watercress - vegetarian recipes

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watercress vegetarian recipes

10 Easy Jícama Recipes You’ll Love

September 18 2017 VegKitchen 

10 Easy Jícama Recipes You’ll Love Jícama is a root vegetable that’s native to the American Southwest. Pronounced HICK-a-mah, until the last decade or so it wasnt easy to find outside that region. Now it’s more widely available well-stocked supermarkets and produce markets from west to east, primarily in the fall. Subltly sweet, crunchy, and a bit more watery than other roots (its actually […] The post 10 Easy Jícama Recipes You’ll Love appeared first on VegKitchen.

Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah

August 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah Hope everyone is having a nice weekend. Just a quick check-in today with a salad we made for lunch during the week that turned out especially lovely. I recently revisited one of my favorite dessert recipes on this blog, the Sweet Dukkah Cigars. I enjoyed them so much, that I was inspired to make a savory dukkah to have for sprinkling on various salads and soups for the weeks to come. Traditionally, dukkah is an Egyptian spice, herb and nut mix, served as a dip for bread. Ours is packed with nuts (almonds and pistachios), seeds (sesame, chia, pumpkin), and invigorating spices (cardamom, cumin, coriander), and it can serve as the perfect finishing touch for a variety of dishes. This salad came together pretty effortlessly, thanks to the abundance of colorful summer produce, which doesn’t need much to taste amazing. There are steamed, multicolored beets, juicy, sweet peaches, spicy watercress, creamy avocado, and a refreshing mint vinaigrette. The dukkah contributes an extra punch of flavor and crunch. It’s vibrant, seasonal food, just the way we all like it :) Below are some links to things we’ve enjoyed looking at on the internet these past couple of weeks. Have a great Sunday. Magic Lessons with Elizabeth Gilbert – we love that so many inspiring people have podcasts nowadays, since they are our favorite thing to listen to while cooking. Just discovered this one from author Elizabeth Gilbert. Rosemary Auberson – interviewed on Apiece Apart Woman, we love her art Stevie Nicks singing Wild Heart backstage, 1981 – obsessed with this video Rachel Saunders – love this ceramicist’s work and instagram Healing Wise – can’t wait to read this book DOEN – love so many of the blouses from this brand Coming Soon – want many things from this home goods store. Love that you can shop according to astrological signs :) Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the multi-seed dukkah ½ cup raw almonds ¼ cup sesame seeds ¼ cup raw pumpkin seeds 2 tablespoons chia seeds 7 green cardamom pods - crushed, green shells discarded ½ teaspoon cumin seeds ½ teaspoon coriander seeds ½ cup raw pistachios sea salt - to taste for the mint vinaigrette 4 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard ¼ cup olive oil ¼ cup minced fresh mint leaves for the salad 4-6 small beets - cut into wedges (we used a combination of red and golden beets) 2-4 ripe peaches or nectarines - sliced about 4 oz watercress or other salad greens 1 ripe avocado - sliced or cubed mint vinaigrette - from above multi-seed dukkah - from above mint leaves for garnish (optional) Instructions to make the multi-seed dukkah Preheat your oven to 350° F (180° C). Spread almonds on a baking tray, place in the oven and toast for 7 minutes. Add the sesame, pumpkin and chia seeds to the tray with the almonds and toast for another 5 minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside. Toast the cardamom, cumin and coriander seeds in a dry pan over medium heat for a couple minutes, until fragrant. Remove from heat and grind the spices in a mortar and pestle or a spice/­­coffee grinder. Combine the toasted almonds and seeds, ground spices, pistachios and salt in a food processor and pulse until most of the nuts/­­seeds are broken dow, with some bigger pieces remaining. Set aside. to make the vinaigrette Combine the lemon juice and mustard in a small bowl and mix until smooth. Add the olive oil and whisk until fully combined. Mix in the mint leaves. Set aside. to make the salad Steam the beets in a bamboo steamer or in a steaming basket over a pot of boiling water for about 15 minutes, or until beets are soft. Let cool for safe handling. The beets should peel easily once cooked or you can even leave the skin on, if they are organic. Divide the watercress between plates, arrange the beets, peaches and avocado on top. Drizzle the salads with the mint vinaigrette and sprinkle with the dukkah. Garnish with more mint leaves, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sorghum Beet Risotto Dragon Fruit Salad Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

10 Benefits of Eating Raw Food

July 19 2017 VegKitchen 

10 Benefits of Eating Raw Food The human race learned long ago that cooking meat before eating it would protect them from parasites. Since then this practice of cooking has grown to include all types of foods and is now considered an art. The average meal generally doesn’t include many raw elements, except for the leafy green salad. Here we’ll consider 10 benefits of […] The post 10 Benefits of Eating Raw Food appeared first on VegKitchen.

Top 10 Benefits of Green Smoothies

April 6 2017 VegKitchen 

Top 10 Benefits of Green Smoothies The benefits of green smoothies are many and varied -- they’re easy to digest, keep you hydrated, increase your energy, get your skin glowing, and more. They can include spinach, lettuce, kale, and collard greens. For the more advanced green smoothie drinker, you can also add parsley, dandelion greens, watercress -- really, any leafy green […] The post Top 10 Benefits of Green Smoothies appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables

April 15 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables I’m a savories-for-breakfast type of person, although you wouldn’t be able to tell when looking at the breakfast section in our recipe index. I’m working on correcting that and including more non-sweets in the mix. I enjoy an occasional smoothie bowl or porridge with dried fruit, especially when making them for Paloma, but having a breakfast that’s not too sugary always sets me up for the day in the best way possible. During the Flordia growing season, when I go to the farmer’s market every weekend, I like to have a salad for breakfast. I can make it filling or light, depending on my needs that day, but I just cannot resist those super fresh greens any time of the day. When it’s a bit chillier outside, I love a savory porridge with any seasonal add ins, which is where these creamy steel cut oats come in. Steel cut oats have a longer cooking time than their rolled counterparts, but, in my opinion, their superior flavor and texture makes it all worth it. They have a potential to be very creamy, but not too mushy, and to maintain a nice bite, which I’m crazy about. Consider making this breakfast this weekend. It takes a little more time and attention than a quick weekday breakfast, and it’s loaded with all the green and crunchy things that spring provides to us this time of year – sugar snaps, snow peas, asparagus, greens and broccoli. There are mushrooms and pine nuts too, for ultimate indulgence. The great thing about this recipe is that you can customize it according to what you have, to your mood, or time of year. Add fruit instead of veggies, sprinkle with favorite crunchy toppings, include spices, and so on. Enjoy the weekend! Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables serves 4 -6 2 tablespoon neutral coconut oil or ghee – divided 1 cup steel cut oats 3 cups hot water sea salt – to taste 1 cup homemade almond milk or canned coconut milk 1/­­4 cup pine nuts 1/­­2-1 lb shiitake – stems removed, caps sliced about 1 1/­­2 cup broccoli florets large handful sugar snaps/­­snow peas – strings removed if present about 5 asparagus sprigs – tough ends removed, sliced diagonally about 1 cup green peas – fresh or frozen about 2 cups baby spinach/­­arugula/­­dandelion/­­watercress 1 tablespoon tamari 1. Warm 1 tablespoon coconut oil/­­ghee in a medium saucepan over medium heat until melted. Add steel cut oats and toast until golden and fragrant. 2. Add 3 cups of hot water and salt. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a slow simmer and let cook, covered, for 25 minutes. Stir periodically to prevent oats from sticking to the bottom of the pan. Add almond/­­coconut milk and simmer, partially covered, for another 15 minutes. Keep stirring periodically to prevent any sticking. Use this time to prep vegetables. 3.When the porridge is about 10 minutes from being done, warm the remaining 1 tablespoon of oil in a medium saute pan over medium low heat. Add a pinch of salt and pine nuts and toast them for about 2 minutes, until golden. Remove with a slotted spoon and set aside. 4. Increase heat to medium. Add shiitake, broccoli, sugar snaps, asparagus and a pinch of salt and saute for about 5 minutes, until vegetables are bright green. Add peas and spinach, stir until spinach just wilted. Stir vegetables and tamari into the porridge, once its cooked. Remove from heat and let stand for a couple of minutes. 5. Distribute between bowls to serve, garnish with toasted pine nuts.

Easy Asian Watercress Soup

November 17 2015 Happy Cow veggie blog 

An easy Asian watercress soup with dates, goji and lots of ginger. This perfect combination of tender watercress leaves, red dates, carrots, ginger and a drizzle of sesame oil is […] The post Easy Asian Watercress Soup appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

12 Warming Fall Harvest Soups and Stews

October 7 2015 VegKitchen 

12 Warming Fall Harvest Soups and StewsWhen the autumn chill sets in and it gets dark early, theres nothing more comforting than a warming bowl of soup or stew filled with harvest vegetables. This selection of 12 vegan fall soups and stews feature potatoes and sweet potatoes, harder squashes, corn, greens, and more -- nicely spiced and aromatic. Some of these recipes are longer-cooking than late summer soups, but none are at all difficult to make. Make a big pot on the weekend and enjoy leftovers when you come home from work on Monday and Tuesday. These soups are great to pack into a Thermos to take to work or school, too. Moroccan-Style Vegetable Stew, above, looks as good as it tastes. Its a wonderful way to warm up cool season dinners, with sweet sugar pumpkin or butternut squash in an aromatic broth.  Nourishing and sublimely satisfying, Curried Red Lentil Soup with Sweet Potatoes and Greens incorporates falls first sweet potatoes with seasonal greens. Red lentils, which cook to a warm golden color, are available in natural food stores and ethnic groceries. Another bountiful bowlful based on red lentils, Curried Red Lentil, Pumpkin, and Cauliflower Soup. Adding a couple of cups of pumpkin or butternut squash puree adds to the orange-y goodness of this soup Potato, Corn, and Green Chile Soup is a nondairy version of a contemporary classic from the American Southwest. Its filling, so it can serve as a centerpiece of a meal, served with a salad or salad-y wraps. Miso Soup with Sweet Potatoes and Greens (choose from spinach, arugula, watercress, or tatsoi) synergize nicely in this miso soup. This one’s a little lighter than most of the soups and stews on this list, but not at all less satisfying. In Kale, Yellow Squash, and Sweet Potato Stew, the deep greens contrasted with the yellow of the squash and the orange of the sweet potato, makes for an attractive and nourishing dish for the autumn harvest. Squash, Sweet Potato, and Corn Chowder is a hearty soup thats especially perfect for fall. Though this admittedly involves a bit of prep, none of it is difficult. Its a great soup to make on a quiet Sunday -- youll be happy to come home to it during the week! Broccoli-Apple Soup with Cashew or Peanut Butter is luscious and nutty with an almost undetectable hint of mellow sweetness from the apple; nut butter gives it a rich flavor. In my home, this has long been a fall favorite. Almond-Brussels Sprouts Soup is elegant and richly flavored, featuring brussels sprouts and a myriad of other veggies. You can use cashew butter or peanut butter in place of almond butter for equally delectable results. In this luscious Creamy Golden Potato-Squash Soup, onions, garlic, winter squash, and silken tofu are all enveloped in the familiar flavor of potatoes, making it a wonderful vehicle for getting a lot of nourishing ingredients into eaters of all ages. Though beet borscht is often eaten cold, the addition of potatoes creates a more robust version for fall in this Hot Potato and Beet Borscht. Unless you are fond of grating, doing so in a food processor makes the job much easier. African-Inspired Quinoa-Peanut Stew has several elements of a certain style of traditional African soups--chiles, sweet potato, and a creamy peanut base. The grain of choice in an African soup like this would likely be millet, but here, quinoa makes for a delightful fusion.  

Roasted Zucchini and Mushroom Pilaf Bowl

September 4 2015 VegKitchen 

Roasted Zucchini and Mushroom Pilaf BowlIt is no surprise that I love to roast vegetables; it always seems to bring out the best in produce. In this vegan bowl recipe, zucchini and mushrooms are roasted to perfection and stirred into a quinoa pilaf that is accented with scallions and arugula. Recipe and photos from Vegan Bowls: Perfect Harmony in Cozy One-Bowl Meals* (C) 2015 by Zsu Dever. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press, LLC.   Save Print Roasted Zucchini and Mushroom Pilaf Bowl Author: Zsu Dever Recipe type: Grain pilaf Cuisine: Vegan /­­ Healthy Prep time:  20 mins Cook time:  30 mins Total time:  50 mins Serves: 4   In this recipe, zucchini and mushrooms are roasted to perfection and stirred into a quinoa pilaf that is accented with scallions and arugula. Ingredients Roast 2 tablespoons olive oil ½ teaspoon sea salt 4 garlic cloves, minced 8 ounces cremini or button mushrooms, wiped clean and quartered 2 medium zucchini, quartered and cut into ¾-inch slices 1 cup corn kernels, thawed and drained if frozen Quinoa 1¼ cups vegetable broth ½ teaspoon sea salt 1 cup quinoa, well rinsed 2 garlic cloves, crushed Pasta 1 tablespoon olive oil ½ cup orzo 2 cups water ¼ teaspoon sea salt Greens 3 cups baby arugula or watercress 2 scallions, minced ½ to 1 serrano chile, minced 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice Instructions Roast: Preheat the oven to 450°F. Combine the oil, salt and garlic on a baking sheet. Add the mushroom, zucchini, and corn. Mix well and bake until tender and roasted, about 20 minutes, stirring midway through cooking time. If you have more time, roast until the corn is golden, an additional 5 to 10 minutes. Keep warm. Quinoa: Heat the broth, salt, quinoa and garlic in a large pot. Cover, bring to boil over high heat, reduce to medium-low heat and cook for 15 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside for 10 minutes to steam. Fluff with fork and set aside. Pasta: Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the orzo and cook, stirring frequently, until golden brown. Add the water and salt and bring to boil. Reduce to simmer and cook until tender, 7 to 9 minutes. Drain and set aside. Greens: Add the orzo to the cooked quinoa. Add the roasted vegetables to the quinoa. Add the arugula, scallions, serrano and lemon juice. Stir well, taste and adjust seasoning with salt and black pepper. 3.3.3077   - Here are more vegan bowls from VegKitchen and around the web. *This post contains affiliate links. If the product is purchased by linking through this review, VegKitchen receives a modest commission, which helps maintain our site and helps it to continue growing!

Authentic Mexican Food Can Be Healthy, Certifies SPE

May 4 2015 Meatless Monday 

Authentic Mexican Food Can Be Healthy, Certifies SPEA frozen margarita is not a Mexican drink.  And if you think Mexicans love to shove slices of lime into their beer, think again. Likewise, when it comes to Mexican food, our popular American conceptions bear little resemblance to the actual Mexican diet.  That was certainly the conclusion of Dos Caminos Chef Ivy Stark who recently traveled south of the border for inspiration. “I want to dispel the myth that melted cheese and sour cream are authentic Mexican food,” she said. You don’t find nachos with beef and cheese whiz, or giant burritos filled with meat and cheese.  What you do find is cuisine that’s rich in vegetables and sauces made with roasted vegetables, spices and sometimes nuts. Following her trip, Chef Stark created a new ‘Healthy Mexican’ menu for Dos Caminos, with dishes like Spring Vegetales Tacos, Grilled Mexican Street Corn and a grapefruit, jicama and watercress salad. Chef Stark worked with nutrition and sustainability consultants SPE, who offer third-party certification to foodservice establishments who are committed to nutrition, sustainability, and their customers’ well-being. Like Meatless Monday, SPE encourage more vegetables, fruits, and whole grains and smaller portions of red meat, as well as limiting processed foods. The inspiration for SPE came from the Latin phrase Sanitas Per Escam, which literally means “Health Through Food.”  Their holistic approach focuses on sourcing (selecting ingredients seasonally, locally and sustainably) preparing (using specific cooking techniques that preserve the integrity and nutritional qualities of the ingredients) and maximizing the nutritional impact through balanced menus and optimal ingredient combinations. For example, SPE recommended Chef Stark not put proteins on the grill since charring can cause carcinogens to form, but they were fine with her grilling vegetables like corn and asparagus. Said Chef Stark, “Grilling is also a really good technique, especially if you’re looking to not use any fat.  It’s really delcious for corn, squash – everything tastes good on the grill because you get that smokiness against the sweetness of the vegetables.  And it’s easy!” Dos Caminos and SPE have generously provided one of the recipes from the certified Healthy Mexican menu, which you can access here.  Happy Authentic Cinco de Mayo!     The post Authentic Mexican Food Can Be Healthy, Certifies SPE appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cauliflower Crown Roast

April 6 2015 VegKitchen 

Cauliflower Crown RoastI must confess that for me, the main appeal of cauliflower crown roast, a new-fashioned way of preparing this veggie, is its appearance. Once you cut wedges away, what you have is lots of unseasoned cauliflower. To mitigate this blandness, serve with plenty of the same simple, tasty gravy used to baste it while it bakes. In its favor, other than the handsome appearance of the cauliflower, is ease of preparation. Serves: 8 Total time: About 15 minutes for prep of cauliflower and gravy; 45 minutes to 1 hour for baking - 1 medium to large cauliflower Easy gravy - 1 cup vegetable broth - 2 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce - 1 teaspoon salt-free seasoning blend (like Frontier or Mrs. Dash) - Freshly ground pepper - 2 tablespoons arrowroot or cornstarch - 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast, optional (but highly recommended) To serve - Arugula, watercress, or mixed baby greens Preheat the oven to 375? F. For the cauliflower: Cut away the fibrous green leaves and any woody part of stem. Put in a casserole dish that will hold it comfortably, stem end down. Cover with foil.  Bake for 30 minutes, covered, then remove from the oven. For the gravy: Combine the broth and soy sauce in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer. Stir in the seasoning blend and add a few grinds of pepper. Combine the arrowroot cornstarch with just enough water to dissolve in a cup or small container. When the broth mixture is at a steady simmer, slowly whisk in the cornstarch, stirring constantly until the liquid is thickened. Remove from the heat and whisk in the optional nutritional yeast.  Using oven mitts or a clean tea towel, uncover the cauliflower, and transfer to a plate for the moment. Drain off any water remaining in the casserole dish and use the same piece of foil to cover the bottom of the dish. Using a spoon and/­­or a basting brush, cover the surface of the cauliflower with a nice layer of the gravy. Set the remaining gravy aside. Bake the cauliflower uncovered for 15 to 20 minutes longer (depending on the size and density of the cauliflower), or until you can pierce through the center fairly easily. Dont let it get overdone and mushy, though! Before serving, coat the cauliflower with another layer of gravy, then transfer it to a serving platter lined with greens of your choice. Transfer the remaining gravy from the saucepan to a small serving container. Serve the cauliflower at once, cutting it into 8 or so equal wedges, and pass around the gravy. - Here are more recipes for cauliflower.

Creamy Green Gazpacho

September 15 2014 Meatless Monday 

The addition of avocado makes this cold soup creamier than your average gazpacho and with jalape?o included, too, it’s got a serious kick that makes it anything but traditional. This recipe is reprinted with permission from Eat Your Vegetables by Joe Yonan, copyright (C) 2013. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc. Food Photography credit: Matt Armendariz (C) 2013 - 1 medium tomato, cored and cut into quarters - 1 small cucumber, peeled and cut into large chunks - Flesh from 1/­­2 avocado, cut into large chunks - 3 large basil leaves - 1/­­2 jalape?o (optional) - 3/­­4 cup lightly packed watercress or baby spinach leaves - 1 small celery stalk (optional) - 1 clove garlic, crushed - 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar, or more to taste - 1 tablespoon honey - 2 ice cubes - Filtered water (optional) - Kosher or sea salt - Freshly ground black pepper - 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil Reserve one-quarter of the tomato, two cucumber chunks, two avocado chunks, and one basil leaf. Combine and finely chop for garnish. Stem and seed the jalape?o half and reserve the seeds. Cut the jalape?o into several pieces. Combine one or two pieces of the jalape?o with the remaining tomato, cucumber, avocado, and basil and the watercress or spinach, celery, garlic, red wine vinegar, honey, and ice cubes in a blender or the bowl of a food processor; puree until smooth. Add 1/­­4 cup or more water to thin the mixture, if necessary. Taste and season with salt, pepper, and more vinegar, if needed. If you want the soup spicier, add more of the jalape?o, a little at a time, as well as some of the seeds if desired, blending and tasting after each addition. Refrigerate until cold, then pour into a bowl and top with the reserved chopped tomato, cucumber, avocado, and basil and a drizzle of olive oil, and eat.   The post Creamy Green Gazpacho appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Slow roasted tomato tart with watercress pesto

June 23 2014 The Everyday Vegetarian UK 

Slow roasted tomato tart with watercress pestoTarts are great for picnics as all you need is a knife for cutting and your hands for eating. The polenta gives is a slightly gritty texture which I think works well for a summer tart. Ingredients For the pastry base: 170g plain flour (plus a bit to dust) 50g polenta 20g finely grated vegetarian style parmesan 140g unsalted butter cut into cubes 40ml water salt and pepper For the filling 8 ripe tomatoes Olive oil 100g feta 100g cream cheese 2 eggs 50ml double cream Salt For the watercress pesto 1 handful of washed watercress 1 small garlic clove Glug of olive oil Salt and pepper Method Turn the oven onto 140 degrees. Cut the tomatoes in half and brush with olive oil. Place on a baking tray and let them slowly roast in the oven for about two hours. Keep an eye on them as you dont want to blacken them. To make the pastry, combine all the ingredients for the pastry in a food processor and give it a blast. It should form a dough. Place the dough onto a lightly floured surface and gently roll out with a rolling pin so it is nice an thin. Carefully put the pastry into a flan dish and cut away any excess. You may need to use the excess pastry to plug any gaps. Line with baking paper and baking beans and blind bake for about 20 minutes. Since the oven is on quite low - it may take slightly longer for the pastry base to cook. Once the tomatoes are cooked, take them out of the oven and turn it up to 180 degrees. In a food processor, combine the feta, cream cheese, eggs, cream and a pinch of salt and blitz it so it is all liquefied. Pour this into the pastry base (after you have removed the baking paper and baking beans!). Dot the tomatoes on top and pop back into the oven for 10 minutes. During this time, make the watercress pesto by giving the food processor a quick rinse before adding all the ingredients for the pesto and giving it another blast. Take the tart out of the oven and dot the pesto between the tomatoes. Pop back into the oven for another 10 minutes.

5 Spring Vegan Soup Recipes

March 18 2017 VegKitchen 

5 Spring Vegan Soup Recipes Spring and summer are headed our way. While that may mean fun in the sun and a great reason to boost those mood-elevating vitamin D levels, it can also be a time for heartache. Heartache because soup season is over.The post 5 Spring Vegan Soup Recipes appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Weekly Plant-Based Dinner Plan, February 1 - 5, 2016

February 1 2016 VegKitchen 

Weekly Plant-Based Dinner Plan, February 1 - 5, 2016 Okay, just one more full month of winter to go! Well help you get through this shorter month with lengthening days with a slew of colorful and tasty meals. If youre thoroughly tired of winter, add a hint of spring by serving

Q & A: Daily Greens CEO and Breast Cancer Survivor Shauna Martin

October 27 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Q & A: Daily Greens CEO and Breast Cancer Survivor Shauna Martin In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness month, we asked breast cancer survivor Shauna R. Martin ten questions to get to know her and her business a little better. Shauna is not only surviving but thriving as founder and CEO of Daily Greens, which is distributed in more than 2,000 outlets including Whole Foods, Krogers,  Safeway, and Costco. VT: What inspired you to begin juicing? Shauna: I vividly recall sitting on the floor of my shower with water and tears streaming down my face trying to figure it all out. I could not stop thinking . . . why me? What did I do wrong? On July 28, 2005, my sons first birthday, I had been diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of thirty-three. My life was flashing before my eyes, as I struggled with the question of whether I was ready to die. It did not take me long to conclude that I was in fact not ready to die–I had a young child and a husband to live for! I had to muster the strength to get out of the shower and take care of my family, but 9 months of chemotherapy and a year of surgeries to first remove my breasts and then reconstruct them had left me weak, bald, and hopeless. After all that I had been through, my doctors told me I still had an up to 40% chance of a recurrence. I wondered how that could that possibly be, after everything I had done to fight my cancer over the past two years? One thing I knew for sure: I had to stay alive for my son and husband, so I resolved to get up off the shower floor and do something about it. I had heard that food could have powerful healing attributes, so I decided to investigate. I read everything I could get my hands on, and my journey lead me to understand that a plant-based diet, filled with raw vegetables, could not only help detox my body from all the toxins from my breast cancer treatment, but it could also potentially prevent a recurrence of my breast cancer. I was so excited to finally find something that would be under my control, so I went for it. I read that the most efficient way to consume raw veggies was to juice them, so I ordered my first juicer and started making a green juice every day. I immediately started to regain my energy and my former stamina. My hair grew back quickly, my skin and eyes started to glow. I was blown away, so I studied further and determined that the right thing for me was to move to a fully plant-based diet. This took several years of slowly eliminating animal protein from my diet, but when I finally got there, the result was amazing. I still eat a fully vegan and plant-based diet 10 years later, and I now know the answer to the why? I was meant to go on my breast cancer journey and struggle so that I could help bring a message of health and hope to America! VT: Whats the process for making these juices? Shauna: All of our juices start with a base of dark leafy greens because greens are the most nutrient dense plants on the planet. We source raw, organic whole greens, veggies, and fruits from farmers we know. We then cold-press them in our state-of-the-art juicing facility. We make them safe for our customers by then putting our finished bottles in our high pressure machine which kills harmful bacteria, while preserving all the nutrients. VT: Tell us about the flavors. Shauna: Our core line of green juices consists of six wonderful flavors using a variety of dark greens, juicy veggies, and fruits. They are all low in calories and sugars, with no added water. We use a large variety of dark greens, ranging from spinach and kale to watercress and dandelion greens, with names like, Renew, Elevate, and Harmony. The very first flavor that I juiced and took to the farmers’ market was Vitality, which I developed after attending a BBQ with my friends and family in Texas. I knew if I was going to get folks in my home town of Austin, Texas to drink a dense green juice it needed to have that familiar sweet and salty taste of BBQ with a kick of heat. Vitality has pineapple juiced with the kale, pink Himalayan salt, and a touch of jalapeno. We also have a line of plant-based hemp protein drinks infused with super greens and other fabulous ingredients like matcha green tea. Our line of hemp milks are a convenient and natural source of plant-based protein, iron, and calcium. We launched the first nationwide line of kid-friendly raw, organic green, and fruit smoothies kmade from whole fruits and greens, making raw, organic, ready-to-drink green smoothies available for the whole family. Finally, our core line of green juices is available in a cleanse kit which contains an excerpt from my Daily Greens 4-Day cleanse book with instructions for completing a 4-day juice and raw food cleanse. VT: Whats your personal favorite flavor? Shauna: Purity, which is the original juice that I started making 10 years ago to help heal myself. Purity is wonderfully simple blend of just greens and veggies. Lately however, I have really been loving Rejuvenate, a blend of carrot and collard greens with a touch of turmeric. VT: Whats the best compliment youve received from someone trying a delicious green juice? Shauna: I was hosting a book signing one day at Whole Foods and a woman came rushing in and said she had just completed my 4-Day juice and raw food cleanse using Daily Greens juices and my vegan raw food recipes. She said: I have felt so terrible for so many years, and after drinking your juices and eating your raw vegan recipes I have more energy and feel better than I have in my entire life. Please tell me how I can continue to feel this way forever! I explained that all she had to do was continue her habit of drinking a green juice every day in combination with a plant-based diet. VT: What are the benefits of a cleanse? Shauna: Periodically giving your intestines a break from digesting will help cleanse your cells of toxins and detox both your body and your mind. This can be accomplished by doing a juice and raw fruit fast during the day and then consuming a raw vegetable dinner, high in fiber, to help move toxins out of the body. It is important to include green juice in any cleanse to continually infuse the body with nutrients and electrolytes as well as lots of high fiber salads and raw vegetable dishes to help move the intestines on a regular basis. Check out our blog, Are Juice Cleanses Healthy? VT: Whats your favorite recipe on Vegetarian Times website? I love this Orange-Sunflower-Slaw recipe. It is very similar to a slaw I make on a regular basis in the summer, but with the addition of orange and sunflower seeds. So fun and yummy! VT: Which breast cancer organizations does Daily Greens benefit? Shauna: Daily Greens has partnered with and donates a portion of its top line sales to the Young Survival Coalition. This is the only national organization specifically focused on the needs of young women battling breast cancer. Having gone through breast cancer at such a young age, I understand the huge need for resources for women under the age of 40 facing breast cancer, and the YSC provides those resources on a national basis. VT: Whats one thing people would be surprised to learn about these juices? Shauna: Folks are usually really surprised at how good our Daily Greens juices are. They are also usually surprised at how different all of them taste, given that they are all very similar in color. VT: What is one thing people should know about the juices? Shauna: I really believe so much in the healing power of drinking a green juice every day, so I encourage folks to try all of our Daily Greens flavors until they find the one that they crave. If folks dont have access to Daily Greens ready-to-drink juices then I encourage making them at home. Whatever it takes, my mission and vision is that everyone gets a green juice in their life each and every day.      

Celery Root and Herb Cream with Goat Cheese Appetizer

September 15 2015 Vegetarian Times 

1 | To make Celery Root: Cut 4 1/­­8-inch-thick slices from celery root. Using 2-inch round cutter, punch out 8 disks from slices, and set aside. Chop remaining celery root (including leftover bits from slices) into 1/­­4-inch pieces (you should have 2 cups). 2 | Bring large saucepan of salted water to a boil. Blanch celery root disks 10 to 20 seconds, remove with slotted spoon, and pat dry with paper towels. Cover, and chill. 3 | To make Herb Cream: Bring large saucepan of water to a boil. Lower egg into water with slotted spoon, and cook 31/­­2 minutes. Transfer cooked egg to bowl filled with ice water; cool until chilled. Remove egg from water, crack shell, and peel. Transfer cooked egg to blender, and add shallots, dill, parsley, and garlic. Process on high speed 3 minutes, or until smooth. Add oil in slow, steady stream, and process 1 minute more, or until sauce is thick. Fold Herb Cream into chopped celery root, and season with vinegar and salt, if desired. Chill. 4 | To make Goat Cheese Foam: Warm milk and cheese in saucepan over medium heat until cheese melts. Whisk in lemon juice and soy lecithin; season with salt, if desired. Cool. Blend with immersion blender until foamy. 5 | To prepare Garnish: Toss crackers and goat cheese together in bowl. 6 | Place 2-inch round cutter on plate, and place 1 celery root disk inside cutter. Top with 1 inch chopped celery root, then Herb Cream; top with second celery root disk. Carefully lift cutter, and top stack with goat cheese-cracker mixture. Top with watercress, and spoon 1 Tbs. Goat Cheese Foam over top. Repeat with remaining ingredients.

Inspirational Sunflower Seed Risotto

June 10 2015 My New Roots 

Inspirational Sunflower Seed Risotto Inspiration is a perplexing creature. As someone who relies on a constant stream of ideas to do what I do, having an endless supply is rather essential. Of all the questions I am asked, the most common of them all is where my inspiration comes from. The funny thing about this is, I cant really give a straight answer because I get ideas from everywhere. Literally. Yes of course there are the obvious places like cookbooks, the farmers market, my vegetable garden, but Ive had ideas strike me like lightening while listening to music, smelling a certain scent wafting on the breeze, the colours in a particular vintage dress. My main motivation for writing a cookbook actually came from a postcard I found randomly, which pictured a faceless girl picking wildflowers. Nothing to do with food. At this point Ive learned that the most important thing for me is to put myself in the way of beauty as often as possible, keep an open mind, and not do discount any sources or ideas as weird, because the best things most often come out of the seemingly strange. I will say that one thing that consistently brings me a lot of inspiration, is just talking to other people who really love food. Sometimes getting out of my head and into someone elses, or at least hearing about their experience with a particular dish or special ingredient can help jumpstart a flood of ideas. For instance, the last time I was in Amsterdam teaching cooking classes, one of the attendees came up to me at the end of the day and told me about a very exciting meal she had eaten in Copenhagen, of all places. It was a risotto made out of sunflower seeds. Sunflower seeds! At first this sounded totally bizarre, but then again, I havent been able to stop thinking about this seriously inspiring idea ever since. I knew that sunflower seeds were about the same size and shape as grains of rice. They were nearly the same colour. But how would they taste? How would they become creamy? What is it like to boil them? When I googled it, all the recipes called for a pressure cooker, which makes sense for those that arent familiar with the awesome power and health benefits of soaking. I knew that that spending the day in a warm bath would make the sunflower seeds totally relaxed and willing to tenderize in a sultry spa of caramelized alliums for dinner that evening. Also, I dont own a pressure cooker. So setting out to make this, I anticipated a weeks worth of trial-and-errors, a pile of dirty dishes and a lot of semi-edible sunflower seeds. But I treated the seeds very much like I would treat rice in a risotto and after one (one!) attempt, it was pretty darn near perfect. And pretty darn inspiring. To say that this recipe is totally surprising is an understatement. The sunflower seeds are tender and chewy, with just the slightest bit of tooth still left - not unlike the real deal. Its remarkably simple to make with just a few common ingredients, truly delicious and deeply satisfying. You can make it suit any season as the seeds create a foundation to build upon no matter what time of year youre enjoying. Since we are finally getting some lovely fresh spring produce here in Denmark, I chose to go that route. I found some beautiful young rainbow carrots, peas in their pods, white and green asparagus and some super fresh watercress. This would be equally lovely with sautéed mushrooms, roasted root vegetables, pumpkin or squash. I am sure youre wondering how the seeds get creamy from cooking, and the truth is they dont – youll need to help them out a little. When cooking a rice-based risotto, starch emerges from the grains as they cook, and magically melds with the broth to create a velvety texture. To mimic this I simply blended some of the soaked seeds with equal parts water and added it back into the mix at the end of cooking, the results astounding. This makes the risotto rich and creamy without any starches or carbohydrates. But what shocks me most of all is how darn flavourful the dish is with such minimal ingredients. The caramelized onions and garlic are really all you need (in this dish, as well as life, I wager) although herbs would be a welcome addition; dried ones during cooking or fresh ones stirred in at the end. My version uses watercress as a finishing touch and is totally lovely with its peppery bite, but I will leave the brilliant blank canvas for you project your own inspiration on to. Everyone Loves the Sunflowers Easy-to-find, inexpensive, and nutrient-rich, sunflower seeds are one of my favourite additions to a number of dishes that I make, from breakfast to dinner and snacks in between. They are delicious toasted or soaked, blended up into seed butter or even milk! Sunflower seeds are one of natures highest sources of vitamin E, the bodys primary fat-soluble antioxidant. Vitamin E is important for overall health, as it functions as a free-radical neutralizer and prevents damage to fat-containing structures and molecules, such as brain cells, cholesterol, and cell membranes. When the fats in cell membranes become damaged, the function of the cell itself can be compromised. This is why researchers have studied whether diets low in Vitamin E are associated with many diseases associated with aging. Sunflower seeds are so high in vitamin E, that just one serving of this risotto contains over 100% of your daily recommended intake! Because sunflower seeds have such a high (and healthy!) fat content, it is best to store them in a tightly sealed glass container in the refrigerator. Keeping them cool will help preserve their delicate, nourishing oils, which can then in turn nourish you! They will also last much longer stored this way. If you purchase shelled sunflower seeds in bulk make sure to sniff the bin first: it should smell fresh and nutty, without any traces of sourness, which can indicate that the fats have become rancid. And always have a good look at the seeds to ensure that they are not discoloured or damaged.     Print recipe     Celebration Sunflower Seed Risotto Serves 4 Ingredients: 2 1/­­2 cups /­­ 350 g shelled, raw, unsalted sunflower seeds 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 2 medium onions, finely diced 5 cloves garlic, minced a generous pinch of sea salt 2-3 cups /­­ 500 – 750ml vegetable broth Spring vegetables for four people + cooking times: 8 spears white asparagus - 10 min 140 g. /­­ 8 young carrots - 4 min 16 spears green asparagus - 3 min 1 cup /­­ 150g shelled green peas - 2 min handful per person watercress - stirred in right before serving Directions: 1. Soak sunflower seeds overnight or all day in pure water with 2 tablespoons of sea salt. 2. Drain and rinse sunflower seeds. Remove about 1 cup /­­ 135g of the soaked seeds and place in a blender with 1 cup /­­ 250ml water. Blend on high until completely smooth. Set aside. 3. Melt coconut oil in a large stockpot. Add onions and sea salt, stir to coat and cook over medium-high heat until translucent, about 5-7 minutes. Add garlic and cook 2 minutes, then add sunflower seeds and about 2 cups of the broth. Bring to a simmer and cook covered for 20-30 minutes, depending on the size of your seeds, adding more broth as needed. When cooked the seeds should be al dente: tender with only the slightest crunch still left in them. If there seems to be a lot of liquid left in the pot, let it simmer uncovered for about 5 minutes to evaporate the excess. Add the sunflower cream from the blender and stir to combine, and heat gently. Season to taste. Remove from heat and fold in a few generous handfuls of watercress. 4. Blanch the vegetables in the same pot of salted water for approximately the time indicated, testing as you go. Do not overcook! 5. To serve, place about a quarter of the risotto on each plate, then top with the vegetables. Drizzle with olive oil, lemon juice and a sprinkling of flaky sea salt. Top with extra watercress and enjoy warm. Where do you get your inspiration from? How does it come to you? What have you been inspired by lately? Tell me! Especially if it’s about food… Wishing you an inspired day! Love always, Sarah B

Greens and Adzuki Bean Stew

April 23 2015 Vegetarian Times 

1 | Heat coconut oil in large pot over medium heat. Add shallots, and sauté 5 minutes, or until beginning to brown. Add garlic, ginger, and salt; cook 3 minutes, then stir in turmeric. Add chiles, lime leaves (if using), lemongrass, coconut milk, and 21/­­2 cups water; bring to a boil over high heat. Cover pot, reduce heat to low, and simmer 30 minutes. 2 | Remove and discard chiles, lime leaves, and lemongrass. Add beans to pot, and return to a simmer. Stir in leek, and simmer 2 minutes more, or until tender. Add bok choy, watercress, ginger juice (if using), tamari, and coconut sugar; stir well, and cook 1 minute more. Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Watercress Spaetzle with Grape Tomatoes

January 6 2015 Vegetarian Times 

1. Blend eggs, sour cream, salt, pepper, and nutmeg in blender until combined. Add 2 cups watercress tops, 1/­­2 cup broth, and 4 Tbs. basil. Blend until watercress is puréed (tiny bits may remain). Pour mixture into large bowl. Add flour, and whisk until smooth, thick batter forms. Cover, and let rest 15 to 20 minutes. 2. Bring large pot of salted water to a boil. Coat baking sheet with cooking spray. 3. Working in several batches, smear or press 1/­­4 cup batter into boiling water through large mesh strainer using flexible rubber spatula, rapping strainer on sides of pot occasionally. Boil dumplings 11/­­2 to 2 minutes, or until tender. Scoop out dumpling with strainer or sieve. Drain, and transfer to baking sheet to dry. 4. Melt butter in large skillet over medium heat. Add shallots, and sauté 1 minute. Add tomatoes, and sauté 3 minutes, or until beginning to soften. Add spaetzle and remaining 1/­­2 cup broth. Toss 2 to 3 minutes, or until mixture is heated through and broth is absorbed. Season with salt and pepper, if desired, and sprinkle with remaining 1/­­4 cup watercress leaves and 2 Tbs. basil.

Book Report: Alicia Silverstone’s The Kind Mama

July 10 2014 Vegetarian Times 

Book Report: Alicia Silverstone’s The Kind Mama   When it comes to mindful eating and parenting, you know you are doing something right when your 1-year old toddler likes to pluck shiitake mushrooms and daikon out of his mama’s miso soup. “At one year his favorite was  bok choy. He would grab it with his little hands,” says Alicia Silverstone, when asked about her son Bear’s favorite first foods. When it comes to feeding your body--and baby--from pre-pregnancy to birth and beyond,  Silverstone is anything but Clueless. On the heels of the release of her latest title, The Kind Mama, Silverstone kindly shares her advice for mamas-to-be.   A healthful, plant-based diet for fertility and pregnancy seems to be just as much about what not to eat as it is about what to eat. Can you offer a quick list of what foods to avoid and what foods to fill up on? Eat your greens! Greens such as kale, bok choy, collards, and watercress are packed with a host of great things like vitamin B9, vitamin K, folate, calcium, and iron. Nurture your body with all kinds of veggies made in a healthy variety of cooking styles. Fill up on whole grains (brown rice, quinoa), beans (adzuki, black beans) and bean products (tofu, tempeh). You’ll find some seriously delicious and healing recipes in The Kind Mama, like Watercress with Creamy Tahini Dressing and Toasted Sesame Seeds. For the sweetest and most blissful pregnancy, avoid meat, dairy, eggs, processed foods, and sugar.   Soy so often gets a bad rap. Can you explain the relationship between soy and estrogen? Do women need to be wary of their soy intake? And, on that note, are all soy products created equal? Soy in its purest form has some amazing qualities: it can help protect you against breast cancer, rebalance hormones in post-menopausal women, and reduce the risk of fibroids in the uterine lining. Organic tofu, tempeh, miso, and shoyu are great for you. Asian cultures have been using soy for millennia and dont experience the estrogen hype. This is because they eat small amounts of high-quality soy and are not indulging in processed foods that contain soy fillers and by-products. Consuming items such as soy ice cream, soymilk, chips and other processed foods daily or often is not healthy. When transforming to a healthier, kinder diet, allow yourself some of these replacement treats in moderation--they are all better than reaching for animal-based items. Once you become more balanced and comfortable with a plant-based life, think of these products as occasional treats.    Whats up with pregnancy brain--is that a myth or is it real? Are there foods that can help clear the foggy-headiness? Pregnancy brain doesnt happen to everyone but it can happen and for good reason! Your brain needs extra fuel during pregnancy since the crucial building block DHA (the omega-3 fatty acid that builds our smarts) is being funneled to your baby to develop its noodle. Your brain is also shrinking and restructuring itself during pregnancy since your metabolism is changing (dont worry, it grows back post-birth). Then, toward the end of your pregnancy, you get an extra shot of the hormone progesterone, which has a tranquilizing effect. All of this can contribute to you feeling fuzzy or out of it. You can protect your neurons by eating plenty of omega-3 foods. DHA-rich plant-based foods include microalgae (chlorella and spirulina), sea plants, tofu, nuts (walnuts), and seeds (especially flax and chia seeds). Foods that help you metabolize these fatty acids are whole grains like quinoa, dark beans (black and adzuki), as well as dark leafy greens.   Did you have any pregnancy cravings? What were they and how did you satisfy them healthfully? On the flip side, did you have any food aversions? I had a strange relationship with food-- I didnt like or want anything really, but did the best I could. Overall when it comes to cravings, the goal isnt to be perfect, but to be resolved. You do your best but are flexible and compassionate with yourself if you fall off the path! If youre craving something meaty, salty, or fried try the following recipes from The Kind Mama: Fat-Fried Udon Noodles or the Sausage and Sweet Potato Hash. Want something sweet? Try the Chocolate-Dunked Coconut Delights.   What were some of your son Bears favorite foods at six months, one year, and today? At six months the baby still isnt totally into complete meals, so its more about introducing gentle foods. At six months Bear was fed lots of whole grains. Whole grains help lay a strong but gentle foundation that assists in fueling development. He enjoyed brown rice and barley porridge. You can find some of these perfect first food recipes in my book. At one year his favorite was bok choy. He would grab it with his little hands. He also liked the shiitake mushrooms and daikon out of my miso soup. Mochi has always been a staple thats quick and easy (the recipe can also be found in my book). Today, he loves cabbage, green beans, sushi with brown rice and avocado (or almond butter in place of the avocado), and of course sweet fruits like strawberries and apples.    

Grilled Pineapple Watermelon Salad

May 26 2014 Meatless Monday 

This delightful fruit salad uses its lemon basil vinaigrette as a marinade for the usually cool watermelon, pineapples and tomatoes. Crunchy greens provide a hearty bed for these fresh fruit, grilled smoky sweet. This recipe comes to us from Jenné of Sweet Potato Soul. Serves 6 For the lemon basil vinaigrette: - 1/­­4 cup lemon juice - 1/­­4 cup fresh basil, chopped - 1 teaspoon agave nectar - 1 teaspoon Mirin* - 2 tablespoons olive oil For the grilled pineapple and watermelon: - 1/­­4 seedless watermelon, cut into 1/­­2 inch chunks - 1/­­2 pineapple, peeled, cored and cut into 1/­­2 inch chunks - 2 large tomatoes, sliced 1/­­2 inch thick - 5 cups watercress or arugala - salt and pepper, to taste *Mirin is a rice wine vinegar found in Asian markets or the Asian section or seasoning sections of most grocery stores.   To make the lemon basil vinaigrette: Place the lemon juice, basil, agave nectar, mirin and olive oil in a blender or food processor. Blend until combined. Pour the mixture into a large shallow bowl. To complete the Grilled Pineapple Watermelon Salad: Preheat the grill medium-high. When the grill is hot, dip the watermelon, pineapple and tomato slices into the vinaigrette to coat both sides. Place the fruit on the grill and cook on both sides for 3-4 minutes per side. Spread the watercress or arugala on 6 plates. Top the greens with the grilled fruit. Drizzle any remaining vinaigrette over the fruit, season with salt and pepper and enjoy! The post Grilled Pineapple Watermelon Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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