tropical - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Frozen Chocolate Frappuccino

Pumpkin Spice Pancakes

Maggi manchurian recipe | noodles manchurian | manchurian maggi gravy

Eggless mayonnaise recipe – 4 flavours | veg mayonnaise | eggless mayo










tropical vegetarian recipes

pineapple kesari bath recipe | pineapple sheera | pineapple rava kesari

September 11 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

pineapple kesari bath recipe | pineapple sheera | pineapple rava kesari with step by step photo and video recipe. rava or sooji based sweets are very common across india and are made for different reasons and purpose. the basic one is the rava kesari or sooji ka halwa but it can be experimented or extended by adding different types of tropical fruit in it. one such easy and simple rava or sooji based sweet recipe is pineapple rava kesari bath or known as pineapple rava pudding. The post pineapple kesari bath recipe | pineapple sheera | pineapple rava kesari appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

banana flower recipes | banana blossom recipes | how to clean banana flower

July 16 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

banana flower recipes | banana blossom recipes | how to clean banana flowerbanana flower recipes | banana blossom recipes | how to clean banana flower with step by step photo and video recipe. indian cuisine is known for its use of almost all tropical fruits grown and available natively. as a matter of fact, we even end up making some of the yummy recipes, which are otherwise termed as waste or not edible. one such traditional healthy recipe using banana blossom is banana flower chutney, banana flower chips and banana flower sukka or poriyal. The post banana flower recipes | banana blossom recipes | how to clean banana flower appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

caramel bread pudding recipe | steamed caramel custard bread pudding

July 10 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

caramel bread pudding recipe | steamed caramel custard bread puddingcaramel bread pudding recipe | steamed caramel custard bread pudding with step by step photo and video recipe. custard-based dessert recipes are very common and are made for various reasons. you may either serve it as it is, or with a combination of tropical fruit toppings. but there are other types of custard recipes and steamed caramel custard bread pudding is one such delicate and creamy dessert recipe. The post caramel bread pudding recipe | steamed caramel custard bread pudding appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

banana ice cream recipe | frozen homemade banana ice cream – no sugar, no cream

June 4 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

banana ice cream recipe | frozen homemade banana ice cream – no sugar, no creambanana ice cream recipe | frozen homemade banana ice cream - no sugar, no cream with step by step photo and video recipe. ice cream recipes have always been a popular choice among many indians and are made with many locally available tropical fruits. most of them involve a cumbersome process in it with not so healthy ingredients in it. however, there are some healthy one and frozen homemade banana ice cream is one such made without sugar and cream. The post banana ice cream recipe | frozen homemade banana ice cream – no sugar, no cream appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

avocado smoothie recipe | avocado banana smoothie | avocado juice

April 29 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

avocado smoothie recipe | avocado banana smoothie | avocado juiceavocado smoothie recipe | avocado banana smoothie | avocado juice with step by step photo and video recipe. smoothie recipes are not native to indian cuisine, but has been widely accpeted by all age groups. in india it is typically made with a combination of milk and wide range of tropical fruits. however, it has been made with other fruits too and avocado banana smoothie is one such simple and tasty milk-based beverage recipe. The post avocado smoothie recipe | avocado banana smoothie | avocado juice appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

aam panna recipe | kairi panha recipe | mango panna drink | aam jhora

April 1 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

aam panna recipe | kairi panha recipe | mango panna drink | aam jhoraaam panna recipe | kairi panha recipe | mango panna drink | aam jhora with step by step photo and video recipe. indian cuisine is known for its adaptation and use of tropical fruits in its recipes. there are myriad types of meals and beverages made out of these seasonal tropical fruits, which can be either made and served immediately, or can be preserved with preservatives to be consumed later. one such easy and simple refreshing beverage drink recipe is aam panna recipe known for its body cooling properties. The post aam panna recipe | kairi panha recipe | mango panna drink | aam jhora appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Sweet and Sour Guava Curry

February 13 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Sweet and Sour Guava Curry (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Amrood Ki khati Methi Sabji (Sweet and Sour Guava Curry) Guavas, or "amrood" in Hindi, are simply delicious and probably one of my favorite fruits! This year I have an abundance of guavas growing in my backyard. I like to sprinkle chaat masala on guavas. The spiciness really brings out its flavor. Since I have so many delicious guavas, I decided it was time for me to make Guava Sweet and Sour Curry (Amrood Ki khati Methi Sabji). In case you are not familiar, this is a popular North Indian dish which I believe tastes best with fresh hot puris or parathas. This was a staple sabji when I was a child growing up in India, provided guavas were in season. My brother especially enjoyed this dish. He simply relished this sabji and could enjoy eating it every day. However, there was catch – he would only eat this dish with puris! Rotis or parathas simply did not do this dish justice! My brother would pretend to read a book while eating so no one would disturb him so he could truly enjoy eating in peace! Whenever I make this recipe, I remember our sweet, innocent childhood memories. Guava Sweet and Sour Curry has the best flavors – spicy, sweet and sour – all in one dish! This recipe will serve 2. Course Main Course Cuisine Indian Keyword Amrood, cooking shows, Gourmet food, Guava Fruit, Home Cooking, Home Made, Indian food, Jain Food, Kadoo Ki Subji, Khatta Meetha, Main Dish, Mandir Food, No Garlic, No lahsun, No Onion, No Pyaj, North Indian Recipes, Recipe videos, Satvik Food, Spicy, Swaminarayan, Tropical Fruit, Vegetarian, Veshno Cooking Prep Time 5 minutes Cook Time 15 minutes Total Time 20 minutes Servings 2 people Ingredients2 cups guavas amrood, cut into bite size pieces 2 Tbsp oil 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds jeera 1/­­4 tsp fenugreek seeds mathi dana 1/­­8 tsp asafetida hing 2 tsp coriander powder dhania 1 tsp fennel seed powder saunf 1/­­4 tsp turmeric haldi 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder 1/­­2 tsp salt 1 Tbsp ginger adrak, thinly sliced 1/­­2 tsp mango powder amchor 1 tsp lemon juice 2 Tbsp sugar adjust to the taste 2 Tbsp chopped cilantro hara dhania InstructionsHeat the oil in a saucepan. Oil should be moderately hot. Test the heat by adding one cumin seed to the oil. If the cumin seed cracks right away, the oil is ready. Add the cumin seeds, asafetida, fenugreek seeds, fennel seeds powder, coriander powder, turmeric, and red chili powder stir for few seconds. Add ginger and guava mix it well add 1 cup of water and cover the pan. Lower the heat and cover the pan cook for about 5-8 minutes until guavas are tender. Add mango powder, lemon juice and sugar stir and add cilantro. Turn off the heat and cover the pan for few minutes. Amrood Ki khati Methi Sabji is ready to serve. NotesIf Guava seeds are hard then remove them, adjust the sugar to taste depends how sweet are guava. The post Sweet and Sour Guava Curry appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

mango burfi recipe | mango barfi | mango coconut burfi recipe

June 11 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

mango burfi recipe | mango barfi | mango coconut burfi recipemango burfi recipe | mango barfi | mango coconut burfi recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. summer season india is very colorful and is full of tropical fruits. these fruits are not just relished by itself and is used heavily in indian cuisine to make beverages and desserts. one such popular indian sweet recipe is the mango coconut barfi known for its combination of mango and coconut flavor. The post mango burfi recipe | mango barfi | mango coconut burfi recipe appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

fruit cocktail recipe | fresh fruit cocktails for summer | fruit salad

May 22 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

fruit cocktail recipe | fresh fruit cocktails for summer | fruit saladfruit cocktail recipe | fresh fruit cocktails for summer | fruit salad with step by step photo and video recipe. cocktail recipes are generally made with mix of beverages including alcohol. but it can be made with different ingredients like fruits, drinks, beverages and also with ice creams. one such variation recipe is fruit cocktail which is basically made with combination of various tropical fruits and creamy yoghurt. The post fruit cocktail recipe | fresh fruit cocktails for summer | fruit salad appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

watermelon juice recipe | tarbooz ka juice | tarbuj ka juice

May 3 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

watermelon juice recipe | tarbooz ka juice | tarbuj ka juicewatermelon juice recipe | tarbooz ka juice | tarbuj ka juice with step by step photo and video recipe. beverages or refreshing drinks are very essential during the hot or summer season. most of the time it is made with tropical fruits available locally but it can also be made with artificial flavours too. watermelon juice recipe is one such tropical fruit drink which can be made with different ways to hydrate the body. The post watermelon juice recipe | tarbooz ka juice | tarbuj ka juice appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

mango frooti recipe | how to make frooti mango drink | mango fruity

April 16 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

mango frooti recipe | how to make frooti mango drink | mango fruitymango frooti recipe | how to make frooti mango drink | homemade mango fruity with step by step photo and video recipe. indian summer season can be extreme hot, and can easily touch 40 degrees. obviously, to lower the temperature and to hydrate the body, many try various tropical fruit and their corresponding beverages. one such popular indian drink is mango frooti made with combination of raw and ripe mangoes. The post mango frooti recipe | how to make frooti mango drink | mango fruity appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

pathrode recipe | how to make patrode | pathrode konkani recipe

January 14 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

pathrode recipe | how to make patrode | pathrode konkani recipepathrode recipe | how to make patrode | pathrode konkani recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. the coastal place of udupi and mangalore are known for its satvik based cuisine. is is widely popular for its breakfast, deep fried snacks or the colourful banana leaf based meal. but the pathrode recipe recipe is traditional snack recipe made with a tropical plant known as colocasia or also known as kesu yele. The post pathrode recipe | how to make patrode | pathrode konkani recipe appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Pulled Jackfruit Sandwiches – Vegan Pulled “Pork”

October 1 2018 Vegan Richa 

Pulled Jackfruit Sandwiches – Vegan Pulled “Pork”Easy Pulled Jackfruit Sandwiches. Shredded Jackfruit seasoned with bbq seasoning and bbq sauce, baked and served with slaw. 6 Ingredient Vegan Pulled Pork. Nutfree Recipe. Can be gluten-free soy-free Unripe Jackfruit, a huge fruit commonly found in tropical climates, has a string like shreddable texture which works great in some applications to make vegan version of meaty meals. It is often used to make a pulled “pork” to fill up sandwiches or tacos.  While trying out my soycurl mango bbq tacos, I felt that this short method of directly baking works out best for me. No additional pans, no additional kitchen standing time! Just shred, mix bbq sauce + seasoning, spread and bake. And done! It cannot be simpler than that! Change it up with different seasonings such as a mix of bbq and cajun, jamaican jerk, taco seasoning etc. This slaw is a basic one with some vegan mayo, pepper, vinegar and sweetener. Make a double helping of the jackfruit and add to sandwiches, tacos or wraps!Continue reading: Pulled Jackfruit Sandwiches – Vegan Pulled “Pork”The post Pulled Jackfruit Sandwiches – Vegan Pulled “Pork” appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Mango Papaya Smoothie Bowl

July 24 2017 VegKitchen 

Mango Papaya Smoothie Bowl If youre new to smoothie bowls, youll soon understand their their appeal. This one combines two juicy tropical fruits, mango and papaya. Add-ins are the best part of smoothie bowls, making them a little more interesting, better-looking, and possibly more filling too (depending on said toppings)? Speaking of toppings, choose as many or as few […] The post Mango Papaya Smoothie Bowl appeared first on VegKitchen.

nimbu ka achar recipe | instant lime pickle recipe | nimbu achar

May 29 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

nimbu ka achar recipe | instant lime pickle recipe | nimbu acharnimbu ka achar recipe | instant lime pickle recipe | nimbu achar with step by step photo and video recipe. pickle recipes are one of the essential recipes in indian cuisine. it is made with myriad tropical fruits which is offered in both traditional and instant version. one such traditional and also instant pickle recipe is nimbu ka achar recipe known for its sour, bitter and spicy taste. The post nimbu ka achar recipe | instant lime pickle recipe | nimbu achar appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegetarian Shipwreck Casserole

April 10 2020 Oh My Veggies 

My mom always had a few recipes that she’d make all the time when I was growing up. There was Cheesy Beef Casserole, which is pretty self-explanatory. Cheese. Buddig Beef. Potatoes. Toast. And then there was Chicken a la King, the only way I’d ever eat peas (even if I’d pick the chicken out). But one of the recipes that always stands out in my memories is Shipwreck. Shipwreck, my mom told me, was named such because it was all that people had to eat after their ships wrecked. Naturally, anytime my mom would make it, I’d imagine Pilgrims on a tropical island, cans of Campbell’s soup and baked beans in hand, preparing to make a casserole over a camp fire. I had an active imagination, you see. (I also had two imaginary friends named Joy and Field--Joy after the dish soap and Field after Marshall Fields. Incidentally, Field looked exactly like Joyce DeWitt from Three’s Company.) Anyway! When I did a vegetarian casserole challenge with Valerie from Eclecticisms, I challenged her to make a vegetarian shipwreck casserole. It sounded so good and brought back so many warm and fuzzy memories that I just had to try to make it […]

mango peda recipe | aam peda recipe | mango pedha | mango fudge

March 5 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

mango peda recipe | aam peda recipe | mango pedha | mango fudgemango peda recipe | aam peda recipe | mango pedha | mango fudge with step by step photo and video recipe. peda recipes are extremely popular across india, and are made generally to be shared with friends or as dessert. generally it is made with milk solids with an optional flavoring agent like vanilla, chocolate or any other tropical fruit pulp. one such simple and easy fruit pulp based peda recipe is mango peda recipe or also known as aam peda recipe. The post mango peda recipe | aam peda recipe | mango pedha | mango fudge appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Don’t Get Spooked by Sweets — Try These 10 Better-for-You Halloween Treats

October 28 2019 Meatless Monday 

Don’t Get Spooked by Sweets  —  Try These 10 Better-for-You Halloween TreatsHalloween season is here, so its time to bust out the bloody bandages, clean out the old cast-iron cauldron, and study up on your seances. And theres no better way to honor the scariest holiday of the year than with a proper Halloween bash (or monster mash, or graveyard smash)? Whether its a spooky soirée for you and your friends or a party for some little monsters , the focal point of the celebration (as with all parties) is the finger food -- minus the fingers, of course. You can always go with the traditional frightening fare -- candy apples, ants-on-a-log, popcorn balls, devils food cake -- but we wanted to offer some more imaginative options that are not only tasty, easy to make, and freaking cute, but theyre also better-for-you! Check out the list below for some hauntingly yummy Halloween treats. Peanut Butter Apple Monsters With sunflower-seed teeth and a strawberry tongue, these gremlin-looking green apples are the perfect snack for guests who are scared of eating too much sugar. Photo courtesy of @nutriacure . Fiendishly Frightening Fruit Platter Ghostly red peppers, Frankenstein kiwis, and cantaloupe tombstones make for a very frightening fruit platter. Photo courtesy of @foodbites . Ghostly Chocolate Cupcakes These are not your ordinary cupcakes. Tucked away within each fluffy chocolate cake is a hint of tangy guava and sweet beet puree. Topping each cupcake is a crown of coconut-milk frosting. Drizzle some thinned out guava juice over the top for an even more ghastly effect. Photo courtesy of Goya . Mummys Favorite Jalape?o Poppers These jalape?o poppers are almost too cute to eat... almost. Photo courtesy of @thepurplepumpkinblog . Ghastly Gluten-Free Zombie Fingers These are almost as scary as someone with a gluten intolerance eating a piece of bread. Made primarily from dates, peanut butter, and oats, these zombie fingers are easy to assemble, and they most definitely look the part. Photo courtesy of Recipes from a Pantry . Boo-nana Popsicles The ideal non-dairy frozen treat for your guests. Not too messy, these popsicles will be gone so fast youll begin to wonder if they ever existed at all... Photo courtesy of Well Plated . Candy Corn Parfait These have the candy-corn look, but with added tropical flavor. Just layer some pineapple, tangerine, and a shot of whipped cream to capture the aesthetic of classic candy corn.  Photo courtesy of Family Fresh Meals . Bat Energy Bites All you need is 20 minutes, a microwave, and a mixing bowl to put these scary snacks together. These ones are just as fun to make as they are to eat. Photo courtesy of Chelsea’s Messy Apron . Tangerine Pumpkins Rushing to complete the Halloween party preparations? These tangerine pumpkins dont require much assembly: Just peel and pop a little wedge of celery on top to give them that pumpkin look. Photo courtesy of Bren Did . Ahhhhh Vegetables! For some, nothing is scarier than a platter of roasted vegetables, but we think these spooky shaped beets, carrots, and squash are just devilishly delightful. Photo courtesy of Live Eat Learn .   Making one of these creepy creations? Tag @meatlessmonday and well repost the scariest photos (and maybe the cutest). The post Don’t Get Spooked by Sweets — Try These 10 Better-for-You Halloween Treats appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Kiwi Basil Smoothies

May 27 2019 Meatless Monday 

The complexly flavored kiwi pairs beautifully with sweet banana, tart grapefruit juice and the unexpected herbal basil finish. This tropical smoothie can serve as a light dessert or a breakfast to refresh you as you begin your day. This recipe comes to us from Kathy of Healthy, Happy Life. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 2 - 6 kiwis, cut into cubes and frozen - 2 bananas - juice from 2 pink grapefruits - 2 tablespoon agave nectar* - 1/­­2 cup fresh basil - handful of ice cubes *Found in health food stores or the health food or sweetener section of most grocery stores.   Place the kiwis, banana, grapefruit juice, agave nectar, basil and ice cubes together in a blender. Puree, pour into 2 glasses and enjoy! The post Kiwi Basil Smoothies appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett

May 5 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett Rachelle Robinett is an Herbalist, Holistic Health Practitioner, and founder of Supernatural, a company dedicated to real-world plant-based wellness. Rachelle has been studying the relationship between plants and people her entire life – be that on a farm in the Pacific Northwest (where she grew up) to time with healers, specialists, and shaman in farther-away places. She now provides functional plant-based wellness services, products, and education to empower people to understand their health, and lean into it, naturally. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? This has changed a lot for me since launching my company and having total control of my schedule. I do schedule every thing, but also move through life very intuitively. For example, on a day off Ill plan to ride my bike but once Im on it, it doesnt matter to me where I go. There are things I do routinely (meal preparation, exercise, rituals, sleep) but I never ignore instincts or anything my body is telling me. I love to be surprised but also care so much about how I spend every moment that planning is a big part of my life. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. No more alarm clock! Or, infrequently, which isnt something I would have predicted for my life. Ill wake up to open windows and the sounds of birds on a breeze. A glass of water with a tincture and probiotics. If its a day off, Ill skip caffeine and head out for a run while Im still sleepy. I love waking up while I run. A work day means a small cup of cold-brew with MCT oil and (currently, though it changes as I work with different herbs) mucuna pruriens and L-theanine. I practice intermittent fasting daily so dont typically eat until 11am or later but in the morning Ill make a broth or giant green juice and also a smoothie, which becomes brunch. A meditation ritual with some South American plants Ive come to love and then its off to the races. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Getting away from blue light! If Im near screens, they have physical filters and apps (like flux) installed to reduce the effect. Dimmed lights, incense, my Zen Spa Stuff playlist, and something to drink. There are always herbs at night as my energy tends to run very high, naturally. I cycle between kava kava, skullcap, valerian, poppy, lavender, and more. Also very in love with a relaxing face-washing routine. :) -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Im working diligently at becoming a more regular meditator. Its most days now, but Id like to deepen it. Otherwise, yoga, running and long bike rides silence my mind. I can practice yoga (ashtanga) for hours a day and be thrilled. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – A giant smoothie made with fresh tropical fruits and fats, ideally picked from a jungle farm that morning. Lunch – All the vegetables, fresh and raw and local. Amazing olive oil, avocado, or coconut. Maybe some seeds. Seaweed too. Every color of the rainbow. Snack – 100% cacao. Local. Dinner - See lunch. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Currently I have about 1/­­2 cup of cold-brew coffee that we make at home. Im so high energy naturally that I often dont finish it. Green juice is my favorite energy support. Otherwise I use water, food, sunlight and breath to adjust my energy. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? Dark chocolate – often homemade but if bought its 92 – 100%. Ill eat that for breakfast, honestly. My sugar intake is so low that sweets cravings are rare but if they get aggressive Ill have extra cacao in smoothies or elixirs, or eat more fruit, sweet potatoes/­­yams, etc. Chocolate chip cookies are dear to my heart though. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? This evolves as I learn and grow too but ... – An excellent probiotic – Personalized herbs. For me those are mood-supportive and nervous-system soothing. I use a combination of herbal teas (infused overnight), tinctures (HerbPharm are my favorite!) and well-sourced powders. – Supplements depending on bloodwork, body composition and lifestyle. – Im seeing the greatest overall health changes in my clients who are working on gut health. It just affects so much! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I live to move. Every single day if possible! If I skip more than two days, I get really restless. Running and yoga are my favorite, but I need both. I joke that running is my church; I treasure it and find it extremely cathartic. Yoga keeps everything balanced and I hope to have the practice for life. Weather permitting, Ill ride my bike for hours but that just feels like play. Im also into strength training (aka lifting weights at the gym, which surprises people). Overall, I consider exercise as essential as good food, water, and sleep. My preference for high-intensity exhaustive stuff comes from my high-energy personality but isnt necessary for everyone. Ive seen some of the fastest changes in my body with a daily yoga practice, some walking, and an excellent diet. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? Absolutely heavenly. Excellent playlists are essential! Also, just do it. ;) Beauty -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I think people doubt me when I say greens, and especially green juice, are responsible for the glow but I really mean it. Veggies veggies veggies, healthy fat, tons of water, and sweat! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Aside from food, water, rest, and sweat, I find that a consistent routine of gentle exfoliation and good quality rehydration (topically, that is) work best for me. Continually renewing the surface, allowing skin to breathe, and keeping it nourished with really simple ingredients (I love Egyptian Magic and fruit enzyme or honey-based masks) gives really great face. That said, Im not an esthetician and have increasingly more respect for what I dont know about skincare (thanks to spending more time with the professionals at CAP Beauty, especially) and it will differ for everyone. What wont differ is the value of a right diet to help reduce inflammation, increase circulation, maintain hydration, and provide enough energy for both exercising and rest. :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Exercise and sleep have always been stress-reliefs for me. Ive recently integrated more meditation, and herbs of course (especially nervines). Whats making the greatest difference, though, is - as with most things - addressing the root cause or source of the stress. Rather than just trying to breathe between emails, Im looking at how to reduce email overall. Setting timers, limits on the number of meetings Ill take each day, inbox pausing, and scheduling (and sticking to) more time truly offline. Personal days, screen-free evenings or weekends, etc. If doing this, its important to prepare for there to be more to address when you return to it, so another part of the practice may be letting go of how much we want to engage with and choosing quality over quantity. Much harder said than done. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Heat and spice! I completely eliminate all sugar including fruit and yes, honey too. I put on three extra layers to get warm and stay warm. Garlic, ginger, and all sorts of spice. And rest. Essentially, Im aiming to help my body reach a sort of break-point with the cold/­­flu, or to sweat it out before it even reaches a peak, which Ive had a lot of success with. Medicinal mushrooms can also be great for cold/­­flu season. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? Im working on this. (See above regarding stress avoidance!) My work is my play is my passion is my love so whats not work is sometimes very hard to determine. My hypnotherapist friend suggests that if it makes me happy, perhaps its not important to distinguish. My partner has inspired me to take in information from sources entirely outside of my usual bubble, which is great for play, and avoiding a filtered or algorithmic existence. This is a new practice for me. I grew up in a home that didnt allow for play so its something Im creating space for and learning how to do as an adult. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Ive found that its just impossible to be my best self when Im not taking care. Its really priority number one (and two, and maybe three) at this point. That said, there are times when life when its worth compromising different things. Like, in my twenties when I worked my ass off (and loved it) in order to achieve certain things. Now, I feel freer to play and rest. These bodies are our only homes in this life. I am so grateful to have one; I really think of it like my best friend and partner in existence. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Learning how to eat entirely plant-based, and well. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Thankfully, I dont have these. But, the opposite side of that spectrum is overworking, under-socializing, or burnout. And, existential crises which seem to strike when things are best. Rest and changes of scenery can do wonders. (Lately, I have been exploring procrastination from the perspective of mindfulness, though. This is an enlightening talk on it.) -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Instead Ill choose a couple of people: My mom, who as a Dietician gave me the greatest start in understanding nutrition, but more importantly taught me how to listen to my body. Rather than bandaging symptoms, she showed us how to ask why and follow the clues to root causes. My dad, an Anaesthesiologist who - much the opposite of Mom - taught us about medicine yes, but of more value he gave me the travel bug and experiences with wild nature that started and perpetuate my relationship with earth. And, Wendy Green, who I met at the perfect time in my journey. She helped direct my then multitudinous health practices into a more singular approach, which Ive honed and deepened since we met years ago. She also showed me how much I love ashtanga yoga, which is the gift of a lifetime. Ill be back to her retreat for the third time this summer. Knowledge -- Do you have any recommendations for those thinking of taking their career in a similar direction? Where does one start, where to find the education, how important is certification, etc. This is one of the most common questions I receive! I appreciate Mountain Rose Herbs list of resources for those looking into schools, teachers, or even just books. Its worth knowing which certifications are recognized by The American Herbalists Guild, though many people disregard the value of that and choose to study from great herbalists or schools that exist outside of the system. Id recommend as much exploration and direct experience as possible in the form of classes, workshops, and apprenticeships before then committing to a longer-term study. Find someone whose approach you respect and identify with and learn from them in whatever ways are available. -- Tell us about HRBLS, your beautiful herb infused chew line! Woo, HRBLS! These are my babies! Long story short, I wanted to give people an easy, delicious, beautiful but still very effective form of herbs. The HRBLS are gummies, or chews, that are equivalent to a dose of a tincture, a strong cup of herbal tea, or some capsules. Theyre a marriage between functional food and herbal remedies. A snack medicine or treat with benefits. Nerve Less is the first flavor (honeyed lavender tarragon) and includes my favorite herbs for daytime stress and anxiety relief, which so many folks come to me for help resolving. In the near future, well announce the next flavor – okay flavor s. :) -- And a last, fun one: what are your three favorite plants for the spring season and why? – Nettle! Because its my bff (we grew up together) and the coolest combination of edible green, super-green plant medicine, and a natural antihistamine. – Dandelion: I love the multi-taskers and like nettle, dandelion is an edible flower and bitter green (great for digestion), and medicinal top to root. – Mimosa. The tree of happiness which blooms more in the summer than spring, but close enough. Aside from looking magical, its full of medicine – everything from antioxidants to DMT. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Deep massages – two hours with the strongest hands I can find please! Acupuncture. Running, yoga, riding. TRAVEL. The post Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

mango custard recipe | mango fruit custard | mango custard dessert

April 29 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

mango custard recipe | mango fruit custard | mango custard dessertmango custard recipe | mango fruit custard | mango custard dessert with step by step photo and video recipe. dessert recipes and fruit based beverages are very common during the summer season. particularly the mangoes are heavily used in the tropical climates which would eventually help to bring down the body temperature. one such fusion and popular recipe is mango custard recipe known for its flavors and creaminess. The post mango custard recipe | mango fruit custard | mango custard dessert appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool

February 9 2019 My New Roots 

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool   When we committed to going to the ocean, I immediately felt the thrilling sensation that washes over me when I stand at the intersection of land meeting water. I smelled brine and dampness. I saw certain patterns and colours; light sand against dark water, wet stones, seaweed, driftwood, and feathers. This was the second recipe I created for the dreamy on-location photoshoot with Christiann Koepke back in October (you can see the first one here). The inspiration for this dish came first in fact, fast and furiously. Just thinking about the seaside brought this recipe to me in a wave of total inspiration. I wanted the ingredients to reflect the elements in this environment, and for the final result to be a visual meeting of land and sea. Now Im not super into “fake meat”, but there is something undeniably satisfying about tricking someone into thinking a vegetable is flesh. Tee hee. Plus, Rene Redzepi does it all the time, so maybe it puts me in the cool cooking club too? Yes? Anyway, I knew something on the plate had to look like seafood, and I had my sights set on scallops. In my first cookbook, I made “scallops” out of leeks, and wanted to try something different, so going through the rolodex of tube-shaped white veggies in my mind, I fell upon king oyster mushroom stems. Naturally. Browned in ghee and well-seasoned, I knew that these morsels would look exactly like mollusks, and taste deceptively meaty. A pool of herbaceous, vibrant green pesto, would be the land, and the perfect resting place for my mushroom medallions. I combined flat-leaf parsley and spinach to create a bright yet balanced sauce that complimented - rather than overwhelmed - the rest of the dish. But with all this creaminess, I knew that I also needed to include something for textural contrast, so toasted hazelnuts became the beach stones, along with fried capers, which added a bite of seaside brine. This dish is surprisingly easy to make, and it is the prefect main to serve for family and friends that you want to spoil a little. It looks impressive, but its a cinch to get on the table without gluing you to the stove. The pesto can be made a week in advance (although the fresher, the better), so that the only thing you need to do before serving is cook the mushroom and capers, and warm the pesto a little. I love cooking the capers and mushrooms in ghee (recipe here) because its just so darn delicious, but the pesto is vegan and if you want the entire meal to be so, simply swap out the ghee for expeller-pressed coconut oil, which is refined for high heat cooking and has no tropical aroma. Beta-glucan Goodness Edible mushrooms are both medical and nutritional dynamos. Collectively, they not only provide us with plant-based protein, vitamin D, and a whole host of minerals, but most excitingly a group of polysaccharides called beta-glucans. These complex, hemicellulose sugar molecules enhance the functioning of the immune system by activating immune cell response and stimulating the production of white blood cells. These compounds also effectively mobilize immune stem cells in your bone marrow, and exhibit anti-tumor properties, so theyre often used supplementally in cancer treatment protocols. Beta-glucans help to lower cholesterol, as this type of fiber forms a viscous gel during digestion, which grabs a hold of excess dietary cholesterol, prevents absorption by moving it through your digestive tract, and eliminates it. Through your poop! This same gel also slows down your digestion, which in turn stabilizes blood sugar, and minimizes the release of insulin. King oyster mushrooms are of course a good source of beta-glucans, but you can get them in other places too: barley, oats, sorghum, mushrooms like shiitake, reishi and maitake, as well as seaweed, algae, and dates.   I wouldn’t put king oyster mushrooms in the “specialty” category of fungi, but I also know that theyre not available at every grocery store, so if you cant find them, substitute with any other kind of mushroom you like and forgo the whole scallop charade. The dish will still turn out delicious, I promise. If you want to change up the herb in the pesto, try basil instead of flat-leaf parsley. Cilantro could also be delicious, but potentially overwhelming, so use more spinach in that case. And instead of hazelnuts in the pesto and garnish, try almonds, pecans or walnuts. Yummm. I like to serve this with a big hunk of crusty bread on the side to mop up any leftover pesto in the bowl. It also helps to have some good olive oil and flaky salt around for this situation, just sayin. If youd prefer the grain route, steamed brown rice, quinoa, or millet could be a decent accompaniment too. And if you want to go completely grain-free, roasted sweet potato, winter squash, or pumpkin would be totally lovely.     Print recipe     King Oyster Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 lb. /­­ 500g king oyster mushrooms (choose ones with fat stems) a generous amount of ghee (or expeller-pressed coconut oil) fine + flaky salt 1 jar brined capers (about 1/­­3 cup /­­ 55g) a handful of toasted hazelnuts, roughly chopped, for garnish 1 batch Parsley-Spinach Pesto (recipe follows) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish a few leaves of parsley, for garnish Directions: 1. Remove any dirt or debris from the mushrooms with your hands, or small soft brush. (do not use water!). Slice the stems into enough rounds so that each person has 5 or 6. Keep the caps for another dish. 2. Drain the capers and pat them dry with a clean tea towel or paper towel. Heat about a tablespoon of ghee (or coconut oil) in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the capers and fry until split and crisp - about 2-3 minutes. Remove from pan and set aside. 3. Add more ghee (or coconut oil) to the same skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add the sliced mushroom stems, a sprinkle of flaky salt, and cook on one side until golden, about 5-7 minutes. Then flip and cook on the other side until golden. Work in batches or use separate skillets - if you crowd the mushrooms they will steam each other and get soggy. That is not what were after! 4. While youre cooking the mushrooms, place the pesto in a small saucepan, add a touch of water to thin, if desired, and warm over low-medium heat. Do not boil! 5. To serve, place about 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml of the warm pesto in the bottom of a dish, spreading it out to make an indent in the center. Place 5 or 6 mushroom stems in the pesto, then top with the fried capers and toasted hazelnuts. Drizzle with olive oil and a few grinds of black pepper. Garnish with parsley and serve immediately. Parsley-Spinach Pesto Makes about 2 1/­­4 cups Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 150g hazelnuts 1 fat clove garlic 2 cups /­­ 35g flat-leaf parsley, lightly packed (tender stems only) 2 cups /­­ 65g baby spinach, lightly packed zest of 1 organic lemon 1/­­3 cup/­­ 80ml freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 2 lemons) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml cold-pressed olive oil 1/­­2 cup /­­ 35g nutritional yeast 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water, more if needed Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place hazelnuts on baking sheet. Toast in oven for 12-15 minutes or until fragrant and lightly toasted. Remove and set aside. Once cool, remove skins by rubbing the hazelnuts together in your hands. Set aside. 2. Remove any tough stems from the parsley. Roughly chop the leaves and tender stems (this prevents the parsley from bruising in the food processor). 3. Place garlic in the food processor and pulse to mince. Add the hazelnuts, parsley, spinach, lemon zest and juice, olive oil, nutritional yeast, and salt. Pulse for 30 seconds, then add the water and pulse again until its thick, but spreadable. Remove lid and scrape. Repeat until reaches desired consistency (I like mine a little chunky, but its up to you!). Store leftovers in an airtight glass container in the fridge for up to one week. We’re home from Bali now, settling back into life in the cold Canadian winter. It feels good to be here, especially after a satisfying few weeks in the sunshine, hosting two glorious retreats. Now it’s time to ground and focus on the year ahead. I’m very excited for 2019 – so many exciting things to share with you, just on the horizon. I hope you’re all well out there, and enjoying a vibrant start to the new year. Sending love and gratitude out to you all, always. xo, Sarah B The post Mushroom “Scallops” in a Warm Pesto Pool appeared first on My New Roots.

The Epic Travel Salad

January 4 2019 My New Roots 

The Epic Travel Salad   When I saw the number, I couldnt believe it: 29 hours. It was undoubtedly going to be one of the longest travel days of my life. Ive been to Bali twice before, but always from Copenhagen, which is about half the distance from Toronto. I almost gave it a second thought since spending that amount of time sitting upright just felt like it might end me, but the retreats were booked, and there was no backing out! I knew what would get me through, and that was food. Lots and lots of delicious, nourishing, consciously-created food. I always always make a point of preparing meals for traveling, since eating mini, microwaved mystery munch seriously kills my vibe. Plus, the amount of calories in one of those airplane trays is barely enough to get me through one romcom and you know that Im watching at least five in a row. When youre about to face any length of time on an airplane, there are a few things to take into consideration. First, fill your snack pack with foods that are hydrating: cucumbers, romaine, bell peppers, carrots, apples, oranges, celery, berries, grapes, and melon. Depending on where youre traveling to, it can help to have the fruits and veggies already prepared or sliced, since some countries wont let you bring in whole fruits and veg, but they will let you bring them in if they look ready to eat. It sounds nonsensical, but it works! I love having huge vegetable salads with lentils and /­­ or whole grains to keep me full too, since I have a tendency to stress-eat when Im in transit and will totally mow down a bag of chips if theyre put in front of me (okay, sometimes I also eat those chips, and that is okay too, but I notice that it always prolongs my jetlag). For other filling munchies, I like my almond flour cookies, nuts like pistachios or walnuts, and granola – especially crossing so many timezones, which requires breakfast-y things. Veggie sticks are also nice, light fare that keep my crunch cravings under control.     As you can see from the photo, I bring my food in reusable containers, use washable wooden cutlery and a straw, all of which are convenient to have once Im at my destination to use for my own cooking and storage. I also always have my 800-ml water bottle with me when I travel. Ive mentioned it in previous posts, but it begs repeating: jetlag is exacerbated by dehydration, and drinking about half a liter (16 oz.) per hour of flight will make such an immense difference, you may never experience jetlag again. I used to suffer terribly from exhaustion for days post-travel (which really ruined my trip when it was a short one), and now its no big deal. I arrive, wait until a mildly appropriate time to go to bed, and wake up feeling about as normal as one could hope to. Yes, youll have to make friends with the flight attendants, since they are the keepers of the water, but go visit them at the back of the plane every so often for a refill, treat them like humans, and youd be amazed at how accommodating and helpful they are. Make sure you fill your bottle before landing as well, since you never know how long it will take for you to get through customs, baggage claim and the taxi line. It always pays to have hydration close at hand. Avoid the plane food if you can, since it is overly salted and often has added sugar. Our taste buds are actually less receptive at high altitudes, due to low air pressure, low humidity, and high levels of white noise. Yup - that is an actual thing. The way our brains interpret flavour signals is impaired, therefore, things taste different, so airlines pump up the levels of salt and sugar in their food to make them taste the way they would at ground level. If you ate that travel-sized chicken or pasta at your dining room table youd be surprised at how exaggerated the flavours were.     Why is this the most epic travel salad? Because its got All. The. Things. Rich, hearty beets, protein-rich and satiating lentils, so its filling, but its not going to leave you feeling stuffed. And because of that whole flavours-being-less-powerful-at-high-altitudes thing, I endeavoured to add as many potent tastes as possible. Lemon, pomegranate, parsley, cumin seeds, and olives are like flavour fireworks that you can safely ignite at 30,000 feet. There is a Middle Eastern vibe going on for sure, and the multitude of textures tick every single box. You dont want your mouth getting bored while youre hurtling through the sky, and this combination will ensure that each bite is a surprise party. Olives that come without their pits are often mushy and less flavourful, so I always opt to remove them myself, or leave them in until I eat them. The problem with leaving the pits in the olives in this situation, is finding a place to put them on your teeny table real estate (the airsick bag is a great option, just sayin...and yes, Ive really thought of everything). If you do want to remove them beforehand, its easiest to do so by smashing the olive with the flat side of a knife blade, then simply pulling the pit out. You can roughly chop the olives from there. If you dont have any black lentils, Du Puy or French lentils work just as well, with green and brown lentils as a passable fallback. I dont dig these types of lentils in salads since they tend to be water-y and dilute the flavour of the dressing, but if it keeps you from making a special trip to the store, by all means just use them. And normally I wouldnt include alliums in a plane salad since your neighbours might give you the stink eye when you pop open your lunch box, but Ive tempered their potency by pickling them ever-so-slightly. This is done in the same container that youre going to put your salad in, preceded by mixing up the dressing right in there too. Easy peasy! I guess I should mention that this salad is not just delicious on a plane - its also fabulous enjoyed at ground level. Perfect for road trips, picnics, school or office lunches, just make sure you make it the day before so that all the ingredients are cool. If you travel with this salad on the warm side, it could spoil in transit.     Maybe its a bit strange to have a travel salad as the first post of the year, but Im a bit tired of the whole new year, new you rant. People expect me to talk about cleansing or detoxing in January, and although Im all for reflecting and re-evaluating ones lifestyle choices, Im a bit bored of the narrative saying that the first day of the new year is the time to atone for all our dietary sins. Why do we need a specific day to act as a reason to start treat ourselves well? If there a New Years resolution to pull out of this post, it should be to resolve to make yourself delicious food when you go anywhere. Avoid the overpriced convenience food, no matter how healthy it is, since nothing sold in a package will ever compare to the freshness, or high-vibrational energy of food youve lovingly prepared for yourself. Case closed! If you’d like more travel food recipes, tips, and inspiration, check out my two previous articles here and here.       Print recipe     The Epic Travel Salad Makes enough for 2-3 meals Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 170g dry black /­­ beluga lentils, soaked overnight if possible 2 1/­­2 pounds /­­ 1200g beets 1 shallot, sliced into rings 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt zest and juice of 1 large organic lemon 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1 Tbsp. cumin seeds 1/­­3 cup /­­ 60g pumpkin seeds 1 tsp. honey (vegans sub with maple syrup) 3 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil heaping 1/­­2 cup /­­ 80g pomegranate seeds heaping 1/­­2 cup /­­ 100g olives, with pits 1 cup /­­ 25g parsley 1/­­2 tsp. flaky salt, or more to taste 1 small head romaine lettuce Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Place whole beets (with the skin on) on a rimmed baking sheet and roast for around 45-60 minutes, until you can easily insert a sharp knife into the center (baking time depends on the size of your beets). Remove from oven, let cool completely, then slip the skins off. Slice into bite-sized batons. 2. While the beets are roasting, cook the lentils. Drain and rinse well (if youve soaked them overnight), and place them in a pot, cover with plenty of fresh water, and bring them to a boil. Reduce to simmer, place a lid on the pot, and cook until tender (about 15-20 minutes if youve soaked them, a little longer if you havent). Salt the lentils a few minutes before theyre done - if you salt them at the beginning of cooking, the skins will be tough and theyll take longer to soften. Drain and rinse lightly. Set aside. 3. While the lentils are cooking, prepare the dressing. Slice the shallot into very thin rings, then place them in the container that youre going to use to store the salad. Add the salt and combine them well. Wait about 2 minutes, then add the lemon zest, juice and apple cider vinegar (these ingredients will lightly pickle the shallots, plus act a as a base for your dressing). 4. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast the cumin seeds until fragrant, set aside to cool. Without washing the pan, toast the pumpkin seeds until fragrant and popping, then set aside to cool. 5. Back to the dressing: whisk in the honey and olive oil. Add the prepared beets, lentils, pomegranate seeds, olives, parsley, toasted cumin seeds, pumpkin seeds and flaky salt. Fold to thoroughly combine. Taste and add more salt if necessary (remember that the ingredients will absorb some salt while marinating, and that it will taste milder in the air). 6. You can either chop the romaine lettuce up and place it on top of the salad (dont mix it in - it will get totally mushy), or you can leave the head whole and peel off the leaves and use them as little salad boats. If youre going for the latter, wrap the washed head in beeswax cloth to keep it fresh. The Wild Heart High Spirit Retreats are starting tomorrow, and I cannot wait to embrace each of the women who have traveled from every corner of the earth to join us here in Bali. We are going to eat the most delicious food, practice yoga, dance, laugh, learn, and celebrate the joy of being alive together! We have one space left for the second week, so if youre interested in joining us in tropical paradise, please visit our site for more information. Peace and blessings for an abundant, healthy, vibrant year ahead. Thank you for being here. I love you. xo, Sarah B The post The Epic Travel Salad appeared first on My New Roots.

Restaurant Highlight: Sayuri Healing Food Café in Bali, Indonesia

August 17 2018 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Are you into raw foods? Im not talking about plain fruits and veggies, Im referring to the real meals and creative ways that raw foods are being used to take vegan cuisine to another level! Raw foods typically include items that have not been cooked beyond 118 degrees Fahrenheit. It is believed that anything cooked above this temperature loses a lot of its nutritional value. After visiting the busy city that is Seminyak in Bali, my husband and I made our way over to Ubud, a tropical jungle retreat. It is an area of Bali surrounded by an array of rice-patty fields, famous landscapes, and temples/­­shrines scattered throughout. In addition to its beautiful scenery, Bali offers a much more relaxed and slower way of living than its famous counterpart, Seminyak. My husband and I were looking forward to slowing down a bit, so we decided to visit a local café that was about a 15-minute walk from our Airbnb. Sayuri Healing Food Café was a great introduction to the raw food world. Their menu is quite extensive with a variety of options and a case full of freshly made desserts to choose from after youve finished your entrée. In addition […] The post Restaurant Highlight: Sayuri Healing Food Café in Bali, Indonesia appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight

July 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight This post was created in partnership with Whole Earth Sweetener Co. Turkish delight is one of those old-school sweets that was always around during my childhood in the Soviet Union, which is surprising because treats were scarce and mainly homemade. There was a tiny store a short walk away from our home, where they carried neat, white paper boxes, lined with tissue and filled with delicate pink, sugar-dusted Turkish Delight squares. We called the treat rahat lokum (just another commonly used name for Turkish Delight). I spent my childhood convinced that it was fairy food, and cherished every pleasantly jelly-like, aromatic bite from the magical paper box. I’ve since completely forgotten about rahat lokum, dismissing it as an outdated sweet of my semi-hungry childhood, until I was in Moscow a few months ago. There is a high-vibe sweets brand sold in some grocery stores in Russia, which makes chocolate, wafers and such, with surprisingly wholesome ingredients, cool herbal add-ins, and a pleasantly low amount of non-refined sugar. I always make a point of hunting down some of their stuff to bring back home. This time around, I discovered a new product of theirs, which was a healthier, green tea-flavored Turkish Delight. It was delicious and disappeared in no time once my family got a taste of it back in Florida. I quickly got the urge to figure out my own recipe, as I often do with these types of obsessions. Thankfully, I’m no stranger to the thickening and gelatinizing properties of arrowroot (starch from a tropical tuber) and agar-agar (sea vegetable). Both make for the perfect, allergy-friendly and healthful alternative to cornstarch, which is traditional to Turkish Delight recipes. After some consideration, I decided to color my delight with hibiscus tea, as a tribute to the pink treats of my childhood, and because I’m generally obsessed with hibiscus and its million health benefits. For an extra aromatic finish, I added some orange blossom water instead of the more commonly used rose water, which truly takes this treat to the next level. When coated in arrowroot powder, this Turkish Delight looks surprisingly professional, as though it was store-bought. The cool thing is that in reality it’s pretty easy to make at home, just take a look at the video above to see the whole process. For sweetener in this recipe, I used an organic blend of stevia and honey from Whole Earth. I’ve had a pretty turbulent relationship with stevia over the years. I’ve always wanted to get into it as a sugar substitute, knowing that it’s totally natural, free of calories, and a zero on the glycemic index, but I just cannot get used to its potent, powerful flavor (when extracted it’s something like 200 times sweeter than sugar!). Any time I add pure stevia extract to anything, it’s all I can taste, and that flavor lingers in my mouth for hours in an unpleasant way. Thankfully, Whole Earth Sweetener Co. figured out that when mixed with other, more traditional sweeteners, stevia is barely distinguishable, and they offer a few carefully considered stevia blends. The neat thing is that because of stevia’s potency, you only need half of the amount of their sweetener in any given recipe. In other words, this Turkish Delight recipe only calls for 1/­­4 cup of the honey and stevia blend, while you would need twice the amount (1/­­2 cup) of pure honey or maple syrup to achieve the same sweetness without the stevia. After trying the Whole Earth stevia-honey blend, as well as their stevia-raw sugar blend, I’m totally on board. I love being able to use less sugar in my sweet recipes, and I’m hoping that these products can help me ease into a love affair with pure stevia, some day :) I’m curious to hear about your guys’ experience with stevia. Do you use it? Did it take you some time to get used to it? Any tips and stories are much appreciated! Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight   Print Serves: about 48 pieces Ingredients 3½ cups purified water 2 tablespoons dried hibiscus flowers ⅔ cup plus ¼ cup arrowroot powder, divided ¼ cup stevia-honey blend or ⅓ - ½ cup pure honey or maple syrup 4½ tablespoons agar agar powder (not flakes) 1¼ teaspoon orange blossom water or rose water Instructions Combine the water with the hibiscus in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, cover and let the tea steep for 30 minutes. Prepare an 8 x 8-inch square, rimmed dish by lining it up with parchment paper. Set aside. Strain the hibiscus tea. Mix ½ cup of the tea with ⅔ cup of the arrowroot powder in a medium bowl. The mixture will be quite thick and difficult to mix at first. Set aside. Pour the rest of the hibiscus tea into the same saucepan used for brewing the tea. Add the sweetener and the agar agar powder, whisk to combine and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and simmer for 5 minutes, whisking periodically. At the end of the 5 minutes, give the prepared arrowroot mixture a good stir and slowly pour it into the saucepan with the agar mixture, stirring vigorously. The mixture will be very thick and stretchy. Remove from heat and add in the orange blossom water, whisking to combine. Immediately spoon the mixture into the prepared dish, evening it out as much as you can. Place the dish into the refrigerator for 1-2 hours, until the mixture is completely set. Once set, lift the delight square out of the dish onto a cutting board, using the extending ends of the parchment paper. Slice into around 48 cubes and roll them in the remaining ¼ cup arrowroot powder to coat. Store refrigerated in an airtight container. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles Almost Savory Raw Chocolate Raw Honey Maca Pancakes, a Weekend Breakfast Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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