valuable - vegetarian recipes

valuable vegetarian recipes

Kitchen Creativity

December 12 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Kitchen Creativity In a break from my usual recipe posts, I’d like to share an excerpt from Karen Page’s new book entitled Kitchen Creativity. Beyond a cookbook, Kitchen Creativity is a guide to inventive cooking (without recipes!) that will inspire you to think, improvise, and cook like the world’s best chefs. Great cooking is as much about intuition and imagination as it is about flavor and technique. Kitchen Creativity gives insights into these creative processes from more than 100 top restaurant kitchens, including the Bazaar, Blue Hill, Daniel, and Dirt Candy. Based on four years of research and dozens of in-depth interviews, Kitchen Creativity illuminates the methods of culinary invention. Part I reveals how to learn foundational skills, including how to appreciate, taste, and season classic dishes before reinventing the classics from a new perspective. Part II’s A-to-Z entries are an invaluable culinary idea generator, with exercises to prompt new recipe ideas and combinations. While not a cookbook, nor a vegan book, for that matter (although vegan chefs and ingredients are very well represented), Kitchen Creativity has a lot to offer for cooks looking to broaden their creativity in the kitchen.  The following is an excerpt from Kitchen Creativity on one of my favorite topics, umami… “Umami” from Kitchen Creativity by Karen Page The taste of umami is imparted by glutamate, a type of amino acid discovered in 1908 by Dr. Kikunae Ikeda of Tokyo Imperial University. In studying kombu (kelp), Ikeda managed to isolate glutamate as its own compound, giving it the name of umami, which translates as savoriness. Thus, 5,000 years after the discovery of salt, and 4,000 years after the discovery of sugar, and 3,500 years after the discovery of sour (vinegar), umami is a relatively new taste concept. Japanese cooks had been using umami-rich ingredients intuitively for centuries, long before their scientific properties were discovered to enhance flavor. While we first mentioned umami in our 1996 book Culinary Artistry, it did not begin to gain more widespread acceptance until after 2000 when glutamate receptors were discovered on the tongue. The main sources of umami are those deriving from 1) the amino acid glutamate (found in, e.g., kelp); and those deriving from 2) so-called nucleotides--such as a) adenylate (aka AMP, which is found primarily in fish and shellfish), b) guanylate (aka GMP, which is found primarily in plants and fungi, e.g., shiitake mushrooms, esp. dried), and c) inosinate (aka IMP, which is found primarily in meat and fish, e.g., bonito flakes). The big umami magic happens when one or more nucleotides are combined with glutamate, as there is a synergistic affect--resulting in umami with as much as eight times the potency. Umami Dynamics Umami can enhance a bland dishs appeal with mouth-filling savoriness. Umami can also enhance a dishs perceived sweetness, while tempering its perceived bitterness. If you find yourself with too much of a good thing when it comes to umami, try balancing with salty, sweet, bitter, acidic, or piquant ingredients. Umami is a taste that tends to linger on the palate--something referred to as a long finish in the wine world. Because it contributes to the qualities of deliciousness and satiation, umami is especially prized as a taste in dishes and menus. Note: Certain herbs and spices can also emphasize a dishs savory aspects, such as bay leaf, cumin, oregano, paprika, sage, and thyme. Using Umami Chefs praise black garlic (aka fermented garlic) for its ability to add depth and earthiness to dishes ranging from vegetables to meats. If you doubt umamis importance as one of the five primary tastes, consider the fact that leading chefs like Michael Anthony, Eric Ripert, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten believe dashi to be a key component of their cooking. Some chefs use it to replace liquids in countless preparations, from brines to broths to salad dressings. Chefs have rising enthusiasm for all manner of fermented ingredients (e.g., fermented soybeans, kimchi, miso, pickles, sauerkraut), which bring umami to dishes including vegetables. The corn smut known as huitlacoche is prized as a Mexican delicacy, not only by chefs cooking in the vernacular like Rick Bayless, but also mainstream chefs who find themselves using it in quesadillas, soups, and tacos. Sean Brock declares is insanely delicious and luxurious, like black truffles. Kombu (aka kelp, the sea vegetable) is prized for its umami by Yoshihiro Narisawa. Brad Farmerie is fanatical about miso, which allows him to achieve a rich mouthfeel without butter or cream. Miso is an integral part of Farmeries roasted chile caramel Brussels sprouts, which involve caramelizing sugar (sweet) before adding chiles (hot), cilantro stems (bitter), lime juice (sour), fish sauce (salt/­­umami), and miso (richness). He adds miso to sweet potatoes + brown butter + rosemary to create another dish hes not able to take off the menu. Other chefs will add misos (e.g., white) to salad dressings or soups for an umami boost. From his time in Japan, Michael Anthony picked up a love of sea weeds and pickles. Thomas Henkelmann describes rich, flavorful stocks as essential for cooking in every season. Umeboshi paste is prized by chefs, including Isa Chandra Moskowitz of Omahas and Brooklyns Modern Love, for its umami quality. Moskowitz adds it to her Caesar salad dressing for its anchovy flavor. Even native Brits like Mark Levy fall prey to the charms of white truffles, which he prizes for their mysterious aroma and short availability. Excerpted from Kitchen Creativity: Unlocking Culinary Genius--with Wisdom, Inspiration, and Ideas from the Worlds Most Creative Chefs by Karen Page (Little, Brown, October 31, 2017). Save Save Save Save The post Kitchen Creativity appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin

October 11 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Amy Chaplin is an author and chef, whose approach to whole foods and cooking is endlessly inspiring. Her cookbook is nothing short of a kitchen bible to us. We had the pleasure of meeting up with Amy in NYC a few years ago and had the best time chatting about our favorite subjects like sprouted flours, cookbook publishing, and acupuncture. Needless to say, we were excited to get a peak at her self-care routine. In this interview, Amy tells us about the valuable self-care tips she learned from her mother, her favorite meals made with pantry staples, the skincare brand she’s been using since she was a teenager, her approach to exercise, stress, and so much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I like both. I like to have a morning routine and create a work routine for whatever project Im working on but I also like to have time for free thinking and spontaneously connecting with friends. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I get up early, 6 am  is the usual time but sometimes eariler depending on what Im working on. I make warm lemon water, light a candle and mediate for 10 to 15 minutes. In late summer the sun is coming up just as I finish and I usually sit for a bit and often reply to messages from Austrlia (they are going to bed around that time). Then I feed our two dogs (my wife takes them out on a long morning walk) start making breakfast and make sencha tea. Sometimes I skip the sencha and have a matcha latte after breakfast but I try not to have too much caffeine, as much as I love it! If Im working on recipes from home, I quickly shower, dress and get started right away....sometimes before breakfast but it depends on what Im testing :) -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I stop working on the computer before dinner and leave it closed. I leave my phone downstairs so its far from my bedroom. I get into bed and usually read cookbooks or watch an episode of any series Im currently obsessed with :) Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast –  soaked oats + chia (recipe is in my book) or activated grain porridge with homemade nut milk, cardamom and berries. I usually eat grains once a day and its usually in the morning. Lunch – Beans of some kind --depending on recipes Im testing. Kraut or other fermented veg, greens--salad or steamed depending on weather. I usually add some toppings too: hemp seeds, toasted seeds, sunflower sprouts, scallions anything to make it tasty Snack – Seeded crackers and nut butter/­­avocado/­­bean pate or chia pudding or coconut yogurt Dinner – An egg or tempeh, avocado, steamed veg and a dressing of some kind--this is often quite small as Im not always hungry if I have a good lunch or if Im testing and sampling recipes. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Yes. I love green tea. Sencha is my favorite for its fresh, grassy umami taste. Rishi Tea First Flush Sencha is sublime. I also love their ceremonial grade matchas with foamed, homemade almond milk. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to but I havent eaten sugar on a regular basis for years. If Im craving something sweet I eat a few spoons of Anitas coconut yogurt--it has a naturally sweet flavor from coconut with no sweetener. If I have a berry compote around Ill have some of that with it but I never sweeten them as Ive gotten used to just the sweetness of the berries. Of course there are times when Im testing recipes for cakes and muffins and I do enjoy tasting them and the same goes for good raw chocolate. Im not rigid about it as its part of being a chef but I dont seek out sugar on a daily basis. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I change depending on what my acupuncturist recommends in the way of Chinese herbs. I have been taking spirulina to increase protein and greens lately. I take a vitamin D. Ive been adding maca powder to my breakfasts for years so dont really consider it a supplement. I like adding locally grown ashwagandha (from Furnace Creek Farm) and reishi or chaga mushroom powder to hot cacao drinks. I drink nettle tea everyday because I love it, especially when you can get it fresh from the farmers market. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  With my job being so physical, these days I gravitate towards Qi Gong and yoga--the gentler classes. I also tend to exercise by default. Walking everywhere, long dog walks, biking and general schlepping around the city and up and down stairs with heavy bags of veggies! -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I used to push myself with torturous classes and long runs but now I do less and enjoy it more. I know that I am more productive when I make time for movement but it has to be mindful.  I do yoga at home and love it when I have the time for long luxurious classes...especially restorative. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Beauty to me is an inner glow that comes from something beyond what and how we take care of our bodies. Mostly it comes with time and a spiritual sense of oneself, our path, the world and other beings around us. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Ive used Dr. Hauschka since I was a teenager. I have a huge respect for biodynamic growing practices and love the way they preserve their products naturally. I think its one of the most difficult things with natural skin care products--preserving. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Local organic veggies, lots of greens, seeds… -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I notice a difference in my skin when I use a warm compress of essential oils (Dr. Hauschka calls them bath oils). You put a few drops in warm water and soak a face cloth, squeeze it out and press it into your skin. I use lemongrass in the morning and lavender at night. Then you cleanse and use the same water to wash the cleanser off. They smell so good and your skin feels really clean and enlivened afterwards. Its my mothers beauty secret, she looks amazing! :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Mainly daily meditation and breathing. I dont feel as clear or grounded without it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Hot shower and miso soup :) -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Make miso soup with lots of ginger and scallions and I also take Woodstock C & F Seasonal Support. It always helps with a sore throat or when Im feeling under the weather. Gargling sea salt with warm water. Colloidal silver spray. Hot lemon drink with grated ginger and turmeric. Bath and sleep. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely overlap. I love what I do and have found comfort in the kitchen for as long as I can remember. Of course there are days when work completely takes over but even when my schedule is jam packed, I try and make time to spend with my partner, cuddle the dogs and see family--it just means well be eating recipes that are being tested and theyre grilled for feed back! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I aften find myself saying “everything is working out for my highest good and remembering that everything is perfect as it is. I grew up with Louise Hay books. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Over time my lifestyle and diet has improved and I have a much more balanced approach. I used to be quite strict at times and I know that its not the way to great health for me anyway. I think now I have better overall health so I dont get thrown off on a regular basis. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Paul Pitchford’s “Healing with Whole Foods has been in my life for over 20 years and I still consult it. It always gets me in the mood for pure, simple temple-like food. My self care is also influenced by my mother. She has a deep connection to nature and a daily ritual of foot baths, lemon water in the morning and making a nightly hot water bottle (in the cooler months) Ive carried on these rituals...but dont seem to get the foot baths in as often as she does. Knowledge -- Your recipes are so well thought out and always turn out delicious, as well as incredibly nourishing. What is your process when it comes to recipe development? Thank you so much! My recipes all begin with what I crave, which is mostly deeply nourishing food with clean uncomplicated flavors. They have to make sense to me and not only be healthy but also be visually beautiful. Nature and beauty are what inspire me most. When I am developing recipes I want the steps to be clear and thorough. I spend a lot of time with new recipes before they are published. Theyre all tested over and over again by myself, friends, family and recipe testers. I feel a lot of responsibility to readers who spend time and money and a lot of effort making my recipes...they have to work and taste delicious! -- You are a big proponent of keeping a well-stocked pantry. What are some of your favorite meals that you like to throw together with pantry ingredients? Simple wraps with nori, fermented veggies, avocado (not really pantry but I always have a few of varying ripeness around). Barrys tempeh, which is made from white beans and adzuki beans and sold frozen, it tastes amazing just panfried in coconut oil. In Australia you can get fresh fava bean tempeh and Im missing it so much! Red lentil soup with lemon and spinach from my cookbook. That is perfect for right now when the weather is getting cooler and if you dont have much in the way of veg. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Drive to the country with my wife, play with my nephew, drink tea and sit in the morning sun. Have a pedicure. Travel and be in nature. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – “The Power of Intention” by Wayne Dyer Song/­­Album – Blue by Joni Mitchell Movie – I recently saw Lion and was so moved Piece of Art – Yoko Onos simple, whimsical pieces -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in NYC? ABC V, Via Carota, Ilbuco Alimentari, De Maria -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – Good tea selection + strainer for infusing – Activated or toasted nuts – Spirulina – Pajamas and cosy sox (no matter the season) – Large scarf/­­shawl – Cardigans -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Luise from Green Kitchen Stories, Henrietta Inman, Elenore from Earthsprout, Emma from My Darling Lemon Thyme..... Photos by Amy Chaplin and Stephen Kent Johnson. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Maintaining a Vegan Diet During Pregnancy

May 25 2017 VegKitchen 

Maintaining a Vegan Diet During Pregnancy Maintaining a vegan diet during pregnancy always seem to cause concern, but it can be done! Here are some tips and valuable information. During pregnancy, your need for all nutrients increases. For example, you will need more calcium, more protein, and more folic acid. But calorie needs increase only modestly during pregnancy. In fact, you […] The post Maintaining a Vegan Diet During Pregnancy appeared first on VegKitchen.

Hemp Seeds: Nutrition, Benefits, & Recipes

February 23 2017 VegKitchen 

Hemp Seeds: Nutrition, Benefits, & Recipes Hemp seeds are a fantastic addition to any healthy diet, packed with easily digestible protein and a multitude of nutrients. Rare among plant-based foods, they provide complete protein with all 10 essential amino acids. That makes them quite valuable to vegans and vegetarians.The post Hemp Seeds: Nutrition, Benefits, & Recipes appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Fight Deforestation With Your Fork

April 25 2016 Meatless Monday 

Fight Deforestation With Your ForkIn celebration of Earth Month, each Monday in April were highlighting an environmental benefit of cutting out meat, one day a week. This week focuses on our rainforests. Can going meatless once a week change the course of our rainforests? Lets look at what, why, and how. Today, the raising of livestock uses 30 percent of the earths total land surface. And every hour, rainforest the size of 4,000 football fields is being destroyed, most of it for beef production. Plus, the raising of cattle further damages the soil – about 20 percent of pastures (and even higher for dry lands) are degraded through overgrazing and erosion. We simply cant afford to lose our rainforests. They produce our clean air, balance the climate, and protect water cycles. Our rainforests are also home to thousands of valuable medicinal plants, many of which are used in modern medicine today. Truly priceless is the culture and wisdom of native peoples who have lived in the rainforests for thousands of years. Livestock displaces them. Simple truth: As the world population explodes and the demand for meat grows, more and more rainforest will be destroyed. But its not out of our hands. You can take one very important step. Just go meatless one day a week. Why? Because for each hamburger you exchange for a delicious meat-free dish like our Pasta Primavera, you save 55 square feet of tropical rainforest. Peggy Neu, President of the Monday Campaigns, reminds us that Meatless Monday has its roots in World War I and II, when Americans were asked to help conserve key staples to aid the war effort. Today, our “cut out meat one day a week” program is active in 40 countries and growing! Activists like actor Mark Ruffalo, Sir Paul McCartney, Sir Richard Branson, and many international cooking stars like Giada De Laurentiis and Mario Batali have jumped on board. Join with all of us on Meatless Monday and watch our food choices change the future. The post Fight Deforestation With Your Fork appeared first on Meatless Monday.

4 Easy Back-to-School Nutrition Tips for Children

September 28 2015 VegKitchen 

4 Easy Back-to-School Nutrition Tips for ChildrenAs you prepare your kids for the school year ahead, what to pack for lunch and snacks for your little darlings is a top priority. If your child is a fussy eater, deciding on good food options can be more difficult. You know your little one needs his or her daily nutrition, but how do you ensure that they dont turn up their noses at healthy choices? Preparing or at least planning nourishing meals for the morning and lunchtime meals in advance cuts down on last-minute hassles and poor choices. Here are are a few ways to ensure that your children are happy with the meals that start their day, as well as the foods you send with them. Add Color to Their Breakfast: Kids eat better if they find their food visually appealing. Theyll be less likely to kick up a fuss over good-for-them foods and more likely to eat enthusiastically if theres some color on the plate. If you serve cereals, embellish them with fresh fruits. Strawberries, blueberries, blackberries and raspberries are great additions to a healthy breakfast. When berries are no longer in season, choose from are apples, pears, oranges and bananas, thinly sliced and served attractively. Theses fruits are rich in antioxidants that will strengthen your childs immunity, and contain fiber thats so valuable to the digestive system. Add a tiny amount of maple syrup or brown rice syrup to hot cereals if need be; you can also add some sliced or chopped nuts such as almonds, or seeds (such as sunflower or pumpkin seeds) to boost protein content of hot or cold cereals. Make lunch look fun: Lunch can be a little tricky since you wont be around to see that your child actually eats it! However, you can still make sure that he does. First, get your child a new lunchbox of her or his choice. With a lunchbox that they choose themselves, theyre less likely to reject the food inside. Or try the newer kind of bento lunchboxes, which make food look really fun and appealing. With regard to his lunch, kids are more likely eat their veggies and fruits theyve been cut into bite sized pieces and served with a dip. As with the lunchbox, giving your child a few choices when it comes to lunch gives them some of the power of decision. If your child tends to eat a lighter breakfast, pack a heartier lunch filled with foods that are wholesome and high in nutrient-dense calories. Here are VegKitchens favorite Healthy School Lunch Recipes and Tips for great ways to actually fill that lunchbox. Grab-And-Go Snack: In the few hours between the end of the school day and dinnertime, your child is likely to become hungry. Pack a light and nutritious snack; fruits or simple fruity snacks are a great choice. Dried fruit is a great option, too. You can pack an apple or a banana in a separate bag or container that her or she he can munch on while on the bus home. Or if you pick your child up from school, you can pack a quick fruit salad that he or she can have on the way home. For more ideas, see Fruitful Flavors for the Lunch Box. You can also explore snack ideas for school and after in Healthy Snacks for Kids and Teens. Dont Forget the Beverage: While planning your childs lunch and breakfast, dont forget to consider their beverage. Water is a natural detoxifier; and there are a number of other clever ways to keep your child hydrated. The main thing to avoid are sugary drinks that do no one any good. Its better to supply a bottle of water and fresh fruit than beverages filled with high fructose corn syrup. Aradhana Pandey is a veteran writer on topics concerning parenting, child nutrition, wellness, health and lifestyle. As a regular contributor to popular sites like Huffington Post, Natural news, Elephant journal, Thehealthsite, Naturally Savvy, Curejoy and MomJunction.com, Aradhana writes to inspire and motivate people to adopt healthy habits and live a stress-free lifestyle. Living in India with two lovely kids, I bring a unique blend of experiences on parenting. I write to inspire people to adopt healthy habits and live a stress-free lifestyle.

5 Ways to Make Environmentally Conscious Food Choices

June 5 2015 VegKitchen 

5 Ways to Make Environmentally Conscious Food ChoicesGrowing up in Idaho I have been fortunate enough to constantly be surrounded by fresh produce and ingredients. We appreciate home grown food here. Though, unfortunately some local businesses havent been able to make it too long and (as with any other US town I would imagine) we have an abundance of processed foods and waste. Have you ever thought that what you eat will make an impact on the status of the world? Its definitely true -- not only what you eat, but where you eat it and who made it. Here are some very easy enviro-friendly tweaks to implement the next time you think about dinner. -  Support good companies that align with your personal environmental standards. I personally, will not buy products that have harmed and human or animal during the process. This means fair wages for workers and putting out a product we can be proud to purchase. A recent act of generosity by Manitoba Harvest towards Nepal earthquake survivors has given me a new found love for righteous food producers. Do your research on brands that you normally purchase from. A quick Google search might yield results you could be shocked to discover. You have a right to know how, where, and at what cost your food was produced using. In addition, those who make our food have the right fair and ethical treatment. Youll be happy to know which companies are making a world-wide difference. Plus, doing research always makes me feel like a scientist. Can I get a heck yes, Bill Nye?! -  Buying Local means your food wont have to contain preservatives in order to keep it fresh which is great for your body and the planet as well. Plus, you can also feel good about supporting local businesses that can only thrive once the community is involved. Doesnt that feel nice? Ways to buy locally include checking to see if your town has a farmers market happening near you or just check out your produce the next time you head down to your favorite super market. Most likely there is a section specifically sanctioned for your states goods. Try places that youve never tried before. Believe me; it took me years to go to some staples in my own home state. I am so glad that I did because they are now my favorite local hot spots! #noregrets -  Storing your food can apply to not only physically storing your food at home or what you pick your food up in, but also storing seasonally appropriate foods over the winter. If you purchase fruits and veggies while they are in season you can always find ways to store them year round! This ensures you wont be eating or supporting any genetically modified franken-foods that shouldnt be growing during the wrong season. Theres a reason nature made it that way, folks. Learning how to store your food is a truly invaluable trait. Did you know that homemade jam usually only uses about 3 ingredients and will last for months in the fridge or all winter in the freezer? Root veggies and fruits save very well when frozen. Soups, stews, sauces, dips and more can be stored safely in the freezer. You can always try drying and candying some fruits which will make excellent snacks and treats. Itll feel like cheating, but youll not its not. -  Growing your own food is not only delicious, but such a positive hobby. I dont mean to say that every person should create their own cornucopia of fresh produce in their backyard. There is just something so satisfying about planting some organic fruits and veg from seeds and watching those little babies grow. Youll know exactly how it was grown and that there werent any chemicals or pesticides used in the process!Start growing from home by planting your own herbs! This is such a simple way to start so that you wont become overwhelmed. Herbs usually grow very well indoors and dont require too much upkeep. Once you have a handle on that you can get a little more adventurous and grow other foods. This will also help you to appreciate all the hard work that goes into making the food you eat. Mo veggies, less hunger. -  Choose less packaging when it comes to your foods. Companies that align with environmentally conscious ideals usually do their best to cut down on unnecessary waste. Check for signs that your packaging is recyclable or you can even decide to reuse your containers for other projects!

Meatless Monday to be Featured at Int’l Restaurant & Food Show

March 2 2015 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday to be Featured at Int’l Restaurant & Food Show  Meatless Monday is partnering with Natural Gourmet Institute (NGI), the leader in health-supportive culinary education, for a special presentation during the International Restaurant & Food Service Show of New York. The show will run March 8 through March 10, 2015, at the Jacob Javits Convention Center in New York City. Its the only all-encompassing event in New York for the restaurant and foodservice industry with over 450 leading vendors, tastings, competitions, and forums. The Meatless Monday/­­NGI presentation will be held at the Food Trends Demonstration Theater, an educational, interactive and entertaining area for restaurant and foodservice professionals who want to stay current with whats hot in the food world. Appropriately enough, it will take place on the Monday of the trade show, March 9that 3pm. During the presentation, Meatless Mondays Diana Rice, RD, will discuss the benefits of going meat-free one day a week. Shell explain how it can benefit personal health, by reducing the risk of chronic preventable diseases like cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity; shell also discuss how skipping meat once a week can benefit the health of the planet by conserving valuable resources like fossil fuels and water as well as reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Chef Olivia Roszkowski, Full-time Chef Instructor at NGI, will then demonstrate and offer tasting samples of a delicious meatless dish: Springtime Edamame and Black Quinoa Sliders with Avocado, Sprouts and Crispy Shallots. A graduate of NGIs Chefs Training Program, Chef Olivia has previously worked at The Mercer Kitchen and Momofuku Ssam Bar. She specializes in root-to-frond cooking and umami flavors. Natural Gourmet Institute is proud to participate in the International Restaurant & Foodservice Show this year. As a leading culinary institution, we are excited to spread the word about innovative healthy cooking techniques, and Olivia is the perfect chef for the task, says Anthony Fassio, CEO of Natural Gourmet Institute. Meatless Monday and NGI make a great team, so dont miss their presentation - and of course taste the samples! Click here for more information.     The post Meatless Monday to be Featured at Int’l Restaurant & Food Show appeared first on Meatless Monday.

How to Edit Your Cookbook Collection

December 2 2014 Vegetarian Times 

How to Edit Your Cookbook Collection If your ever-growing cookbook collection is starting to take over valuable real estate in your kitchen, perhaps its time you spend an hour or so weeding through it. After all, the holiday season is high time to donate or re-gift some of your lesser-loved volumes--as long as the pages arent stuck together. Since parting can be such sweet sorrow, here are 5 tough-love rules for how to edit your cookbook collection: 1. Many of the recipes include a key ingredient thats no longer in your diet, such as meat, fish, dairy, gluten, or other taboo ingredient that you are currently avoiding. 2. If its available as an e-cookbook for a few easy clicks and less than the price of a cocktail, say sayonara to sticky pages and hello to the digital age. 3. You fell in love with the restaurant and left with the cookbook, but the one recipe you tried cost you more in ingredients than your restaurant bill. 4. The recipes send you on a scavenger hunt for hard-to-source ingredients. If you have to go to more than two locations to find all the ingredients, its probably not worth the carbon emissions, or the hassle. 5. The recipes require cooking gear that you have no intention of ever owning, such as an ice-cream maker, pasta press, or a dehydrator. If the tool isnt currently on your holiday wish list, toss it. How do you decide which cookbooks should stay and which should go? Share in the comments below.

Genius Chickpea Tofu

April 1 2014 My New Roots 

Genius Chickpea Tofu As someone who eats a predominantly plant-based diet, you can imagine that Ive enjoyed a long history of consuming soy-based foods. When I became a vegetarian at 16 and vegan thereafter, there wasnt the variety of plant-based protein foods readily available as there are these days, nor was I educated about alternatives to meat back then. Soy became my answer and my replacement for everything from dairy to eggs to chicken nuggets (eew). Before I knew it, I was eating some form of soy up to three or four times a day, when things started to get weird. Without going into too much detail Ill just say that my PMS and menstrual issues became incredibly, ahem, challenging. I didnt even like being around me. Period. Ha. Once I started studying holistic nutrition, I began to think that perhaps my issues lay in the hands of the health food industrys little darling. Yes, soy. Seeing as I was really grooving on being a human guinea pig while studying, I decided to give up the soy for other foods, such as hemp, chia, nuts, seeds, leafy green, other legumes just to see what would happen. Call it a coincidence, but after a couple months, my symptoms started to clear up and I returned to my regular, only slightly neurotic self, every 28 days. Did I miss tofu? Actually, yes. And I still do from time to time, which is why Im pretty darn excited to share this recipe with you today. A recipe for tofu, made from chickpeas. But first, lets discuss soy. Ive gotten a lot of emails and inquiries from many of you regarding this topic, because soy and soy foods are drowning in controversy these days. What is all the fuss about? Well, there are two schools of thought: one being that soy is a highly valuable source of plant-based protein because it is complete (meaning that it contains all essential amino acids). The other school of thought is that soy is bad, or even harmful for you if it is not fermented. This brings up a good point, and its great to hear that more people are turning toward fermented foods, especially legumes and grains. But the idea that unfermented soy is downright dangerous to eat is blowing things a little out of proportion if you ask me. If we are going down that road, then we also have to say that all legumes, grains, nuts and seeds are harmful if not fermented. The process of fermentation neutralizes some of the naturally occurring phytic acid (a compound that binds to minerals in the digestive tract making them difficult to absorb), while breaking down some the hard-to-digest proteins. Soy actually contains less phytic acid than some of its vegetable counterparts, like flax, sesame, Brazil nuts, and pinto beans. This is why soaking legumes, grains, nuts and seeds before eating them is important for better digestion, nutrient assimilation, and therefore overall health. That is a statement I can get behind. Fermented soy foods include tempeh, miso, and naturally brewed soy sauces, like tamari. I for one have been eating fermented soy foods exclusively for the past few years just because I feel better eating that way. I also choose non-GMO and organic soy because I support those agricultural practices. In conclusion, I will say that eating any food in balance is okay, as long as it is minimally processed. That definitely excludes tofu chicken nuggets, soy cheese, soy eggs, and even most soymilk (always check the ingredient list - some brands are good and some contain a laundry list of un-pronounceables). My rule of thumb with any food, is that if you cant make it at home, dont eat it. Although tofu and tempeh are bit of an ordeal to make yourself, Ive done it and it is possible. Tofu chicken nuggets? Good luck with that one. Okay, onto the Chickpea Tofu! Although this stuff is pretty genius, I am not the genius who came up with it. Its a traditional food originally from Burma, and often referred to as Burmese tofu or Shan tofu (here’s the original recipe I followed). It is easy to make with just a few basic ingredients and is a tasty, soy-free alternative to regular tofu that I think will be on the regular rotation in my kitchen. I think the really surprising thing about Chickpea Tofu is its texture. It is lusciously creamy and silky, not unlike silken tofu in fact. It is delicate yet firm, and kind of melts in your mouth. Ive found it works really well fresh in salads (a traditional way of serving it), and in soups. This way you can really enjoy its unique consistency. I liked the it in a simple miso-ginger broth with a few rice noodles swirling around too. Ive even seen recipes online for egg salad sandwiches and coconut curries. Yum! The downside of Chickpea Tofu is that it doesnt do all the things that tofu can do. It doesnt fry very well (deep fried however, Im sure would be ah-mazing), nor can you really bake it to crisp up as I had hoped. But, I am pretty new at this game and looking forward to trying out more recipes with it. If anyone out there really knows how else to work with Chickpea Tofu, please clue me in down below in the comments section! I am so curious to learn more. Some thoughts on the recipe... You can purchase chickpea flour at most health food stores, but it is also available (and tends to be much cheaper) at ethnic grocery stores. Chickpea four is also called garbanzo bean flour, gram flour, and cici flour. It also falls under the name besan, an Indian flour made from both chickpeas and yellow split peas. This will work just fine for the recipe. I think making a half batch of this would be a good idea. This made so much tofu that I had to freeze the majority of it, and I have no idea what it will be like after thawing. I used turmeric in my recipe, which is a traditional ingredient for colour. This is optional but gives the tofu a lovely golden hue. I also added garlic powder - a decidedly untraditional ingredient but I am really happy that I did because it gave the tofu a mellow garlicky flavour, which I love. This is also optional.     Print recipe     Genius Chickpea Tofu Makes more tofu than you could ever eat Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 350g chickpea flour (or besan, a yellow split pea + chickpea flour combo) 15 cups /­­ 3 1/­­2 liters water 1/­­2 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 2 1/­­2 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 Tbsp. ground turmeric (optional) 1 tsp. garlic powder (optional) Directions: 1. In a very large stockpot (make sure that is has capacity to hold over 20 cups /­­ 4 1/­­2   liters), combine the chickpea flour and water. Place somewhere to sit where it will not be disturbed. Let sit overnight, for about 12 hours. 2. In the morning, without moving the pot, carefully remove 6 cups of water from the top of the mixture with a ladle, and discard. 3. In a medium stockpot, melt the oil over medium heat. Carefully pour in the remaining liquid, without disturbing the bottom too much (what youll be left with is a thick chickpea sludge, which will be used as the thickening agent). Add the salt, and turmeric if using, and whisk well to combine. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently for 20-30 minutes, until the mixture begins to simmer and thicken. 4. Add the chickpea sludge. Like magic, you will notice almost immediately that the mixture thickens. To avoid the bottom burning, whisk vigorously and continuously for 10 minutes. 5. Line a 7×10 (18x25cm) baking pan with a clean cotton tea towel or cheesecloth (something you dont mind being stained with turmeric!). This is important because the fabric will help absorb excess liquid. Pour the thickened chickpea mixture into the pan and smooth out the top. Fold the edges of the cloth over the top and let sit at room temperature until the evening, when it is ready to eat (about 8 hours). 6. To remove tofu from the pan, place a cutting board on top and flip over, pull cloth away. Store leftovers in the fridge for up to five days. The salad in the top photo was a very quick dish I threw together to enjoy the tofu with, and it turned out so well I thought I should share it with you. I took the dressing from this recipe and combined it with shredded purple cabbage, spring onion, and plenty of cilantro. Later in the evening for dinner, I tossed the leftovers together with brown rice pad thai noodles, and it went over very well with the husband. He said it tasted better than junk food, which, coming from him, is the biggest compliment ever. *   *   *   *   *   * In other news, I am thrilled to mention that Ive been nominated again this year for the Saveur Best Food Blog Awards! Super cool. And congrats to the other nominees in my category of Special Diets - what an honor to be in your company! If youve been enjoying My New Roots in the past year, show some love and vote for me (scroll down to the bottom of the page to the last category). Thank you a ton for your support. Im still wild about writing this blog and it feels good knowing youre wild about reading it. Hugs and Chickpea Tofu, Sarah B.

Wanted to Say Thanks!

April 28 2013 Manjula's kitchen 

Wanted to Say Thanks!I would first like to acknowledge and thank my viewers and everyone who voted for me. Because of you all I was selected for “YOUTUBE ON THE RISE” program. As a result, my channel will be featured on April 30th on YouTube blog, www.youtube.com/­­YouTube I truly enjoy doing these recipes and sharing with you. I take a lot of pride in my work through Manjula’s Kitchen. I often spend many hours working on each recipe. Despite this, I must say I truly enjoy this process. You, the viewers, have given me so much love and encouragement over the years. Your feedback and enthusiasm for Manjula’s Kitchen is invaluable. Youtube has given me a wonderful platform to promote my passion and love for cooking. Not many people are able to say that they are following their passion at my stage in life (being a grandmother of four and all!). You, the viewers, deserve credit for this. So I would like to say a heartfelt thank you.   Related RecipesVote for ManjulaHappy Holidays!Jaljeera in the Summertime!100th Video RecipeHappy Thanksgiving!Working on Few New RecipesI Have Been BusyBack To Reality And Back To Working On Some Fresh New Recipes!My 61st BirthdayRecipe For Peach Phirni (Rice And Peach Pudding)

5 Valuable Tips on Raw Nutrition

May 5 2016 VegKitchen 

5 Valuable Tips on Raw Nutrition The process of digesting food is the most complex job our body does, and it has to do it several times a day. It is so complex that the bodys process of healing pauses when food is digesting. When we eat a simple, easy-to-digest diet of raw foods, our body has more energy to fight pathogens, rebuild tissue, and detoxify.

Blogger Q & A: Olives for Dinner

February 24 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Blogger Q & A: Olives for DinnerIn each issue of Vegetarian Times, we feature a talented vegetarian food blogger. Our Featured Blogger shares a little info about the blogger plus one of their tasty, meat-free recipes. In March, we highlighted Erin Wysocarski, vegan and the inspirational blogger behind Olives for Dinner. We chatted with Erin to find out more about her blog.   Subscribe now for just $10 to see our featured blogger recipe every month!      VT: What was the inspiration for your awesome blog? Erin: When I first went vegan more than 10 years ago, I wasnt much of a cook. In fact, I rarely cooked at all!  So I relied primarily upon other vegan blogs to help me know what to cook and how to cook it. Once I eventually got the hang of cooking, it became less intimidating and more like a fun adventure, and I became better with each cooking experiment. Armed with my newfound confidence, I was inspired to create my own blog similar to those blogs that inspired me--with the goal of inspiring others.   VT: What is your most popular recipe (and why do you think its popular)? Erin: Definitely my vegan crab cakes (made with hearts of palm) and vegan lox (made by salt roasting carrots). I think its appealing to those readers who want to eat in alignment with their veganism, but miss the ritual and sensory experience of piling smoky lox on top of a bagel or tapping into a crispy, flaky crab cake. Also, its kind of fun taking a plant-based ingredient like hearts of palm or carrots and manipulating it to recreate the flavor and texture of seafood. VT: How would you describe your recipes/­­cooking style? Erin: Im really drawn to the flavors, ingredients and visual components of East and Southeast Asian cuisines, and most of my recipes implement at least one element inspired by them. I especially love veganizing traditional, meat-centric dishes like pork buns (using oyster mushrooms) and sambal seitan skewers (using vital wheat gluten), as well as creating other non-traditional dishes like my spicy Thai-style pizza (using crushed and crumbled tofu) and dynamite Rolls (using king oyster mushrooms). Veganizing meat-heavy dishes is always kind of like putting a puzzle together--its fun to see how plant-based ingredients can be moved around and put together to create a dish that is not only compassionate, but also creative and delicious.   VT: You talk about debunking the myth that vegan food is inaccessible. What is some advice youve give to someone who feels like it is? Erin: Because we live in such a meat-centric world, veganism only seems difficult, but is actually very accessible once you shift your focus towards making compassionate choices. No matter where you live or what you like to eat or cook, there are so many great vegan resources, products, cookbooks, classes and recipe blogs available that make it easier than ever to become less dependent upon animal-based products in our daily lives. As far as finding specialty vegan ingredients and products, the market has exploded with online and brick and mortar shops like Food Fight! Grocery, Thrive Market, Rabbit Food Grocery, Herbivore Clothing Co. and Vegan Essentials, to name a few. There are fantastic meat alternative brands like Gardein (my favorite), Field Roast and Beyond Meat that are typically available at Target, Costco and most mainstream grocery stores. Vegan cheese alternatives like Daiya, Miyokos Kitchen (my favorite), Kite Hill and Chao are also popping up more frequently in some stores and online. And if you are looking for vegan restaurants near where you live or while travelling, HappyCow is a great resource! To help with vegan cooking, there are literally hundreds of vegan cookbook titles for every type of cooking style (from quick and easy to more advanced and involved) to choose from. I suggest checking out any of Isa Chandra Moskowitzs cookbooks (Vegan with a Vengeance was my first vegan cookbook, and I still refer to it today, 10 years later!) and visiting sites like Finding Vegan, Minimalist Baker, Vegan Richa and Oh She Glows, to name a few. The food on these sites are easy to make, beautifully photographed and inspiring! And if youd like a more comprehensive approach to plant-based cooking, there are some fantastic resources out there. Last year I completed Rouxbe’s Plant-Based Professional Certification Course and was in a virtual classroom with other like-minded students at all levels of cooking ability across the globe. I would recommend it to anyone, from beginner to the seasoned cook. (Check out VT’s new online course, Secrets to Vegan Baking: American Classics, which features vegan baking basics to professional-level techniques.) VT: What is the best comment youve received from a reader? Erin: I appreciate all comments and feedback, but the ones I like best are from readers who have tried a recipe, loved it and let me know ... and its especially awesome when a recipe or dish is shared with others. One comment that stands out was from a reader who made my carrot lox and said, This recipe turned out AMAZINGLY! Thank you so much for such a great food experience … My omni husband also raved about it, taking some to our neighbors (good friends) and insisted they try some. They also couldn’t believe it was carrot. Win, win, win! On the shortlist for dinner parties. Enthusiastic feedback like this makes all of the hard work and effort I put in behind the scenes worth it! VT: Tell us your favorite Vegetarian Times recipes. (Or ones youd like to try). Erin: 1. Tempeh Avocado Sushi 2. Moroccan-Spiced Millet-and-Lentil Salad 3. Basil Ice Cream 3. Tempeh Tacos with Ancho-Lime Sauce 4. Singapore Hawker Noodles with Golden Tofu and Coconut are all some of my favorites! VT: What is one valuable thing youve learned from vegan cooking? Erin: That it gives the opportunity to be compassionate, creative and nourished all at once! Vegan cooking isnt exclusively about removing things from your diet--its about adding and combining plant-based ingredients and flavors together to create dishes that are not only delicious, but also kind to the planet and all forms of life. Subscribe now for just $10 to see our featured blogger recipe every month!  Follow Olives for Dinner:  Facebook: https:/­­/­­www.facebook.com/­­OlivesForDinner/­­ Instagram: https:/­­/­­www.instagram.com/­­olivesfordinner/­­ Twitter: https:/­­/­­twitter.com/­­olivesfordinner Pinterest: https:/­­/­­www.pinterest.com/­­olivesfordinner/­­ Bloglovin: https:/­­/­­www.bloglovin.com/­­blogs/­­olives-for-dinner-3848756

How to eat a vegan diet overseas, or any specific diet, with ease!

July 25 2015 Vegie Head 

I love travelling! There’s much to be said about diving neck deep in the culture and tradition of different countries, swimming and hiking in foreign lands, shopping, experiencing and immersing yourself fully in the experience. But….what about food? I share some invaluable tips for you! ...

Veg Hot Spot: California’s The Farmer and the Cook

March 30 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Veg Hot Spot: California’s The Farmer and the Cook Off the beaten path in Ojai, Calif., youll find The Farmer and the Cook, the realization of Steve Sprinkel and Olivia Chases farm-to-table dream. Since 2001, the organic vegetarian market and restaurant have offered produce from Sprinkels 16-acre farm and ?a Mexican-inspired daily menu from Chases kitchen. We use organic soybean meal ?as a fertilizer because of animal welfare issues and because of unknowns like GMO biology in commercial compost, says Sprinkel, adding: Things tend to ?be fresher and crisper because of our practices in the field. On weekends, the markets salad/­­deli bar serves up salads prepped by Mio and Megumi, Japanese chefs whose repertoire includes pickled vegetables and an arame salad Mio learned from her mom. Order restaurant fare at a central counter--grilled-vegetable-and-goat cheese tacos with aji cilantro and red pepper sauces are popular--and grab a table inside a cozy area set off from the market or outside on the patio. The weekend menu features seasonal specials and pizzas, and live music plays on ?the patio on Sundays. The spots friendly and relaxed vibe, combined with the owners commitment to healthful, sustainable food, has earned it plenty of regulars among the locals. The benefit of walking your talk is invaluable, Sprinkel says. Hungry for more? Visit The Farmer and the Cook at 339 W. El Roblar, Ojai, Calif.

Meatless Monday is in the House!

February 9 2015 Meatless Monday 

Tony Cárdenas, Congressional Representative from Californias 29th District Meatless Monday has made it to the House of Representatives, thanks to Tony Cárdenas , Congressional Representative from Californias 29th District,  Congressman Cárdenas recently sent a Dear Colleague letter to his fellow Representatives in the 114th Congress that was all about Meatless Monday; its history, its benefits, and the reasons why last year he and his staff made the decision to join the global Meatless Mondays movement. The production of meat employs a tremendously wasteful amount of resources, wrote the Congressman.  Raising livestock for food causes the destruction of open space in favor of factory farms, the release of millions of tons of greenhouse gases, and the consumption of valuable drinking water. He also cited research by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization showing that livestock contributes to 15 percent of all human-related greenhouse gas emissions. By choosing to go meat-free even one day a week, we can help conservation efforts and take one more action to help mitigate the threat of global climate change. In addition to the environmental impact, he also addressed the health benefits of giving up meat one day a week, referring to a recent draft of the Department of Agricultures new dietary guidelines which urge a shift toward more plant-based foods. He also quoted the American Heart Association which says, Going meatless at a meal every now and then can help you lower your cholesterol and may reduce your risk for cardiovascular disease. Cárdenas expanded on this in an interview with the Latin Post.   Latinos face higher risks from heart disease, due to more cases of diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity in our communities.  He went on to say, Red meat also leads to an increased risk of heart disease and so cutting back on red meat is a great idea for Latino Americans concerned about their overall health. Since sending out the letter, Cárdenas says hes received an outpouring of support from local farmers, environmentalists, restaurants, and community members. Folks in the Valley want to know more about how they can eat healthy and how to cut down on meat to make their diet better and help the environment.   He is hoping his colleagues in Congress are equally as enthusiastic. He closed his letter to them with the following: The adoption and awareness of Meatless Mondays continues to grow. Some of the nations largest school districts, workplaces and public figures are signing up to start the week off by taking a day off from eating meat. Going meat-free means enjoying delicious vegetarian options at restaurants and trying out new recipes at home. I hope you will join me and my staff in observing Meatless Mondays and I hope that you will encourage our other colleagues to participate. The post Meatless Monday is in the House! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Contest 2014 May

May 6 2014 Manjula's kitchen 

Mother’s Day is coming up this weekend! For this month’s contest, I would love to hear what makes your mother so special to you. What is your mother’s favorite vegetable recipe? Share some valuable cooking lessons she has taught you over the years. Feel free to share anything else about your mother. Please post your answers on the discussion forum topic: Mother’s Day 2014 that I have created. The winners will be selected randomly from all the forum post entries. Below is my checklist: - You will not have to email me anything this time. You can simply leave a posting on the Mother’s day forum topic. - If you are creating a new account for the forum, please enter your email address in the profile so that I can contact you after the contest is over. Don’t worry, your email address will not be public (only I will be able to see it). - The deadline is May 31th. - The winner will be featured on the homepage and a link to their website (if available). 1st Prize: $100 gift certificate from Amazon.com 2nd Prize: $25 gift certificate from Amazon.com **Anyone can join this contest**

Contest 2013 May

May 13 2013 Manjula's kitchen 

I hope everyone has had a wonderful Mother’s Day. For this month’s contest, all you have to do is share something special about your mother. You can share what makes your mother so special to you. And/­­or something valuable that she has taught you over the years. Feel free to share anything else about your mother. All you have to do is post your Mother’s Day story to the discussion forum on the Mother’s Day topic that I have created. The winners will be selected randomly from all the forum post entries. Below is my checklist: - You will not have email me anything this time. You can simply leave a posting on the Mother’s day forum topic. - If you are creating a new account for the forum, please enter your email address so that I can contact you after the contest is over. Don’t worry, your email address will not be public (only I will be able to see it). - The deadline is May 31th. - The winner will be featured on the homepage and a link to their website (if available). 1st Prize: $100 gift certificate from Amazon.com 2nd Prize: $25 gift certificate from Amazon.com **Anyone can join this contest**


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