truffles - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

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truffles vegetarian recipes

Christmas Breakfast with Pom & Flora

December 4 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Christmas Breakfast with Pom & Flora Last week we biked over to our friends Anna & Rasmus. They run two super cozy and popular cafes in Stockholm called Pom & Flora. Together we made a Christmas inspired breakfast with Saffron Buns, Lingonberry Smoothie Bowls, Gingerbread Truffles, Xmas Tree Smoothie and their signature Christmas Saffron Porridge. Our Elsa and their son Henry helped out with the food and they also gave the cafe a Christmas decoration touch-up . We recorded this little video from that morning. You can find all the recipes from the video below. We will be back soon with a savory Christmas recipe roundup. xo Lucia Saffron Buns Lussebullar Makes around 24 large buns For a vegan version simply replace butter with coconut oil + almond butter and quark with a vegan soft cheese alternative or yogurt. 50 g fresh active yeast or 1 tbsp dry active yeast 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1 g (2 sachets) saffron powder 120 g organic butter (or 100 g coconut oil + 20 g almond butter) 2 cups milk of choice (oat milk, rice milk, cow’s milk or soy milk) 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup coconut sugar or maple syrup 250 g /­­ 1 cup quark cheese, greek yogurt or vegan yogurt 800 g /­­ 7 cups flour (we use half light and half whole grain) 50 raisins (approx. 1/­­3 cup) Brush with 1 egg yolk, beaten  (use plant milk for vegan alternative) Crumble the yeast in a large mixing bowl. Melt butter in a medium size sauce pan, then add milk, sugar or maple syrup and saffron and heat until 37°C /­­ 98°F. Pour the mixture into the mixing bowl with yeast. Add quark cheese and stir around until dissolved. Add 2/­­3 of the flour. Stir around with a wooden spoon until it is thick enough to knead with your hands. Add more flour until the dough is easy to work with and has formed into a round ball that doesnt stick to your hands. Cover the bowl with a kitchen cloth and leave to rise in a warm place for about an hour, or until double in size and full of air pockets. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface and knead for a minute, form it into the shape of a baguette. Divide it into 24 equal pieces and, using your hands, roll each piece into a long 1/­­2-inch ( about 1 cm) thick string. Then roll both ends tight in opposite direction into an S-shaped bun. Place buns, well spaced apart, on 2 baking sheets, cover with a cloth and set aside in a warm spot to rise for about 30 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 440°F (225°C). Brush the buns with an egg yolk or milk and then place one raisin in each circle. Bake the buns until golden brown on top, about 5-8 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack to let cool slightly. Serve! Xmas Tree Smoothie 2 glasses 2-3 large kale leaves, stems removed 1 banana 2 dates 1 tbsp hazelnut butter 250 ml /­­ 1 cup oat milk or plant milk of choice 1/­­2 lemon, juice 2 tsp freshly grated ginger 1 tsp ground cinnamon To serve 1 tbsp shredded coconut snow 2 spruce sprigs Place all ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth and creamy. Taste and adjust the flavours to your liking. Serve in to glasses and sprinkle with coconut snow and decorate with spruce sprigs. Lingonberry Smoothie Bowl Serves 2 2 frozen bananas (sliced)  250 ml /­­ 1 cup oat milk or milk of choice, more if needed 500 ml /­­ 2 cups frozen lingon berries 1 tsp ground cardamom 2 tbsp tahini (sesame paste) For serving 2 tbsp toasted buckwheat  2 tbsp desiccated coconut Start by blitzing the coconut in a food processor so it looks like tiny snow flakes, then set aside. Add all smoothie bowl ingredients to the food processor and blend until smooth and thick like a soft serve. Spoon into two bowls and serve with toasted buckwheat and the coconut snow flakes. Pom’s Christmas Porridge Serves 4 500 ml /­­ 2 cups oat milk 250 ml /­­ 1 cup water 1 tsp ground cardamom 1 pinch sea salt 100 g /­­ 1 cup steel cut oats 100 g /­­ 1 cup rolled oats 0,5 g ground saffron (1 sachet) 2 tbsp raisins 2 tbsp dried cranberries   For serving  4 tbsp mascarpone 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup foamed oat milk Place oat milk, water, cardamom and salt in a saucepan and bring to the boil. Add the steel cut oats and whisk to combine, bring to the boil, lower the heat and then add the rolled oats, saffran, raisins and cranberries and let simmer for 6-8 minutes. Turn off the heat and let the porridge sit for a couple of minutes before serving. When ready, spoon into two bowls and serve with mascarpone and foamed oat milk. Gingerbread truffles Makes 20 truffles 16 soft dates, pitted 60 g almonds 2 tbsp coconut oil 1/­­2 tsp ground ginger 1/­­2 tsp cinnamon 1/­­2 tsp cardamom 1/­­2 tsp allspice 1 pinch cloves 1/­­4 tsp salt For rolling 50 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup desiccated coconut 50 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup desiccated coconut mixed with 1/­­2 tsp beetroot powder Mix all the ingredients in a food processor for about 1 minute or until it forms up like a ball. If using dried dates, you can soak them in hot water for 30 minutes before adding them to the food processor. Remove the knife blades from the food processor. Place the mixture in the fridge for about 10 minutes, if it is too sticky to form, it depends on how sticky the dates are. Then form 15 - 20 small round truffles with your hands. Roll half of the truffles in shredded coconut and the other half in shredded coconut mixed with beetroot powder for a red colour. If the coconut doesnt stick, you can dip the truffles in cold water before rolling them in the coconut. Serve or store in the fridge. ******* Here is also our last video from when we went out in the forest foraging mushrooms with our friend Niki, cooked over open fire and forgot to bring anything to eat from/­­with :)

Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreats Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap

December 2 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreats Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap We are so excited to announce that registration for two of our retreats in Abruzzo, Italy is now open for the Spring of 2019! We hosted our first foraging and cooking retreat there this past October, and it really exceeded all of our expectations. We are elated to announce that this time around, we will have an on-site Acupuncture Physician (for one of the retreats) and an on-site Yoga Teacher (for both retreats)! In addition to cooking, eating, foraging, hiking, and sightseeing in the beautiful Abruzzo countryside, we will be exploring the ways to inner balance through yoga, meditation, and ancient techniques of Chinese Medicine. Read on for retreat registration, testimonials, and a photo recap of our first retreat. We hope to see you in the spring :) 1) Re-Center Retreat 2019 with On-Site Acupuncture Physician and Daily Yoga/­­Meditation (May 27th - June 2nd, 2019) For the wellness enthusiast and vegan or vegetarian (or plant-loving) foodie looking to relax and re-center. Activities and Services will include: one-on-one appointments with on-site Acupuncture Physician (diagnostic consultation, acupressure, deeply relaxing facial and body gua sha massage), daily yoga with on-site certified yoga instructor, meditation, forest-bathing, plant-based meals prepared by the Golubka Kitchen team, foraging, truffle hunting, meditation in a 600 year old olive grove and olive oil tasting, winery visit and wine tasting, plant-based cooking, medicinal jam, and herbal tonic classes with the Golubka Kitchen team, cooking with Abruzzo locals, and more! Click to Book | Click to See a Sample Itinerary 2) Forage, Cook & Yoga Retreat (June 4th - June 10th, 2019) For the vegan or vegetarian (or plant-loving) foodie, who also enjoys daily yoga and meditation. Activities and Services will include: sampling the best of Abruzzo’s plant-based fare, truffle hunting, wine tasting, 600 year old olive grove visit and olive oil tasting, pasta-making class with Abruzzo locals, cooking classes with the Golubka Kitchen team, foraging and cooking local edible plants, mountain hikes and visits to mountain villages, daily yoga with on-site certified yoga instructor, meditation, and more! Click to Book | Click to See a Sample Itinerary Testimonials “Having the opportunity to explore a lesser known region of Italy to find its hidden gems in the Culinary arts was such an enriching experience! Getting to see first hand how the people in these areas live, visiting locals in their homes... From truffle hunting to tasting oil from 600 year old olive groves... Wild foraging for greens & making pasta in an Italian womans kitchen.... Not the typical trip to Italy. It was a delightful & delicious experience!” – Rachel, Alabama “I loved the retreat. It was well managed, we had the best food, awesome accommodation, great people, perfectly sized travel group and great tour guides. I had looked very much forward to this retreat and it was even better than I imagined. You created an amazing experience, with wonderful and very unique accommodations, the best meals I have ever had, set in a beautiful landscape, off the beaten path. The silence was palpable and so welcome to step out of the noisy and hectic lifestyle most of us have these days. I seriously consider joining you again, so I can have more of those meals, go back to the medieval village of Santo Stefano and the unique scattered hotel. We also had an awesome group, which made it even more special!” – Claudia, Massachusetts “It was a trip of a lifetime. Abruzzo could not have been more beautiful! I loved the diversity of the land, the hiking, cooking and loved loved loved the food. I also was glad that it was not a large group…I liked the intimacy of the smaller number of participants. It truly was a remarkable 6 days and you all were so kind, knowledgeable and pleasant to be with.” – Helen, Michigan “Thank you for the wonderful trip. It was so much more than I thought it would be. A deep dive into the food, culture and people of Abruzzo. I had experiences that I could never have on my own. I thought we were a good mix of ages, interests and countries. Diversity makes things so interesting.” – Maudia, Michigan “I’ve been to Italy before but never like this! We visited magical places that I’d never know about on my own: Santo Stefano with its fairytale charm, the beautiful truffle plantation, ancient olive grove, a winery located right in a family home’s basement… Every single one was a unique, unforgettable experience. Thank you!” – Katya, Sochi Truffle Hunting & Tasting We visited a family truffle plantation, where the sweet truffle-hunting dogs Rita and Nina dug up about 1kg of summer truffles right in front of us. We then got to have home-cooked lunch at the truffle plantation owners’ house, where we sampled the day’s harvest, as well as the family’s line of truffle pastes. Hiking and Foraging We hiked up beautiful mountain paths to see historical castles, churches, and hermitages, and foraged for wild herbs, berries, and fruit along the way. We foraged rosehips, wild mint, wild chicory, figs, and even jujube dates. Exploring Local Villages & Towns Pictured below are the breathtaking towns of Pacentro, Sulmona and Santo Stefano (we stayed in Santo Stefano in this experience of a hotel), where we had the pleasure of sightseeing and visiting local artisan businesses, as well as a bustling farmer’s market. Visiting Local Artisans We visited a local wine producer (also a family business) and sampled their exquisite wines. We also had the transcendent experience of wandering around an olive grove with trees up to 600 years old, and got to taste incredibly fresh olive oil, made with the olives from those trees. Cooking, Eating & Drinking! Eating well was the main mission of this retreat, and I think it’s very safe to say that the mission was accomplished. We tasted vegan and vegetarian food from a variety of cozy restaurants, cafes, artisans, and local’s homes. We foraged and ate wild chicory, learned to make pasta and cookies, and got to know famous Abruzzo ingredients, like their local lentils, solina flour, spelt, and more. You might also like... Abruzzo, Italy: Join Our Vegan/­­Vegetarian Forage and Cook Retreat .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Abruzzo, Italy 2019 Retreats Open for Registration + 2018 Retreat Recap appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Tagliolini ai Funghi

November 5 2018 Meatless Monday 

Savory mushrooms compliment tagliolini pasta in this recipe. Tagliolini is a richer version of fettuccine, usually made fresh. Dried fettuccine will work as a swap, but fresh pasta will elevate the recipe (and save cooking time). If you can find them, dont forget the fresh truffles to finish off the dish! This recipe comes to us from Chef Michael Pirolo, executive chef and owner of Macchialina. Serves 4 - 4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil - 2 tbsp butter - 7 oz Abalone mushrooms, sliced - 1/­­2-1 oz. fresh truffles - 3 tbsp grated Parmesan cheese, plus more as needed - 10.5 oz tagliolini or tagliatelle pasta - salt - chili flakes - parsley, chiffonade   Heat oil and butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add mushrooms and sauté for a few minutes, adding chili flakes and salt. Add about 6 oz of water, reduce heat and simmer for about 5 minutes. If the sauce gets too thick, add another 1/­­2 cup of water. In the meanwhile, cook the tagliolini in abundant salted water until ‘al dente’, reserving about 1 cup of cooking water before draining the pasta. Fold the pasta into the mushrooms. Add drizzle of olive oil, parsley, and sauté while adding the grated parmesan, until you have a creamy consistency. Add some of the reserved cooking water if pasta is too dry. Serve immediately, grating or shaving the fresh truffle over each plate. Buon appetito! Note: To clean the mushrooms, do not wash with water! With a small knife cut off the bottom; then take off any remaining dirt with a vegetable brush or a damp cloth. The post Tagliolini ai Funghi appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Pumpkin Pie Truffles

October 4 2018 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Pumpkin Pie TrufflesVegan Pumpkin Pie Truffles or No Bake Pumpkin Donut Holes. 7 Ingredient No oil, No Refined Sugar. These fudgy bites are perfect for fall. Vegan Glutenfree Soyfree Recipe  Jump to Recipe Fudgy Bites, that taste like Pumpkin Pie in a fudge form! hell yes! 7 Ingredients, No Bake, No oil, No Refined Sugar! And ready in 15 mins. It cannot get easier and tastier than this! Pumpkin puree gets heated with maple syrup to thicken slightly, then mixed with almond and coconut flours, as much pumpkin pie spice as you like, then rolled in a mix of cinnamon and coconut sugar. Bliss. Make a double batch! You can also make your own pumpkin pie spice, or use store bought or use just cinnamon, or other spice blends like chai.Continue reading: Vegan Pumpkin Pie TrufflesThe post Vegan Pumpkin Pie Truffles appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Kitchen Creativity

December 12 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Kitchen Creativity In a break from my usual recipe posts, I’d like to share an excerpt from Karen Page’s new book entitled Kitchen Creativity. Beyond a cookbook, Kitchen Creativity is a guide to inventive cooking (without recipes!) that will inspire you to think, improvise, and cook like the world’s best chefs. Great cooking is as much about intuition and imagination as it is about flavor and technique. Kitchen Creativity gives insights into these creative processes from more than 100 top restaurant kitchens, including the Bazaar, Blue Hill, Daniel, and Dirt Candy. Based on four years of research and dozens of in-depth interviews, Kitchen Creativity illuminates the methods of culinary invention. Part I reveals how to learn foundational skills, including how to appreciate, taste, and season classic dishes before reinventing the classics from a new perspective. Part II’s A-to-Z entries are an invaluable culinary idea generator, with exercises to prompt new recipe ideas and combinations. While not a cookbook, nor a vegan book, for that matter (although vegan chefs and ingredients are very well represented), Kitchen Creativity has a lot to offer for cooks looking to broaden their creativity in the kitchen.  The following is an excerpt from Kitchen Creativity on one of my favorite topics, umami… “Umami” from Kitchen Creativity by Karen Page The taste of umami is imparted by glutamate, a type of amino acid discovered in 1908 by Dr. Kikunae Ikeda of Tokyo Imperial University. In studying kombu (kelp), Ikeda managed to isolate glutamate as its own compound, giving it the name of umami, which translates as savoriness. Thus, 5,000 years after the discovery of salt, and 4,000 years after the discovery of sugar, and 3,500 years after the discovery of sour (vinegar), umami is a relatively new taste concept. Japanese cooks had been using umami-rich ingredients intuitively for centuries, long before their scientific properties were discovered to enhance flavor. While we first mentioned umami in our 1996 book Culinary Artistry, it did not begin to gain more widespread acceptance until after 2000 when glutamate receptors were discovered on the tongue. The main sources of umami are those deriving from 1) the amino acid glutamate (found in, e.g., kelp); and those deriving from 2) so-called nucleotides--such as a) adenylate (aka AMP, which is found primarily in fish and shellfish), b) guanylate (aka GMP, which is found primarily in plants and fungi, e.g., shiitake mushrooms, esp. dried), and c) inosinate (aka IMP, which is found primarily in meat and fish, e.g., bonito flakes). The big umami magic happens when one or more nucleotides are combined with glutamate, as there is a synergistic affect--resulting in umami with as much as eight times the potency. Umami Dynamics Umami can enhance a bland dishs appeal with mouth-filling savoriness. Umami can also enhance a dishs perceived sweetness, while tempering its perceived bitterness. If you find yourself with too much of a good thing when it comes to umami, try balancing with salty, sweet, bitter, acidic, or piquant ingredients. Umami is a taste that tends to linger on the palate--something referred to as a long finish in the wine world. Because it contributes to the qualities of deliciousness and satiation, umami is especially prized as a taste in dishes and menus. Note: Certain herbs and spices can also emphasize a dishs savory aspects, such as bay leaf, cumin, oregano, paprika, sage, and thyme. Using Umami Chefs praise black garlic (aka fermented garlic) for its ability to add depth and earthiness to dishes ranging from vegetables to meats. If you doubt umamis importance as one of the five primary tastes, consider the fact that leading chefs like Michael Anthony, Eric Ripert, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten believe dashi to be a key component of their cooking. Some chefs use it to replace liquids in countless preparations, from brines to broths to salad dressings. Chefs have rising enthusiasm for all manner of fermented ingredients (e.g., fermented soybeans, kimchi, miso, pickles, sauerkraut), which bring umami to dishes including vegetables. The corn smut known as huitlacoche is prized as a Mexican delicacy, not only by chefs cooking in the vernacular like Rick Bayless, but also mainstream chefs who find themselves using it in quesadillas, soups, and tacos. Sean Brock declares is insanely delicious and luxurious, like black truffles. Kombu (aka kelp, the sea vegetable) is prized for its umami by Yoshihiro Narisawa. Brad Farmerie is fanatical about miso, which allows him to achieve a rich mouthfeel without butter or cream. Miso is an integral part of Farmeries roasted chile caramel Brussels sprouts, which involve caramelizing sugar (sweet) before adding chiles (hot), cilantro stems (bitter), lime juice (sour), fish sauce (salt/­­umami), and miso (richness). He adds miso to sweet potatoes + brown butter + rosemary to create another dish hes not able to take off the menu. Other chefs will add misos (e.g., white) to salad dressings or soups for an umami boost. From his time in Japan, Michael Anthony picked up a love of sea weeds and pickles. Thomas Henkelmann describes rich, flavorful stocks as essential for cooking in every season. Umeboshi paste is prized by chefs, including Isa Chandra Moskowitz of Omahas and Brooklyns Modern Love, for its umami quality. Moskowitz adds it to her Caesar salad dressing for its anchovy flavor. Even native Brits like Mark Levy fall prey to the charms of white truffles, which he prizes for their mysterious aroma and short availability. Excerpted from Kitchen Creativity: Unlocking Culinary Genius--with Wisdom, Inspiration, and Ideas from the Worlds Most Creative Chefs by Karen Page (Little, Brown, October 31, 2017). Save Save Save Save The post Kitchen Creativity appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Black Bean Truffles

November 30 2017 Veganpassion 

Black Bean Truffles The best gift you can give someone is something home-made. With this black bean truffles you are going to please everyone the health freak just as the sweets lover. Making truffles from black beans might not be the first thing that pops in mind when thinking about a delicious treat but trust me they're worth a try! Makes 25 truffles Ingredients: 1 can /­­ 4 cups (250g) cooked black beans 2 tbsp (25g) oats 4 tbsp (40g) cocoa 4 tbsp coconut blossom sugar 2 tbsp (60g) coconut oil Cocao powder for coating Rinse the black beans. Grind oats, cocoa and coconut blossom sugar in your mixer. Add in melted coconut oil and beans and mix until it forms into a smooth batter. Form 25 truffles, toss them in cocoa powder and store in an airtight container to prevent from getting dry.

Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet

September 13 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

I’m writing from a hotel in Orlando, where we’ve been waiting out hurricane Irma. Man did we dodge the bullet with this one. Our home is on a tiny island off the West Coast of Florida, and originally the storm’s projected path fell right over the island as a very powerful category 4. So powerful that we were getting ready to say goodbye to our house. Due to some extremely fortunate weather circumstances, our home only got hit with a category 1 storm and the island did not flood. There’s no power or cell reception, the streets are a mess, the bridge to the island has a large boat jammed against it, and everything is closed, but we still have a house! Hope everyone is staying as safe as possible this hurricane season. This is an extra cozy, late summer meal that I made last week when we were trying to figure out exactly what to do as the hurricane was approaching. It’s great for weekdays and tastes amazing, even in times of total uncertainty :) Eggplants are at their absolute tastiest right now, so this is a friendly reminder to take advantage of late summer produce while it’s abundant. There’s something about cutting eggplant into large wedges that makes it taste entirely different than roasted halves or whole roasted eggplant. That shape just speaks of comfort, sort of like huge oven fries. Here it’s sprinkled with za’atar and served with delicious and warming herbed pistachio millet, quick pickled onion, as well as a classic, creamy tahini sauce. Hope you’ll give this one a try! P.S. We just heard that our power is back on, so I’m off to pack up and finally go home. Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the quick pickled red onion half of a red onion - thinly sliced apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon coconut sugar (optional) for the herbed pistachio millet 1 cup millet - soaked in purified water w/­­ a splash of apple cider vinegar 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil or ghee 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 1½ teaspoons turmeric sea salt - to taste 1 cup mixed chopped herbs like dill, parsley, cilantro, basil, mint ⅓ cup pistachios - chopped for the eggplant wedges 2 medium eggplants - sliced into wedges 1 tablespoon coconut oil sea salt freshly ground black pepper zaatar for the tahini sauce 1/­­4 cup tahini 1 teaspoon maple syrup or honey ½ teaspoon sriracha (optional) pinch of sea salt freshly squeezed juice of 1 lemon 1/­­4 cup purified water Instructions to make the quick pickled red onion Place the sliced onion in a small bowl and generously drizzle it with apple cider vinegar. Add the coconut sugar, if using, and toss to coat. Let marinate while cooking the millet and roasting the eggplants. to make the herbed pistachio millet Drain the millet and thoroughly rinse it in a strainer. Warm the oil over medium heat in a medium pot, add cumin seeds and toast for 1-2 minutes, until fragrant. Add turmeric and stir it around for a minute. Add the millet and toast, stirring, for a few minutes. Add 2 cups of purified water and salt. Increase the heat to a medium high and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer the millet for 15-20 minutes, covered, but stirring occasionally. Let the millet cool a bit and stir in the herbs and pistachios. to roast the eggplant wedges Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place the eggplant on a the baking sheet. Drizzle with the coconut oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper and mix to coat. Roast for 20 minutes, then flip the wedges and roast for another 15 minutes until soft and golden on both sides. Let cool a bit and sprinkle with zaatar when serving. to make the tahini sauce Combine the tahini, maple syrup, sriracha (if using), salt and lemon juice in a small bowl, mix until smooth. Add water gradually, while mixing, until you achieve a smooth sauce consistency. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Flatbread Pizza Raw Pad Thai with Baby Bok Choy and White Crab Mushrooms Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Dried Fruit and Walnut Energy Balls

August 22 2017 VegKitchen 

Dried Fruit and Walnut Energy Balls We love healthy treats that are as tasty as candy truffles, and these dried fruit and walnut energy balls fit that description. With just a few ingredients, theyre super easy to make, too. Did you you know that walnuts are just about the best source of omega 3 fatty acids? This beneficial fat is hard […] The post Dried Fruit and Walnut Energy Balls appeared first on VegKitchen.

Pumpkinseed Caramel ‘Twix’ Bars

June 25 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Pumpkinseed Caramel ‘Twix’ Bars This post was created in partnership with Nuts.com Wow, am I excited to finally be sharing these bars here today! They are sort of like a much healthier, more colorful and plant-based version of Twix bars, they’re also no-bake and easy to make at home. The recipe was born out of a collaboration with Nuts.com, our favorite online bulk foods supplier that carries pretty much every magical whole food ingredient, from nuts to dried fruit, spices to superfood powders and snacks. They sent me a mystery ‘Pantry in a Box,’ and I had the fun challenge of coming up with a recipe using the ingredients in the box. The stand-outs were plump pumpkin seeds, the freshest coconut flour, electric pink beet powder, and flaky sea salt. It took me a while to simmer on the recipe. First, I wanted to go savory and tested out a few dishes in that direction, but I ended up arriving at these bars, and I’m so glad I did. The bottom, ‘shortbread’ layer is made with coconut flour and colored pink with beet powder, which is totally optional, but contributes to the bars’ stunning appearance (and nutrition!). No baking required there. The green ‘caramel’ layer is made with sweetened, homemade pumpkinseed butter, but you can pretty much use any nut or seed butter in its place. Everything is covered with chocolate and generously sprinkled with flaky salt. So good! The recipe looks long because I give directions for making your own seed butter and chocolate coating, but those two can easily be store-bought for a quicker prep time. We made a step-by-step video to show the fun of the process, too :) Pumpkinseed Caramel Twix Bars   Print Serves: 16 Ingredients for the shortbread cookie layer ½ cup coconut flour small pinch of sea salt (optional) 2 teaspoons beet powder (optional, you can also use any colorful berry powder) ½ cup coconut butter/­­manna (not oil) ¼ cup maple syrup for the pumpkinseed caramel layer 1½ cups pumpkin seed butter (recipe follows) or any nut/­­seed butter of choice ¼ cup maple syrup ⅓ cup toasted pumpkin seeds (optional) 1-2 tablespoons bee pollen (optional) for the raw chocolate coating 100 g (about 1 cup) shredded raw cacao butter 2 tablespoons maple syrup ½ cup raw cacao powder ¼ cup mesquite powder (optional) 2 tablespoons maca powder (optional) flaky sea salt - for sprinkling (optional) for the homemade pumpkinseed butter 2 cups raw pumpkin seeds 1 tablespoons neutral coconut oil, melted ½ teaspoon sea salt 2 teaspoons moringa or matcha powder - for color, (optional) about ¼ cup olive oil Instructions to make the shortbread cookie layer Line an 8 x 8-inch rimmed pan with parchment paper and set it aside. Combine the coconut flour, salt and beet powder, if using, in a medium bowl. Set aside. Combine the coconut butter with the maple syrup in a small saucepan and melt over low heat, stirring until mixed thoroughly. Add the coconut butter mixture to the bowl with the coconut flour and mix until combined, using your hands towards the end. Transfer the mixture into the prepared pan and press against the bottom into an even layer. Set aside while making the caramel layer. to make the pumpkinseed caramel layer Combine the pumpkinseed butter with the maple syrup in a small saucepan and warm it over low heat, stirring, until thoroughly mixed. If your butter is quite soft and creamy, you can mix in the maple syrup without heating it up. Evenly spread the pumpkinseed butter mixture over the cookie layer. Sprinkle with the toasted pumpkin seeds and bee pollen, if using, slightly pressing them into the caramel. Place the pan into the freezer until firm to the touch, for about 2 hours. to make the raw chocolate coating Gently melt the cacao butter in a medium heatproof bowl on a double boiler. Whisk in the maple syrup, sift in all the powders, if using, and whisk to combine thoroughly. Allternatively, melt about 1½ cups chopped dark chocolate or chocolate chips in a medium heatproof bowl on a double boiler. Add 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil and whisk to combine until smooth. to make the bars Remove the pan from the freezer. Pull the bar cookie out of the pan onto a cutting board by the sides of the parchment paper. Slice in half lengthwise and crosswise and continue slicing each piece in half until you have 16 slim bars. Working with one bar at a time, dip them into the melted chocolate using two forks. Turn to coat evenly, remove from the coating and gently shake over the bowl to let most of the chocolate excess drip back into the bowl. Place the coated bars on a drying rack over a piece of parchment paper. Optionally, drizzle with more chocolate and sprinkle with flaky salt. Transfer the coated bars into the freezer for about 10 minutes, until the chocolate is set. From here, you can enjoy them right away or store in an airtight container in the freezer. Remove 5 minutes prior to enjoying. to make the pumpkinseed butter Preheat the oven to 350° F (180° C). Line a rimmed baking tray with parchment paper. Combine the pumpkin seeds with the oil and salt and toss to coat. Toast for 7 minutes, until slightly golden. Transfer the pumpkin seeds into a food processor, add the moringa/­­matcha powder, if using, and grind into a fine meal. With the motor still running, add the olive oil, 1 tablespoon at a time, until a smooth, slightly runny butter forms. Stop the processor and scrape the sides periodically during the process. Keep refrigerated in an airtight glass container. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Ricotta Fig Tart with Chocolate and Roasted Grapes Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways Beet Mille-Feuille from the La Tartine Gourmande Cookbook Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Pumpkinseed Caramel ‘Twix’ Bars appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Portobello Nachos

May 10 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Portobello Nachos This post was created in partnership with Newman’s Own Organics. Roasting up a bunch of goodies and serving them up right on the baking sheet together with sauce and toppings is a sure way to a fun dinner or a low-maintenance spread for last minute company. In the winter, I’ll bake an assortment of roots rubbed with plenty of spices, and slather them with herby sauce or tahini/­­cashew cream to go alongside some beans or grains. In the summer, it’s all about the slow-roasted tomatoes, eggplants and peppers served with some sort of bread, herbs, greens and good olive oil. Nachos definitely fall into this throw-together oven meal category, and we tend to crave them often around here, so I’m constantly thinking about ways to freshen up the format. These healthful portobello nachos utilize meaty, roasted portobello caps instead of chips, which then get topped with all kinds of savory and spicy components. There is an addictive, plant-powered ‘queso’ sauce made with roasted sweet potatoes, avocado, a bit of Newman’s Own Organics Mild Salsa, and spices. There’s also a simple, spicy corn and black bean sauté, as well as some extra roasted sweet potato cubes, more of that salsa, and all the fixings. The combination is incredibly flavorful and satisfying enough to pass for a meal. The whole thing can be served up family style, with all the toppings piled on top, and maybe even some extra sauce on the side. We made a step-by-step video for you to see the fun of the process :) I used Newman’s Own delicious organic mild salsa twice in this recipe – as one of the toppings and whirled into the sauce. I suspect that I’m not the only person who has opened a jar of salsa for a meal, only to use a small portion and then proceed to forget about the rest of the jar until it’s too late. This recipe uses more, if not all of the jar. All the ingredients in this salsa are as recognizable and pure as can be, and every single thing inside the jar is organic. It’s mild in spice, but all the other components in this dish compensate with their own spicy kick, and the balance ends up quite perfect. This is the second recipe we’ve made in collaboration with Newman’s Own Organics (the first one involved their tasty marinara sauce), and we love working with this classic brand that donates 100% of their net profits to charities around the world. It’s also so exciting to see them expanding their Organics line and working towards popularizing organic foods with their accessible, quality products for over twenty years now. Enjoy! If you like these nachos, you might like these: - Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings - Spring Vegetables with Smoky Chickpea Croutons and Avocado Aioli - Taco Collard Green Rolls Portobello Nachos   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 8 large or 12 small portobello mushrooms 2 large or 4 small sweet potatoes - peeled and cubed 3 tablespoons neutral coconut oil - divided sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 1 yellow onion - chopped 4 garlic cloves - sliced 1 jalapeno - seeded and minced kernels from 3 corn ears or about 3 cups frozen corn 1¼ cups cooked or canned black beans 1 ripe but firm avocado 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon chipotle in adobo sauce or ¼ teaspoon ground chipotle, or to taste splash of tamari juice of 1 large lime, plus more to serve 1 16 oz jar prepared tomato salsa, divided vegetable broth or water ¼ cup olive oil ½ cup olives (optional) ½ medium red onion - chopped cilantro - for garnish microgreens - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 450° F (230° C). Place the portobello caps and sweet potatoes on two large, parchment paper-covered baking trays, drizzle with 2 tablespoons coconut oil and mix to coat. Spread everything out in a single layer and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast for 10 minutes, then remove from the oven, flip the portobellos and stir the potatoes. Roast for another 10 minutes or until golden and soft throughout. Remove from the oven and set aside. In the meantime make the corn and black bean sauté. Warm the remaining 1 tablespoon coconut oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add cumin and toast for 1 minute, until fragrant. Add onion and a pinch of salt and sauté for 5 minutes, until translucent. Add garlic and jalapeno and sauté for 2 more minutes, until fragrant. Add corn and another pinch of salt and sauté for 5 minutes. Add black beans and sauté for another 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside. Make the sauce. In an upright blender, combine ⅓ of the amount of the roasted sweet potatoes, ¼ avocado, nutritional yeast, chipotle, a splash of tamari, lime juice, ½ cup salsa, and ¼ cup vegetable broth or water until smooth. Add more vegetable broth/­­water if needed to achieve the consistency of thick but pourable sauce/­­queso. With the blender still running on low add in ¼ cup olive oil. To assemble, arrange the portobellos caps on a tray or a platter, top with the corn and bean sauté, sweet potato cubes, the remaining avocado (sliced), olives, if using, and red onion. Drizzle with the sauce and spoon in some more salsa to taste, top with cilantro and microgreens, if using. Squeeze more lime juice over the nachos and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles No Noodle Pad Thai .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Portobello Nachos appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles

February 26 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles These cheesecake truffles are another fun recipe I developed for Nuts.com. Chocolate truffles full of healthful ingredients are everywhere these days, but that’s not so much the case with white chocolate, since it is admittedly more difficult to reinvent into a high-vibe and wholesome treat. It is possible, though, and the two ingredients perfect for the job are coconut and cacao butters, both of which happen to be really good for you, loaded with healthy fats and all. If you’ve never heard of coconut butter before, it’s a product made of the entire contents of the coconut – meat and oil – and you will most likely be amazed by how rich and delicious it is upon your first taste. I love having a jar of it in the kitchen, and since a little of the butter goes a long way, the jar lasts a pretty long time, while I add it to desserts, hot drinks, porridges, smoothies, and even slather it on toast. Cacao butter is another entirely natural ingredient that’s amazingly luxurious, so it goes without saying that these vegan cheesecake truffles are as decadent as they get. The sweetness comes from your choice of maple syrup or honey, and the characteristic, tart cheesecake flavor is brought out with the addition of fresh lemon juice and zest. The texture is soft, airy and very cheesecake-like –  you could technically eat these truffles with a fork if you wanted, but I recommend biting. Indulging in these feels good, since all the ingredients are real foods, which is not generally the case with white chocolate truffles. There are some links below, a lot of really good ones this week. Enjoy your Sunday! Chef’s Table Season 3 – the 1st episode with Jeong Kwan, a Buddhist nun recognized for her temple food cooking by chefs around the world, blew me away. The Woman Behind Martin Margiela Nigel Slater Quotes – a twitter account that makes me smile, highlighting some of Slater’s finest quotes like ‘Cooking has always been the cheapest therapy in town,’ ‘I swear I can hear the courgettes growing,’  ‘You could measure my life in fishcakes,’ and ‘Ginger swings both ways.’ Inside Sarah Britton’s Kitchen The True Hard Work of Love and Relationships – Alain de Botton interviewed on the On Being podcast Caren Motika and Adam McPherson’s Home – in love with the photos (and the house) I Work From Home – made me laugh Vegan Samosa Shepherd’s Pie – YUM Follow this link to get the recipe for the Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles :) You might also like... Sweet Dukkah Cigars Raw Ginger and Lemon Pyramid Cakes Taco Collard Green Rolls Sweet and Savory Energy Bites, What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Black Bean Truffels

February 11 2017 Veganpassion 

Black Bean Truffels Hello lovelies ? For Valentine's Day you can always give away some chocolate. There's always a good reason for chocolate. For your New Years resolutions I have created these truffels made out of black beans for you. Give a sniff at these delicious truffles and try them out. No one could guess what they consist of and they were gone so fast I could not believe my eyes. So why don't create a special Valentine's Day gift for your loved ones. Homemade and from the heart Makes 25 pieces Ingredients: 1 can (8 oz) black beans 2 tbsp.oats 4 tbsp. cocoa 4 tbsp. coconut sugar 2 tbsp. coconut oil some cocoa to toss Drip off the black beans and put them in a mixer with oats, cocoa and coconut sugar. Blend it nicely. Warm up the coconut oil a little bit and add to the mixer. Blend until smooth. Form 25 balls out of the chocolate mass and toss them into cocoa. Keep the balls airttight so that they don't drain. Enjoy!

Hasselback Potatoes with Kale & Pesto

December 21 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Hasselback Potatoes with Kale & Pesto I posted a photo of thinly sliced spuds on instagram a while back, mentioning that we would roast them, add kale, beans, red onion and cherry tomatoes, slather with pesto and call it dinner. The response was unusually loud for such a humble dinner that we decided to recreate and share this simple recipe here. I’m sure you have seen this potato technique before - slicing them thinly but not all the way through, drizzling with fat and baking them until the edges are crispy and the middle is creamy and soft. Hasselback potatoes were apparently invented at a restaurant here in Stockholm in the 1950’s, as a method to shorten the baking time. It was a very popular dish when I was around Elsa’s age (almost 30 years ago!!!). My mom made Hasselback potatoes almost as often as she did her famous baked giant sausage stuffed with pineapple and cheese - yup, that was what we ate back in 1989. I haven’t seen a lot of pineapple stuffed sausage since then, but Hasselback potatoes sure made a comeback and have been increasingly popular during the last couple of years. The original version uses butter and breadcrumbs but we’re simply using oil. I’m sure some almond flour could be tossed on top towards the end of the baking, if you like it with a little crust. We also stuff herbs into the slices to give the spuds more flavour and that also helps the fat to find its way inside the potato. A good trick is to place the potato in a large wooden spoon when you cut it, to prevent from cutting it all the way through. Or placing it between two chopsticks or chopping boards. On the photo above, Luise uses a metal spoon which actually makes it more difficult to slice because the potato isn’t flat and it can also be bad for the knife. So not the best example. What can I tell you, she’s Danish, very stubborn and she doesn’t like to follow my instructions. But she got the job done with that spoon as well. As I mentioned in the intro, we add kale, beans, tomatoes and onion towards the last 15 minutes of the roasting and then serve with pesto on the side. It’s an easy one-tray dinner. It is however also an awesome side dish on the Christmas table. It looks really nice and Christmassy on that bed of kale. While we were at it, we compiled a list of a few other great Christmas related recipes from the archives. Last year’s loaf would make an excellent companion to the potatoes. o Christmas Spiced Parsnip Cake o Shaved Brussels Sprouts Christmas Salad o Mushroom, Rice & Hazelnut Loaf o Pomegranate, Raspberry & Thyme Jam o Saffron Falafels o Quinoa, Kale & Apple Salad o Homemade Nutella Finally, can we just say a massive Merry Christmas /­­ Happy Hanukkah or whatever yo are celebrating! This has been an intense year for us with books, babies and lots more. We haven’t been posting recipes as often as we intended but we want to thank you for your constant support, kindness and cheering comments. We have a lot more planned in the near future so stay tuned. BIG LOVE! /­­David, Luise, Elsa, Isac and baby Gabriel Hasselback Potatoes with Kale, Beans & Pesto The baking time can vary depending on the potato size and variety. Smaller potatoes will need a little less time. Hasselback potatoes 2 kg /­­ 4 lbs (roughly 12) large baking potatoes 80 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup olive oil sea salt black pepper 1 bunch fresh thyme, leaves picked To serve 3 large handfuls kale, thick stalks removed and leaves roughly chopped 1 small red onion 170 g /­­ 1 cup cooked black beans (1/­­2 can), rinsed 12 cherry tomatoes 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup pesto (if you are vegan, choose a pesto without cheese) 1. Preheat the oven to 200°C/­­400°F. 2. Wash and scrub the potatoes. 3. Slice each potato thinly. Let each slice cut about two-thirds into the potato, leaving the bottom intact. This is easiest done by placing the potatoes inside a large spoon, the edges of the spoon will then stop the knife from cutting too deep. 4. Tuck some thyme leaves sporadically between the slices of each potato and place them on a baking tray. 5. Use a brush to drizzle the potatoes with about half of the oil and then sprinkle with salt and pepper. 6. Bake for 30 minutes and then brush the potatoes with the remaining olive oil. The potatoes should have started to fan out slightly which will make it easier to get some of the oil down in-between the slices as well. If the slices are still stuck together, you can let them roast a while longer before adding the last oil. 7. Bake for 30 minutes more. Meanwhile, cut the onion in thin slices and place it in a bowl along with the kale, beans and tomatoes. Drizzle with olive oil, salt and pepper and toss to combine. 8. When the potatoes have been in the oven for about 1 hour in total, arrange the onion, kale, beans and tomatoes on the tray, around the potatoes and bake for 15 minutes more, or until the potato edges are crispy and the centre feels soft when pierced with a toothpick. 9. Drizzle pesto over the potatoes and kale and serve immediately, while still hot. ******************** PS! We have also updated our Green Kitchen app with 6 Christmas recipes. Apart from this Hasselback Potato recipe and some favorites from last year, you’ll also find our simple Sesame & Gingerbread Truffles and this delicious Saffron Overnight Oats recipe there. Enjoy!

Cookie Dough Truffles Vegan Gluten-free

December 2 2016 Vegan Richa 

Cookie Dough Truffles Vegan Gluten-freeVegan Cookie Dough Truffles. Fudgy Cookie Dough balls coated in melted chocolate and topped with coarse sea salt or candied ginger, sprinkles or coconut. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe Cookie Dough = everything.  Even though you can possibly eat up all the cookie dough any time of the year, I reserve this treat for the holiday season. Super easy, sweet and customizable.  Add whatever toppings of choice like candied ginger, crushed candy cane, crushed ginger snaps, coconut, vegan sprinkles, add some spices to the dough and what not. A simple Cookie dough with maple and coconut sugar and oat and almond flour. Oat flour and almond flour make a good neutral and textured dough that I like over plain flour dough. But feel free to use other flours.  These truffles are based on my very popular Cookie Dough Bars. It is easy to find cocoa butter based vegan chocolate which does not use palm oil. Works out perfectly in terms of melting, setting and flavor. Melt in your mouth goodness and so easy to whip up! You can shape the mixture into bars or other forms as well, if you can wait long enough that is. Most days, the dough goes from bowl to large spoon to mouth and 5 minutes later there is no trace of what was in the bowl.  Continue reading: Cookie Dough Truffles Vegan Gluten-freeThe post Cookie Dough Truffles Vegan Gluten-free appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Pineapple Sandesh (Bengali Sweet)

May 13 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Pineapple Sandesh (Bengali Sweet) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Pineapple Sandesh (Bengali Sweet) Pineapple Sandesh is a popular Bengali sweet. This is healthy and delicious dessert and a great dessert for sophisticated people and so easy to make.  - 4 cup whole milk - 3 Tbsp lemon juice - 3 Tbsp fine sugar - 1/­­4 tsp cardamom - 6 slice pineapple (canned) - 2 Tbsp sliced pistachios (for garnishing) - Making paneer: Boil the milk in a heavy bottomed pan over medium high heat, stirring occasionally. - As the milk comes to a boil, add the lemon juice gradually and stir the milk gently. The curd will start separating from the whey, turn off the heat. - Once the milk fat has separated from the whey, drain the whey using a strainer line with cheesecloth, or muslin cloth. - Wrap the curds in a muslin cloth, rinse under cold water, and squeeze well.  - Making Sandesh: Once the paneer is drained, place on a dry, clean surface and knead the paneer until the paneer is almost rolls into smooth soft dough. - Add the sugar and cardamom powder into the paneer and knead the paneer again until sugar is mixed well. Now this paneer known Sandesh. - Spread the pineapple slices on a dry surface and pat dry using the muslin cloth or paper towel. - Spread the Sandesh covering the pineapple slices evenly and garnish with slice pistachios. I prefer cutting them in four. - Refrigerate the Sandesh for about 1 hours before serving. Pineapple Sandesh taste best when it is served chilled and refrigerating the Sandesh also helps to set over pineapple. After kneading the sugar with paneer it is known as Sandesh. This is a basic Sandesh you can use this for making many variation of Sandesh. I also I have 2 more recipe of Sandesh, you will be interested Sandesh, and Chocolate Sandesh The post Pineapple Sandesh (Bengali Sweet) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Vegan Chocolate Macadamia Truffles with Coconut

December 5 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Chocolate Macadamia Truffles with Coconut When you love chocolate, macadamia nuts, and coconut, theres only one thing to do - make these decadently delicious truffles. Chocolate Macadamia Truffles with Coconut are great for holiday gift giving, and they’re a terrific addition to dessert trays at parties, too! Chocolate Macadamia Truffles with Coconut When you love chocolate, macadamia nuts, and coconut, ?theres only one thing to do - make these decadently delicious truffles. - 1 1/­­3 cups shredded unsweetened coconut - 1/­­3 cup semisweet vegan chocolate chips - 1/­­3 cup macadamia butter - 3 tablespoons coconut milk - 2/­­3 cup confectioners sugar - Finely chop the coconut by pulsing it in a food processor. Set aside. - Place the chocolate in a heatproof bowl and set it over a small saucepan of simmering water until the chocolate melts. (Alternatively, melt the chocolate chips by placing them in a small microwaveable bowl and microwave on high for about 1 1/­­2 minutes, or just until the chocolate is completely melted.) Add the macadamia butter and coconut milk and blend until smooth and creamy. - Place the chocolate mixture, sugar, and 1/­­3 cup of the reserved coconut into a food processor and process until well combined. - Shape the mixture into 1-inch balls and roll them in the remaining 1 cup coconut, pressing so the coconut adheres to the truffles. Place the truffles on a platter or a baking sheet. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use. From The Nut Butter Cookbook by Robin Robertson. (C)2014 Robin Robertson. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Lori Maffei. The post Vegan Chocolate Macadamia Truffles with Coconut appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Pumpkin Spice Truffle

October 27 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

For a healthier Halloween treat, Feasting On Fruit‘s Pumpkin Spice Truffle checks all the boxes! This yummy vegan recipe contains dates, which helps sweeten the truffles naturally. And of course it’s got pumpkin, to satisfy all your fall pumpkin treat cravings! Here’s how to make these fun little truffles yourself: Read the full recipe here. The post Pumpkin Spice Truffle appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Red Cabbage and Sweet Potato Smoothie

September 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Red Cabbage and Sweet Potato Smoothie Smoothies are my absolute favorite breakfast. I always get sad once the mornings start getting cooler, because an ice-cold smoothie bowl no longer seems like a very appropriate breakfast option. I continue making them into October anyway :) For years, I’ve had the same smoothie formula that consisted of frozen banana, frozen berries, as well as any greens and super-powders I had on hand. This past year though, I decided to start packing more stuff into my smoothies, specifically more veggies. If you have a blender, especially a high-speed one like a Vitamix, it’s so easy to ‘hide’ all kinds of things in your smoothies. I’ve been favoring steamed and frozen cauliflower, sweet potato, and zucchini in place of frozen banana. I’ve also been adding things like raw beets, red cabbage, and even mung bean sprouts into the blender. At first, eating a barely sweet smoothie was strange, but now I can honestly say that I’ve grown to appreciate and love having a less sugary breakfast. I realized that it’s more important to me to have a smoothie, any smoothie than to have a sweet, dessert-like one in the morning. This red cabbage and sweet potato smoothie has been my favorite variation since I randomly decided to throw some leftover red cabbage into the blender. Its flavor is barely noticeable in the final product, but it adds excellent color and nutrition into the mix. Steamed and frozen sweet potato contributes some sweetness and creaminess, while making the smoothie quite filling and satisfying. Avocado ensures an even silkier smoothie and brings all of its healthy fats to the table. Frozen berries make the whole thing seem and taste like an actual smoothie. I like to add maca, because I swear it gives me all kinds of energy in the morning, as well as puts me in a really great mood. You can also add cacao, medicinal mushroom powder, or any other super-powders you like. I doctor it up quite a bit with nut butter or coconut yogurt, more berries and seed sprinkles, and eat it with a spoon. I love seeing the rainbow of color that all the ingredients create in the blender. To me, it’s the best thing. Would love to hear about your favorite smoothie combos! Have a nice Sunday. Red Cabbage and Sweet Potato Smoothie   Print Serves: 2 big smoothie bowls Ingredients about an eighth of a small head of red cabbage (should be a small wedge, smaller than in the photo) half of an avocado ½ cup cubed, steamed and frozen sweet potato ½ cup frozen blueberries, plus more for garnish ¼ cup frozen strawberries 1-2 teaspoons maca powder (optional) handful of any greens of choice (optional) 1½ - 1¾ cup purified water almond butter or coconut yogurt - for garnish sprinkles like chia seeds, cacao nibs, bee pollen or any other nuts/­­seeds of choice - for garnish Instructions Combine the red cabbage, avocado, sweet potato, blueberries, strawberries, maca, if using, greens, and water in a high-speed blender. Blend until smooth. I like to start out with just 1½ cups of water for a spoonable smoothie consistency and add more water if needed. If you would like the smoothie to be drinkable, add 1¾ - 2 cups of water. Serve right away, garnished with more berries, almond butter/­­coconut yogurt and sprinkles. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder Grapefruit Smoothie Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Red Cabbage and Sweet Potato Smoothie appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight

July 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight This post was created in partnership with Whole Earth Sweetener Co. Turkish delight is one of those old-school sweets that was always around during my childhood in the Soviet Union, which is surprising because treats were scarce and mainly homemade. There was a tiny store a short walk away from our home, where they carried neat, white paper boxes, lined with tissue and filled with delicate pink, sugar-dusted Turkish Delight squares. We called the treat rahat lokum (just another commonly used name for Turkish Delight). I spent my childhood convinced that it was fairy food, and cherished every pleasantly jelly-like, aromatic bite from the magical paper box. I’ve since completely forgotten about rahat lokum, dismissing it as an outdated sweet of my semi-hungry childhood, until I was in Moscow a few months ago. There is a high-vibe sweets brand sold in some grocery stores in Russia, which makes chocolate, wafers and such, with surprisingly wholesome ingredients, cool herbal add-ins, and a pleasantly low amount of non-refined sugar. I always make a point of hunting down some of their stuff to bring back home. This time around, I discovered a new product of theirs, which was a healthier, green tea-flavored Turkish Delight. It was delicious and disappeared in no time once my family got a taste of it back in Florida. I quickly got the urge to figure out my own recipe, as I often do with these types of obsessions. Thankfully, I’m no stranger to the thickening and gelatinizing properties of arrowroot (starch from a tropical tuber) and agar-agar (sea vegetable). Both make for the perfect, allergy-friendly and healthful alternative to cornstarch, which is traditional to Turkish Delight recipes. After some consideration, I decided to color my delight with hibiscus tea, as a tribute to the pink treats of my childhood, and because I’m generally obsessed with hibiscus and its million health benefits. For an extra aromatic finish, I added some orange blossom water instead of the more commonly used rose water, which truly takes this treat to the next level. When coated in arrowroot powder, this Turkish Delight looks surprisingly professional, as though it was store-bought. The cool thing is that in reality it’s pretty easy to make at home, just take a look at the video above to see the whole process. For sweetener in this recipe, I used an organic blend of stevia and honey from Whole Earth. I’ve had a pretty turbulent relationship with stevia over the years. I’ve always wanted to get into it as a sugar substitute, knowing that it’s totally natural, free of calories, and a zero on the glycemic index, but I just cannot get used to its potent, powerful flavor (when extracted it’s something like 200 times sweeter than sugar!). Any time I add pure stevia extract to anything, it’s all I can taste, and that flavor lingers in my mouth for hours in an unpleasant way. Thankfully, Whole Earth Sweetener Co. figured out that when mixed with other, more traditional sweeteners, stevia is barely distinguishable, and they offer a few carefully considered stevia blends. The neat thing is that because of stevia’s potency, you only need half of the amount of their sweetener in any given recipe. In other words, this Turkish Delight recipe only calls for 1/­­4 cup of the honey and stevia blend, while you would need twice the amount (1/­­2 cup) of pure honey or maple syrup to achieve the same sweetness without the stevia. After trying the Whole Earth stevia-honey blend, as well as their stevia-raw sugar blend, I’m totally on board. I love being able to use less sugar in my sweet recipes, and I’m hoping that these products can help me ease into a love affair with pure stevia, some day :) I’m curious to hear about your guys’ experience with stevia. Do you use it? Did it take you some time to get used to it? Any tips and stories are much appreciated! Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight   Print Serves: about 48 pieces Ingredients 3½ cups purified water 2 tablespoons dried hibiscus flowers ⅔ cup plus ¼ cup arrowroot powder, divided ¼ cup stevia-honey blend or ⅓ - ½ cup pure honey or maple syrup 4½ tablespoons agar agar powder (not flakes) 1¼ teaspoon orange blossom water or rose water Instructions Combine the water with the hibiscus in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, cover and let the tea steep for 30 minutes. Prepare an 8 x 8-inch square, rimmed dish by lining it up with parchment paper. Set aside. Strain the hibiscus tea. Mix ½ cup of the tea with ⅔ cup of the arrowroot powder in a medium bowl. The mixture will be quite thick and difficult to mix at first. Set aside. Pour the rest of the hibiscus tea into the same saucepan used for brewing the tea. Add the sweetener and the agar agar powder, whisk to combine and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and simmer for 5 minutes, whisking periodically. At the end of the 5 minutes, give the prepared arrowroot mixture a good stir and slowly pour it into the saucepan with the agar mixture, stirring vigorously. The mixture will be very thick and stretchy. Remove from heat and add in the orange blossom water, whisking to combine. Immediately spoon the mixture into the prepared dish, evening it out as much as you can. Place the dish into the refrigerator for 1-2 hours, until the mixture is completely set. Once set, lift the delight square out of the dish onto a cutting board, using the extending ends of the parchment paper. Slice into around 48 cubes and roll them in the remaining ¼ cup arrowroot powder to coat. Store refrigerated in an airtight container. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Black and White Chocolate Pudding

June 18 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Black and White Chocolate Pudding Out of all the desserts in the world, I crave the pudding/­­mousse-kind the most. A tiny cup full of something light, creamy and porous to finish off a meal is my idea of dessert heaven. I’m always on the lookout for new pudding/­­mousse ideas and constantly searching for ways to revolutionize my own tried and true recipes in one way or another, mostly to simplify the process or ingredients. I freestyled these black and white pudding cups the other day, when I made a fresh batch of almond milk and had all the other ingredients on hand. They turned out perfect and were gone within a day. I had no problem repeating them to photograph and share here :) There are some weekend links below, enjoy your Sunday! Amy’s Love Letter to Miso Soup – that recipe sounds amazing Best Books for Wellbeing – love this list Eye + I – Satsuki Shibuya (you’ve probably seen her intuitive watercolors) now has a podcast La Muralla Roja – I want to stay here If Sex and the City Came Out in 2017, Miranda Would be the Protagonist :) The Beguiled – on our list of things to watch Black and White Chocolate Pudding   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients 3 cups plus 4 tablespoons unsweetened almond milk (preferably homemade) - divided ¼ cup maple syrup or more to taste 1 vanilla bean, seeds scraped out, or a splash of vanilla extract 3 tablespoons agar agar flakes (not powder) pinch sea salt 4 tablespoons arrowroot powder 3-4 tablespoons shaved raw cacao butter - optional, but highly recommended 2-4 tablespoons raw cacao powder Instructions Combine 3 cups of almond milk with the maple syrup, vanilla seeds and bean, agar agar flakes and salt in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Combine the arrowroot powder with the rest of the almond milk in a small bowl. Slowly pour the arrowroot mixture over the agar-agar milk, whisking, until thickened. Discard the vanilla bean. Remove the mixture from the heat and pour into an upright blender. Add the cacao butter and blend until smooth. Taste for sweetness and add more maple syrup, if desired. Pour half of the pudding into small serving cups. Add the cacao powder to the remaining mixture in the blender (I added 4 tablespoons for a more intense chocolate flavor) and blend until well combined. Pour between serving cups. Cover and refrigerate until set, about 1 hour. Serve cold, garnished with berries, if desired. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Chocolate Truffles and Mango Sorbet on Palomas Birthday Chocolate Avocado Truffles and Concord Grape Sorbet Summer Greek Salad Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Black and White Chocolate Pudding appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans + Quick Marinated Beans

April 30 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans + Quick Marinated BeansFagor recently sent me their 6 quart pressure cooker, and I was very excited since I’ve never had one before and knew that it would be a very practical addition to my kitchen. Aside from stews, soups, and rich veggie broth, I was especially thrilled about the prospect of perfect home-cooked beans. I’d heard that cooking beans in a pressure cooker makes them amazingly creamy, yet firm and intact, on top of significantly speeding up the cooking process. As an example, soaked kidney beans only take 5 minutes of active cooking time in the pressure cooker. Crazy stuff! All the rumors turned out to be true – my pressure cooker beans have been coming out amazingly buttery. The reason I’m so excited about a more efficient way to cook beans is that I really dislike buying canned ones. I’ll do it in case of an emergency, but it’s really not my favorite way to go. Firstly, canned beans never taste as good as my homemade ones, since I usually include some aromatics like peppercorns, garlic and bay leaf in the cooking water. Canned beans also seem to be harder on my digestion, since I take time to soak and rinse my beans, as well as cook them with kombu (more on that below), while most companies don’t. Maybe I’m just sensitive, but that’s a big factor as well. Plus, dried beans are more affordable than canned ones, and that’s always a great bonus. Today I’m sharing a few useful things I’ve learned about cooking my own beans after years of practice, as well as my favorite recipe for simple marinated beans. I like to make those on a Sunday and spoon them into meals throughout the week. Even if you don’t have a pressure cooker, there are still plenty of great tips and tricks that you might find helpful below. Have a great Sunday :) Soak I always soak dried beans before cooking them. I know, it seems like an annoying practice that doesn’t allow for any spontaneity in the kitchen, but it’s also really easy to make a habit out of it. Soaking reduces the cooking time, as well as helps eliminate the phytic acid (antinutrient) in beans and activates the germination process, making the beans easier to digest/­­more nutritious. To help break down phytic acid, especially during shorter soaking times, add a splash of acidic liquid, such as lemon juice, vinegar or even a few pinches of salt to your soaking water. Cover your beans with plenty of water and leave room in the bowl, since the beans will grow quite a bit as they take on the water. Once done soaking, rinse and drain the beans really well to wash off all of that unwanted stuff. I like to soak my beans overnight. I’ve gotten into the habit of asking myself if there’s anything that needs to be soaked before I go to bed, and sometimes I’ll just soak a cup of some bean/­­lentil/­­grain without even knowing what I’ll do with it the next day. If you happen to soak some beans and don’t have the time to cook them the next day, just change the water, cover, and put them in the fridge until ready to cook. Batch Cook & Freeze The trick that does allow for spontaneity when using home-cooked beans is batch cooking and freezing them for future use. Cook a whole pound of beans at a time and freeze them in 1 1/­­2 cup batches (equal to around a 16 oz can), and you’ve got a foundation for so many meals right in your freezer. It feels really good! You can freeze the beans in glass containers or zip lock bags for anywhere from 6 months to a whole year (labeling with a date is a good idea in these cases). A good tip I learned for preventing freezer burn is to cover the beans with their cooking liquid, then freeze. Add Aromatics & Kombu Another great thing about cooking beans at home is that you can flavor the cooking water any way you want. That will make the beans taste better, as well as provide you with a whole batch of broth, which you can use in place vegetable broth in any recipe. I pretty much never throw away the cooking water, and usually end up freezing it for future use. That way, I almost never have to buy boxed broth. The aromatics I personally like to add to the cooking water are bay leaf, black peppercorns and garlic. Some people add onions, carrots and herbs – the possibilities are endless. Another important addition to bean cooking liquid is kombu, which is a mineral-rich seaweed. Kombu yields all of its beneficial minerals to the beans and the water, as well as helps tenderize the beans and make them easier to digest – a life-changing tip I learned from Amy Chaplin. Pressure Cooking One quirk of pressure cooking is not being able to check the food for doneness while it’s cooking, since the pot cannot be opened while there’s pressure built up inside. It’s helpful to know how long your ingredient will take to cook ahead of time, and time the cooking process accordingly. Thankfully, there is this very helpful chart that tells you suggested cooking times for most common types of beans. I love that it has cook times for both soaked and unsoaked beans, since those vary pretty significantly, and I’ve found them to be very accurate. Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans   Print Serves: around 3 cups Ingredients 1 cup dried beans of your choice - soaked overnight in purified water w/­­ a splash of vinegar, lemon juice or salt 2 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife 2 bay leaves 1 piece kombu 1 teaspoon black peppercorns sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the beans very well. In a pressure cooker, combine the beans, garlic, bay leaves, kombu, peppercorns and plenty of salt. Cover the beans with plenty of water, water level should be about 4 inches above the beans. Remember that when cooking beans, you cannot fill up the pressure cooker any more than half way, since the foam from the beans might clog up the pressure release valve if there is too much water. Close the pressure cooker lid, set the pressure to high (15PSI) and turn up the heat to high. Wait until the pressure indicator shows that the pressure has been built up and turn the heat down to low. This is when your cooking time starts. Refer to this chart to determine the cook time for your beans and cook accordingly. Once the time is up, turn off the heat and let the pressure release naturally, which will take around 10 minutes. Open the pressure cooker, drain the beans, preserving the cooking liquid to use as broth or as freezing liquid. Discard the bay leaf, peppercorns and kombu. Enjoy the beans :) 3.5.3226   Quick Marinated Beans   Print Serves: 3 cups Ingredients 3 cups mixed cooked beans (I used baby Lima and kidney) handful of parsley - chopped handful of chives - sliced 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar juice of 1 lemon sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste Instructions In a bowl, combine the beans with parsley and chives and give everything a stir. Add the olive oil, vinegar, lemon juice, salt and pepper, and mix thoroughly. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Store the beans in the refrigerator, in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. The flavors will develop further as the beans marinate. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Vegan Tiramisu Fudge Bars

February 14 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Tiramisu Fudge BarsTiramisu Fudge Bars with creamy cashew vegan mascarpone layered with cocoa coffee cream. These freezer fudge bars are easy and dreamy. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe These fudgy creamy bars have a vanilla cashew layer with a bit of tang like masarpone and a creamy cocoa coffee layer. Together they feel like a tiramisu in icecream fudge form. Dont like coffee? just make a vanilla and chocolate version. Or add a layer of cookie dough instead of cocoa layer for fudge sandwiches! Easy and perfect for valentines day or any day of the week.  These fudge bites retain their shape in the fridge too. I like them from the freezer as they are sturdy and less messy. I also like them sliced smaller so they are bite size. No biting into the cold bar needed then! You can also serve these as ice cream. Scoop so you get both layers and serve. The almond extract adds an amazing amaretto like flavor. Use amaretto liquor if you like.  Continue reading: Vegan Tiramisu Fudge BarsThe post Vegan Tiramisu Fudge Bars appeared first on Vegan Richa.

18 Vegan Chocolate Dessert Recipes for Valentines Day

February 9 2017 Vegan Richa 

18 Vegan Chocolate Dessert Recipes for Valentines DayVegan Chocolate Dessert Recipes. Easy Chocolate Cake, Brownies, Chocolate Chip Cookies, Chocolate Mousse, Chia Chocolate Shake, Marble Chocolate Cake, Chocolate Silk Pie and More. Vegan Chocolate Recipes for Valentines Day. I mean do we really need a day to eat more chocolate! Make a Moist Fudgy Chocolate Cake, a mousse cake, Chocolate Chip Cookies, Blizzard, Truffkes,, Brownies, Fudge and what not. Everything Chocolatey, Everything comfort food, Everything Palm oil free.  What are you making today! or for Valentines Day? My current faves are the super simple Boston Cream Pie Pudding, Cookie Dough Truffles, All Chocolate Ginger Fudgy Cookies and the PB Blender Cake. They disappear too soon. Continue reading: 18 Vegan Chocolate Dessert Recipes for Valentines DayThe post 18 Vegan Chocolate Dessert Recipes for Valentines Day appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Miso Caramel Popcorn

December 18 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Miso Caramel Popcorn This popcorn is the treat I’ll be gifting my friends and bringing to holiday parties this coming week. After spending some time contemplating the bags of caramel popcorn for sale at the grocery store, I became curious about making it at home. After a few trials, I’m pleased to say that it’s quite easy and satisfying to put together on your own, delicious and – I have to warn you – extremely addictive. The caramel here is on the healthier side of the spectrum, made with coconut milk and coconut sugar instead of butter/­­regular sugar, and the addition of miso adds a nice, salty hint to contrast all the sweetness. If you’ve never made stovetop popcorn before, we’ve got some tips to help you through the process in the recipe. There are some weekend links after the jump. Stay warm this Sunday :) Fire Cider – this recipe from Kimberley of The Year in Food looks amazing, going to give it a shot to keep the bugs at bay Chyawanprash – just ordered this Ayurvedic herbal jam that stimulates the metabolism, aids digestion and helps strengthen the body in face of stress. So curious to try it out! Has anyone had it before? Interview with Nahvae Frost on Local Creatives – can’t wait to visit her cafe Durga Chew-Bose’s Twitter – captivated with this writer’s words The Well Woman – new instagram crush McKel Hill on Chris Ducker’s podcast – stripping back a personal brand success story Miso Caramel Popcorn   Print Serves: 12-15 cups Ingredients for the miso caramel 1 can full fat usweetened Thai coconut milk 1/­­2 cup coconut sugar 1 tablespoon neutral extra virgin coconut oil 2 teaspoons vanilla extract (optional) 1 tablespoon sweet miso paste for the caramel popcorn 1½ tablespoons coconut oil ½-3/­­4 cup popcorn kernels (see note) miso caramel (from above) 2 tablespoons chopped dark chocolate (optional) Instructions to make the miso caramel Combine coconut milk and coconut sugar in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for about 30 minutes, stirring, until thickened to a caramel consistency. Remove from heat and whisk in coconut oil, vanilla extract and miso paste, until smooth and well combined. to make the caramel popcorn Warm a large, heavy bottomed pot (pot must have a tight fitting lid) over high heat. Add coconut oil and let it melt and heat up for about 30 seconds. Drop in 3 popcorn kernels to test the heat and shake the pot a bit to cover them with oil. Once those kernels pop, your oil is hot enough and you are ready to add all the popcorn kernels. After adding all the kernels to the pot, cover it with a lid and begin moving the pot back and forth over the burner, to ensure that all the kernels are being covered with oil and to keep them from burning. Once you hear that the popcorn has started popping, turn down the heat to medium low and keep moving/­­shaking the pot quickly. Youll know that all/­­most of the kernels have popped when you hear the popping slow down - once there are about 5 seconds between each pop, remove the pot from the heat, your popcorn is ready. If you smell any burning at any point, remove the pot from the heat. Preheat oven to 250° F (120° C). Place two oven racks in the top and bottom third of the oven. Prepare two parchment paper-covered baking trays. Pour caramel into the pot with the popcorn, a little bit at a time, mixing it in every time. If possible, have someone help you - one person can pour and the other can mix. Immediately distribute the popcorn between the two baking trays in a single, even layer. Place in the oven and bake for about 1 hour, mixing every 15 minutes, until caramel is candied. Once popcorn is ready, optionally sprinkle the chopped dark chocolate over one of the trays of popcorn while its still hot and mix to coat to make chocolate caramel popcorn. Keep the popcorn in an airtight container or distribute between paper bags for gifts. Notes 1. The amount of popcorn kernels you use depends on what kind of popcorn you want. If you want popcorn thats completely covered in caramel (like the second photo in this post), use ½ cup kernels. If you want popcorn with bits of caramel here and there, with some white still showing (like the first photo in this post), go for the ¾ cup. 2. Caramel popcorn technique adapted from The Kitchn. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Cookie Dough Truffles

December 2 2016 Vegan Richa 

Cookie Dough TrufflesCookie Dough Truffles. Fudgy Cookie Dough balls coated in melted chocolate and topped with coarse sea salt or candied ginger, sprinkles or coconut. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe Cookie Dough = everything.  Even though you can possibly eat up all the cookie dough any time of the year, I reserve this treat for the holiday season. Super easy, sweet and customizable.  Add whatever toppings of choice like candied ginger, crushed candy cane, crushed ginger snaps, coconut, vegan sprinkles, add some spices to the dough and what not. A simple Cookie dough with maple and coconut sugar and oat and almond flour. Oat flour and almond flour make a good neutral and textured dough that I like over plain flour dough. But feel free to use other flours.  These truffles are based on my Cookie Dough Bars. You can shape this mixture into bars or other forms as well, if you can wait long enough that is. Most days, the dough goes from bowl to large spoon to mouth and 5 minutes later there is no trace of what was in the bowl.  Continue reading: Cookie Dough TrufflesThe post Cookie Dough Truffles appeared first on Vegan Richa.


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