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Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford

December 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford Trinity Mouzon Wofford is the founder of GOLDE Turmeric, a line of high-quality turmeric blends for golden milk, lattes, and more. We are in love with everything GOLDE, and were so excited to get a peek at its radiant founder’s wellness routine. In this interview, Trinity tells us about her rule-free approach to self-care, her path to self-acceptance, and the importance of giving the body exactly what it’s craving, as well as a Geisha-approved moisturizer that works wonders for her skin, her number one cold remedy that’s likely in your kitchen right now, exercise, beauty, stress, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think having some form of a routine is crucial to your mental health when you run a business from home. It’s been sort of tricky as of late because we’re in transition from our home in Upstate New York to moving back down to Brooklyn. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. On an ideal day, I’m up around 6:30am and checking my phone for email and GOLDE‘s social media. Following that, I’ll do a bit of stretching to loosen up, and then hop in the shower. After I’ve gotten ready, I’ll sit down to work and make a to-do list for the day -- this is crucial for me. I forget things and get really anxious about what I’m forgetting if I don’t bother to organize my thoughts and tasks in advance. I’ll usually dig into whatever those tasks are for an hour or so before pausing for breakfast. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My partner, Issey, and I always make sure to have a cut-off time for work, barring emergencies. Once that point rolls around (it varies day-by-day), I’m usually catching up on the news or my favorite blogs while Issey preps dinner. We’ll eat together and then usually end off binging some TV show. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Issey’s miso soup with tons of mushrooms and seaweed. He makes it completely from scratch using his mom’s recipe. Lunch – Lunch is usually whatever is leftover from dinner that week  -- lately its a lot of hearty stews. Snack – We’ll do a little crudite plate with raw veg from the farmer’s market: carrots, turnips, radishes, persian cucumbers. Always with some cheese and seed crackers. Sometimes also with wine. Dinner – Tibetan food from our favorite spot in Jackson Heights, Queens. It’s a lot of dumplings (momos), noodles, and warming soups. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I can’t, really. I love the taste of coffee, but it turns me into a shaking, anxious mess. I always start the day with a turmeric tonic made with one of our blends -- usually cacao or original because the matcha also makes me a bit hyper. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Yes, yes, yes. I try not to “keep it in check” so much as listen to it with a variety of foods. Sometimes it’s fruit or homemade popcorn with coconut sugar. Sometimes it’s half a box of Dots eaten while laying on the couch. Refined sugar is trash for your system, but so is getting too regimented with your foods. I keep it light (emotionally) and eat what I’m craving. When junk food isn’t off limits, you’re not going to crave it every day. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Well, turmeric, of course. It makes such a difference in my skin and immunity. Issey loves it for instant allergy relief. There are apparently over 10,000 medical studies on its effects on the body --it’s really incredible. We’re also huge proponents of ashwaghanda in our household. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Upstate New York is not exactly the land of boutique fitness, so it can be more challenging to get in a sweat on the regular. I focus mostly on stretching and going on walks/­­hikes on the weekend. I think I’ve probably gained a bit of weight since I’ve been up here because I’m not moving as much as I did in NYC, but I don’t really mind. It’s okay for your body to fluctuate with your circumstances, as long as you’re treating it with respect. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? It varies. I really like working out as a method to clear my head, so often I do look forward to it. But that said, I don’t really try to push myself too much. If you want to be a world-class athlete, then by all means, train 2+ hours a day. I’m just looking to keep my body and psyche in good health, so if I don’t feel like making it to my workout, I don’t feel the need to punish myself later. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I grew up black in a very white town, so I’ve had a lot of really emotional moments coming to terms with what beauty means for me. At the moment, I like to keep things really natural with my curls out and minimal makeup. It took a while to accept my looks for exactly what they are, so now I’m really openly embracing it. I feel more beautiful now than I did 5 years ago, mostly due to opening myself up to the concept that I’m perfectly fine just as I am. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I try to keep my routine relatively simple. I’ll wash my face with raw African black soap or something gentle like Cerave. I love Drunk Elephant products, and I apply their C-Firma and B-Hydra serums every day. They help a lot with keeping my skin clear and getting rid of dark marks. After that I’ll moisturize with raw shea butter, or a cream that has that. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Turmeric, again. Because it’s anti-inflammatory, I’ve found it to be really helpful in clearing up redness or breakouts. Besides that, I try not to get too bogged down with a ton of supplements. I focus mostly on eating a variety of plants every day. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Shea butter is amazing for my skin. My partner’s Japanese mother recently put me on to this cream called Secret de Maiko. It contains shea butter and a few other natural, organic ingredients. Apparently this is what young Geisha girls would use as a moisturizer/­­makeup base. This cream is better than pure shea butter because it won’t leave you greasy at all. I use it twice daily. It’s great for keeping your skin clear and calm. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Well, cannabis helps. I use a vaporizer pen so there’s no smoke-related health detriments/­­lingering smell. I really want to try the Hmbldt pen because I’m a sucker for sharp design. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? There’s going to stress sometimes. I try to deal in healthy ways like going for a walk to clear my head, or talking to a close friend about whatever I’m dealing with. But life isn’t perfect, so sometimes you just end up being a bit tense for a few days. I think that’s normal and natural -- I try not to fight it too much. You have to let yourself feel it so that you can process it and move past it. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Garlic!! At my old job, everyone in the office knew about this because I would practically through bulbs of raw garlic at anyone who complained of illness. Nothing works better for immediately beating a bad cold. If I feel something coming on, I take 2-3 whole cloves (swallowed like horse pills) with a ton of water. That can save you in just a couple hours -- it’s crazy. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I really like to work, so what I consider to be a healthy work/­­life balance might not be the right approach for someone else. I genuinely enjoy spending my free time dreaming up new campaigns, product ideas, or designs for GOLDE. I guess that’s the benefit to doing your own thing -- it doesn’t always feel like work. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I’ve gotten a lot better with this with age. I try not to have any food or exercise rules. Being militant about your body is not self-care, and it can really easily spiral into disordered behavior that veers on the edge of “orthorexia.” I mostly just listen to my body and allow itself what it wants, whether that has to do with food, movement/­­exercise, socializing vs. indulging my natural introvert, etc. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? I really think doing away with rules (re: food, etc.) has been the most important change I’ve made. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with avoiding gluten or dairy because it upsets your stomach or causes breakouts, but don’t complicate your life with structure that does not serve you. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Usually moments like these mean I need to re-focus myself. I’ll start by making to-do lists, and go from there. Knowledge -- What was your path to starting GOLDE? I was pre-med at NYU, with plans to practice holistic medicine. By my senior year of college, I wasn’t so sure about spending more time and money on schooling, and sort of fell into a marketing role at a tech startup. I really loved the creative aspects of marketing, and found that GOLDE was a way of combining my interests in sharp branding with making holistic health more accessible. The interest in turmeric actually came from my mom, who has Rheumatoid Arthritis. She noticed a huge difference in her overall levels of inflammation when she started incorporating it into her daily routine -- that’s when I started paying attention. -- How do you approach the sourcing of your ingredients for GOLDE? We actually just started sourcing all of our turmeric with a company called Diaspora Co. They focus 100% on supporting ethical and high-quality spice trade that empowers rather than disenfranchises the people of color who have been growing and ingesting medicinal plants like turmeric for generations. The turmeric that we’re going to be using is an heirloom variety with almost twice the typical amount of curcumin. It’s grown on a fourth-generation, family-owned farm in India, and farmers are paid 6X the standard commodity prices to ensure truly fair wages. We’re really excited to be featuring a product that’s not only incredibly high-quality, but also works to re-build lingering inequality left in the wake of colonialism. -- What’s your favorite way to use your wellness blend? I love to have it just with hot water and raw honey in the morning. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Heading to the Union Square Greenmarket is one of my favorite activities. When I’m in the city, I like to go every Monday morning when it’s not too crowded. It’s mostly just you and the chefs (or their assistants?) shopping for what they’ll be preparing that day. I also love infra red sauna. I go to Higher Dose in the East Village. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Americanah – Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie Song/­­Album – Songs in the Key of Life – Stevie Wonder -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I am nowhere near as regimented as our dear Joan. Usually my suitcase is packed haphazardly with whatever clothing is clean and well-suited for the weather. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? More people of color, please! A few of my favorites: Diane Chang Yaminah Mayo Dr. Tiffany Lester Latonya Yvette Nikisha Brunson Alex Elle Lauren Ash Sana Javeri Kadri Photos by Sana Javeri Kadri, Issey Kobori and Nico Behnzukeh. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway

June 28 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway This post was created in partnership with Raw Rutes. We’ve got a zinger of a hot weather dish for you today. Have you ever tried cucumber noodles in favor of the more common spiralized zucchini? I’m obsessed. They are the perfect, cooling and hydrating food, especially when dressed with plenty of lime juice, herbs and a kiss of spice. They’re great with tropical fruit, creamy avocado, and a sprinkling of toasted seeds, as well as tofu for more substance and a savory element. The glazed tofu recipe I give here is an absolute favorite of mine and generally very special, easy, and able to transform any tofu hater into a true believer. It’s garlicky and spicy, and with a touch of sweetness. You can see the video of the whole process above. I love cooking with tofu because it’s a flavor sponge and therefore extremely versatile. One of the most important steps in achieving outstanding tofu involves draining it of the liquid that it comes in. Generally, the less liquid tofu holds, the better it is at absorbing all the surrounding flavors. That’s where the beautiful, stainless steel Tofu Press from Raw Rutes comes in. Raw Rutes is a charming, online shop full of back-to-basics kitchen tools, from dreamy fermenting crocks to home brewing supplies, dehydrators and even freeze dryers (!). They sent me their Ninja Tofu Press to try out, and though I’m often skeptical of single-purpose kitchen tools, this one stole my heart. Previously, I would make a contraption of two plates, kitchen towels and a large jar of water for draining tofu, and I’m pretty relieved that I no longer have to make that much mess for such a simple step. This tofu press looks great and comes with a 4.5 lb weight, which gets all the liquid out of the tofu quickly and efficiently, with no required effort on your part. It can also be used for making your own homemade tofu (still on my list of things to try), as well as getting moisture out of pretty much any foods that fit. I’ll definitely be using it for my homemade nut cheeses. Some other items on my Raw Rutes wish list include this terra-cotta sprouter, this fermenting crock, and this crazy cherry pitter (why not?). Discount Code and Giveaway! For 11% off any items on Raw Rutes, enter code GOLUBKA at checkout through July 31st, 2017. To enter to win one Ninja Tofu Press, leave a comment here with your favorite item from the Raw Rutes offering or favorite way to prepare tofu until July 5th, 2017 (USA only). Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the glazed tofu 1 14 oz (398 g) package firm tofu (I used sprouted tofu) 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice - divided ½ tablespoon tamari 1 teaspoon sriracha 1 tablespoon miso paste ½ tablespoon honey or maple syrup 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil 4 garlic cloves - minced for the bok choy (optional) 1-2 baby bok choy - sliced into wedges splash of tamari juice of half a lime for the cucumber noodles 2 English cucumbers - spiralized or julienned ½ -1 lime sea salt pinch of red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil large handful each basil and cilantro leaves for serving 1 ripe, firm avocado - thinly sliced 1-2 small ripe, sweet mangoes - thinly sliced toasted sesame seeds basil/­­cilantro/­­mint leaves - for garnish Instructions to prepare the glazed tofu Press the tofu for 15-30 minutes to drain it of as much liquid as possible. Slice it into cubes. Combine 1½ tablespoons lime juice together with the tamari and sriracha in a small bowl. Set aside. In another small bowl, combine the miso paste, honey/­­maple syrup and the remaining ½ tablespoon lime juice, and set aside as well. Warm the coconut oil in a medium sauté pan over medium heat. Add the tofu and sauté, flipping periodically until golden on all/­­most sides. Add more oil if needed throughout the process. Drizzle 1 teaspoon of the sesame oil over the tofu and add the minced garlic, sauté for 30 seconds until fragrant. Add the tamari mixture, bring it to a boil and cook until reduced and syrupy, for 1-2 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the miso mixture into the pan and toss until well-combined. Remove the tofu from the pan and set it aside. to cook the bok choy Return the pan to the heat and add the bok choy. Cook for about 2 minutes on each side, or until the white parts are lightly golden. Add a splash of tamari and a squeeze of lime juice, and stir until most of the liquid is evaporated. Remove from heat. to prepare the cucumber noodles Place the spiralized cucumber into a medium/­­large serving bowl. Squeeze the lime juice over the noodles, sprinkle with salt and red pepper flakes, and drizzle with sesame oil. Add the herbs and toss gently to coat. to serve Distribute the noodles between serving bowls. Arrange the avocado slices on top of the noodles, followed by the mango, bok choy and spicy tofu, toasted sesame seeds and herbs. Enjoy right away. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream Turnip Blueberry Muffins Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Grapefruit Smoothie .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Spring Ragu

May 1 2017 Meatless Monday 

A ragu is basically a well-seasoned stew. This one takes its flavor from the tarragon, which brings out the best in the array of seasonal vegetables. This recipe was created by Stephanie Alexander and can be found in The Meat Free Monday Cookbook. Serves 3-4 - 8 garlic cloves, whole and unpeeled - 2 pounds fresh fava beans in pods, shelled - ice cubes - 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, chopped - 4 trimmed and cooked artichoke hearts, - halved or quartered, depending on size - 12 baby turnips, peeled - 1 cup vegetable stock - 1 pound peas in pods, shelled - 2 teaspoons coarsely chopped - French tarragon - 1 tablespoon finely chopped flat-leaf parsley - freshly ground black pepper Put the garlic in a saucepan and cover with water. Bring slowly to a boil over low-medium heat, then drain. Repeat this process and then slip the skins off each clove and set aside in a bowl. Refill the saucepan with water and return to a boil over high heat, and drop the fava beans into the boiling water for 1 minute only. Immediately drain in a colander and tip into a bowl of ice-cold water. Then peel the beans. Reserve until needed. Melt half of the butter in a sauté pan over a medium heat. Once it starts to froth, add the artichoke pieces, turnips, and peeled garlic, and sauté until the artichoke pieces become golden flecked with brown. Add the vegetable stock and peas, then cook, covered, for 5 minutes. Uncover, scatter with the beans and herbs, and shake gently to mix; there should be very little liquid remaining in the pan. If it still looks sloppy, increase the heat to high and continue to shake the pan. Add the remaining butter to form a small amount of sauce. Taste for seasoning; there probably wont be any need to add salt. Grind over some black pepper and serve at once. The post Spring Ragu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash

April 13 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash Food magazines and online food publications are all about bright and green spring recipes right now, but I know that a lot of us are still waiting for that first asparagus to pop up, and for rhubarb to show its blush at the stores and markets. I’m checking in with one more transitional meal today, still cozy and hearty, but very vegetable-forward. There’s a step-by-step video, too :) Have you ever tried braising or roasting whole leeks? It’s a revelatory way of preparing the vegetable, since leeks usually play a secondary role, where they get thinly sliced and pretty much disappear into whatever dish they are in. Cooking leeks whole yields surprisingly delicious results, and brings forward their sweet, mildly oniony flavor. The texture becomes incredibly buttery, and the modest vegetable becomes completely transformed. One thing that makes me nervous about cooking with leeks is throwing away the majestic, green tops, since most recipes only call for the more tender, white parts of the leek. I always save the tops to include in homemade vegetable broth, and I suggest making a quick broth out of the tops and cauliflower stems here (although you can of course use store-bought broth as well). The cauliflower and white bean mash is the perfect, hearty pairing to the braised leeks. It’s smooth and peppery, with a studding of fresh herbs throughout. Both components of the dish keep well and make for great leftovers. I can imagine the mash working well served with roasted carrots or grilled asparagus for another quick meal. Enjoy! Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients for the braised leeks 5-6 large leeks with long white parts 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or ghee sea salt freshly ground black pepper veggie broth - reserved from boiling green parts of the leeks or store bought for the cauliflower white bean mash 1 cup dried white beans - soaked overnight 3-4 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife 2 bay leaves (optional) one 2-inch piece kombu (optional) sea salt 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil or ghee pinch red pepper flakes 1 large yellow onion - chopped 3 garlic cloves - sliced 1 small head of cauliflower - cut into florets leek broth from above or any veggie broth freshly ground black pepper handful each parsley and dill - chopped (optional) olive oil - for serving microgreens - for serving (optional) Instructions to braise the leeks Cut the dark green parts off the leeks. Wash the green parts thoroughly and place into a large soup pot together with leftover cauliflower core and stems, cover with water. Bring to a boil over the high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer, add salt and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. You can also add any vegetable scraps you have on hand to this broth. Reserve the rest of the broth for the future use - refrigerate for up to 4 days or freeze for up to 2 months. This step could be done the day before. You can of course skip this step entirely and just use store-bought or pre-cooked vegetable broth. Slice the white parts of the leeks in half vertically and place into the sink or a large bowl and cover with water. Let soak a bit and carefully wash all the dirt from between the layers. Warm the oil or ghee in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the washed and dried leeks to the pan face down in a single layer. Leave to cook undisturbed until golden on one side. Flip, add salt and pepper and let the other side caramelize. Add leek broth/­­any veggie broth to cover the leeks partially. Establish a strong simmer, cover the pan and cook for 15-20 minutes, or until the leeks are tender throughout. Add more broth if too much evaporates. Reserve the rest of the broth for the future use - refrigerate for up to 4 days or freeze for up to 2 months. Serve the leeks on top of the cauliflower white bean mash, below. to make the cauliflower white bean mash While the leek broth and leeks are cooking, drain and rinse the beans and add to a large pot. Cover the beans with plenty of water, add garlic, bay leaves and kombu, if using, and bring to a boil, covered. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, partially covered. Start checking the beans for doneness after 30 minutes and continue to cook until tender, if necessary. Add salt at the last 10 minutes. Drain the beans and set aside. This step can be done the day before. The cooking liquid from the beans can be reserved and used as vegetable broth in other dishes, as well as frozen for up to 2 months. Warm the oil or ghee in a large saucepan over medium heat, add red pepper flakes, onion and a pinch of salt and cook for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add garlic and cook for another 2 minutes, until fragrant. Add cauliflower, a large pinch of salt, black pepper and the leek broth/­­any veggie broth to cover the bottom of the pan. Bring to a simmer, cover and cook for 7-10 minutes, or until cauliflower is tender. Add more liquid if too much evaporates to ensure that the cauliflower is being steamed. Add in cooked beans at the end, toss to warm them through. Add the cauliflower and beans to a food processor, along with a splash of the leek broth/­­any veggie broth. Process until smooth. Test for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Add parsley and dill and pulse to incorporate. You may need to do this in batches, depending on the size of your food processor. Serve drizzled with olive oil and topped with the braised leeks from above. Notes 1. If you dont have time to cook dried beans, you can use 3 cups already cooked/­­canned white beans in this recipe. 2. Although kombu is optional, its a great thing to throw into the pot when cooking beans, as it helps make beans more digestible, as well as contributes its minerals. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes

November 28 2016 My New Roots 

Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes When I was in elementary school I ate in the cafeteria. It was the cool thing to do after all, since homemade brown bag lunches were sooo kindergarten. At the time, I thought that the highly processed offerings behind the sneeze guard were a dream come true: pizza, burgers, chicken fingers, fish sticks, mac n cheese. But the very best thing of all in my first-grader opinion? Sloppy Joes. For those of you who dont know what Im talking about (ahem, mostly everyone outside North America), a Sloppy Joe is like a stew-y, wet hamburger. Ive also heard it been called a loose meat sandwich. Stay with me, people – I realize how riduclously unappetizing this sounds. As a kid, eating a Sloppy Joe was like getting permission to make a mess - a rare, sanctioned moment to smear sauce all over your face, drip on your plate, and have your whole meal basically deteriorate into a pile of savoury, saucy, deliciousness that you were allowed to eat with your hands?! Isn’t this every kid’s dream? Because eating a Sloppy Joe is just that: its sloppy. And that is why its awesome. Sloppy Joes are definitely not on top of the sophisticated food list, but that does not mean that they should be discriminated against. When made with plant-based, whole food ingredients, they are in fact quite the respectable meal. Perfect for chilly autumn and winter nights when all you want to do is tuck into something super cozy and comforting, Sloppy Joes are a one-way ticket to the land of savoury satisfaction. Since the temperatures have dropped here in Copenhagen, Ive been craving this kind of meal like crazy, so Im more than happy to have a healthy solution at hand, and of course to share it with you. The classic Sloppy Joe recipe includes ground beef cooked with onions and garlic, crushed tomatoes, ketchup, sugar and some spices. Sometimes there are some token carrots and celery tossed in, sometimes vinegar, mustard, or chilies, but the basic idea is a moist mixture that you pile on top of a bun. But! In my vegan Plant-Powered version, Ive replace the ground beef with black lentils and mushrooms. I suggest using this type of lentil for this recipe since they are very small, and they maintain their shape and texture while cooking. And if you care about appearances, or perhaps fooling someone, they look the most like ground beef. Just sayin. The flavouring elements of the Plant-Powered Sloppy Joe mix are diverse and potentially strange-sounding, but trust me, altogether just right. Balsamic for a sweet hit of acidity, Sriracha for a little heat, and cumin and paprika add smoky complexity. I also tossed in some walnuts because I am a firm believer in texture, and all that mushiness needed buffering! I toasted them lightly before giving them a rough chop and a stir through the thick lentil mixture. I love how their nuttiness comes through the rich sauce and adds even more deliciousness. I also made a simple slaw from red cabbage to add more crunch and freshness, plus some token sprouts. These items are optional, but I really love the bright contrast they provide against the rich lentil filling. Fill up on Folate Lentils are one of the yummiest sources of folate. Just one cup of cooked lentils provides you with almost 90% of your daily recommended intake! And why is folate so important? Youve probably heard about this vital B-vitamin in regards to pregnancy, as it is critical in the prevention of birth defects, but folate also functions to support red blood cell production and help prevent anemia, allows nerves to function properly, helps prevent osteoporosis-related bone fractures, and helps prevent dementias including Alzheimers disease. Folate received its name from the Latin word folium, meaning foliage, so its not wonder that other excellent sources of folate are dark leafy greens (yum, your favorite!) - kale, romaine lettuce, spinach, asparagus, turnip greens, beet greens, mustard greens, parsley, and collards to name a few. This may explain why North American diets seem to be on the deficient end of things when it comes to this B-vitamin, as folate is available from fresh, unprocessed food. The good news is it is easily absorbed, used, and stored by the body. Folate is also manufactured by intestinal bacteria (remember those probiotics?), so if colon flora is healthy, we have another good source of this important vitamin. Find the most high-vibe buns or bread you can get your hands on for this recipe. I used wholegrain sourdough buns from my local organic bakery, then toasted them lightly before drowning them in vegan sloppy goodness. You can also eat these open-faced if youd like to cut back on the bread. Or pull an alt-bread move and wrap it in socca, a cabbage leaf, or use it to top a crispbread (although, lets be honest: the bun rules). I should also mention that the sloppy joe filling was totally delicious on its own as a stew, and thinned with a little water to make soup! Bonus.     Print recipe     Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes Makes 6-8 sandwiches Ingredients: 6-8 wholegrain sourdough buns 1 batch Simple Cabbage Slaw (recipe follows) 1/­­2 small red onion, thinly sliced sprouts for topping, if desired 1 cup /­­ 230g black lentils 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 1 medium onion, diced 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 3 cloves garlic, minced 135g brown button mushrooms, chopped 1 red bell pepper, diced 2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (hot or sweet, your choice) 1/­­2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 2 Tbsp. Sriracha 1 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 14oz. /­­ 400ml can crushed organic tomatoes 1/­­2 cup /­­ 60g walnuts, roughly chopped Simple Cabbage Slaw 2 cups shredded red cabbage 2 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup a couple pinches sea salt Directions: 1. Soak lentils overnight if possible. Drain, rinse, and place in a medium saucepan. Cover with about 3 cups /­­ 750ml water, bring to a boil and reduce to simmer until tender, about 15-20 minutes (cook time will depend on whether or not youve soaked them). 2. While the lentils are cooking, melt the coconut oil in a large skillet. Add the onions and salt, stir to coat, and cook for about 15 minutes until starting to caramelize. Add the garlic, mushrooms and red pepper and cook for about 5 minutes or so until fragrant. Next add the cumin, paprika, black pepper and stir to coat. Stir in the Sriracha, balsamic, and can of tomatoes. 3. Drain and rinse the lentils, add them to the pan with the veggies and spices. Give it all a stir and let simmer for a few minutes for the flavours to meld. 4. In a separate skillet over medium heat, lightly toast the walnuts until golden in places and fragrant. Give them a rough chop and add them to the lentil mixture. 5. Have a taste and adjust the seasoning to suit you. Add more salt if necessary, more balsamic for sweet-tartness, or Sriracha for heat. 6. Toast your buns and ladle and a generous amount of the sloppy joe filling over the top of one half. Top with the red cabbage slaw, red onion and some sprouts, if desired. Top with the other half of the bun, and tuck in! Show me your Sloppy Joes on Instagram: #MNRsloppyjoes The post Plant-Powered Sloppy Joes appeared first on My New Roots.

Bring Home the Winning Recipes from the Matthew Kenney Culinary Meatless Monday Challenge

November 7 2016 Meatless Monday 

Bring Home the Winning Recipes from the Matthew Kenney Culinary Meatless Monday ChallengeRecently, Meatless Monday President Peggy Neu was a guest presenter at a Matthew Kenney Culinary Food Future educational course held in Manhattan. The class concluded with 18 student chefs participating in a Meatless Monday Quick-Fire Challenge, where they had to reinterpret traditional dishes by turning them into plant-based raw recipes. All of the entries submitted were raw-tastic. We invite you to try your hand at the winning recipes here: 1st Place Winner Turnip Ravioli By Alexandra Jones from Australia Instagram: @_­akj  This innovative ravioli uses round turnip shapes to envelop a burnt butter, sage, and nut filling.   2nd Place Winner Raw Enchiladas By Heidi Briggs from Australia Instagram: @heidi.flora This enchilada recipe offers an abundance of vegetables: from the marinated vegetable filling to the Chinese cabbage wrap! The vegetables in this dish provide fiber and vitamin C, among other nutrients.   3rd Place Winner Raw Tomato Soup and Green Garden Salad with Avocado Dressing By Fiona Galloway from Australia Instagram: @fifigalloway Soup paired with salad is a lunch staple. This raw tomato soup and green garden salad recipe offers refreshing citrus and cilantro flavors that are sure to please. Wed love to hear your thoughts on these new raw food recipes as well as some of your own favorites. Let us know on Facebook. The post Bring Home the Winning Recipes from the Matthew Kenney Culinary Meatless Monday Challenge appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Marinated Summer Vegetables and Beans over Freekeh

July 6 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Marinated Summer Vegetables and Beans over Freekeh Today I thought I would share an everyday recipe that I make quite often, great for satisfying a vegetable craving, and nourishing but summery at the same time. One of my favorite treatments for vegetables, besides the go-to roasting/­­steaming/­­sautéing, is marinating, which is especially good for summer, since marinated vegetables are at their best when cold. Marinated beans are another staple in our house. I try to make a pot of beans most weekends, and let them develop in a marinade of lemon juice, oil, garlic and herbs over the week. It’s a great thing to have in the refrigerator for spooning into salads and bowls throughout the workweek – an easy way to make a quick, nourishing meal. Right now, I’m obsessed with Rancho Gordo’s heirloom Scarlet Runner Beans, which are perfectly plump, meaty and creamy all at the same time, but use any favorite beans in this recipe. In this dish, a rainbow of crisp, blanched and sautéed summer vegetables and velvety beans is marinated in a simple, garlicky and mildly spicy dressing. Use whichever vegetables you have on hand here – omitting a few is fine – but I recommend keeping the cauliflower as a constant, whether purple or regular in color, as it tastes amazing here. Have you tried freekeh yet? It’s fairly new to me, and very much worth seeking out if you’re looking for variety in your grain selection for salads and bowls. Freekeh is made of an ancient wheat variety, which is harvested when young and roasted over an open fire, which burns off all of the grain’s outer shell, while the inner young grain stays intact. This intricate process yields a pleasant, slightly smoky flavor. These veggies and beans taste delicious over freekeh, but any grain of choice can of course be used in place of it. Lastly, this year’s Saveur blog awards are upon us, and being nominated has proven to be an important milestone for any food blog, a kind door opener if you will. If you enjoy our recipes and photos, we would be absolutely thrilled if you could take a minute out of your day and nominate us for the food obsessive award category, which is basically a special diet category, (or any other category that you see fit). It would truly mean the world. Thank you for your support, and as always, we wouldn’t be here without your readership. Marinated Summer Vegetables and Beans over Freekeh   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the marinade 1 tablespoon cumin seeds 4 garlic cloves - minced juice of 1 lemon - freshly squeezed 1 teaspoon sweet Hungarian paprika ½ teaspoon sriracha/­­chili sauce of choice or more to taste 3 tablespoons olive oil sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste for the vegetables and beans 1 small cauliflower head - cut into florets 1 yellow summer squash or zucchini - sliced into bite-sized pieces 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 small broccoli head - cut into florets handful green beans - strings removed if present sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste 2-3 large kale leaves - stems removed and sliced (optional) 1 large carrot - shaved into ribbons with a vegetable peeler 1 cup cooked beans large handful fresh dill - minced large handful parsley - minced 1 cup freekeh or other grain of choice - cooked (optional) Instructions to make the marinade Toast cumin seeds in a small pan until fragrant, for about 1 minute, then grind in a mortar and pestle. Combine all the ingredients in a small bowl and whisk until blended well. Set aside. to cook the vegetables Bring well salted water to a boil in a medium soup pot. Prepare an ice or cold water bath for blanched vegetables. Add cauliflower to the boiling water and blanch for 2 minutes. Add zucchini and blanch together with the cauliflower for another minute. Drain and transfer into the cold water bath. Warm coconut oil in a large saute pan over medium high heat. Add broccoli and green beans, sprinkle with salt and freshly ground black pepper, and saute for 3-4 minutes, until bright green and crisp-tender. Add kale and stir around until wilted. Add cauliflower, zucchini and carrots, toss to combine. Remove from heat, add beans and herbs. Pour marinade over and toss to coat. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Serve immediately over freekeh/­­other grain of choice or transfer to a glass container and let sit at room temperature for 30 minutes. Refrigerate until ready to eat. The flavors will develop further with time. Notes You can cook the vegetables any preferred way - steam, boil or sauté. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Summer Squash Herb Salad Ethiopian Injera with Mustard Lentils and Braised Cabbage Colourful Veggie Falafel with Pickled Turnips Squash Noodle Soup with Healing Turmeric-Ginger Broth, Roasted Carrots... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Marinated Summer Vegetables and Beans over Freekeh appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegetable Couscous Stew

January 5 2016 Vegetarian Times 

1 To make Ras El Hanout: Combine all ingredients in small bowl. 2 To make Stew: Pour Ras El Hanout into large Dutch oven, and add onions, tomato purée, oil, garlic, and 6 cups water. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. Cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 30 minutes. 3 Add zucchini, carrots, turnips, and bell pepper; cover, and bring to a boil. Simmer 30 minutes, or until vegetables are tender. Stir in chickpeas just before serving. Slow-Cooker Option: Place Ras El Hanout and Stew ingredients (except chickpeas) in slow cooker, and set on medium or high heat. Cook 8 hours.Stir in chickpeas just before serving. 4 To make Couscous and Garnishes: Place couscous in large heat-proof bowl; place raisins in medium heat-proof bowl. Pour 4 cups boiling water over couscous, cover, and let plump 5 minutes. Pour 2 cups boiling water over raisins, and let plump 5 minutes. Fluff couscous, and drain raisins. 5 Serve Stew with couscous, raisins, and harissa.

Shepherds Pie

October 16 2015 Vegetarian Times 

1 | Preheat oven to 350°F. Bake sweet potatoes directly on oven rack 60 minutes, or until tender. 2 | Meanwhile, heat oil in Dutch oven or large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, and sauté 4 minutes. Add turnips, celery root, carrots, and squash, and cook 10 minutes, or until vegetables are tender. Stir in flour, and cook 1 minute more. Stir in 1 cup water, and cook 2 to 3 minutes, stirring constantly, or until liquid thickens. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 5 minutes more. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. Transfer to 13- x 9-inch baking dish. 3 | Scoop flesh from sweet potatoes, and, while still hot, purée in food processor with butter until smooth. Add cayenne pepper, and season with salt, if desired. Spread sweet potato purée over vegetables in baking dish. 4 | Bake 15 minutes, or until bubbling hot.

9 Odd-Ball Vegetables to Try This Summer

July 6 2015 Meatless Monday 

9 Odd-Ball Vegetables to Try This SummerTrying a new food is exciting; especially if its a vegetable youve never seen before. But what is it called? How can you prepare it? And really... what is it? Farmers market odd-balls are a delicious way to make your Meatless Monday extra special or punch up a meal any day of the week. Kohlrabi Image Credit: Shape.com This farmers market favorite is a leafy green with a thick, bulbous stem about the size of a baseball. Try the greens in your favorite kale or collards recipes, and enjoy the stem raw or cooked, just like a turnip (simply peel off the woody skin first). Daikon Radishes Image Credit: Shape.com These white root veggies have a spicier kick than many other radishes, and can be over a foot in length! Like more typical radishes, they can be eaten raw on salads, sautéed in stir-fry blends, or roasted. Garlic Scapes Image Credit: Shape.com These curly, woody greens sprout from the everyday garlic bulbs you know from the grocery store. You can use scapes to replace garlic (one whole scape is roughly one cloves worth of flavor) or you can poach, stir fry, steam, or even grill them. Ramps (Wild Leeks) Image Credit: Shape.com Ramps pack a flavorful punch and taste like a blend of garlic, chives and scallions. The whitish bulbs are perfect for pickling, while the green stalks can be prepared in any way that youd cook scallions or traditional leeks. Hakurei Turnips Image Credit: Shape.com These roots can grow up to the size of a softball, and the bulbs have a mildly sweet flavor. Try them raw on a salad or roast them for a more intense sweetness. Pick up a bunch with healthy greens and you can steam or braise those for a tasty side dish! Purple Potatoes Image Credit: Takepart.com These potatoes cook up like red new potatoes, making them ideal for colorful potato salads or a strikingly violet mash. To make their color even stronger, try adding a little lemon juice as you cook them. Romanesco Broccoli Image Credit: Takepart.com More like cauliflower broccoli, this cone-shaped veggie has a milder, sweeter flavor than standard white cauliflower. Try roasting to enhance its flavor or using it as a cauliflower replacement in your favorite recipes. Purple Carrots Image Credit: Takepart.com These violet cousins of the orange carrot have the same flavor and can be enjoyed in the same ways: raw, steamed, roasted, and more. Their bright purple color tends to bleed when cooked, so be ready for your dishes to have a purplish-pink hue! Manioc Image Credit: Firstwefeast.com This tuber is long (many are over a foot long when harvested) with a brown skin. Also known as cassava or yuca, manioc is ideal for mashes or fritters. A ground meal made from dried manioc can be used as a thickener in sauces and puddings. Hungry for more? Check out these meatless recipes perfect for summer meals and snacking. The post 9 Odd-Ball Vegetables to Try This Summer appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Chinese-Style Shredded Cold Vegetables and Tofu

December 27 2014 VegKitchen 

Chinese-Style Shredded Cold Vegetables and TofuA friend from Shanghai described this to me as a typical dish that comes as close the definition of  salad in both the Eastern and Western interpretations of the word. Its name, literally translated, is the less-than-descriptive cold mix. This veganized version features matchstick-cut vegetables and a  chewy baked tofu. Serve with a simple noodle or rice dish for a delightful meal. Serves: 4 to 6 Dressing - 3 tablespoons natural reduced-sodium soy sauce - 1tablespoons toasted sesame oil - 2 tablespoons natural granulated sugar (coconut sugar is good with this) - 3 tablespoons rice vinegar Salad - 1 small turnip, peeled and cut into 2- to 3-inch matchsticks - 2 medium carrots, peeled and cut into 2- to 3-inch matchsticks - 1/­­2 medium crisp cucumber, peeled and cut into 2- to 3-inch matchsticks - 2 medium celery stalks, cut into 2- to 3-inch matchsticks - 8-ounce. package baked tofu, preferably teriyaki flavor, cut into 2- to 3-inch matchsticks - 2 scallions, green parts only, cut into 2- to 3-inch ribbons - 2 to 3 oz. shiitake mushrooms, stemmed and thinly sliced (see note) - 1/­­4 cup minced fresh cilantro To finish - Dried hot red pepper flakes to taste - Shredded romaine lettuce or tender kale for serving - Toasted cashew pieces or sesame seeds for garnish, optional Combine the dressing ingredients in a small bowl, stir together, and set aside. Combine the turnip, carrots, cucumber, celery, tofu, scallions, mushrooms, and cilantro in a mixing bowl and stir gently. Pour the dressing over them and stir gently again. Allow the mixture to stand for at least 30 minutes, stirring from time to time. Just before serving, taste to see if youd like to add more soy sauce, sugar, and/­­or vinegar. Sprinkle in some some red pepper flakes -- enough to give the mixture gentle heat, but not to over power it. Line a serving platter with shredded lettuce or kale, which help to absorb the plentiful marinade. Top with the optional cashew pieces or sesame seeds, and serve. Originally published in the Sept. 2014 issue of Vegetarian Times. - Here are more Main-Dish Salads.  

Stocks and Broths for Vegan Soups

September 15 2014 VegKitchen 

Stocks and Broths for Vegan SoupsAdapted from Vegan Soups and Hearty Stews for All Seasons.   Contrary to culinary myth, the absence of a strong-flavored meat stock does not present a huge challenge to the creation of tasty plant-based soups and stews. Many ethnic cuisines produce classic soups that in their original form are completely vegetarian or vegan. True, almost any soup can benefit from a good stock to boost flavor, but I place fresh and flavorful ingredients and creative seasoning above stock in contributing to the success of a soup. I would venture to say that most vegan soup recipes will work as well using water (with the help of a bouillon cube or two sometimes) as they will with a homemade or store-bought stock. With all the fresh ingredients and flavorings in vegetable-based soups, this is generally sufficient for achieving a good, rich flavor. Once in a while, especially for brothy soups, I suggest using a 32-ounce carton of low-sodium vegetable broth to boost flavor. There are many good natural and even organic brands of this kind of soup starter. Here are a few more options for creating a good soup base: Basic Vegetable Stock: If youre a purist, by all means, make your stock from scratch. You need to allow an extra hour before making the actual soup to prepare and cook this stock. Of course you can make stock ahead of time and even freeze it in portions. There will be cooks who prefer making their own stock, and if that includes you, see the recipe further down in this post. Water with bouillon cubes or soup base: The easiest and most economical option. Look for a no-salt vegan brand. My favorite is Rapunzel Vegan Vegetable Bouillon. It’s packed with flavor, organic, and has no added sodium. Each cube is actually equivalent to two standard-sized cubes. Vegetable broth powder: A tablespoon of this type of stock enhancer goes a long way in a pot of soup. However, I don’t recommend it in the ingredients listings, as it’s more difficult to find a low-sodium variety of this product than either bouillon cubes or prepared broths. Prepared vegetable broth: As mentioned above, I sometimes call for this product for brothy Asian soups. I like to use a 32-ounce aseptic carton (Pacific and Health Valley are two brands to look for, among others), rather than canned broth. But it’s your choice; canned vegetable broth can also be a good option, if it is all natural, and low in sodium or salt-free. Following are a handful of stocks and broths, the first two of which are suitable as soup bases. The remaining ones, in the Asian tradition, make good broths to be eaten on their own or lightly embellished. All are very low in fat and calories -- less than 50 calories and less than 2 grams of fat per cup. Basic Vegetable Stock This is a basic stock that may be used in place of water in most any vegetable soup to give added depth of flavor. It’s also a good way to use up vegetables that are limp or less than perfectly fresh. Makes: About 6 cups - 7 cups water - 1 large onion, chopped - 2 to 3 cloves garlic, minced - 1 large carrot, sliced - 2 large celery stalks, sliced - 1 medium potato, scrubbed and diced - 1 cup coarsely shredded white cabbage - 2 teaspoons salt-free seasoning blend Place all the ingredients in a large soup pot. Bring to a simmer, then cover and simmer gently over low heat for 40 to 45 minutes, or until the vegetables are quite tender. Strain the stock through a fine mesh strainer. Discard the solids or puree them and add to soup for a thicker consistency. Onion and Garlic Broth This broth may be used as an extra-flavorful soup stock or as an alternative, with a little extra kick, to the Basic Vegetable Stock above. It’s also a soothing remedy for the common cold! Makes about 6 cups - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 large onion, chopped - 4 to 6 cloves garlic, minced - 1/­­4 cup dry red wine - 6 cups water Heat the oil in a 2-quart saucepan or small soup pot. Add the onion and sauté over medium heat until golden. Add the garlic and continue to sauté until the onion or leeks brown lightly. Add the wine and water. Bring to a simmer, then cover and simmer gently over low heat for 30 to 40 minutes. You may leave the onions and garlic in if you wish, or strain the stock through a fine strainer. Discard the solids or puree them and add to soup for a thicker consistency. Simple Miso Broth Miso is a nutritious, high-protein product fermented from soybeans and salt (or a combination of soybeans, grains, and salt). Available at all natural food stores and Asian groceries (as is the sea vegetable kombu), pungent-tasting miso is most commonly used to make simple broths. Heres a basic recipe, which can be considered a soup in itself. All you need to complete it are a few simple ingredients. Note that once the miso is stirred into water, it shouldnt be boiled. Otherwise, its beneficial enzymes will be destroyed. Makes about 6 cups - 1 recipe Basic Vegetable Stock (above) or one 32-ounce container low-sodium vegetable broth plus 2 cups water - 2 strips kombu (sea vegetable), each about 3 by 5 inches - 2 to 4 tablespoons miso, to taste Combine the stock with the kombu in a 2-quart saucepan or small soup pot and bring to a simmer. Dissolve the desired amount of miso in just enough warm water to make it pourable. Stir into the broth and remove from the heat. Let stand for 30 minutes or serve at once, removing and discarding the kombu just before serving. VARIATIONS Embellish miso broth with any of the following: - Diced tofu - Cooked Asian noodles (or or shiratake or kelp noodles, which need no cooking) - Finely chopped scallions - Grated fresh daikon radish or white turnip - Crisp cucumber, seeded and grated   Basic Dashi (Japanese Kombu and Shiitake Broth) Like miso broth, dashi is another traditional Japanese stock that may be embellished in a number of ways, or eaten as is. It also makes a good base for certain Asian vegetable soups. Look for the sea vegetable kombu and dried shiitake mushrooms in Asian groceries or in natural food stores. Makes about 6 cups - One 32-ounce container low-sodium vegetable broth plus 2 cups water, or 6 cups water with 2 vegetable bouillon cubes - 2 strips kombu (sea vegetable), each about 3 by 7 inches - 6 to 8 fresh shiitake mushrooms stemmed and thinly sliced Combine the broth and kombu in a 2-quart saucepan or small soup pot. Bring to a simmer. Add the mushrooms to the broth, remove from the heat, and let stand for 30 minutes. Remove the kombu from the broth and discard before serving. VARIATIONS Dashi with noodles: Simply cook a quantity of Asian noodles (like soba) in the broth. Once they are al dente remove the soup from the heat, season to taste with natural soy sauce, and serve immediately. Garnish each serving with some finely chopped scallion. Or you can add cook-free noodles like shiratake or kelp noodles once the broth is done and you set it aside to stand for 30 minutes. Dashi with miso and vegetables: Use the broth to simmer any quantity of thinly sliced vegetables, such as carrot, cabbage, daikon radish, turnip, etc. Once the vegetables are just done, add 2 to 4 tablespoons miso, to taste, dissolved in just enough warm water to make it pourable. Remove from the heat and serve at once. - See more of VegKitchens  Green Kitchen  tips .

Roasted Winter Veggies and Tofu with Orange Cranberry Sauce

November 27 2013 Vegan Dad 

Roasted Winter Veggies and Tofu with Orange Cranberry Sauce I thought I would squeak in one last recipe before American Thanksgiving just in case you arent sure what you are making this year.  I love this method for roasting veggies because it produces a dish reminiscent of the Sunday roasts of my youth.  The potatoes are my absolute favourite.  All of this can be made in one pan, so it makes for a less busy holiday kitchen.  The real key here is the cast iron skillet, so if you dont have one go borrow one.   INGREDIENTS Roasted Veggies - 1/­­4 cup margarine - 3 leeks, halved lengthwise and sliced in 1/­­2 inch slices - 3 shallots, halved and sliced - 1 large sweet onion, halved and sliced - 4 garlic cloves, chopped - 6 sprigs of fresh thyme - a variety of winter veggies: 1 used 3 turnips, 6 large Yukon Gold potatoes, and 6 large carrots,   chopped into large chunks (you want enough to fill up your pan) - 2 cups vegetable broth - salt and pepper to taste Tofu with Orange Cranberry Jus - 1 pkg firm tofu, cut into twelve pieces - salt and pepper - 2 tbsp margarine - 2 cups vegetable broth (more as needed) - 1/­­8 tsp white pepper - 1/­­2 tsp poultry spice - 1/­­2 cup chopped cranberries - 2 tbsp brown sugar - 2 tbsp orange juice - salt and pepper to taste METHOD Roasted Veggies Preheat oven to 400 degrees 1. Heat a large 14 cast iron skillet over med-hi heat.  Melt margarine, then saute leeks, shallots, and onion for 5-7 mins, until nice browned and golden.  Add garlic and thyme and saute for 1 min. 2. Add veggies and mix well to coat.  Cook veggies for 5 mins, stirring regularly to heat through.  Add broth and cook for another 5 mins, stirring regularly.  Season to taste. 3.  Place pan in the oven, uncovered.  Roast veggies for about 45 mins, stirring about every 10 mins, until veggies are golden and tender and broth has reduced. Tofu with Orange Cranberry Jus 1. While veggies are roasting, salt and pepper both sides of the tofu.  Set aside. 2. When veggies are done roasting, remove thyme stems, transfer veggies to a serving bowl and keep warm in the oven. 3. Without cleaning the pan, return it to the stove over med-hi heat.  Melt margarine and add tofu.  Fry on each side for 3-5 mins, until golden.  Add 1/­­2 cup of the broth, then sprinkle pepper and poultry spice over the tofu.  Mix around and flip tofu, deglazing the pan until the broth has reduced. 4. Add another 1/­­2 cup of broth and mix around and flip tofu until broth has reduced.  Remove tofu from pan to a serving dish. 5. Increase heat to high.  Add remaining 1 cup of broth, cranberries, sugar, and orange juice.  Add broth reduces, mash the cranberries.  Reduce by about a third, season to taste, then spoon over the top of the tofu.

Roasted Rainbow Root Tangles

April 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Rainbow Root Tangles Apart from discussing important topics like if it’s worth climbing a mountain of bureaucracy to change baby Gabriel’s name (long story…), if we would be much happier running a smoothie bar on a small tropical island than living in a cold and dark Stockholm (obviously that is a yes), and how ALL of Elsa’s leggings suddenly have huge tears around the knees (she swears that she is innocent), we have also spent the past week playing around with this super simple recipe based on root shoestrings. It turns out that if you spiralize (check notes below if you don’t have a spiralizer) root vegetables, toss them in a little bit of oil and salt, arrange into tangled nests and roast for 25 minutes, you get something similar to rösti or hash browns. These little root tangles are quick, cheap and easy, they are crispy towards the edges and soft in the middle, contain a lot more nutrients than just potatoes and since they are baked instead of pan-fried, they don’t cause a smoke alarm situation in the kitchen. Not to mention how pretty they look with the different colors combined. Our kids devour them straight from the plate (they call them root fries) and we have been using these root tangles as a base for a bunch of meals lately. In this recipe we’ve topped them with yogurt and a herby chickpea salad, which is perfect as you get something creamy, a few greens and proteins along with the roots. But they also work well paired with avocado mash, hummus or with a poached egg, asparagus and spinach on top, for an Easter twist. Instead of trying to convince you with words, we did a little recipe video for our youtube channel that shows how it’s done. Press play! We always have so much fun making these videos, can’t believe it’s been seven months since we last did one - that needs to change. You can basically use any roots or hard vegetable of preference to make these - beetroot, potato, sweet potato, carrot, parsnip, turnip and even butternut squash. If you choose organic, you don’t have to bother peeling them. It actually tastes better with the peel left on, just like sweet potato fries. You can obviously flavor these root tangles in lots of ways. Try tossing them with cinnamon or sumac, or add vinegar for an acidic twist. If you prefer them crisp all the way through, you can spread them out on the trays instead of arranging them like nests. If you don’t have a spiralizer, you can use a julienne peeler or the coarse side of a box grater instead (you can place the grated roots in muffin tins if you like them to hold together better). Although a spiralizer is pretty fun tool to have at home. It doesn’t cost much and it’s great for making vegetable noodles and slices that can be used in pasta dishes, salads or thai noodle dishes. Roasted Root Tangles with Yogurt and Chickpea Salad Serves 4 1 1/­­2 lb /­­ 750 g mixed roots (we used 1 sweet potato, 3 beetroots, 1 parsnip) 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tsp salt Herby Chickpea Salad 2 cups mixed baby leaf lettuce 4 sprigs cilantro /­­ coriander 4 sprigs fresh mint 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g can chickpeas /­­ garbanzo beans 2 tbsp toasted sesame oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice To serve 1 cup Turkish yogurt or coconut yogurt 1 avocado 2 tbsp mixed sesame seeds sauerkraut (fermented cabbage), store-bought or homemade (we are sharing three varieties in our new book) Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F and grease or place baking paper on two baking trays. Rinse the roots and scrub off any dirt. Trim off the edges, attach to a spiralizer and make noodles/­­ribbons/­­shoestrings (or use a julienne peeler or box grater). Drizzle with olive oil and salt and toss and mix so all root ribbons are combined. If you have very long ribbons, you can cut them with a scissor to make it easier to mix. Arrange the tangled ribbons into nests and place on the baking tray, make sure that there aren’t too many loose ribbons on the sheet or they will burn quicker. Roast for 25-30 minutes or until crispy on the outside but not yet burnt. While the roots are roasting, prepare the salad. Chop the herbs and mix with the lettuce. Rinse the chickpeas thoroughly and add them to the lettuce. Drizzle with toasted sesame oil, lemon juice and sea salt. Toss and mix. Divide the avocado into quarters, remove the stone and use a sharp knife to slice each quarter thinly. Remove the roots from the oven. Arrange 2-3 root tangles on each plate. Add a dollop of yogurt on each root tangle, top with salad, sliced avocado, sesame seeds and a spoonful of sauerkraut. Enjoy! *********** PS! Today Green Kitchen At Home is released in Australia! And in just three weeks it will launch in the UK and next month in the US. Exciting! Here are some links in case you would like to order or pre-order it: Amazon.co.uk (UK). Amazon.com (USA). Booktopia.com (Australia & NZ).

Turnip, Nut and Sage Ravioli

November 7 2016 Meatless Monday 

This innovative ravioli uses round turnip shapes to envelop a burnt butter, sage, and nut filling. This recipe comes to us from culinary student Alexandra Jones and was the first place winner in the Matthew Kenney Culinary Meatless Monday challenge. Serves 4 For the “Burnt Butter” Sauce - 1/­­3 cup olive oil -  1/­­2 tablespoons nutritional yeast - 1 pinch smokey paprika - 1 pinch Himalayan salt In a small blender, blend all ingredients and set aside. For the Turnip Ravioli: - 1 medium sized turnip First, finely slice the turnip into 1/­­16 inch thick discs with the mandolin slicer, or slice very thin with your knife. Then, using the 2 inch Round Ring Mold/­­Cookie Cutter, punch out 2 inch circles to make the ravioli nice and even.  There will be 3 ravioli per dish, so you will need 12 turnip rounds in total.  Brush each turnip round with a drop of the butter, to soften the turnip while you create the filling. Season each round with a little pinch of salt. For the Candied Walnuts: - 1 cup walnuts - 2 teaspoons paprika - 2 tablespoons maple - 2 tablespoons tamari Mix all ingredients together and set off to the side- can be made first, if want more of a candied effect and taste. Set off to the side while making the rest of the filling For the Almond Walnut and Sage Filling: - 1 tablespoons finely diced shallot - 1 tablespoons lemon zest - Juice from 1 lemon - 1 tablespoons liquid from candied walnuts - 2 tablespoons finely chopped sage - 1/­­2 cup almonds - Water, if needed - Salt, to taste Add almonds to a small blender, along with lemon zest, lemon juice and the liquid from the candied walnuts. Add a little water if needed to blend, you want to have quite a smooth consistency. Transfer mixture to a bowl. Chop shallot into a fine brunoise (very small dice), as well as half of the candied walnuts. Add to the mixture, folding it in to add some texture. Fold in finely chopped sage and salt to taste. Assembly:  After completing all of these steps your turnip rounds will be almost translucent, and will look like pasta as the salt makes the turnip tender. Now you are ready to assemble your dish. Place 2 teaspoons of filling onto a turnip round. Followed by another turnip round to close the ravioli. Repeat the process so that you have 3 complete raviolis per dish. Place the three raviolis in the center of the plate, over lapping slightly. Drizzle with a little bit of the burnt butter sauce and top with a few candied walnuts. Place micro greens to garnish your dish. Shave the macadamia over the top to look like Parmesan, which gives it a beautiful look and tastes delicious. Top with freshly cracked pepper and a pinch of Maldon sea salt to finish. The post Turnip, Nut and Sage Ravioli appeared first on Meatless Monday.

From Garden to Grill: The Tasty AND Socially Conscious Way to BBQ

September 5 2016 Meatless Monday 

From Garden to Grill: The Tasty AND Socially Conscious Way to BBQWhen it comes to turning your grill green, you have a smorgasbord of issues to choose from. Youve probably heard that gorging on meat filled with hormones and antibiotics is not good for your health. Or, that you can save a lot of carbon emissions by going meatless at least one day a week. Then there are the land sustainability and the water security issues. Throwing a barbecued fruit-and-veggie party is not only fun and inventive; it could change the course of a lot of peoples lives. But what you may not realize is that greening your grill sacrifices no flavor at all. In fact, the sweet, smoky notes that barbecuing brings out in fruits and vegetables will speak for themselves--once you get the hang of green grilling. Ready to take on the meatless grilling challenge? Share your pictures with Meatless Monday and Slow food USA using the hashtag #GrillChallenge on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!   Tips to Help Get You Started Go firm, go fresh. When it comes to grilling, shop the freshest fruits and vegetables at your local farmers market. The firmer the vegetable, the less it will crumble when grilled. Court the usual suspects. Traditional candidates for the grill are peppers, carrots, beets, turnips, zucchini, corn, green beans, asparagus, tomato (firm ones), onion, eggplant, garlic (whole cloves), potato, squash, peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, and turnips. For fruits, consider peaches, apples, pineapple, and figs. But also try the unusual. Avocado, artichoke, romaine lettuce, portobello mushroom, and watermelon are just some of the new grillees that are becoming trendy. Oil down first. Many vegetables need just a light brushing of olive oil before grilling. For extra kick, add spices and marinate overnight, Arrange the perfect meatless match-up. Kabobs are a BBQ staple, but you can make them entirely with veggies: think tofu cubes mixed with cherry tomatoes, mushrooms, roasted potatoes or just about any other vegetable that strikes your fancy. Support guilt-free burgers. Make your own veggie burgers packed with hearty ingredients like black beans, lentils, quinoa, or chickpeas. You can also find healthy pre-made patties at supermarkets and natural food stores. Make a burger trade. Swap a meat pattie for a portobello mushroom or eggplant slices. Use your same bun and add your favorite toppings, like avocados, caramelized onions, roasted red peppers, or an olive spread. Smoke out your pizzas. Turn up the creativity and make delicious veggie pizzas right on the grill. All you need is pizza dough, sauce, and your favorite vegetables thinly sliced or pre-grilled. For dessert, consider a fruit pizza with grilled peaches drizzled with vanilla icing. Cross party lines. Dressing your grilled veggies in taco form will garner you a lot of new fans. Be prepared to make extras. Keep up the cubes. Tofu can be bland so enlist your favorite marinade recipe to add flavor. Grill the cubes up and add them to a salad, serve them with veggies, or enjoy them as appetizer served with a dip. Give your salads a good grilling. Garnish grilled romaine lettuce with a bit of fruit, feta cheese, and extra virgin olive oil, or simply drizzle with balsamic vinaigrette. Enlist your favorite sides. When planning a meatless BBQ, pasta salads, raw vegetables, and hummus dip are great ways to turn your plant-based dishes into a full meal. Grill-Worthy Recipes to Download and Share   The post From Garden to Grill: The Tasty AND Socially Conscious Way to BBQ appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Spring into Meatless Monday at Your Local Farmer’s Market

May 9 2016 Meatless Monday 

Smell the strawberries and taste the sugar snap peas! Spring is prime time to visit your local farmers market. Not only will you support your local growers by buying from them, youll also have access to the freshest and ripest produce available in your region. As well, youll enjoy the opportunity to develop a relationship with your farmers and ask questions like: How did you grow this? Is it organic? How do you cook it best? When all is said and purchased, theres nothing like cooking a delicious meal with fresh fruits and vegetables grown by people you know. Plus, shopping locally cuts down on the long-distance transportation of conventional agriculture, which often leaves toxic by-products in the environment. How to find a market near you to visit? Check out the Eat Well Guide where theyve hand-picked markets, farms and other sources of local sustainable food. Or, plan a destination trip to visit some of the great farmers markets in the U.S., like Union Squares Greenmarket in New York, or Ferry Plaza Farmers Market in San Francisco, or  Sweet Auburn Market in Atlanta. If you dont want to fill your suitcase with greens, you can definitely take home regional goodies like homemade honey or preserves. And for sure, there will be lots of samples to nosh on - from homemade breads to artisanal cheeses. Take a Farmer’s Market Tour with Chef Bryce Shuman   While farmers markets are great for getting the best in-season produce, its important to know whats in season in your region. In general, lettuces, greens, turnip, kale and some root vegetables like onions and fennel are signatures of Spring. You’re also likely to feast your eyes on strawberries, okra, rhubarb and asparagus. Check out this guide for what is ripest in your region. And for your next Meatless Monday lunch or dinner, try our Chilled Asparagus Pea Soup - a perfect nod to Springtime at your local farmers market! The post Spring into Meatless Monday at Your Local Farmer’s Market appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Saturday Six | Turnip Tacos, Hot Oil Noodles & Mascarpone Mashed Potatoes

November 14 2015 Oh My Veggies 

Were rounding up some of our favorite recipes from this weeks Potluck submissions, including a 10-minute, gluten-free version of Chinese hot oil noodles, lemon-dill roasted turnip tacos, and mascarpone mashed potatoes with sage browned butter.

Make the Most of Produce Shopping at Farm Markets

August 26 2015 VegKitchen 

Make the Most of Produce Shopping at Farm MarketsThe sights and aromas of common and offbeat varieties of vegetables and fruits are truly inspiring as you browse the aisles of farm markets. Often, there are samplings, food demos, and even music, so your shopping trip becomes more of a fun outing than a mere errand. The experience can be a great one for kids, helping them make the connection between the food they (hopefully) eat and the people who grow it. Just-harvested farm market fare -- that hasnt been trucked across the country -- is at its peak of flavor and nutrition. Here are a few tips for making the most of your farm market shopping expeditions, adapted from Plant Power by Nava Atlas (HarperOne, (C)2014, reprinted by permission). Photos by Hannah Kaminsky. Know when to go: Most markets are busiest in the morning. If you want the best, freshest selection, go early. But for the best deals, shop just before the market closes. Vendors would rather not take goods back to the farm, and might be open to marking prices down at the end of the day. And while its most fun to shop at farm markets when the weather is inviting, iffy-weather days may yield more bargains. Bring a cooler: Farm markets are often a bit further afield from your home than your local supermarket, and often operate during some of the hottest months -- summer through early fall. During warm weather months, bring a cooler packed with ice in which to put your produce (or at least the most perishable, like berries and tender greens) for the trip home. Leave your list at home: Farm market shopping is one time to do away with shopping lists. You never know what might call to you, or what may be on offer for a great price. Its a chance to try new kinds of produce, so approach this expedition with an open spirit. This being said, dont overdo it. Its tempting to go home with tons of gorgeous produce, and heartbreaking when you need to compost it a week or two down the road. Be realistic about what youll use within a week. Comparison shop: Farm market shopping isnt always inexpensive. The farm market in my town is on the pricey side; the one an easy 30-minute drive from here is bigger and far more reasonable. So my quandary is always whether to save to save time or money. I usually opt for the larger, less expensive farm market, as I also like the wider selection. So, try to compare the local farm markets within an hour radius of your home. Take an overview: Another way to save money is to take a browse around the entire market before you start buying. Theres often price differences between the exact same kind of goods from one stand to another. Pick your own: A nice way to extend the farm market experience is to seek out pick-your-own farms and farms that maintain their own stand. Kids seem to especially enjoy picking produce, and are quite likely to want to eat whatever it is that theyve toiled to gather. Local chambers of commerce usually have information on hand to help you locate such farms nearest where you live. Prep your produce: When you get home with your farm market goods, dont just stash everything in the fridge in opaque bags. A minimal amount of processing will ensure that these nutritious foods will be used, and used soon. For example, you can stem, chop, wash, and dry greens to use for the same nights dinner. Go one step further and massage kale in preparation for making salads. Wash berries and put them into clear bowls to tempt those who open the fridge to snack on them. Cut up veggies that are good raw (carrots, turnips, bell peppers, etc.) into bite-sized pieces for snacking on later. By shopping and/­­or picking straight from the farm, youre supporting local agriculture, and in effect, whats called local food systems.  You can forge personal relationships with growers, and feel good about supporting local economies.

Winter Rainbow Panzanella

March 16 2015 My New Roots 

Winter Rainbow Panzanella Dear colour. I miss you. Please come back soon. Your pal, Sarah B Ive joked before about the oh-so dark, single-toned, and super grey city Copenhagen becomes in the winter. After months upon months of this, I feel as if my eyes have turned into little slits, and only capable of seeing in black and white. Needing some kind of sign that I wasnt turning into a subterranean mammal, I cycled down to the central market of Copenhagen last week to find some inspiration in the form of light and colour. I was pretty shocked when I arrived to see a plethora of vibrant veggies, all lined up and waiting for me take them home. I guess Id gotten into such a routine with my shopping that I had failed to remember that winter does in fact offer a lot of brightly hued food, and that I am, undoubtedly, a human. Excited and hungry, I hurried home with a whack-load of produce and a plan brewing in my brain. Oh the colours! Oh the possibilities! Oh what a nerd I am! With some stale sourdough rye sitting on the counter and a knob of ginger in the fridge, a hearty, satisfying salad began to take shape in my mind, a rainbow swathe of vegetables stretched out before me like a beacon in an stubborn steel grey sky. Super Cool Kohlrabi Kohlrabi is a mysterious and intimidating vegetable, dont you agree? Ive gotten a lot of questions about this prehistoric looking creature, as many of you out there seem to be quite scared of even taking it home! Well fear not. Kohlrabi is not going to take off a finger or worse if you approach it with a knife. It is a rather gentle and yielding brassica, a cross between a cabbage and a turnip that can be enjoyed cooked or raw. Its pleasantly crisp texture is perfect julienned in salads, but its also a tender treat roasted in the oven in slices or batons. The flavour is somewhere near to broccoli but a tad milder and sweeter. I really like it in soups as well, blended up with white beans or chickpeas. The leaves are also edible and very delicious in salad or stir-fried with garlic like collards or Swiss chard. Key nutrients in kohlrabi include vitamin C, for fighting infection, vitamin E for preventing arterial plaque build-up, and a range of B-vitamins for combating stress. The potassium in kohlrabi helps the body maintain proper fluid balance, while the calcium manages the acid/­­alkaline balance of our blood. Other minerals in kohlrabi include iron, magnesium and zinc. When buying kohlrabi, look for bulbs that are firm, smooth and free of holes or cracks. Typically this part of the vegetable is pale green, but you can also find purple varieties like the one pictured above. The younger ones can be eaten with the skin on, but as their season (late fall to early spring) stretches, youll find peeling the more mature bulbs is a tastier choice. The leaves should be taut and unblemished. To prolong the kohlrabis shelf life, remove the leaves and wrap them in a damp towel, place them in a plastic bag in the fridge for up four days. The root bulb can be stored separately in the crisper as well, and will keep well for couple weeks. To the panzanella! Traditionally, this is a salad made with stale white bread and tomatoes, a popular dish in Tuscany. My version is a far, Nordic cry from the classic, but its a meal in itself and a very satisfying one at that, since there is just so. much. going. on. The key to building this dish, or any dish for that matter is layers and balance; flavours, textures and of course, colours. Taking into consideration that the base of this dish would be hearty winter greens I knew that I needed something creamy and yielding, like roast veggies, and something dense and crusty, like the Garlic Sourdough Rye Bread Croutons to contrast and compliment. From a flavour perspective, especially in salads, balancing tastes is very important for success. Because the roast vegetables are so sweet, its important to have an acidic hit to add brightness. I made some very tasty Ginger-Pickled Carrots in advance, but capers would also be a nice touch if you are pressed for time. The point is to step back and look at your dish as a whole, then adjust all the levels of salt, sugar, and acid as needed tipping the scales until everything is just right. And just a special note about these croutons, because they are so darn delish. I first came up with these in the good ol days when I was cooking at a very small café here in Copenhagen, inventing new dishes every day and being creative with what I had available. The odd time we had any leftover rye bread, I would make these garlic croutons, few of which actually made it onto any finished dishes because I would typically eat them all up before service with my kitchen mates. They are addictive. The kind of thing you wouldnt necessarily think of as a terrific little snack, but wow, are they ever hard to stop eating! There is a high amount of garlic-to-bread ratio, but because Danish rye is so rich and flavourful, youll need that amount of garlic to be heard. If youre using a lighter bread, a spelt loaf for instance, you can scale back just a touch unless you really love your garlic and/­­or not planning on making out with anyone for a couple days. This dish may seem component-heavy, but most of these elements can be made in advance so the whole thing comes together when youre ready. The only thing you need to do before serving in fact, is massaging the kale and kohlrabi leaves. Now excuse me as I dive face first into this bowl of rainbow ecstasy! Okay, good-byyyyyyeeee!     Print recipe     Winter Rainbow Panzanella Serves 4 Ingredients: 4 cups /­­ 100g shredded kale and kohlrabi leaves (or any hearty winter green) 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 1 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice a couple pinches sea salt A variety of winter vegetables suitable for roasting. I chose: – sweet potato – golden & red beets – kohlrabi – parsnip – Brussels sprouts Other suggestions: – celeriac – butternut squash – purple potatoes – Jerusalem artichoke – cauliflower – broccoli – leeks Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F/­­200°C. 2. Scrub veggies well, chop into similar sized pieces (no need to peel!) and place on a baking sheet with a few knobs of coconut oil or ghee. Place in the oven and when the oil has melted, remove pan from oven, toss to coat veggies and return to the middle rack. Bake for 25-35 minutes, depending on the size of your veggies. Remove from oven, season with salt and pepper, and a drizzle of olive oil. 3. While the veggies are roasting, prepare the kale and /­­or other greens. Wash and dry then well and chop into small pieces. Place in a large bowl and dress with olive oil, lemon juice and sea salt. Vigorously massage the oil and juice into the greens for two whole minutes until they are tender and dark green. Season to taste. 4. To assemble salad, Top the greens with the roasted veggies, add as many pickled carrots as you like, drizzle the dressing over and toss. Top with garlic croutons and serve. Overnight Ginger-Pickled Carrots Ingredients: 300g carrots 1 cup /­­ 250ml apple cider vinegar 1 cup /­­ 250ml water (or more if needed) 1 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1/­­2 Tbsp. fine grain sea salt small knob of ginger (about 10g), peeled and sliced Directions: 1. Scrub carrots well. Using a vegetable peeler, slice the carrots lengthwise into long, thing ribbons. Place into a 1-quart /­­ 1 liter glass container. 2. In a measuring cup combine the vinegar, water, maple syrup, salt and ginger, and stir to dissolve the salt. Pour over the carrots and top up with more water as needed to cover them completely. Place in the fridge for 24 hours and enjoy the next day. Grainy Mustard Dressing Ingredients: 3 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1 Tbsp. whole grain mustard 1 tsp. maple syrup generous pinch of sea salt Directions: 1. Whisk all ingredients together. Season to taste. Garlic Sourdough Rye Bread Croutons Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 200g stale dark sourdough, cut into generous cubes (any bread here would work, but make a healthy choice) 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee (ghee is definitely the tastiest) 2 fat cloves garlic, finely minced or grated on a microplane a couple pinches flaky sea salt Directions: 1. Melt oil in a small saucepan over low heat. When it is melted, grate in the garlic and stir to combine. Cook just until the garlic starts to simmer, immediately remove from heat and let cool slightly. Preheat oven to 400°F/­­200°C. 2. Cut bread into generous cubes and place in a medium sized bowl. Pour the garlic oil over the top and toss to coat, using your hands to squish the oil into the bread. Spread out bread cubes on a cookie sheet, sprinkle with salt and place in the oven. Toast for 10-15 minutes, tossing a couple times during cooking. Croutons are ready when they are crisp and golden around the edges. Once cool, store leftovers in an airtight container for up to three days. *   *   *   *   *   * Hey guys! I have some very exciting news...Im going on tour with my cookbook! Although we are still working out some of the hard details, I wanted to let you know when and where Ill be so you can make a note of it. It would be so rad to meet you, and I hope that you can come out and celebrate! I will update this page and post the events on my Events page and Facebook as they are finalized. Looking forward to it, more than you know! TORONTO April 9-14 VANCOUVER April 15-17 LOS ANGELES April 18 + 19 NEW YORK April 22 + 23 I hope that everyone who has pre-ordered the book is enjoying the Bonus Pack of recipes! Thanks for all of your very positive feedback so far. There is still time to get yours if you’re interested…click here!

Peak Season: Rutabaga

October 23 2014 Vegetarian Times 

Peak Season: Rutabaga The mildly peppery rutabaga bears a family resemblance to the turnip, which has a sharper bite; both belong to the cruciferous clan, whose members include broccoli and cabbage. Pick Choose rutabagas that are heavy for their size and free of soft spots or sprouts; naturally occurring crevices around the top are normal. In stores, rutabagas are often coated in a food-grade wax to reduce dehydration and prolong shelf life. For a better guarantee of freshness, Sharon Funderburk of Beartrack Farm in Turkey, N.C., suggests seeking out unwaxed rutabagas at farmers markets. Rutabagas will last up to six months when stored in a cool, dark, slightly damp place like a root cellar or unheated garage. They can also be stored in your fridge crisper, in a plastic bag with some ventilation to discourage sprouting, Funderburk says. Prep Trim the ends and remove the skin with a sharp vegetable peeler. Chunks of rutabaga can be steamed or boiled, then mashed ?just like potatoes, says Funderburk. Roasting elevates the veggies natural sweetness. Rutabaga also can be enjoyed raw, grated into ?salads or slaws. Rutabagas mild-tasting green tops are perfectly edible, but should be stored separately from their roots, Funderburk advises. Try This o Combine shredded rutabaga, flour, and eggs; form into patties, pan-fry, and top with apple chutney. o Thinly slice rutabaga, ?and stir-fry until crisp and tender; toss with cooked pasta, sliced pear, and baby kale. o Toss together chopped rutabaga, grapeseed oil, maple syrup, salt, and cayenne; roast until tender. o Simmer together rutabaga cubes, chopped carrot, and sliced leeks; purée with fresh oregano and chipotle chile pepper for a smoky-tasting soup. o Steam rutabaga until tender, and whip with butter, Dijon mustard, and orange zest. o Grate together rutabaga, celery root, and carrot; toss with raisins and a honey vinaigrette for a slaw. o Julienne rutabaga, toss with zaatar spice mixture, and bake until crisp and tender for veggie fries. What’s your favorite way to cook with rutabagas? Share in the comments!

Turnips, Kohlrabi, Radishes, and Other Odd Vegetables: Are They Our Key to Survival?

August 3 2014 VegKitchen 

Turnips, Kohlrabi, Radishes, and Other Odd Vegetables: Are They Our Key to Survival?Last week, we got kohlrabi in our CSA boxes for a second time in a row. Chatting with a fellow CSA* member she complained, “Why did we get kohlrabi again? Can’t they just give us vegetables we know?” Our personal vegetable kingdoms are frequently divided between “vegetables we know” and “everything else.” The former category includes perennial favorites like tomatoes, lettuce, cucumbers and peppers. The latter is a dumping ground for those vegetables we never buy or that don’t have instant taste appeal, like kohlrabi, collards, radishes, turnips, parsnips, and celeriac. If we can go to the store and buy easy things like carrots and spinach, why go to the effort of buying and cooking odd vegetables that present such preparation and palatability challenges? It’s a fair question, and I’ve often asked it of myself, especially since our classes frequently use vegetables from the “everything else” category. The answer can be summed up in one word:  Diversity. I recently attended Food: Our Global Kitchen, at the Colorado History Museum. Two juxtaposing displays really drove home the point of diversity.  The first described how, at the time of the tragic Irish Potato Famine, millions of Ireland’s population subsisted largely on just one crop, the potato. To make matters worse, they relied on just one variety of potato. So when the pathogen P. infestans (a/­­k/­­a potato blight) struck in 1845, it “spread alarmingly quickly, cutting yields from that year’s harvest in half. By the next year, harvest from potato farms had dropped to one quarter of its original size.” In the ensuing famine, over one million people died of starvation. The second display described a very different situation across the globe, where native populations in the Andean highlands had developed nearly 4000 potato varieties over thousands of years, each capable of withstanding different diseases, pests, water availability, soil conditions, etc.  So even though P. infestans is believed to have originated in Peru, the Andean region was spared its devastation. My great grandmother was a Potato Famine emigrant, so these displays really left me shaken.  Monoculture, i.e., the practice of planting acres and acres with a single variety of a single plant, leaves us so frighteningly vulnerable -- just one disease from disaster. Sadly, we haven’t learned much. Not many years after the Irish Potato Famine, American farmers continued planting fields upon fields with just a few varieties of potatoes. These became an “ocean of breakfast” for the next potato scourge: the Colorado potato beetle, which has been a continuing pest epidemic ever since, kept in check only by massive and multiple applications of pesticides. What’s to save us? Diversity. It’s the “technology” Nature has always deployed to keep disease and pests in check. Faced with a riotous mix of species and varieties, insects and pathogens can’t multiply and adapt to dangerous levels. Which brings us back to turnips, kohlrabi, and radishes. The more odd things on our farms, the less we are vulnerable to massive crop failures. And should pests or hail or a water shortage bring down one crop, there’s a good chance the damaging condition will have little or no affect on other crops or varieties.  Last year, for instance, our CSA farm was hit by fury of hail that sheared the tops off most crops-but all the root crops were safely buried in the ground. So we rued the loss of Monroe’s famous melons, but cheered at the bounty of carrots, potatoes, beets, and celeriac. Diversity yields benefits on a personal level, too. As we eat a greater variety of foods, our bodies benefit from a wider range of nutrients. In fact, our CSA farmer, says this is an important reason for including vegetables from the “everything else” category, i.e., so members get a chance to try and benefit from new foods.  And there’s nothing like a variety of tastes -- from the sweetness of peaches to the earthiness of turnips -- to create a dish with deep, well-rounded flavor. In a world where easy and familiar vegetables are shipped in to your grocery store no matter the month, it’s easy to ignore the odd vegetables. But perhaps you want to help transition us to an environmentally sound, resilient food system, where tomatoes aren’t shipped in from places 1,000 miles away and we aren’t dependent on drought-ravaged California for 90% of our food supply. One of the best ways to contribute is also one of the easiest: simply buy, use and create demand for the odd vegetables. And don’t worry about the taste. Over time, our taste buds grow and develop so that we come to treasure the “unique” flavors of each member of the vegetable kingdom. Find ways to experiment and learn tricks and tips to make the odd vegetables a natural part of your diet. Mary Collette Rogers is the author of   Take Control of Your Kitchen . * In addition to writing, she offers kitchen makeover services, meal planning consultations, and classes on healthy cooking, in the hope of sharing her practical KitchenSmart habits and tools so busy people everywhere can enjoy wonderfully delicious and nourishing meals. Visit her at  Everyday Good Eating .   *This post contains affiliate links. If the product is purchased by linking through this review, VegKitchen receives a modest commission, which helps maintain our site and helps it to continue growing!  


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