watermelon - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Wheat dosa recipe | instant wheat flour dosa | godhuma dosa or godhi dose

Vegan Gluten-Free Green Bean Casserole

Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette

Cranberry-Carrot Cake from Vegan Holiday Kitchen










watermelon vegetarian recipes

Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette

November 15 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. I’ve been wanting to come up with a worthwhile roasted vegetable salad ever since the weather turned chilly. I can’t be the only one who loses appetite for cold, super-green, lettuce-y salads once it’s cold outside. I’ll still say yes to something like a hearty kale salad, but most other ones make me shiver, if not accompanied by something warm. This salad is anything but shiver-inducing. Fingerling potatoes, carrots, and red onion all get roasted together in the oven, then mixed with green split peas, parsley, and a very special miso vinaigrette. The result is a substantial and hearty fall salad that makes for a great side dish or even lunch. Lets talk about split peas for a second. Did you know they are not only good for soups? When I was growing up in the Soviet Union, split pea soup or split pea puree was on the menu of every kindergarten/­­school lunch, and neither item was my favorite. Since then Ive learned that I like my split peas left intact, with a little bit of bite even. They are protein-rich, instantly making any dish more nourishing, and they are great at drinking up any dressing that theyre mixed with, which makes them perfect for salads. They take this salad from being just a plate of vegetables to a complete, well-rounded dish, thats acceptable to eat on its own. Do you have any favorite split pea recipes? Whether you use split peas, beans, lentils or chickpeas, making a habit of incorporating at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week will lead to some sustainable, nourishing and affordable meals. For more recipes using pulses, check out our White Bean Tuna Sandwich, Smoky Chickpea Croutons, Fennel-Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans, Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans, Red Lentil Gazpacho, or any recipes on the Half Cup Habit website. Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the miso vinaigrette 2 tablespoons white miso paste 2 tablespoons brown rice vinegar 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime or lemon juice 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil 1 teaspoon tamari 1 garlic clove - minced ¼ cup olive oil for the salad 1 cup green or yellow split peas - soaked in purified water w/­­ a splash of acv overnight sea salt 2 lb fingerling potatoes - halved or quartered 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil - melted freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary (optional) 3 medium carrots - diced diagonally 1 medium red onion - cut into small wedges 1 small bunch parsley - finely chopped handful of dill - finely chopped (optional) Instructions to make the vinaigrette Place the the miso paste into a small bowl. Add 1 tablespoon of the brown rice vinegar and mix until smooth. Add the rest of the brown rice vinegar, lime/­­lemon juice, sesame oil, tamari and garlic, stir to combine. Continue stirring and slowly pour in the olive oil to emulsify. to make the salad Drain and rinse the split peas and combine them with plenty of purified water and sea salt in a medium pot. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook, partially covered, for about 30 minutes, until soft, but not mushy. Drain over a colander and set aside. In the meantime, preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare two parchment paper-covered baking trays. Place the potatoes on one of the trays, drizzle with half of the oil, sprinkle with salt, pepper, and half of the rosemary, if using, and mix. Put the carrots and onion on the second tray, do not mix them together. Drizzle both with oil, salt, pepper and the rest of the rosemary, if using, and toss to coat. Place both trays in the oven and roast for 30-40 minutes, until all vegetables are golden and cooked throughout. The onion might cook quicker than the potatoes and carrots. Remove it from the baking sheet earlier, if thats the case. Let the roasted vegetables cool slightly and combine them with the cooked split peas in a large bowl, add the herbs and the vinaigrette, and toss to coat. This salad gets even better with time, as everything marinates in the vinaigrette. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Metabolism Boosting Everything Salad Watermelon Panzanella Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Baked Veggie Spring Rolls .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin

October 11 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Amy Chaplin is an author and chef, whose approach to whole foods and cooking is endlessly inspiring. Her cookbook is nothing short of a kitchen bible to us. We had the pleasure of meeting up with Amy in NYC a few years ago and had the best time chatting about our favorite subjects like sprouted flours, cookbook publishing, and acupuncture. Needless to say, we were excited to get a peak at her self-care routine. In this interview, Amy tells us about the valuable self-care tips she learned from her mother, her favorite meals made with pantry staples, the skincare brand she’s been using since she was a teenager, her approach to exercise, stress, and so much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I like both. I like to have a morning routine and create a work routine for whatever project Im working on but I also like to have time for free thinking and spontaneously connecting with friends. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I get up early, 6 am  is the usual time but sometimes eariler depending on what Im working on. I make warm lemon water, light a candle and mediate for 10 to 15 minutes. In late summer the sun is coming up just as I finish and I usually sit for a bit and often reply to messages from Austrlia (they are going to bed around that time). Then I feed our two dogs (my wife takes them out on a long morning walk) start making breakfast and make sencha tea. Sometimes I skip the sencha and have a matcha latte after breakfast but I try not to have too much caffeine, as much as I love it! If Im working on recipes from home, I quickly shower, dress and get started right away....sometimes before breakfast but it depends on what Im testing :) -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I stop working on the computer before dinner and leave it closed. I leave my phone downstairs so its far from my bedroom. I get into bed and usually read cookbooks or watch an episode of any series Im currently obsessed with :) Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast –  soaked oats + chia (recipe is in my book) or activated grain porridge with homemade nut milk, cardamom and berries. I usually eat grains once a day and its usually in the morning. Lunch – Beans of some kind --depending on recipes Im testing. Kraut or other fermented veg, greens--salad or steamed depending on weather. I usually add some toppings too: hemp seeds, toasted seeds, sunflower sprouts, scallions anything to make it tasty Snack – Seeded crackers and nut butter/­­avocado/­­bean pate or chia pudding or coconut yogurt Dinner – An egg or tempeh, avocado, steamed veg and a dressing of some kind--this is often quite small as Im not always hungry if I have a good lunch or if Im testing and sampling recipes. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Yes. I love green tea. Sencha is my favorite for its fresh, grassy umami taste. Rishi Tea First Flush Sencha is sublime. I also love their ceremonial grade matchas with foamed, homemade almond milk. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to but I havent eaten sugar on a regular basis for years. If Im craving something sweet I eat a few spoons of Anitas coconut yogurt--it has a naturally sweet flavor from coconut with no sweetener. If I have a berry compote around Ill have some of that with it but I never sweeten them as Ive gotten used to just the sweetness of the berries. Of course there are times when Im testing recipes for cakes and muffins and I do enjoy tasting them and the same goes for good raw chocolate. Im not rigid about it as its part of being a chef but I dont seek out sugar on a daily basis. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I change depending on what my acupuncturist recommends in the way of Chinese herbs. I have been taking spirulina to increase protein and greens lately. I take a vitamin D. Ive been adding maca powder to my breakfasts for years so dont really consider it a supplement. I like adding locally grown ashwagandha (from Furnace Creek Farm) and reishi or chaga mushroom powder to hot cacao drinks. I drink nettle tea everyday because I love it, especially when you can get it fresh from the farmers market. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  With my job being so physical, these days I gravitate towards Qi Gong and yoga--the gentler classes. I also tend to exercise by default. Walking everywhere, long dog walks, biking and general schlepping around the city and up and down stairs with heavy bags of veggies! -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I used to push myself with torturous classes and long runs but now I do less and enjoy it more. I know that I am more productive when I make time for movement but it has to be mindful.  I do yoga at home and love it when I have the time for long luxurious classes...especially restorative. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Beauty to me is an inner glow that comes from something beyond what and how we take care of our bodies. Mostly it comes with time and a spiritual sense of oneself, our path, the world and other beings around us. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Ive used Dr. Hauschka since I was a teenager. I have a huge respect for biodynamic growing practices and love the way they preserve their products naturally. I think its one of the most difficult things with natural skin care products--preserving. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Local organic veggies, lots of greens, seeds… -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I notice a difference in my skin when I use a warm compress of essential oils (Dr. Hauschka calls them bath oils). You put a few drops in warm water and soak a face cloth, squeeze it out and press it into your skin. I use lemongrass in the morning and lavender at night. Then you cleanse and use the same water to wash the cleanser off. They smell so good and your skin feels really clean and enlivened afterwards. Its my mothers beauty secret, she looks amazing! :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Mainly daily meditation and breathing. I dont feel as clear or grounded without it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Hot shower and miso soup :) -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Make miso soup with lots of ginger and scallions and I also take Woodstock C & F Seasonal Support. It always helps with a sore throat or when Im feeling under the weather. Gargling sea salt with warm water. Colloidal silver spray. Hot lemon drink with grated ginger and turmeric. Bath and sleep. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely overlap. I love what I do and have found comfort in the kitchen for as long as I can remember. Of course there are days when work completely takes over but even when my schedule is jam packed, I try and make time to spend with my partner, cuddle the dogs and see family--it just means well be eating recipes that are being tested and theyre grilled for feed back! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I aften find myself saying “everything is working out for my highest good and remembering that everything is perfect as it is. I grew up with Louise Hay books. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Over time my lifestyle and diet has improved and I have a much more balanced approach. I used to be quite strict at times and I know that its not the way to great health for me anyway. I think now I have better overall health so I dont get thrown off on a regular basis. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Paul Pitchford’s “Healing with Whole Foods has been in my life for over 20 years and I still consult it. It always gets me in the mood for pure, simple temple-like food. My self care is also influenced by my mother. She has a deep connection to nature and a daily ritual of foot baths, lemon water in the morning and making a nightly hot water bottle (in the cooler months) Ive carried on these rituals...but dont seem to get the foot baths in as often as she does. Knowledge -- Your recipes are so well thought out and always turn out delicious, as well as incredibly nourishing. What is your process when it comes to recipe development? Thank you so much! My recipes all begin with what I crave, which is mostly deeply nourishing food with clean uncomplicated flavors. They have to make sense to me and not only be healthy but also be visually beautiful. Nature and beauty are what inspire me most. When I am developing recipes I want the steps to be clear and thorough. I spend a lot of time with new recipes before they are published. Theyre all tested over and over again by myself, friends, family and recipe testers. I feel a lot of responsibility to readers who spend time and money and a lot of effort making my recipes...they have to work and taste delicious! -- You are a big proponent of keeping a well-stocked pantry. What are some of your favorite meals that you like to throw together with pantry ingredients? Simple wraps with nori, fermented veggies, avocado (not really pantry but I always have a few of varying ripeness around). Barrys tempeh, which is made from white beans and adzuki beans and sold frozen, it tastes amazing just panfried in coconut oil. In Australia you can get fresh fava bean tempeh and Im missing it so much! Red lentil soup with lemon and spinach from my cookbook. That is perfect for right now when the weather is getting cooler and if you dont have much in the way of veg. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Drive to the country with my wife, play with my nephew, drink tea and sit in the morning sun. Have a pedicure. Travel and be in nature. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – “The Power of Intention” by Wayne Dyer Song/­­Album – Blue by Joni Mitchell Movie – I recently saw Lion and was so moved Piece of Art – Yoko Onos simple, whimsical pieces -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in NYC? ABC V, Via Carota, Ilbuco Alimentari, De Maria -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – Good tea selection + strainer for infusing – Activated or toasted nuts – Spirulina – Pajamas and cosy sox (no matter the season) – Large scarf/­­shawl – Cardigans -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Luise from Green Kitchen Stories, Henrietta Inman, Elenore from Earthsprout, Emma from My Darling Lemon Thyme..... Photos by Amy Chaplin and Stephen Kent Johnson. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Meatless Monday Pittsburgh Hosts Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh Pirates

October 2 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Pittsburgh Hosts Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh PiratesLast Monday, September 26th, Meatless Monday Pittsburgh hosted the first ever Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh Pirates! The event was a great success with over 300 tickets sold. Each ticket included a corner box seat for the Pirates vs. Orioles game, as well as access to the exclusive vegan menu. Guests dined on delicious meatless fare including: - Pretzels, chips and dips (house chips with French onion dip, corn chips with smashed avocado salsa, pretzel sticks with local PA maple mustard) - Power chop salad (kale, cabbage, grilled vegetables, garbanzo beans, sunflower seeds, pepitas, citrus-dijon dressing) - Ultimate vegan burger (beefless beef patty, lettuce, tomato, dill pickles, vegan house sauce, sesame seed bun) - Buffalo cauliflower with vegan ranch dipping sauce - Sweet potato tacos (black beans, cilantro, salsa verde, tortilla threads, nondairy sour cream, flour tortilla) - Watermelon and berries for dessert     The delicious meat-free menu was enjoyed by vegetarians, vegans, and flexitarians alike. Everyone left the ballpark full and the Pirates bringing home a win was the cherry on top! The post Meatless Monday Pittsburgh Hosts Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh Pirates appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Sauce

August 9 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Sauce Hello! This is David & Luise. Remember us? During our almost eight years of blogging we have never left it silent for two months before. We’re going to do what we always do in these situations and blame the kids. Wether we miss a dentist appointment, forget to answer a text message, get a parking ticket or are two months late with a blog post, it’s always our kid’s fault. In this case however it’s actually somewhat true. We simply underestimated how much time and attention three kids on summer holiday takes. They have sooo much energy. I (David) have been thinking of ways to connect them (and with them I mean Isac) to the power grid so that they (he) could replace a nuclear power plant or two. And I could perhaps cash in a Nobel price for saving the world. Anyway, after a couple of weeks of feeling bad about not having a single second over to blog new recipes, we instead decided to give ourselves a summer break from it all. So we have been trying to keep up with our children’s pace (obviously impossible) and play on their rules (also impossible because they ignore rules) this summer. It’s been fun and much needed. But we are here now with plenty of new recipe ideas and projects. Lots of other things have happened during the summer. We almost bought ourselves a tiny smoothie bar in a park, we burnt pancakes from Green Kitchen at Home inside a jam-packed little book store in Bath and we have planned the release of the European languages next month, but we’ll find time to talk more about all that. For now, let’s just talk food. Before the summer and watermelon season is all over. This recipe has been going on repeat all summer. It’s actually a combination of two recipes which we recently realized work brilliantly together. A simple watermelon and halloumi salad and our Magic Green Sauce. We first got the idea to combine watermelon with halloumi from a recipe photo in a supermarket pamflett and from that combo, we’ve added some chickpeas, cherry toms and pumpkin seeds to make it less of a side and more of a meal. It’s a really nice combination. Rich and chewy halloumi, sweet and fresh watermelon, crunchy pumpkin seeds and a tangy, flavorful and slightly spicy sauce. If I wasn’t such a humble guy, I would say that it’s probably one of the best watermelon salads you’ll try this summer. Luckily, I’m super humble and will just say that it’s pretty good. A simple vegan option would be to replace the halloumi with marinated tofu. Just make sure to squeeze out the liquid before marinating it, so it soaks up all the flavor. Quinoa, black lentils or rice could also be a great addition if you want to make this salad more substantial. Here is a little salad assembling action by Luise. Technically, the Magic Green Sauce is just our take on Chimichuri with a more hippie name. We use lime juice instead of vinegar and have added a little avocado to give it the right balance between creamy and chunky and also a few drips maple syrup to round off the sharpness from the other flavors. The magic lies in its ability to transfer any simple dish into something flavorful. Apart from this salad, we also use it on scrambled eggs, as a dip for raw crudités, inside rye sandwiches and on top of shakshuka. We have made it with a number of different herb combinations and found that anything goes (but parsley, cilantro/­­coriander and mint is still a fav). Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Green Sauce Serves 4 Watermelon & Halloumi Salad 1 kg /­­ 2 lb watermelon 200 g /­­ 7 oz halloumi 150 g /­­ 1 cup good quality cherry tomatoes  1 can /­­ 200 g /­­ 1 cup cooked chickpeas  60 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup pumpkin seeds /­­ pepitas 2 large handfuls Mâche lettuce (or any tender lettuce) 2 tbsp olive oil 1 lime Salt Magic Green Sauce 1 large handful (30 g /­­ 1 tightly packed cup) mixed fresh herbs (we used parsley, cilantro and mint) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 120 ml olive oil Juice from 1 lime 1 tbsp capers 1 tsp maple syrup 1 clove garlic 1 small chili 1/­­2 avocado 1/­­2 tsp sea salt flakes Start by preparing the sauce. Add all sauce ingredients to a food processor and pulse a few times until coarsely mixed, check the flavor and consistency and add more salt, herbs or oil if needed. If you don’t have a food processor, finely chops herbs, capers, garlic and chili, mash the avocado and mix everything in a bowl together with olive oil, lime juice and maple syrup. Add salt to taste. Then set aside. Dice the watermelon and halloumi, quarter the tomatoes and rinse the chickpeas. Toast the pumpkin seeds on medium heat in a dry pan with a little salt until they begin to pop, then transfer them to a chopping board and chop coarsely. Add a little oil to the pan and fry the halloumi for a couple of minutes until golden on all sides. Arrange the lettuce in a bowl or on a serving platter. Add chickpeas, tomatoes, watermelon and halloumi. Squeeze over a little lime juice and drizzle with oil and toss until mixed. Top with pumpkin seeds and Magic Green Sauce, with extra in the side. Enjoy! ***************** PS! We are off to Rome now to celebrate that it was 10 years ago that my drunk feet tried to seduce dance Luise on a club by the Tiber while simultaneously using ALL my Italian pick up lines on her (took me approx 1 hour before I realized that she was Danish and not Italian!). We’re bringing all the kids this time and we’d really appreciate a comment if you know any good places to eat, fun playgrounds, outdoor pools or your favorite gelato bars. Grazie!

ACV Drinks for Health and Energy: E-Book

August 5 2017 VegKitchen 

ACV Drinks for Health and Energy: E-Book On VegKitchens popular page featuring apple cider vinegar and weight loss, many readers are seeing the results of adding ACV to their daily regimen, not only for the possibility of losing pounds, but improving energy and well-being. In this e-book featuring simple recipes for ACV drinks for health and energy, youll also learn about a […] The post ACV Drinks for Health and Energy: E-Book appeared first on VegKitchen.

Watermelon, Cucumber, and Feta Mason Jar Salads

July 3 2017 Oh My Veggies 

When its too hot to cook, try these individual watermelon feta salads with cucumber, feta cheese, fresh basil, and a honey-jalape?o dressing.

Strawberry-Watermelon Slush (with ACV option)

June 12 2017 VegKitchen 

Strawberry-Watermelon Slush (with ACV option) There are few beverages more hydrating for summers hottest days than a fresh watermelon slush. With added strawberries, this semi-frozen sweet drink will keep you cool and refreshed. If youd like, give it a probiotic boost with a little raw organic apple cider vinegar -- its benefits are legion, and youll hardly taste it! Makes: 2 […] The post Strawberry-Watermelon Slush (with ACV option) appeared first on VegKitchen.

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl

March 10 2017 My New Roots 

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Poke seems to be everywhere these days, from fine restaurant menus, to fast-casual and even food trucks. Chefs are coming up with clever combos and creative reinterpretations - even fish-free versions for the veg set. I knew had to take a stab at it. Or at least a poke. Sorry. For those of you hearing about poke for the first time, this fresh and tasty dish (pronounced POH-kay), hails from Hawaii. In its most unadulterated form, poke is raw fish, originally combined with sea salt, candlenut and seaweed. It evolved over the years as ingredient availability increased, and the salt was replaced with soy sauce, the seaweed with spring onion, the candlenut with sesame and so on. Once it hit mainland America a few years ago, poke mania ensued and the dish evolved to become more of a meal - not just a snack. Now it is often served atop rice and garnished with all manner of innovative ingredients. Fully-focused poke restaurants have established themselves in major cities across North America. Many of these eateries allow their patrons to customize their bowls with veggies, sea weed, pickles, beans, nuts, and alt-grains, tapping into the to the fact that fast, fresh, healthy meals are becoming mainstream. Which totally rocks. I had most of the elements for my own poke-inspired version in my head...except for the fish (the most important part?). I racked my brain to come up with something that looked just like tuna or salmon, but didnt want to use fruit, like watermelon or papaya, since I didnt want the dish to be sweet. It wasnt until I was trying to fall asleep one night, that it came to me...chiogga beets! Chiogga, or candy-striped beets are gorgeously two-toned when they are raw. Sliced thin horizontally, they reveal rings of deep pink pigment and creamy white, resembling something that your grandmother keeps on her coffee table in a crystal dish. But for anyone who has ever roasted these stunning creatures will know that the magic doesnt last; the magenta bleeds into the white during cooking, resulting in an almost homogenous pale pink, with slight variegation. WHICH LOOKS EXACTLY LIKE TUNA. I almost couldnt sleep. Too excited. The next day I gathered up all the things Id like in a poke bowl: short grain brown rice (not long grain - an important distinction), spring onion for bite, carrot for crunch, edamame for pop and protein, and avo for creaminess. I took this last one a step farther and blended it with lemon and wasabi for the most boss sauce ever. This alone would be delish on most things...please try it. And for the fishy component, I thought back to the raw vegan tuna I made for my first cookbook, and how effective adding a sprinkle of nori was to boost that fresh-from-the-sea flavour. This is not a deal breaker for the overall dish, but it definitely made it taste complete. If you cant find nori flakes, just crunch up a couple sheets of the stuff that youd use to make sushi. Easy fix! I like to use wasabi powder in the avo cream since the pre-made stuff in a tube is questionable. Have you ever read the ingredient list on one of those packages? It can be scary stuff. In a pinch, use it, but tracking down the powder is worth it from a nutrition standpoint, and also a flavour one. The real stuff tastes infinitely better! What a shocker. Wasabi is Japanese horseradish, and like its western counterpart, it belongs to the Brassica family, like cabbage, broccoli and mustard. The root is dried and then pulverized, which gives us the powder that we can blend with water to create wasabi paste. It is a difficult crop to grow, which explains the high price for the genuine product. Most wasabi powders dont contain any wasabi at all, but are instead a mix of mustard powder and regular horseradish mixed with green food dye. A high-quality wasabi powder should be organic and contain only horseradish and wasabi. The colour should be pale green - not disco neon. Most health food stores carry wasabi powder. This is a good brand. Everything unfolded just as Id hoped it would. The beets came out perfectly pink with those thin white stripes that look just like fat striation. The marinade that I tossed them around in was acidic and ginger-y and just plain yum. Building the meal up with the rice, the beans, the veggies, a dollop of cream, a sprinkle of nori and roasted sesame, was ever so satisfying and fun. This healthy, fresh meal is calling you. No need to poke about, just make it. Again, sorry.     Print recipe     Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Serves 3-4 Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 200g short grain brown rice, soaked overnight if possible 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 2 cups /­­ 250g edamame beans, fresh or frozen 2 tsp. cold-pressed olive oil a couple pinches flaky sea salt Beets & Marinade 3 medium Chiogga (candy striped) beets 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1 tsp. finely grated ginger pinch fine sea salt Avocado Wasabi Cream 2 medium ripe avocados 2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1-2 tsp. wasabi powder, to taste pinch fine sea, to taste 2 spring onions, sliced lengthwise into ribbons 2 medium carrots, julienned 2 Tbsp. sesame seeds 3 Tbsp. nori flakes Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Wrap beets in aluminum foil and place on a baking sheet in the oven. Roast until tender, about 45 minutes (to check doneness, peel back the foil of one beet and insert the tip of a sharp knife. If there is little resistance, its ready). Peel back foil from each beet and let cool slightly. 2. While the beets are roasting, make the rice. Drain and rinse well. Place in a pot with 2 cups /­­ 500ml of fresh water and salt. Cover, bring to a boil and reduce to simmer. Cook until tender (add more during cooking if necessary), about 45 minutes. 3. While the rice is cooking, make the Avocado Wasabi Cream. Scoop out the flesh from both avocados and add to a food processor. Blend on high, then add the lemon juice, wasabi powder and salt. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. 4. In a medium bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil, ginger and salt. Slip the skins off the cooled beets. Cut the beets into cubes and toss in the marinade. Let sit for at least 20 minutes. 5. While the beets are marinating, bring a medium pot of water to the boil. Add a few pinches of salt and the edamame. Simmer for a couple minutes until bright green and tender (do not overcook!). Drain and rinse under cold water to halt cooking. Toss with a little olive oil and sprinkle with flaky salt. 6. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast sesame seeds, stirring often until fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside. 7. Julienne the carrots. 8. To assemble, divide the rice among the bowls. Add the marinated beets, edamame, carrots and a dollop of Avocado Wasabi Cream. Sprinkle with nori flakes, the toasted sesame seeds and top with the spring onions. Enjoy! I’m on my last few days of the North American tour now. Honestly, it’s been just magical and I am so grateful to all of you who came out to show some love and connect with the healthy community around them! I have just one more event left, and if you’re in LA, please come to The Springs tomorrow! I’ll be giving a lecture on Improving Immunity, Digestion and Detoxification, serving a delicious lunch, and launching a recipe collaboration with their chef! Hope to see you there. All love and smiles, Sarah B Show me your bowls on Instagram! #mnrpokebowl The post Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl appeared first on My New Roots.

From Garden to Grill: The Tasty AND Socially Conscious Way to BBQ

September 5 2016 Meatless Monday 

From Garden to Grill: The Tasty AND Socially Conscious Way to BBQWhen it comes to turning your grill green, you have a smorgasbord of issues to choose from. Youve probably heard that gorging on meat filled with hormones and antibiotics is not good for your health. Or, that you can save a lot of carbon emissions by going meatless at least one day a week. Then there are the land sustainability and the water security issues. Throwing a barbecued fruit-and-veggie party is not only fun and inventive; it could change the course of a lot of peoples lives. But what you may not realize is that greening your grill sacrifices no flavor at all. In fact, the sweet, smoky notes that barbecuing brings out in fruits and vegetables will speak for themselves--once you get the hang of green grilling. Ready to take on the meatless grilling challenge? Share your pictures with Meatless Monday and Slow food USA using the hashtag #GrillChallenge on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!   Tips to Help Get You Started Go firm, go fresh. When it comes to grilling, shop the freshest fruits and vegetables at your local farmers market. The firmer the vegetable, the less it will crumble when grilled. Court the usual suspects. Traditional candidates for the grill are peppers, carrots, beets, turnips, zucchini, corn, green beans, asparagus, tomato (firm ones), onion, eggplant, garlic (whole cloves), potato, squash, peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, and turnips. For fruits, consider peaches, apples, pineapple, and figs. But also try the unusual. Avocado, artichoke, romaine lettuce, portobello mushroom, and watermelon are just some of the new grillees that are becoming trendy. Oil down first. Many vegetables need just a light brushing of olive oil before grilling. For extra kick, add spices and marinate overnight, Arrange the perfect meatless match-up. Kabobs are a BBQ staple, but you can make them entirely with veggies: think tofu cubes mixed with cherry tomatoes, mushrooms, roasted potatoes or just about any other vegetable that strikes your fancy. Support guilt-free burgers. Make your own veggie burgers packed with hearty ingredients like black beans, lentils, quinoa, or chickpeas. You can also find healthy pre-made patties at supermarkets and natural food stores. Make a burger trade. Swap a meat pattie for a portobello mushroom or eggplant slices. Use your same bun and add your favorite toppings, like avocados, caramelized onions, roasted red peppers, or an olive spread. Smoke out your pizzas. Turn up the creativity and make delicious veggie pizzas right on the grill. All you need is pizza dough, sauce, and your favorite vegetables thinly sliced or pre-grilled. For dessert, consider a fruit pizza with grilled peaches drizzled with vanilla icing. Cross party lines. Dressing your grilled veggies in taco form will garner you a lot of new fans. Be prepared to make extras. Keep up the cubes. Tofu can be bland so enlist your favorite marinade recipe to add flavor. Grill the cubes up and add them to a salad, serve them with veggies, or enjoy them as appetizer served with a dip. Give your salads a good grilling. Garnish grilled romaine lettuce with a bit of fruit, feta cheese, and extra virgin olive oil, or simply drizzle with balsamic vinaigrette. Enlist your favorite sides. When planning a meatless BBQ, pasta salads, raw vegetables, and hummus dip are great ways to turn your plant-based dishes into a full meal. Grill-Worthy Recipes to Download and Share   The post From Garden to Grill: The Tasty AND Socially Conscious Way to BBQ appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn

August 3 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn A bit on the state of things around here - The kitchen renovations have been put off until October, and all I can say is that I’m very relieved. I knew that gutting the kitchen right after submitting the cookbook manuscript would be chaotic, but when it actually came down to it, I felt even more unprepared and exhausted than I ever expected. Not to mention, I still have a list of recipes to perfect for the book, which requires a fully working kitchen. Thankfully, our contractor – the only good one we could find after months of meetings and unreturned calls (because sometimes people in Florida are too chill) – is booked up two months in advance. A blessing in disguise, if I ever saw one. Among other things, I’m finding it painfully difficult to choose tile for the kitchen floor (Moroccan? Spanish? Mosaic? Forget the tile and do hard-wood?) and I’m really welcoming this extra time for making a decision. I am still working on the staircase leading up to the kitchen, and if you follow us on snapchat (golubkakitchen), you’ve likely seen some snaps of that whole process. The stairs were covered in bad carpet by previous owners, and finally stripping off that dust magnet of a surface felt great. Re-finishing the wooden stairs underneath, however was a huge pain, and re-awakened my carpal tunnel, which started when I was working in the dental field. But at least the stairs are looking great. Paloma goes back to school mid-August and turns eight around the same time too. We’re looking for a Beatles-related present (girl has serious Beatlemania), and the birthday cake will be an ice cream cake, which I will hopefully share here one of the coming Sundays. I recently promised to do more salad posts, and since we are getting into the hottest part of the summer, salads are the key item at any given meal around these parts. And this Caesar, you guys! I’ve already made it several times since coming up with the entirely vegan Caesar dressing. The dressing is everything you want your salad leaves drenched in (and you will want to drench with this one, not just drizzle) – it’s garlicky, creamy and incredibly savory. I aimed for a salad that can be eaten as a main course, and besides the addition of protein-rich beans in the dressing, there are crispy, golden tempeh ‘croutons’ that will fill you up nicely. Grilled peaches and corn contribute perfect little pockets of juice and sweetness here, and Laura’s pine nut parm is optional but very addictive. This Caesar is also easily adaptable to other seasons – instead of the peaches and corn, include roasted squash in the fall/­­winter, asparagus/­­peas in the spring, etc., etc. It’s August! Take it easy and enjoy this last stretch of summer, perhaps even with some hearty Caesar in tow ;) Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients for the Caesar dressing 1 cup cooked white beans, plus cooking liquid/­­liquid from can to achieve desired dressing consistency 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice ½ tablespoon Dijon mustard ½ tablespoon vegan Worcestershire sauce 1 teaspoon capers ½ teaspoon maple syrup ¼ teaspoon sriracha 1 garlic clove sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste 2 tablespoons olive oil for the salad 4-6 corn ears 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil - divided freshly ground black pepper - to taste 3-6 ripe, sweet peaches - cut in half 1 package tempeh - cubed 1 medium bunch kale - stems removed, leaves cut into bite-sized pieces ½ tablespoon olive oil sea salt - to taste 1 small head Romaine lettuce - torn into bite-size pieces pine nut Parmesan - optional Instructions to make the dressing Combine all the ingredients, with the exception of the cooking liquid and olive oil in an upright blender. Blend until smooth, adding in cooking liquid as needed to achieve the desired creamy salad dressing consistency. Add olive oil with the motor still running. to make the salad Rub corn ears with 1 tablespon coconut oil, salt and black pepper and grill on an outdoor grill or under the broiler, watching and rotating the corn, until charred in places. Let cool slightly and cut kernels off the ears, set aside. Grill peaches on an outdoor grill or under the broiler until charred. Let cool and slice into wedges. Set aside. Warm the remaining 1 tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium pan. Add tempeh cubes, sprinkle with salt and fry until golden and crispy. Set aside. Place kale in a large mixing bowl, drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt, and massage until wilted. Add in torn Romaine lettuce. Pour the dressing over the greens and toss to coat. Distribute between bowls or plates, top with corn kernels, peach slices, tempeh croutons and sprinkle with pine nut Parmesan, if using. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle Roasted Pepper Lasagna Baby Spinach and Strawberry Salad with Pink Dressing No Noodle Pad Thai .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Exercisers: Make Your Own Fuel Food!

July 20 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Exercisers: Make Your Own Fuel Food! If you like to run, bike, hike or swim, then you know how well you feel and perform can be greatly affected by eating the right foods before, during, and after an intense workout or event. But you might be really, really tired of energy bars. If so, take a look at Matthew Kadeys new book, Rocket Fuel: Power-Packed Food for Sports & Adventure--in it, he shows how easily you can these snacks, smoothies and energy bars yourself. The benefits are huge:  You can tailor your power food to include ingredients you like and that meet your dietary needs, without the non-food additions that many commercial sports snacks and drinks rely on. And, youll save money. Tasty bars and smoothies As a registered dietitian who specializes in sports nutrition, Kadey understands what an athletes body needs, and offers lots of simple recipes like Millet Cherry Bars, Zucchini Bread Bites, Hot Chocolate Recovery Smoothie, Watermelon Slushie and others--real-food fuel, as he calls them. He uses ingredients like cacao nibs, chia seeds, almond flour and other nutrient-dense foods to make refreshingly flavorful snacks. This last point is key--Kadey is a long-distance cyclist who knows that we all get tired of eating the same gels and energy bars again and again, which can lead many to not eat enough. But keeping an even energy level during a game, bike ride, or long run, is essential for endurance. Something for Everyone In his book, foods Kadey categorizes recipes by when they can provide a needed fuel: before, during and after a major workout or competitive event. And Kadey indicates which recipes are diary-free, gluten-free, Paleo-friendly and vegetarian or vegan-friendly. Even if youre not a sports enthusiast, you can make any of these power-packed snacks for those times when you need an energy boost or food break--theyre good for you, tasty, and best of all, made in your own kitchen.

5 Unexpected Ways to Use Watermelon

June 25 2016 VegKitchen 

5 Unexpected Ways to Use Watermelon Were hitting watermelon season, so now is the prime time to use plenty of this super-hydrating, vitamin-C filled summer fruit. Seedless watermelon has become more and more common, sparing you from the tedium of removing all those pesky pits. Of course, we all love watermelon chilled from the fridge and cut into wedges, but here are 5 ways to serve it that you might not think of.

Grill the Unusual! Vegetables and Fruits Perfect for Charring

May 30 2016 Meatless Monday 

Grill the Unusual! Vegetables and Fruits Perfect for CharringSweep that meat off your grill! This summer, farmers markets are bursting with fresh, colorful fruits and vegetables that are perfect for grilling at your Memorial Day blast. But dont reach for the normal culprits. This holiday sear up some off-road options like charred romaine or grilled kale; they’ll make excellent salad starters. All youll need is a simple oil-based dressing. Or, try grilling up some fresh cucumbers; theyll remain just as crunchy as they are fresh, but perhaps a bit denser. Or, try charred avocados--a delicious standout either alone or with fillings. Sure, you can always grill up old fruit standards like peaches, but why not go nouveau with our recipe for grilled grapes? And for a real Summer crowd-pleaser, char up our delicious watermelon salsa! Avocado. Sear some tracks in this baby! Start with large ripe Haas avocados, cut in half and remove seeds. With a spoon drizzle with fresh lime or lemon juice and brush lightly with olive oil. Gently place cut side down on grill over hot coals and grill 2-3 minutes. Salt and pepper to taste. Fill with chopped veggies or salsa (see our Watermelon Salsa below). Artichoke. A smoky alternative to steamed. Steam and cook artichoke the day before, until fully tender, but not overly soft. (Cool on rack or prepare the day before and cool in fridge, covered.) When ready, prepare grill for direct, high heat. Brush artichoke with herb-infused oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, then place halves cut side down on the grates. Cover and grill for 5-10 minutes, until char mark appear on cut side. Romaine lettuce. Versatile for salads or as sandwich filler. Wash and cut romaine halves. Start with medium-hot fire in a charcoal grill, or heat on gas grill to medium-high. Place halves cut side down on grill, and cook about 4 minutes, turning once, until charred and slightly wilted. Transfer lettuce cut side up to a serving platter, and season with salt and pepper; drizzle with balsamic vinaigrette. Red, orange, and/­­or yellow peppers. Make a tri-color array. Prepare outdoor grill for covered direct grilling on medium. Cut each pepper lengthwise into quarters; discard stems and seeds. In medium bowl, toss peppers with oil, 1/­­2 teaspoon salt, and 1/­­4 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper. Place peppers, skin side up, on hot grill rack. Cover grill and cook peppers 4-5 minutes or until beginning to soften. Turn peppers over; cover and cook 3-4 minutes longer or until slightly charred. When done, return to same bowl. Add parsley and toss to coat. Add to salads, or eat as a side dish tossed with onions and chickpeas. Cucumbers. Still crispy, but with a dense bite. Slice English (seedless) cucumbers lengthwise in half, scoop out centers, then cut into spears. Place on a plate and sprinkle with salt; let stand for 10 minutes. Rinse, drain, and pat dry, then toss with a bit of olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste. Grill the spears, alongside a green onion or two, over medium heat about 2 minutes per side. Toss with rice vinegar, sliced green onions, thinly sliced red or green jalape?o, and a drizzle of toasted sesame oil. Top with sesame seeds. Grilled Kale. Crisp, smoky, and addictively delicious. Remove stems, leaving large leaves. In a large bowl, toss leaves with 2 Tbs. olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. Using tongs, place leaves on grill, cover, and cook until bottom sides are lightly charred, about 2 minutes. Flip leaves, cover grill, and cook until other side is lightly charred, about 1 minute longer. Remove kale from grill and set aside to cool. Add feta cheese crumbles or pine nuts, if desired Portobello Mushrooms. Plush and filling--a delicious alternative to meat. Wash, remove the stems, then brush with 1 tsp. oil. Grill 15 minutes per side. Eat alone or use as sandwich filler. Grapes. Healthy alternative to traditional sides. Prepare outdoor grills for covered, direct grilling on medium. Wash, then place grapes, broken into clusters (for ease of handling) on hot grill grate. Cover grill and cook 4-5 minutes until grapes begin to char and soften, turning occasionally. Watermelon. Bring out the hidden caramel flavor. For Watermelon Salsa, brush wedges (keep rind on for easier handling) with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill over medium heat, about 2 minutes per side, until grill marks appear. Cut off and discard rinds, then dice into small pieces. Toss gently with minced red onion, some fresh lime juice, finely chopped mint, and a pinch of cayenne. Serve, topped with crumbled feta cheese, if desired, with pita chips. The post Grill the Unusual! Vegetables and Fruits Perfect for Charring appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Virgin Pina Colada (Mocktail)

May 24 2016 Manjula's kitchen 

Virgin Pina Colada (Mocktail) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Virgin Pina colada, a non-alcoholic drink. This is very refreshing tropical fruit drink. Pina colada is easy to make, just perfect for hot summer days. Pina colada is made with pineapple and coconut and has a nice and soothing taste. Recipe will serve 2. Ingredients: - 1-1/­­2 cups fresh pineapple cubes - 1 cup coconut milk - 2 teaspoons ginger chopped - 2 teaspoons lime juice - 3 tablespoons sugar adjust to taste - 1/­­2 cup water - 2 cups crushed ice - Few pineapple wedges for garnishing Method - Combine all ingredients except garnish in a blender. - Blend until smooth and frothy. - Pour the drink into 2 glasses and garnish the rim with pineapple slices. You will also like to try Fruit smoothie, Watermelon cooler, Cucumber cooler The post Virgin Pina Colada (Mocktail) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Watermelon Panzanella

August 9 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Watermelon Panzanella Hey friends, this is Masha checking in with my (now annual) Woodstock, NY trip photos and a really good watermelon panzanella recipe that we cooked while there. My boyfriend and I went to Woodstock for the first time last summer and were completely enamored by its lush nature, chill swimming spots, and friendly small town vibe. We couldn’t wait to repeat the experience this year, and ended up staying at the same cottage in the woods for a weekend, which is perfect as far as we’re concerned. For our Saturday night dinner, we repeated the routine of shopping at Kingston Farmer’s Market in the morning and cooking dinner with all the bounty we found there at night. We made grilled pizzas and watermelon panzanella, and enjoyed the sweetest local blueberries together with Fruition chocolate for dessert. The panzanella turned out so lovely, and I couldn’t help but think how perfect it would be for any type of summer gathering or potluck. The inclusion of watermelon is a bit unexpected for panzanella, but it works so well in place of tomatoes and makes the salad extra cooling and hydrating. It’s also a pretty satisfying dish since it’s a bread salad, so it could be served as the prominent or only side at any summery event. I hope you’ll give it a try while August is in full swing! Below is a list of a few new-for-us places we visited and liked in Woodstock and around, but make sure to check out this post from last year for a more extensive list of things to do, if you’re looking to visit the area. Food Cucina – a modern Italian restaurant located in a beautiful farmhouse, serving dishes made with local and seasonal ingredients. I highly recommend getting a table on their wraparound porch, it’s stunning. Oriole 9 – a breakfast and lunch restaurant with an inspired menu and great specials. The coconut tofu hash was really good. Kimchee Harvest – sold at the Kingston Farmer’s Market on Saturdays. Really tasty kimchi made with unique ingredients. They have cucumber kimchi and rhubarb kimchi! I highly recommend getting the rhubarb one. Stuff to Do /­­ Visit High Falls Waterfall – a big waterfall with excellent swimming a bit downstream from the main fall, as well as cliff jumping. Zaborski Emporium – a huge, four story warehouse full of chaotically organized ‘architectural salvage.’ You kind of have to see it to believe it. A very impressive place to visit, especially if you are looking for a vintage door, sink, bathtub, stove, dishes, furniture and sooo much more. Candlestock – a shop full of every kind of candle and candle accessory imaginable. I’m especially into their beeswax candles. Tinker Toys – the coolest toy shop I’ve ever been too. Little to none of that bright-colored plastic, but a ton of educational games and toys for every age. It made shopping for Paloma’s birthday present a breeze. Watermelon Panzanella   Print Serves: 4-6 as a side Ingredients half of a small red onion - thinly sliced 2½ tablespoons apple cider vinegar - divided about 6 slices of crusty, whole grain sourdough bread - torn into bite-sized pieces 1/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil - divided 2 large garlic cloves - minced 1/­­2 teaspoon salt quarter of a medium-large watermelon - cubed 1 English cucumber - sliced into half-moons 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard handful of sprouts or microgreens handful of torn basil Instructions Place the onion into a small bowl and drizzle 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar over it. Set aside. Place the bread onto a covered baking tray, drizzle with 2 tablespoons of olive oil and sprinkle with the minced garlic and salt. Toast in the oven for 10-15 minutes, until the edges are golden. Combine the watermelon, cucumber and toasted bread in a large bowl. Whisk the remaining 1 1/­­2 tablespoons of the apple cider vinegar together with the Dijon mustard in a small bowl. Add the remaining 1/­­4 cup olive oil, whisking it until smooth. Pour the dressing over the salad and mix very well. Serve right away, garnished with sprouts/­­microgreens and basil. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Lemon Plum Salad with a Poppy Seed Dressing Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Spiced and Seeded Multigrain Loaf & A Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Watermelon Panzanella appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Red Lentil Gazpacho

July 26 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Red Lentil Gazpacho This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. There’s something about the act of making gazpacho that makes me feel like I’m taking full advantage of summer. The chilled soup is definitely a constant on our family’s summer menu, simply because it combines the best of all worlds – it’s incredibly refreshing, packed with sun-grown produce, and such a breeze to make. Since I’m always feeling the urge to experiment in the kitchen, I try to switch up our gazpacho recipe pretty much every year. Some favorites have included this strawberry gazpacho, as well as ones made with tomatillos and watermelon. This summer, I’m all about this unexpected lentil version. It might sound a bit strange to puree lentils into gazpacho, but I assure you that it makes for some seriously tasty and nourishing soup. Red lentils were basically made for gazpacho, not only because of their color, but also because they seamlessly blend in with the rest of the ingredients, while contributing some extra savoriness. Lentils also do a great job of making the soup more filling and satisfying, since they fall into the category of pulses (together with chickpeas, beans and dry peas), which are protein and fiber-packed little superfoods. We’ve been working with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada this year on creating some simple, weekday-friendly pulse recipes, as part of their Half-Cup Habit program. Making a habit of incorporating at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week is a great idea, since you’ll end up with sustainable, nourishing and affordable meals. This gazpacho is a great place to start, as well as our White Bean ‘Tuna’ Sandwich, Smoky Chickpea Croutons, or any recipes on the Pulses website. Hope you’ll give this gazpacho a try :) Red Lentil Gazpacho   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients ½ cup red lentils - soaked overnight 3 garlic cloves - divided 1½ cups water 2 bay leaves (optional) sea salt 3-5 large to medium heirloom tomatoes - roughly chopped 1 medium cucumber - peeled and roughly chopped 1 red bell pepper - seeded and roughly chopped, reserve some for garnish 1 small red chili pepper - seeded, or ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes ¼ cup soft sun-dried tomatoes juice of 1 lemon freshly ground black pepper basil - for serving microgreens - for serving (optional) Instructions Drain and rinse the lentils. Smash 2 garlic cloves with the back of a knife and peel. Combine the lentils, garlic, water and bay leaves, if using, in a medium soup pot. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, partially covered, for about 5-7 minutes, or until lentils are soft and most of the water is absorbed. Add salt at the end and discard the bay leaves. Combine the lentils and cooked garlic, remaining raw garlic clove, tomatoes, cucumber, peppers, sun-dried tomatoes, lemon juice, salt and pepper to taste in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Taste and adjust salt if needed. Chill very well before serving. Serve garnished with basil leaves, microgreens, if using, and the reserved chopped bell pepper. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Green Skillet Pizza with Asparagus and Pesto Tile Flatbreads Clementine Fudge Cake Spring Vareniki .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Red Lentil Gazpacho appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Grilling on Meatless Monday

July 3 2017 Meatless Monday 

Grilling on Meatless MondayIts that time of year again, when we fire up the grill and take our dinners outside! Usually, meat is in the spotlight for a cookout, but if youre looking for a lighter spread for the hot weather, seek out the produce section! Many seasonal vegetables turn out great after some time on the grill - sometimes they even produce some unexpected flavors! This Monday, for the July 4th holiday weekend, follow these tips for great vegetables on the grill! Think outside the box. When it comes to grilling vegetables, you cant go wrong with the usual suspects - peppers, eggplant, onions, and zucchini. But many more vegetables - and fruits - are delicious after being grilled. Try artichokes and romaine lettuce or avocados and cucumbers! Experiment with seasonings. While the combination of olive oil, salt, and pepper is a classic way to bring out the flavor of grilled veggies, seasonings provide flavor options from around the globe! You can go as mild, savory, or spicy as you want with Caribbean-style jerk seasoning, Italian seasoning, Mexican-style, Indian-style… be creative! Use stand-ins for meat. Sometimes people will still miss burgers and hot dogs despite the best veggie platter, but those cravings can still be satisfied with meatless options. Swap out burgers for portabella mushrooms, or use vegetarian versions of hot dogs, meat crumbles, and bacon to add a savory flavor. Grilling firm tofu or tempeh will not only provide protein but also absorb the flavor from the veggies and smoke. Download our Meatless Monday Burger Cookbook for even more ideas. Try different delivery systems. Veggies are great on their own, but they can be even better when served as part of a meal. Grilled veggies are perfect for tacos - fajitas, anyone? - and dont rule out grilling pizza! Try skewers for shish kabobs or throw grilled veggies in a salad. Dont forget dessert! Vegetables dont own the grilling game. Several fruits take on great new flavors after being grilled when the heat makes them caramelize. Pineapples and stone fruits, like peaches, plums and apricots, are perfect for grilling. But less expected choices like watermelons, grapes, apples, strawberries, and bananas also work great on the grill. Just be careful - fruits will cook a lot faster, so keep an eye on them and let them rest a bit before eating! The post Grilling on Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Summervibes Salad

June 8 2017 Veganpassion 

Summervibes Salad On hot days like today my body is craving for salad. It has to be colorful and fresh and varied with lots of good stuff in it :-). Because I'm in such a good summer mood I named the salad "summervibes". I'm very interested in how you like the combo with asparagus, rocket, strawberries, avocado and watermelon. Just can't get enough of the good stuff! I'd love to hear your creative salad ideas. Have lots of fun with this one and enjoy! Makes 2 portions Preparation time: 10 Minutes Ingredients: 10,5 oz asparagus 4,4 oz rocket 8,8 oz Strawberries 1/­­2 small cucumber 6 radishes 1/­­2 small watermelon (2x 0,4 inch slices) lemon juice balsamic vinegar oilve oil salt hemp seeds/­­pumpkin seeds Peel the lower third of the asparagus and cut them lengthways. Cook in slated water for 7-8 minutes. When the water evaporates toss the asparagus in it, salt it and put it aside. Wash the rocket and cut the cucumber and the radishes in small slices. Cut the watermelon and the strawberries in half. Then sprinkle with lemon juice. Cut avocado in cubes. Serve rocket, fruits and veggies on a plate. Use some balsamic vinegar and sprinkle the salad. Spread with some oil and hemp seeds. Enjoy the summer!

Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake

March 8 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Upside Down Citrus Polenta CakeThis post was created in partnership with North Coast. March is tricky. It’ll throw out a few of those luxuriously warm days in a row, which cause collective memory loss about the fact that it’s still winter, and you’ll suddenly see a few dazed people out on the street wearing shorts. And then it gets cold again, and it might even snow soon, and the warm coat you so optimistically tucked away into your closet has to come back out. By this time, you might also be really tired of root vegetables and stews, and all things earthy and hearty. I am. Thankfully, there is citrus. Bright, sweet, lush, like little suns in fruit form. I’m continually amazed by the variety of citrus fruit available at the grocery store this time of year. Based on my last scan of the citrus section, there are at least three types of oranges, the blood variety being the star, about as many kinds of grapefruits (red, pink, white), and don’t even get me started on the numerous hybrids, smooth-skinned, wrinkled and everything in between. I wanted to make a treat that really captures that brightness and abundance, so an upside down cake was in order. It looks involved to those not in the know, but it’s actually the easiest kind of cake to make. For the cake itself, I wanted a batter that would come out of the oven moist and fluffy, and I aimed for gluten-free and vegan, since that is what most of you guys seem to enjoy. There was a large jar of polenta in my pantry – there always is, since my eight year old is a polenta fiend – and I had the idea to go the corncake route. I’m really happy I did, and the cake was gone within a day as proof of its success. It’s sweetened with dates, apple sauce and orange juice, so nothing too sugary here. The mellow sweetness and crumbly texture of the cake combines really well with the fragrant, bright notes of the blanket of citrus on top. I like keeping the skin on the citrus slices, since its oils contribute lovely, complex notes to the overall flavor, but if you or your kids are not fond of a little bitterness, you can cut the skin off the slices. One of the main challenges of vegan baking is coming up with the correct combination of ingredients for a moist batter that doesn’t fall apart, without eggs. I’ve found apple sauce to be the essential ‘secret’ ingredient that makes all of the above possible, while adding a bit of its subtle sweetness to the mix. It also seamlessly integrates into sweet baked goods, so you won’t be tasting apple sauce in the finished product. Plus, it’s a healthy, clean, plant-based ingredient, and we all love those here. I was excited to work with North Coast on this recipe, since their apple sauce is the best I’ve ever tasted and contains no preservatives and no added sugar, all the while being made with real, organic, non-GMO ingredients. Their sauce tastes incredibly fresh and crisp, and they offer well-considered flavor options, like plain, berry, apricot, pumpkin spice and more, made with all U.S. grown fruit. Besides this cake, I’ve been using North Coast apple sauce in so much of my cooking lately, from these brownies, to my morning oats, atop a cup of coconut yogurt and even in smoothies. The brand also offers apple cider vinegar, cider and juice, so there is a definite mastery of wholesome apple products, which I absolutely love. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake   Print Serves: one 9-inch cake Ingredients for the cake 1 cup non-GMO polenta 1 cup brown rice flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon baking powder sea salt zest of 2 organic oranges 10-12 soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in warm water for 10 minutes, soaking liquid reserved 1 cup freshly squeezed orange juice ⅓ cup apple sauce 2 tablespoons coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pan 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 2-3 oranges - sliced ½-inch thick (You can use a variety of different kinds for a more colorful presentation. I used navel, cara cara and blood oranges.) Instructions to make the cake Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Cut out a parchment paper circle to cover the bottom of a 9-inch spring form or cake pan. Thoroughly oil the sides of the pan with coconut oil. In a large bowl, combine the polenta, brown rice flour, baking soda, baking powder, a pinch of salt, and orange zest, and mix thoroughly. Reserve 1/­­2 cup of the date soaking water and add it to an upright blender along with the dates and orange juice, blend until smooth. Add the apple sauce, coconut oil and apple cider vinegar and pulse to combine. Pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the dry ingredients and stir to just combine. Arrange the orange slices to cover the parchment paper-lined bottom of your pan and pour the batter over them. Even the batter out with a spoon. Lift and drop the pan gently a couple of times to get rid of any possible air bubbles. Bake for 40-45 minutes, or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean. Let cool for at least 20 minutes before inverting the cake onto a plate or a cake stand and peeling off the parchment paper. Slice and serve with plain yogurt or coconut yogurt. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Giveaway)

August 31 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Giveaway) Hey friends, this is Masha. I usually do the photos and editing around here, but I am now venturing into doing some full posts as well. Today I’m excited to share some photos I took this past weekend in magical Woodstock, NY and its surrounding areas, along with a dish my boyfriend and I cooked there from Kristin Donnely’s beautiful new cookbook, Modern Potluck. True to its title, the book offers plenty of original, make-ahead recipes for gatherings, where contribution in the form of food is encouraged, along with useful potluck prep tips. Despite this wonderful theme, however, the recipes are very appealing to make and eat at home just as well. The book is not vegan or vegetarian (perfect for omnivores), but offers plenty of vegetarian, vegan, dairy-free and gluten-free options. Some of the recipes that caught our eye include Potato Salad with Fennel and Pickly Things, Miso and Molasses Baked Beans, Samosa-Filling Stuffed Poblanos, Vegetarian Borscht Salad, and Vegan Caprese Salad. All the photography is done by Yossi, who is one of our favorite food photographers in this whole wide world. We are giving away a copy of the book too, so read on for the giveaway details. I live in NYC, and my man and I have been thinking about getting away from the city to explore Upstate New York for a while. We finally got it together on one of the last weekends of summer and had the most incredible time. Woodstock exceeded all my expectations – I knew it would be nice, but didn’t expect it to be as breathtaking as it was, and now I daydream about one day moving there. The whole town seems to be woven into the woods, and this time of year, the forest is thick with green leaves and sweet summer air, accompanied by bird and cricket songs, scurrying chipmunks, and majestic deer. At night, it’s dark enough to see the Milky Way, of which we are very deprived in the city. We rented this Airbnb – a cottage built by the owner, an artist, and secluded in the woods, right off his main property. The place was amazing, from the layout and tree-filtered light streaming through the windows all day, to all the well-considered, hand-crafted details. The kitchen was very well equipped for all the cooking we did, and there is an outside grill, as well as a fire pit. It’s technically in the town of Saugerties, but very close to the main stretch in Woodstock, The Big Deep and Opus 40. Big Deep  A popular swimming hole in the area. You leave your car in an unpaved parking lot in the woods and follow a short trail to the water. We were there right around golden hour and I felt like I was in a fairy tale – the water was clear and refreshing, with sunrays streaming through the surrounding tall trees. As we witnessed, it can get crowded at the immediate entrance off the trail, but if you walk away from the main area a bit, you can find plenty of quieter, semi-private spots for taking a dip. Opus 40 A huge environmental sculpture, built by sculptor Harvey Fite over the course of 37 years in an abandoned bluestone quarry. Fite originally planned out the space as an outdoor sculpture gallery, and had a 40 year plan for finishing it, but died on the 37th year of completion. The structure is composed of curving steps, levels, passageways and water pools, and the entire thing is built without cement, inspired by ancient Mayan building techniques, and using old quarrymen’s tools. Everything about Opus 40 is incredibly impressive, and the whole time, I felt like I was walking around an alien-built playground. It’s also a great spot for eating lunch – there are plenty of places to sit down and enjoy the view. Kaaterskill Falls A 260 ft waterfall, one of the highest in New York. We overheard someone talking about it at a cafe and decided to check it out, and so glad we did. It’s a drive away from Woodstock, around 20 minutes, up a serpentine road and into the Catskills. The amazing thing about this waterfall is that there are trails leading to both the crest of the waterfall, where it first begins to drop, and the bottom, where it makes a nicely-sized pool, and you can swim in both places. As in, you can stand under a waterfall (!) and you can swim in river pools, in water which will be dropping hundreds of feet after it brushes past you. Insane. This was the last thing we did before heading back to the city, and it was the perfect closing to our trip. Some food-related places we liked: Kingston Farmer’s Market There are plenty of farmers markets in the area, but we only got to try out this one. A very nice, medium-sized farmer’s market with a good number of produce stands. The August produce was absolutely beautiful – heirloom tomatoes the size of a baby’s head, jewel-colored eggplants, ground cherries, peaches, shiso leaf (!), purslane, etc, etc. Open Saturdays 9am-2pm. Bread Alone We buy this company’s bread in NYC and were interested in visiting one of their home stores, since the company originated in the Catskills. This location sells many different varieties of their bread, a ton of pastries, coffee (Irving Farm) and sandwiches. Good for breakfast and lunch. Shindig Good burgers (they do have a brown rice and beet veggie burger for the veggie-inclined) and sandwiches (veggie melt), but I liked the watermelon gazpacho special I got the most. The cocktails are also fun, generously sized, and unique – their booze of choice seems to be soju and sake. Provisions Went here for lunch. A modern deli that bakes its own bread, pickles their own veggies and uses local produce. Lots of interesting sandwich options and a few salads. Sunflower Natural Foods Market A very well stocked local health food store. Fruition Chocolate  A local bean to bar chocolate company that offers a variety of chocolate bars for all tastes. They even sell a 100% cacao bar! Vinnie’s Farm Market A crazy place we stopped at on the way back from Kaaterskill Falls. A family-owned produce stand and store with a TON of homemade canned goods, from pickles to jams to hot pepper spreads, pastries and bread, homemade butter, farm eggs and milk. The amount of product they have is almost overwhelming, and the whole place feels like a step back in time. Since the cottage we rented was so cozy, we had no problem staying in for dinner and cooking with all the amazing produce we got at the farmer’s market. I’d been flipping through Modern Potluck the week prior, and was really attracted to the cover recipe for Spice-Roasted Carrots Over Lentils, which seemed perfectly simple, and like a good accompaniment to the grilled pizza we were planning on making in Woodstock. We loved the dish, it was a breeze to make and had all the elements I love in a side dish – substance from lentils and carrots, sweetness from dates, complexity from the spices and a fresh finish from the herbs. I imagine that bringing a platter of these lentils to a potluck would definitely earn you a status of a famous cook among your friends. Giveaway: For a chance to win a copy of Modern Potluck, leave a comment with your favorite potluck dish and a working email until Wednesday, September 7th, 2016. Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck   Print Serves: 8-16 Ingredients for the carrots 3 pounds real baby carrots or other small carrots - scrubbed if organic, peeled if not 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon ground coriander 1 teaspoon paprika 1 teaspoon ground cumin salt and freshly ground black pepper ½ cup tender fresh herb leaves - cilantro/­­dill/­­tarragon/­­mint/­­basil - roughly chopped, plus more for garnish ¼ cup finely sliced pitted medjool dates, dried figs or prunes for the lentils 1 pound dried black beluga or french green lentils salt and freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil 1 large onion - quartered lengthwise, peeled and thinly sliced crosswise 1 tablespoon minced garlic (about 2 large cloves) 1 teaspoon ground coriander 1 teaspoon ground cumin ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 1 cup fresh cilantro leaves - roughly chopped plain yogurt or cashew cream for serving (optional) Instructions prepare the carrots Preheat oven to 425°F. Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment paper. In a large bowl, toss the carrots with olive oil, coriander, paprika and cumin, and season generously with salt and pepper. Spread the carrots out on the baking sheets. Roast, rotating the baking sheets halfway through and shaking the carrots, for 20 to 30 minutes, until the carrots are nicely browned and tender. Let the carrots cool slightly, then transfer to a large bowl and toss with the herbs and dates. prepare the lentils In a medium saucepan, cover the lentils with water by 2 inches and bring to a boil. Simmer over medium heat until tender, 20 to 25 minutes. Drain the lentils, reserving ½ cup of the cooking liquid and season with salt. In a deep skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onion and season generously with salt. Cook, stirring frequently until lightly browned, about 15 minutes. Add the garlic, coriander, cumin, and cinnamon, and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the lentils and reserved cooking liquid, and cook until heated through, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in the lemon juice and the cilantro. Arrange the lentils on a platter and top with the carrots. Garnish with more herb leaves and dollops of yogurt/­­cashew cream and serve warm or at room temperature. potluck prep The lentils and roasted carrots, without the herbs and dates, can be refrigerated separately, overnight; bring to room temperature before serving. Bring the dish to the potluck already assembled with the vegetables on top of the lentils, then garnish with yogurt/­­cashew cream and herbs just before serving. Notes I halved the recipe for two people, but giving you a whole one here as per the book. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Vegan Cobb Salad with Watermelon Bacon

July 20 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Cobb Salad with Watermelon BaconThis post was created in partnership with Kuisiware. I’m sure I’m not alone in my desire to live off salads during these hot summer months. Leafy greens are in abundance and at their most flavorful right now, and if I don’t take full advantage of them, I feel as though I’m missing out. So this summer, our goal is to expand the salad section of our recipe index with all kinds of twists on the classics and more. This week, the idea was to come up with the most vibrant vegan version of Cobb Salad, and putting it together was a true pleasure. Since Cobb Salad is an entire meal type of affair, I knew I had to load my plant-only version with all kinds of nourishing, savory components. Big, buttery beans replace eggs here, while velvety roasted eggplant could be seen as a stand-in for chicken. There is roasted corn and sweet cherry tomatoes to celebrate the season, avocado for a good dose of healthy fat, and briny Castelvetrano olives for an additional saltiness. I couldn’t resist the edible flower salad mix at the market, but you can use any favorite greens or lettuce as a bed for the ingredients here. Overall, although fruity and colorful in appearance, this Cobb Salad is full of deep, umami flavors. I left the dressing to be quite a traditional, simple vinaigrette, which nicely marries all the ingredients. Now on to watermelon bacon! An amazing and addictive new discovery, which is essentially just dehydrated strips of watermelon, with salt, lime juice and smoked paprika, for a smoky, bacon-like flavor. The preparation is simple too – the only downside is that it takes quite a long time to make. Although I have a dehydrator, I know that most people don’t, and I really wanted to see if this ‘bacon’ was possible to make in the oven, and it turned out that it is, as pictured. I provide instructions for both oven and dehydrator versions in the recipe below. If using an oven, you will have to keep it on for quite a while, but the temperature that the watermelon dries at is so low, that it shouldn’t heat up your kitchen very much at all. In the end, with some patience, you will have a delicious, sweet and savory snack, that goes very well with this faux-Cobb. For a person, who cooks with greens a whole lot, I came around to the idea of salad spinners pretty recently. I’m very protective of my kitchen space, having quite a good amount of cooking equipment already, and always wary of adding another thing to the collection, especially one dedicated to a single task. But some time ago, I used a salad spinner while cooking at a friend’s house, and was amazed at how little effort it took to dry the greens – no endless shaking and drying off needed. Since then, I’d gotten a spinner of my own, the kind where you pull a string to spin the bowl. The string had broken numerous times, and I kept replacing it, thinking that’s just how it went with salad spinners. When Kuisiware sent me their salad spinner to try out, I realized that not all spinners are created equal. This one is made with BPA-free materials and is incredibly sturdy, with a hand pedal that takes a few satisfying pushes to get your greens spinning fast. It’s nicely sized, able to fit the curliest bunches of kale, and does its job perfectly. I feel good about adding it to my kitchen repertoire, and can tell that it will last me a long time. To get $5 off the Kuisiware salad spinner, use discount code XGK5OFFX, starting today at 3 pm PDT. Enjoy the salad and have a nice rest of the week :) This post was created in partnership with Kuisiware, with all opinions being genuine and our own. Thank you for considering the sponsors that help keep Golubka Kitchen going. Vegan Cobb Salad   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the red wine vinaigrette 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard ¼ cup olive oil sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste for the salad 1 medium eggplant - cut into cubes 3 tablespoons neutral coconut oil/­­olive oil - divided sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste 2 corn ears mixed salad greens or lettuce - washed and dried thoroughly 1 cup cooked beans (I used Christmas Lima and Butter Beans) - to taste olives - to taste 1 cup cherry tomatoes - sliced if necessary 1 avocado - sliced basil (optional) Instructions Whisk together all vinaigrette ingredients and set aside. Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Cover a baking tray with a piece of parchment paper. Place eggplant cubes onto the tray, drizzle with 2 tablespoons oil, salt and pepper, and toss to coat. Roast for 25-30 minutes, tossing at halftime, until soft and golden. Remove from the oven, set aside and turn on broiler to high. Oil corn ears, sprinkle with salt and paper and place under the broiler. Broil for about 5 minutes, or until dark in places, turn and broil 3-5 more minutes, continuing to turn until both ears are visibly grilled. Let cool and cut kernels off the ears, set aside. Alternatively, grill corn on an outdoor grill. Wash your greens well and dry thoroughly. Distribute between bowls and top with roasted eggplant, corn, beans, olives, tomatoes, avocado and basil, if using. Drizzle with red wine vinaigrette and garnish with torn watermelon bacon (recipe below). 3.5.3208 Watermelon Bacon   Print Ingredients ½ medium watermelon ½ teaspoon sea salt 2 teaspoons smoked paprika lime juice - optional Instructions Preheat oven to 170° F (77° C). Slice watermelon into very thin strips, around ⅛-inch in thickness, remove and discard green rind. Pat dry with paper towels. Arrange watermelon slices on 2 baking trays, covered with parchment paper, and sprinkle with salt, paprika and lime juice, if using. Place trays on racks positioned in the upper and lower ⅓ of your oven. Let dry for 5 hours, flip pieces and rotate trays. Dry for another 2-3 hours, or until dry and chewy. Alternatively, use a dehydrator - dry watermelon strips on mesh screen trays for 8-12 hours, at 135° F. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Declare Your Independence From Meat This Monday!

July 4 2016 Meatless Monday 

Declare Your Independence From Meat This Monday!Whats patriotic? Its not a color (red, white, and blue). Its not hot dogs and grilled burgers. Its a feeling inside--a feeling of pride, of being proud to be part of a country and a planet that can be free and sustainable. Its a feeling of commitment to make that sustainability a reality. This year July Fourth falls on Meatless Monday--the perfect opportunity to refrain from eating meat once a week in support of our own well-being and the well-being of the planet. Those of us who follow Meatless Monday do it with joy. Holidays included! But what if youre invited to a Fourth of July barbecue thats overloaded with meat? Not to worry! Here are 5 ways to stay proud and and go Meatless Monday on a prime grilling day! Meet them burger for burger. Theres absolutely no need to give into carcinogenic charred meat any time of the year. Instead, protect your health and choose from our delicious stock of TWELVE different kinds of meatless burgers--from Supreme Crispy Quinoa Burgers to Grilled Portobello Mushroom Burgers to Grilled Watermelon Pineapple Teriyaki Burgers. Send our recipes to your hosts ahead of time or bring along the ingredients and cook together. Just make sure you bring enough; one bite and guests will be wanting more. Grill the fruit and veggie aisle. Nothing says Meatless Monday better than delicious fruits and vegetables. And dont be intimidated by the word grilling. From avocados to artichokes, there are lots of unusual fruits and vegetables you can happily throw on the rack and nudge that steak aside! For even more ideas, check out our Recipe section. Commandeer the sides. Even meat-packed barbecues usually feature great summer side dishes like crisp salads, grilled corn, and juicy chunks of fresh watermelon. Bring along a can of garbanzo beans or feta cheeseand sprinkle onto your salad for an extra boost of protein. Give a toast to Meatless Monday. Pick up a glass of bubbly (kombucha works great!) and make a salute to everyones health. Follow-up with a shout-out about Meatless Monday and explain how its one of the best things youve ever done to lower your cholesterol and reduce your chances for chronic disease. Brag about your lowered emissions. When your friends rave on about their new low-emission vehicles, tell them that by not eating meat for just one day a week, you are saving the carbon equivalent of driving your car every day for a month! Not to mention, youre also helping to conserve the planets water supply. Check out this video for more eco-oriented talking points. The post Declare Your Independence From Meat This Monday! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Tropical Soba

June 1 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Tropical Soba The hotter the weather gets, the more I find myself substituting meals with just a ton of watermelon, mango or papaya, or even some kind of iced and very hydrating smoothie or drink. The heat brings out those strong cravings for all things hydrating, juicy, and cooling, and I’m pretty sure I’m not alone in this. For something more substantial and nourishing, but still in line with all the aforementioned requirements for a hot summer day meal, there is this Tropical Soba. Papaya is one of my favorite tropical fruit. Of course, we didn’t have anything like it when I was growing up in Russia, so when I moved to Florida and tried papaya for the first time, I was blown away by its buttery consistency and complex, unfamiliar flavor. I was also pleasantly surprised by all its sunny health benefits – papaya is anti-inflammatory due to a wealth of vitamin C and beta-carotene, and some special enzymes, and contains other good stuff like potassium, magnesium, copper, fiber and folate, etc. (the list is quite long). I had a very similar story with mangoes, being completely overjoyed the first time I tried one. So when both of these fruit come into season, they sneak into all kinds of meals around here. Soba noodles are on high rotation in our house as well. Paloma, being in her very picky eater stage, will accept some kind of soba bowl any time of day, which I’m ok with, as the protein-rich buckwheat in soba makes the noodles filling and nutritious. For her, I tend to buy the 100% buckwheat soba, just to pack in as many extra goodies as I can into her meal, but I also like wheat/­­buckwheat blend soba, which tends to be more affordable. This recipe basically combines everything we want to eat at the moment. Nourishing, chilled soba noodles are the base, accompanied by sweet and luscious pieces of papaya and mango, jicama for a nice crunch, a sprinkle of desiccated coconut for some bite, basil, cilantro and mint for that herbal freshness, all dressed with a creamy coconut milk and lime sauce. A tropical dream in a bowl really. I hope you get around to making it sometime this summer :) Tropical Soba   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 large, ripe mango - peeled and sliced into bite-sized pieces ½ medium papaya - peeled and sliced into bite-sized pieces 1 small or ½ large jicama - peeled and cut into small cubes basil, mint, cilantro - to taste juice of 2 large limes - divided 1 8 oz package of soba noodles (I used these) sea salt Thai chili paste/­­sriracha - to taste (optional) 1 can light coconut milk unsweetened desiccated coconut - for garnish Instructions Combine mango, papaya, jicama and herbs in a large bowl. Squeeze juice of 1 lime over the mixture, toss to coat. Cook soba noodles in well salted water, according to instructions on the package, take care not to overcook. Drain over a colander, rinse briefly with cold water and shake off any excess water. Add soba to the bowl with the fruit, toss gently and squeeze juice from the second lime over the dish. Add a little squeeze of chili paste, if using, followed by coconut milk. Toss to coat well. You can add more coconut milk to make the dish soupier, if desired. Distribute between bowls or serving plates, garnish with desiccated coconut and more herbs. 3.5.3208   You might also like... Raw Rutabaga and Crispy Sage Pizza No Noodle Pad Thai Raw Caramelized Vegetables in Crispy Coconut Cups Raw Thanksgiving .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Tropical Soba appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Emma’s Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet -- Ice Cream Sunday

May 29 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Emma’s Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet -- Ice Cream Sunday Florida is on its own schedule when it comes to growing seasons, and we usually have our local strawberries in March. This year’s strawberry crop was especially abundant, a field of ruby-red like I’ve never seen it before. We went strawberry picking at the nearby organic farm and ended up gathering way more of the sun-ripened beauties than we initially planned. We took home enough to enjoy fresh for a week and froze the rest. Soon after, Roost Books sent me Emma’s beautiful cookbook, My Darling Lemon Thyme – Recipes from My Real Food Kitchen, and all stars aligned for me to make her Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet. I waited a bit to share this until strawberry season kicked off in northern climates, and when I saw strawberries being sold at the Union Square Greenmarket while visiting NYC last weekend, I knew it was finally time. Aside from eating them just as they are, nothing showcases seasonal fresh berries more than homemade sorbet. One of the things I adore about Emma’s cooking style is her love of fresh herbs. Just like her, I often include herbs in sweet dishes, it’s a little trick to turn many ordinary desserts into a completely unique and memorable treat. The inclusion of Thai basil in this recipe is genius and makes this creamy sorbet even more refreshing, aromatic and summery. It’s also hard to believe that this intense crimson colour comes just from strawberries – a real show stopper. As the heat approaches, My Darling Lemon Thyme offers a nice collection of easy frozen desserts, like Watermelon, Rose and Mint Icepops, No Churn Banana Berry Ice Cream and dreamy Chocolate Cream Pops. The breakfast chapter includes such gems as Tahini, Orange and Coconut Toasted Muesli, creamy porridges, crepes and pancakes. When I turned the page to the Raspberry, Dark Chocolate and Pistachio Brownies, I knew I had to make them right away and have several times since then – they came out perfect every time. The savory dishes in the book are just as exciting, ranging from flavorful salads and soups to big dinner plates, all influenced by various cuisines and utilizing the most beautiful array of vegetables, grains, legumes, spices and herbs. The whole book is gluten-free and I was especially excited to receive it and study the thorough and detailed instructions for the Gluten-Free Sourdough Starter that is used in the Brown Rice, Millet and Chia Sourdough Bread. The recipe for the Gluten-Free Pizza Crust is also at the top of my list of things to try. My Darling Lemon Thyme is Emma’s debut cookbook, and although the U.S. edition came out a few months ago, Emma already released her second cookbook, A Year in My Whole Food Kitchen, in Australia and New Zealand. It looks nothing short of amazing and I can’t wait for it to be published in our side of the world. Below, some links for the long weekend. Michael Pollan interviewed on the Here’s the Thing Podcast Rene Redzepi is the chef/­­co owner of Noma and his Instagram is full culinary wonders – veggies preserved in beeswax for 5 months, pickling wild roses, crazy peas, or how about stale pumpkin flowers that didn’t come out tasting so good :) Nettle, Raspberry Leaf and Goji Beauty Tonic – I’ve been making this for a few months now and I swear I’ve noticed my nails get stronger in the process. Transcendental/­­Vedic Meditation has been on my mind a lot lately and I enjoyed this interview on the subject between Bob Roth and Jerry Seinfeld. Who would have ever guessed Seinfeld has been meditating since the 70s? States of Undress – a very typically Vice show about global fashion intertwined with cultural and political issues, hosted by girl crush Hailey Benton Gates. GKS Smoothies Cookbook – so excited for this! Blog Love – Shelly’s Chive Blossom Vinegar, Laura’s White Lentil Spring Onion Sauce, Sophie’s Pistachio Ice Cream, Jodi’s Rhubarb Panna Cotta, and this Mango Tahini Sauce! Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet   Print Serves: 8 Ingredients 2 lb/­­1 kg strawberries - hulled and sliced ¾ cup/­­200 g unrefined raw sugar (1 cup in original recipe) 1 cup loosely packed Thai basil leaves - roughly torn ½ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice Instructions Combine strawberries and sugar in a large bowl and set aside for 1-2 hours, stirring occasionally until syrupy. Drain syrup from the berries into a small saucepan, add basil and bring to a boil. Boil for 1 minute, remove from heat and let infuse while cooling down to a room temperature. Puree strawberries in a blender until smooth and strain through a fine sieve. Discard the seeds. Strain basil syrup over the strawberry puree, squeezing basil leaves with your hands to get the most flavor out of them. Add lemon juice, stir to combine and chill in the fridge for at least 2 hours - I prefer overnight. Churn in an ice-cream maker for 20-25 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Transfer to a container and freeze for another 2 hours. Notes If you dont have an ice cream machine, pour the mixture into a shallow, freezer-proof container, freeze for 1 hour until the edges are starting to freeze, and then beat with a whisk to break down ice crystals, until smooth. Return to the freezer and repeat this 2-3 times before leaving to freeze for 2 hours. Or make popsicles - pour the final mixture into a popsicle mold and freeze. 3.5.3208   You might also like... Spiced Apple and Blackberry Kuchen Ice Cream Valentines Day Dessert - Rose Ice Cream, Pomegranate Sorb... Homemade Yogurt and Frozen Yogurt Lemongrass Raspberry Pops Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Emma’s Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet -- Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Meatless Meat to the Front of the Line!

April 11 2016 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Meat to the Front of the Line!If youve been wondering if your seitan burger or veggie bacon really helps the environment, heres proof. A recent study just proved that - yes! –  the production of vegetarian meat alternatives generates about 10 times less greenhouse emissions than comparable beef-based products. Researchers from Andrews University tracked CO2 emissions from the whole life cycle of plant-based meats – from seed to harvest to package and transport. Using specialized software to crunch thousands of data points, they found that the average emissions impact across all meat substitutes was 2.4 kilograms. Meat substitutes like crumbles, nuggets, deli slices and sausages had the lowest emissions while veggie burgers, which came in the highest at 4.1 kilograms, was still 5 to 124 kilograms lower than beef. Inspired by programs like Meatless Monday, more and more consumers are clamoring for meat alternatives that are not only healthy but also environmentally sustainable. Meat-free meals dont just generate less emissions; they are most often free of everything that is typically deemed unhealthy about meat: cholesterol, trans fat, and saturated fat, as well as antibiotics and hormones. From both the individual and the collective perspective, meat-free meats are a win-win choice. Luckily, there are lots of options these days for those of us still hankering for the experience of meat, but without the drawbacks. Check out our featured recipe this week, Kale Greek Salad with Chickn or these options from our partners in the meatless meat biz! Grilled Watermelon Pineapple Teriyaki Burger Pasta Alfredo with Walnut Parmesan Chickn Tortilla Soup The post Meatless Meat to the Front of the Line! appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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