipe highlights freekeh’s unique flavor and versatility. This recipe comes to us from Tawnie of Kroll’s Korner. - 1/­­2 white onion, finely chopped - 2 cloves garlic, jarred or fresh - 3 tsp. olive oil - 1 cup Freekeh - 1/­­4 tsp. cinnamon - 1/­­4 tsp. ground allspice - 1/­­4 tsp. ground coriander - salt and pepper to taste - 2 cups vegetable broth or water - 2 tablespoons pine nuts - 1 handful of fresh mint, parsley and cilantro, chopped. - 3/­­4 cup Greek yogurt, plain nonfat - 1 1/­­2 tsp. lemon juice Place oil, onion, and 1 clove garlic into saucepan. Sauté on medium heat for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add Freekeh to pot, and then add the cinnamon, allspice, coriander, salt and pepper. Add vegetable broth or water and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to low. Let simmer for 20 minutes. Remove pan from heat and let sit for 5 minutes, covered. Then, remove lid and fluff with fork. Stir in herbs, mix well, and top with pine nuts! Wonderful alternative for rice pilaf! Optional: Mix together 3/­­4 cup Greek yogurt, garlic, and lemon juice and top on pilaf. Very tasty!! The post Freekeh Pilaf appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus

April 7 2017 My New Roots 

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus The first job I landed after moving to Copenhagen, was working as a chef in a little cafe. After a few weeks of consistently not burning lasagna and under seasoning everything, I was asked if I was interested in cooking on a few episodes on a local, public TV station. The producers suggested I choose a few dishes that I love, and filmed me in a friends kitchen, since mine was too small. My husband gently warned me beforehand that Danes dont respond well to overly-enthusiastic, hyperbolic Americans, so I faked it and was awkwardly not myself as I spoke lukewarmly about whole grains and beans, fermented things and dark leafy greens. The first recipe I made on the show was sprouted hummus, and although the recipe turned out well, I felt like a fraud. Because above all things, sprouts were, and still are, my true love. The show was on at 2 or 3 in the morning, and because I didnt have a television, I never actually saw it on air. Instead, I watched it on my computer on a borrowed CD, long after it had been on TV. Much to my dismay, the producers titled the show Cooking with Sareh, which still baffles me considering the fact that my name is spelled the exact same way in Danish. The program was poorly edited, badly lit, awkward in every sense, and in my attempts to come off as cool and nonchalant, I seemed utterly bored as I fondled chickpea sprouts - something that otherwise would get me pretty riled up. On the whole, this experience was totally mortifying, except for one small, redeeming factor. I was suddenly being recognized at work in the café, and on the bike paths of Christiania: hey sprout girl! theyd call at me. Its you! I didnt make your hummus, but your show is great, sprout girl, theyd say. If there was any consolation, this was it. I was Sprout Girl. So in case you missed my break out performance on Cooking with Sareh, and my reined-in, lackluster pitch about sprouts, here it is again. Because I am Sprout Girl forever and always. Sprouting is like any other kitchen endeavour: it seems pretty daunting until you actually do it, then youre left wondering what took you so long to try – a real facepalm moment. With simple equipment that you most likely have in your cupboard, and seeds that you already have in your pantry, its a fun and empowering practice that brings you one step closer to your food. Sprouts are so nutritious because they are life potential, ignited. When we soak a seed, we end its dormancy, and awaken the nutrition inside it needed to grow a plant which will in turn make more seeds and more plants. When we eat a sprout, we eat this potential! Pound for pound, sprouts have the largest amount of nutrients of any food. Did you get that? This is a big deal! And its all because sprouting increases vitamin content significantly, especially vitamin A, Bs, C and E, along with boosting calcium, iron, selenium, and zinc. The quality of protein and carbohydrates improves, as the sprouting process begins to break down the complex proteins and starches into amino acids, peptides, and simple carbohydrates needed by the seed to grow. At the same time, anti-nutrients such as phytic acid, protease and amylase inhibitors are neutralized. This makes a sprout very easy to digest with highly absorbable nutrients. Who is responsible for this influx of awesomeness? Its enzymes! Enzymes are compounds found in raw plants that are needed for nearly every biochemical process that takes place in our body, and something many of our modern diets are lacking. Sprouts are virtually loaded with them. There are up to 100 times more enzymes in sprouts than uncooked fruits and veggies! Enzymes are also what sets living food apart from raw food. Yes, raw foods still offer us enzymes, but eating a food that is alive guantees more enzymes, and in fact more nutrients altogether. As soon as a food is picked, it begins losing its nutrients. Imagine how much vitamin C is left in that orange, which has traveled hundreds, if not thousands of kilometers to get to your plate, and spent weeks, if not months in a storage facility before being dropped off at your local grocer. Sprouts are the remedy to this, pulsating with life and life-giving nutrients, and pretty much the freshest food you can eat outside of a garden. Sprouts are also incredibly low in calories, yet deliciously filling due to their high fiber and water content. A fantastic food to binge on, especially if youre trying to elbow out some of the other stuff from your diet. I love the versatility of sprouts, not only are there so many varieties, but they can be used in so many ways. Like this hummus for example! You can also go classic and top your sandwiches with sprouts, or fold them into grain salads, puree them into soups and even smoothies. I also love freshening up cooked dishes, like stir-fries, curries and pizzas with sprouts. Their crunch and earthy brightness are a welcoming balance to heavier, richer meals. If youre on a budget, sprouts are a sweet deal. Because the amount of food you sprout triples or quadruples in size, youll end up with way more to eat than you started with for the same price. Its kind of magical. Whats more, is that properly stored sprouts can last over a month, and some varieties up to 70 days. If youre prone to tossing away spoiled produce, sprouts will save you money, big time. Sprouting can take place anywhere you have access to fresh, clean water twice a day. Ive sprouted on road trips, beach holidays, visiting the in-laws...all over the place! And the groovy thing about taking your show on the road is that you can convince other people to get sprouting too. And sprouts are not just great for our health, but also the planet. Consider the fact that youre growing a garden right in your kitchen, using your own energy to make the magic happen. Its hyper-local food at its best! No chemicals or pesticides during the growing process, or fossil fuels for transportation. Could sprouts be the perfect food?! The answer is yes. But I may be a little biased. I am the Sprout Girl, after all. If you are concerned about mold or bacteria contamination, please understand that commercially-grown sprouts are propagated in an ideal environment for pathogens to proliferate. Just one more reason to grow your own sprouts at home where you can be sure of proper hygiene and care. Make sure that your jar or sprouting container is thoroughly clean, that youre rinsing your sprouts with cool water twice daily, and that your sprouts have plenty of airflow. After I drain my sprouts, I make sure that the seeds /­­ sprouts arent blocking the entire opening of the jar (see photo). If you follow these tips, you shouldnt have any problems. Scoring Seeds You can sprout just about anything, but the cheapest and easiest things are found in the bulk bin of your health food store! Lentils, beans, chickpeas, rice, buckwheat, wheat are all widely available and inexpensive. Its imperative that you choose organically-grown ingredients, as conventionally grown seeds are often irradiated, making them difficult, or even impossible to germinate. You can also purchase seeds online, especially the more specialty ones, like alfalfa, radish, onion, broccoli etc. Finding Equipment There are plenty of sprouting apparatuses that you can buy, but if youre just starting out, use a jar! I bet you already have one. – 1 sterilized, large-mouth, quart-sized glass jar with an airtight lid – small piece of cheesecloth – rubber band – a bowl or dish rack How to Sprout There are countless resources on this topic online, and even whole books written about sprouting, so I am presenting you with a very simple, yet rather foolproof technique. If you want to learn more (which I encourage you to do!) here’s a great place to learn about different methods, applications, as well as help and advice: Sprout People     Print recipe     Simple Sprouting Day 1 1. Prep (night) Take a quick glance at the seeds as you put them into the sterilized soaking container. Remove any stones, cracked /­­ damaged seeds, and rinse well. 2. Soak (night) A general rule is covering the seeds with 2-3 times the amount of water (e.g. 1 cup seeds : 2-3 cups water). Use pure, filtered, unchlorinated water. Skim off any seeds that are floating. Let sit for 8-12 hours. Day 2 1. Drain (morning) Put a piece of cheesecloth over the mouth of the jar and secure it with a rubber band. Drain the seeds letting all the water run out. 2. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 3. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 3 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 4 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) 3. Enjoy (night) Your sprouts are ready! The tail should be at least the length of the seed itself (if it is not quite there yet, continue with the rinsing and draining process until it is. Some seeds take a couple more days). If youre not going to eat all the sprouts right away, make sure you let the sprouts drain for at least 8 hours after their last rinse before you put them in the fridge. Never store wet sprouts, as they will spoil quickly. Store sprouts in the sprouting jar with an airtight lid for one month, or more.     Print recipe     Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus Makes 4 cups Ingredients: 2 cloves garlic 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml tahini 1/­­2 tsp. fine salt, to taste 2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (optional) zest of 1 lemon 4 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 4 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 4 cups /­­ 500g sprouted chickpeas (start with 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 300g dried chickpeas) Directions: 1. Pulse the garlic in the food processor until minced. Add all other ingredients, except for the sprouted chickpea and blend until you have a paste. Add the chickpeas and blend on high until as smooth as possible. Season to taste and adjust more salt /­­ spice if desired. To achieve an even smoother consistency, scoop hummus into a high-speed blender and blend on high for an additional 10-15 seconds. Serve immediately and store leftovers in an airtight container for up to five days. I hope that this process seems simple enough for you to try. I promise that once you start sprouting, you won’t be able to stop! It’s so easy, fun, and connecting – not to mention delicious. Good luck and happy sprouting, dear friends! xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Copenhagen! I am thrilled to announce my first two cookbook events in CPH this Spring. The first will be an intimate talk and demonstration at SLOW Copenhagen, and the second will be a magical, celebratory dinner in collaboration with the local, organic grocer and kitchen, Kost. Click on the images for more info and tickets! Can’t wait to see you there.    The post It’s Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

Aloo Tamatar Ki Sabji (Potato with Spicy Tomato Gravy)

April 3 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Aloo Tamatar ki Sabji (Potatoes with Spicy Tomato Gravy) Aloo Tamatar ki Sabji or Potatoes with spicy tomato gravy is a classic combination and a popular North Indian dish. Aloo Tamatar, is flavorful and delicious and the best part is that it goes well with all different kinds of bread and rice. - 3 medium-sized potatoes (boiled and peeled) - 1 cup tomatoes (finely chopped) - 2 Tbsp oil ((canola or vegetable)) - 1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 3 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder - 1/­­4 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 1 tsp finely grated ginger - 1 tsp salt - 2 cups water (approx. 2 cups) - 1/­­4 tsp garam masala - 2 Tbsp finely chopped cilantro (dhania) - 1 pieces green chili (seeded and cut into small , optional) - Break the potatoes by hand in bite size pieces and roughly mash them, this should make about 3 cups. - Heat the oil in a saucepan over medium high heat. Oil should be moderately hot, when you add the cumin seeds they should crack right of way. Add cumin seeds, and asafetida, as cumin seeds crack add the tomatoes. - Cook the tomatoes until they are soft and mushy. Add the other spices coriander powder, turmeric, chili powder and ginger, stir fry until tomato start separating from oil. This should take about 2 minutes. - Add potatoes and salt mix them well with spices, add water, as potatoes come to boil cover the pan and lower the heat to medium and let it cook for about ten minutes. - Mix the potatoes and mash some potatoes as mixing the potatoes, this will thickness to gravy. Adjust the water in gravy to your liking; gravy will thicken as it will cool. - Add garam masala and cilantro, and green chilies this is optional. Mix it well turn off the heat and cover the pan. Aloo Tamatar Sabji is ready. Serve this with Paratha, Purie, Plain Rice, or you choice of bread.   The post Aloo Tamatar Ki Sabji (Potato with Spicy Tomato Gravy) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.


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