water - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Curried Baked Carrot Chips

Mojito Moctail, Non-Alcoholic

Tomato dosa recipe | instant thakkali dosai | tomato dosai

Chickpea and Sweet Potato Burger










water vegetarian recipes

Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder

before yesterday Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder We’re very ready for spring and all of its tender, green produce, but unfortunately it’s still very much soup weather around here. I think that soups are such lifesavers for busy people. They’re simple to make, hard to mess up, and can be customized millions of ways. You can make a giant soup for the week and have warming, wholesome meals right at your fingertips when you don’t have the energy to cook. They’re easy to bring to go in a mason jar or thermos. It’s also great to freeze some soup, which will always be appreciated later, in the midst hangry emergencies. We had two goals for this chowder – we wanted it to be creamy, filling, and comforting, but also light and a bit different from the squash and root vegetable soups that are always around in the winter. Just a little nod to spring :) The creaminess in this chowder comes from blended roasted cauliflower, mushrooms, and chickpeas. There’s no cashews or any nut-based products, since we wanted to go for a lighter soup. I think that cauliflower works so well in creating both a chowder-like consistency and flavor here, while the roasted mushrooms bring an extra depth of flavor. There are also green peas for more springy vibes, along with a base of mirepoix (onion, carrot, celery), and smoked paprika. When it comes to creamy soups, we still love having some chunky texture present, so we leave some of the cauliflower, mushrooms, and chickpeas whole here. The chowder just tastes more like a meal this way, but it could definitely also serve as a side in smaller portions. We’ll be showing the step-by-step process for preparing this chowder on our Instagram Stories later today, and we’ll also save it in our Highlights. Hope you try this one and have a great weekend :) Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients olive oil toasted sesame oil (optional) 1 yellow onion - chopped 1 medium carrot - cubed 1 stick of celery - sliced sea salt 3 cloves of garlic - minced 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon nutritional yeast (optional) ¾ cup dried chickpeas - soaked overnight or up to 24 hours 8 cups purified water 2 bay leaves 1 large head of cauliflower - cut into bite-sized florets 10 oz crimini mushrooms - cut into quarters or eighths for bigger mushrooms freshly ground black pepper 1 cup frozen peas juice from 1 lemon fresh herbs - for garnish Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Warm a soup pot over medium heat. Add a generous drizzle of olive oil and sesame oil, if using. Add the onion, carrot, and celery to the pot, along with a pinch of salt. Cook the vegetables for about 10 minutes, until soft. Add the garlic, smoked paprika, and nutritional yeast, if using, and stir around for about 30 seconds to 1 minute, until fragrant. Drain and thoroughly rinse the chickpeas and add them to the pot, stirring to coat. Add the water and bay leaves, bring the liquid up to a simmer and cook, with the pot lid askew, for 30 minutes. Taste a few chickpeas after the 30 minutes, they should be cooked and creamy inside. If the chickpeas are not yet done, cook them longer. This process can take up to an hour or even longer with some older chickpeas. Generously salt the chickpea broth towards the end of the chickpea cooking time. While the chickpeas are cooking, prepare two rimmed, parchment paper-covered baking trays. Place the cauliflower on one of the trays and the mushrooms - on the other one. Drizzle both the cauliflower and mushrooms with olive oil (or other roasting oil of choice), sprinkle with salt and pepper, and stir. Place both trays in the preheated oven and roast for 30-40 minutes, stirring halfway, until the cauliflower is soft and caramelized. The mushrooms will release water while roasting, so thats why using a rimmed baking tray helps. Once the chickpeas are cooked and the vegetables are roasted, add the cauliflower and mushrooms to the pot with the chickpeas, stirring to combine. Add about half of the soup to an upright blender, making sure to catch plenty of chickpeas, cauliflower, and mushrooms for creaminess. Blend until smooth and return the blended liquid to the soup pot, mixing everything together. Bring the soup back up to a boil and simmer for 5 more minutes for the flavors to merge. Turn off the heat and stir in the peas, which will thaw immediately in the hot soup. Stir in the lemon juice. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the chowder, garnished with fresh herbs, a drizzle of sesame oil or olive oil, and with a side of toasted sourdough bread or croutons. Enjoy! Notes You can also make this soup with canned chickpeas! Just use one to two 15 ounce cans of chickpeas and less water (start with about 5-6 cups). Since the chickpeas are cooked, you dont have to simmer them for 30 minutes. Otherwise, proceed as written out in the recipe. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Mojito Moctail (Non-Alcoholic Drink)

March 22 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Mojito Moctail (Non-Alcoholic Drink)  Mojito Mocktail, Non-Alcoholic Cucumber Mojito is a very refreshing drink that is perfect for the spring and summer. It just started warming up this weekend in San Diego, so I was inspired to prepare this for my friends. This recipe is super simple and is a delicious combination of flavors.   - 1 cup cucumber (peeled deseeded and cubed) - 2 Tbsp mint leaves (chopped, just the leaves) - 4 Tbsp simple syrup - 4 Tbsp lime juice - 1/­­2 tsp ginger paste For Garnishing - cucumber slices - lime wedges - mint leaves for garnish Also need - ice cubes - soda water -  Simple syrup is easy to make take sugar and water equal parts. Take 1 cup sugar and 1 cup water Stir and place the saucepan over medium heat. By the time the edges start to simmer, the liquid should be completely clear, not cloudy. Turn off the heat. Simple syrup can be made in advance and can be refrigerated. - Blend cucumber, mint leaves, simple syrup, lime juice and salt together. Taste the mix if needed add more lime juice and simple syrup to taste. - Fill the serving glass half the way with ice, pour cucumber mixture over top, and fill glass with club soda. Garnish with cucumber slices, lime wedges or mint leaves, to your choice. The post Mojito Moctail (Non-Alcoholic Drink) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Mojito Moctail, Non-Alcoholic

March 22 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

  Mojito Mocktail, Non-Alcoholic Cucumber Mojito is a very refreshing drink that is perfect for the spring and summer. It just started warming up this weekend in San Diego, so I was inspired to prepare this for my friends. This recipe is super simple and is a delicious combination of flavors.   - 1 cup cucumber peeled deseeded and cubed - 2 tbsp mint leaves chopped, just the leaves - 4 tbsp simple syrup - 4 tbsp lime juice - 1/­­2 tsp ginger paste Also need, Ice cubes and Club Soda For Garnishing - Cucumber slices, lime wedges, mint leaves for garnish -  Simple syrup is easy to make take sugar and water equal parts. Take 1 cup sugar and 1 cup water Stir and place the saucepan over medium heat. By the time the edges start to simmer, the liquid should be completely clear, not cloudy. Turn off the heat. Simple syrup can be made in advance and can be refrigerated. - Blend cucumber, mint leaves, simple syrup, lime juice and salt together. Taste the mix if needed add more lime juice and simple syrup to taste. - Fill the serving glass half the way with ice, pour cucumber mixture over top, and fill glass with club soda. Garnish with cucumber slices, lime wedges or mint leaves, to your choice. The post Mojito Moctail, Non-Alcoholic appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Five Veggie Raw Pad Thai

March 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

This recipe comes to us from Dr. Robert Graham, co-founder of FRESH Med . Dr. Graham says: Pad thai is one of my favorite recipes. I wanted to create a version for you with easy, healthy raw vegan ingredients. We chose zucchini noddles to make all the ingredients easy to find. This raw pad thai is gluten free, nutrient dense and look at all those gorgeous plants youre going to eat! Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 2 - 1 medium zucchini, spiraled or julienned - 2 large carrots, julienned - 1 red pepper, thinly sliced - 1 cup thinly sliced red cabbage - 3/­­4 cup frozen edamame, thawed - 3 green onions, thinly sliced on bias - 1 teaspoon sesame seeds (toasted) - optional: 1 cup of rice vermicelli noodles   - For the dressing: - 1 garlic clove minced - 1/­­4 cup raw almond butter (can also use peanut butter) - 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice - 2 tablespoons low-sodium tamari - 2 tablespoons water (may need more for desired consistency) - 2 teaspoons pure maple syrup (or other sweetener) - 1/­­2 tablespoon toasted sesame oil - 1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger Directions: 1. Prep all the vegetables. Add the zucchini, carrots, pepper, and cabbage into one large bowl. Toss with hands to combine. 2. Prepare the dressing by processing all dressing ingredients in a food processor or vitamix. The dressing may seem a bit thin at first, but it thickens as it sits. 3. Top bowls with edamame, green onion, and sesame seeds. Pour on dressing and enjoy. The post Five Veggie Raw Pad Thai appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Gur Para (Punjabi Sweet Snack)

March 17 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Gur Para (Punjabi Sweet Snack) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Gur Para, Punjabi Sweet Snack Gur Para is a traditional Punjabi treat. This is made in preparation for festivals such as Holi, Makarshakrantri, and Diwali. Gur Para makes for a great homemade gift because of its long shelf life. It can be stored for up to 2 months in an airtight container. This is a super simple recipe that only requires a few ingredients.   For Dough - 1 cup all-purpose flour (plain flour, maida) - 2 Tbsp sooji fine (samolina) - 2 Tbsp oil - 1/­­3 cup water, use as needed For Syrup - 3/­­4 cup gur (jaggery) - 1 tsp oil - 1/­­4 cup water Making Para -  Mix flour, sooji, and oil, and mix it well to get consistency of breadcrumb.  Add water as needed to make firm but smooth dough. Cover with damp cloth and set aside at least for ten minutes. - Knead the dough for another minute and divide in two equal parts. - Take each part of the dough and make a flat ball shape. Roll them into 8-inch circles and thickness of salted crackers. - Cut each of the rolled dough into about half inch wide and 2 inch long pieces. Note: you can cut them in your desire shape. - Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium heat. The frying pan should have about 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put little piece of dough in the oil. The dough should make the oil sizzle and come up slowly. - Fry the paras until both sides are light golden-brown. Let them cool off to room temperature before coating them. Making Sugar Syrup -  Put the water and gur in a frying-pan and bring to a boil on medium heat. Keep stirring till gur is dissolve, syrup should be about 1 thread, to check the right consistency of syrup drop the syrup in cold water and you should be able to roll into ball. Close the heat. - Put all the paras to the syrup and mix it well, making sure all the paras are coated with syrup. Keep stirring every few minutes and keep separating them. After they are just warm, take them out on a greased plate, making sure that paras are not clumped together. - Allow them to cool. Gur paras can be stored for several weeks in airtight container. Notes: If Syrup consistency is not right paras will be sticky, if paras are little sticky let them dry for longer. You will also like to see these recipes they are good for gifting and easy to make Moong dal Ladoo, Apple Coconut Burfi, Besan Save   The post Gur Para (Punjabi Sweet Snack) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Bali Butter

March 12 2019 My New Roots 

Bali Butter I miss Bali. Or maybe I just miss the warmth, the sun, the vibrancy, the life bursting forth from every nook and cranny. I miss living outside, I miss my eyes being assaulted by colours, and layers upon layers of wild sounds, but hey, its March in Ontario and this is a familiar feeling. Are you feeling it too? A couple weeks ago when I was in the depths of yet another snowstorm, feeling like spring may never come, I came up with this recipe to remedy my winter woes. Its called Bali Butter - and its the most delicious thing to cross my lips since I could see grass outside my window. A rich combination of cashews, coconut, and cacao, blended together with coconut sugar and salt, its like the nut butter of DREAMS in all of its salty-sweet-crunchy-chocolatey glory. And I am really excited to share this one with you, wherever you and no matter what season youre experiencing. What does one do with Bali Butter, you ask? Let me tell you, it goes on all. the. things. Pancakes, waffles, smoothie bowls, toast, rice cakes, ice cream, fruit salad, porridge, yogurt, and fingers! You can stuff dates with Bali Butter, stick them in the fridge and have something delicious on hand to satisfy those salty-sweet-fat cravings too. Slice a banana lengthwise, slather Bali Butter in the middle and sandwich it together again. I even like it with carrot sticks. No joke. I chose to use coconut sugar in my Bali Butter because its one of the main sweeteners used on the island and you can easily find it everywhere. Some of you may be curious about using liquid sweetener as an alternative, but the problem with using something like maple syrup or honey, is that it causes the nut butter to seize up. Fat is hydrophobic (translation: its afraid of water) and will stiffen when it comes into contact with anything that contains it. Using a solid sweetener, like coconut sugar, avoids this problem and keeps the finished product relaxed and runny. If you dont want to use coconut sugar and you dont mind a less-spreadable version of Bali Butter, sweeten it with whatever you have on hand. I think Ive talked about all of these ingredients respectively, but for the heck of it, lets recap why theyre awesome! Coconut - Once a maligned food for its saturated fat content, coconut has taken center stage in the wellness world, as scientific research has confirmed that the type of fat in coconut integrates differently in the body, compared to other saturated fats. MCTs (medium-chain-triglycerides) are a type of fat that can be broken down quickly and used as fuel, instead of being stored, so its prefect for people who enjoy an active lifestyle. Coconut also contains a surprising amount of protein, about 14% by weight, and impressive amounts of manganese.   Cashews - Contrary to popular belief, cashews have a lower fat content than most nuts. And 66% of their fats are heart-healthy, monounsaturated fats, like those found in olive oil. Cashews are an excellent source of copper, and a good source of magnesium, phosphorus, and zinc. They also contain good amounts of fiber, so that they keep you feeling full for longer.  Cacao - One of the best sources of magnesium found in nature, in addition to containing high amounts calcium, zinc, iron, copper, sulfur, and potassium, cacao is a nutritional powerhouse. It also contains many chemical compounds that enhance physical and mental well-being, including alkaloids, proteins, magnesium, beta-carotene, leucine, linoleic acid, lipase, lysine, and some neurotransmitters such as dopamine and anandamide - which explains why eating chocolate makes you feel so darn good! Coconut sugar - Sometimes called coconut palm sugar, this incredibly delicious sweetener is high in minerals, such as potassium, magnesium, zinc and iron. It is happily low glycemic, ranking 35 on the GI scale, compared to agave at 42, honey at 55, cane sugar at 68. This is due to coconut sugars composition of long-chain saccharides, which are absorbed by the body at a slower rate than something like refined white sugar. Coconut sugar also contains amino acids, which are thought to slow down the rate at which the sugar is absorbed into the bloodstream, acting as a buffer of sorts.  Some notes on the recipe. Its very important that you make coconut butter to start, as it creates the liquid base to help the get the cashews going in the food processor. Once youve made the coconut-cashew butter, feel free to stop there (it tastes incredible on its own), or go all the way as I have and add the cacao, coconut sugar and salt. I like to leave my Bali Butter out of the fridge, since it remains liquid and spreadable at room temperature. If you refrigerate it, Bali Butter with harden completely. You can roll it into balls and make yourself some pretty delicious little energy bites when its in this state, but its impossible to drizzle when chilled.   If youre into smooth nut butters, simply leave the cacao nibs out of the equation. They arent necessary for any other purpose than crunch, which I personally feel is essential, but I wont judge anyone for skipping them. Even though youre obviously crazy     Print recipe     Bali Butter  Makes 3 cups /­­ 750ml Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 375g raw cashews 3 cups /­­ 240g unsweetened desiccated coconut   3/­­4 tsp. large flake sea salt (I used Maldon) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 23g raw cacao powder 3 Tbsp. coconut sugar 3 Tbsp. cacao nibs seeds from 1 vanilla bean Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 325°F /­­ 160°C. Spread cashews out evenly on a rimmed baking sheet and place in the preheated oven. Toast for about 10 minutes, keeping an eye on them so that they dont burn! Remove from oven and let cool. 2. While the cashews are in the oven, toast the coconut in a dry skillet over medium heat, stirring often, until slightly golden. Remove from heat and set aside. Depending on the size of your skillet, you may want to work in batches. 3. Place the coconut in a food processor. Blend on high, scraping down the sides every so often, until the coconut is creamy and smooth (this make take up to 10 minutes, depending on the strength of your food processor - be patient!). 4. Add the cashews to the food processor and blend on high until creamy and smooth. Add the remaining ingredients and blend on high. Taste and adjust saltiness /­­ sweetness /­­ chocolate levels to suit your taste. 5. Store Bali Butter in an airtight glass container at room temperature (out of the fridge) for one month. The post Bali Butter appeared first on My New Roots.

Impossible Meatless Kefta with Tamarind Chutney

March 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Plant-based meat replaces lamb in this flavorful meatless take on traditional Moroccan Kefta. This recipe comes to us from Chef Patricia Washuta, Director of Culinary Services, Executive Chef, and Certified Dietary Manager, at Gentry Park Orlando . Chef Washuta cooked it for the Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge at the 2019 International Restaurant & Foodservice Show of New York. Chef’s note: This is a vegan and gluten free dish. I use a little Quinoa flour to help keep the Kefta to bind when making a large batch.   Serves 4 - Ingredients - 16 oz. Impossible Burger(R) (or Beyond Burger(R)) - 1 tablespoon coriander mint chutney (recipe below) -  1/­­4 cup tamarind date chutney (recipe below)   - Coriander Mint Chutney - 1/­­8 cup fresh mint* - 2 cups cilantro -  1/­­4 cup onion -  1/­­2 teaspoon toasted coriander seeds - 1 tablespoon fresh crushed garlic - 1 tablespoon fresh minced ginger - 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice - 2-3 tablespoon water or as needed to make the chutney of a pesto consistency - 1 teaspoon cumin seeds toasted - 1 Tablespoons diced jalape?o - Salt and pepper to taste - *Use up to 1/­­2 cup, depending on your preference for mint in savory dishes.   - Tamarind Date Chutney - 1/­­2 cup tamarind paste - 1 cup dates pitted - 1 cup apple juice - 2 c water or vegetable stock -  1/­­2 teaspoon cumin - 1 Tablespoon Garam Masala -  1/­­2 teaspoon chili powder -  1/­­2 teaspoon coriander -  1/­­2 teaspoon fresh ground ginger - 1 teaspoon fresh crushed garlic - 1 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 cup coconut milk solids - 1 teaspoon Coconut oil   - Carrot Achar - 1 pound carrots - 1 Tablespoon whole cardamom pods - 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorn - 1 each cinnamon stick - 3 each bay leaves -  1/­­2 teaspoon mustard seeds -  1/­­2 teaspoon coriander seeds -  1/­­2 cup Late Harvest Riesling Vinegar (or sweet vinegar) - 1 cup water -  1/­­4 cup honey -  1/­­4 cup white vinegar - 1 whole cucumber   Instructions 1. Preheat the oven to 375° F. 2. Mix defrosted Impossible Burger(R) or Beyond Burger(R) with one tablespoon of the mint chutney (see below). Roll the mixture into round keftas (oblong meatballs). 3. Place keftas on greased on a baking sheet, and bake at 375° F for 8-10 minutes. 4. Serve with tamarind chutney (see below. 5. Plate with carrot achar (see below).   Coriander Mint Chutney 1. Toast coriander seeds. 2. Cut the stems away from the cilantro and discard stems. 3. Pull the mint from the stems. 4. Place all ingredients in food processor and blend until consistency of pesto. 5. Add a small amount of water to gain the consistency desired.   Tamarind Date Chutney 1. In a saucepan, heat the coconut oil and add spices, garlic, ginger, apple juice, water/­­vegetable stock, dates, and tamarind paste. 2. Cook on a low heat, stirring constantly. 3. Remove from heat and strain the paste through a fine screen to remove any unwanted tamarind seed debris. 4. Add the coconut solids or a small amount of coconut milk. 5. Season with salt to taste.   Carrot Achar 1. Peel carrots and use a mandolin to cut into long thin strips. 2. Lightly toast the spices in a dry pan over medium heat. 3. Wrap the spices in a cheese cloth to create a spice sachet. 4. Mix water, sugar, salt, and vinegar. 5. Add the spice sachet and bring the mixture up to a simmer. 6. Before the mixture starts to boil, remove from heat and add the fresh carrots. 7. Let stand for 1 hour. 8. Place in a container and chill. 9. Leave the spice sachet in the liquid for best flavor. The post Impossible Meatless Kefta with Tamarind Chutney appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew – Abruzzo Inspired

March 7 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew – Abruzzo Inspired We’re continuing with our series of Abruzzo-inspired, plant-based meals today (all our previous recipes are linked below). We love this style of cooking, because it’s focused on an elegant kind of simplicity that really lets every single ingredient shine. Italians tend to take the integrity of their ingredients really seriously, which we experienced first-hand everywhere we ate and cooked in Abruzzo. That obsession with quality ingredients really comes through in the amazing flavor of seemingly very basic dishes. This golden, warming stew was inspired by a seriously unforgettable cabbage and potato stew we tried in Abruzzo. We added our own spin to it – white beans and mushrooms – but the core stayed the same. It’s got just the type of soul-warming energy that we want in our kitchens and on our stoves during a decidedly un-spring like, snowy March. There are still spots open for our retreat in Abruzzo this coming October! You can read all about our past retreat here, complete with photos and testimonials. This time around, we will be focusing on re-centering and relaxation, together with exploring beautiful Abruzzo. We are super excited to have an on-site yoga/­­meditation instructor and an on-site acupuncture physician, both offering daily services. We’ll be hosting a bunch of fun workshops like medicinal jams, vegan cheese, meal planning, and homemade skincare (wink wink Magic Moisturizer). Also: visits to an olive grove, winery, and a family truffle plantation. You can see our whole sample itinerary here, and book here! Click Here to book our Abruzzo Retreat! This stew is all about the combination of the fragrant, golden broth and the rustic, chunky pieces of variously textured veg. There’s tender, silky cabbage, carby goodness from the potatoes, and meatiness from the mushrooms and white beans. Onion, carrots and garlic establish a solid flavor base, and the addition of nutritional yeast, mustard, red pepper flakes, and lemon brings even more depth and a kick of zing and spice. We are crazy about this recipe. You can also watch us making this stew step-by-step later today on our Instagram Stories (it will be saved to our highlights as well). Hope you give it a try! For more of our Abruzzo-inspired recipes, check these out: Pasta e Ceci, The Simplest Lentil Soup, Ciabotta, Rhubarb Jam Cookies. And all scenery photos in this post are from our past retreat in Abruzzo this fall. Click Here to book our Abruzzo Retreat! Having the opportunity to explore a lesser known region of Italy to find its hidden gems in the Culinary arts was such an enriching experience! Getting to see first hand how the people in these areas live, visiting locals in their homes... From truffle hunting to tasting oil from 600 year old olive groves... Wild foraging for greens & making pasta in an Italian womans kitchen.... Not the typical trip to Italy. It was a delightful & delicious experience! - Rachel, Alabama I loved the retreat. It was well managed, we had the best food, awesome accommodation, great people, perfectly sized travel group and great tour guides. I had looked very much forward to this retreat and it was even better than I imagined. You created an amazing experience, with wonderful and very unique accommodations, the best meals I have ever had, set in a beautiful landscape, off the beaten path. The silence was palpable and so welcome to step out of the noisy and hectic lifestyle most of us have these days. I seriously consider joining you again, so I can have more of those meals, go back to the medieval village of Santo Stefano and the unique scattered hotel. We also had an awesome group, which made it even more special! - Claudia, Massachusetts It was a trip of a lifetime. Abruzzo could not have been more beautiful! I loved the diversity of the land, the hiking, cooking and loved loved loved the food. I also was glad that it was not a large group...I liked the intimacy of the smaller number of participants. It truly was a remarkable 6 days and you all were so kind, knowledgeable and pleasant to be with. - Helen, Michigan Thank you for the wonderful trip. It was so much more than I thought it would be. A deep dive into the food, culture and people of Abruzzo. I had experiences that I could never have on my own. I thought we were a good mix of ages, interests and countries. Diversity makes things so interesting. - Maudia, Michigan Ive been to Italy before but never like this! We visited magical places that Id never know about on my own: Santo Stefano with its fairytale charm, the beautiful truffle plantation, ancient olive grove, a winery located right in a family homes basement... Every single one was a unique, unforgettable experience. Thank you! - Katya, Sochi Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients olive oil 1 medium onion - diced 2 large carrots - finely cubed sea salt 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast generous pinch of red pepper flakes 3 cloves of garlic - minced 4 oz shiitake mushrooms - stems removed, sliced 1 lb any starchy potatoes of choice - cut into 1 chunks freshly ground black pepper 1½ tablespoons Dijon or grainy mustard 2 bay leaves 7 cups water or veggie broth/­­broth from cooking the white beans 1 small Nappa or white cabbage - cored and cut into 1 chunks 2½-3 cups cooked white beans juice from 1 lemon handful of parsley - chopped, for serving Instructions Heat up a soup pot over medium heat and add some olive oil for sautéing. Add the onion and carrots, along with some salt and pepper, and sauté for about 8-10 minutes, until the onion and carrots are soft. Add the nutritional yeast, red pepper flakes, garlic, shiitake, and another pinch of salt. Stir and cook for another 8 minutes, or until the mushrooms are cooked through and any liquid that they release is evaporated. Add the potatoes, black pepper, mustard, and another pinch of salt, and give everything a stir. Add the bay leaves and water/­­broth and bring up to a simmer. Be mindful to use less salt if you are using a salted broth or more salt if using water. Using a wooden spoon or spatula, deglaze any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Simmer, partially covered, for 20-25 minutes, until the potatoes are tender. Add the cabbage and white beans, and bring the stew back up to a simmer. Simmer, partially covered, for another 15 minutes, until the cabbage is silky and tender. Turn off the heat. Add the lemon juice and stir it in. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the stew, garnished with parsley and a drizzle of olive oil. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn Black Sesame and Ginger Ice Cream Roasted Pepper Lasagna Simple Mango Gazpacho .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew – Abruzzo Inspired appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

How to Save The Chutney

February 28 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

How to Save The Chutney Chutney are a big part of the condiments that I serve and I always like to keep them handy since they have long shelf life. These chutneys are used as an extra source of flavor with many appetizers, snacks, and chaat (whether it be sweet, sour,spicy, etc.). They are great to have readily available, because it makes life so easy when preparing a large menu, especially when you are in mood to have something spicy or when you make a sudden plan to entertain family or friend for afternoon tea. You can easily take any kind of dry snacks that you have on hand, even boiled potatoes, chickpeas, or crackers and turn them into a mouth-watering treat. These two chutneys, in my opinion, are a staple to every household preparing Indian food. I have their recipes on my website. Tamarind Chutney This chutney can be refrigerated for months. I like to make it thick in texture so that I can adjust the thickness of the chutney depending on what I am using it for. This exotic, sweet and sour chutney and can be called the ketchup of the east! This is delicious as a dipping sauce for French fries, as a spread over crackers, or even as a zesty addition to a rice dish. You really can never go wrong with it. Cilantro Chutney I prefer to prepare this in a large quantity in advance and freeze it in ice cube trays. You can store the frozen cubes in a zip-lock plastic bag. When you ready to serve, defrost as many cubes of chutney as needed. And after so many years, I have finally learned how to keep the vibrant green color of chutney. When blending the chutney, use crushed ice to blend instead of room temperature water; I was amazed by the difference it makes. Keep looking out for my blogs because I will continue sharing the tips I have learned over the years. It might just solve the one problem you could not figure out. The post How to Save The Chutney appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Ragda Puri Chaat

February 26 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Ragda Puri Chaat (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Ragda Puri Chaat Ragda Puri is a chaat dish that will leave you licking your fingers. Made with crunchy puris, ragda, and chutney, this recipe is the perfect addition to any chaat menu. This appetizer is easy to make and tastes delicious.  - 24 Puries (I am using store bought) - 1 cup vatana - 1 cup potato (boiled peeled and cubed in small pieces) - 1 tsp salt - 1 tsp black salt - 1/­­4 tsp black pepper - 2 tsp sugar - 1 Tbsp dry roasted cumin seed powder (bhuna jeera) - 1 Tbsp dry roasted coriander powder (bhuna dhania) - 2 Tbsp ginger (chopped) - 1 small green chili (chopped) - 1/­­2 cup cilantro (chopped) - 1 Tbsp tamarind chutney - 1 Tbsp lemon juice - 1 Tbsp green chili (finely chopped, optional) For Serving - 1/­­4 cup tamarind chutney (use more as needed) - 1/­­4 cup fine sev -  Wash and soak vatana in three cups of water for at least 8 hours. After soaking vatana will be about 2 1/­­2 times the volume of the original. -  Put the vatana in a pressure cooker with 2 1/­­2 cups of water. When the pressure cooker starts to steam, turn the heat down to medium and cook for 10 minutes. Turn off the heat and wait until steam has stopped before opening the pressure cooker. Vatana should be soft and tender. I have used instant pot, because it is more convenient. - Blend cilantro, green chilies, and ginger, tamarind chutney, and lemon juice. - Mix cilantro paste and all the spices, salt, black salt, sugar, black pepper and finely chopped green chili this is optional, to boiled vatana mix the spices well. This is known Ragda. Add hot water if needed Ragda should not be very dry it should have thick gravy, Ragda thickens in consistency as it cools. - For serving, make a small hole on top of each puri and arrange them on a platter. Stuff them with the ragda. Drizzle with tamarind chutney and sev. Ragda Puri Chaat can be prepared few days in advance When you are craving for chaat. This is a Healthy Chaat, Ragda has no oil, and can be served by itself, over crackers, over bread, roll with any indian flat bread, or make sandwich . Check the recipe for Pani Puri , and Tamarind Chutney    The post Ragda Puri Chaat appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Earl Grey Tea Sandwich Cookies, Vegan and Gluten-Free + Giveaway

February 20 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Earl Grey Tea Sandwich Cookies, Vegan and Gluten-Free + Giveaway This post was created in partnership with Arbor Teas /­­ Giveaway below! We come from a culture, where tea is everything. In Russia, tea is probably the most commonly consumed beverage. It’s like water, but much more popular than water. Everyone drinks it – adults, kids, and even coffee lovers. It’s acceptable to have tea after every meal, as well as as during breaks throughout the day, any time of day. If you attempt to stop by someone’s house for a quick second, you will most likely end up staying for tea. And tea time is sacred. It’s when 90% of conversations happen (or at least it seems that way). Tea time is never just tea, either, there’s always some kind of treat involved. It can really be anything sweet: hard candy, chocolate, cookies, waffles, cake, powdered sugar-dusted cranberries… Dessert is so intertwined with tea for us, that to this day we can’t enjoy anything sweet without a hot beverage. It just doesn’t taste good. We’d rather have no dessert than dessert without tea. This is especially true for cookies. Today we are super excited to be collaborating on a tea time-ready, sandwich cookie recipe with Arbor Teas, a Michigan-based tea company that carries the loveliest selection of organic and fair-trade loose leaf tea. There’s a giveaway, too! When we were dreaming up these cookies, we immediately thought about tea sandwiches – you know, those miniature, crustless sandwiches that usually accompany fancy tea. With that format in mind, we went for a layered ‘sandwich’ cookie. Earl Grey tea is probably our favorite, most nostalgia-inducing black tea, and since the Arbor Teas Earl Grey smelled so incredibly fresh (the best we’ve ever had!), we were very excited to incorporate that flavor in some way. The result: buttery, vegan and gluten-free cookies, layered with a luxurious Earl Grey cream, with a kiss of dark chocolate. They are the perfect cross between virtuous and indulgent. And of course, they are best enjoyed with or dipped in tea. Arbor Teas is one of those dream sponsors that we feel lucky to work with. Not only do they take pride in the quality of their product, but they also put a huge emphasis on sustainability. They source only organic and fair-trade tea, package it in backyard-compostable packaging, and run their facility on solar power. We like to believe that companies like this are the future. Besides their earl grey, we’ve been loving the Chaga Chicory, Makaibari Estate Silver Tips, and Golden Ginger Turmeric teas. G i v e a w a y  :  Today’s giveaway is for one 4 oz Earl Grey tea and a stainless steel infuser from Arbor Teas, as well as one copy of our cookbook, Simply Vibrant. To enter, leave a comment on this post telling us about your favorite kind of tea or a tea that intrigues you from the Arbor Teas shop, until February 28th, 2019. Giveaway is U.S. only. Earl Grey Tea Sandwich Cookies, Vegan and Gluten-Free   Print Serves: about 12 complete cookies Ingredients for the Earl Grey cream heaping ¼ cup cashews - soaked in boiling water for 10 min and drained ½ tablespoon arrowroot powder ⅓ cup very strong Earl Grey tea 1 tablespoon lemon juice 2 tablespoons maple syrup 2 tablespoons coconut oil fat from one 13.5 oz can full fat coconut milk for the cookies 1/­­2 packed cup pitted dates 2 tablespoons flax/­­chia meal (aka ground flax/­­chia) 1 cup old-fashioned gf rolled oats 1/­­2 cup ground walnuts/­­almond meal + 1/­­2 cup ground oats/­­oat flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/­­2 teaspoon baking soda 1 tablespoon loose leaf Earl Grey tea - ground in a mortar and pestle (optional) pinch of sea salt - to taste 1 cup nut butter like almond, cashew, peanut, sunflower or tahini 1/­­4 cup plus 1 tablespoon melted neutral coconut oil, divided 1 cup dairy-free dark chocolate chips Instructions to make the Earl Grey cream Place the cashews, arrowroot, tea, lemon juice, maple syrup, and coconut oil in an upright blender. Blend until smooth. Place the coconut fat in a medium bowl and whisk it with a whisk to make it a little fluffier. Add the blended mixture to the bowl and whisk it in. Place the bowl in the refrigerator for about 1 hour, until the cream is hardened but scoopable. You will likely have some cream left over after making the cookies. You can freeze it and use it as cupcake/­­cake icing, serve on the side of pancakes, waffles, crepes, etc. to make the cookies Place the dates into a small, heat proof bowl and pour hot purified water over them, then leave to soak for 10 minutes. Place the flax/­­chia meal into another small bowl and add 6 tablespoons of purified water. Whisk to combine and let sit to gel for 15 minutes. Preheat oven to 350° F (180° C). Combine the oats, flour or meal, baking powder, baking soda, Earl Grey powder (if using), and salt in a large bowl, mix well. Combine the nut butter, ¼ cup of coconut oil, drained soaked dates and the gelled flax/­­chia in a bowl of a food processor fit with an S blade. Process until smooth. Add the mixture into the bowl with the oats and flours, and stir to combine. The mixture will be stiff and sticky. Prepare a baking sheet by covering it with parchment paper. Use a small ice cream scoop to scoop uniform batter portions onto the baking sheet. If you dont have an ice cream scoop, portion out about 2 tablespoons of batter for each cookie. Leave enough space between each portion for flattening. Using a lightly oiled hand, flatten each cookie into uniform circles, about ¼ in thickness. Bake for 10-12 minutes, or until the outside of the cookies is dry to the touch. Let the cookies cool for about 5-7 minutes on the baking sheet, then transfer to a cooling rack to cool completely. You will probably need to bake the cookies in 2 batches. To make the cookie sandwiches, place a generous amount of the Earl Grey cream into the center of a cookie, then use another cookie to sandwich the cream and let it spread out to the sides, pressing gently. The cookies should be facing bottom side in. Repeat with the rest of the cookies, placing them back on their baking sheet. Place in the refrigerator while you prepare the chocolate, for the Earl Grey cream to harden a little. Prepare a drying rack, lined with parchment paper underneath. Melt the chocolate chips in a small saucepan or bowl on a double boiler, together with the remaining 1 tablespoon of coconut oil. Dip each cookie into the melted chocolate about half way, letting the excess chocolate drip off. Place on the drying rack. Repeat with the rest of the cookies. Transfer the rack to the refrigerator for a few minutes for the chocolate to harden. Keep the cookies in an airtight container in the refrigerator or a cool room. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles Melon Basil Summer Rolls Creamy, Garlicky Fettuccine with Roasted Green Vegetables .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Earl Grey Tea Sandwich Cookies, Vegan and Gluten-Free + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

chenna poda recipe | chhena poda | how to make oriya chhena poda

February 15 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

chenna poda recipe | chhena poda | how to make oriya chhena podachenna poda recipe | chhena poda | how to make oriya chhena poda with step by step photo and video recipe. bengali or odissa recipes are known for for their extensive use of milk and chenna in their dessert recipes. typically the chenna is shaped and boiled in sugar water or milk to make a classic dessert. but this dish is unique where sweetened chenna is baked and burnt to have a unique combination of taste. The post chenna poda recipe | chhena poda | how to make oriya chhena poda appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Salted Caramel Granola Bars

February 11 2019 Oh My Veggies 

After I finished grad school and had to start repaying my student loans, I decided to set up a deferred payment plan where I’d pay a smaller monthly payment for a few years, and then the payments balloon later. Obviously by then, I’d be rolling in cash from my swanky library job and I’d have a dollar sign shaped pool in my backyard and wash my hair with Fiji water, so this sounded like a good idea to me at the time. However, now that I’m a month away from the increased payments, it sounds like a terrible idea and it threw me into another I’m-paying-for-a-degree-I-don’t-use-wah-wah pity party. Because as much as I want to be one of those people who gives the finger to the past and goes through life with a t-shirt emblazoned with the words NO REGRETZ, I am a person with regretz and that degree has been one of them. (Sidenote: If I ever start a clothing line, I’m definitely calling it NO REGRETZ. In addition to t-shirts, I will sell bandanas with eagles on them.) Usually these pity parties end when I realize that practically no one uses their degrees and it’s okay! But this […]

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool

February 9 2019 My New Roots 

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool   When we committed to going to the ocean, I immediately felt the thrilling sensation that washes over me when I stand at the intersection of land meeting water. I smelled brine and dampness. I saw certain patterns and colours; light sand against dark water, wet stones, seaweed, driftwood, and feathers. This was the second recipe I created for the dreamy on-location photoshoot with Christiann Koepke back in October (you can see the first one here). The inspiration for this dish came first in fact, fast and furiously. Just thinking about the seaside brought this recipe to me in a wave of total inspiration. I wanted the ingredients to reflect the elements in this environment, and for the final result to be a visual meeting of land and sea. Now Im not super into “fake meat”, but there is something undeniably satisfying about tricking someone into thinking a vegetable is flesh. Tee hee. Plus, Rene Redzepi does it all the time, so maybe it puts me in the cool cooking club too? Yes? Anyway, I knew something on the plate had to look like seafood, and I had my sights set on scallops. In my first cookbook, I made “scallops” out of leeks, and wanted to try something different, so going through the rolodex of tube-shaped white veggies in my mind, I fell upon king oyster mushroom stems. Naturally. Browned in ghee and well-seasoned, I knew that these morsels would look exactly like mollusks, and taste deceptively meaty. A pool of herbaceous, vibrant green pesto, would be the land, and the perfect resting place for my mushroom medallions. I combined flat-leaf parsley and spinach to create a bright yet balanced sauce that complimented - rather than overwhelmed - the rest of the dish. But with all this creaminess, I knew that I also needed to include something for textural contrast, so toasted hazelnuts became the beach stones, along with fried capers, which added a bite of seaside brine. This dish is surprisingly easy to make, and it is the prefect main to serve for family and friends that you want to spoil a little. It looks impressive, but its a cinch to get on the table without gluing you to the stove. The pesto can be made a week in advance (although the fresher, the better), so that the only thing you need to do before serving is cook the mushroom and capers, and warm the pesto a little. I love cooking the capers and mushrooms in ghee (recipe here) because its just so darn delicious, but the pesto is vegan and if you want the entire meal to be so, simply swap out the ghee for expeller-pressed coconut oil, which is refined for high heat cooking and has no tropical aroma. Beta-glucan Goodness Edible mushrooms are both medical and nutritional dynamos. Collectively, they not only provide us with plant-based protein, vitamin D, and a whole host of minerals, but most excitingly a group of polysaccharides called beta-glucans. These complex, hemicellulose sugar molecules enhance the functioning of the immune system by activating immune cell response and stimulating the production of white blood cells. These compounds also effectively mobilize immune stem cells in your bone marrow, and exhibit anti-tumor properties, so theyre often used supplementally in cancer treatment protocols. Beta-glucans help to lower cholesterol, as this type of fiber forms a viscous gel during digestion, which grabs a hold of excess dietary cholesterol, prevents absorption by moving it through your digestive tract, and eliminates it. Through your poop! This same gel also slows down your digestion, which in turn stabilizes blood sugar, and minimizes the release of insulin. King oyster mushrooms are of course a good source of beta-glucans, but you can get them in other places too: barley, oats, sorghum, mushrooms like shiitake, reishi and maitake, as well as seaweed, algae, and dates.   I wouldn’t put king oyster mushrooms in the “specialty” category of fungi, but I also know that theyre not available at every grocery store, so if you cant find them, substitute with any other kind of mushroom you like and forgo the whole scallop charade. The dish will still turn out delicious, I promise. If you want to change up the herb in the pesto, try basil instead of flat-leaf parsley. Cilantro could also be delicious, but potentially overwhelming, so use more spinach in that case. And instead of hazelnuts in the pesto and garnish, try almonds, pecans or walnuts. Yummm. I like to serve this with a big hunk of crusty bread on the side to mop up any leftover pesto in the bowl. It also helps to have some good olive oil and flaky salt around for this situation, just sayin. If youd prefer the grain route, steamed brown rice, quinoa, or millet could be a decent accompaniment too. And if you want to go completely grain-free, roasted sweet potato, winter squash, or pumpkin would be totally lovely.     Print recipe     King Oyster Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 lb. /­­ 500g king oyster mushrooms (choose ones with fat stems) a generous amount of ghee (or expeller-pressed coconut oil) fine + flaky salt 1 jar brined capers (about 1/­­3 cup /­­ 55g) a handful of toasted hazelnuts, roughly chopped, for garnish 1 batch Parsley-Spinach Pesto (recipe follows) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish a few leaves of parsley, for garnish Directions: 1. Remove any dirt or debris from the mushrooms with your hands, or small soft brush. (do not use water!). Slice the stems into enough rounds so that each person has 5 or 6. Keep the caps for another dish. 2. Drain the capers and pat them dry with a clean tea towel or paper towel. Heat about a tablespoon of ghee (or coconut oil) in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the capers and fry until split and crisp - about 2-3 minutes. Remove from pan and set aside. 3. Add more ghee (or coconut oil) to the same skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add the sliced mushroom stems, a sprinkle of flaky salt, and cook on one side until golden, about 5-7 minutes. Then flip and cook on the other side until golden. Work in batches or use separate skillets - if you crowd the mushrooms they will steam each other and get soggy. That is not what were after! 4. While youre cooking the mushrooms, place the pesto in a small saucepan, add a touch of water to thin, if desired, and warm over low-medium heat. Do not boil! 5. To serve, place about 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml of the warm pesto in the bottom of a dish, spreading it out to make an indent in the center. Place 5 or 6 mushroom stems in the pesto, then top with the fried capers and toasted hazelnuts. Drizzle with olive oil and a few grinds of black pepper. Garnish with parsley and serve immediately. Parsley-Spinach Pesto Makes about 2 1/­­4 cups Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 150g hazelnuts 1 fat clove garlic 2 cups /­­ 35g flat-leaf parsley, lightly packed (tender stems only) 2 cups /­­ 65g baby spinach, lightly packed zest of 1 organic lemon 1/­­3 cup/­­ 80ml freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 2 lemons) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml cold-pressed olive oil 1/­­2 cup /­­ 35g nutritional yeast 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water, more if needed Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place hazelnuts on baking sheet. Toast in oven for 12-15 minutes or until fragrant and lightly toasted. Remove and set aside. Once cool, remove skins by rubbing the hazelnuts together in your hands. Set aside. 2. Remove any tough stems from the parsley. Roughly chop the leaves and tender stems (this prevents the parsley from bruising in the food processor). 3. Place garlic in the food processor and pulse to mince. Add the hazelnuts, parsley, spinach, lemon zest and juice, olive oil, nutritional yeast, and salt. Pulse for 30 seconds, then add the water and pulse again until its thick, but spreadable. Remove lid and scrape. Repeat until reaches desired consistency (I like mine a little chunky, but its up to you!). Store leftovers in an airtight glass container in the fridge for up to one week. We’re home from Bali now, settling back into life in the cold Canadian winter. It feels good to be here, especially after a satisfying few weeks in the sunshine, hosting two glorious retreats. Now it’s time to ground and focus on the year ahead. I’m very excited for 2019 – so many exciting things to share with you, just on the horizon. I hope you’re all well out there, and enjoying a vibrant start to the new year. Sending love and gratitude out to you all, always. xo, Sarah B The post Mushroom “Scallops” in a Warm Pesto Pool appeared first on My New Roots.

Vegan Blueberry Muffins (during a mandatory evacuation: crochet a mandala, knit a sweater)

March 17 2019 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Blueberry Muffins (during a mandatory evacuation: crochet a mandala, knit a sweater) I began baking like a fiend this week. Remarkably, everything I've cooked/­­baked or attempted to do in lieu of checking myself into some place for a "respite" has turned out to be exactly what I needed to function just one minute longer, one hour longer, then an afternoon and finally an evening longer. Because that's how I'm operating here: in moments--with really good food. I stumbled across this recipe for blueberry muffins in a mad search for a morning treat for the workers in the yard and DH and me (because who doesn't love blueberry muffins?). I have dozens of amazing blueberry muffin recipes throughout my collection. But the need to seek and find just the right recipe was urgent and a nice Google distraction. Trusty King Arthur Flour was the answer to my prayers. I landed on the Famous Department Store Blueberry Muffin recipe. If you've got five minutes, cupcake liners and blueberries (frozen are fine), I highly recommend you give these a shot. Mine were made with a flax egg and vegan butter--that's all the substitution needed to re-create the recipe. I know I'll be making these again, possibly adding lemon zest next time, and subbing some whole wheat flour in the mix as well--making a gluten free version would work well, too. It's quite a forgiving recipe: so simple, plain and lovely. If you'd like a taller muffin, you can always up the baking powder by a 1/­­8-1/­­4 teaspoon. My kitchen once again became my sanctuary.  Vegan Blueberry Muffins  *Adapted from Famous Department Store Blueberry Muffin Recipe by King Arthur  2 cups all-purpose flour 2 1/­­4 t. baking power 1/­­4 t. salt (I adjusted down the amt. with salted vegan butter) 1/­­2 cup vegan butter 1 cup sugar 4 t. ground flax seed with 4 T. water and 2 t. EVOO (flax egg subbing for 2 eggs) 1 t. vanilla extract 1/­­2 cup almond milk 2 cups frozen blueberries  *a little sugar for sprinkling on top of muffins before baking Preheat oven to 375. Prepare muffin tin lined with cupcake wrappers, spray wrappers with nonstick spray. Measure out flour, salt and baking soda in bowl and sift together. Set aside. In medium bowl, mix butter for about two minutes. Add sugar, mixing until light and fluffy--about a minute longer. Add vanilla and flax egg, then mix a bit more. Then add flour and milk alternately mixing lightly after each addition--just until the dry flour is mixed in. Then fold in the blueberries. Fill cupcake liners about 3/­­4 full with batter, then sprinkle about a 1/­­2 teaspoon of sugar on top. Bake for 30-40 minutes. *I found baking for a little longer yielded a nice golden brown top. I used a toothpick to test if batter was baked through.   So why all this baking urgency, kitchen therapy? Well, last week this happened: continued treatment for winter poison ivy outbreak, major demolition of yard, my sister scheduled for surgery in a week...oh and there was the mandatory evacuation of our home IMMEDIATELY owing to our gas line being hit during yard excavation--(not owing to our crew, rather something to do with "marking" of line). With barely enough time to spare to grab my purse, phone and two Great Pyrenees--knocking on neighbor's doors to warn them of potential doom--again with TWO seventy pound white Thunder Wolves on my wrists--it's a miracle I've made it to Sunday. ALL this while DH went about calmly managing the entire surreal afternoon as the fire department, gas, water and line inspectors arrived. (Wonder how I held up? Picture exactly what I've described here, sprinkle in screaming, crying, blaming and more crying. Okay, so I'm not exactly Mother Teresa during a crisis.) It's all I could do to keep my heart from simply stopping in my chest. Alas, the crisis was averted, things repaired and life returned to somewhat normal conditions. Above--as the demolition began. Below, the calm after the "evacuate" storm: Dr. Thyme checking on the progress with the workers. I was inside at this point--rocking back in forth in a chair chanting some illegible crap about "There's no place like home...there's no place like home." So yes, there be baking happening. All through this, I'm trying to remain calm. Lending positive affirmations to my sister who is about to face a really tough trial (as if she hasn't faced enough already).  It's been one thing after another.  Luckily I have friends (dear, dear friends) who've received texts with probably too-long-while-also-trying-not-to-be-overly-dramatic explanations of all that's transpired. Then there's been two- and three-hour phone conversations with these women and my sister as well. Truthfully, everyone I know has A LOT happening, but I don't know what I'd do without them. I guess we've hit the age in life where the proverbial sh*t hits the fan fairly regularly. But honestly, enough already. "Pass the muffins, please!" Helping along the way are my needlework projects--working with my hands while my mind tries to make order out of chaos.  Projects I've found incredibly blissful. The Sunny Spread blanket. Using my stash yarn for this. It's a mandala with a square finish. Such a calm one-mandala-at-a-time escape. I'll need to make about 25 of these to create a nice throw.  Oh boy do I have a long way to go, but my Great Love Cardigan will be SO lovely when it's finished. I can't wait. I've been working on this while listening to an audiobook: Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens.  This is the Adirondack Wrap crochet project. It's very relaxing to work on. Three triangles sewn together for final assembly. I just love it in my Mandala yarn. 

Next Level Lemon Miso Potatoes

March 14 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Next Level Lemon Miso Potatoes These potatoes are extra in every way. They take extra ingredients, extra work, and come out extra flavorful as a result. Simple roasted potatoes are already really good and don’t need changing, but I like to look at these lemon-miso ones as a category of their own. They’re for that time when you’re craving something indulgent, when you’re up for a fun kitchen project, and when you want to try out something new. They’re next level! The key to the flavor here is the marinade. The potatoes get par-boiled and marinated in a garlicky lemon-miso sauce. They are then slowly roasted in the marinade until they’re soft and creamy on the inside and golden and crispy on the outside. Pretty sure it’s impossible not to finish the whole batch in one sitting! Hope you give them a try, and if you’re interested in the step-by-step prep, check out our Instagram Stories later today (and highlights if you’re not reading this the day of). Sending you lots of love .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Next Level Lemon Miso Potatoes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Walnut “Meat” Stuffed Pepper

March 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Walnuts stand in for ground beef in this Tex-Mex-inspired stuffed pepper. This recipe comes to us from Chef Lisa Sereda, executive chef of Wine Time . Chef Sereda cooked it for the Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge at the 2019 International Restaurant & Foodservice Show of New York. Serves 8 – 10 - 6 quarts of water - 12 medium sized Anaheim peppers - 2 cups diced yellow onion - 2 tbsp minced garlic - 3 cups roasted peppers - 6 cups roasted walnuts - 2 1/­­2 tbsp cumin - 1 tbsp cayenne pepper (plus or minus depending on spice index) - 2 tbsp paprika - 4 tbsp white sugar - 1 tbsp salt -  1/­­4 cup lemon juice - 2 tbsp olive oil - 6 cups shredded white cheddar (more or less depending on cheesy preference) - 2 cups crumbled feta - 1 cup full fat Greek yogurt (to make the pepper vegan, skip the cheese, feta and Greek yogurt) - Non-stick cooking spray - Diced fresh chives for garnish   Directions: Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Bring water to full boil in large saucepan. Cut peppers lengthwise down one side from stem to within 1/­­2 inch of tip. Boil peppers in water for about seven minutes or until pepper turns an olive green color. Remove and place in ice bath and remove seeds and veins from pepper. Drain and pat peppers dry. In separate pan sauté onion and garlic in olive oil until translucent. Pulse roasted walnuts in food processor or chop until the consistency of sautéed ground beef. Add chopped walnuts to onion and garlic and cook until mixed through. Chop roasted bell peppers in food processor until almost a liquid consistency. Add to walnut mixture. Add cayenne, paprika, cumin, sugar, salt and lemon juice. Sauté on medium for about five minutes until the mixture begins to come together and most of the moisture has evaporated. Place peppers onto prepared cooking sheet (spray bottom of pan with nonstick cooking spray before placing peppers on pan). Stuff each pepper with desired amount of walnut meat mixture. Cover each pepper with generous amount of white cheddar (omit for vegan pepper). Cook uncovered for about twenty minutes until cheese is melted and slightly browned. Garnish with crumbled feta, a drizzle or scoop of Greek yogurt and fresh chives.   The post Walnut “Meat” Stuffed Pepper appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Raw Mock Tuna

March 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Nuts, seeds, seaweed, and kelp come together to create a convincing plant-based take on tuna that can be enjoyed in a lettuce wrap on a sandwich, or wherever you’d use tuna salad. This recipe comes to us from Heidi Liv Tompkins, Co-Founder, CFO, product development manager, Heidis Health Kitchen . It was the winning entry in the Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge at the 2019 International Restaurant & Foodservice Show of New York. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - Ingredients: - 1 cup sunflower seeds, raw - 1 cup almonds, raw - 1/­­3 cup water - 1/­­4 cup lemon juice, fresh - 2-3 tbsp vegan fish sauce substitute (such as Fysh Sauce) - 1/­­2 tsp garlic powder - 1/­­2 tsp dulse powder - 1 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 cup cashew mayo (recipe below) - 1/­­4 cup onion, chopped - 1/­­4 cup celery, chopped - 1/­­4 cup fresh parsley, chopped - 2 tsp kelp powder - 1/­­1/­­2 tsp garlic, minced - Yum Yum Ginger Sauce (recipe below)   - Cashew Mayo -  1/­­2 cup water -  1/­­2 cup fresh-squeezed lemon juice - 1 cup raw macadamia nuts - 1 cup raw cashews - 1 Tbsp. garlic - 1 1/­­2 tsp. Celtic sea salt   - Ginger Yum Yum Sauce -  1/­­2 cup fresh lemon juice -  1/­­2 cup water -  1/­­2 cup coconut aminos -  1/­­2 cup coconut nectar -  1/­­2 cup tahini - 2 inches ginger root, peeled - 2 cloves garlic - 1/­­2 bunch mint leaves   Directions: 1. Soak almonds, sunflower seeds, cashew, and macadamia nuts in water, separately, overnight. 2. In a food processor, process almonds, sunflower seeds, water, lemon juice, fysh sauce, garlic powder, dulse, & salt until fairly smooth. 3. Transfer to mixing bowl. Add Cashew Mayo and incorporate thoroughly. 4. Fold in finely chopped onion, celery, parsley, powdered kelp and freshly minced garlic. 5. Serve in lettuce wraps with Yum Yum Ginger Sauce, on sandwiches or on toast.   For the Cashew Mayo: 1. Blend ingredients until smooth. 2. Store in a glass jar & refrigerate.   For the Ginger Yum Yum Sauce: 1. Blend ingredients until smooth. 2. Store in a glass jar & refrigerate. The post Raw Mock Tuna appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo

March 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo Every year, people around the world celebrate Mardi Gras and Carnival, a festival of parades, music and eating decadent foods leading up to Lent. Millions of people observe Lent by fasting or foregoing treats and meats for 40 days. Fun fact, the term carnival is from carnelevare, or to remove meat. So thats what were doing, removing the meat, but keeping the delicious flavor of the popular Mardi Gras dish gumbo. This Creole stew from Southern Louisiana usually features strong-flavored stock, meat, or shellfish, but, with a few simple swaps, it’s a perfect vegetarian dish. Green Gumbo is a popular plant-based version that includes a variety of greens and herbs that give it an amazing color and rich flavors. Richard McCarthy, Member of the Executive Committee for Slow Food International and a Meatless Monday ambassador , shares his green gumbo recipe and great tips for making this plant-based dish taste authentic. Richards essentials for cooking green gumbo: Cook with what you have. Use collard greens, kale, mustard greens, turnip greens, spinach, and herbs like parsley, dill, etc. Green gumbo appears throughout the Lenten culinary calendar as meatless and on Holy Thursday in famous restaurants (like Dooky Chase) with meat stock. Begin by making a roux. Heat the pan with vegetable or olive oil, add flour, and mix with a wooden spoon until dark brown. The color of the gumbo will be determined by how dark you make the roux. The roux gives butter beans and lima beans a great base of flavor. Or, consider any medley of vegetables. Add Shiitake Bacon to get the traditional umami flavor. Umami is the savory flavor that many eaters say is missing in vegetarian recipes. One way to add umami to green gumbo is to make shiitake bacon, which provides the missing depth of flavor. Dont forget the rice. Rice is a traditional accompaniment to gumbo. While a saucepan is perfectly good for preparing rice, rice cookers are also an easy way to prepare perfect rice every time. Any grain or variety of rice can work, but long-grain rice is best since it provides the gumbo with more surface areas to cover with flavor.  McCarthy recommends a simplified version of the recipe crafted by Richard Stewart, the former chef of Gumbo Shop. Green Gumbo Serves 4 Ingredients: Gumbo: 1/­­4 cup of vegetable or olive oil 1/­­4 cup of flour 1 large onion, minced 4 stalks of celery, minced 1 bell pepper, minced 2 bunches of available greens (collard, mustard, kale, turnip, and/­­or spinach), chopped 1/­­4 cup of chopped parsley 2-4 cups of water (or enough to make a soup) 2 bay leaves Salt and pepper, to taste Cayenne pepper or hot sauce, to taste 1 cup of dried field peas (or Sea Island red peas, on the Slow Food Ark of Taste ) Vegetable stock, to taste (optional) Mushroom Bacon: 1 dozen fresh shiitake or button mushrooms 1 TBS of liquid smoke, smoked salt and/­­or smoked paprika 1/­­4 cup of vegetable or olive oil 1 TBS of salt or soy sauce (to taste) Rice: 1 cup of long-grained rice 2 cups of water Preparation: Field peas: Rinse, then boil field peas in salt water until soft. Drain peas of excess water and either store or immerse immediately into the gumbo. This step can be done in advance in order to cut down on preparation time on the day of serving. You can even prepare and freeze the peas days before, drop them into the hot soupy pot mid-way through the process. Make the gumbo: Heat a soup pot at a medium setting and make a roux (the soup base). Roux: add oil to the pot, once sizzling, add flour and mix with a wooden spoon. When the flour starts to smell delicious, it will then begin to turn a brownish color. Stir fairly vigorously to avoid burning. Once its a dark brown (5-10 minutes), add minced onions, celery and bell pepper. Stir the ingredients well to blend the flavors. Add salt, pepper, and more oil and/­­or water (or wine) to deglaze the pan. The roux will become bubbly and smell almost sweet. At this point, start adding water and turn down the heat a little. Add bay leaves, other seasonings, and the chopped greens and herbs. They will soon turn from bright green to dark green. Add field peas and any additional vegetables, like chopped carrots or turnips, whatever you have in the kitchen. Let simmer for at least 60 minutes. Once the gumbo is hot, tasty and ingredients cooked down into dark greens, and soft field peas, it is ready to serve. Tasting it at the end is important: Is it salty or spicy enough? If not, add more cayenne or hot sauce, black pepper, salt, etc. Mushroom bacon: Slice fresh mushrooms vertically in thirds, depending upon the size of the mushrooms. (Button mushrooms are fine and usually easily available, feel free to select shiitake or other exceptionally tasty varieties.) In a mixing bowl, add 1/­­4 cup of oil, 1 TBS of liquid smoke, salt or soy sauce. Mix the ingredients, and then add the fresh mushrooms and mix until they are coated. Spread sliced mushrooms across a baking sheet and bake for 20-30 minutes at 375 degrees F. Check after 15 minutes and turn over ones that are browned and crisp. Once crispy, turn off the oven and let cool slowly in oven. Rice: If you have a rice cooker, prepare as usual. If not, wash 1 cup of rice under running cold water to remove any excess dust, etc. Boil in 2 cups of water until soft (usually 25-30 min). Final Preparations: Place 1/­­4 cup of rice in the middle of a shallow soup bowl. Pour gumbo around the rice, making sure that there are equal amounts of greens and liquid. Take the dried, crispy mushroom bacon from the cooled oven and add a handful on top of the rice, and serve. Invite your friends and family to celebrate a plant-based Mardi Gras with this Green Gumbo recipe. If youre looking for other meatless recipe inspiration throughout the Lenten season, check out our recipe gallery . Happy Mardi Gras! Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Less Waste: Broccoli Stem ‘Tartare’

February 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Less Waste: Broccoli Stem ‘Tartare’ It seems like a lot of people still see broccoli stems a scraps to be thrown away, but the truth is that broccoli is delicious in its entirety. The stems make up the bulk of the weight for a reason – they are totally edible, incredibly tender inside, and very versatile. To prep them, all you have to do is peel away the tough outer skin, and you’ll be left with a velvety ‘heart,’ which kind of reminds us of an artichoke heart. It can be utilized in so many ways – in fried rice, soups, salads, gratin, latkes, and even apps. This ‘tartare’ is an unexpected little number to serve on a snack platter, but we think that it will pleasantly surprise any guests. It comes together with the help of staple pantry ingredients, and tastes indulgent…but in reality you’re eating a bunch of broccoli. Win-win all around. We came up with the idea for this recipe because broccoli stems get incredibly tender when steamed, and they take on flavor really well, like little sponges. We’ve seen various plant-based ‘tartare’ done before, like carrot tartare and avocado tartare, so we had the idea to try out something similar with broccoli stems. We marinated the stems with classic tartare ingredients like mustard, capers, and red onion (or shallot), and were so pleased with the result. Give broccoli stems a chance! And enjoy :) Broccoli Stem Tartare   Print Serves: 3 cups Ingredients 4 broccoli stems (or 5-6 if theyre particularly thin) ⅛ of 1 red onion - finely chopped 2 teaspoons capers - minced 4 teaspoons mustard (mix of Dijon and grainy or just 1 type) 4 teaspoons apple cider vinegar 2 teaspoons tamari sea salt black pepper red pepper flakes 5 tablespoons olive oil any herbs of choice - for garnish (optional) Instructions Prepare a steamer or steaming basket and boil water for steaming the broccoli stems. Peel the broccoli stems with a vegetable peeler, making sure to peel away all the tough outer skin, until youre left with the tender inner stem. Roughly chop the stems into about ½ thick rounds and place in the steamer basket. Steam for 10 minutes, or until very tender but not mushy. Once ready, chop the broccoli stems into finer pieces. You can chop them finely for a smoother tartare or leave them chunky for one with more bite. Meanwhile, in a large mixing bowl, combine the onion, capers, mustard, apple cider vinegar, tamari, salt, black pepper, and red pepper flakes to taste, and mix. Pour in the olive oil, whisking it in to emulsify. Add the broccoli stems and mix to coat in the dressing. Transfer the tartare to an airtight container and ideally refrigerate for 30 min to an hour before serving, to allow the broccoli stems to marinate, and also for the olive oil to thicken, which will make the tartare easier to spread. Serve with your favorite crackers or toasted bread, garnished with any herbs of choice. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Fruit Leather Puzzle Tofu Saag Paneer, Spring Style Raw Onion Bread Pink Soup with Roasted Onions and Broccoli .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Less Waste: Broccoli Stem ‘Tartare’ appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Make Perfect Chapati, Roti

February 21 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Make Perfect Chapati, RotiMake Perfect Chapati I have been making cooking videos for 12 years, and I feel that it is finally time to answer some of the most commonly asked questions about the most staple item to almost every Indian meal - Chapati, (Chapati is also known Roti or phulka). There are so many questions including why Chapatis become dry or hard, why they are not easy to roll, why the dough is sticking to rolling pin or rolling surface. So here are some tips to make the perfect Chapati. This dough is perfect for making whole wheat Chapati, or Parathas. For Chapati, the most important part is the making of the dough. Note: usually approximately 1 cup of whole wheat flour will be needed and 1/­­2 cup of water (use the water as needed). Add water so that the dough is soft but not sticking to your fingers. If the dough is right, it makes rolling the Chapati easy and makes it so that they will be soft. Dough should be well kneaded for about 2 minutes. After that, let it rest for 10 minutes and knead the dough again before making the Chapati. Press the dough with your fingertip, and the dent that your fingers make should almost bounce back. If this doesnt happen, it means that the dough is too hard, and it can cause the Chapati to be dry. Another important part is the skillet. This is a factor that is often overlooked since we dont check the temperature of the skillet the same way that we do for baking. The best way to check if the skillet is ready is to drizzle a few drops of water on the skillet. If it sizzles, you are ready to make your Chapatis. Along with that, a heavy skillet works better. If done right, the chapati puffs up like a balloon. Dough can be refrigerated for 2-3 days. The best way to refrigerate the dough is to lightly oil the dough and the bowl. The bowl you are storing the dough in should be spacious and should be covered tightly. These are all the tips that you need to make the perfect roti. They are super easy to make and will become second nature with just a little bit of practice! The post Make Perfect Chapati, Roti appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

California State Capitol Goes Meatless Monday — Q&A with Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon

February 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

California State Capitol Goes Meatless Monday — Q&A with Assembly Speaker Anthony RendonTo celebrate Presidents Day, Meatless Monday is thrilled to share a recent interview with Speaker Anthony Rendon , who represents the 63rd Assembly District in the California State Assembly. Californias state capital, Sacramento, is known for its Farm to Fork Festival and its support of sustainable food policy, including a Meatless Monday resolution passed in 2016. Keeping with this tradition, the capitol cafeterias -- managed by Statehouse Restaurant -- recently launched Meatless Monday for the employees of the California State Capitol. If youre like Anthony Rendon and interested in bringing Meatless Monday to your community or government office, join the growing list of communities and city leaders who support Meatless Monday as a simple change that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions and lessen the risk of chronic preventable diseases. See our Community Guide with simple steps to get it going now. We asked Speaker Rendon to share his thoughts and enthusiasm for Meatless Monday with us. Sacramento has a great history of sustainability, including passing a Meatless Monday resolution in 2016 - how has this benefited the community? The thing I like best about Meatless Monday is that it reminds us to think about what we eat and to make choices that are good for our health and good for our environment. Meat production is extremely costly to our environment. In general, it uses more water and has greater environmental costs, including production of gases that accelerate climate change. I think we can make California a better place for all of its residents if we can give people healthy, tasty, plant-based food options wherever they go. This should include going into communities that have been underserved, like some in my district, and making sure they have access to healthy foods that are also affordable. Why are you supportive of Meatless Monday in the Capitol?  There are a lot of things about Meatless Monday that are worth supporting. In a classic essay titled, The Pleasures of Eating, Wendell Berry wrote, Eating is an agricultural act. Most of us who have time-consuming jobs buy a lot of our food ready to eat, and forget how it gets to the table. Everything we eat starts out on a farm or ranch somewhere. Meatless Monday is a good way for all of us to be reminded of the work it takes to grow and prepare our meals. What recommendations do you have for other communities and politicians who want to include Meatless Monday as part of their sustainability strategy? There are very small things we can all do. For instance, Ive added a reminder to my calendar, so when I check my schedule on my phone every Monday morning, Im reminded that its Meatless Monday! It helps me plan out my meals for the day. Are there plans to expand Meatless Monday to other areas of your community and Capitol? Statehouse Restaurant, the cafeteria located in the Capitol, has rolled out a Meatless Monday menu that they will make available every Monday. Included on that menu are vegan and vegetarian pizzas that I had the opportunity to try  - theyre quite delicious! Whats your favorite meatless meal?   I love all types of Indian food. I’m lucky to live close to the Little India neighborhood in Artesia, California - the largest Indian-American enclave in Southern California, so my wife and I often find ourselves at restaurants there.   Use Mondays to make positive change that will do a world of good. Meatless Monday is a global movement followed by millions who choose not to eat meat one day a week for their health and the health of the planet.   Join us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post California State Capitol Goes Meatless Monday — Q&A with Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon appeared first on Meatless Monday.

LOVE Soup with Pistachio Dukkah

February 14 2019 Green Kitchen Stories 

LOVE Soup with Pistachio Dukkah Hey there! We haven’t posted for a while because we wanted to get our new site ready (soon there!!!). But we got tired of waiting and felt like making a little food contribution on V-day so we cooked a red soup with cute and tasty toppings on. Unfortunately our kids rated this soup as “One of the worst soups they have ever eaten!” so that was kind of a bummer. But don’t listen to them. Your Valentine’s date hopefully has better taste than our kids. Because this is a good and simple little number with creamy cauliflower and potatoes, earthy beetroots and tasty spices. We serve it with sauerkraut and a generous drizzle of pistachio dukkah on top. So, happy Valentine’s Day. Cook this soup for someone you like. Make sure to top it with lots of dukkah. And don’t let your kids try it. We also made giant dino kale chips by brushing whole dino kale leaves with oil and salt and roasting them on 150°C /­­ 300°F for 20 min or until crisp. Peace, Love and Beetroots! /­­Lul Beet & Cauliflower Soup Serves 4-6 This is a vegan soup but you could add a little cream or plant based cream if you want to make it extra round and creamy (maybe our kids would have liked it more then ;) 2 tbsp olive oil 1 onion 1 garlic clove 1 tsp fennel seeds 1 tbsp cumin seeds 1 head (500 g /­­1 lb) cauliflower, cut into florets and stem chopped 4 (300 g /­­ 10 oz) beetroots, peeled and chopped 2 potatoes vegetable stock or water, to cover 1 tsp sea salt lemon juice, to taste Heat oil in a saucepan and stir-fry onion, garlic, fennel seeds and cumin seeds until fragrant and golden. Add cauliflower florets and the chopped stem, beetroots, water and salt and cover with a lid and bring to the boil. Lower the heat and let simmer for 20 minutes or until the vegetables are soft. Use a stick blender to blend the soup smooth. Taste and adjust the flavours, adding in a little lemon for acidity and a splash of cream if you prefer. Serve in bowls topped with a drizzle of olive oil, fermented sauerkraut and Pistachio Dukkah Spice Blend. Pistacchio & Hazelnut Dukkah Spice Blend 4 tbsp pistachio nuts 4 tbsp hazelnuts 2 tbsp coriander seeds 2 tbsp cumin seeds 2 tbsp fennel seeds 4 tbsp sesame seeds 2 tsp nigella seeds 1 tsp sea salt Place pistachio nuts and hazelnuts on a dry frying pan and gently roast on low to medium heat for 3 minutes. Transfer to a pestle and mortar or a food processor. Now add coriander, cumin, fennel and sesame seeds to the pan and gently roast for 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Then transfer to the nuts and add nigella seeds and sea salt as well.  Bash it up in a pestle and mortar or pulse a few times in the food processor, we´re looking for a nice crunchy texture, not a powder. Store in an airtight glass.

Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta

February 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Cinnamon, citrus, maple, mushroom, chickpea, almond, garlic and rosemary sing in this creamy, yet hearty-textured pasta. With all the light citrus and cinnamon flavors this pasta can be easily served for brunch, lunch or dinner. This recipe comes to us from Kathy of Healthy. Happy. Life. Serves 8 For the butternut squash sauce: - 2 cups frozen butternut squash cubes, frozen - 1 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed - 1 teaspoon garlic powder - 1 tablespoons maple syrup - 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - dash of salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon black pepper - 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast* For the chickpeas: - 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, to coat the skillet - 1/­­2 small white onion, diced - 1 15 ounce can chickpeas, drained - 1 large portobello mushroom, diced - 1/­­8 teaspoon cinnamon - 1 tablespoon lemon juice - 1 cup roasted, unsalted almonds, slivered To complete the Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta: - 1 pound orecchiette pasta, cooked - additional nutritional yeast, for tossing the cooked pasta* - a little extra olive oil, for tossing the cooked pasta - 1 orange, sliced into segments - 1 teaspoon orange zest *optional. Found in health food stores of the health food section of some grocery stores. To make the Butternut Squash Sauce: Place the frozen, cubed butternut squash in a skillet over medium high heat. Season with the rosemary, garlic powder, maple syrup, olive oil, salt, pepper, nutritional yeast, orange juice and orange zest. Cook for 3-5 minutes, working the seasonings into the squash with a fork, until the squash has softened into a lightly mashed mixture. Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat and begin cooking the orecchiette according the package directions. To make the chickpeas: Place the olive oil and chopped onion in a skillet over medium-high heat. Cook the onions for 4-5 minutes, or until they become translucent. Add the chickpeas and diced Portobello mushroom to the pan and season with the cinnamon and lemon juice. Cook for another 4-5 minutes, or until the chickpeas begin to brown and the Portobellos begin to become tender. Add the almonds and sauté for just 1 minute more. To complete the Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta: Drain the orecchiette when it has completed cooking. Toss the cooked pasta with a few dashes extra virgin olive oil and nutritional yeast, if using. Toss the pasta with the butternut squash sauce until fully coated. Fold in the chickpeas. Serve in a bowl with fresh orange slices and a dash of orange zest on top. The post Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Glazed Tempeh Steaks with Rosemary Mushroom Gravy

February 6 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Glazed Tempeh Steaks with Rosemary Mushroom Gravy Hi friends! Checking in really quickly with a favorite dinner as of late. I think tempeh is one of those things that people either love or hate, but there’s a few ways of cooking it that I’m pretty sure would make anyone like it. ‘Glazing’ it is one of those. It’s a decadent method that leaves you with irresistibly golden tempeh ‘steaks’ with crispy edges. Today we’ve got a cozy rosemary, mushroom and white bean gravy to top it with. I thought I’d also share something that’s been helping me stay on track with eating the foods that make me feel good after an indulgent December and January. I noticed myself falling into some not-so-great eating patterns ever since the holidays. Things like treats after dinner almost every night, or buying salty processed snacks more often than I like (have you tried Hippeas?!). None of them are a big deal, but it’s things that don’t contribute to me feeling 100%. So I’ve been aiming to gently steer my focus towards the food that gives me the most energy: whole plant foods. I like the idea of Dr. Michael Greger’s daily dozen checklist, which is his proposed list of the most nourishing plant foods to try to fit into your daily routine. It goes as follows: beans, berries, other fruit, cruciferous vegetables, greens, other vegetables, flax seeds, nuts and seeds, herbs and spices, whole grains, beverages (water), along with the suggested number of servings. So, I’ve been aiming to check off most of the items with my meals every day. At first it becomes a fun game, and then turns more and more into a habit. Of course, it’s not realistic to expect yourself to eat that way every single day, and some days I don’t even eat half of the things listed, but it’s also easier than you might think to get these things in. These tempeh steaks, for example, check off 4 of the items! I make sure to use this tool as a gentle reminder, definitely not as a way to control my eating or stress myself out in any way. There’s a daily dozen app that lets you check off the items, which I used at first, but now I just think about the checklist when buying groceries for the day/­­week, and it helps so much with building out nourishing meals. Just wanted to share this, in case anyone else finds it helpful. Have a great rest of your week! Glazed Tempeh Steaks with Rosemary Mushroom Gravy   Print Serves: 4 medium portions or 2 large Ingredients for the tempeh steaks 8 oz tempeh (we used 3-grain tempeh) 1 teaspoon sesame oil 1½ tablespoons tamari or coconut aminos 1 tablespoon brown rice vinegar or mirin 1 teaspoon maple syrup 1 tablespoon avocado oil or olive oil for oiling the pan for the rosemary mushroom gravy avocado or olive oil 1 yellow onion - diced sea salt 1 lb crimini mushrooms - sliced 2 cloves of garlic - minced 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 cups or 1 can of cooked white beans (any variety) 1 tablespoon white miso 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard splash of Sriracha/­­chili sauce or a pinch of red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon chopped rosemary freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup white bean broth (if cooking white beans from scratch), veggie broth or water parsley, cilantro, or other herbs - for serving Instructions to make the tempeh steaks Slice the tempeh in half crosswise and then slice each half in half lengthwise, so that you end up with 4 thin, square or slightly rectangular pieces. In a shallow dish, whisk together the sesame oil, tamari/­­coconut aminos, vinegar, maple syrup, and oil. Place the tempeh pieces into the shallow dish with the marinade and let it marinate while you make the gravy. To cook the steaks, heat oil in a large pan over medium heat. Remove the tempeh from the shallow dish, leaving the marinade in the dish. Place the tempeh in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes on each side, until golden. Pour the remaining marinade over the tempeh, letting it bubble up and create a glaze over the tempeh. Serve right away with the mushroom rosemary gravy. to make the rosemary mushroom gravy Heat some oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and cook for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms, stir once, and then let them sit without stirring for a minute or two. Cook for another 7 minutes, or until all the liquid, released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the garlic and stir for about 30 seconds, until fragrant. Add the balsamic and cook for another few minutes, until the vinegary flavor of the balsamic cooks off. Add about a ¼ of the amount of the mushrooms to an upright blender. Add half of the white beans, miso, mustard, chili sauce/­­red pepper flakes, rosemary, black pepper, more sea salt, and broth/­­water. Blend until smooth, adding more broth if needed. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Add the blended gravy back to the pan with the mushrooms, along with the remaining white beans. Heat everything through, adding more broth if necessary to achieve a gravy-like consistency. Serve the gravy over the tempeh steaks, garnished with herbs. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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