vitamin - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

10 Reasons Why You Need To Eat More Plant Proteins

Vegan Malai Kofta Recipe ( Baked or Pan-Fried)

Baked Sriracha Potato Chips

Balsamic Basil Watermelon Antipasto










vitamin vegetarian recipes

Cauliflower Spinach and Chickpeas with Mustard Seed Curry Leaf Sauce

May 7 2020 Vegan Richa 

Cauliflower Spinach and Chickpeas with Mustard Seed Curry Leaf SauceThis easy cauliflower chickpea and spinach sauté features a fragrant Mustard seed & Curry Leaf Sauce – an easy vegan meal that is ready in under 45 minutes. Packed with healthy cauliflower, creamy chickpeas, and superfood spinach in every bite.  Grain-free and gluten-free! Jump to Recipe Coming at you with a dish that is as simple as it is delicious! Could I possibly interest you in some cauliflower, chickpeas and spinach? And South Indian flavors! In my book, these ingredients are just about the greatest things ever. Toss them in a pan with a delicious mustard seed and curry leaf sauce and serve with quinoa, rice, or have it as-is and youve got yourself a simple dish that is sure to please. Toasted mustard seeds, Urad dal lentils, crisp curry leaves, and Sambhar masala add a fabulous complex flavor. An unexpected, sensational combination of simple ingredients that makes for a well-rounded recipe that is a must-try! You got your iron, you got your protein, you got your vitamins. Check, check, check.Continue reading: Cauliflower Spinach and Chickpeas with Mustard Seed Curry Leaf SauceThe post Cauliflower Spinach and Chickpeas with Mustard Seed Curry Leaf Sauce appeared first on Vegan Richa.

My Journey with Alex

May 3 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

My Journey with Alex Many of you have asked me about the man behind-the-scenes of Manjula’s Kitchen…Well as many of you know, that person is my husband Sikander aka Alex. Alex is responsible for me being in the spotlight of Manjula’s Kitchen, while he prefers to stay in the background. The simple truth is my YouTube channel exists only because of his hard work and dedication. He introduced me to this new concept for me at the time, YouTube. Alex takes the lead on all of the hard work these videos take, from the editing to ensuring the recipes meet his quality control (i.e. taste testing!) Every recipe has to meet Alex’s high standards for being posted. Alex feels so proud when reading the comments on my posts and always tells me that he is my biggest fan. With a huge smile on his face, he will tell me your fans don’t know that the biggest fan of yours is standing right next to you! Alex and I have spent over 50 memorable years together and of course with that comes ups and downs. Sometimes it feels like Alex and I still don’t know everything about each other, and I think that is a good thing! We still love to learn new things about each other. Every day is unique with different challenges. During another lifetime, we ran a business together. For 20 years, we worked in an office together, sitting side by side. It was nice that we got to spend so much quality time together. Now as we enter our golden years, we still enjoy working together, even though we are partially retired. We both work from home and can still enjoy sitting side by side! I cherish the fact that we are never alone. Our marriage was an arranged marriage. In todays times, I recognize that it sounds really outdated. However, ours was an arranged marriage with a happy ending. Alex was my fathers choice. At their first meeting, my father was extremely impressed with him. They first met Alex for about an hour, but it felt like they knew him for a lifetime. My father described him to me with great detail. I was amazed my father could pick up so much on someone he just met! What stuck with me is my father finished by emphasizing that Alex would love and respect me and that because we shared the same values I would be proud of the person I was when with him. My father invited Alex and his family for afternoon tea so that I could meet him myself. I was so curious to see what my father had seen in Alex. I knew that Alex had already decided to marry me and told his father that he was already in love with me. Alex had been working abroad in the U.S. and at this time and was in India visiting his family and to get married. We had just one month before he had to go back to the U.S. for his work. It happened so quickly. We got married within the week. It was at that point it hit me. I would have to move to the U.S. too. My mother was not happy with this situation and was upset at my father. Of course, she didn’t want her daughter to move so far away. I was very confused, but I knew my father he will not take such a big step unless he was sure it was absolutely the right decision. We got married and moved to the U.S. and settled into a brand new way of life. It took some time to get used to a new country, a new language, and most importantly new food. But it was a life we enjoyed discovering together. When my parents visited us in the U.S. the first time, my mother and Alex spent a lot of time together. The immediately formed a great bond, becoming best friends. My parents noticed just how much Alex cared for me and how happy we were together. They would say Alex would light up when I was near him. Alex really enjoys pampering me. The gestures were small, but with great care. Alex happily makes me the best cups of hot tea and always with a smile. In fact, I can’t remember the last time I made tea for myself. He always makes sure I take care of myself, leaving my daily vitamins/­­medicines and water on the kitchen table to make sure I don’t forget. Then there are those times he can sense I need a break and I will see a fresh hot grilled cheese sandwich waiting for me. Everyone (especially our grandkids!) in our family has decided that Alex makes the “world’s best” tea and grilled cheese sandwiches. Of course, we have our share of disagreements and arguments, as every couple does. Alex is not one to say sorry very easily so most of the time I’ll give in and say sorry. The next day I will see a beautiful bouquet of colorful flowers waiting for me and all is well again. I suppose that is how a good marriage works – you know when to give in. I can say with confidence that my father chose correctly for me and I married a man who truly takes care of me. We’ve made a good life for ourselves, with our two sons and their lovely families. More on them later… Stay safe & healthy everyone! The post My Journey with Alex appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Our Top 10 Favorite Bean Recipes

April 6 2020 Meatless Monday 

Our Top 10 Favorite Bean Recipes Beans are the pillars of the pantry; theyre easy to prepare, packed with plant-based protein and a host of other vitamins and minerals, versatile, flavorful, and adaptable. We love adding them to stews, transforming them into burgers, or serving them cold and dressed for a bright and hearty salad. With so many varieties available, from pinto beans and black-eye peas to navy beans and chickpeas, your recipe options are truly endless. Depending on how you cook them, beans can be creamy and elegant or toothsome and refreshing, which is why its important to have a stock of both canned beans and dried beans in your pantry. This Monday, grab a can of beans and experiment with one of our top 10 favorite bean recipes. Hearty White Bean and Millet Soup All the flavors of your favorite Italian restaurant -- roasted garlic, crushed tomatoes, dry white wine -- packed into one hearty, comforting bowl of soup. For the Hearty White Bean and Millet Soup recipe, click here .     Tahini Quinoa Bean Salad Tahini is made from pulverized sesame seeds; its creamy nuttiness is magic when used as a dressing for this colorful quinoa bean salad. For the Tahini Quinoa Bean Salad recipe, click here .     Navy Bean Bruschetta  Sure, traditional bruschetta is made with diced fresh tomatoes, but this version boasts a bit more protein thanks to a base of navy beans. For the Navy Bean Bruschetta recipe, click here .     New Orleans Red Beans and Rice For authentic red beans and rice, youve got to start with dry beans. Soak overnight and boil with some aromatics for a bean dish that is unlike anything youve ever tasted before. For the New Orleans Red Beans and Rice recipe, click here .     Farro and White Bean Veggie Burger Although the recipe calls for a handful of ingredients, you can make the base of these burgers using just farro (a yummy, toothsome grain) and white beans. Add any other additional vegetables, seasonings, or bread crumbs to round out the flavor and texture. For the Farro and White Bean Veggie Burger recipe, click here .       Butternut Squash Black Bean Chili This chili is rich and smoky thanks to the liberal use of chipotle and ancho chili powder, cumin, and, of course, lots and lots of black beans. For the Butternut Squash Black Bean Chili recipe, click here .       Quick and Easy Hummus To make hummus requires four ingredients -- chickpeas, tahini, lemon juice, salt -- and a food processor. Yep, thats it. Enjoy. For the Quick and Easy Hummus recipe, click here .       Vegetarian Hoppin John Though traditionally made with ham or bacon, this vegetarian version of Hoppin John doesnt lack for flavor thanks to hot sauce, liquid smoke, and yummy black-eyed peas. For the Vegetarian Hoppin John recipe, click here .     Roasted Red Pepper and Red Bean Meatballs Meatless meatballs made with roasted red peppers and kidney beans mimic beautifully the meat versions. The flavor is all there, too, with onion and garlic, herbs, and non-dairy Parmesan cheese. For the Roasted Red Pepper and Red Bean Meatballs recipe, click here .   Pinto Bean Falafel Most falafel recipes call for chickpeas, but this version using pinto beans is creamier than traditional versions, but with all the same flavor. For the Pinto Bean Falafel recipe, click here .     Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation.   The post Our Top 10 Favorite Bean Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go Bad

March 30 2020 Meatless Monday 

Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go BadEvery food item will eventually go bad, but there are many food staples that offer a terrific value, can be prepared in big batches, and have an incredibly long shelf-life. Some of these ingredients can serve as the centerpiece of a meal, like potatoes, beans, and pasta, while others act as supporting actors, providing quick bursts of flavor to ordinary dishes. Best of all, many of these foods are completely plant-based and rich in many of the essential vitamins and minerals necessary for a healthy body. Our list of plant-based ingredients all have a shelf life of over two months (when stored properly) and are relatively inexpensive. But most importantly, these pantry staples give you the opportunity to get in the kitchen and experiment with flavors and ingredients that you may have overlooked in the past. And Meatless Mondays are always a great opportunity to start a new healthy ritual. Beans Often sold for less than a dollar a can, beans are the ultimate plant-based protein. With so many different types to choose from -- kidney, black, pinto, cannellini, pigeon peas, butter beans -- the recipe possibilities are endless. Make a stew, vegetable chili , bean salad, or these black bean meatless balls with zucchini noodles . Diced Tomatoes (canned) Take a simple stew, stir-fry, or sauce to the next level with a can of diced tomatoes. At only a buck a can, diced tomatoes will become your new secret weapon in the kitchen. Try adding them to this boldly-seasoned spicy chickpea ragout. Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Toss them into a blender, soup pot or sauté pan to add some nutrients and heft to your mid-week meals. When stored properly, frozen fruits and vegetables will last years (but please dont make them wait that long). Some frozen vegetables -- spinach, collards, broccoli rabe -- should be thawed and drained before cooking, while others like broccoli, peas, and peppers can be thrown into a hot pan as-is and easily transformed into a garlic-ginger fried rice. Granola A bag of granola wont run you much more than $4.00, depending on the brand, but it will impart an invaluable crunch to yogurt and oatmeal. Many manufacturers sell granola with a shelf life of up to six months, but it should be good to eat it even past that point (although it might not retain its full crunch). Lentils (dry) At $1.50 per pound, a bag of dried lentils is one of the best bargains in the grocery store. Besides an almost indefinite shelf life, the lentil contains a laundry-list of essential minerals like iron, folate, and manganese, is packed with protein, and is a great source of fiber. If youve never before cooked with dried lentils, start with a simple stew or this easy French lentil salad with cherry tomatoes. Onions When stored in the refrigerator, onions can last for up to two months (sometimes longer). Theyre pretty cheap, too, costing only around $1.00 – $1.50 per pound. Sear on the stove top for a smoky, charred flavor or cook them low-and-slow to unlock their natural, caramel-like sweetness and sprinkle them over this sweet potato caramelized onion stew. Oatmeal Think of oatmeal as a blank canvas. Costing less than a quarter per serving, let your imagination run wild when it comes to cooking breakfast. Mix in everything from peanut butter, jam, nuts, seeds, or even savory spices. Dried oatmeal can last longer than a year when properly stored. Use oatmeal in this vanilla almond milk oatmeal or try using it to make dessert, like this apple cranberry oatmeal bread. Pasta Costing only $1.00 per box, your pantry should be loaded with pasta, but we recommend going beyond the standard semolina/­­durum wheat flour varieties and experiment with pastas made from whole grains, vegetables, lentils, and chickpeas. Try some unique flavor combinations to keep things interesting, like this recipe for green tea pesto pasta . Peanut Butter Whether you like it creamy or crunchy, peanut is the ideal pantry staple . A serving of peanut butter is packed with protein and healthy fats, both of which will keep you feeling nice and satiated. Peanut butter has a shelf life of more than a year (unopened), and many brands of sell for less than $2.00 a jar. Polenta (corn meal) Polenta is made by mixing cornmeal (dried, ground corn) with either water or milk. Inexpensive and versatile, polenta can serve as the foundation of any number of meals, pairing especially well with tomato sauce, like in this recipe for Italian white beans with kale and polenta.  Potatoes These starchy staples dont last forever, but when stored in a cool dark space they can last for between 2 - 3 months. At around .50 cents per pound, the potato is an excellent source of fiber, nutrients, and calories; they can add creaminess to soups or serve as a vessel for a delicious stuffed potatoes primavera . Rice Whether its white, brown, or wild, rice costs less than a quarter per serving. Rice can serve as an accompanying carbohydrate or act as the main meal. For a new take on everyones favorite grain, try this vegetarian biryani or meatless brown rice jambalaya . Salsa Jarred salsa is an excellent (and convenient) alternative to fresh varieties. Add a tablespoon to anything bean burritos and taco bowls to spicy puttanesca pasta and gallo pinto ; mash some together with a ripe avocado and youve got a quick-and-easy guacamole. Soy Sauce Drizzle soy sauce into your stir fry, salad, sautéed vegetable, or tomato sauce for a boost of salty umami flavor. You can also use it liberally in this yummy Asian noodle bowl with spicy almond sauce . Soy sauce can cost as little as $2.00 a bottle and can last nearly two years after opening when stored in the refrigerator. Sweet Potatoes The sweet potato is natures candy; slice it down the middle and heat in the microwave for five minutes and out comes tasting reminiscent of a sugary soufflé. If you want to try making a dish that requires a little more technique, cook up this spicy and aromatic sweet potato chana or a coconut milk sweet potato white bean soup . Vegetable Broth/­­ Bouillon A box of vegetable broth is a staple of any kitchen, but you can expand your soup selection by adding some chickn bouillon cubes to your pantry. Add some beans, frozen vegetables, and seasonings and you have a clean and simple dinner for around $1.00 per serving, or add some flour, nut-milk, and noodles for a creamy vegetable noodle soup . Curious about what other plant-based ingredients you should be storing in your pantry? Check out our list of 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients . The post Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go Bad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward Eating

March 10 2020 Meatless Monday 

Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward EatingThe recent COVID-19 outbreak has caused concern across the world, and many people are taking measures to make sure they do not fall sick. Besides washing your hands and staying home if youre sick, theres a lot you can do from a nutrition standpoint to boost your immune system  – eat more vegetables and fruits, legumes and whole grains .  Vegetables and fruits especially, have nutrients and special natural compounds called phytochemicals that serve as antioxidants to neutralize damage to cells and fight nasty pathogens like COVID-19, the flu and the common cold. Will they prevent you from getting sick? Maybe not. But a healthy diet can help strengthen your immune system to help fight the virus and recover quickly. Below are some nutrients found in plant-based foods that are vital for a strong and robust immune system: Vitamin C An antioxidant that increases production of white blood cells, is key to fighting infections. Citrus fruits, papaya, dark green and yellow vegetables, red bell pepper, strawberries, tomatoes and watermelons are great sources of Vitamin C. Try this recipe.  Vitamin E An antioxidant that protects your cells from free radical damages, enhances the immune system to fight off bacteria and viruses. Foods high in vitamin E are sunflower seeds, nuts and green vegetables. Try this recipe. Vitamin A Functions mainly by keeping the skin, vision, and tissues of the mouth, stomach, intestine, and respiratory system healthy. Its anti-inflammatory properties enhance the immune system. Good sources of vitamin A are sweet potatoes, spinach, pumpkins, carrots, peppers, cantaloupes. Try this recipe. Zinc An important mineral that helps in wound healing, functions in the development of immune cells, which is needed for the immune system to work properly. Food sources of zinc are legumes, whole grains, nuts and seeds. Try this recipe.  Dietary protein Plays a major role in the bodys immune response. They activate cells that help fight off infections in the body. Good plant sources of dietary protein are: legumes, beans, peas, soy, and nuts. Try this recipe.    Overall, if pondering about which vegetable or fruit to eat, think of colors – purple, blue, red, yellow and orange, because it usually means they are packed with antioxidants that are great for your health and immune system.     Resources: 1. Zinc in Human Health: Effect of Zinc on Immune Cells. https:/­­/­­www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/­­pmc/­­articles/­­PMC2277319/­­ . Accessed March 5, 2020 2. Health Professional Fact Sheet. NIH, Office of Dietary Supplement. https:/­­/­­ods.od.nih.gov/­­factsheets/­­VitaminA-HealthProfessional/­­ . Accessed March 5, 2020 3. Li P, Yin YL, Li D, Kim SW, Wu G. Amino Acid and Immune Function. Br J  Nutr, 2007 Aug:98(2):237-52.  4. Protect your Health with Immune-Boosting Nutrition. https:/­­/­­www.eatright.org/­­health/­­wellness/­­preventing-illness/­­protect-your-health-with-immune-boosting-nutrition . Accessed March 5, 2020 The post Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward Eating appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Freezer-Friendly Greens & Tofu Scramble Wraps

January 6 2020 Oh My Veggies 

It’s always my goal to create recipes that aren’t just tasty, but that are doable. For me, part of “doable” is ingredients that are readily available. This isn’t just about you, it’s also about me--I live in a smallish town and I don’t want to be schlepping all over the place for ingredients either. But I was working on a tofu scramble for a while and it just wasn’t coming together and I finally had to acknowledge the fact that I needed to go to Raleigh to get some nutritional yeast. Nutritional yeast is a flaky little deactivated yeast that tastes like cheese. So it’s great for vegan cooking. It’s a good source of vitamins (some brands, like Bob’s Red Mill, are fortified with Vitamin B12) and even contains some protein. If, like me, you can’t find it at your local grocery store, you can buy nutritional yeast on Amazon. But since I needed the nutritional yeast right away, I didn’t order it online and went to Earth Fare, 40 minutes away, to get it. I got home and since I was going to use it the next day, I decided to leave it on the countertop, as I sometimes […]

Anja Schwartz Rothe

December 15 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Anja Schwartz Rothe Anja Schwartz Rothe is an herbalist, gardener, medicine maker, and writer, based in New Yorks Hudson Valley. Anja is the alchemist behind Fat of the Land, a small batch herbal apothecary with a focus on cultivating connection to self, environment, and the cycles by which we live. We interviewed Anja about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, her work and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? A nice balance of both! I need to exist inside a structured, but flexible container. A little bit of routine allows me to make the most of my time, while feeling free and inspired. -- Do your routines change with the seasons? Definitely, it is one of the biggest factors that informs the way I live – acknowledging the seasonal shifts within and without and using that information to alter how I show up to take care of myself. -- What do your mornings look like? I dont like alarms, so I usually wake up naturally, somewhere between 6:30 and 8, depending on the time of year. Then I drink a bunch of water, sometimes with lemon and sometimes not. I try to get out in nature almost immediately. I live right next to a bird sanctuary on the Hudson River, so I bring a hot bevvie and do a long walk there. I always leave my phone at the house so I have a chance to really check in with myself, do some breathing, and connect before the day starts. After that, its breakfast and usually emails. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I usually wash my face and do some facial gua sha. Its so relaxing and helps me unwind. Then, I have little ritual of turning down the house, where I close the curtains, turn off the lights, and say goodnight to everything. It sounds like a small detail, but its a gesture I really like, acknowledging the animacy of the home energies, thanking them, and setting it all to rest for the day. In my bedroom, I try to keep good sleep hygiene, which for me means low technology and minimal artificial lighting. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice? Honestly, I think my whole life is a mindfulness practice. Isnt that what mindfulness is all about, practicing showing up in the mundane of the day-to-day in the fullest capacity? Sustenance -- Describe your typical or favorite meal for each of these: Breakfast – Usually some combination of eggs and ferments. In the summer, hard-boiled with smoked salmon and sauerkraut. Right now, Im on a scallion and ginger congee kick – a simple Chinese rice porridge served with a soft boiled egg and miso. Its so good. Lunch – Sometimes an open-face sandwich or leftovers from the night before. Lately, Ive been working through lunch and having an early dinner. Snack – Fruit and chocolate. Its apples, pears, and citrus right now. Dinner – Currently: soup and sourdough bread with lots of ghee. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I make myself a matcha latte with oat milk and a couple droppers of our brain tincture almost every day. On weekends, I might have a cup of coffee and I sometimes do a mushroom tea/­­dandy blend/­­cacao mixture as an afternoon pick me up. I really try not to have too much caffeine though, it makes me a bit of a mess and dehydrates me way too much, always trying to find that balance. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your basket? Its pretty broken up between farmers markets, the local food shop, and the co-op in the next city over. In the summer, primarily farmers markets for that good good fruit and veg. Right now, my staples are eggs, potatoes, citrus, oatly, broccoli, and cauliflower. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? Definitely. I like to keep my kitchen stocked with what I call hippie treats and lots of fruit. I dont buy a lot of packaged food, which means if I want to have sweets in the house I have to prepare them myself. I love baking, and will usually make a treat at least once a week – recently, its been sticky apple ginger date cake and berry crisps from a stocked freezer of gleaned summer berries. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do, but with much variability. In the past, I’ve been really into running, yoga, and rock climbing — and these things come back in waves. In the summer, I’m cycling a lot, and right now I’m getting back into my ephemeral winter gym flow. Sometimes, my exercise is just doing squats in the kitchen while waiting for the kettle to boil. Thats actually my favorite kind. Beauty -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I definitely subscribe to the less is more skincare model. I wash with just warm water, am very liberal with hydrosols, and then use a serum and/­­or balm. I make all my own hydrosols in my garden during the summer and offer some of them in the apothecary. Im currently really loving Dragon Balm by Apis Apotheca, a farm and skincare line run by my friend Aviva, who really knows her shit. Most days I also do a quick little gua sha facial massage afterwards – I always see instant results and it feels too good. -- Do you have any beauty tricks that you’ve found to be especially useful? Drinking lots of water and herbal infusions. My present go-to is nettle, raspberry leaf, goji berry, and fresh ginger root. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress? Big Calm tincture in every pocket, purse, and drawer. I lean heavily on nervines and deep breathing. Getting outside is also really important — and socializing! -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? To be honest, I havent gotten so much as a cold in more than ten years! I owe this mostly to a naturally strong constitution, but also a pretty large emphasis on tonic, preventative medicine and lifestyle. Cooking with medicines, like infused vinegars, dank broths, and elderberry syrup, are big, but getting enough rest is the biggest. Im constantly doing micro check-ins throughout the day to see how I can best give myself what I need to prevent burnout, fatigue, and illness. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? Theyre so fluid in my life. I enjoy the hell out of the work I do, and I’d probably be doing most of it even if it wasnt my job, but Im also pretty good at allowing myself to turn off when I’m tired and not place undue expectations on myself all the time. I find allowing myself to take frequent mini vacations is the most helpful — getting out of my environment is the only thing that really turns off my work brain, plus it brings in a fresh influx of new inspiration and perspective. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming an herbalist? My first job in high school was at the local health food store. There were a couple older women who worked there and would walk me through the vitamin and bulk aisles, teaching me all about the different herbs and supplements. This was a sort of epiphany for me, viewing plants in this way. I then studied anthropology in university, focusing mostly on traditional sustenance and healing practices. After finishing school, I knew I needed to immerse myself in plant medicine, so I enrolled in an herbal medicine program in Appalachia. -- How do you approach foraging the ingredients for your apothecary and seasonal wellness boxes? Do you have a plan in mind for each season or is it more about going with the flow? I definitely have a plan in mind, but I usually have to surrender it while remaining open to new inspiration. It can be a challenge to have expectations for a season, nature doesnt really work that way, and thats been both a constant source of inspiration for me, as well as a lesson in boundaries and respect. I could be inspired to make one thing, but if its not a particularly fecund year for a certain plant, I have to cede to that. Making things from intuition and by listening to the seasons and cycles is probably not the best business model, but its the only way I want to work with plant medicine. -- What are some offerings youre working on currently? Im getting ready to re-release a little book I wrote last year, Always Coming Home: a guide to seasonal wellness, with some edits and new content. Im also refining the 2020 Seasonal Wellness Box subscription that will soon be available. -- How were you able to grow a business with your interests and loves in mind? Its been a very slow chipping away for me to remain really clear on the things that matter and the things that dont in growing my business. It turns out, remaining true to creating medicine that is intimate, small batch, and well cared for is much more important than being able to mass produce things or being on every shelf in the country. I want my values to be foremost and my business to be second. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Going full hibernation this January. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Put my legs up the wall, get a massage, go hiking with a friend, sweat, travel, in the summer I go swimming multiple times of day in various bodies of running water, thats my favorite. -- We love the Catskills so much. What are some of your favorite places to visit in the area? Montgomery Place farm stand for all your fruit and veg needs, there are so many great trails in the mountains, Colgate Lake for a swim, Talbott and Arding picnic at the Saugerties lighthouse for lunch and Lil Debs Oasis for dinner. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Im reading The Overstory by Richard Powers right now, and it is SO GOOD. A vignette of short stories written about trees and so much more. Song/­­Album – Hildegard von Bingen forever. Movie – Fantastic Fungi! Just saw and highly recommend, mushrooms will save the world. Piece of Art – All things Andrew Wyeth. Photos by Jenn Morse, Gabrielle Greenberg and Anja herself. The post Anja Schwartz Rothe appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

New Plant-Based Meatless Monday Cookbook Will Get the Whole Family to Eat Their Veggies

November 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

New Plant-Based Meatless Monday Cookbook Will Get the Whole Family to Eat Their VeggiesLooking for some culinary inspiration for your next round of Meatless Monday meals? Well, we have some EXCITING news: The first Meatless Monday cookbook is finally here, and with over 100 delicious, better-for-you plant-based recipes youll be able to whip up a meat-free meal for any type of eater -- from experimental flexitarians to new vegans to the staunchest of carnivores. The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook , by Jenn Sebestyen, emphasizes the limitless potential of plant-based cooking. The recipes are nutritious, easy-to-prepare, and mimic the look, taste, and texture of comfort-food favorites (youve got to check out the lentil Bolognese, butternut-squash mac and cheese, and meaty mushroom stew). The book, whose foreword is written by Sid Lerner, founder of the global Meatless Monday initiative and The Monday Campaigns, is based on the Meatless Monday philosophy of cutting out meat one day a week for your health and the health of the planet. And as its title suggest, The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook is designed for the whole family, because when kids are involved in the prepping and cooking process, they develop a greater appreciation, understanding, and respect for the food in front of them. The cookbook officially goes on sale November 19, but weve included a few recipe highlights to share with you. And with Thanksgiving right around the corner, these plant-based recipes might just be what you need to round out the holiday dinner table.     Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast with BBQ Drizzle This recipe marries the best traits of avocado toast with the enticing aroma and flavor of cannellini beans slowly sautéed with fresh garlic and olive oil. The mixture is spooned on to the avocado-smeared toast and drizzled with a sweet and tangy homemade barbecue sauce. Pumpkin Maple-Glazed Penne with Roasted Fall Vegetables With butternut squash, carrots, parsnips, and Brussels sprouts, youre getting all the best that autumn has to offer. The subtle maple glaze adds a surprisingly subtle sweetness that pairs nicely with the fall vegetables. Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes Theres nothing cozier than a hearty stew and some mashed potatoes. This recipe, which uses cremini and shitake mushrooms and a healthy dose of tamari, is an homage to umami. Ladle it over a scoop of mashed potatoes for some pure plant-based bliss. Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup Its like a chicken potpie -- minus the chicken and the pie. No animal products are necessary for this smooth and sultry creamy vegetable noodle soup. Vegetable broth, almond milk, nutritional yeast, and a whole lot of seasonings and aromatics make this soup satisfying and delicious. Very Berry Quinoa Salad with Cinnamon Toasted Pecans This salad is light and fresh yet has plenty of protein from the quinoa and pecans. Fresh summer berries are little powerhouses of vitamins and are super kid-friendly. The toasted pecans take this dish to the next level. Rice and Bean Pan Grilled Burritos A burrito is engineered to include an entire meals worth of goodies wrapped in one, warm, fluffy package. Chocked full of smoky pinto beans, cilantro rice, lettuce, and an avocado green chile sauce, be prepared for requests for seconds. BBQ Chickpea Veggie Bowls Channeling the hot smoke of the barbecue pit, this BBQ chickpea veggie bowl is charred, sweet, and tangy with a satisfying crunch. The recipe calls for roasted broccoli, red peppers, onions, and chickpeas, but you can top your brown rice bowl with any variety of vegetables. Just dont forget to drizzle over some homemade sweet-and-spicy barbecue sauce. Sweet-and-Spicy BBQ Sauce The proper blend of sweet and heat, this BBQ sauce uses smoky chipotles, tart apple-cider vinegar, maple syrup, and a blend of spices. Squeeze a little bit any meatless Monday meal to take it to the next level. About the author: Jenn Sebestyen is the creator of VeggieInspired.com. She was inspired to write The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook to help moms and dads get both picky kids and die-hard carnivores to eat more veggies. She offers tips and tricks that have worked for getting her kids on board with a veggie-heavy Meatless Monday plan.   Interested in learning more about Meatless Monday? Click here for more recipes, cooking tips, and ways that you can spread the Meatless Monday message to your community. For a chance to be featured in our next recipe roundup, make sure to tag @MeatlessMonday or use the hashtag #meatlessmonday the next time you post a meatless or plant-based recipe. The post New Plant-Based Meatless Monday Cookbook Will Get the Whole Family to Eat Their Veggies appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons

October 4 2019 My New Roots 

Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons Hey friends! Im coming in hot, to drop this stellar soup recipe on you, while the weather is still fine and early fall produce is at its peak. The bell peppers in my region are bountiful and beautiful, and because I am the biggest sucker for roasted pepper anything, I came up with this dish to celebrate a seasonal favourite. But first, can we take a moment and please talk about how I just invented giant croutons? I think it might be my personal opportunity to break the internet. How is this not a thing yet?! Sure, I guess you could look at the cheese toast on French onion soup and say that is a giant crouton, but in my opinion, its merely an open-faced grilled cheese sandwich. Pfff. Not even close to this. My crouton is a cube of sourdough (important shape-distinction), kissed with garlicky oil and seared to toasty, golden perfection. The outsides are caramelized and crisp, while the center is fluffy, creamy and studded with nooks and crannies for the soup to slide in to. Guh. Too good to be true! Honestly guys, Im pretty proud of this. But I also need you to know that this soup is darn good too, even without the crouton. The recipe is loosely based on the North African Sun-dried Tomato Soup in my second cookbook, except I left out many of the warming spices, which felt prematurely winter-y. Its still t-shirt weather here, so the ginger and cinnamon had to go. Plus, I doubled the pepper count, added a teeny splash of balsamic (to round out the flavor), and made it bisque-y without the cream. Guess what I used?! Lentils!! Mic drop. But instead of bulking it up and putting the soup on legume-overload, I was conservative in my approach and just used half a cup. This made the soup rich and creamy without the cream, but in a very hush, hush way, so that you literally have no idea that theyre there. But their presence can be felt, because this soup is the real meal deal, not just a bowl of blended up veggies that will leave you hungry again in 20 minutes. With the bonus lentils, youre getting way more protein and fiber that youd normally expect from a pepper soup, and they will fill you up, and keep you energized for hours. This suddenly feels very infomercial-y. Did I mention there is a giant crouton? Moving on! Lets talk about peppers because they are in the nightshade family and that is a hot topic, if I ever heard one. Nightshade vegetables are a part of the Solanaceae family, and include tomatoes, peppers (and chilies), eggplant /­­ aubergine, and all potatoes except for sweet potatoes and yams. Originally cultivated in South America, nightshade vegetables were brought to Europe and Asia by Spanish explorers. Their name supposedly comes from the fact that they grow at night (as opposed to mushrooms, which grow in the shade). You may have heard rumors that Nightshade vegetables are toxic, that they can cause inflammation or that theyre linked to autoimmune disorders. While it is true that edible nightshades contain high levels of glycoalkaloids, specifically solanine, which at very high levels is toxic, it only seems to trigger reactions in individuals who are sensitive to it. Those with pre-existing inflammatory conditions may experience worsening of their symptoms when they consume these foods, but an elimination diet would be the only way to determine if nightshades are in fact, causing the issues. For people who do not suffer from chronic inflammatory ailments, enjoying ratatouille, a pizza, or a baked potato is likely just fine, and certainly not going to cause you to get these conditions. As far as autoimmunity is concerned, alkaloids from edible nightshades have been shown to irritate the gut, since solanine is effectively natural insecticide produced by this plant family. Gut irritation can contribute to intestinal permeability, which can set off an autoimmune reaction when proteins that should remain in the digestive tract leak into the bloodstream. The level of irritation depends on the amount consumed, and how sensitive the individual is. The highest amounts of solanine are found in green potatoes, and sprouted potatoes, but we should avoid eating those anyway.   Lets review: if you have an autoimmune disorder, leaky gut, or you exhibit symptoms of discomfort (digestive or otherwise) after consuming nightshades, try eliminating them from your diet for at least 6 weeks and see if you notice a difference. Then, re-introduce them one at a time and be aware of how you feel within a 24-hour period after eating them. If you dont have these issues, dont worry about it! There is absolutely no reason to limit your intake of these highly nutritious vegetables if they seem to do your body good. Bell peppers contain an astounding amount of vitamin C, high levels of A, and B6, with very good levels of folate, fiber, and vitamin E. They also provide flavonoids, and carotenoids. Remember to buy bell peppers that have fully ripened - anything other than the greens ones, which are typically unripe red, orange, yellow, or purple peppers. Their nutrient profile will be at its peak, and the natural sugars will be fully developed, easing their digestion. Let’s get to the recipe! If youre really pressed for time, skip roasting the peppers in the oven, and just dice them up, and add them to the pot along with the garlic in step 3. The overall flavour will be less rich, but still incredibly delicious. When Im in a crunch, Ill pull this move and have dinner on the table in 30 minutes. If you want to change things up, try orange or yellow peppers instead of the red ones. As far as sun-dried tomatoes go, I like organic, dried ones, instead of the oil-packed ones, but either would work here. With the canned tomatoes, go for whole, since they tend to be of higher quality than the diced ones. Lets talk bread. If you have access to a bakery where they make the real thing (sourdough), please use that. If you dont, find an unsliced loaf at your supermarket; bonus points if its made with wholegrain flour, organic, yeast-free, or all of the above. The bread should be cut into cubes with the serving bowl size in mind (youll want to see some of the soup around it), but if you have a huge bowl, go crazy and make that crouton as gargantuan as you want! And dont throw the offcuts away - I put them in the toaster and slathered them with hummus for my son. He was stoked about the oddly-shaped chunks.       Print recipe     Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons Makes 8 cups /­­ 2 litres /­­ Serves 4 Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee, divided 2 medium yellow onions, diced 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 large garlic cloves, minced 2 tsp. ground cumin 2 tsp. ground coriander 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. hot smoked paprika (depending on how spicy you like it) 4 large red bell peppers (stems, seeds, and ribs removed) 5 - 7 cups /­­ 1 1/­­4 – 1 3/­­4 liters vegetable broth 1 14.5-oz. /­­ 400ml can whole tomatoes 1/­­2 cup /­­ 45g sun-dried tomatoes, roughly chopped 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100g dried red lentils, soaked for 1 – 8 hours, if possible 2 tsp. balsamic vinegar Directions: 1. If you have time, soak the lentils in water overnight, or for up to 8 hours. Drain and rinse very well. If youre starting from dried, that is okay too, just give them a very good wash and drain before using. 2. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Prepare the peppers by cutting each of them in half, scooping out the seeds, and rubbing with a little coconut oil. Place peppers cut-side down on a parchment-lined baking sheet and place in the oven. Roast for 25-30 minutes until the skins are totally wrinkled and charred in places. 3. In a large stockpot, melt the remaining coconut oil over medium heat. Add the onions and salt and stir to coat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions soften and begin to slightly caramelize, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic, cumin, coriander, and smoked paprika, and cook until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Add a little broth to the pot if the mixture becomes dry. 4. Add the whole tomatoes and their juices along with the sun-dried tomatoes, lentils, and the rest of the broth. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, and break up the whole tomatoes with your spoon. Simmer, covered for 15 minutes. Stir once or twice during cooking to prevent sticking. 5. The peppers should be done by now, so take them out of the oven, transfer all of them to a bowl with a lid or plate over the opening, making sure there are no gaps (this technique steams the peppers so that the skins will just slip right off, without using plastic wrap). Once cool enough to handle, remove the skins from the peppers, and place the peeled peppers in a blender. 6. Remove the soup from the heat and take off the lid to let cool just for a minute. Transfer to the blender, and blend on high until completely smooth. Add balsamic vinegar, and broth or water to thin, until your desired consistency is reached. Season to taste. Transfer back to the pot and keep warm. 7. Make the croutons (recipe below). 8. To serve, ladle the soup into bowls, top with fresh herbs, edible flowers, a drizzle of good olive oil, and of course place one giant crouton in the middle of each bowl. Enjoy! Giant Croutons Make as many as you want! Ingredients: 1 loaf of good bread (wholegrain sourdough is preferred) 2 Tbsp. expeller-pressed coconut oil (the unscented kind - very important!) or ghee, divided 1 clove of garlic, finely minced flaky salt, to taste Directions: 1. Cut the bread into 2 1/­­2 (6cm) slices - mine weighed 1.25 oz /­­ 35g per piece. Cut off the edges and make a cube (save the off-cuts for snacks). 2. Spread a little coconut oil on each side. 3. Heat remaining coconut oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and sauté for a few minutes, just until the garlic is starting to turn golden. 4. Lower the heat to medium-low, and add the bread cube. Rub each side in the oil to coat with some of the garlic and sprinkle lightly with salt. Let cook on each of the six sides for a couple of minutes until golden brown. Remove from heat and enjoy immediately. I hope that wherever you are on this earth, youre enjoying the seasons shifting and embracing the changes that come with that. When I started writing this post, it was a very hot day, and now, just 48 hours later, I can feel a significant shift in temperature and weather. Here we go, fall! Im happy youre here. Big thanks to my friends at Foragers Farms for letting me crash the greenhouse at the crack of dawn to get these pics. Love to all, happy fall! Sarah B The post Bell Pepper Bisque with Giant Croutons appeared first on My New Roots.

Sip Your Fruits and Veggies this Meatless Monday with these 8 Summer Smoothie Recipes

July 8 2019 Meatless Monday 

Sip Your Fruits and Veggies this Meatless Monday with these 8 Summer Smoothie RecipesDont sweat your Meatless Monday breakfast. Cool off and energize your Monday routine with a delicious and nutritious vitamin-packed smoothie. Its a refreshing way to eat more fruits and vegetables on a hot summer Monday, or any day of the week. These smoothie recipes feature health and wellness all-star ingredients. Bananas are filled with potassium, an essential mineral to replenish electrolytes. Low-glycemic berries are packed with anti-aging phytonutrients. Green, leafy vegetables contain antioxidants, which fight cancer and reduce inflammation. The sour kiwifruit is full of vitamin C. Cocoa powder not only makes your smoothie chocolaty, it also has protein and is rich with fiber. Here are a few of our favorites: Kiwi Basil Smoothies from Healthy, Happy Life Chocolate Avocado Smoothie from Pepperoni Is Not a Vegetable Ultimate Green Smoothie from the New Baguette   Orange Dreamsicle Smoothie from The Happy Health Freak Blueberry Pomegranate Slushie from the Verdant Life Chocolate Banana Smoothie from Lauren Grogan Blueberry Brainiac Smoothie from To Cheese or Not to Cheese? Dr. Funk, a board-certified breast surgeon and co-founder of the Pink Lotus Breast Center in Los Angeles, visited Meatless Monday and showed us how to make her famous antioxidant and health-boosting super smoothie. Watch and enjoy! (Video starts at 00:50) Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. The post Sip Your Fruits and Veggies this Meatless Monday with these 8 Summer Smoothie Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Meatless Mother’s Day Breakfast Recipes Your Mom Deserves

May 6 2019 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Mother’s Day Breakfast Recipes Your Mom DeservesMothers Day is approaching. If youre still struggling to come up with a gift for the inspiring maternal figure in your life, weve got you covered with some mouthwatering recipes! Cooking up a meatless, homemade breakfast is the perfect way to show your love - brownie points if you serve it to her in bed. Weve put together some of our favorite morning meals that mom - and the whole family - will adore. Why not use Mothers Day as an opportunity to get kids cooking? Our sister campaign, The Kids Cook Monday , encourages families to set aside the first night of every week for cooking and eating together. When kids are involved in preparing meals, theyre empowered to consider portions, vitamins and nutrients. Cooking also helps to reinforce skills like math, teamwork and following instructions. Find some truly tasty breakfast recipes below from The Kids Cook Monday that the whole family can get involved in. Avocado Toast with Fresh Beet Hummus Chocolate Chip Zucchini Muffins from Inspired RD   Potato, Black Bean and Swiss Chard Hash from Potato Goodness Quinoa Cranberry-Almond Granola from School Nutrition Plus PB&J French Toast from The Gourmand Mom Overnight Egg, Spinach & Hash Brown Strata from Jackie Newgent, RD Walnut Cinnamon Quinoa from The Veggie Converter Are you cooking for mom? Let us know what youre making on our Facebook  page or post it using #MeatlessMonday. Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Meatless Mother’s Day Breakfast Recipes Your Mom Deserves appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales

April 28 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales Adriana Ayales is a rainforest herbalist from Costa Rica and the founder of herbal apothecary Anima Mundi. We are in love with Adriana’s world and creations, and so excited to share this interview. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Although I love the grounded power of routine, I’m living in a phase of being open and free. With kids, and a beyond full time devotion to running a business, I just ride the waves as they come. I’ve learned to surrender that not everything has to look the way it should look. Lifes situations and patterning moves around like the seasons. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I love getting up before the kids, and sneaking into the kitchen to make myself a healing cup(s) of medicine. First thing I do is a big ole cup of vitamin C rich goodness, sometimes its mangosteen hibiscus with a lemon squeeze, or fresh picked turmeric from the garden grated with ginger, along with camu camu and lemon water. Then I make a seasonal fruit bowl of sorts, with oatmeal, or homemade granola loaded with mineralizing herbs (like nettle or mesquite powder). Followed by my favorite, and not so healthy friend, Coffee. Ah coffee. I cant tell you how wonderful locally grown heirloom coffee is here, paired with deliciously fresh cacao and medicinal mushrooms and homemade almond. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Massaging the face, forehead and skull with warm oil at night is one of the simplest and most restorative practices we can do to induce deep sleep. I love using a mix I make at home of jojoba oil, with rosehip, infused with clary sage and a fine sandalwood. Another one of my all time favorites for evening relaxation is blue lotus. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Sipping tea mindfully in nature, witnessing time in silence is one of my favorite things. I tap into my feelings, breath, mind, and begin to clear energy. Sustenance -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do love caffeine. Growing up in Costa Rica has woven me into loving a good cup of locally roasted coffee. Depending on the day, I love adding reishi, or a mix of medicinal mushrooms, raw cacao with mucuna, along with a homemade plant based milk. I also love having an aged puerh, or traditional matcha with added herbs for nourishment, like moringa. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? Sometimes I do, especially when I’m tired or running on low energy. When im over-worked, or running on stress I definitely crave more carby and sugary things, and this is usually due to skipping a meal, or needing a quick-fix. Some tips I bare in mind during stressful moments that ignite the sweet tooth (or just in general!) are: always go for fruits before you opt for a sugary dessert, always choose low glycemic sweeteners vs. sugar (some faves are coconut sugar, maple syrup, and real stevia extract -- not the synthetic ones!) For carbs avoid empty carbs and refined flours, and opt for ones that are more easily absorbed, like coconut, almond and cassava flour. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness?  Oh my, so many! I seasonally change my herbal intake, but certainly stick with some favorites. I love having my potent singles (single herb tinctures) on me at all times, like shisandra berries and blue lotus. A Brain tonic while I’m working, usually with herbs like gotu kola, ginkgo, brahmi and lion’s mane mushroom. Two that I dose with very often are the Happiness tonic (st johns wort, mucuna, ashwagandha, etc.) and euphoric/­­mood elevating herbs like catuaba, mucunam muira puama and damiana. I also love our Liver formula for daily cleansing and nourishment, like the moringa, burdock, nettles, chlorella. And of course beauty herbs like He Shou Wu, Mangosteen and more! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Absolutely, I love doing a mix between yoga and pilates. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I love the torture! When I feel a little lazy and not like suffering in an intensive workout, I just remind myself how excellent I feel when I finish it. Not just seeing physical results, but especially the mental peace and happiness after working out. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? A feeling of wholeness. When your mood is high, your gut is vibrant, and you feel confident and beautiful. When there is no sense of lack, imbalance or deficiency. When you feel aligned. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love making my own body and face oils. I usually infuse collagen boosting herbs, and skin strengthening herbs and lather up. I also like to keep things simple, like using cacao butter with coconut oil, or just a fluffy shea butter for deep moisture.  -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Yes! I’m a big fan of eating herbs and supplements that protect the skin, increase our own collagen receptors and help activate our natural glow. The herbs I designed for the vegan collagen formula have been my go-tos for quite sometime. Horsetail, He Shou Wu, Calendula, Nettle seed + leaf, Comfrey, and others like Mangosteen, Camu Camu and Hibiscus are great for the skin too. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? I love making edible masks. Infusing a high potency extract into a raw clay and avocado, along with an activating source like apple cider vinegar, or more protein like flax, and making a smooth paste to lather all over the face, body and even hair is one of my all time favorites. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Visualization is huge for me. Sitting in silence and tuning in is vital, along with the help of nervines and adaptogenic herbs that assist in de-compression like skullcap, blue lotus and ashwagandha. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I like taking a walk or hike in nature, get in the ocean/­­lake/­­river or any kind of body of water. I completely unplug from work, the phone, or computer. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Before the cold kicks in, I take strong echinacea extracts in a soothing tea, mixing turmeric, lemon, grated ginger, apple cider vinegar, garlic and aloe in warm water. It works every time. I make a large batch and dose all day long --  even my kids love it!  -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? This certainly overlaps for me, which can honestly be a bitter sweet reality. I love everything surrounding plants, and its medicinal uses, as well as teaching, and medicine making. I love that my business is all about honoring ancestral ways, plant medicine, the art of herbalism, righteous cultivation, and medicine making. Yet, like any business owner would understand, there are many tasks to the job that are exhausting and certainly not what made you fall in love in the first place. For me personally, Ive learned to reconcile by doing what I love doing the most, medicine making and wildcrafting. I made a commitment to myself in making space for this no matter what, and not disregarding it by prioritizing business with the things that dont really matter in life. Its vital that we take moments in our free time that refine our focus and intention in life, re-align to what inspired the dream, without getting side swept with busy-ness. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Over the last couple years Ive struggled with this because of having babies. Which Im sure a lot of new moms can relate to this! Every time I get a moment between being a mother, wife and business owner, my priority to feel more self loving (and more human!) is yoga. The simple act of getting oxygen, doing conscious breathing, and distracting the monkey mind from its patterning, you become yourself again.  -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Herbs. Integrating plant medicine into everything has significantly changed my body mind and soul. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Off the top of my head I love these: Healing with Whole Foods with Paul Pitchford, Gabriel Cousens’ Spiritual Nutrition, The Body Ecology Diet by Donna Gates, and of course The Medical Medium by Anthony William. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming an herbalist and starting Anima Mundi? Growing up I learned closely with curanderos on plant medicine and rainforest herbalism overall. I then attended herbal schools in California where I learned a lot of native, northern and european herbalism. Life somehow took me to NYC (a place I NEVER thought I would ever go to) after living in California for quite some years, and I started practicing privately as an herbalist. I kept noticing the common trends, symptomology and imbalances folks that came in had, and started developing mother formulas to be able to make large batches. -- How do you approach sourcing herbs for Anima Mundi?  First and foremost we try to create a direct relationship with the people/­­farmers that cultivate. Although we value certification of prime ingredients, there are many ethical wild crafters and farms that do not have special certifications, yet cultivate sustainable practices and have quality products that we also like to support. We are also adamant of supporting local economies as much as possible, particularly with rainforest herbs sourced directly from indigenous people, supporting their craft as well as ethically crafted botanicals. -- What are some of Anima Mundis best sellers? Our plant-based Collagen Booster, Happiness Tonic, Adaptogenic Immortality Tonics, Curam Beauty Elixir, our 100% Coconut Cream Powder, Mushroom Mocha Milk and more...! Fun and Inspiration -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Women Who Run with Wolves Song/­­Album –  Cuatro Vientos /­­ Danit Movie –  Loving the The OA lately! Piece of Art –  Ayahuasca art by Pablo Amaringo Photos by Renee Byrd and from Anima Mundi’s IG /­­ This post contains Amazon Affiliate links. The post Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool

February 9 2019 My New Roots 

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool   When we committed to going to the ocean, I immediately felt the thrilling sensation that washes over me when I stand at the intersection of land meeting water. I smelled brine and dampness. I saw certain patterns and colours; light sand against dark water, wet stones, seaweed, driftwood, and feathers. This was the second recipe I created for the dreamy on-location photoshoot with Christiann Koepke back in October (you can see the first one here). The inspiration for this dish came first in fact, fast and furiously. Just thinking about the seaside brought this recipe to me in a wave of total inspiration. I wanted the ingredients to reflect the elements in this environment, and for the final result to be a visual meeting of land and sea. Now Im not super into “fake meat”, but there is something undeniably satisfying about tricking someone into thinking a vegetable is flesh. Tee hee. Plus, Rene Redzepi does it all the time, so maybe it puts me in the cool cooking club too? Yes? Anyway, I knew something on the plate had to look like seafood, and I had my sights set on scallops. In my first cookbook, I made “scallops” out of leeks, and wanted to try something different, so going through the rolodex of tube-shaped white veggies in my mind, I fell upon king oyster mushroom stems. Naturally. Browned in ghee and well-seasoned, I knew that these morsels would look exactly like mollusks, and taste deceptively meaty. A pool of herbaceous, vibrant green pesto, would be the land, and the perfect resting place for my mushroom medallions. I combined flat-leaf parsley and spinach to create a bright yet balanced sauce that complimented - rather than overwhelmed - the rest of the dish. But with all this creaminess, I knew that I also needed to include something for textural contrast, so toasted hazelnuts became the beach stones, along with fried capers, which added a bite of seaside brine. This dish is surprisingly easy to make, and it is the prefect main to serve for family and friends that you want to spoil a little. It looks impressive, but its a cinch to get on the table without gluing you to the stove. The pesto can be made a week in advance (although the fresher, the better), so that the only thing you need to do before serving is cook the mushroom and capers, and warm the pesto a little. I love cooking the capers and mushrooms in ghee (recipe here) because its just so darn delicious, but the pesto is vegan and if you want the entire meal to be so, simply swap out the ghee for expeller-pressed coconut oil, which is refined for high heat cooking and has no tropical aroma. Beta-glucan Goodness Edible mushrooms are both medical and nutritional dynamos. Collectively, they not only provide us with plant-based protein, vitamin D, and a whole host of minerals, but most excitingly a group of polysaccharides called beta-glucans. These complex, hemicellulose sugar molecules enhance the functioning of the immune system by activating immune cell response and stimulating the production of white blood cells. These compounds also effectively mobilize immune stem cells in your bone marrow, and exhibit anti-tumor properties, so theyre often used supplementally in cancer treatment protocols. Beta-glucans help to lower cholesterol, as this type of fiber forms a viscous gel during digestion, which grabs a hold of excess dietary cholesterol, prevents absorption by moving it through your digestive tract, and eliminates it. Through your poop! This same gel also slows down your digestion, which in turn stabilizes blood sugar, and minimizes the release of insulin. King oyster mushrooms are of course a good source of beta-glucans, but you can get them in other places too: barley, oats, sorghum, mushrooms like shiitake, reishi and maitake, as well as seaweed, algae, and dates.   I wouldn’t put king oyster mushrooms in the “specialty” category of fungi, but I also know that theyre not available at every grocery store, so if you cant find them, substitute with any other kind of mushroom you like and forgo the whole scallop charade. The dish will still turn out delicious, I promise. If you want to change up the herb in the pesto, try basil instead of flat-leaf parsley. Cilantro could also be delicious, but potentially overwhelming, so use more spinach in that case. And instead of hazelnuts in the pesto and garnish, try almonds, pecans or walnuts. Yummm. I like to serve this with a big hunk of crusty bread on the side to mop up any leftover pesto in the bowl. It also helps to have some good olive oil and flaky salt around for this situation, just sayin. If youd prefer the grain route, steamed brown rice, quinoa, or millet could be a decent accompaniment too. And if you want to go completely grain-free, roasted sweet potato, winter squash, or pumpkin would be totally lovely.     Print recipe     King Oyster Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 lb. /­­ 500g king oyster mushrooms (choose ones with fat stems) a generous amount of ghee (or expeller-pressed coconut oil) fine + flaky salt 1 jar brined capers (about 1/­­3 cup /­­ 55g) a handful of toasted hazelnuts, roughly chopped, for garnish 1 batch Parsley-Spinach Pesto (recipe follows) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish a few leaves of parsley, for garnish Directions: 1. Remove any dirt or debris from the mushrooms with your hands, or small soft brush. (do not use water!). Slice the stems into enough rounds so that each person has 5 or 6. Keep the caps for another dish. 2. Drain the capers and pat them dry with a clean tea towel or paper towel. Heat about a tablespoon of ghee (or coconut oil) in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the capers and fry until split and crisp - about 2-3 minutes. Remove from pan and set aside. 3. Add more ghee (or coconut oil) to the same skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add the sliced mushroom stems, a sprinkle of flaky salt, and cook on one side until golden, about 5-7 minutes. Then flip and cook on the other side until golden. Work in batches or use separate skillets - if you crowd the mushrooms they will steam each other and get soggy. That is not what were after! 4. While youre cooking the mushrooms, place the pesto in a small saucepan, add a touch of water to thin, if desired, and warm over low-medium heat. Do not boil! 5. To serve, place about 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml of the warm pesto in the bottom of a dish, spreading it out to make an indent in the center. Place 5 or 6 mushroom stems in the pesto, then top with the fried capers and toasted hazelnuts. Drizzle with olive oil and a few grinds of black pepper. Garnish with parsley and serve immediately. Parsley-Spinach Pesto Makes about 2 1/­­4 cups Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 150g hazelnuts 1 fat clove garlic 2 cups /­­ 35g flat-leaf parsley, lightly packed (tender stems only) 2 cups /­­ 65g baby spinach, lightly packed zest of 1 organic lemon 1/­­3 cup/­­ 80ml freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 2 lemons) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml cold-pressed olive oil 1/­­2 cup /­­ 35g nutritional yeast 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water, more if needed Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place hazelnuts on baking sheet. Toast in oven for 12-15 minutes or until fragrant and lightly toasted. Remove and set aside. Once cool, remove skins by rubbing the hazelnuts together in your hands. Set aside. 2. Remove any tough stems from the parsley. Roughly chop the leaves and tender stems (this prevents the parsley from bruising in the food processor). 3. Place garlic in the food processor and pulse to mince. Add the hazelnuts, parsley, spinach, lemon zest and juice, olive oil, nutritional yeast, and salt. Pulse for 30 seconds, then add the water and pulse again until its thick, but spreadable. Remove lid and scrape. Repeat until reaches desired consistency (I like mine a little chunky, but its up to you!). Store leftovers in an airtight glass container in the fridge for up to one week. We’re home from Bali now, settling back into life in the cold Canadian winter. It feels good to be here, especially after a satisfying few weeks in the sunshine, hosting two glorious retreats. Now it’s time to ground and focus on the year ahead. I’m very excited for 2019 – so many exciting things to share with you, just on the horizon. I hope you’re all well out there, and enjoying a vibrant start to the new year. Sending love and gratitude out to you all, always. xo, Sarah B The post Mushroom “Scallops” in a Warm Pesto Pool appeared first on My New Roots.

Broccoli and Parmesan Soup

January 16 2019 Oh My Veggies 

This velvety broccoli soup with parmesan cheese is perfect to warm up and feast in the winter. Beautifully colored and rich in flavor, this soup is prepared quickly and with very few ingredients. Broccoli is full of vitamins, so enjoy it without any restriction!

Vegan Chocolate Chunk Blondies (somehow I must've known it would come to this)

March 12 2020 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Chocolate Chunk Blondies (somehow I must've known it would come to this) I threw these blondies together as I prepped a big batch of black bean burgers to freeze for later. (Yes, I am food prepping.) Probably made over a dozen batches of these cookies over the past few months. As usual, I took a break from sugary carb-craving in February. Things are much different now. Even though the grass is beginning to green up and my daffodils are blooming, the urge to bake and soothe my soul with comfort foods normally reserved for dark, winter months has returned with a vengeance.  (As a news-obsessed individual, I'm sure you can guess why.) My cookbooks lining the kitchen walls are more precious to me than ever right now. I've collected hundreds over the decades. I drop into flea markets looking for Pyrex and instead find myself with a two-dollar cookbook I'd wanted years ago. One more for the collection. Call me crazy, but in my Marie Kondo cleaning frenzy last spring--very few cookbooks left this house. Very. Few. One of my old stand-by cookbooks, an Alice Medrich classic, stands the test of time.   Published in 2010, my dog-eared, taped-page and post-it noted guides indicate the cookbook's utility.  Here's my vegan version blondie--and don't bake these in an 8" square pan. Use instead a rectangle if you can. Mine is 10 x 6" pan I purchased for eight bucks at the grocery store. Once you add the batter to the pan, you may look at it and think: this cannot be right--there's barely enough batter to cover the bottom of the pan. Trust the recipe, they bake up beautifully. And after a night in the fridge, even better.  Vegan Blondies (adapted) 3/­­4 cup unbleached AP flour 1/­­4 cup whole wheat flour 1/­­2 t. baking powder 1/­­4 t. fine sea salt 1 stick vegan butter 3/­­4 cup light brown sugar 1 t. vanilla extract 2 T. ground flax, plus 3 T. water, 1 t. olive oil (vegan egg) 2/­­3 cup walnuts or pecans 1/­­2 cup chocolate chunks Preheat oven to 350. Line pan with parchment paper, lightly spray. Mix dry ingredients together, set aside. Place small saucepan over low heat, add butter and sugar and stir until butter melts and sugar is mostly dissolved. Remove from heat. Add vanilla extract and flax egg. Mix well. Add dry ingredients to butter mixture. Mix just until flour is mostly incorporated. Add half nuts and half chocolate. Spread batter in pan, then sprinkle remaining nuts and chocolate over. Bake for about 20 minutes or just until the sides begin to turn golden. Let cool completely, then cut into squares and store in fridge. With all the bleak AF stuff out in the world lately, my own version of self-care includes a nice vitamin rich juice first thing in the morning. I've had my juicer for a dozen or so years now. It's come in very handy lately (even though it sat literally unused for about eight of these). If you think, "Hey, nice blondie recipe, but then juicing...how's that work?" Um, resistance is futile. I will always have chocolate in my life in one form or another. This is my favorite juicing recipe: 1 beet 1 carrot 1 celery stick 1 knob ginger 1 granny smith apple juice of half a lemon When I can, I make enough for two small pints (one before I eat oatmeal for breakfast, another to drink later in the day--you know, around three in the afternoon when I'd rather scarf down a whole package of M&Ms). I've been a believer in juicing for ages...has it helped? I have no damned idea. It makes me feel good. So yes. It "helps". Also been intermittent fasting. So basically the day goes like this: Eat between nine and five. Stop.  Went to my local WM on Tuesday, just as a precaution, trying to get my hands on bleach cleaner. Wow. I happened to turn the corner and spotted an out of place single bottle left. I was like: "Thank you retail-eagle-eye for helping me spot the thing that wasn't like the other things."

Eat Your Way to a Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

February 3 2020 Meatless Monday 

Eat Your Way to a Reduced Risk of Heart DiseaseHeart disease (also referred to as cardiovascular disease) is a term that covers an array of health conditions affecting the heart such as coronary artery disease, heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias), and congenital heart defects. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for both men and women, with half of all Americans (47%) qualifying for at least one of the three key risk factors (high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking cigarettes). For more information about the relationship between diet and heart disease, check out our Meatless Monday heart-health guide . The good news is that you can manage two of these risk factors -- high blood pressure and high cholesterol --by making a few simple adjustments to your daily diet, without missing out on flavor. In honor of American Heart Month, weve put together a list of tips to help you eat your way to a reduced risk of heart disease. Eat More Fruits and Vegetables Fruits and vegetables contain the nutrients your body needs to function properly and ward off disease. Many fruits and vegetables, regardless of how theyre prepared (sans the deep fryer), are low in calories and contain vitamins, minerals, and fiber that help prevent heart disease. Focus on the Right Fats The American Heart Association emphasizes the importance of eating the right type of fats and oils. Saturated fats from animal products, trans fats, and hydrogenated vegetable oils should be replaced with healthy fats like olive oil and canola oil. Go with Whole Grains Whole grains provide the body with fiber and other nutrients that regulate blood pressure and promote heart health. Improve your diet by swapping out white rice, bread, and pasta for brown rice and whole-wheat varieties of your favorite carbohydrates. Maintain a Healthy Weight Excess weight and a large waist size have been found to raise the risk of developing heart disease. Reaching a healthy weight doesnt require an extreme diet, but rather a commitment to weekly exercise and an eating plan rooted in fruits, vegetables, legumes, and other minimally processed foods. Limit Consumption of Red and Processed Meats Processed meats contain high amounts of additives, chemicals, and sodium. These foods, which include deli meats, hot dogs, sausages, and bacon, should only be consumed in moderation. Think Mediterranean Studies show that a Mediterranean-style diet which includes a balanced proportion of fruits, vegetables, legumes, healthy oils, and monosaturated and polyunsaturated fats, reduced incidences of major cardiovascular disease. Avoid Too Much Sugar and Processed Carbohydrates Foods of minimum nutritional value like sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drinks, white breads, pastas, and other heavily processed carbohydrates are major sources of excess calories and can lead to weight gain and insulin resistance. Control Portion Size Moderation is key to any healthy diet. Reducing serving sizes grants you the flexibility to eat a wider variety of foods you enjoy. For more information on meat reduction and heart health: Reduce your risk of heart disease by starting healthy habits on Monday Check out the Meatless Monday Recipe Gallery for healthy, tasty recipes Join the community and share photos of your own plant-based creations by using the hashtag #MeatlessMonday and tag @MeatlessMonday. The post Eat Your Way to a Reduced Risk of Heart Disease appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cauliflower Mash

January 6 2020 Meatless Monday 

Cauliflower is roasted until brown, then blended with Greek yogurt and vegetable broth for a flavorful, creamy cauliflower puree. This cauliflower mash can be served on the side in place of mashed potatoes and offers a healthy dose of the vitamin K! This recipe is from Ashley of Sprout. Serves 4 - 1 head cauliflower, cut into 1 inch florets - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 teaspoon black pepper - 1/­­4 cup plain Greek yogurt - 1 cup low sodium vegetable broth, divided - whole wheat breadcrumbs, for garnish - fresh parsley, for garnish Preheat an oven to 450 degrees. Toss the cauliflower with the olive oil. Season with the salt and pepper. Spread the florets onto a baking sheet in 1 layer. Roast for 30-35 minutes, or until the edges of the cauliflower are deep brown. Transfer the roasted cauliflower florets to a blender. Add the yogurt and 1/­­2 cup of the vegetable broth to the blender. Blend until smooth. If cauliflower mash seems too thick, add a little more vegetable broth, 1 tablespoon at a time until the mash has reached desired consistency. Taste for seasoning and adjust if desired. Divide into 4 portions, sprinkle each with breadcrumbs and parsley. Enjoy! The post Cauliflower Mash appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Recipe | Baked Sriracha Butternut Squash Fries

December 2 2019 Oh My Veggies 

I am perpetually counting calories. Which is a whole lot of fun! Perhaps this is just my perception, but it sure seems like the food blogging world is full of the “Oh gosh, I just eat whatever I want and I never workout!” types who weigh 110 pounds and post six dessert recipes a week, usually involving Rolos and/­­or several heaping cups full of Nutella and I resent them and their amazing metabolism. I am not one of those bloggers. Nope. I have to watch every single thing I eat. So butternut squash fries make a frequent appearance on our dinner table. If I’m making veggie burgers or grilled cheese or something else that’s a little bit high in calories, butternut squash fries are a good low calorie counter-balance to that. And they’re filling! And delicious! And healthy! Butternut squash is high in fiber, beta carotene, potassium, and Vitamins C & B6. So in addition to having fewer calories than potato fries, they’re more nutritious too. Lower calories! More nutrition! Really, you can’t go wrong with butternut squash fries. Okay, there’s one slight downside. Butternut squash fries are not as crispy as regular fries. They’re just as versatile, though. I […]

Very Berry Quinoa Salad with Cinnamon Toasted Pecans

November 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

This salad is light and fresh yet has plenty of protein from the quinoa and pecans. Fresh summer berries are little powerhouses of vitamins and are super kid-friendly. The toasted pecans take this dish to the next level. This recipe comes to us from The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook by Jenn Sebestyen. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - For the Quinoa: - 1 cup (173 g) tri-color dry quinoa, rinsed well with cold water (or any color quinoa) - 1 1/­­4 cups (295 ml) water   - For the Cinnamon Toasted Pecans: - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons (30 g) pure maple syrup - 1 tablespoon (9 g) coconut sugar or (15 g) brown sugar -  1/­­2 teaspoon ground cinnamon - Pinch of salt - 1 cup (110 g) pecan halves - 1 teaspoon coconut oil   - For the Salad: - 6 cups (330 g) mixed baby salad greens - 2 cups (weight will vary) fresh mixed berries (blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, strawberries, etc.)   - For the Maple Dijon Vinaigrette: - 3 tablespoons (45 g) Dijon mustard - 2 tablespoons (40 g) pure maple syrup, or to taste - 2 tablespoons (28 ml) apple cider vinegar -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt, or to taste -  1/­­2 cup (120 ml) extra-virgin olive oil   For the Quinoa: Combine the quinoa and water in a small pot and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce the heat to medium-low, and simmer for 12 to 15 minutes until the quinoa is tender and the liquid is absorbed. Fluff with a fork.   For the Cinnamon Toasted Pecans: Line a large plate with parchment paper and set aside. In a small bowl, whisk together the maple syrup, sugar, cinnamon, and salt. Add the pecans and stir to coat evenly. Heat the coconut oil in a nonstick skillet over medium heat. Pour the pecans in the skillet, spreading them out in an even layer. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until toasted. Nuts can burn quickly, so dont walk away at this point! Youll know the pecans are done when you start to smell them. Pour them out onto the parchment-lined plate and spread in an even layer. Let them cool. They will crisp up as they cool.   For the Salad: Combine the mixed baby greens, mixed berries, cooked quinoa, and toasted pecans in a large salad bowl. Mix well. To serve, divide among 4 bowls and drizzle with the Maple Dijon Vinaigrette.   For the Maple Dijon Vinaigrette: In a small bowl, whisk together all the ingredients until smooth. Heat the coconut oil in a nonstick skillet over medium heat. Pour the pecans in the skillet, spreading them out in an even layer. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until toasted. Nuts can burn quickly, so dont walk away at this point! Youll know the pecans are done when you start to smell them. Pour them out onto the parchment-lined plate and spread in an even layer. Let them cool. They will crisp up as they cool.   Swap it! Try using romaine, red leaf lettuce, or arugula instead of the mixed baby greens to change it up. The post Very Berry Quinoa Salad with Cinnamon Toasted Pecans appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Chocolate Popsicles

August 3 2019 Oh My Veggies 

This Chocolate Popsicle recipe provides a way to make fudge popsicles a little healthier. This version uses banana and avocado, which makes the popsicles creamy and adds a dose of vitamins.    

12 Athletes Who Get Their Fuel From Plants

June 10 2019 Meatless Monday 

12 Athletes Who Get Their Fuel From PlantsProfessional athletes use their bodies in incredible ways. Whether serving as a human bulldozer or striking a ball with colossal force, their bodies require loads of fuel in order to function as powerfully and efficiently as possible. And as the athletes prove below, fuel can come in many forms, and plant-based fuel has helped many achieve great things. Read on to see what this diverse bunch has to say about running on plants.   Lewis Hamilton, Formula 1 Champion I have plenty of protein in my diet and Ive gained muscle, and Im healthier and happier than Ive ever been. Wish I did it sooner. Five-time Formula 1 world champion Lewis Hamilton, via Instagram , discussing the benefits of adopting a plant-based diet. According to Forbes, Hamilton was the world’s 12th highest-paid athlete in 2018 and is the highest-paid Formula 1 driver. Hamilton sites his concerns for the environment around climate change and animal welfare as his motivations for switching to a plant-based diet. He is vocal across his social media platforms about the benefits of plant-based eating and encourages his fans to also reduce meat in their diets.     Venus Williams, professional tennis player “I was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease, and I wanted to maintain my performance on the court. Once I started, I fell in love with the concept of fueling your body in the best way possible [through raw, vegan food], she told Health . “Not only does it help me on the court, but I feel like I’m doing the right thing for me.”       Derrick Morgan, American professional football player “Overcoming the preconceived notions is the biggest part. I was a part of it. I used to believe athletes had to eat meat to maintain play, then I educated myself,” Derrick Morgan, NFL football player to ESPN . Morgan is a 100 percent plant-based athlete who has encouraged many of his Tennessee Titans teammates to join him in eating plant-based. He and many of the Titans players have also attributed improved energy, reduced inflammation and better performance to switching to a meatless diet.     Kyrie Irving, professional basketball player for the NBAs Boston Celtics I’ve been on more of a plant-based diet, getting away from all the animals [products], Irving told ESPNs Chauncey Billups . Irving also credits plant-based eating with giving him more energy and endurance, which helps him sustain a high performance level throughout games. So my energy is up, my body feels amazing.       Hannah Teter, American Olympian snowboarder “I feel stronger than I’ve ever been, mentally, physically, and emotionally, Teter told HuffPost . My plant-based diet has opened up more doors to being an athlete. It’s a whole other level that I’m elevating to. I stopped eating animals about a year ago, and it’s a new life. I feel like a new person, a new athlete.”       Scott Jurek, American Ultramarathoner I grew up hating vegetables, eating meat and potatoes, he told GQ . When I was in college I started reading more about different diets and the vegetarian and vegan diets really came up quite a bit. As I worked in hospitals through physical therapy school it became clear to me that I needed to change my diet to avoid the health problems I was seeing. It was definitely a long-term decision rather than one made for short-term performance gains.       Jermain Defoe, English professional footballer I think Ive managed [to adopt veganism] successfully, he told the Guardian . I dont find anything hard to give up, as such, because I know the feeling scoring goals gives me. So, while getting in an ice bath isnt nice, I just think: You know what? Im going to do this and be rewarded. Its hard but in another way its easy because all I want to do is play well and score goals.       Tia Blanco, Puerto Rican professional surfer “I feel really great eating a plant-based diet and love the way it makes me feel physically and mentally, she said in an interview with Teen Vogue . Many of us know the effects of diet on one’s health, but fail to realize that diet plays a huge role in more than just your personal well-being.”         Austin Aries, American professional wrestler Im usually concerned with keeping my calories up to maintain my size, though I adjust my calories depending on if I need to bulk up or cut weight, he told Mens Journal . I try to limit my intake of things like soy, gluten, and overly processed foods. The easiest way to do this is by making sure Im eating a variety of different foods every day. This also ensures I am consuming all different types of plant-based protein to cover the full amino acid profile as well as my vitamins and nutrients.     JJ Redick, American professional basketball player for the Philadelphia 76ers During the season, my main focus is staying healthy and feeling strong, he said in an interview with Mens Journal .  Ive always had a leaner frame, so balancing my intake of protein, fat, and carbs is an important focus that guides my food choices. Ive found that incorporating plant-based protein items like Beyond Meat into my diet can deliver just as much protein, if not more, than some traditional meat items, while making me feel healthy, fit, and agile.       David Carter, American professional football player Football is a machismo sport, which is great, but everything can’t be machismo. On the field and at practice, yes, you can be machismo, but when it comes to diet, you need to have compassion for your body, he told NFL.com in an interview.         Barny du Plessis, British professional body builder and Mr. Universe winner I am the best Ive ever been. I feel fantastic, no aches, pains or niggles. No delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMs) after heavy sessions, du Plessis said in an interview with the Thinking Vegan . All my workouts are on fire; endurance and energy are awesome, strength and power are as good as I want them to be. I feel really healthy, fit, and buzzing with energy. I feel lighter, and not bloated, but Im still as heavy as I was when eating meat and animal products. Being leaner on more calories - thats always a good thing!     FREE ORGANIC GOYA FOR A YEAR Dont miss your chance to win ONE YEAR of FREE ORGANIC GOYA PRODUCTS! Meatless Monday has teamed up with Goya to promote their Dont Panic, Its Organic giveaway. Check out Goyas organic products and enter to win Goya goodness for a year . Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post 12 Athletes Who Get Their Fuel From Plants appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Celery and Spinach Soup

May 4 2019 Oh My Veggies 

Simple, delicious, and full of vitamins, this “cream all dressed in green” will please the whole family! You can serve it both cold and warm.  

Green Shakshuka

March 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

Spring Green Shakshuka is a versatile one-pot breakfast (or dinner) meal packed with nutrients and vitamins. Ready in less than 30 minutes. This recipe comes to us from Happy Kitchen.Rocks . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 2  tablespoons  olive oil 1  medium-sized yellow onion  chopped 2  cloves  garlic  minced 1/­­2 -1  jalapeno  with seeds for extra spiciness (otherwise, removed), chopped 1/­­2  teaspoon  ground cumin 1/­­2  teaspoon  smoked paprika 1/­­2  leek  chopped 4  spears asparagus  chopped 100  grams  or 1 cup mung bean sprouts 2  green onions  chopped 100  grams  or 1 cup baby beet greens 100  grams  or 1 cup stinging nettles  chopped, leaves only 100  grams  or 1 cup baby spinach 50  grams  or 1/­­2 cup wild garlic  chopped 2  sprigs oregano  chopped 4  eggs 2  tablespoons  chopped parsley  to garnish salt and freshly ground black pepper hot sauce  to serve (optional) crusty bread  to serve (optional)   1. Heat olive oil in a large skillet or cast iron pan over medium heat. Sautéing chopped onion, garlic and jalapeno until soft, for about 3 minutes. Add ground cumin and smoked paprika and cook for 1 more minute, stirring frequently. 2. Add chopped leek, asparagus, mung bean sprouts, green onions, baby beet greens, stinging nettles, baby spinach, wild garlic and oregano. Sauté until the liquid evaporates, stirring occasionally, for about 8 minutes. 3. Make wells in the green mass and poach eggs into them. Cook until the eggs are done. You can cover the skillet with a lid for a quicker result. 4. Garnish with chopped parsley and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Serve with hot sauce of your choice and fresh crusty bread (optional). The post Green Shakshuka appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera

January 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera Cortney Herrera is the artisan distiller and founder of the holistic skincare company Wildcare, located in the Pacific Northwest. We’ve been crushing hard on Cortney’s creations, like her expertly distilled hydrosols and face masks full of the most unique, glow-promoting ingredients, and we’re so excited to share this wisdom-packed interview. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Structure of certain things like eating & sleeping times has always made me feel the most supported. I am a triple virgo so by nature I crave a solid routine around the everyday basics. With that said, its freeing to just rehash it all and recreate a functional flow if I feel like Im too caught up in our pattern. Now that I have a baby (hes 1!) as much as I want things to be regimented for us all to thrive,  its necessary to play with flexibility for the unexpected too, so Ive shifted a bit more towards that direction. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. We sleep with our curtains open so that each morning we wake up to natural light. We just moved back to Oregon from sunny CA, so this is especially crucial for me here in the Pacific Northwest to feel more stable during the darker winter months. Our baby almost always wakes us up around 7am and usually starts babbling, so well take him out of his crib and have a little cuddle time. If hes not out on a job, my husband Alex will get him ready for the day and then Ill make us a morning beverage (usually tea with mushroom powder and coconut manna, and honey) and either one of us will cook a simple breakfast for the family (tortilla with an egg, handful of parsley or cilantro and a fermented veggie). We both work from home so we each hop on our computers shortly after while switching off with who is playing with baby Oso. One thing I am firm on is giving myself a facial massage for 5-10 minutes after I wash up. My skin loves it, but more importantly its a nice form of meditation to have that little moment of space to zen out a bit. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I opt for a magnesium bath, face mask (I like our creamy Soft Focus Mask at night), sometimes a chocolate and always a cup of tea – lately its a blend of lemon balm, chamomile, oatstraw and raspberry leaf. If time gets the best of me, Ill have a mug of hot water with magnesium powder to relax before bed. Im also really big on lists (virgo) so I usually write a new one before bed every night for all different things like shopping lists, distillation lists, who I need to email back more urgently, recipes I want to make.... everything thats been floating around in my mind that day so Im more freed up before bed. I watch a little Netflix and laugh, and then get in bed around 11. I like the Headspace app as a guided 5-10 minute meditation to center my breathing when I lay down. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Outdoor explorations! We aim to weave one day trip into each week, usually within an hour of home, and drive to a mountain, forest, or river to breathe clean air & explore without much of a plan or direction in mind. Having this free-flowing space contrary to our routines during the week creates lots of room for spontaneity…and sometimes we hit a dead-end, but thats all part of the fun of experimenting and not having a plan! Balance is key. If we dont have time to physically drive to a big open landscape that weekend because of work, well take walks in the neighborhood or a smaller visit to a nearby park (there are parks everywhere in Portland!). I like to be present and check in with myself as I move…how does the sun or mist feel on my skin, what scents are in the air, what does this leaf feel like in my hand.... All of these little check-ins help me feel more grounded and connected. Sustenance -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I stopped drinking coffee and caffeinated tea about 8 or so years ago to curb my anxiety – its helped tremendously! My favorite go-to drinks for energy & focus are roasted dandelion tea, fresh juice we make at home (the greener, the better), or chocolate milk with walnut milk and raw cacao! For the most part good quality chocolate has always mellowed me out actually – I think its the magnesium. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? I like to opt for something that will satisfy a sweet tooth without the crash or sugar spike like incorporating dates, honey or maple with healthy fats that sustain my energy. Lately Ive been making these very simple almond butter cookies. The recipe is: 1 cup almond butter (any nut butter will do!), 1 egg, 1/­­2 Tbs of virgin coconut oil, a couple spoons of coconut sugar, a pinch of himalayan salt and any spices that appeal (cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla bean etc). Roll into balls, smoosh with a fork and bake for 10 minutes! -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? My sister Ash (Black Sage Botanicals) makes delicious oxymels – vinegar based tinctures with infused organic and foraged herbs and honey. Im in love with her Tulsi Oxymel made with rose and pomegranate vinegar. It feels heart-opening and nurturing! Im pretty regimented on taking Vitamin D, a DHA fish oil, and iron with nettles along with various flower essences dependent on what my emotional state is calling for. Water is the main tool for me I need to remember, all day every day!!!!! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I aim to get out at least a couple times a week on an adventure and walk, usually finding a new forest to explore here in the northwest. Its been the single best thing for me in releasing any anxiety or stress from the week. I also am just getting back into yoga, focusing on the balance between movement + stillness. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I see beauty in nourishing and embracing every facet of our unique selves so much that the joy and loving energy we hold for our own bodies and spirit inherently radiates to those around us. I think when we allow ourselves to really connect with others, be vulnerable, be authentic, be blissful, be curious, beauty is an energy thats more magnetic than visually stimulating. I find a lot of rocks beautiful because I take time to notice their expressive nature. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? My approach is all about balance supported by nature and ancient rituals. Cold-pressed oils, raw honey, herb infusions, powdered herbs....focusing on the balance between humans and the natural world – how we care for botanicals and how they may care for us. I like to look at skincare the same way I look at the food I eat; when I feel happy about the ingredients I apply on my skin, my skin feels happy too. Its all about respecting and caring for ingredients so we create more harmony as we utilize them. My favorite tools are oil + water, in the form of our face oil and hydrosols. It may sound counterintuitive for those two to go hand in hand yet its what our skin is essentially made of and vital for nourished skin + optimal function. After cleansing, Ill mist a hydrosol (during winter I choose Empress Cypress or Rosemary Bay) and follow with SunRoot Solar Serum. Ill take about 5-10 minutes for a facial massage and then follow with another generous mist of Hydrosol. My skin glows!! -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water mainly. Eating lots of healthy fats like coconut oil/­­manna, ghee, avocado. The fish oil and vitamin d every day along with eating a lot of fermented foods and drinking the roasted dandelion tea I mentioned earlier (hormone balancing = skin balancing). The more we can do to support the gut and liver especially, the happier our skin is! I love incorporating raw honey and bee pollen in my rituals. Our Bee Rosy Mask actually has ground bee pollen in it and makes my skin feel like a spring flower. As for my hair, I like to use our skin soother Rosemary Bay Hydrosol to keep my scalp healthy. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? As a mama & business owner, there is always stress – good stress and real earth-shaking stress. The beauty/­­wellness business is pretty idealized – its HARD work and creating boundaries to minimize stress and prioritize your own personal wellness can be easily misplaced. Some things that usually help me release are talking it out with my sisters, breathing deep with a tall glass of water, embracing quietness, saying no when I need to, saying yes when I want to, putting my hands in dirt to work in the garden, and going on a walk. The past year I also started writing more regularly. Oddly enough a lot of it started flowing on my instagram which has led me to a beautiful community of friends that Ill message with on and off. On some more wild days, my husband and I will just run to the living room, turn up the music and just go crazy dancing for 10 minutes and then go back to work. This often helps the most with little stressors, especially seeing baby Oso laughing at us. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I make elderberry syrup every winter and take a spoon everyday when Im run down. Magnesium baths, herbal steams, foot soaks, rest, water, raw honey, and garlic. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Something that always helps me is doing something for myself first thing in the morning, so I dont end up too busy and putting it off later. That usually takes shape as a face massage. At the end of the day when Im laying in bed, I almost always do a self-check in and think of one nice thing I did for myself that day. If I forgot to physically do something, Ill say a few affirmations to myself. Im also quite excited to be starting therapy again and EMDR this month. I honestly am really eager to get back into it and work through some heavy triggers and blockages. I think thats one of the nicest things I could do for myself right now. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Allowing myself space to slow down & connect. Wildcare has been buzzing since conception. We were featured in Vogue the first month we opened, and from there it just became an everyday hustle to stay caught up – a challenge Im incredibly grateful for. Last year I had my first baby, and he arrived to our surprise 2 months early via an emergency cesarean. He remained in the NICU for a month while my husband and I went home as baby and I each had to separately heal. I felt broken, and at first, I jumped right back into work as soon as I had more movement to distract from much of the emotional pain I had experienced. A few months later when he was home, business was great but there was this moment I knew I needed to stop everything, reflect and be present with what I was feeling and with our baby. I closed the shop for a few weeks, and decided to stop taking on new retail partners for pretty much the remainder of 2018. Being transparent and open with those around me – even our customers about what I was going through, has been the biggest change Ive made. Slowing down, bridging that connection of my voice + products, being present and prioritizing the same amount of care for myself that I give others has allowed me to feel more honest with myself. Still a huge work in progress yet this practice continues to reveal a community of supporters that wouldnt have been there unless I was vulnerable. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I feel like inspiration finds me within the energy of the landscapes I’m immersed in. Right now its walking on the soft mossy forest floor in Oregon, hypnotized by rushing rivers and gazing up at towering Fir trees and dancing leaves. I really trust in the natural relationship of quiet down time vs the times Im energized with new ideas, and think its important to allow things to reveal themselves naturally as a connection is made. These visuals, scent memories, and feelings from nature always wind their way into my dreams even years later and lead me to formulas and product names so its best for me to just to go with the flow. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a distiller and starting Wildcare? My sisters and I grew up strongly influenced with our moms skin care rituals who worked as a makeup artist for film & tv, amongst other things. As kids, we would concoct foot soaks using pine needles and flowers we would collect on afternoon walks, and hair masks with eggs and mayonnaise! These DIY projects have always stayed with me. My formal schooling was both in Culinary and Herbal disciplines – a foundation that propelled my special focus on care – internal & external. There was an afternoon in particular where I had focused all my energy on exploring a better remedy to comfort my eczema flare-ups. When I noticed all the Rosemary that was growing in our yard near a little Bay tree I intuitively crafted my first Wildcare product, The Skin Soother Rosemary + Bay Hydrosol using a makeshift distillation system out of kitchen pots & pans. I remember I actually cried at the moment I saw the first hydrosol emerge…I really felt lucky to be in the presence of such an ancient form of alchemy. After obsessively spraying this camphorous green-smelling mist for a few weeks & seeing my skins improved health, this artful practice of distilling was something I fully got behind. I spent a year doing playful and careful experimentations, making hydrosols for family and friends. There was one night I even dreamt about filling a table full of tiny amber bottles with aromatic liquid and then a month or so later, I sprung up from a dream and shouted Wildcare! to my husband. Wildcare was born shortly after that in the end of 2015. -- At Wildcare, you make your own hydrosols and advocate their healing properties. Can you tell us a little bit about what they are and why they are so effective? Hydrosols are the subtly aromatic waters from distilled plant material. A copper still is placed over fire, holding spring water (we hand-collect from a local Oregon spring!) & fresh plant material. Inside the still, steam rises & passes through the plant in the form of vapor, carrying vital nutrients, plant acids & suspended particles of the plants essential oils. As the vapor cools, it condenses back into a liquid state and emerges in the form of aromatic water (now a Hydrosol) along with its essential oil counterpart. Our distillations have about an 8 hour duration depending on the plant utilized, a very slow & thoughtful process that requires a focused presence from the distiller. The majority of the essential oil will rise to the top, leaving the Hydrosol with about 0.1% micro-particles of essential oil, making it a very gentle mist without the same safety concerns that essential oils carry. When you purchase a pure Hydrosol, note that it will read as 100% distillate or floral water – without the addition of other ingredients or essential oils. More on the distillation process here. -- What are some of your best-sellers? 100% SunRoot Solar Serum, but more on that below! Our best selling Hydrosols of the season have been the skin soother Rosemary Bay, awakening Palo Santo, and Empress Cypress (a personal favorite!). From our face and body line, Soft Focus Mask has been flying off the shelves. Its a gentle and creamy clay based mask with brightening pearl powder, soothing organic coconut milk, and pineapple extract to even out lackluster skin. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? SunRoot Solar Serum is a product Ive worked on for 2+ years and was just released! After working so long on this formula, its been the most rewarding experience to see so many glowing reviews pour in. Im overwhelmed in the best possible way. It features a 4-week infusion of organic artichoke leaf in this incredibly beautiful Jojoba oil that Im sourcing directly from a farmer here in the US. He is self-taught and does all his cold-pressing by hand! Artichoke leaf is a powerhouse in healing sun damage, scarring and repairing tissue. Its combined with warming turmeric root, and juicy fruit oils like Sea buckthorn, Rose hip and Raspberry Seed. To extend even more beauty and peace of mind, its a 90+% certified organic formula! I am also in the middle of a complete rebrand, designed by artist Morgan Ritter (my younger sister!), with SunRoot as the first look of Wildcares new visual identity. The bottles are entirely covered with my actual tiny handwriting thats been screen-printed, echoing my commitment to being a maker – literally being a conduit, like water. Its a bold gesture to avoid a standardized typeface and is unlike what is commonly seen in the market, as we intend for this design to be a personal, embodied approach to commerce. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Its been a challenge as a nurturer however Ive been practicing treating myself more, creating stronger boundaries around my own personal time so that I can give more too. My affirmations since going through what I did last year have been The nurturer deserves to be nourished. I am deserving of nourishment. I am deserving of my own care. Simple pleasures like tinkering around in the kitchen and baking something experimental, even a chiropractic care visit from my favorite Luna Wellness practitioner, Megan makes me feel extra supported. Every so often Ive been treating myself to a facial from any one of a few dear friends here in Portland too. Allowing myself this space has been crucial to be able to lovingly care for child and have peace of mind. -- Standout book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art: Book - Aromatic Medicine by Patrice de Bonneval & Cathy Skipper Song/­­Album -Papa Celestin ragtime music, bought it at Mississippi Records :-) Movie - Stargate (I just saw Hackers for the 1st time and that was cool, ha ha ha) Piece of Art - STOOL WITH WHEELS (ALL THE WORLD’S PAIN, YET THERE ARE MOVEMENTS) by Morgan Ritter from her show The Cat House Settlements -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Dena Nakhle Birch – She is my friend/­­angel/­­naturopathic doctor based out of Santa Barbara, CA. A brilliant healer with one of the biggest hearts I know. Erica Chidi Cohen – her friendship and book Nurture was incredibly supportive to me after my birthing experience. Neva Osterloh – the sweetest woman offering loving forms of care through her Portland skincare studio. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Gabrielle Russomagno Self-Care Interview Series: Rocio Graves Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Magic Moisturizer is Here! + Orange-Tahini Mousse

January 9 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Magic Moisturizer is Here! + Orange-Tahini Mousse Happy 2019, friends! Hope you’ve been having an inspiring beginning to the year. Today we’re excited to announce that a small batch of our Magic Moisturizer is now available for sale, as per your amazing feedback. You can read all about it here (and get the recipe if you want to make it yourself), but basically, it’s been our go-to skincare product for the past few years. It’s made with all-natural ingredients that we find to be super nourishing and hydrating for all different types of skin, and it has the most luxurious texture and scent. Click here to go to our shop. Since Magic Moisturizer is like skin food, made with all food-grade ingredients, we were inspired to create a dessert recipe, celebrating two of the star ingredients in the formula: cacao butter and citrus. The result is this dreamy Orange-Tahini Mousse that takes minutes to put together. The lush ingredients in the Magic Moisturizer are: organic raw cacao butter, organic virgin coconut oil, beeswax, organic olive oil, organic jojoba oil, organic calendula oil, organic vitamin E oil, organic rosehip oil, distilled water, and essential oils of blood orange, Italian lemon, lavender, carrot seed, and clary sage, all of which have balancing, hydrating, anti-inflammatory, and anti-bacterial properties. Our friends love it, and it’s been reported to help with cold sores, eczema, and chronically dry skin. We’re so excited to share it as a physical offering! Now on to the mousse. To make it, shredded cacao butter, orange juice and zest, tahini, cashews, and maple syrup get whipped into oblivion in a high-speed blender. Distribute that mixture among little cups or ramekins, let it set in the fridge for about an hour, and you’ll have the most amazing, cloud-like mousse that tastes like pure heaven. We have people coming over tonight, and I’ve got a batch cooling in the fridge for a simple but elegant finish to our meal. Seriously can’t wait. Hope you enjoy the recipe, and look out for a new meal plan coming next week :)    Orange-Tahini Mousse   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons orange juice (from about 3 organic oranges) zest from 1 organic orange, plus more for garnish ½ cup cashews - soaked in purified water for 1-2 hours or in boiling water for 15 minutes ¼ cup maple syrup 5 tablespoons shaved or finely chopped raw cacao butter (leveled, not heaping) 4 tablespoons tahini (leveled, not heaping) Instructions Combine all the ingredients, except the orange zest, in a high-speed blender. Blend on high for about 30 seconds to a minute, until completely smooth. Add the orange zest and pulse on low, until just incorporated. Distribute the mixture between about 4 ramekins or small cups. Refrigerate for an hour, or until completely set and enjoy, garnished with more zest. After the mousse has been refrigerated for a while, remove from the refrigerator about 5 minutes prior to eating. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Spring Tea Party by The Rose Journals Super Decadent Vegan Chocolate Walnut Spread Sweet and Savory Energy Bites, What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp Raw Chocolate Layer Cakes with Black Cherry and Orange .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Magic Moisturizer is Here! + Orange-Tahini Mousse appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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