turmeric - vegetarian recipes

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turmeric vegetarian recipes

Vegan Cheesy Crackers

November 21 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Cheesy CrackersIts easy to find crackers without animal ingredients, unless of course, your favorite crackers happen to be the cheesy ones. Now you can make vegan Cheesy Crackers at home, complete with the delicious crunch and flavor you love but without the animal ingredients and additives.   Cheesy Crackers Now you can make vegan Cheesy Crackers at home, complete with the delicious crunch and flavor you love but without the animal ingredients and additives. - 1 cup all-purpose flour - 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast -  1/­­2 teaspoon baking powder -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt -  1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder -  1/­­4 teaspoon smoked paprika - ? teaspoon turmeric - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 tablespoon vegan butter - 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice - 5 to 6 tablespoons cold water, or more as needed - Preheat the oven to 350°F. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, nutritional yeast, baking powder, salt, garlic powder, smoked paprika, and turmeric. Mix well. Add the olive oil, butter, and lemon juice, mixing with a fork until the dough is fine and crumbly. Add the water a tablespoon at a time until the dough becomes cohesive. - Transfer the dough to a piece of parchment paper large enough to fit a large rimmed baking pan. (You can use a Silpat instead, if you have one.) Top the dough with another sheet of parchment paper and roll out the dough until thin, measuring about 11 x 13 inches. Transfer the parchment paper and rolled-out dough to a large rimmed baking sheet. Remove the top sheet of parchment paper and cut the rolled dough into 2-inch squares. If desired, remove any uneven pieces of dough from around the edges and press together into a small disk and roll it out to get more crackers that are a uniform size. (Otherwise, youll have a few partial crackers from around the end to nibble on!) - Bake for 15 to 17 minutes, or until the crackers are baked but not browned. The color should be golden. Cool completely on the baking sheet. These crackers keep well for a week in a sealed container at room temperature. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by William and Susan Brinson. Save Save The post Vegan Cheesy Crackers appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2

November 2 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2 Here comes Part 2 of our Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, complete with cozy dinner and dessert recipes for the week. There are stellar homemade veggie burgers, a nourishing stew, and beautifully simple roasted plums for dessert. To see the breakfast and lunch recipes, as well as the grocery shopping list for the entire meal plan, head to Part 1. We hope you’ll find this entire thing useful, and we’d love to hear any feedback you have, as always :) Menu (see Part 1 for breakfast and lunch recipes) Breakfast Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins Lunch Grain Bowl with Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup Dinner Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers w/­­ Any Fixings of Choice Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew Dessert Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Day by Day Prep List Monday Night: Make the Veggie Burgers to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you’ve already cooked the squash, rice, kale and lentils that are called for in the recipe during prep day. Roast the plums for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. - Make the Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers. - Make the Rosemary-Roasted Plums with Cardamom Sprinkle. Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the Veggie Burgers, prepare the Brussels Sprouts Stew for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week.  - Make the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew.   Recipes 1. These veggie burgers utilize the lentils, brown rice, squash, and kale that you already cooked during prep day. They are nourishing, satisfying, and cooked in the oven, which means that you won’t have to spend any time frying them on the pan. The flavors are earthy and warming, and the burgers develop really nice, crispy edges as they bake. Enjoy them for dinner with any fixings of choice, on burger buns, inside lettuce wraps, or even alongside a green salad. Make sure to try them with the Lentil and Squash Hummus from Part 1 as well. Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers   Print Serves: 9 veggie burgers Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes about 2 tablespoons chopped sage, rosemary and thyme (optional) 4 garlic cloves - minced blanched kale (from part 1) - chopped roughly sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 cup toasted pumpkin seeds 1½ cups cooked brown rice (from part 1) 1½ cups cooked lentils (from part 1) remaining ½ cup roasted butternut squash (from part 1) 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar or apple cider vinegar Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Warm the coconut oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add the onion, red pepper flakes and herbs, if using, and sauté for 7 minutes, until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic and cook for another minute, then add the kale, salt and pepper, and stir around for another minute. Add the tomato paste and toss to mix well. Remove the pan from heat. Transfer the pumpkin seeds to a food processor and pulse into small pieces. Add the rice, lentils, squash, vinegar, and the sautéed onion and kale mixture to the food processor. Pulse until well-mixed and combined into a chunky mixture. Taste for salt, add more if needed. Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Use a ½ cup measurement to form burger patties and finish shaping each patty with your hands. Arrange the patties on the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 25-35 minutes, until the burgers look nicely toasted. Serve on burger buns, lettuce wraps, or alongside salad with any burger fixings of choice. Store in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. These burgers also freeze very well. 3.5.3226   2. A pot of good stew is such a great solution to the weekday dinner problem, especially during the colder months. It doesn’t take too long to make and lasts a while in the fridge, only getting better with time. This one is made with so many star ingredients of warming fall fare: mushrooms, carrots, garlic and onion, as well as jarred tomatoes, brussels sprouts and lentils. There’s smoked paprika, too, which ensures a bit of piquancy and depth of flavor. Serve this stew with crusty sourdough bread or over any brown rice, left over from the veggie burgers. Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 teaspoon whole cumin seeds 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt 1 lb crimini mushrooms - sliced freshly ground black pepper 6 garlic cloves - sliced 1 jalape?o - seeded and chopped 2 medium carrots - sliced 1 lb Brussels sprouts - trimmed and halved (quartered for larger ones) 1 teaspoon smoked paprika kale cooking water from part 1, veggie broth or purified water 2-3 bay leaves (optional) remaining cooked lentils from part 1 - about 1½ cups 28 oz box or can crushed tomatoes 4 cups baby spinach Instructions Warm the coconut oil in a medium saucepan. Add the cumin and sauté for about 1 minute, until fragrant. Add the onion and salt and sauté for 5 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms and black pepper and cook for about 8 minutes, until all the liquid thats released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the garlic, jalapeno, carrots, Brussels sprouts and paprika, and stir to coat for about 2 minutes. Add enough of the reserved kale cooking liquid (from part 1), veggie broth, or purified water to achieve a thick stew consistency (keep in mind that youll also be adding crushed tomatoes). Add the bay leaves at this point too, if using. Bring to a simmer. Cook, partially covered, for 10 minutes. Add the cooked lentils and crushed tomatoes, bring everything back to a simmer and cook for another 10 minutes. Discard the bay leaves, if using. Add the spinach at the end, and stir it in until wilted. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Serve over rice or with crusty sourdough bread. 3.5.3226   3. Roasting up a sizable batch of fruit is a great way to ensure that you’ll have beautiful, healthy dessert for the week. Add a little dollop of ice cream or yogurt (have you tried this coconut one?!), and you’re in business. These plums are roasted with coconut sugar, which brings out their sweetness, and rosemary, which contributes its piney, earthy notes. Besides ice cream/­­yogurt, I love serving the plums with a sprinkling of toasted pumpkin seeds, cardamom and cacao nibs. Another idea: try topping the millet porridge from Part 1 with some of the roasted plums for one of your breakfasts. If you can’t find plums, try a similar roasting technique with apples or pears (and include cinnamon in your sprinkle). Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle   Print Ingredients 8 ripe plums - sliced in half and pitted 2 tablespoons coconut sugar 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary ¼ cup toasted pumpkin seeds - roughly chopped 2-3 cardamom pods - shells discarded, ground in a mortar and pestle 1 tablespoon cacao nibs (optional) vanilla ice cream or plain yogurt - for serving Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place the plums on the baking sheet, cut side up. Generously sprinkle each plum with the coconut sugar and rosemary. Put in the oven and roast for 20-30 minutes, until soft throughout. Meanwhile, combine the pumpkin seeds, cardamom and cacao nibs in a small bowl. Serve the plums with ice cream/­­yogurt, sprinkled with the pumpkin seed cardamom mixture. 3.5.3226   < < .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1

November 1 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 This summer, we set out to share one practical, budget-friendly, and non-boring plant-based meal plan per season. Here is our meal plan for the Fall of 2017! We are really excited about the recipes in this one. It all starts out with cooking a pot of lentils and a pot of rice, roasting some winter squash, and prepping some kale. Those foundations then make their way into breakfast, lunch and dinner recipes that will take you through a whole week of nourishing and cozy fall meals. As usual, we are splitting this meal plan into two parts. This first part will focus on weekend prep, as well as breakfast and lunch recipes. Part 2 is here, and it’s all about dinner and dessert recipes. Here we go! Menu (see Part 2 for dinner and dessert recipes) Breakfast Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins Lunch Grain Bowl with Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup Dinner Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers w/­­ Any Fixings of Choice Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew Dessert Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Shopping List (print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Produce Vegetables - 1 large and 1 medium butternut squashes - 2 medium delicata squashes - 1 lb Brussels sprouts - 2 bunches kale (or 1 very large bunch) - 4 cups baby spinach - 1 jalape?o pepper - 1 lb crimini mushrooms - 2 medium carrots - 3 large yellow onions - 2 heads of garlic Fruits - 2-3 green apples - 1 lemon - 1-2 limes (if using in place of brown rice vinegar for the marinated delicata) - 8 ripe plums Herbs  - rosemary - sage - green onions (optional) - thyme (optional) Other - 3 cups almond milk or other plant milk of choice - 1 13.5 oz can unsweetened Thai coconut milk - 1 28 oz can or box crushed tomatoes - 1 cup brown rice flour or other gluten free flour - sesame tahini - white sweet miso - burger fixings like buns, lettuce, or anything else you like w/­­ your veggie burgers - vanilla ice cream or plain yogurt to serve with the roasted plums (optional) - crackers to snack on with the hummus or sourdough bread to eat with the hummus, soup or stew (optional) Bulk - 2 1/­­4 cups dried green lentils - 3/­­4 cup millet - 1 1/­­2 cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for the grain bowl) - 1 cup other grain of choice for the grain bowl, or 1/­­2 more cup of brown rice - 5-7 Medjool dates - 2 cups pumpkin seeds – toasted - unsweetened coconut flakes (optional) - cacao nibs (optional) Pantry /­­ Refrigerator Staples - neutral coconut oil - apple cider vinegar - brown rice vinegar (if not using limes for delicata marinade) - balsamic vinegar (optional) - tamari - olive oil - toasted sesame oil - tomato paste - coconut sugar - sea salt - maple syrup or honey - sriracha/­­chili sauce of choice - baking soda - baking powder Spices - whole cumin seeds - whole coriander seeds - green cardamom pods - smoked paprika - black peppercorns - turmeric - red pepper flakes - bay leaves (optional) Day by Day Prep List Saturday Night (Night Before Main Prep Day): These are just quick tasks that need to be done the day before your main prep day. Soaking grains and lentils helps rid them of phytic acid, which makes them easier to digest. It also kickstarts the germination process, making the grains and lentils more nutritious. - Soak 3/­­4 cup of dried millet overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 2 1/­­4 cups of lentils overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 1 1/­­2 cups of brown rice (2 cups if you are using it for the grain bowl) overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - If not using brown rice for the grain bowl, soak 1 cup of another grain of choice for the grain bowl in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. Sunday (Main Prep Day): This is your main prep day, which you can also split into multiple days, depending on your schedule. You will find all the recipes for this prep day in this post, which includes two breakfast options and two lunch options for the whole week, as well as some simple prep for the dinners for the coming week. - Roast the butternut and delicata squashes to be used in Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. - Cook the lentils to be used in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. - Cook the brown rice to use in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl, if that’s your grain of choice for the bowl. - If you chose another grain for the grain bowl, cook it now as well. - Cook the kale and coconut kale to be used in the Grain Bowl and Veggie Burgers. - Make the Lentil and Squash Hummus to be used in the Grain Bowl, on the Veggie Burgers, and on crackers/­­bread as a snack throughout the week. - Marinate the roasted delicata squash to use in the Grain Bowl. - Make the Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup. - Bake the Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins. - You can also cook the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash for your breakfasts ahead of time, but I suggest making it in the morning. It’s pretty quick. Monday Night: Make the Veggie Burgers to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you’ve already cooked the squash, rice, kale and lentils that are called for in the recipe during prep day. Roast the plums for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. The recipes for the Veggie Burgers, Brussels Sprout Stew and the Roasted Plums are in Part 2.  - Make the Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers. - Make the Rosemary-Roasted Plums with Cardamom Sprinkle. Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the Veggie Burgers, prepare the Brussels Sprouts Stew for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. The recipe for the stew is in Part 2.  - Make the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew.   Prep 1. Winter squash is a beautifully versatile vegetable that can be used in millions of ways in both sweet and savory dishes. It’s always a great idea to roast a bunch of squash on the weekend, to use in all kinds of dishes throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use Butternut and Delicata Squashes in the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. See what I mean? It really is a super-vegetable. Roasted Butternut and Delicata Squashes   Print Ingredients 1 large and 1 medium butternut squash - cut in half lengthwise and seeded 2 medium delicata squashes - seeded and sliced into ½-inch rings neutral coconut oil - soft sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2-3 parchment paper-lined baking sheets. Arrange all the squashes on the baking sheets in a single layer. Oil them with the coconut oil and sprinkle with salt and paper. Roast the delicata squash for 10 minutes, then flip all the rings and roast for another 15-20 minutes, until cooked through and golden on both sides. Delicata squash skins are edible, so no need to peel off the skin. Roast the butternut squashes at the same time, for about 40 minutes or until soft throughout. You should end up with about 3 cups of roasted mashed squash flesh from the large butternut squash, which you will use for the hummus, muffins, porridge and burgers. The remaining 1 medium butternut squash will be used for the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. 3.5.3226   2. A pot of lentils, cooked on the weekend, can easily take you through a week of meals. They are nourishing, affordable, and can work as a base for so many meals. In this meal plan, we use French lentils in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. Pot of Lentils   Print Ingredients 2¼ cups dried French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the lentils. Place them into a medium-large pot, cover with purified water, and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook for about 15-20 minutes, or until soft, but still intact. Add salt at the last 5 minutes. Drain and use in recipes right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   3. Similarly to lentils, a pot of rice or any other grains, prepared on the weekend, can help you pave the way to quicker and better meals throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use brown rice in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl (if that’s the grain you chose for your bowl). Serve any leftover rice with the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. If you chose a different grain for your grain bowl, cook it now as well. Pot of Brown Rice   Print Ingredients 1½ cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for your grain bowl) - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2½ cups filtered water (3½ cups if cooking 2 cups of rice) sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the rice. Combine it with the water and plenty of sea salt in a medium pot, cover with a lid and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 25-40 minutes, until all the water is absorbed and the rice is cooked. Use in recipes right away or store refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   4. Blanching kale is one of my favorite, low maintenance ways of prepping a whole bunch of it for the week. In this meal plan, it will be used for the Coconut Kale and the Veggie Burgers. I also like to use the leftover kale cooking water for soups, stews, etc. In this meal plan, you can use the leftover kale broth for the Coconut Kale, the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew and even the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. Half of this blanched kale gets stored away for later use in the Veggie Burgers, while the other half becomes the Coconut Kale for our grain bowl lunch. You’re going to love the coconut kale – it’s velvety, creamy, and keeps well throughout the week. Blanched Kale and Coconut Kale   Print Ingredients 2 bunches (or 1 very large bunch) kale of choice sea salt 1 can unsweetened Thai coconut milk Instructions Separate the kale leaves from the stems. Wash and tear the leaves into roughly bite-sized pieces. Reserve the stems to use in homemade vegetable broth in the future, if desired. Place the torn kale leaves in a large pot and cover with purified water. Add salt and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes. Drain the kale, reserving the cooking liquid for the Coconut Kale and the Brussels Sprouts Tomato Stew. Return half of the kale to the same pot. Squeeze the other half of the kale dry and store it away in an air-tight container, in the refrigerator, to use later in the veggie burgers. Add ½ cup of the reserved kale cooking liquid and 1 can of coconut milk to the pot. Bring to a strong simmer and cook for 10-20 minutes, until creamy. Add more of the kale cooking liquid throughout the cooking time, if needed. Taste for salt and adjust, if needed. Eat right away or store refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   5. The good news is, you already have all the important ingredients prepared for this hummus – you’ve cooked the lentils and roasted the squash, which you’re going to puree with autumn herbs, garlic, tahini, lemon juice, and olive oil. Though for efficiency’s sake, we use lentils instead of the traditional chickpeas here, the spread still very much tastes like hummus. And not just any hummus – it’s fresh, savory, earthy hummus that’s better than anything you can get at the store. Use it throughout the week in the Grain Bowl, on top of the Veggie Burgers, or as a quick snack with some crackers. Lentil and Squash Hummus   Print Ingredients ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil - divided 4-5 cloves of garlic - peeled and sliced 1-2 tablespoons chopped herbs, such as rosemary, sage and thyme 1 cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1½ cups cooked green lentils (from above) juice from 1 lemon ¼ cup sesame tahini 3-4 tablespoons cold water toasted pumpkin seeds - for garnish (optional) Instructions Warm 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a small sauté pan over medium heat. Add garlic and herbs and sauté for about a minute, until garlic is fragrant and cooked, but not burnt. Add the squash, salt and pepper, and toss to coat. Stir around for a minute or so for the flavors to mix. Add the mixture to a food processor or a high-speed blender like a Vitamix. Add the lentils to the food processor/­­blender, followed by the lemon juice, sesame tahini, and more salt, to taste. Process until smooth, scraping the walls if needed. With the motor still running, pour in ¼ cup of the olive oil through the funnel, followed by the cold water. Pour in the water 1 tablespoon at a time until you achieve a desired, creamy consistency. Sprinkle the hummus with the toasted pumpkin seeds when serving, if using. Store the hummus in the refrigerator in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   6. Marinating vegetables is one of my favorite preparations, especially if I’m cooking ahead. It’s as easy as mixing up a marinade, and the veggies will only get more flavorful with each passing day. This miso-marinated delicata squash has got it all – it’s a little sweet, a little savory, and a bit spicy. It’s the perfect, powerful component to a memorable grain bowl, which is how it’s utilized in this meal plan. If you are planning on eating this squash at work/­­social settings, you might need to be cautious with the garlic – the squash is still really good without it! Miso-Marinated Delicata Squash   Print Ingredients 2 sliced and roasted delicata squashes (from above) 2 tablespoons white sweet miso paste 1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey (not vegan) 2 teaspoons chili sauce, such as sriracha 4 tablespoons brown rice vinegar or lime juice 1 tablespoon tamari 2 teaspoons sesame oil 1 garlic clove - minced (optional) 1 tablespoon finely chopped green onion (optional) Instructions Place the sliced and roasted delicata squash in a shallow dish. In a small bowl, combine the miso with the maple syrup and sriracha, and mix until smooth. Add the rice vinegar/­­lime juice, tamari, and sesame oil, and mix until smooth. Mix in the sesame seeds, garlic and green onion, if using. Pour the marinade over the delicata squash and toss to coat. Cover and let marinate at room temperature for 1-3 hours. Keep refrigerated for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   Recipes 1. These gluten-free muffins make for a great breakfast or snack. They are very subtly sweet – sweetened only with dates – and get their soft, crumbly texture from the roasted squash that’s hiding in the batter. There are pockets of cubed apple throughout, and the pumpkin seeds on top add a nice bit of crunch. Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins   Print Serves: 10 medium-sized or 12 small muffins Ingredients 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pan ¾ cup brown rice flour or other gluten-free flour pinch of sea salt 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda 5-7 soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in 1 cup of hot water for 10 minutes ½ cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1-2 Granny Smith apples - peeled and finely cubed (optionally slice some of the apple to decorate the tops of muffins) 2 tablespoons chopped sage leaves (optional) pumpkin seeds - for sprinkling Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare a muffin pan by thoroughly oiling the holes or lining it with paper muffin liners. Combine the flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda in a medium bowl. Put the dates in an upright blender, together with their soaking water. Add the squash and blend until smooth. Add the coconut oil and vinegar and pulse to combine. Pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the dry ingredients and quickly stir to mix. Fold in cubed apples and sage, if using. Fill the muffin holes with the batter until each hole is about ⅔ full. Sprinkle each muffin with pumpkin seeds and decorate with apple slices, if using. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean. Let cool a little, then remove the muffins from the pan and let them cool on a cooling rack. Enjoy right away or store in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   2. This millet porridge is warming, cozy, satisfying, and overall perfect for chilly fall mornings. Millet is a humble and affordable gluten-free grain, but it has the potential to be quite creamy and luxurious when cooked in plant milk with turmeric and squash. The porridge is pictured here topped with some of the roasted plums from Part 2 of this meal plan, which makes it even more special. Turmeric Millet Porridge   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons coconut oil or ghee (not vegan) 1 teaspoon turmeric a few grinds of black pepper (to activate the turmeric) ¾ cup millet - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 1½ tablespoons coconut sugar pinch of sea salt 4 cups almond milk or other plant milk (or 3 cups milk and 1 cup water) - divided 1 cup roasted butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes - for serving (optional) Instructions Warm the oil/­­ghee in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the turmeric and black pepper, and stir around for about a minute. Add the millet, coconut sugar, salt and 3 cups of plant milk (or 2 cups of milk and 1 cup of water). Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Stir periodically to prevent the porridge from sticking to the bottom. In the meantime, blend the squash and the remaining 1 cup of plant milk in a high-speed blender. Mix the blended mixture into the porridge after the 20 minutes of cooking and stir to combine. Simmer everything for another couple of minutes. (Alternatively, skip blending the squash and the remaining plant milk in a blender and add both the squash and the rest of the milk to the porridge, stirring to warm everything through. This will result in a less smooth porridge with some pockets of squash, which I like as a nice change from a smooth porridge). Serve the porridge topped with toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes, if desired. Store in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. Reheat gently over medium low heat with more ghee/­­coconut oil and a splash of plant milk or water. 3.5.3226   3. This grain bowl will come together very quickly during a weekday lunch, since you’ve already gotten all the components ready during prep day. As an alternative to the bowl, you can spread the hummus on some sourdough bread and top that with the squash for an open-faced sandwich, with the coconut kale on the side. Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Grain Bowl   Print Ingredients cooked brown rice or another grain of choice (from above) coconut kale (from above) miso-marinated delicata squash (from above) lentil and squash hummus (from above) toasted pumpkin seeds Instructions Heat up the rice and coconut kale in a pan or saucepan with a bit of oil or water. You can also gently heat the miso-marinated squash, but be careful not to heat it too much because of the miso. Serve all the components together in a bowl, sprinkled with toasted pumpkin seeds. 3.5.3226   4. Our second lunch option is a very lovely and very simple pureed fall soup, with flavors of butternut squash, green apple, and autumn herbs. Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 green apple - peeled, cored and chopped 2 garlic cloves - sliced 1 teaspoon coriander seeds - preferably freshly ground about 1 tablespoon chopped sage and rosemary sea salt freshly ground black pepper flesh from 1 medium roasted butternut squash (from above) Instructions Warm the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, apple, garlic, coriander and herbs, if using, and sauté everything for 10 minutes. Scoop the flesh out of the roasted squash and add it to the saucepan, followed by the sea salt, pepper and 3 cups of purified water. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes, until all the flavors are combined well. Carefully blend everything in an upright blender until smooth. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226 Continue to Dinner and Dessert Recipes > > >  You might also like... Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Squash Noodle Soup with Healing Turmeric-Ginger Broth, Roasted Carrots... Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2 .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte

October 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte This happens to me pretty much every day at around 3 o’clock, providing that I’m working from home. I get up from my desk, put on the teapot, throw a bunch of things in the blender, whirl it all together, and end up with a cozy and satisfying latte-ish drink that gets me through to dinner time. I don’t drink caffeine anymore, because I’ve always been very sensitive to it, and found that avoiding it altogether really helps with even energy levels (I may have made a few exceptions in Italy :)). But this little ritual takes me back to the days when 3 o’clock meant a cup of really good tea or a matcha. There’s really nothing better. I end up making a different drink every time, based on my mood and the ingredients I have on hand, but the general formula is the same. There’s always something for creaminess, something for flavor, something for an energy boost… So I thought I’d give a ‘no-recipe’ recipe here, as well as a few of my favorite combinations. Midday super-latte making is a really fun routine to add to your day if you’re around a blender, and it’s good for your in a number of ways: it gets you out of the busyness of the day and nudges you to take a break, it’s creative, and the beverage you’ll end up with will likely be good-for-you, warming and tasty. Tahini Hot Chocolate This was one of our most popular recipes last winter. It’s an incredibly satisfying blender hot chocolate that comes together in seconds. Rosemary Hot White Chocolate Another hot chocolate, but this one is a white hot chocolate infused with rosemary. A great case for using cacao butter in drinks, which lends both its chocolatey flavor, as well as a richness and a froth. Spirulina Latte Another blender latte, but this time boosted with all the green benefits of spirulina, without the swampy taste. Chamomile Latte The most grounding and delicious latte to drink before bed. Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca Playing off New Orleans-style coffee, this herbal mocha is a great option for those trying to take a break from coffee and missing it dearly. Chicory brings a coffee-like richness, while maca and cacao boost energy. Honey Miso Latte This is basically a golden milk latte, but boosted with the flavor and health benefits of miso and raw honey. I like to drink this one before plane journeys, since miso might be helpful when it comes to countering the radiation we are exposed to on any given flight. Hibiscus Ginger Latte This latte gets is beautiful color and a pleasant sour note in the flavor from steeped hibiscus flowers. Pear Cranberry Chai Any modesty aside, this is the best chai I’ve ever had or made in my life. A great example for how creative you can get with your beverages, this one uses both fruit and a bunch of healing spices to achieve an otherworldly flavor. No-Recipe Vegan Cozy Latte Start With: This is your base liquid, which will determine what other ingredients you will add to your blender. Choose one or a couple. Hot water is a blank canvas, while herbal coffee and tea will give you a base flavor, which you can play off off with your other ingredients. - hot water - chicory coffee or Dandy Blend - tea – herbal, black, green, etc. - hot plant milk – coconut, almond, cashew, oat, etc. Creamy: Add one of these ingredients or a combination of a few of them for a rich, extra-creamy latte, especially important to include if you are just using hot water as the base. - coconut butter - tahini - almond butter/­­cashew butter/­­any other nut butter - tocos - cacao butter Frothy: This is optional if you already have a creamy element, but adding some extra fat to your latte contributes to the most beautiful froth. Also, if your base is something with caffeine like a black or green tea, this will help slow the absorption of caffeine for a more even boost of energy (like in Bulletproof coffee). - Coconut oil/­­MCT oil - Ghee Sweet: Add as much sweetness as you need, tasting as you go. - dates - raw honey - maple syrup - date syrup Flavor: Play off your drink base while adding some flavor. Both cacao powder and turmeric do well in creamy, milky drinks, while spices, herbs and vanilla can be used millions of ways (just see the drink round-up above). - cacao powder - cacao butter - turmeric - other spices like cinnamon, cardamom, nutmeg, ginger - vanilla - herbs - miso Extras & Boosts: My absolute favorite energy-boosting ingredient for drinks is maca powder – it instantly wakes me up and tastes so delicious. But there are a ton of other boosters you can add to your lattes, some ideas below. - maca powder - cacao butter - other adaptogens: chaga, reishi, lion’s mane, cordyceps, ashwagandha - more: pearl powder, tocos, mucura pruriens, spirulina, etc. etc. Blend all your components until frothy and enjoy :) You might also like... Berry Kombucha Float Peach and Zucchini Smoothie Avocado Kiwi Smoothie and a Jus by Julie Cleanse Giveaway Honey Miso Latte .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Meal Plan | Coconut Curry Soup, Falafel Burgers & Autumn Nourish Bowls

October 6 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegan meal plan includes: coconut curry soup with sweet potato noodles, chickpeas in spicy smoked tomato sauce with penne; one-pot curried quinoa with butternut squash and chickpeas; turmeric falafel burgers; and autumn nourish bowls.

Veggie Tray Extra Everything

October 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Veggie Tray Extra Everything We’ve got a small, square shaped wooden table with three chairs + a highchair in our kitchen. I bought the table when I moved to my first 1-bedroom apartment and it was perfect for that tiny space. Back then I only had two chairs and the table mostly carried pasta dishes and red wine glasses. Eighteen years, four apartments and three children later, we still eat most our meals on it. It is honestly not very pretty and its wine stains are now mixed with blueberries, turmeric, coconut and all the stains, smudges and scratches that come from years of feeding babies. Because it is square shaped and we are five in the family, Luise or I end up either eating our meals standing up or snugged on an extra chair on a corner. Its a small but pretty striking symbol that: A) I am too sentimental about my furniture. B) We werent entirely prepared for how life with three children would be. I wrote a little text on Instagram about this. That behind glossy photos of food, travels and a kitchen that on good days looks picture perfect, we are still trying to figure out life. And find somewhere to sit. The plan is to get a round table that hopefully both will fit into the kitchen and have seats for the entire family. But until then, I’ll keep eating standing up. I first shared this recipe/­­method about a week ago on Instagram stories (hence the poor image quality above) and judging from the number of direct messages in my inbox, I thought I’d post an more outlined version here as well. We cannot get enough of tray bake dinners in our family. They are simply one of the easiest and most delicious weekday solutions we know and this recipe represents much of what we love about food. Easy to make, easy to like, easy to adapt. It combines warm and cold and sweet and savory. It is vegetable centered, comforting and leaves a minimum of dishes. And the kids like it too. Our twist is that we add lots of fresh ingredients to the tray once it’s ready in the oven; yogurt, pesto, lettuce, spinach, black beans and pomegranate seeds. They add texture and make it feel more like a proper meal. Some days we act like adults and put plates on the table. Other days we just stick the kids a fork each and we all eat from the same tray (sorry mum!). Weve shared the recipe exactly as we made it last week but weve also included a list of variations below the recipe. So don’t get hung up on any specific ingredients, simply use this more as a starting point. The important thing in this recipe is the combination of roasted ingredients + fresh veggies + fruit + something creamy. I hope you give it a try. All-in-One Veggie Tray We wrote a similar recipe for the September issue of Jamie Magazine. We added raw spiralized vegetables (makes it even prettier!) and halloumi instead of yogurt. We add kale and Brussels sprouts midway through roasting since they need less time. The goal is that they will be perfectly crunchy at the same time as the other vegetables are ready. It can be a little tricky to time it right on your first try but second time around you usually get the hang of it. Warm ingredients 1 kg /­­ 2 lbs potatoes 3-4 carrots, peeled 1 broccoli  250 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb Brussels sprouts 3-4 large kale leaves olive oil Cold ingredients 2 handfuls baby spinach 1 avocado 1 cup cooked black beans yogurt pesto (you can thin it out with a little olive oil) lemon Cut potato, carrots and broccoli into bite-sized pieces. Add to a large tray and drizzle with oil and salt. Bake at 200°C /­­ 400°F for approx. 15-20 minutes. Cut the Brussels sprouts in halves. Trim off the thick stalks from the kale and tear the leaves into smaller pieces. Drizzle with oil and salt, add to the tray and bake for 10-15 minutes more or so. The vegetables are ready when they are golden and tender and the kale chips are crunchy. Scatter baby spinach, sliced (or mashed) avocado, black beans, dollops of yogurt and pesto evenly over the vegetables. Squeeze over a little lemon and drizzle with oil. Dig in! Variations Roasted ingredients: Carrots /­­ Broccoli /­­ Cauliflower /­­ Cabbage /­­ Sweet potato /­­ Bell pepper /­­ Brussels Sprouts /­­ Kale /­­ Potatoes /­­ Parsnip /­­ Beetroot Fresh ingredients: Lettuce /­­ Aragula /­­ Spinach /­­ Avocado /­­ Cucumber /­­ Cherry Tomatoes /­­ Spiralized Carrots, Beetroot or Zucchini Fruit: Apple /­­ Orange /­­ Pear /­­ Pomegranate Seeds /­­ Grapes Sauce: Yogurt /­­ Tahini /­­ Pesto /­­ Romesco /­­ Hummus /­­ Dijon Vinaigrette /­­ Coleslaw Extra: Nuts /­­ Seeds /­­ Beans /­­ Boiled eggs /­­ Halloumi cheese /­­ Feta Cheese /­­ Goat’s Cheese

Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov

September 24 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Today’s self-care dialogue is with Tonya Papanikolov, holistic nutritionist, plant-based chef, and creator of The Well Woman. Tonya is a true renaissance woman, well-versed in all things wellness, mindfulness, and natural healing. We are constantly inspired by her otherworldly plant cheese plates and other whole food creations, as well as her radiance and spirit. In this interview, Tonya tells us about her approach to exercise and stress, the protocol she’s been implementing for skin integrity and gut healing, her favorite facial massage tool, her path to holistic nutrition, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I honestly really need both! Routine is so important in keeping me aligned, on track and grounded however too much of it interferes with my natural creative process. I like routine for certain things like: waking up in the morning, meditation, yoga, bowel movements, meals. However, Im a very spontaneous person and I absolutely need the freedom to throw everything up in the air to do something unpredictable. Im distracted quite easily, which means I may go on a walk and begin to inspect the sap coming out of a cedar tree which derails my routine for dinner time, hypothetically speaking ;) Those are moments I happily take freedom over routine. But its all a fine balance. There cant be too much regimentation and there cant be too much freedom. The pendulum is always somewhere along the spectrum being balanced and fine-tuned. Right now in my life, based on various situations and work, I have very little routine and it is actually something Ill be working on in the fall! Calling in some solid routine. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. Mornings do differ from day to day. It just depends on what I have going on. My ideal morning would be waking around 6:30-7am and having a big glass of lemon water before a 30-minute meditation, followed by a return to bed for a cuddle and hug. Next I would have a quick cold shower and head to the kitchen to make a morning elixir. This might be a coffee with nut milk and herbs or matcha, pearl, collagen or whatever else I feel like throwing in my blender that day based on how Im feeling! But definitely a warm beverage and some reading material. I would then begin to prioritize my day and make a list of everything I want to accomplish. I really like to save some time in the mornings to respond to emails, its been a goal of mine this year to get better at responding to emails in a timely manner. But if we had to strip everything down to the bare essentials: the absolute perfect morning is any morning that I have prioritized my meditation before everything else. This is absolute self-care time and if I do nothing else but this, I am ready for my day. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Not specifically at this time. I feel very lucky to be a great sleeper. Bedtime is funny because on the one hand I know I should be going to bed earlier but on the other Im never tired in the evening and am extremely productive during these hours. It is the time of the day I love to work the most! I am the clearest, calmest, there are so few distractions for me and I never feel my energy dip at night (for better or worse). I rarely feel tired at any point in the day so I will happily stay working until 11pm. I do try to limit computer time at night and if I cant then I always have f.lux on my screen to cast off the blue light. Im really working on this! Id like to begin shutting down work by 10pm latest but when you are working for yourself, its not always possible! I feel quite blessed that I fall asleep as soon as my head hits the pillow and that I wake with ease as well. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast - a big green smoothie, a green juice, a warm elixir in the winter time, often with cacao. I will usually add a plant-based, raw, fermented protein to my smoothie or elixir. Sometimes Ill have a piece of sourdough toast from a local organic bakery with nut butter or some avocado and lemon. Lunch - a salad with raw seasonal vegetables or some cooked vegetables like broccoli, squash, sweet potato. Or steamed greens with sauerkraut, hummus and sprouts. Snack - some of my plant-based cheeses with chia/­­flax crackers Dinner - Soup, dahl, kitchari I love making elaborate meals for dinner gatherings and special evenings but when Im cooking for myself I like to aim for simple, healthy and balanced. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do! But Im not that religious about it. I have one drink in the morning that is caffeinated which will alternate between a high-quality coffee or a matcha. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I cant say I do. I dont consume any processed sugar so this helps keep everything in check. When I do bake or use a sweetener I go for maple syrup, honey or dates. I dont feel fiendish about sweet stuff or have cravings for it. I feel lucky for this. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I am just getting through a protocol for strengthening skin integrity and gut healing. I was using a potent antioxidant Quercetin, vitamin C, collagen, an EFA supplement and a general clean diet free of the major allergens. My skin issue cleared up very quickly once I begun this protocol. I also got a good dose of salt water and vitamin D from the sun which played a huge role and were the missing pieces. But in terms of everyday stuff I take a vegan probiotic and ashwagandha. I rotate other things in and out like maca, he shou wu, schisandra. I also drink a nettle and astragalus tea. Id like to say I get everything I need from a healthful diet and clean water but Im a very sensitive being and have a long history of gut trouble like IBS (its really good now!) but this means that I do take extra care with supplementation and herbs when Im feeling sensitive or stressed. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  My day to day is extremely active and yoga is my main form of routine movement. I also dance a lot. I find it to be a wonderful way to start the day. Im usually on my bike for over an hour a day as well and this definitely gets my heart rate up. I go on the occasional run or to a spin class but as we move into Fall Im going to be looking for a new form of movement and exercise - something a bit more strenuous. This is part of the routine Ill be looking to form for fall. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I do find it pleasurable. I dont think Id ever describe the process as torturous (ha!) but I definitely think the hardest part is just getting to the class. Having the motivation to go every day or every other. Once Im there I feel good instantly. The moving and stretching make me feel stronger as the class gets more intense. And of course afterwards, the feeling is the best. Endorphins, detoxing, cooling the body down. Sign me up! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I like to think of beauty from an energetic, magnetism point of view. When I feel my most beautiful its generally an energetic state Im in where I exude magnetism. And Im not talking about a physical beauty magnetism but more of an energetic allure for life, a curiosity. I think other people notice that. I definitely notice that in other people. I find food and nature to have so much physical beauty and that definitely effects the final dishes/­­plates I make. Im an aesthete through and through. My eyes see such beauty in ordinary everyday life moments: the colour of someones eyes, their laugh, the way they move their hands, little unnoticed smirks, hair blowing in the wind, a cluster of sunflowers growing toward the sun, the sound of leaves in the wind. This is all so beautiful to me. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Im big on my skincare regime! If I had it my way Id go for natural facials every month but it usually turns out to be once a season. I use natural products from Pure and Simple in Toronto, Naturopathica and Living Libations which is a Canadian company. Nadine makes incredible skincare products from Haliburton Ontario, you can read her interview on The Well Woman. I only use natural products on my skin which should come as no surprise! My regime is the usual: cleanser, toner, serum and cream. I also have a jade facial gua sha tool that I massage my face with after serum. Best Skin Ever is a pretty remarkable product, its an oil based serum. I try to stay on top of a weekly exfoliation and mask. If you notice your skin getting dull the best way to correct it is with some weekly exfoliation. I use a fig enzyme peel and a clay mask. I try to do this once a week. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water! The easiest way to get beautiful, hydrated and glowing skin is from drinking 2L + water a day. Other things that help are drinking bone broth, colonics or coffee enemas always make my skin and eyes glow because they are so beneficial to our gut health. Getting good sleep is key and meditation is always elevating and leaves me with a glow. A plant-based diet with lots of veggies, greens and fermented foods is also key. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My facial gua sha massage tool! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Meditation, yoga, breath-work, moving my body, laughing at myself, dancing. I use ashwagandha daily too. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? All of the above! I also will talk it out with friends and my sister, family, my therapist. My therapist uses an amazing method that she has been teaching me called the Sedona Method (its an amazing book that I highly suggest). Shes not your usual therapist who you just talk to. She makes me release on all feelings and this has been an incredible tool for releasing stress, fear or any negative emotion. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Oil of oregano, lots of water, a tea with ginger, turmeric and raw honey, minimal food (so that the body can send all of its energy into fighting off the bug instead of to digestion) and LOTS of sleep! -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? There is such overlap for me! Life and work are very intertwined, one in the same. And although I love it that way Im trying to implement some more boundaries and turn-off time. But the fact is that I love what I do so much so working doesnt come with a burden. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Some of the tools have become engrained at this point. I have a morning gratefulness practice of putting my hands toward the ceiling and going over everything I am grateful for in that moment. Its really just about making new habits and setting them as priorities. I try to take 20 minutes a day for stillness in the form of meditation and breath work. I journal regularly as well. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Eating a plant-based diet that consists of mostly vegetables, lots of green smoothies and healthy fats. Diet has been number one, followed by yoga and meditation. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Many books along the way. Siddhartha. The Great Work of Your Life (which not-so coincidentally appeared on my door step one day). All the books I read while studying at The Institute of Holistic Nutrition. Knowledge -- Have you always been interested in the connection between wellness and sustenance? What was your path to studying Holistic Nutrition?  My interest started quite young. I ate really healthy as a kid, my favourite food growing up were carrots (?!). The trend continued as a teenager but I definitely had a lot to learn. I knew I wanted to get into nutrition in high school and chose a university school and program accordingly. I studied nutritional science for four years at the University of Guelph and thought I would become a naturopathic doctor but decided to switch directions after school. I got into a totally different line of work in fashion, where I worked for a Canadian retailer doing fashion direction! It was a really fun job but after a substantial amount of stress and awakening, I decided to pivot back into health, wellness and food. I went back to school, to the Institute of Holistic Nutrition in Toronto. -- You make your own plant cheeses and even developed a plant cheese plate for the Toronto restaurant Nota Bene! How did you come across the plant cheese-making practice and develop your own recipes? What’s your favorite cheese that you make? I learned the process to make the plant-based cheeses while studying at Matthew Kenney Culinary in California, from there its just been experimenting and playing with new flavor and consistency combinations! Thats a tough question, I really love the truffle and charcoal flavor and the freshness of the dill and chive! -- You cook plant-based dinners for groups of people, often centering the food around beautiful themes, like your Spring Equinox dinner. Can you tell us a bit more about the dinners and your approach? Its really just about getting a group together to share in a healthy meal and to show people how versatile, delicious and vibrant a plant-based meal can be. The themes often come from inspiration around the seasons, a book, or an artist. I love the idea of working with a theme for dinners to tie everything together. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Ultimate unwinding is a weekend getaway to a cabin on a lake! Unwinding in nature is always my preference. I treat myself with a facial or going for acupuncture, reiki or to a restorative yoga class. Unwinding can be as simple as a walk. But the classic Tonya move is a back-scratch before bed. My! Favourite! -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book - You Are a Circle and You Are a Message Song/­­Album - This song that I wake up to each and every morning: Ik Ardas Wahe Guru by White Sun Movie - The Scent of Green Papaya by director Tran Anh Hung Piece of Art - Ronan Bouroullec drawings -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Toronto? Awai, Dandylion, Actinolite, nutbar, Kupfert and Kim, Earth and City -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I love this! Here are some of mine: - Probiotics - Oil of oregano - Camera - 2L of water - A book - My recipe/­­poetry notebook - A good pen - A homemade trail mix - My favourite copper spoon - My Jesse Kamms - theyre comfortable and I love wearing them travelling -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Nikisha Brunson! Photos by Nathan Legiehn, Kelly Brown and Tonya Papanikolov. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet

September 13 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

I’m writing from a hotel in Orlando, where we’ve been waiting out hurricane Irma. Man did we dodge the bullet with this one. Our home is on a tiny island off the West Coast of Florida, and originally the storm’s projected path fell right over the island as a very powerful category 4. So powerful that we were getting ready to say goodbye to our house. Due to some extremely fortunate weather circumstances, our home only got hit with a category 1 storm and the island did not flood. There’s no power or cell reception, the streets are a mess, the bridge to the island has a large boat jammed against it, and everything is closed, but we still have a house! Hope everyone is staying as safe as possible this hurricane season. This is an extra cozy, late summer meal that I made last week when we were trying to figure out exactly what to do as the hurricane was approaching. It’s great for weekdays and tastes amazing, even in times of total uncertainty :) Eggplants are at their absolute tastiest right now, so this is a friendly reminder to take advantage of late summer produce while it’s abundant. There’s something about cutting eggplant into large wedges that makes it taste entirely different than roasted halves or whole roasted eggplant. That shape just speaks of comfort, sort of like huge oven fries. Here it’s sprinkled with za’atar and served with delicious and warming herbed pistachio millet, quick pickled onion, as well as a classic, creamy tahini sauce. Hope you’ll give this one a try! P.S. We just heard that our power is back on, so I’m off to pack up and finally go home. Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the quick pickled red onion half of a red onion - thinly sliced apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon coconut sugar (optional) for the herbed pistachio millet 1 cup millet - soaked in purified water w/­­ a splash of apple cider vinegar 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil or ghee 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 1½ teaspoons turmeric sea salt - to taste 1 cup mixed chopped herbs like dill, parsley, cilantro, basil, mint ⅓ cup pistachios - chopped for the eggplant wedges 2 medium eggplants - sliced into wedges 1 tablespoon coconut oil sea salt freshly ground black pepper zaatar for the tahini sauce 1/­­4 cup tahini 1 teaspoon maple syrup or honey ½ teaspoon sriracha (optional) pinch of sea salt freshly squeezed juice of 1 lemon 1/­­4 cup purified water Instructions to make the quick pickled red onion Place the sliced onion in a small bowl and generously drizzle it with apple cider vinegar. Add the coconut sugar, if using, and toss to coat. Let marinate while cooking the millet and roasting the eggplants. to make the herbed pistachio millet Drain the millet and thoroughly rinse it in a strainer. Warm the oil over medium heat in a medium pot, add cumin seeds and toast for 1-2 minutes, until fragrant. Add turmeric and stir it around for a minute. Add the millet and toast, stirring, for a few minutes. Add 2 cups of purified water and salt. Increase the heat to a medium high and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer the millet for 15-20 minutes, covered, but stirring occasionally. Let the millet cool a bit and stir in the herbs and pistachios. to roast the eggplant wedges Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place the eggplant on a the baking sheet. Drizzle with the coconut oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper and mix to coat. Roast for 20 minutes, then flip the wedges and roast for another 15 minutes until soft and golden on both sides. Let cool a bit and sprinkle with zaatar when serving. to make the tahini sauce Combine the tahini, maple syrup, sriracha (if using), salt and lemon juice in a small bowl, mix until smooth. Add water gradually, while mixing, until you achieve a smooth sauce consistency. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Flatbread Pizza Raw Pad Thai with Baby Bok Choy and White Crab Mushrooms Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Indian Burgers

August 26 2017 Vegan Dad 

Indian Burgers As promised, here is the burger recipe to go with the naan bun recipe. The burger is durable, but is better suited to the oven than the grill.  INGREDIENTS Makes 6 large burgers - 1 medium onion, minced - 1/­­2 cup coarsely grated zucchini - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 2 cups chopped cauliflower (small pieces) - 2 cups small diced potato - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 2 tsp minced ginger - 1/­­4 cup chopped cilantro - 1 tsp turmeric - 2 tsp garam masala - 1 tsp cumin - 1 tsp chili powder - 1/­­4 tsp ground fenugreek - 1 tsp salt - 1/­­4 cup vital wheat gluten - 1/­­4 cup chickpea flour METHOD 1. Mix together onion, zucchini, and salt in a small bowl. Set aside. 2. Blanch cauliflower and potato in boiling salted water for 5 mins. Remove from boiling water and plunge into cold water. Drain. Rinse again with cold water and drain well. 3. By this time the onion and zucchini should have released a bunch of water. Squeeze out as much water as you can with your hands and place onion/­­zuke mixture in a new bowl. 4. Add 2/­­3 of the potato/­­cauliflower mixture. Mash the remaining 1/­­3 of the mixture with a fork, and add to the bowl. Add the garlic, ginger, cilantro, spices and salt and mix well. 5. Add the gluten and chickpea flours and mix well. 6. If necessary, mush/­­squeeze the mixture with your hands to bring it together. 7. Line a baking sheet with parchment and lightly oil it. 8. Divide mixture into 6 and press into a ring mold to make the burgers. Mist with oil and place in the fridge to chill. 9. While burgers are chilling, preheat oven to 400 degrees. Bake burgers for 10 mins, then flip, spray with oil, and bake for another 10 mins. Let stand for 5 mins before serving. As you can see from the pic, I served these with with onion rings on top. I used this recipe, but cut the onions into rings and fried them separately. I dressed the burgers with vegan mayo, green tomato chutney, lettuce, and tomato.

Superfood Tie Dye Pops

August 2 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Superfood Tie Dye Pops Paloma’s been taking an active interest in cooking and working on fun food projects with me in the kitchen. This newfound fascination may have something to do with the fact that she’s on summer break and cannot stand being at home with nothing to do for more than a few hours at a time. Instead, she’ll wake up with wild ideas about what she’d like to cook that day. I try to carve out time for those little projects whenever possible, since I obviously support this type of hobby :) In all seriousness though, cooking with kids creates such a great awareness about the importance and power of ingredients, and teaches them all about our connection to food and nourishment. So we’ll cook colorful things like berry-filled ravioli with a green, spirulina-dyed dough and our raw chocolate with a ton of different flavorings, and the kid’s always happy to partake in the fruits of her labor. Paloma recently learned how to tie dye at a summer art camp, and got the idea to ‘make tie dye food.’ At first, I dismissed it as something too difficult and time-consuming, but then realized that it would be pretty easy to make tie dye popsicles with some fruit and all the different, colorful superfood powders I have lying around. All you have to do is make a few coconut milk mixtures of various colors, layer them in a popsicle mold, and freeze. The whole layering process is not unlike a fun art project, and the result doesn’t just turn out pretty, but surprisingly delicious as well. Our layers, all coconut milk-based and sweetened with maple syrup, included mango-turmeric, mango-beet, plain beet, spirulina, moringa and white chia. The contrast between the fruity, creamy and icy layers, plus a bit of crunch from chia seeds and bee pollen is truly heavenly. I know these aren’t your everyday popsicles, but they might be a fun thing to try with a couple of little ones. Adults love them, too :) Superfood Tie Dye Pops   Print Serves: 10 popsicles Ingredients 2 13.5 oz cans unsweetened full fat Thai coconut milk ¼ cup maple syrup 1 tablespoon chia seeds 1 small ripe mango - peeled, pitted and chopped 1 teaspoon turmeric 2 teaspoons beet powder or more to taste - divided 1 tablespoon moringa or matcha powder, or to taste 1 tablespoon spirulina powder to taste bee pollen (optional, not vegan) Instructions Soak wooden popsicle sticks in water for at least 1 hour. Blend the coconut milk with maple syrup in an upright blender. Pour ⅓ cup of the mixture into a small bowl, glass or jar. Add the chia seeds to the bowl, mix thoroughly and set aside to gel. This will be your white chia layer. Pour more of the coconut milk mixture into a different vessel until you have 1 cup of it left in the blender, set the vessel with the coconut milk aside for later. Add the mango to the blender and blend until smooth. Pour half of the mango mixture into a separate bowl, jar or glass. Add the turmeric to the remaining half of the mango mixture in the blender and blend to combine. Pour the turmeric mango mixture into another bowl, jar or glass. This will be your yellow turmeric-mango layer. Briefly rinse the blender and add the reserved half of the just mango mixture back into the blender and add 1 teaspoon of the beet powder. Blend until combined. Pour the beet-mango mixture back into the same bowl, glass or jar that it was in. This will be your red, mango-beet layer. Briefly rinse the blender and add a third of the reserved sweetened coconut milk into the blender, along with the rest of the beet powder. Blend to combine. Pour into a separate bowl, glass or jar. This will be your pink beet layer. Briefly rinse the blender once again and add another third of the reserved sweet coconut milk. Add the moringa/­­matcha powder and blend to combine. Pour into a separate bowl, glass or jar. This will be your green moringa layer. Add the remaining sweetened coconut milk to the blender (no need to rinse the blender here), add the spirulina and blend untill combined. Transfer to a bowl, glass or jar. This will be your aqua spirulina layer. You should end up with 6 different coconut mixtures to work with, providing that you use all the specified ingredients. Start pouring the mixtures into the popsicle molds in layers, alternating between colors. To make the layers bleed into each other a bit, insert a chopstick or skewer into the mold a couple of times, but make sure to not overdo it. Once filled, sprinkle the bottoms of the pops with bee pollen, if using. Cover the molds and place in the freezer for about 1 hour. Install the soaked wooden sticks, place the mold back into the freezer and let freeze completely before unmolding, preferably overnight. Enjoy right away or keep frozen. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Strawberry Oat Smoothie Bowl and Superfood Raw Chocolate Bar Green Smoothie Pops -- Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Superfood Tie Dye Pops appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Peanut Butter Sweet Potato Curry with Veggies and Peas

July 22 2017 Vegan Richa 

Peanut Butter Sweet Potato Curry with Veggies and PeasVegetable Peanut Sweet Potato Curry. 1 Pot 30 Minute Quick and Easy Weekday or Weekend Meal. Serve over rice or quinoa or with toasted pita bread. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe. Can be nut-free with sunbutter. Its getting pretty hot out here. Baking and standing near the stove for too long is not fun. So what to do with the sweet potatoes if not bake them? Make them into a quick curry. This is a simple Sweet Potato, Veggie, and Pea curry with Peanut butter sauce. Sweet potato works really well with the nut butter and this sweet savory stew is a perfectly satisfying meal as well as satisfies the summer sweet craving. In summer, I prefer less spices in the stews, so I add just a sprinkle of garam masala in the end. Curry powder, Berbere, harissa and cajun spice blend also work well in this curry. Add the spices you prefer towards the end with the peas and adjust to preference. This curry is a great base to build up on with additional vegetables, beans, spices and flavor. For a deeper flavor profile, try the sauce from this very popular Chickpea Turmeric Peanut Butter Curry.  You can also make this into a soup with additional water or broth and serve it hot or cold. Add some chickpeas or lentils to make it hearty. 1 Pot, easy and makes a great dinner. Continue reading: Peanut Butter Sweet Potato Curry with Veggies and PeasThe post Peanut Butter Sweet Potato Curry with Veggies and Peas appeared first on Vegan Richa.

tomato pickle recipe | tomato pachadi recipe | tomato achar recipe

July 4 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

tomato pickle recipe | tomato pachadi recipe | tomato achar recipetomato pickle recipe | tomato pachadi recipe | tomato achar recipe or andhra tomato pickle recipe with detailed photo and video recipe. basically a cooked tomato concentrate, spiced with pickle spices, specifically used as a condiment to enhance taste and staple. the most common spices used in tomato pickle recipe is asafoetida, red chili powder, turmeric, and fenugreek with the sourness of ripe tomatoes. Continue reading tomato pickle recipe | tomato pachadi recipe | tomato achar recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegan Breakfast Nachos

June 13 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Breakfast Nachos These Breakfast Nachos are a favorite “anytime” meal at our house, and they can make an extra-special brunch on Father’s Day.  I plan to make this for Jon on Sunday to thank him for being such a great dad to all of our kitties.  Lucky for him, the cats won’t be helping me in the kitchen! I hope you and your family enjoy this as much as we do! Breakfast Nachos Nachos for breakfast is a fun way to start the day. Make the queso sauce in advance and the nachos will come together quickly. - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 small yellow onion, minced - 2 garlic cloves, minced - 3 scallions, chopped - 12 ounces extra-firm tofu, drained and diced - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cumin - 1/­­4 teaspoon turmeric - 1 1/­­2 cups cooked or 1 (15-ounce) can black beans, drained and rinsed - 1 large tomato, diced - 1 jalapeno, seeded and minced -  1/­­4 cup chopped cilantro, plus more for garnish (optional) - 1 ripe avocado, peeled, pitted, and diced - 1 recipe Smoky Queso Sauce (below), kept warm - 1 (13-ounce) bag restaurant-style tortilla chips -  Heat the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion and cook for 3 minutes, then add the garlic and scallions and cook 2 minutes longer. Add the tofu and salt, and cook, stirring, for 5 minutes. Stir in the nutritional yeast, cumin, and turmeric. Taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. Stir in the beans, cover, and keep warm. -  In a medium bowl, combine the tomato, jalapeno, cilantro, and lime juice. Season with salt to taste and mix well. Gently stir in the avocado. -  To assemble, spoon a thin layer of the sauce on the bottom of a large plate. Place half of the chips on top of the sauce. Spoon half of the sauce on top of the chips, followed by half of the tofu and beans, and then half of the salsa. Top with the remaining chips and repeat with the remaining ingredients. Serve immediately, garnished with additional cilantro, if using. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by William and Susan Brinson.   Smokey Queso Sauce This easy-cheesy sauce is great for nachos or folded into cooked pasta for a zesty mac and cheese. If chopped pimientos are unavailable, you can substitute 3 tablespoons chopped roasted red bell pepper. - 1 (2-ounce) jar chopped pimientos, drained - 1 teaspoon canned chipotle chiles in adobo sauce - 1/­­2 cup nutritional yeast - 3 tablespoons cornstarch - 1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika - 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder - 1 teaspoon salt - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice - 2 teaspoons rice vinegar - 1 1/­­2 cups plain unsweetened almond milk or water -  Combine all the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Transfer to a saucepan and cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until thickened, about 5 minutes. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Use as desired. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. The post Vegan Breakfast Nachos appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London

June 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London We love yogurt in our family*. The unsweetened, thick, creamy and tangy kind. We enjoy yogurt for breakfast (with fruit) and sometimes dessert (with dates + chocolate + nuts). We top our soups with yogurt, we add it to smoothies and ice pops and we also dress our salads with it (Isac likes to dress himself with it as well). Yogurt works remarkably well both with sweet and savory flavors. And yet, the thought of making a yogurt bowl with savory toppings instead of sweet, had never struck us before. But as we were playing around with this crunchy cucumber and melon salad with spiced chickpeas, we (and with we, I humbly mean ME, MYSELF and I - as in, not David) had the simple idea to put them on a bed of yogurt instead of doing the usual yogurt dressing. In theory, it’s more or less the same thing but in reality it’s so much better. The warm, rich and spicy chickpeas on a bed of cold, thick and tangy yogurt, with the addition of a fresh salad with lots of crunch. It’s simple but yet so very good. And quick too. I’m sure there are plenty of savory yogurt bowls all over internet, but now they are also in our kitchen. *David and Isac are actually intolerant to dairy but yogurt is their weak spot. We buy oat yogurt for them but David often chooses a day of stomach ache just to enjoy a bowl of plain yogurt. And Isac has literally been caught with his hand in the yogurt jar more than once. Coconut yogurt has a fantastic taste and consistency but is simply too expensive to enjoy more than as an occasional treat (very keen on giving Ashley’s versions a try though!). Hey hey hey, wait a sec. This is David acting as proofreader today and I just noted Luise’s attempt at hijacking my idea. This recipe = my idea. Just wanted to make that clear. I’ll give the word back to her now. The salad is super quick as you just need to chop everything up. We found that crunchy vegetables like cucumber, celery, sturdy roman lettuce and radishes work really well here, with the avocado and melon adding softness and sweetness. The yogurt is, well, just yogurt. It needs to be quite thick to hold up the topping - our preference is Greek yogurt but choose whatever you prefer. The only thing that needs a little more preparation and heat are the spiced chickpeas. Even if the ingredient list looks long, it’s simply spices, oil and chickpeas and the result tastes way better than just using plain chickpeas. They have a rich, spicy and slightly nutty flavor which works so well with the freshness from the yogurt and the crunchy and sweet salad. VARIATIONS There are plenty of ways to vary this recipe and we’re going to leave you with a few ideas. - Whisk some creamy goat’s cheese into the yogurt. It will dissolve, become smooth and give the yogurt a more mature flavor. - If you don’t have all the spices at home for the chickpeas, use what you find. A bread spice mix works great along with a little cayenne. A turmeric or curry version would be interesting too. - You can skip the salad and pour the yogurt into small sealable jars with spiced chickpeas on top. Store them in the fridge for a quick snack. - Vegans can of course use a vegan yogurt option or simply settle for the salad with warm chickpeas stirred through. - Roasting the chickpeas in the oven together with eggplant or pumpkin could be amazing on top of the yogurt as well. Let us know if you have any other favorite variations on savory yogurt bowls and we can include them in this list. Savory Yogurt Bowl with Spicy Chickpeas & Cucumber Salad Serves 4, or 2 very hungry persons Cucumber & Melon Salad 1 cucumber 1 small (or 1/­­2 regular) melon (we used Piel de Sapo but honeydew would also work) 1 spring onion 2 celery stalks 10-15 fresh mint leaves 1 avocado 6 radishes 1/­­2 roman lettuce 1/­­2 lemon, juice 1 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil Spiced warm chickpeas 2 tbsp sunflower seeds 1 tbsp sesame seeds 2 tsp fennel seeds  1 tsp coriander seeds 1 tsp cardamom seeds 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1/­­2 tsp ground cayenne 1/­­2 tsp ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp ground paprika powder 1/­­4 cup – 1/­­2 cup cold-pressed olive oil 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g can cooked chickpeas, drained and rinsed For serving 2 cups plain full-fat Greek yogurt  For the cucumber & melon salad:  Wash all produce. Cut cucumber and melon in large bite-size pieces. Trim and finely slice spring onion, celery and mint leaves. Cut the avocado in half and remove the stone, then cut into cubes. Trim the radishes and thinly slice them. And chop the roman lettuce. Place all prepared ingredients in a mixing bowl, squeeze over lemon juice, drizzle with olive oil and a little salt, give it a good toss and set aside. For the spiced warm chickpeas:  Add all seeds and spices (except for the ground spices) to a dry skillet, heat gently for a couple of minutes while stirring. When the spices starts to pop and smell fragrant, they’re done. Pour into a mortar and give them a few bashes with the pestle (alternatively on a cutting board and use the back of a chef’s knife). Transfer the seeds and spices back to the skillet. Now add oil (start with the lesser amount and add more later on if it looks dry), ground spices  and chickpeas and heat on low temperature for 2-3 minutes. Stir to combine. When the chickpeas are warm and covered in spices and seeds, remove from the heat. Dollop the yogurt into four bowls. Use the back of a spoon to smooth it out. Arrange the salad on one side of the yogurt and the spiced warm chickpea on the other side. Drizzle a little extra oil on top. Enjoy immediately while the chickpeas are still warm. ********* LONDON + BATH In all my excitement over a simple bowl of yogurt, I almost forgot to mention that we are coming to London and Bath next week for a couple of book events. We’re very excited and can’t wait to meet some of you! We’re having a supper club at Grace Belgravia on Monday 5 June, 7-10 pm. More info here. We’ll do talk and Q&A at Whole Foods Market in Kensington on Wednesday 7 June, 6.30 pm. More info and tickets here. We’ll also do a talk and cooking demo at Topping & Company Booksellers in Bath on Friday 9 June, 7.30 pm. More info and tickets here. Finally, we’re having a hands on cooking class at Bertinet Kitchen in Bath on Saturday 10 June, 10 am. Tickets here (only one left). Big love!

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin

October 11 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Amy Chaplin is an author and chef, whose approach to whole foods and cooking is endlessly inspiring. Her cookbook is nothing short of a kitchen bible to us. We had the pleasure of meeting up with Amy in NYC a few years ago and had the best time chatting about our favorite subjects like sprouted flours, cookbook publishing, and acupuncture. Needless to say, we were excited to get a peak at her self-care routine. In this interview, Amy tells us about the valuable self-care tips she learned from her mother, her favorite meals made with pantry staples, the skincare brand she’s been using since she was a teenager, her approach to exercise, stress, and so much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I like both. I like to have a morning routine and create a work routine for whatever project Im working on but I also like to have time for free thinking and spontaneously connecting with friends. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I get up early, 6 am  is the usual time but sometimes eariler depending on what Im working on. I make warm lemon water, light a candle and mediate for 10 to 15 minutes. In late summer the sun is coming up just as I finish and I usually sit for a bit and often reply to messages from Austrlia (they are going to bed around that time). Then I feed our two dogs (my wife takes them out on a long morning walk) start making breakfast and make sencha tea. Sometimes I skip the sencha and have a matcha latte after breakfast but I try not to have too much caffeine, as much as I love it! If Im working on recipes from home, I quickly shower, dress and get started right away....sometimes before breakfast but it depends on what Im testing :) -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I stop working on the computer before dinner and leave it closed. I leave my phone downstairs so its far from my bedroom. I get into bed and usually read cookbooks or watch an episode of any series Im currently obsessed with :) Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast –  soaked oats + chia (recipe is in my book) or activated grain porridge with homemade nut milk, cardamom and berries. I usually eat grains once a day and its usually in the morning. Lunch – Beans of some kind --depending on recipes Im testing. Kraut or other fermented veg, greens--salad or steamed depending on weather. I usually add some toppings too: hemp seeds, toasted seeds, sunflower sprouts, scallions anything to make it tasty Snack – Seeded crackers and nut butter/­­avocado/­­bean pate or chia pudding or coconut yogurt Dinner – An egg or tempeh, avocado, steamed veg and a dressing of some kind--this is often quite small as Im not always hungry if I have a good lunch or if Im testing and sampling recipes. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Yes. I love green tea. Sencha is my favorite for its fresh, grassy umami taste. Rishi Tea First Flush Sencha is sublime. I also love their ceremonial grade matchas with foamed, homemade almond milk. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to but I havent eaten sugar on a regular basis for years. If Im craving something sweet I eat a few spoons of Anitas coconut yogurt--it has a naturally sweet flavor from coconut with no sweetener. If I have a berry compote around Ill have some of that with it but I never sweeten them as Ive gotten used to just the sweetness of the berries. Of course there are times when Im testing recipes for cakes and muffins and I do enjoy tasting them and the same goes for good raw chocolate. Im not rigid about it as its part of being a chef but I dont seek out sugar on a daily basis. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I change depending on what my acupuncturist recommends in the way of Chinese herbs. I have been taking spirulina to increase protein and greens lately. I take a vitamin D. Ive been adding maca powder to my breakfasts for years so dont really consider it a supplement. I like adding locally grown ashwagandha (from Furnace Creek Farm) and reishi or chaga mushroom powder to hot cacao drinks. I drink nettle tea everyday because I love it, especially when you can get it fresh from the farmers market. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  With my job being so physical, these days I gravitate towards Qi Gong and yoga--the gentler classes. I also tend to exercise by default. Walking everywhere, long dog walks, biking and general schlepping around the city and up and down stairs with heavy bags of veggies! -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I used to push myself with torturous classes and long runs but now I do less and enjoy it more. I know that I am more productive when I make time for movement but it has to be mindful.  I do yoga at home and love it when I have the time for long luxurious classes...especially restorative. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Beauty to me is an inner glow that comes from something beyond what and how we take care of our bodies. Mostly it comes with time and a spiritual sense of oneself, our path, the world and other beings around us. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Ive used Dr. Hauschka since I was a teenager. I have a huge respect for biodynamic growing practices and love the way they preserve their products naturally. I think its one of the most difficult things with natural skin care products--preserving. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Local organic veggies, lots of greens, seeds… -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I notice a difference in my skin when I use a warm compress of essential oils (Dr. Hauschka calls them bath oils). You put a few drops in warm water and soak a face cloth, squeeze it out and press it into your skin. I use lemongrass in the morning and lavender at night. Then you cleanse and use the same water to wash the cleanser off. They smell so good and your skin feels really clean and enlivened afterwards. Its my mothers beauty secret, she looks amazing! :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Mainly daily meditation and breathing. I dont feel as clear or grounded without it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Hot shower and miso soup :) -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Make miso soup with lots of ginger and scallions and I also take Woodstock C & F Seasonal Support. It always helps with a sore throat or when Im feeling under the weather. Gargling sea salt with warm water. Colloidal silver spray. Hot lemon drink with grated ginger and turmeric. Bath and sleep. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely overlap. I love what I do and have found comfort in the kitchen for as long as I can remember. Of course there are days when work completely takes over but even when my schedule is jam packed, I try and make time to spend with my partner, cuddle the dogs and see family--it just means well be eating recipes that are being tested and theyre grilled for feed back! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I aften find myself saying “everything is working out for my highest good and remembering that everything is perfect as it is. I grew up with Louise Hay books. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Over time my lifestyle and diet has improved and I have a much more balanced approach. I used to be quite strict at times and I know that its not the way to great health for me anyway. I think now I have better overall health so I dont get thrown off on a regular basis. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Paul Pitchford’s “Healing with Whole Foods has been in my life for over 20 years and I still consult it. It always gets me in the mood for pure, simple temple-like food. My self care is also influenced by my mother. She has a deep connection to nature and a daily ritual of foot baths, lemon water in the morning and making a nightly hot water bottle (in the cooler months) Ive carried on these rituals...but dont seem to get the foot baths in as often as she does. Knowledge -- Your recipes are so well thought out and always turn out delicious, as well as incredibly nourishing. What is your process when it comes to recipe development? Thank you so much! My recipes all begin with what I crave, which is mostly deeply nourishing food with clean uncomplicated flavors. They have to make sense to me and not only be healthy but also be visually beautiful. Nature and beauty are what inspire me most. When I am developing recipes I want the steps to be clear and thorough. I spend a lot of time with new recipes before they are published. Theyre all tested over and over again by myself, friends, family and recipe testers. I feel a lot of responsibility to readers who spend time and money and a lot of effort making my recipes...they have to work and taste delicious! -- You are a big proponent of keeping a well-stocked pantry. What are some of your favorite meals that you like to throw together with pantry ingredients? Simple wraps with nori, fermented veggies, avocado (not really pantry but I always have a few of varying ripeness around). Barrys tempeh, which is made from white beans and adzuki beans and sold frozen, it tastes amazing just panfried in coconut oil. In Australia you can get fresh fava bean tempeh and Im missing it so much! Red lentil soup with lemon and spinach from my cookbook. That is perfect for right now when the weather is getting cooler and if you dont have much in the way of veg. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Drive to the country with my wife, play with my nephew, drink tea and sit in the morning sun. Have a pedicure. Travel and be in nature. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – “The Power of Intention” by Wayne Dyer Song/­­Album – Blue by Joni Mitchell Movie – I recently saw Lion and was so moved Piece of Art – Yoko Onos simple, whimsical pieces -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in NYC? ABC V, Via Carota, Ilbuco Alimentari, De Maria -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – Good tea selection + strainer for infusing – Activated or toasted nuts – Spirulina – Pajamas and cosy sox (no matter the season) – Large scarf/­­shawl – Cardigans -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Luise from Green Kitchen Stories, Henrietta Inman, Elenore from Earthsprout, Emma from My Darling Lemon Thyme..... Photos by Amy Chaplin and Stephen Kent Johnson. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Curried Almond Sweet Potato Soup

October 3 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Curried Almond Sweet Potato SoupThis Curried Almond Sweet Potato Soup has it all: great taste, vibrant color, and the creamy goodness of almond butter. For this recipe, I use Frontier brand organic curry powder, a heady blend of coriander, turmeric, cumin, mustard, fenugreek, cardamom, nutmeg, red pepper, cinnamon, and cloves, but most any curry spice blend should perform well. For a thinner soup, stir in a small amount of nondairy milk during the final heating. Curried Almond Sweet Potato Soup - 1 tablespoon neutral vegetable oil or 1/­­4 cup water - 1 large yellow onion, chopped - 1 clove garlic, chopped - 1 (28-ounce) can crushed tomatoes - 5 cups vegetable broth or water - 2 large sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks - 2/­­3 cup almond butter - 1 tablespoon curry powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon cayenne pepper - Salt - 1/­­4 cup chopped roasted almonds - Heat the oil or water in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic, cover, and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. - Add the tomatoes, broth, and sweet potatoes. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to low. Cook, uncovered, until the potatoes are soft, about 30 minutes. - Stir in the almond butter, curry powder, cayenne, and salt to taste. Remove from the heat and allow to cool. - Puree the mixture in a blender or food processor until smooth, or use an immersion blender to puree the soup right in the pot. Heat the soup over low heat until hot. Serve sprinkled with the chopped almonds. From The Nut Butter Cookbook by Robin Robertson. (C)2014 Robin Robertson. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Lori Maffei. The post Curried Almond Sweet Potato Soup appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Giardiniera Mac and Cheese

September 26 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Giardiniera Mac and Cheese Italian pickled mixed vegetables, called giardiniera, can be quite tart, so its best to drain and rinse before using. You can make this mac and cheese without the gardiniera or with the addition of cooked vegetables, frozen, thawed green peas, or marinated artichoke hearts. You can also make this ahead and then cover and pop it in the oven to reheat.   Giardiniera Mac and Cheese - 8 to 12 ounces fiore pasta or other bite-sized pasta shape - 2 1/­­2 cups giardiniera vegetables, drained and coarsely chopped - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1/­­3 cup panko crumbs - 1 1/­­2 cups unsweetened almond milk - 1/­­3 cup raw cashew pieces, soaked and drained - 2 tablespoons cornstarch or tapioca flour - 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast flakes - 1 tablespoon mellow white miso - 1 heaped tablespoon tomato paste - 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar or lemon juice - 3/­­4 teaspoon mustard powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika - 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder - 1 small clove minced garlic - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground turmeric - 1 teaspoon salt, or to taste - Cook the pasta in a pot of boiling salted water until it is al dente. About 3 minutes before the pasta is done cooking, stir in the giardiniera. Drain and leave in the strainer. - Heat the oil in a small skillet over medium-high heat. Add the panko crumbs, stirring to coat with the oil. Cook, stirring for a few minutes until the crumbs are toasted. Remove from the heat and set aside. - In a blender, combine all of the remaining ingredients and blend until smooth and creamy. Pour the sauce into the pot in which the pasta was cooked and cook stirring, over medium-high heat, until the sauce is hot, bubbly, and thickened, about 4 minutes. Add the pasta and vegetables to the sauce, stirring gently to combine and heat through. Transfer to a casserole dish and sprinkle with the reserved panko. Serve hot. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. The post Giardiniera Mac and Cheese appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King

September 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Today’s self-care dialogue is with LA artist and meditation teacher, Lauren Spencer King. We first learned about Lauren a few years ago, when we came across her bimonthly moon writings that ring incredibly true and clear up a lot of things for us every month. Since then, we’ve fallen in love with Lauren’s art and meditation work, which is centered around breath work and her extensive knowledge about the healing powers of minerals. Lauren was kind enough to open up a space for us in her 4 day online meditation workshop for stress and anxiety, and we had the most lovely and calming time following her techniques and suggestions, which we often use to this day. Lauren’s self-care routine is as inspiring as it is down to earth, with a focus on finding the wisdom in the inner self. In this interview, Lauren tells us about the Ayurvedic cleanse she’s on, what minerals she keeps next to her bed, her ideas about exercise and beauty, why she sees the concept of a work-life balance as a myth, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think in my everyday things do feel open and free, its part of the benefit of being an artist and working for yourself. But, I do find routine within that freedom. Days are also made up of habits (good and bad), and trying to prioritize things that are important and meaningful. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I like to have a few hours to wake up and start my day. I like the quiet of the mornings, the possibility of a new day. Sometimes if I happen to wake up really early for some reason, like 5:00am, I like to read in bed for a bit, or watch a scary movie early in the morning. Its weird... I know. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? On good nights I am in bed early and read before I go to sleep. I love reading in bed, there is something about it that feels so intimate. On a not so good night I will work too late, and fall asleep to a movie. I do like to sleep with a few minerals next to my bed, some make their way under my pillow at certain times: purple fluorite to relax my mind, danburite for sweet dreams, aquamarine for calming, a piece of dream quartz, and a piece of shungite that is next to my phone (on airplane mode). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: I am on an Ayurvedic cleanse right now. I have been working with this great Ayurvedic practitioner, her name is Meredith Carter. Years ago I did panchakarma (here), and if I could afford it I would do it annually. Its incredible. What I am doing now is like panchakarma lite! Breakfast – In the morning I make homemade almond milk. I will warm the almond milk and mix in my herbs and adaptogens, sometimes I will add fresh turmeric. I have been obsessed with making sweet potato toasts. I will top them with tahini and a cooked fruit compote (been loving cherry, wild blueberry, or pear ginger), with some pistachio nuts or pumpkin seeds. If I need some protein then I will eat two eggs toped with basil, and a tangerine. Lunch – I make fresh dahl with special non-heating spices and ghee, all of which I get from Surya Spa, they have the best mung beans and spices. Dahl is very healing. I will have a bowl full with some steamed chard or beet greens, black lava sea salt, toasted pumpkin seeds and lots of parsley or coriander on top. Snack – right now cherries are in season and they are making me so happy, I will have a bowl full of them with a handful of pistachios (lets be honest, like 1/­­2 a bag, I love pistachios). And some fresh ginger tea. Or I will make some beet hummus and have that with my favorite almond crackers. Dinner – I have been getting really into making soups! My two favorite are a green soup made with celery /­­ chard /­­ beet greens /­­ asparagus /­­ Japanese sweet potato. And a kabocha /­­ carrot /­­ginger soup. Or I will cook a big artichoke and dip the leaves into a melted ghee, lemon dip. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? None, I have never even had a cup of coffee. I usually have a huge jar of warm water with lemon or fresh ginger in the morning. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to when I was younger, until I developed all sorts of health problems because of it, some that I still deal with even over a decade later. I was living in Paris and eating nothing but delicious breads and sweets! It really took a toll on my body and since then I have cut both out. But, I still dream of flaky French almond croissants. Maybe in another life I will get to enjoy them again. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I love eating a spoonful of Chyawanprash in the morning. My good friend who runs Rebbl and develops all of their delicious drinks sent me a wellness mixture, it has very high grade reshi, ashwaganda and maca in it. I have that every morning. I love QuintEssentials 3.3 minerals. I also swear by Alexis Smarts flower remedies, she is amazing! I also almost always tend to all ailments physical and emotional with a homeopathic remedy from her. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I have an aversion to most forms of exercise, especially any kind of class where an instructor is wearing a headset and yells things at you like, Its almost swimsuit season, ladies. But sometimes I get into a routine where I go to yoga. I like to take hikes and go on walks, and I love to dance. But, my favorite is swimming. Recently I was swimming laps, and was having one of those days where I was feeling very unkind and judgmental of my body, and there was this older man in the lane next to me, he was a very serious swimmer, he might have even been a swim coach at some point, you could just tell. And I stopped to catch my breathe and he asked me how I had such a strong breaststroke. I told him it was because I was on swim team for years as a kid and maybe because I was tall. We talked for a bit about it and then I got back to my laps. And I started to think that in day to day life what I criticize most about my body in other contexts I use to my advantage. In this case, that my un-slender legs and bigger hips and butt actually made me a stronger swimmer and made my stroke more powerful. It really changed the way I thought about my body. I try to remember this. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really love natural beauty, which to me means being whole and owning all of who you are. You know, there are times when I see someone crying, and they dont maybe look their best, but they are so beautiful to me, because they are so present and authentic. Bodies arent meant to be perfect, thats not why we have them. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love oils and go through different phases of them on my face and body. Right now at night I use a hazelnut or arnica oil from a Paris apothecary for my face. I am also completely obsessed with Sans Ceuticalss Activator 7 Oil. I use it everywhere – body, face and hair! I dont really wear make up but when I do it is from RMS. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I either dry brush or do abhyanga massage with basil oil every day, its more for the internal lymphatic system, but it makes my skin really nice. Eating well and drinking enough water are also key. And a little sun is always nice. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I love using my jade face roller to refine the tone of my skin as well as relieve some tension I carry in my jaw. I also am into my second year of no bra, for the most part. For a few reasons, one of them being that they actually arent good for your body. No products with chemicals. My mum was a natural beauty, she really taught me what that was, she had a style that was all her own. She was radiant from the inside out. I sometimes think this is something you are born with. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Stress is often what I teach most about in class, because it has been the biggest teacher to me. I feel I am always at a growing edge with it. I try not to over schedule myself. Rest is a big part of being healthy for me. I have gone through some very difficult periods in my life of having sever adrenal fatigue, which comes from stress of all kinds. So, I have to listen really carefully not to push myself too hard, despite at times wanting to ignore my limitations. Recently I have been working with someone to understand the deeper level of stress that I unconsciously take on from people around me and from living in a city. It has been fascinating. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Yes, sometimes stress can not be avoided, like when I have a show, or need to be on the computer all day, or travel. Those are the big ones for me. I have to really work hard to stay grounded. Its really all sorts of little things, that when I do them really add up. And I just do the best I can, its not about perfection. Even stopping to dance the stress out of my body for five minuets really helps. Stress is more physical than we think. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Stop everything. Get into bed in something comfy with socks. Sleeping as much as I can. Raw garlic. Olive Leaf supplements. Colloidal silver. Apple Cider Vinegar if I have a sore throat. Hot shower (or bath) with eucalyptus oil. Thieves oil on my chest and throat. Lots of water. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I honestly think this idea of work /­­ life balance is a myth. At least it is for me. Sometimes its only about working on Fields of Study, sometimes I am all about being in the studio, sometimes its more relaxing and I can see friends and go on a trip or a weekend getaway. There is balance within the year if I am lucky. I recently just let this idea go, I was making myself feel so bad trying to make that ideal happen on a daily or even weekly timeline. I am also a bit of a workaholic, never feeling like I am doing enough. Thats something I am trying to work on. But, this pressure for balance seems like a modern day version of the women can have it all mantra. There are always compromises and I think its more empowering if we own that and voice it and have conversations about it. Instead of silently thinking that there is something wrong with us. Motivation -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Its not one single thing, but if it was it would be learning to listen to my body. My health and understanding of health has come from a bumpy road of making lots little shifts. I dont believe in a one size fits all mentality for health. I think we are all different and in every moment we need different things. I am wary of the companies and self proclaimed health gurus out there right now that give sometimes ill informed blanket recommendations. I think it is up to us to empower ourselves and take the time to learn about our bodies and ourselves. Its important to have support and create a team of people that can help you. I have an amazing doctor, a homeopathist, an Ayurvedic practitioner, a woman who I do energy work with, and a therapist that have all at different times saved my life in various ways. It can take time, but finding the people that resonate with your understanding of health is key. I have learned so much about my body and what health and healing is from working with all of them. And remembering that deep and true healing takes time. Its always a process. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. What came to mind was this movie Agnes Martin made called Gabriel. Its terribly long and boring. It is about the boy on a walk in nature, and it is very stripped down and minimal, no dialog and most of the movie is silent, it has one tiny part with music. But, I think it relates to the way I think about self-care in a way because it is about listening to the subtleties, and how all of that gets lost when there is a lot going on. Once I really started refining my diet, routine, relationship to my energy, my intuition, etc... I started to really be able to notice those subtle changes and messages my body was sending me, and as time goes on I keep going deeper and deeper. Its like in Martins paintings, when color is introduced, it feels monumental. Like for me, bananas are just too sweet now. Knowledge -- You are well-versed in so many amazing practices! Could you tell us a little bit about each of them: – Your art (would love to know more about your process on the mineral paintings) After graduate school I started making my own watercolors out of historical pigments, mostly from minerals and some earth pigments. I taught myself how to make paints the way they were made for centuries before there were synthetic colors. The mineral monochromes are just one aspect of the work I make, and they are about many things. But, the main ones are a redirection of how we think about representation. I think of them as representational paintings, as they are made of the very thing they are depicting: malachite, azurite, agate, epidote... They are also about an interest in the healing powers of art. They are made with the intention that the viewer and the space receive the same healing properties of the minerals and the earth from which they are sourced. I usually pair them with a highly rendered graphite drawings or watercolors. –  Fields of Study and mineral meditations Some years back after teaching meditation for a bit I was longing for an alternative to what I was seeing in the ways of spiritual teachings and mediation work, both in approach and aesthetic. I wanted to support people and teach them tools they could use in their every day life, while also creating a container for all the things I was interested in and all the things that I brought into my own spiritual practice, which I feel I am always shaping and discovering. Something that would allow for a deep conversation that also had breadth, and was based in every day life and could be accessible. Something that could be malleable and evolve as I did. And Fields of Study was born. I originally wanted to open up a non-profit space that would be like a modern day community center with classes and workshops for the community, as well as have a little shop and a residency space. And someday this might happen. But for now its just me – working to change the world, one person at a time. I say this with some humor, but its also a very real desire to be in service and help instigate change. The same goes for how I teach about minerals, I want to present an alternative, something that resonates with me and represents how I grew up with minerals in my home because of my mother, who was a silversmith. The goal of all those workshops is really to show people that they know more than they think they do, about most things, minerals included. And its not really about helping people feel like they know everything, but showing them that when they ask and they trust themselves they can source the answers. The participants really end up teaching the workshop, which I think is pretty amazing. – Your Moon writings I have been writing about the moon twice a month for about six years now. It really came out of a desire to understand its energy on a deeper level, and also to check in with myself about what I was feeling on a bimonthly basis. Its hard to take credit for the writing as I feel I have gotten to a place with it where I just sit down to write and something comes through me. As out there as that sounds, thats really what happens. I just listen as best as I can, I have gotten pretty good at listening. Writing in this way has really strengthened my intuition, its really incredible. Its also nice to get conformations from people when they write to tell me how right on it was for them. It reminds me that we are all connected. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Swimming in the ocean. The hot springs in Ojai or a trip to Joshua Tree. A bad movie. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Golden Bough and She by Robert A Johnson Song/­­Album – Gamelan Orchestra music, JD Emmanuel, and Neil Youngs album Harvest Moon, particularly Natural Beauty. Its my favorite song. Movie – The Color of Pomegranates Piece of Art – Fragonard, Brancusi, and John McCracken. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Funny enough I just re-read this essay from The White Album where she talks about her packing list related to her being a journalist. At the very end she mentions that the one thing she never had was a watch, which she supposes is some reflection of the climate of the late 60s. But, a watch is the thing I always have, perhaps that says something about me and the times we are living in now. When I travel I also always wear this gold Victorian compass. You never know when you will have to find your way home. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? My Ayurvedic practitioner – Meredith Carter, my Homeopath – Alexis Smart, or anyone of the ladies on the @onigiriemoji Instagram feed I am a part of. Its a feed where a group of friends post what they are cooking and eating. Also, I wish you could have interviewed my mum, she was the best cook, I wish I learned more about cooking from her. Photos by Lauren Spencer King, Claire Cottrell and from Lauren’s shop. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso

September 6 2017 My New Roots 

Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso I have to start by saying how incredibly moved I was by the comments on the last post, and the emails I received from you guys - a deep, heartfelt thank you. I knew that opening myself up would spark a lot of conversation, but I never imagined the impact it would have, not only in regards to the incredible outpouring of support, but for sharing your own stories and struggles. Time and time again I am reminded of the power in vulnerability and open communication. I feel truly blessed to have a community of conscious and loving readers, and that we can all share our journey with one another. That is what makes us stronger, and certainly healthier human beings in every sense of the word. Before I dig deeper into what Ive been doing to eat for balancing my hormones, Id like to just follow-up with the topic of orthorexia. Many of you expressed surprise at my struggles, thinking that because I do what I do, I must have had it all together. The truth is I thought that I did have it all together for a very long time, and creating My New Roots has been the most powerful catalyst in my healing. For the last decade, Ive felt very grounded in my choices and excited to celebrate them with you. But like I mentioned in the last post, the experience of changing my diet has brought back many of the challenges, dark thoughts and feelings that I had convinced myself were gone forever. Putting new restrictions on myself made me to put food into good and bad categories. This probably doesnt sound so terrible, but like I said before, this is a slippery slope into full-blown disordered eating for me. I see now that there is an incredibly fine line between caring about what I eat and caring too much. I believe that my relationship to food is something that I may have to keep in check for the rest of my life, or at least as long as I choose to use it as a tool to become a healthier person (so, like, forever). In the last four months of tuning into what I need right now, and eating more consciously, Ive really experienced a positive difference in how I feel, which is the biggest reward anyone could ask for! But Ive also had bad days where I wasnt prepared, and suddenly being at a wedding or a birthday party, or out for dinner with friends without much to eat in the good category, wasnt so rad. My blood sugar would crash, Id feel desperate, totally out of control and the voices would come back. What Ive learned from these experiences is that I need to be as prepared as possible in these situations, but if I can’t, I simply have to let go. I cannot control everything and I cannot always be prepared, but that in order to move forward, I have to maintain flexibility, and stop being so darn hard on myself! I firmly believe that there is more strength in being fluid and forgiving, than rigid and judgmental. I am just a person, after all. Since many of you were curious about the connection between food and hormone balance, Id like to discuss it in more detail, and share what Ive been doing to keep these miraculous chemicals in check, and keep them working for me, not against me! Upping my fat and protein intake – but especially fat Fats are an essential part of a healthy, well-balanced diet, and they are especially important for hormone balance. Fats actually create the structural components of hormones, and cholesterol specifically is responsible for our reproductive hormones; estrogen, progesterone and testosterone. The type of fat you choose however, is critical to achieving a positive effect, as the ones you consume become the building blocks for your hormones. Saturated fats like coconut oil, butter and ghee, and monounsaturated fats like olive oil, nuts, eggs, and avocados are excellent choices and should be consumed responsibly every day. Cut back on or eliminate corn, canola, sunflower, safflower and soybean oils, and replace them with the aforementioned instead. Ive also increased my protein intake, and consciously replacing more high-carbohydrate foods with more protein-rich foods such as tempeh, hemp, sprouts, activated nuts, eggs, and quality protein powder has really made a difference in stabilizing my energy levels and appetite. Getting enough protein on a vegetarian diet is totally possible, but I find that if Im not really paying attention, I can dip below the ideal 45 grams a day. Loosely (not obsessively) keeping track of my daily intake of protein has helped me feel my best. Keeping my blood sugar stable It may seem totally unrelated, but blood sugar and hormones are in fact inextricably linked. One of the main functions of the endocrine system (the system that creates and transports hormones in your body) is delivering glucose to your brain, muscles, and heart. So if anything in that process isnt working properly, than mismanaged blood sugar is the inevitable result. But whats worse is that it creates a cascade effect whereby none of the other parts of your endocrine system will work either. Sheesh! Walking the line between high and low blood sugar is something that Ive really been focusing on lately, and its working well, but it is an ongoing process that takes some getting used to. Including more fat and protein in my diet has been a game-changer for me, since those macronutrients digest slower than carbohydrates - even the complex ones from things like sweet potatoes, quinoa, and chickpeas. I try to eat a large and protein-rich breakfast within an hour of waking up (after the lemon water, of course!). Lunch is where I get the majority of my calories since that is when I need the most energy. I like eating roasted vegetables, avocado, eggs, and sprouted pseudo-grains like quinoa and buckwheat. I snack in between meals when Im hungry, but instead of reaching for a slice of rye bread or a rice cake, Ill have veggies with a high-fat dip, or a handful of my Maple Cinnamon Grain-free Granola. Dinner is mostly grain-free these days and I stick to salads, soups and stews. I go to bed no longer than four hours after dinner so that Im not hungry right before I hit the pillow. Then I like to have a break of about 14 hours between dinner and breakfast the next day, as my digestion does well on the rhythm of intermittent fasting. Eating more vegetables (and less bread a.k.a. DUH) I almost always had a couple slices of rye bread at lunch. Not that there is anything wrong with doing so, but Ill admit to feeling pretty foggy-headed afterwards. And because it filled me up so much, I had less room for veggies. Now Im prepping raw and cooked vegetables ahead of time and keeping them on hand specifically for my big lunches. Some favourites to roast in the oven are cauliflower, sweet potato, pumpkin, red onion, zucchini, tomatoes, and broccoli. Ive also started cutting up a big plate of veggie sticks in the early afternoon, before I even get hungry, so that it is there and waiting for me - no excuses. Right before diving in I douse it in freshly squeezed lemon juice, Maldon salt and Aleppo pepper. Its honestly delicious. I dont have to tell you that vegetables are full of filling fiber, replenishing phytonutrients, and yes, protein. Especially dem green ones. Eat more plants. Habits + meal prep I think this was the other big hurdle for me when it came to changing things up with my eating habits. I knew that if I was going to start eating food differently, Id have to start preparing food differently too - and a lot more often. I already spend a lot of time in the kitchen (obvi) and I love it, but I am also a person who likes to spend her non-work hours away from the cutting board. Eating this way admittedly does take more time, and makes it more challenging to eat out, or just grab something on the go. Coming to terms with this was challenging, but Ive realized that I have to dedicate more time to my diet if I want to be successful. No matter how you slice it, meal preparation is a very big part of sticking to your goals, whatever they may be. Of course there are times when its just not possible to do, and divergent days are fine, but the majority of your food youre should fall into the category that helps you feel your best, however you define that. Instead of prepping one day a week, which I know a lot of people like to do, I actually prefer to pepper it throughout the week in a way that is a little more fluid for me. If the Life-Changing Loaf of Bread is in the oven for instance, Ill chop up a bunch of veggies, and put them in too. If Im washing greens for a salad, Ill do all of them so that theyre ready to chuck into a smoothie on a whim. Lee from Americas Fat Balls have also been a super snack these days. And like I mentioned before, having fresh veggies washed and sliced up for afternoon cravings is very helpful. I can prepare two or three days worth at a time and keep them in the fridge. Mindset Instead of looking at food in terms of good and bad which I think is a dangerously judgemental way to categorize what were eating, I like to say yes to certain things, and the others fall into the not-right-now basket. For instance, I love brown rice to the ends of the earth and back, but Im not eating it right now since it doesnt make me feel all that great. And just because Im not eating brown rice these days doesnt mean I’ll never eat it again! This leaves room for flexibility and creates a far more sustainable way to look at ones diet. Isn’t it relieving to know that if you are out for dinner and there’s only rice for example, that you could potentially eat it and not beat yourself up? Ahhhh…did you feel that?! What a relief, eh? Tomorrow you’ll get back on the horse, no big deal at all. Making changes should be fun, and keep those labels for tin cans! You’re a fluid being, ever-changing, so make space for that in your meal planning too. Self-care routine, stress-reduction, exercise, and sleep I used to see self-care as something that only people with time have. Well, after totally hitting the wall a while ago, I realized that it just has to be a priority, respected as a part of a holistic approach to health, and something to actually schedule in the calendar. Staying active, sleeping, and treating myself to some yummy stress-reducing activities like spending time in nature, bodywork, and cooking (go figure) keeps me feeling happy and relaxed. Squelching stress doesnt happen by accident: it is truly a daily practice and something to be mindful of. Listen to yourself. How can this moment be juicier and more relaxing? Its fun to love yourself! Keeping stress levels low means that your body will be relaxed and not producing hormones that should only be reserved for emergency situations. Cortisol is a stress hormone released by the adrenal glands. Every time we experience a stressful situation we secrete this hormone into the blood stream so that our bodies can deal with the stressor at hand. Although cortisol is our friend in acute situations, our systems arent designed to be pumping it out round the clock as we juggle and struggle with backlogged emails, fussy kids, and traffic jams. This is why chronic stress is so detrimental to our bodies: prolonged, elevated cortisol levels wreak all kinds of wrong inside of us, raising our blood pressure, causing unwanted weight gain, exhaustion, anxiety, impaired brain function, and weakening the immune response. All the more reason to take self-care seriously, and do the things you love more often. Its actually healthy. Sleeping 7-9 hours a night is another non-negotiable. Getting enough sleep helps us to control our cortisol production, balance our blood sugar, and put us back in line with our natural circadian rhythm. Turning screens off an hour before bedtime will help signal to your body that it is in fact, night time. Create a relaxed, cozy environment and spend the last hour before bed reading, stretching, or meditating. I still struggle with this one, as I love looking at Instagram right before turning out the light, but Im becoming more mindful and doing my best. Required Reading There are a few really amazing books out there that I recommend every woman reads, whether or not you’re seeking advice on a particular health issue. Understanding our bodies and cycles is the first step in helping ourselves become healthier, stronger, more connected women. Woman Code by Alisa Vitti has been hugely educational and supportive for me. Her book is a guide to figuring out what the heck is going on inside you, and how to correct it through diet and lifestyle. I appreciate her easy-to-understand language and humour in this book, because let’s face it: nothing is very funny when you’re hormones are raging! The Complete Natural Medicine Guide to Women’s Health by Dr. Sat Dharam Kaur has been and continues to be another excellent resource for me. This book is more of an all-round toolkit for lifelong health and healing, than specifically about hormone balance. I love the holistic approach to all conditions, and inspiring programs to get us back in touch with our natural cycles in connection to the earth. The third book I recommend is Hormone Balance by Carolyn Dean. Dean is a naturopathic doctor that utilizes both traditional and alternative solutions to help readers rebalance their hormone levels. Her writing is engaging and inspiring, and this book is full of ways for women to achieve greater overall health. Oh man, I havent even talked about the tacos yet! So. I got the idea for these this past summer when I was chopping up tempeh to replace ground beef with in a tomato sauce for pasta. It turned out so meaty, satisfying, and delish that I thought I could perhaps take that same idea, spice it up a little differently, and serve them in a taco. Woot! I knew that grilled veggies and red cabbage would help cut the richness, but that I would also need a boss sauce to put them over the top. During one of my retreats I made a raw queso in our cooking class and everyone went wild for it. It seemed like a natural fit! Topped with some lime, avo, pickled red onions, and cilantro these were the best tacos Ive ever had. Ever. Ever. And Ive had a lot of tacos. I know some of you are going to ask about the corn tortillas and probably remind me that corn is a “grain”. Yes, I am aware of that, and I’ll remind you that I am not grain-free, just cutting way back. I stick mostly to pseudo-grains and make sure they are soaked prior to cooking, and enjoy a treat like this once in a while. I only purchase tortillas made with sprouted corn, or from corn that has been nixtalmized (that topic is a whole other blog post!). I buy my corn tortillas from Hija de Sanchez here in Copenhagen. Their tortillas are made fresh daily using nixtamalized corn imported from Mexico, so they taste unbelievably good. Of course taco fillings are important to a good taco, but the tortilla quality should not be overlooked! It makes the dish. Go find the good ones.     Print recipe     Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso Serves 3-4 Tempeh Taco Meat 250g /­­ 8.8oz organic, non-GMO tempeh 1 medium red onion 4 cloves garlic 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 1 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. chipotle or smoked hot paprika, to taste 2 Tbsp. tamari 2-5 Tbsp. water, as needed Grilled vegetables 1 medium zucchini 1 medium red onion 1 red bell pepper 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 tsp. ground cumin a couple pinches of cayenne, if desired 12 small corn tortillas (try to find organic, non-GMO if possible) 1 batch Raw Cashew Queso, recipe below Optional add-ins: 1 ripe avocado 1 small bunch cilantro pickled red onion or thinly sliced red onion shredded red cabbage tossed with a little salt and lime juice limes for serving hot sauce Cooking and assembly: 1. Start by making the Raw Cashew Queso (see recipe below). 2. Heat your grill or barbecue to medium-high. If not using a grill, simply cook everything in a skillet on the stove. 3. Finely chop or crumble tempeh into whatever size appeals to you (mine were rather small to mimic ground beef). Set aside. Mince red onion and garlic. Set aside. 4. Soak wooden skewers in water while you prepare the vegetables, or longer if you remember. If using metal skewers, skip this step. 5. Wash and cut the zucchini and onion into rings, the peppers into chunks. Place in a large bowl and toss with the salt and spices. 6. Skewer the vegetables so that their largest surface will lay flat on the grill (see photo). Alternate veggies until youve used them all. Place on the grill and cook until stating to char on the underside, anywhere from 5-10 minutes, depending on your cooking method. Flip and cook on the other side. 7. While the vegetables are grilling, cook the tempeh. H eat your cooking oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and a few pinches of salt. Cook until starting to brown, about 7-10 minutes. Add garlic and cook for another minute until fragrant. Add crumbled tempeh, cumin, chipotle, and stir well to incorporate. Pour in the tamari, followed by a couple tablespoons of water. Stir well and add water as needed - youre after a moist mixture. Taste and adjust seasoning as desired. Cook for a total of 10 minutes. The mixture should be golden brown, hot and delicious! 8. Warm the tortilla shells on the grill or in a pan over medium-high heat. 9. Spoon the desired amount of tempeh into each tortilla shell. Followed by the roasted veggies, avocado, cabbage, cilantro and pour on the Raw Cashew Queso. Enjoy! Raw Cashew Queso Makes about 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 150g cashews, soaked for 4-8 hours or overnight 1 red bell pepper 1/­­2 tsp. salt 2 Tbsp. nutritional yeast 2-3 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice, to taste 1/­­2 clove garlic 1 small piece fresh turmeric ground cayenne, to taste 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water Directions: 1. Drain and rinse the cashews. 2. Put all ingredients, except water, in a high-speed blender or food processor and blend, adding water one tablespoon at a time until the desired consistency is reached. If you want a thick cream, use less water, for a thinner sauce, use more. (You will not achieve a perfectly smooth sauce with a food processor, but it is still delicious!). Before I go I just want to reiterate how wonderful it felt to be met with such open arms after the last post. I wish I could write back to every single one of you who shared their story with me, and everyone else here, but I simply couldnt get to them all. I am moved beyond words that so many of you felt open and supported in this space too, and I will urge you to seek out help if you need it. And if you know someone who you think may struggle with disordered eating, reach out and help them in a loving, and non-judgmental way. We are all in this together. In love and light, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   *   * http:/­­/­­www.goldencircleretreats.com/­­portugal/­­index.html Dear friends! I am thrilled to share the location for my next wellness retreat in magical Comporta, Portugal, November 5-11, 2017. Join Mikkala Marilyn Kissi and I at Sublime Comporta for seven days of luxurious living, divinely delicious meals, inspiring cooking classes and nutrition seminars, yoga, Pilates, meditation, and breath work. Come press the reset button with me! Ride horses on the beach, dance under the stars, and cozy up by the fire. This will be a week to remember. I cant wait to see you there! Click here for more info and tickets. The post Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso appeared first on My New Roots.

Beet Tartare with Sesame Labneh + Amsterdam

August 19 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Beet Tartare with Sesame Labneh + Amsterdam Earlier this year we were in New York to launch Green Kitchen at Home. We had a blast doing a live cooking session at Food52, teaching a cooking class and had a book signing in a tiny but packed little store in Greenwich Village. But what I really wanted to talk about today was our night off. When we tucked baby Noah (formerly known as Gabriel) to sleep in his stroller and headed to ABCV for dinner. Side note: You should know that for being a food writing couple, Luise and I very rarely go out and eat at proper restaurants. With kids, it’s just easier to do takeaway or pick places where it’s okay that they climb, run and crash. Also, fancy restaurants make me feel awkward. But we had an epic evening at ABCV. We tried the tasting menu of which I can’t even remember half of the dishes. But I know that there were simple crudités with lots of spreads, some kind of soft beet carpaccio/­­tartare with a little bit of sting to it, a whole roasted cauliflower with turmeric tahini dressing(!), avocado lettuce cups, roasted shiitake and a couple of desserts. And what made the evening even better was that Noah slept through almost the entire dinner (thank you jetlag!). We have been talking about that beet carpaccio (and the cauliflower with tahini turmeric dressing) a few times since we got back. And when Luise recently spotted a recipe for roasted beets and sesame labneh in the latest issue of Jamie Magazine, we started talking about it again. Looking through our recipe archive, it is pretty obvious that we’ve got a love for beets. They are sweet and mildly earthy, have an awesome color, can grow in our harsh Swedish climate and are cheap! What’s not to love? So a couple of days ago, we picked up a few bunches of beets, started cooking and here we are. With some kind of beetroot tartare (mixed minced beets), dollops of sesame labneh and a few suggestions on what can be used to scoop it into your mouth, apart from crackers. And as a last minute contribution, we are also offering a less fancy way of serving this, inside a rye waffle toast (yup, you might want to scroll down to it right away). This recipe is great as a starter, at a buffet table or a party. It’s pretty and impressive, creamy and delicious with plenty of flavor from fresh dill and mint and a little sting from horseradish. Since we love yogurt just as much as we love beetroots, we invited labneh (yogurt’s fancy cousin) to the party. We totally stole the idea to mix tahini into labneh from that Jamie Mag article. You should too. You need at least two hours to let the yogurt drain into labneh cheese but I’m still going to claim that this is an easy recipe - only a few ingredients and apart from draining the yogurt, it’s all pretty quick.  I imagine that a quick cheat version could be accomplished by simply using thick yogurt without draining it and buying pre-cooked beetroots. I can’t promise that it will be as good, but it’ll at least be quick and effortless. http:/­­/­­www.greenkitchenstories.com/­­wp-content/­­uploads/­­2017/­­08/­­Labneh_­drip.mp4 Okay, I can hear Isac trying to teach baby Noah how to roar like a lion with the only result that little brother cries like a baby. So I better post this now before major chaos is breaking out. No proofreading needed because yolo. Enjoy the recipe and check out info below re Amsterdam. Ciao! Beet Tartar & Sesame Labneh Serves 4 Recipe is inspired by a recipe from Jamie Magazine, Aug 2017 and a dinner we had a ABCV NYC. Sesame labneh 2 cups /­­ 500 g Greek or Turkish Yogurt 1/­­2 tsp salt 2 tbsp tahini 1 tbsp olive oil Beet Tartare  1/­­2 kg /­­ 1 lb  beetroots 2 tbsp capers juice from 1/­­2 lemon 1 tsp horseradish (or mustard) 1 handful fresh dill 1 handful fresh mint leaves salt & pepper Topping 1 handful pistachio nuts, finely chopped fresh dill, chopped fresh mint leaves, chopped 2 tbsp capers, halved lemon slices olive oil Serve with rye bread crisps, tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices Start by making the labneh. Add salt to the yogurt and stir until smooth. Wrap the yogurt in a cheese cloth or other clean thin cloth and tie it over a bowl for about 2 hours or more to allow liquid to be drained (meanwhile, cook the beetroots). You can leave it for 24-36 hours if you prefer a thicker labneh but 2 hours and a gentle squeeze (to get rid of some extra liquid) works fine. Stir in tahini, transfer to a serving bowl and top with a little bit of olive oil. Peel the beetroots, divide them in quarters and cook in salted water for approx 20 mins min or until tender. When ready, let cool and then transfer them to a food processor along with capers, lemon juice, horseradish, fresh dill, mint and seasoning. Pulse a few times until the beetroot has the consistency of course grits. Not too much though or you will end up with a sauce. You can also dice them finely. Arrange the beet tartare on a large serving plate. Fold in large dollops of sesame labneh and top with pistachio, fresh herbs, capers and lemon slices. Add a drizzle of olive oil and serve with crackers or thin rye bread crisps (thin rye bread pieces toasted in a pan or the oven for a couple of minutes), tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices to scoop with. Beet & Labneh Rye Waffle Toast We made this Waffled rye bread toast with the leftovers.  It’s a family favorite and we’ve got another recipe and the whole story behind this method in our latest book. Here are some quick instructions: Simply smudge labneh on two pieces of dark rye bread, add some spinach, fresh dill and mint and a thick layer of beet tartar. Brush a hot waffle iron with butter or coconut oil, combine the two slices and place inside the waffle iron, pressing together lightly. When you’re bread has got a nice and brown waffle pattern, the toast is ready. Cut the waffle toast in half and eat it while it’s hot. **************************** AMSTERDAM & ANTWERP - 7-9 September Green Kitchen at Home is being released in Dutch next week and to kick things off, we are coming to Amsterdam and Antwerp for a couple of press events, signings, dinners and talks. We will have a little talk, signing and dinner at the bookstore ‘t Stad Leest in Antwerp at 19.30 pm on 7 September. Tickets can be booked here. We are having a little talk + Q&A and a book signing at Limon in Amsterdam on 9 September between 10.30-11-30. There will be nibbles from the book served and we will end with a book signing. There will also be a lunch afterwards (between 12.00-14.00) and we will try to move around so we get the chance to chat with all of you. You can either buy tickets for both the talk and lunch, just the talk or just the lunch. Follow this link to read more about it in Dutch: Greenkitchenbooks.nl  

Gatte Ki Sabji (Rajasthani Cuisine)

August 1 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Gatte Ki Sabji Gatte Ki Sabji is a traditional dish from Rajasthan. These steamed gram-flour dumplings are cooked in a spicy gravy. This mouth-watering dish will complement any meal. Enjoy Gatte Ki sabji with roti or plain rice. The recipe is also vegan and gluten free. For Gatte - 2 cups besan (gram flour) - 4 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable oil) - 1 tsp salt - 1 tsp red chili powder (adjust to taste) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing, asafetida is gluten free spice, but asafetida powder contains some wheat flour, gluten free asafetida, is available on amazon.) For Gravy - 3 Tbsp oil - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 1 tsp fennel seeds (saunf) - 2 bay leaves (tejpat) - 2 dry red chilies -  1/­­2 tsp red chili powder - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 1 tablespoon coriander powder (dhania) - 1 tsp salt - 1 Tbsp Kasuri Methi - 1 tsp mango powder (amchoor) - 1/­­2 tsp garam masala - Mix all the ingredients for gatte together and make a stiff dough, using water as needed. You will need about 1/­­3 cup of water. Knead the dough well, let it rest for 10 minutes. Divide the dough into 8 parts and roll them in calendar about half inch thick. - Bring about 4 cups of water to boil in a pan on medium high heat. Gently drop the Gatte logs in boiling water. After it comes to boil, cover the pan and reduce the heat to medium low, and cook them cover for about 12-15 minutes gate should be floating on the top and will have bubbles all around. - Take them out from water and save the water, this will be used for making gravy. let them cool for few minutes and cut them in about half inch-thick slices. - Heat the oil in heavy bottom pan over medium heat, add fennel seeds, asafetida, red chilies stir and add Gattes, stir-fry for about 4-5 minutes until they are light golden brown. - Add bay leaves, chili powder, turmeric, coriander powder, and salt, stir-fry for about 2 minutes. - Add the water we saved, and Kasuri Methi boil for about 10 minutes over low medium heat, covered. This is the time add more water to adjust the thickness of the gravy. As Gatte Ki Sabji will cool off it gravy will become thick. - Turn off the heat and add mango powder, and garam masala, Gatte Ki Sabji is ready to serve. The post Gatte Ki Sabji (Rajasthani Cuisine) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

July 7 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

INDIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterMy newest cookbook, The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the the INDIA cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2uGbsog My new INDIA cookbook has been years in the making - with recipes, stories, artwork & photographs inspired by 8 trips to my most favourite country. It’s a culinary love story of my favorite cuisine - based on a total of nearly two years in India and 25 years of devotion to Indian cooking. My first trip to India was in 2001: mostly North India and Nepal. I spent 4 months on that journey, then another 6 weeks in South India in 2006. I visited twice more, in 2009 & 2010, followed by living and working for a year (as an art teacher) in Central India, returning to Berlin in 2011. In Autumn 2016 & Spring 2017, I went back to India to taste and explore the last regions (and cuisines) of India still waiting for me. I traveled across Kashmir & Ladakh, trekking through mountain villages and exploring towns and cities, staying mostly with families and cooking together in their kitchens. Then I went deep into the Northeast: West Bengal, Assam, Sikkim, and Nagaland. I even met with world famous chefs at their restaurants - and homes - for incredible eats and great times in the kitchen. Now I’m back in Berlin, recreating the culinary wonders of the Indian subcontinent in my own kitchen. As with my previous 4 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. It’s a labor of love and the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. I’m back on Kickstarter for my 5th international cookbook project. You can join the crowdfunding which makes everything possible. It’s an adventure in itself, complete with backer-only updates, behind the scenes sneak peaks, exclusive travel videos & stories, recipe testing groups, and more. Pre-order a signed copy of The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA (including worldwide shipping, stickers & e-book for EUR25!) My INDIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 5th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 192 pages with 90+ recipes and over 70 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by 8 trips /­­ 21+ months of travel around India and over 25 years vegan cooking experience - Total variety of regional cuisines: Rajasthani, Gujarati, Punjabi, Kashmiri, Sindhi, Maharashtrian, Tamil, Kerelan, Karnatakan, Goan, Hyderbadi, Bengali, Assamese, Sikkimese, Ladakhi, Tibetan, Nepali - Indian classics & family favorites, timeless treats, new culinary wonders, mind-blowing mega-metropolitan snacks, fabulous village feasts, scrumptious street food, and insanely delicious desserts - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and awesome cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Shahi Bengan – Roasted Stuffed Eggplant Gobi Pakoras – Batter-fried Cauliflower Saag Paneer – Spinach & Fried Tofu Cubes Pani Puri – Street Food Favorite Aloo Paratha – Grilled Potato-Stuffed Flatbreads Shahi Paneer – fried tofu cubes in creamy tomato sauce Seitan Vindaloo – Goan Tangy Curry Samosas! Fried Potato-Stuffed Pastries Gajur Halava – Bengali Carrot Pudding Gulab Jamuns – Doughballs in Rose Syrup Berry Halava – Fruity Semolina Dessert Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA: - Garam Masala, Sambar Masala, Chaat Masala & Panch Puran - Tamarind Ginger, Pineapple, Tomato, Coconut, Chili & Bhang Chutneys - Aam Achar – Mango Pickle - Amitar Khar – Assamese papaya starter - Handvo – Gujurati zucchini cake - Uttapam – South Indian rice & lentil pancakes with tomatoes - Idly Paper Dosa – Karnatakan crispy rice & lentil crepes - Rava Dosa – Tamil semolina crepes - Dahi Vada Chaat – lentil cakes with yogurt & chutney - Hariali Paneer Tikka – Punjabi tofu skewers with spices & herbs - Gobi Pakora – batter-fried cauliflower - Mirchi Vada – Rajasthani batter-fried chillies - Aloo Tikka – spicy, fried potato cakes - Samosa – vegetable-stuffed fried pastry - Pani Puri – potato-stuffed fried pastry with tamarind spice water - Pav Bhaji - spicy vegetable mash with fresh baked buns - Momos – Tibetan vegetable dumplings - Shapaley – Tibetan vegetable pies - Kolkota Kathi Roll – spicy soymeat & shredded cabbage wrap - Sambar Bandhgobi Rolls – stuffed cabbage leaves - Aloo Dum – Kashmiri tomato potato curry - Shahi Tamatar – roasted stuffed tomatoes - Shahi Bengan – roasted stuffed eggplant - Shahi Mirch – roasted stuffed peppers - Shahi Paneer – tofu cubes in creamy, tomato curry - Paneer Jalfrezi – spicy tofu cubes - Saag Paneer – spinach & tofu cubes - Mutter Paneer - peas & tofu cubes - Xaak – Assamese greens, potatoes & cherry tomatoes - Bengan Bhartha – Kashmiri roasted aubergine - Malai Kofta – potato dumplings in creamy tomato curry - Bindi Aloo Tawa Masala – spicy stir-fried okra & potatoes - Khumb Kaju Makhani – Rajasthani cashew mushroom curry - Shukto – Bengali eggplant, potato & plantains - Pumpkin Posto – Bengali squash in creamy poppy seed curry - Seitan Vindaloo – Goan tangy curry - Black Sesame Seitan – Assamese spicy curry - Tamatar Pitika – Assamese tomatoes with herbs & spices - Aloo Pitika – Assamese potatoes with herbs & spices - Bol Tenga – Assames lentil dumplings in tangy curry - Mas Tenga – Assamese tangy jackfruit curry - Chupke – Tibetan dumpling soup - Tarka Dal – Punjabi lentil curry - Chana Masala – spicy chickpeas - Rajma - Kashmiri red kidney bean curry - Lobia Palak – black-eyed peas with lemon & spinach - Golden Rice - with turmeric & spices - Chana Pulao – rice with chickpeas - Pulihora – Tamil tamarind rice with peanuts & spices - Classic Biryani – Kashmiri rice dish with vegetables, nuts & spices - Jackfruit Biryani – Tamil coconut rice dish with spicy jackfruit - Tupula Bhaat – Assamese sticky rice steamed in banana leaves - Aloo Paratha – grilled flatbread stuffed with potatoes - Tibetan Bread – fried breakfast snack - Makki Roti – grilled cornbread - Roti – wholewheat grilled flatbread - Garlic Naan – traditional baked flatbread - Poori – deep-fried flatbreads - Date Ladoo – date & nut sweets - Besan Ladoo – chickpea sweet - Gajur Halava – spiced carrot pudding - Berry Halava – strawberry & blueberry semolina sweet - Mysore Pak – traditional sweet squares - Gulab Jamun – deep-fried dough balls in rose syrup - Rasmalai – cheese balls in saffron mango milk - Jalebi – fried, syrupy sweet - Peda – lemon cashew creamy sweet - Kheer – Kashmiri rice pudding with cardamom, nuts & raisins - Mishti Doi - Bengali sweet curd - Shrikand - Maharashtran yogurt dessert - Pista Kulfi – pistachio ice cream - Pitha – Bengali sesame & date pastry - Narikol Ladoo – Assamese shredded coconut balls - Kadala Parippu – Keralan sweet chana dal dessert - Ginger Chai – spiced black tea - Kahwa – Kashmiri green tea with almond & saffron - Badam Dudh – almond milk with cardamom & cinnamon - Anjoor Kaju Dudh – cashew shake with fig & date - Strawberry Mint Lassi – yogurt smoothie The post INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Cheesy Potato Wedges from The Vegan Air Fryer

June 27 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Cheesy Potato Wedges from The Vegan Air Fryer If you love your air fryer as much as I do, you’re going to be thrilled to own The Vegan Air Fryer, a new cookbook by JL Fields.  And if you don’t yet own an air fryer, I encourage you to page through this book to see what you’re missing. Like many people, the main thing I cook in my air fryer is potatoes — how great it is to have crispy French fries without oil!  But air-fried French fries are only the beginning.  In The Vegan Air Fryer you’ll find everything from appetizers to main dishes and even desserts. And for all you potato lovers out there, there are also loads of other recipes for air-fried spuds, including these Cheesy Potato Wedges. Cheesy Potato Wedges Try these potato wedges if you love potato skins but want that potato, too. This is a great side dish and also a fun recipe to make for game day noshing. (From The Vegan Air Fryer, copyright (C) 2017 by JL Fields. Used by permission. Photo by Michelle Donner.) Serves 4 Potatoes - 1 pound fingerling potatoes - 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil - 1 teaspoon kosher salt - 1 teaspoon ground black pepper - 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder  Cheese Sauce - 1/­­2 cup raw cashews - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground turmeric - 1/­­2 teaspoon paprika - 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast - 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice - 2 tablespoons to 1/­­4 cup water Potatoes: Preheat the air fryer to 400°F for 3 minutes. Wash the potatoes. Cut the potatoes in half lengthwise and transfer them to a large bowl. Add the oil, salt, pepper, and garlic powder to the potatoes. Toss to coat. Transfer the potatoes to the air fryer. Cook for 16 minutes, shaking halfway through the cooking time. Cheese Sauce: Combine the cashews, turmeric, paprika, nutritional yeast, and lemon juice in a high-speed blender. Blend on low, slowly increasing the speed and adding water as needed. Be careful to avoid using too much water, as you want a thick, cheesy consistency. Transfer the cooked potatoes to an air fryer-safe pan or a piece of parchment paper. Drizzle the cheese sauce over the potato wedges. Place the pan in the air fryer and cook for 2 more minutes at 400°F. No-Oil Option: Omit the olive oil.   The post Cheesy Potato Wedges from The Vegan Air Fryer appeared first on Robin Robertson.

20 Turmeric Recipes Vegan Glutenfree options

June 1 2017 Vegan Richa 

20 Turmeric Recipes Vegan Glutenfree options20 Recipes with Turmeric. Turmeric Cauliflower Rice, Turmeric Chocolate Marble Loaf, Golden Iced Tea, Turmeric Miso Soup, Turmeric brussels spouts and more. Vegan Gluten-free Turmeric Recipes. Soy-free options.  Turmeric is one of the common spices used in Indian food. We grew up eating food which had turmeric in most meals. Most Dals, curries, veggie sides have Turmeric added to them in small amounts. Some creamy white sauces, Indo- chinese food or snacks were exceptions.  Fresh turmeric is a bit more bitter than powder and can be an acquired flavor. Dried powdered turmeric root (turmeric powder) is more easily available than fresh turmeric root. Powdered turmeric in larger amounts can also add a bitter profile to the dish. The overall flavor might be pronounced for some, ok or undetectable for many. With the interest in Turmeric recently increasing because of many beneficial properties, I now experiment with Turmeric in other applications other than Indian food as well. Try a few of these to start on your Turmeric adventure. In a Sauce, soup, dals, with cauliflower rice, as Turmeric Lentil Fritters (pic above), in sushi roll, in muffins, cakes, Iced tea and more. Continue reading: 20 Turmeric Recipes Vegan Glutenfree optionsThe post 20 Turmeric Recipes Vegan Glutenfree options appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones

May 25 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones This post was created in partnership with Bob’s Red Mill. When I was writing my first cookbook four years ago, I was completely infatuated with developing gluten-free baking recipes and baking almost every day. More than that, I was really into making my own flours (by blending whole grains in my Blendtec), and mixing my own gluten-free flour blends. I am one of those crazy people that enjoys making everything from scratch, but I also did all of those things out of necessity, since there were no high-quality gluten-free flour blends out on the market. Things have really changed since then! Health food stores are now flooded with all kinds of exotic flours and flour blends, which makes me a little less compelled to make my own. I still do from time to time, but I feel comforted by the fact that I can pick up a gluten-free flour blend in the store and whip up some tasty scones without getting messy with the blender and tons of jars. I should add that I don’t have a gluten sensitivity, but a few people I like to share scones with do, and I also just really love the challenge that gluten-free baking presents. I’ve been baking with Bob’s Red Mill 1 to 1 Gluten Free Baking Flour and can confidently say that it’s the best pre-mixed gluten-free flour blend I’ve tried. The blend was formulated to substitute wheat flour in baking recipes in exact amounts, which makes it super easy to use if you ever want to try your hand at a gluten-free version of your favorite recipe. These blueberry lemon scones are my favorite thing I’ve made with the flour so far. I’ve tested three batches, and each one has disappeared within a day, with the help of friends and family. They are a true crowd pleaser, and make for a satisfying little breakfast or dessert. Slightly crisp on the outside and nice and crumbly inside, with pockets of blueberries, and a sweet and tangy lemon ‘glaze.’ There’s a lovely zing from lemon zest throughout, and they are pretty low maintenance in terms of preparation, as scones should be. I hope you’ll give them a try :) Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones   Print Serves: 8 scones Ingredients for the scones ½ cup unsweetened almond milk ½ tablespoon apple cider vinegar ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons gluten free rolled oats 1½ cups 1 to 1 gluten free flour blend ¼ cup plus 1 tablespoon coconut sugar, plus more for sprinkling on top 2 teaspoons baking powder pinch of sea salt zest of 2 organic lemons, divided ¼ cup neutral coconut oil - scoopable, at room temperature ½ cup pistachios - chopped, plus more for garnish 1½ cup fresh or frozen (not thawed) blueberries ¼ cup aquafaba (water from a can of chickpeas or other beans) 1 teaspoon vanilla extract for the glaze ¼ cup cashew butter 1½ tablespoons maple syrup or honey ¼ teaspoon turmeric - for color juice of 1 lemon Instructions to make the scones Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a baking sheet by covering it with a piece of parchment paper. Combine the almond milk and apple cider vinegar in a small bowl and set aside to make a vegan buttermilk. Pulse the rolled oats several times in a high speed blender or food processor to grind them partially. Combine the oats with the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt and ⅔ the amount of the lemon zest in a medium bowl, toss to mix thoroughly. Add coconut oil and work it into the flour mixture with a fork until mostly mixed in, with some small clumps remaining. Add the pistachios and blueberries, toss to combine. Make a well in the center, add the buttermilk, aquafaba and vanilla, and mix to combine. Take care not to overwork the batter. Transfer the batter to a floured surface and use your hands to form a disk about 1-inch thick. Cut into 8 wedges with a floured knife. Transfer the wedges onto the prepared baking sheet with a spatula or a pie server. Sprinkle some coconut sugar on top of each scone. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until the edges are golden and crispy. Let cool and drizzle with the glaze (recipe follows), sprinkle with the rest of the lemon zest and pistachios. to make the glaze In a small bowl, combine the cashew butter with the maple syrup and turmeric, mix until smooth. Add lemon juice and whisk until shiny and smooth, add more lemon juice or water if the glaze seems too thick. Drizzle over the scones and enjoy. Notes I learned from Minimalist Baker that coconut oil works best in vegan scones when its not in a frozen or a liquid state, but in between those two and scoopable, the way its sold in grocery stores from. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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