traditional - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Rhubarb Milk

Cabbage, Apple, and Raisin Slaw

Mexican Baked Polenta with Salsa Beans & Sautéed Veggies

Bread cake recipe | instant bread ka cake | no bake black forest cake










traditional vegetarian recipes

moong dal idli recipe | green gram idli | moong dal ki idli

May 23 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

moong dal idli recipe | green gram idli | moong dal ki idlimoong dal idli recipe | green gram idli | moong dal ki idli with step by step photo and video recipe. idli recipes are very common across india and are made with different ingredients. generally it is made with the combination of rice and urad dal which makes a soft and moist white idli. but then there are other variations like moong dal idli recipe which can be an ideal alternative for the traditional ones. The post moong dal idli recipe | green gram idli | moong dal ki idli appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Party Party: Vegan Diamond Jubilee 75 Years of Veganism

May 21 2019 World Vegetarian And Vegan News 

Party Party: Vegan Diamond Jubilee 75 Years of VeganismThe whole world has been caught up in a whirlwind of veganism with delicious vegan food literally on every street corner, even seemingly "Carry on vegans, nothing to see here" traditional Dingly Dongly ice cream vans. In fact the other day I asked for the vegan option (jokingly) and he asked "Which one?" 2019 is year of the vegan, a Diamond Jubilee Vegan year. It's 75 years since the word vegan was first officially used and The Vegan Society was founded. If that doesn't call for a party, or should I say parties  - all over the world, then I really don't know what you are all waiting for. 75 years since Vegan was born - Diamond Jubilee 2019 For the first time since I can remember National Vegetarian Week just completely managed to pass me by unnoticed this year. There just doesn't seem much point anymore. Just going vegetarian doesn't stop animal cruelty, doesn't sort climate change and doesn't hugely impact on health if you just swap meat with cheese. No wonder the Vegetarian Society Approved quality assurance and labelling scheme now offers a vegan version. Although my vegan sandwich, finalist in the British Sandwich Awards , wasn't the overall winner, Marks & Spencers, Greggs the bakers and Crussh all won awards for their new vegan products. and many others got a mention. I feel my job there is done, I can't think of anywhere there is no vegan sandwich option now, even our local gym. Nearly everywhere has at least a fallafel/­­hummus/­­chick pea offer and most have something more exciting leaving all the Pret vegan hallabaloo as all very last year. A Star is Bun, Vegan Christmas Dinner Star Bun - FinalistAnyway, get organising, have a party, organise an event, vote for your favourite new vegan things, let's celebrate 75 years of veganism, especially the last few years More Vegan and Vegetarian News at Vegan News - Health, Diet and Nutrition News

bread cake recipe | instant bread ka cake | no bake black forest cake

May 17 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

bread cake recipe | instant bread ka cake | no bake black forest cakebread cake recipe | instant bread ka cake | no bake cake from left over bread with step by step photo and video recipe. cake recipes are not native to indian cuisine, but has been embraced gracefully by everyone. evidently there has been many alteration and experiment to the traditional recipe to make it easy and hassle free. one such easy and simple cake recipe is bread cake recipe made by layering the bread slices. The post bread cake recipe | instant bread ka cake | no bake black forest cake appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie

May 15 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie Spring has been super rainy for us (it’s been raining for almost a full week now!), with only a sprinkling of a few nice days, so cozy food cravings are still in full swing around here. I seriously can’t wait until freezing cold smoothies, raw salads, and huge watermelon mono-meals regain their appeal, but I definitely don’t mind living on this pot pie til then :) It’s got almost all the comforting features of a traditional pot pie, but is made with bright spring produce and a blanket of thinly sliced vegetables instead of the more traditional pastry-based crust. Leeks, asparagus, peas, and spinach all made it into this pot pie in celebration of spring. There’s also quinoa for more substance and a stew-like texture, as well as carrots and zucchini. The crust is made up of thinly sliced potatoes (use new potatoes for the ultimate seasonal points) and zucchini. You could totally sub in your favorite pot pie pastry crust here if you’re looking for something even more substantial, store-bought biscuits would work too. Don’t be afraid to improvise and include other spring goodies that you might find around this time of year. Green garlic, spring onions, and ramps could replace some of the leeks. Quickly blanched fava beans could stand in for part of the peas. Chives can be used for garnish instead of scallions, and chive blossoms will always offer the most beautiful finish. Hope you enjoy this one :) Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie   Print technique adapted from The First Mess cookbook Serves: 6 Ingredients avocado oil or olive oil 2 leeks - white and pale parts only, thinly sliced 2 medium carrots - sliced into half-moons salt - to taste 3 medium zucchini - divided 5 garlic cloves - minced about ½ teaspoon each of dried herbs - such as thyme, rosemary, marjoram (you can use fresh herbs as well, about 1 tablespoon minced total) 1 tablespoon tomato paste ¼ cup uncooked quinoa freshly ground black pepper - to taste ½ cup dry white wine scant ¼ cup ground rolled oats or oat flour (gluten-free if needed) 2½ cups vegetable stock 1 small bunch asparagus - tough ends trimmed, cut into 1-inch pieces 4 cups baby spinach or other tender spring greens 8-10 oz fresh or frozen green peas 2 medium new potatoes or Yukon gold potatoes - thinly sliced into rounds on a mandoline fresh herbs - for garnishing Instructions Preheat the oven to 375° F (190° C). Warm a generous drizzle of oil in a soup pot or very deep pan over medium heat. Add the leeks, carrots, and a pinch of salt, and sauté for about 7 minutes, until the leeks are soft. Meanwhile, dice 2 of the zucchini into medium cubes and mandoline the remaining 1 zucchini into thin rounds, setting it aside together with the mandolined potatoes. Add the garlic, herbs, and tomato paste and stir to incorporate for about 30 seconds, until garlic is fragrant. Add the diced zucchini, quinoa, more salt, and pepper, and stir to incorporate. Pour in the wine and turn up the heat to a medium high. Let the wine cook off and absorb for 1-2 minutes. Add the ground oats/­­oat flour and the vegetable stock to the pot. Bring everything up to a simmer and cook for 3-5 minutes, stirring periodically, until the mixture is slightly thickened. Turn off the heat and let the pot sit off the heat for a few minutes, then stir in the asparagus, spinach, and peas, mixing to lightly wilt the spinach. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Spoon the stew into an oiled 9 x 9 baking dish (or a dish of a similar size), evening it out with a spoon. Arrange the mandolined potato and zucchini on top of the stew, overlapping them and alternating them in a pattern. Brush the vegetables with more oil and season with salt and pepper. Bake for 35-40 minutes, until the potato slices are fully cooked. Turn on your broiler on low and place the pot pie under the broiler for about 5 minutes, or until your crust is crispy, golden and blistered in places. Be careful not to burn the crust. Let the pot pie cool slightly and serve, garnished with fresh herbs. Notes You could divide the pot pie mixture and crust vegetables into small, single serve dishes or ramekins for individual pot pies. Just place the ramekins on a baking sheet and slide into the oven. 3.5.3226 The post Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Idli Chaat (South Indian Appetizer)

April 28 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Idli Chaat (South Indian Appetizer) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Idli Chaat, South Indian Appetizer Idli Chaat is a tasty twist to traditional South Indian Idli. This can be served as an appetizer or an afternoon snack. It’s quick and easy to make, with the perfect savory flavors! Try this recipe today and you will be satisfied with a great dish!  - 6 Idlies - 1/­­2 cup potatoes (boiled peeled and cut into small pieces) - 2 Tbsp oil - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 Tbsp green chili (finely chopped) - 2/­­3 cup yogurt whipped (dahi,curd) - 3 Tbsp cilantro chutney - 3 Tbsp tamarind chutney - 1/­­4 cup fine sev -  I am using store bought frozen idlies or you can also use left over idlies. Make sure though frozen idlies to bring to room temperature. - Whip the yogurt until smooth. Add a little milk as needed to make the pourable consistency.  - Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a pan and arrange the idle do not overlap them. Cooked the idlis over medium heat, turn them about 3-4 time, till they are light golden brown both sides. This should take about 4 minutes. - Transfer them on a plate and stir-fry the potatoes in the same pan sprinkling the 1/­­4 teaspoon of salt. Stir-fry the potatoes till they start getting light golden color this should take about 2 minutes.   Serving the Idli Chaat -  Arrange the idlies in a serving plate, sprinkle remaining salt 1/­­4 teaspoon. Put 1/­­2 the potatoes drizzle the yogurt, cilantro chutney and tamarind chutney. Garnish with green chilies and fine sev. Notes You can slice the idli in about 6 pieces and stir fry. This is another delicious way to serve to serve left over idlies. You will also enjoy Dahi Vada, and Bhel Puri. Links for Cilantro Chutney and tamarind Chutney The post Idli Chaat (South Indian Appetizer) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

General Tso’s Cauliflower from Healthier Together

April 25 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

General Tso’s Cauliflower from Healthier Together Today we’re sharing a serious crowd pleaser of a recipe from Liz Moody’s beautiful new cookbook Healthier Together. Liz’s book is all about falling in love – with food, with her husband, and with the way that cooking and eating brings people together. It provides gentle encouragement for getting into the kitchen with someone else, whether a friend, a partner, or family, and for getting healthier together by nurturing relationships through sharing considered and tasty, home-cooked food. I’ve never actually tried General Tso’s chicken, but was immediately attracted to this cauliflower version in the book. I think that the appeal of glossy, sticky, sweet and sour goodness served over a mound of fluffy white rice is pretty universal! Liz’s recipe hits all of the aforementioned flavor and texture notes and then some. The cauliflower turns out beautifully gingery and garlicky, with an intensity of flavor that you would expect from a restaurant dish. But it’s also made with what I imagine to be way more wholesome ingredients than traditional Chinese takeout. There’s rice flour instead of wheat for anyone avoiding gluten, tamari instead of soy sauce, and coconut sugar instead of white sugar. All of the recipes in Healthier Together serve two, making it a great book for those cooking with a partner or a roommate, or even just for themselves. But as Liz suggests, it would be a great idea to double this General Tso’s Cauliflower recipe and serve it as an app at a party. Other recipes we’re super excited to try: Mexican Street Corn and Quinoa Bowl, Broccoli Rice Tabbouleh with Lemon and Dill, Caramelized Parsnip Steaks with Zesty Chimichurri, Brussels Sprout & Toasted Almond Tacos, Extra Bloody Mary, and Carrot Cake Breakfast Cookies. For all the 100% plant-based friends, it’s worth mentioning that this book is not vegetarian or vegan, but about 80% of the recipes are vegetarian, vegan, or can be made plant-based with suggested substitutions. Hope you’ll check out this stunner! General Tsos Cauliflower   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients 3/­­4 cup rice flour 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon ground ginger generous pinch fine-grain sea salt 1 medium head cauliflower, cut into florets 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seed oil 1 tablespoon peeled, minced ginger 2 garlic cloves, minced 3 tablespoons tomato paste 1/­­4 cup tamari or soy sauce 3 tablespoons rice vinegar 1/­­4 cup vegetable broth 1/­­2 cup coconut sugar 1 green onion, white and light green parts only, thinly sliced, to garnish Instructions Preheat the oven to 425°F. Line a baking sheet (or 2, if you have them) with parchment paper. In a large bowl, whisk together 1/­­2 cup of rice flour, 1/­­2 cup of water, the garlic powder, ground ginger, and salt. Dust the cauliflower with the remaining 1/­­4 cup rice flour, then dredge the florets in the wet rice flour mixture until well coated, shaking off any excess. Arrange on the prepared baking sheet, spacing them apart. Bake for 25 to 40 minutes, flipping once halfway through, until golden brown all over (the smaller the florets, the faster theyll cook). Transfer to a large bowl. Keep the oven on and the lined baking sheet handy. Heat the sesame oil in a small pot over medium heat. When it shimmers, add the ginger and garlic, and sauté, stirring constantly, until fragrant, 2 to 3 minutes. Add the tomato paste, tamari, rice vinegar, broth, and coconut sugar, whisking to combine. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer, stirring occasionally, until reduced by about one-quarter, about 5 minutes Pour the sauce over the cauliflower and toss to coat well. Transfer the cauliflower back to the baking sheet and bake for an additional 10 to 15 minutes, or until the cauliflower is dark brown but not burned. Serve topped with the green onions. 3.5.3226 The post General Tso’s Cauliflower from Healthier Together appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

aloo toast recipe | aloo bread toast | aloo toast sandwich

April 17 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

aloo toast recipe | aloo bread toast | aloo toast sandwichaloo toast recipe | aloo bread toast | aloo toast sandwich with step by step photo and video recipe. indian street food has evolved from the traditional deep fried snacks to sandwich and toast. these street style toast follow the traditional way of toasting the bread slices, but spice it up with local ingredients. one such popular and attractive bread toast recipe is aloo toast recipe made with aloo masala. The post aloo toast recipe | aloo bread toast | aloo toast sandwich appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Restaurant Highlight: Cúrcuma In El Chalten, Argentina

April 9 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Patagonia is the ultimate fantasy for any traveler. The magnificent mountains covered by eternal snow, the turquoise lakes formed by ancient icecaps, the remaining deep crystal glaciers, the end of the American continent is doubtlessly a fascinating place. In the Argentinian part of Southern Patagonia, the national park of Los Glaciares has a massive power of attraction over international trekkers. The mountain village of El Chalten is the starting point of some of the most breathtaking hikes in the park. With its wooden cottages, the many hikers getting ready to step on the trails and the majestic mountains in the background, El Chalten has something magical of a traditional Swiss village. With the Argentinian culture of worshipping meat, being vegan is something of a challenge, especially in such a small and remote village. Tamara Martinez resolved this problem when she opened her restaurant Cúrcuma three years ago. While she knew the local people of her village wouldnt be supportive of a meat-free kitchen, she dared to be the owner of the first vegan restaurant in town! She cant deny the fact that the majority of her customers are of international origin but she happily welcomes some neighbors from time to […] The post Restaurant Highlight: Cúrcuma In El Chalten, Argentina appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese

April 3 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese This might be our favorite recipe so far this year! We were craving bolognese, but were also mindful of the fact that it’s spring, which generally has people cooking lighter, greener fare. So we compromised and came up with a vegetable-packed bolognese that doesn’t depend on canned tomatoes. Instead, we start with fresh cherry tomatoes, bell pepper, zucchini, and tons of basil. Tempeh and mushrooms bring savoriness and meatiness, while some pantry staples help build the deep flavors that you’d generally expect from bolognese. The result is super flavorful and amazing on pasta, but it also feels lighter and more spring-appropriate than your traditional bolognese. We’ll be showing how to make this recipe step-by-step on our Instagram Stories later today, so check that out if you’re interested in trying it :) If you’re doubtful about including zucchini in bolognese, give it a chance! When roasted, it has a nice, meaty texture that goes perfectly with the mushrooms and tempeh. In addition to that, some of the zucchini gets blended into the sauce, which makes the whole thing super creamy. This recipe is also great for tempeh skeptics. The tempeh just takes on the flavors of the sauce and aromatics here and contributes a meaty bite, without any other foreign flavors. We’re having a bit of a tempeh obsession right now and it’s so good in this dish. That’s pretty much it! Hope you try this one and thanks so much for all your comments on last week’s giveaway. Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients 8 oz tempeh 2 tablespoons tamari 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar ⅓ cup cashews ⅓ cup sun dried tomatoes (dry, not oil-packed) 10 oz cherry tomatoes - halved 2 zucchini - cut in half lengthwise 1 red bell pepper - cored and quartered 1 lb crimini mushrooms - quartered sea salt freshly ground black pepper avocado oil or other roasting oil of choice 1 yellow onion - chopped 3 cloves of garlic - minced 1 tablespoon tomato paste splash of red wine (optional) ¼ cup nutritional yeast 12 oz pasta or more - for serving 1 bunch of basil - chopped, plus more for garnish Instructions In a bowl, crumble the tempeh and drizzle with the tamari and balsamic, toss to coat. Soak the cashews and sun dried tomatoes in hot water. Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2 parchment paper-covered baking trays. Arrange the tomatoes, zucchini, bell pepper, and mushrooms on the trays. Sprinkle everything with salt and pepper, drizzle with oil, and mix to coat. Place the trays in the oven and roast for 35-45 minutes, until all the vegetables are soft and all the liquid thats been released by the mushrooms cooks off. Meanwhile, heat oil to a large pan set over medium heat (if you dont have a large pan, consider using a soup pot here). Add the onion and sauté for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the marinated tempeh, stir once, and then let sit without stirring for a good 3-4 minutes, so that it thoroughly browns. Stir and sauté for another 3-4 minutes, until completely browned. Stir in the garlic at the end. Add the tomato paste and a splash of wine, if using, and stir to coat. Once the vegetables are done roasting, in an upright blender, combine 1 roasted zucchini half, all of the bell pepper, all the tomatoes, about ⅓ of the amount of the mushrooms, the drained cashews and sun dried tomatoes, nutritional yeast, and about 3 cups of water or broth. Blend until smooth, taste for salt and adjust if needed. Cube the remaining roasted zucchini. Add the sauce to the pan with the tempeh, along with the cubed zucchini and remaining mushrooms and bring up to a simmer. Let the sauce reduce for 10-15 minutes. Meanwhile, cook the pasta. Once the sauce is done cooking, stir in the basil. Serve the bolognese over pasta, garnished with more basil. Notes This bolognese keeps really well, so we suggest cooking as much pasta as youre planning on eating that day and serving it with the sauce bit by bit. That way, you can enjoy properly cooked, al dente pasta every time. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Salsa-Style Nectarine Panzanella from Cook Share Eat Vegan Mediterranean Dolma Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette Simple Mango Gazpacho .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Chunky Monkey Overnight Oats

April 1 2019 Meatless Monday 

Delightfully vegan, perfectly dense, and pleasurably sweet, this protein-packed breakfast is filled with heart-healthy whole grains that will keep you full all morning. Simply add all of the ingredients to a Mason jar, refrigerate overnight, and wake up the next day to an incredibly healthy breakfast! Overnight oats are a perfect alternative to many traditional sugary breakfast options and can be enjoyed by the entire family. This recipe comes to us from Triad to Wellness . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 1 1/­­4  cup  mashed bananas ( 1/­­2 medium banana) 2  tablespoons  salted nut butter,  your choice 1/­­4  cup  unsweetened plain almond milk 1/­­3  cup  gluten-free rolled oats 2  teaspoons  hemp hearts 1/­­2  teaspoon  vanilla extract 1/­­2  teaspoon  cinnamon 1  teaspoon  vegan chocolate chips (for topping) 1 1/­­2  teaspoons  coconut (for topping)   Place banana, nut butter, and almond milk in a glass jar (or container with a lid) and stir with a spoon to combine. Add oats, hemp hearts, vanilla, and cinnamon and stir, then press down with a spoon to ensure all oats are coated in almond milk. Cover securely with a lid or plastic wrap and set in the refrigerator overnight (or at least 5 hours). The next day, open and enjoy as is, or garnish with desired toppings. The post Vegan Chunky Monkey Overnight Oats appeared first on Meatless Monday.

paneer chilla recipe | paneer cheela | paneer ka chilla

March 25 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

paneer chilla recipe | paneer cheela | paneer ka chillapaneer chilla recipe | paneer cheela | paneer ka chilla with step by step photo and video recipe. cheela recipes are traditional north indian breakfast recipe made with besan or chick pea flour. but then there are myriad variations to this traditional recipe and are made with different ingredients and toppings. one such new recent addition to the cheela recipes is paneer cheela where grated paneer is toped on these pancakes. The post paneer chilla recipe | paneer cheela | paneer ka chilla appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Gur Para (Punjabi Sweet Snack)

March 17 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Gur Para (Punjabi Sweet Snack) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Gur Para, Punjabi Sweet Snack Gur Para is a traditional Punjabi treat. This is made in preparation for festivals such as Holi, Makarshakrantri, and Diwali. Gur Para makes for a great homemade gift because of its long shelf life. It can be stored for up to 2 months in an airtight container. This is a super simple recipe that only requires a few ingredients.   For Dough - 1 cup all-purpose flour (plain flour, maida) - 2 Tbsp sooji fine (samolina) - 2 Tbsp oil - 1/­­3 cup water, use as needed For Syrup - 3/­­4 cup gur (jaggery) - 1 tsp oil - 1/­­4 cup water Making Para -  Mix flour, sooji, and oil, and mix it well to get consistency of breadcrumb.  Add water as needed to make firm but smooth dough. Cover with damp cloth and set aside at least for ten minutes. - Knead the dough for another minute and divide in two equal parts. - Take each part of the dough and make a flat ball shape. Roll them into 8-inch circles and thickness of salted crackers. - Cut each of the rolled dough into about half inch wide and 2 inch long pieces. Note: you can cut them in your desire shape. - Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium heat. The frying pan should have about 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put little piece of dough in the oil. The dough should make the oil sizzle and come up slowly. - Fry the paras until both sides are light golden-brown. Let them cool off to room temperature before coating them. Making Sugar Syrup -  Put the water and gur in a frying-pan and bring to a boil on medium heat. Keep stirring till gur is dissolve, syrup should be about 1 thread, to check the right consistency of syrup drop the syrup in cold water and you should be able to roll into ball. Close the heat. - Put all the paras to the syrup and mix it well, making sure all the paras are coated with syrup. Keep stirring every few minutes and keep separating them. After they are just warm, take them out on a greased plate, making sure that paras are not clumped together. - Allow them to cool. Gur paras can be stored for several weeks in airtight container. Notes: If Syrup consistency is not right paras will be sticky, if paras are little sticky let them dry for longer. You will also like to see these recipes they are good for gifting and easy to make Moong dal Ladoo, Apple Coconut Burfi, Besan Save   The post Gur Para (Punjabi Sweet Snack) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Impossible Meatless Kefta with Tamarind Chutney

March 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Plant-based meat replaces lamb in this flavorful meatless take on traditional Moroccan Kefta. This recipe comes to us from Chef Patricia Washuta, Director of Culinary Services, Executive Chef, and Certified Dietary Manager, at Gentry Park Orlando . Chef Washuta cooked it for the Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge at the 2019 International Restaurant & Foodservice Show of New York. Chef’s note: This is a vegan and gluten free dish. I use a little Quinoa flour to help keep the Kefta to bind when making a large batch.   Serves 4 - Ingredients - 16 oz. Impossible Burger(R) (or Beyond Burger(R)) - 1 tablespoon coriander mint chutney (recipe below) -  1/­­4 cup tamarind date chutney (recipe below)   - Coriander Mint Chutney - 1/­­8 cup fresh mint* - 2 cups cilantro -  1/­­4 cup onion -  1/­­2 teaspoon toasted coriander seeds - 1 tablespoon fresh crushed garlic - 1 tablespoon fresh minced ginger - 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice - 2-3 tablespoon water or as needed to make the chutney of a pesto consistency - 1 teaspoon cumin seeds toasted - 1 Tablespoons diced jalape?o - Salt and pepper to taste - *Use up to 1/­­2 cup, depending on your preference for mint in savory dishes.   - Tamarind Date Chutney - 1/­­2 cup tamarind paste - 1 cup dates pitted - 1 cup apple juice - 2 c water or vegetable stock -  1/­­2 teaspoon cumin - 1 Tablespoon Garam Masala -  1/­­2 teaspoon chili powder -  1/­­2 teaspoon coriander -  1/­­2 teaspoon fresh ground ginger - 1 teaspoon fresh crushed garlic - 1 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 cup coconut milk solids - 1 teaspoon Coconut oil   - Carrot Achar - 1 pound carrots - 1 Tablespoon whole cardamom pods - 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorn - 1 each cinnamon stick - 3 each bay leaves -  1/­­2 teaspoon mustard seeds -  1/­­2 teaspoon coriander seeds -  1/­­2 cup Late Harvest Riesling Vinegar (or sweet vinegar) - 1 cup water -  1/­­4 cup honey -  1/­­4 cup white vinegar - 1 whole cucumber   Instructions 1. Preheat the oven to 375° F. 2. Mix defrosted Impossible Burger(R) or Beyond Burger(R) with one tablespoon of the mint chutney (see below). Roll the mixture into round keftas (oblong meatballs). 3. Place keftas on greased on a baking sheet, and bake at 375° F for 8-10 minutes. 4. Serve with tamarind chutney (see below. 5. Plate with carrot achar (see below).   Coriander Mint Chutney 1. Toast coriander seeds. 2. Cut the stems away from the cilantro and discard stems. 3. Pull the mint from the stems. 4. Place all ingredients in food processor and blend until consistency of pesto. 5. Add a small amount of water to gain the consistency desired.   Tamarind Date Chutney 1. In a saucepan, heat the coconut oil and add spices, garlic, ginger, apple juice, water/­­vegetable stock, dates, and tamarind paste. 2. Cook on a low heat, stirring constantly. 3. Remove from heat and strain the paste through a fine screen to remove any unwanted tamarind seed debris. 4. Add the coconut solids or a small amount of coconut milk. 5. Season with salt to taste.   Carrot Achar 1. Peel carrots and use a mandolin to cut into long thin strips. 2. Lightly toast the spices in a dry pan over medium heat. 3. Wrap the spices in a cheese cloth to create a spice sachet. 4. Mix water, sugar, salt, and vinegar. 5. Add the spice sachet and bring the mixture up to a simmer. 6. Before the mixture starts to boil, remove from heat and add the fresh carrots. 7. Let stand for 1 hour. 8. Place in a container and chill. 9. Leave the spice sachet in the liquid for best flavor. The post Impossible Meatless Kefta with Tamarind Chutney appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pasta Curry with Cauliflower and Chickpeas

March 4 2019 VegKitchen 

Pasta Curry with Cauliflower and Chickpeas Pasta and veggie combos are always welcome, no matter what time of year. Though not a traditional combination, I long ago discovered that pasta marries well with curry. With the addition of cauliflower and chickpeas, it’s a tasty Italian/­­Indian fusion that’s ready in 30 minutes or so. Continuing reading Pasta Curry with Cauliflower and Chickpeas on VegKitchen

Vegan Hamantaschen

April 29 2019 VegKitchen 

Vegan Hamantaschen Making these traditional Purim cookies in a vegan rendition is not much of a stretch--Earth Balance comes to the rescue. I like to make them with at least two, or even three types of jam for variety and color. Makes about 2 dozen 2 1/­­2 cups whole wheat pastry or spelt flour, plus more as needed 3/­­4 cup sugar 1 1/­­2 teaspoons baking powder 1/­­4 teaspoon salt 3/­­4 cup nonhydrogenated vegan margarine or shortening (such as Earth Balance, in both cases) 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/­­4 cup orange juice (from about 1 large orange) Fillings (use any, or a combination): The post Vegan Hamantaschen appeared first on VegKitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales

April 28 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales Adriana Ayales is a rainforest herbalist from Costa Rica and the founder of herbal apothecary Anima Mundi. We are in love with Adriana’s world and creations, and so excited to share this interview. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Although I love the grounded power of routine, I’m living in a phase of being open and free. With kids, and a beyond full time devotion to running a business, I just ride the waves as they come. I’ve learned to surrender that not everything has to look the way it should look. Lifes situations and patterning moves around like the seasons. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I love getting up before the kids, and sneaking into the kitchen to make myself a healing cup(s) of medicine. First thing I do is a big ole cup of vitamin C rich goodness, sometimes its mangosteen hibiscus with a lemon squeeze, or fresh picked turmeric from the garden grated with ginger, along with camu camu and lemon water. Then I make a seasonal fruit bowl of sorts, with oatmeal, or homemade granola loaded with mineralizing herbs (like nettle or mesquite powder). Followed by my favorite, and not so healthy friend, Coffee. Ah coffee. I cant tell you how wonderful locally grown heirloom coffee is here, paired with deliciously fresh cacao and medicinal mushrooms and homemade almond. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Massaging the face, forehead and skull with warm oil at night is one of the simplest and most restorative practices we can do to induce deep sleep. I love using a mix I make at home of jojoba oil, with rosehip, infused with clary sage and a fine sandalwood. Another one of my all time favorites for evening relaxation is blue lotus. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Sipping tea mindfully in nature, witnessing time in silence is one of my favorite things. I tap into my feelings, breath, mind, and begin to clear energy. Sustenance -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do love caffeine. Growing up in Costa Rica has woven me into loving a good cup of locally roasted coffee. Depending on the day, I love adding reishi, or a mix of medicinal mushrooms, raw cacao with mucuna, along with a homemade plant based milk. I also love having an aged puerh, or traditional matcha with added herbs for nourishment, like moringa. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? Sometimes I do, especially when I’m tired or running on low energy. When im over-worked, or running on stress I definitely crave more carby and sugary things, and this is usually due to skipping a meal, or needing a quick-fix. Some tips I bare in mind during stressful moments that ignite the sweet tooth (or just in general!) are: always go for fruits before you opt for a sugary dessert, always choose low glycemic sweeteners vs. sugar (some faves are coconut sugar, maple syrup, and real stevia extract -- not the synthetic ones!) For carbs avoid empty carbs and refined flours, and opt for ones that are more easily absorbed, like coconut, almond and cassava flour. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness?  Oh my, so many! I seasonally change my herbal intake, but certainly stick with some favorites. I love having my potent singles (single herb tinctures) on me at all times, like shisandra berries and blue lotus. A Brain tonic while I’m working, usually with herbs like gotu kola, ginkgo, brahmi and lion’s mane mushroom. Two that I dose with very often are the Happiness tonic (st johns wort, mucuna, ashwagandha, etc.) and euphoric/­­mood elevating herbs like catuaba, mucunam muira puama and damiana. I also love our Liver formula for daily cleansing and nourishment, like the moringa, burdock, nettles, chlorella. And of course beauty herbs like He Shou Wu, Mangosteen and more! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Absolutely, I love doing a mix between yoga and pilates. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I love the torture! When I feel a little lazy and not like suffering in an intensive workout, I just remind myself how excellent I feel when I finish it. Not just seeing physical results, but especially the mental peace and happiness after working out. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? A feeling of wholeness. When your mood is high, your gut is vibrant, and you feel confident and beautiful. When there is no sense of lack, imbalance or deficiency. When you feel aligned. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love making my own body and face oils. I usually infuse collagen boosting herbs, and skin strengthening herbs and lather up. I also like to keep things simple, like using cacao butter with coconut oil, or just a fluffy shea butter for deep moisture.  -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Yes! I’m a big fan of eating herbs and supplements that protect the skin, increase our own collagen receptors and help activate our natural glow. The herbs I designed for the vegan collagen formula have been my go-tos for quite sometime. Horsetail, He Shou Wu, Calendula, Nettle seed + leaf, Comfrey, and others like Mangosteen, Camu Camu and Hibiscus are great for the skin too. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? I love making edible masks. Infusing a high potency extract into a raw clay and avocado, along with an activating source like apple cider vinegar, or more protein like flax, and making a smooth paste to lather all over the face, body and even hair is one of my all time favorites. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Visualization is huge for me. Sitting in silence and tuning in is vital, along with the help of nervines and adaptogenic herbs that assist in de-compression like skullcap, blue lotus and ashwagandha. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I like taking a walk or hike in nature, get in the ocean/­­lake/­­river or any kind of body of water. I completely unplug from work, the phone, or computer. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Before the cold kicks in, I take strong echinacea extracts in a soothing tea, mixing turmeric, lemon, grated ginger, apple cider vinegar, garlic and aloe in warm water. It works every time. I make a large batch and dose all day long --  even my kids love it!  -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? This certainly overlaps for me, which can honestly be a bitter sweet reality. I love everything surrounding plants, and its medicinal uses, as well as teaching, and medicine making. I love that my business is all about honoring ancestral ways, plant medicine, the art of herbalism, righteous cultivation, and medicine making. Yet, like any business owner would understand, there are many tasks to the job that are exhausting and certainly not what made you fall in love in the first place. For me personally, Ive learned to reconcile by doing what I love doing the most, medicine making and wildcrafting. I made a commitment to myself in making space for this no matter what, and not disregarding it by prioritizing business with the things that dont really matter in life. Its vital that we take moments in our free time that refine our focus and intention in life, re-align to what inspired the dream, without getting side swept with busy-ness. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Over the last couple years Ive struggled with this because of having babies. Which Im sure a lot of new moms can relate to this! Every time I get a moment between being a mother, wife and business owner, my priority to feel more self loving (and more human!) is yoga. The simple act of getting oxygen, doing conscious breathing, and distracting the monkey mind from its patterning, you become yourself again.  -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Herbs. Integrating plant medicine into everything has significantly changed my body mind and soul. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Off the top of my head I love these: Healing with Whole Foods with Paul Pitchford, Gabriel Cousens’ Spiritual Nutrition, The Body Ecology Diet by Donna Gates, and of course The Medical Medium by Anthony William. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming an herbalist and starting Anima Mundi? Growing up I learned closely with curanderos on plant medicine and rainforest herbalism overall. I then attended herbal schools in California where I learned a lot of native, northern and european herbalism. Life somehow took me to NYC (a place I NEVER thought I would ever go to) after living in California for quite some years, and I started practicing privately as an herbalist. I kept noticing the common trends, symptomology and imbalances folks that came in had, and started developing mother formulas to be able to make large batches. -- How do you approach sourcing herbs for Anima Mundi?  First and foremost we try to create a direct relationship with the people/­­farmers that cultivate. Although we value certification of prime ingredients, there are many ethical wild crafters and farms that do not have special certifications, yet cultivate sustainable practices and have quality products that we also like to support. We are also adamant of supporting local economies as much as possible, particularly with rainforest herbs sourced directly from indigenous people, supporting their craft as well as ethically crafted botanicals. -- What are some of Anima Mundis best sellers? Our plant-based Collagen Booster, Happiness Tonic, Adaptogenic Immortality Tonics, Curam Beauty Elixir, our 100% Coconut Cream Powder, Mushroom Mocha Milk and more...! Fun and Inspiration -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Women Who Run with Wolves Song/­­Album –  Cuatro Vientos /­­ Danit Movie –  Loving the The OA lately! Piece of Art –  Ayahuasca art by Pablo Amaringo Photos by Renee Byrd and from Anima Mundi’s IG /­­ This post contains Amazon Affiliate links. The post Self-Care Interview Series: Adriana Ayales appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Achari Mathri (Masala Mathri)

April 21 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Achari Mathri (Masala Mathri) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Achari Mathri (Masala Mathri) Achari Mathries, is a traditional staple snack in North India. They are usually served with spicy pickles, but in this recipe I have added mango pickle spices in the dough instead to add a tangy flavor to the mathri itself. With my family, mathries are a must have while travelling, and now with Achari Mathri, we no longer need the pickle, so it becomes one less thing to carry.  - 2 cup all purpose flour (planin flour, maida) - 1/­­2 cup fine sooji (samolina) - 1-1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­4 tsp dry ginger powder (saunth) - 1/­­4 tsp asafetida (hing) - 1/­­2 tsp fennel seeds crushed (saunf) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1 tsp yellow mustard seeds powder - 1/­­2 tsp mango powder (amchoor) - 2 tsp red chili flake (adjust to taste) - 4 Tbsp oil - 3/­­4 cup lukewarm water (use as needed) -  Mix all the ingredients except the water. Add the water little at a time, kneading into a firm dough.  Cover the dough and set aside for 15 minutes or more. Prick them with a fork all over the rolled dough, so the Mathries do not puff when frying, and Mathries stay crisp. -  Divide the dough into 3 equal parts. Take each part of the dough and make a flat ball shape. Roll them into about 12-inch circles and thickness of salted crackers. -  Take a cookie cutter and cut them in rounds. I am using 2-1/­­2 inch cookie cutter. Use the size and shape to your choice. -  Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium heat. The frying pan should have at least 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put a small piece of dough in the oil. The dough should make the oil sizzle and come up slowly. -  Make sure to place just enough mathris in the oil it should be easy to turn them. Fry the mathris until both sides are light golden-brown. This should take about 7-8 minutes. Tip - Achari Mathries can be stored for a couple of months in airtight containers.  - If the mathries are cooked on high heat, they will be soft. - You will also enjoy Gulab Jamuns, Besan Ki Burfi, Plain Mathri The post Achari Mathri (Masala Mathri) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Eggplant Pesto “Meatballs”

April 15 2019 Meatless Monday 

Who said meatballs must be made with meat? Hearty eggplant is one of the best vegetable substitutes for making meat-less meatballs because of its meaty texture and high fiber content. These plant-based Eggplant Pesto Meatballs have a similar texture to your traditional Italian recipe, but the eggplant in our recipe gives these balls a more tender and silky consistency and a flavor that makes it easy to forget that you are not eating beef. This recipe comes to us from Triad to Wellness . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Makes 40 meatballs (5 servings) - Eggplant mixture 1 1/­­2  tbsp  olive oil 1  medium  onion  chopped 2  garlic cloves  minced 1 1/­­4  pounds  eggplant  unpeeled and cut into 1″ cubes 3/­­4  cup  water 1/­­4  tsp  salt 1/­­2  tsp  pepper 1  cup  panko bread crumbs red pepper flakes  optional - Cashew Pesto 2  garlic cloves,  minced 1 cup  raw cashews,  soaked overnight or boiled for 20 minutes until soft 2  tbsp  pine nuts 2  tbsp  water 2  tbsp  lemon juice 1/­­4  cup  nutritional yeast 1/­­4  tsp  sea salt   Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Place 1/­­2 tablespoon olive oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium high heat. Add onion and saute until translucent about 3 minutes. Add garlic until lightly browned, remaining olive oil, and eggplant, and brown on both sides. Add water, season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally until eggplant is soft. Remove from heat, transfer to a heat proof bowl, and set aside. In a food processor, add garlic, cashews, pine nuts, nutritional yeast, sea salt, and water. Process until smooth. Add basil, lemon juice, and olive oil while processing. Mix until smooth and set aside. In the bowl, mash eggplant into small pieces with the back of a wooden spoon or potato masher. Add the cashew pesto and mix well. Lastly, add the breadcrumbs and red pepper flakes and stir until well combined. Roll eggplant meatless balls in about 2-inch diameter approximately 1 1/­­2 tablespoon of mixture. Transfer to parchment lined baking sheet and bake until browned (about 25 minutes) turning once so the eggplant pesto “meatballs are browned on both sides. Serve over zucchini noodles or your choice of pasta with tomato sauce. The post Eggplant Pesto “Meatballs” appeared first on Meatless Monday.

kadala curry recipe | puttu kadala curry | black chickpeas curry

April 8 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

kadala curry recipe | puttu kadala curry | black chickpeas currykadala curry recipe | puttu kadala curry | black chickpeas curry with step by step photo and video recipe. kerala cuisine are known for its traditional recipes mainly derived from coconut base. particularly with the curries, they are purpose based dishes and typically each breakfast dish has its own corresponding curry. one such spicy and tasty curry recipe is kadala curry served with puttu or appam dosai recipes. The post kadala curry recipe | puttu kadala curry | black chickpeas curry appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Pennsylvania Dutch Corn Noodles

April 1 2019 VegKitchen 

Pennsylvania Dutch Corn Noodles This simple, tasty pasta dish is traditional to the “plain and simple” Pennsylvania Dutch cuisine. It’s a perfect way to use fresh summer corn and tomatoes when they’re at their peak of flavor and abundance. In its original form this recipe is made with egg ribbons; to make it vegan, I recommend substituting ribbons made of hearty whole grain flours like spelt or quinoa. Continuing reading Pennsylvania Dutch Corn Noodles on VegKitchen

halbai recipe | halbai sweet recipe | how to make rice halbai

March 28 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

halbai recipe | halbai sweet recipe | how to make rice halbaihalbai recipe | halbai sweet recipe | how to make rice halbai with step by step photo and video recipe. udupi and mangalore region is known for its healhty and tasty delicacy it holds in its cuisine. most of the recipe belongs to the breakfast and snacks but it does have lot of traditional recipes too. one such unique and traditional sweet recipe is halbai recipe or rice halbai halwa made for occasions and festival. The post halbai recipe | halbai sweet recipe | how to make rice halbai appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Chickpea and Sweet Potato Burger

March 23 2019 VegKitchen 

Chickpea and Sweet Potato Burger This chickpea and sweet potato burger is perfect for those times when you want to try stray from the traditional recipes you’re used to. For a quick meal, you can prepare the patties in advance and warm them up when you need them. Save Print Chickpea and Sweet Potato Burger Serves: Continuing reading Chickpea and Sweet Potato Burger on VegKitchen

paneer momos recipe | paneer momo | veg paneer momos

March 15 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

paneer momos recipe | paneer momo | veg paneer momospaneer momos recipe | paneer momo | veg paneer momos | paneer ke momos with step by step photo and video recipe. momos are the traditional delicacy snack from the nepali cuisine. generally it is made with finely chopped freshly harvested vegetables with an option of minced meat. but then there is an indian version of momos made with grated paneer and veggies knwon as paneer momos or cheese momos recipe. The post paneer momos recipe | paneer momo | veg paneer momos appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Recipe | Sweet Potato French Toast Cups with Vanilla Cardamom Creme Anglaise

March 4 2019 Oh My Veggies 

A typical weekend breakfast in our household involves microwaved muffins or string cheese. We’re always busy on the weekends and it seems like from Saturday morning to dinnertime on Sunday, we’re running errands or working in the yard. Taking the time for a sit-down breakfast seems like a small luxury. And when we do have traditional breakfast foods like pancakes or waffles, it’s usually for dinner because I’m in no mood for cooking first thing in the morning. The wonderful thing about French toast casseroles, though, is that they can be made the night before–and really, they’re so much better when you make them ahead of time too. Although I’ve never made a French toast casserole myself, I thought I’d try one because doing most of the work the night before and simply popping it in the oven in the morning seemed like the happy medium between the string cheese breakfast and homecooked pancakes or waffles. We’d still have something delicious to sit down to, but I wouldn’t have to be flipping pancakes while groggy and cranky. Of course, a whole French toast casserole is a little too much for two people, so I decided to make Sweet Potato French […]

Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo

March 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo Every year, people around the world celebrate Mardi Gras and Carnival, a festival of parades, music and eating decadent foods leading up to Lent. Millions of people observe Lent by fasting or foregoing treats and meats for 40 days. Fun fact, the term carnival is from carnelevare, or to remove meat. So thats what were doing, removing the meat, but keeping the delicious flavor of the popular Mardi Gras dish gumbo. This Creole stew from Southern Louisiana usually features strong-flavored stock, meat, or shellfish, but, with a few simple swaps, it’s a perfect vegetarian dish. Green Gumbo is a popular plant-based version that includes a variety of greens and herbs that give it an amazing color and rich flavors. Richard McCarthy, Member of the Executive Committee for Slow Food International and a Meatless Monday ambassador , shares his green gumbo recipe and great tips for making this plant-based dish taste authentic. Richards essentials for cooking green gumbo: Cook with what you have. Use collard greens, kale, mustard greens, turnip greens, spinach, and herbs like parsley, dill, etc. Green gumbo appears throughout the Lenten culinary calendar as meatless and on Holy Thursday in famous restaurants (like Dooky Chase) with meat stock. Begin by making a roux. Heat the pan with vegetable or olive oil, add flour, and mix with a wooden spoon until dark brown. The color of the gumbo will be determined by how dark you make the roux. The roux gives butter beans and lima beans a great base of flavor. Or, consider any medley of vegetables. Add Shiitake Bacon to get the traditional umami flavor. Umami is the savory flavor that many eaters say is missing in vegetarian recipes. One way to add umami to green gumbo is to make shiitake bacon, which provides the missing depth of flavor. Dont forget the rice. Rice is a traditional accompaniment to gumbo. While a saucepan is perfectly good for preparing rice, rice cookers are also an easy way to prepare perfect rice every time. Any grain or variety of rice can work, but long-grain rice is best since it provides the gumbo with more surface areas to cover with flavor.  McCarthy recommends a simplified version of the recipe crafted by Richard Stewart, the former chef of Gumbo Shop. Green Gumbo Serves 4 Ingredients: Gumbo: 1/­­4 cup of vegetable or olive oil 1/­­4 cup of flour 1 large onion, minced 4 stalks of celery, minced 1 bell pepper, minced 2 bunches of available greens (collard, mustard, kale, turnip, and/­­or spinach), chopped 1/­­4 cup of chopped parsley 2-4 cups of water (or enough to make a soup) 2 bay leaves Salt and pepper, to taste Cayenne pepper or hot sauce, to taste 1 cup of dried field peas (or Sea Island red peas, on the Slow Food Ark of Taste ) Vegetable stock, to taste (optional) Mushroom Bacon: 1 dozen fresh shiitake or button mushrooms 1 TBS of liquid smoke, smoked salt and/­­or smoked paprika 1/­­4 cup of vegetable or olive oil 1 TBS of salt or soy sauce (to taste) Rice: 1 cup of long-grained rice 2 cups of water Preparation: Field peas: Rinse, then boil field peas in salt water until soft. Drain peas of excess water and either store or immerse immediately into the gumbo. This step can be done in advance in order to cut down on preparation time on the day of serving. You can even prepare and freeze the peas days before, drop them into the hot soupy pot mid-way through the process. Make the gumbo: Heat a soup pot at a medium setting and make a roux (the soup base). Roux: add oil to the pot, once sizzling, add flour and mix with a wooden spoon. When the flour starts to smell delicious, it will then begin to turn a brownish color. Stir fairly vigorously to avoid burning. Once its a dark brown (5-10 minutes), add minced onions, celery and bell pepper. Stir the ingredients well to blend the flavors. Add salt, pepper, and more oil and/­­or water (or wine) to deglaze the pan. The roux will become bubbly and smell almost sweet. At this point, start adding water and turn down the heat a little. Add bay leaves, other seasonings, and the chopped greens and herbs. They will soon turn from bright green to dark green. Add field peas and any additional vegetables, like chopped carrots or turnips, whatever you have in the kitchen. Let simmer for at least 60 minutes. Once the gumbo is hot, tasty and ingredients cooked down into dark greens, and soft field peas, it is ready to serve. Tasting it at the end is important: Is it salty or spicy enough? If not, add more cayenne or hot sauce, black pepper, salt, etc. Mushroom bacon: Slice fresh mushrooms vertically in thirds, depending upon the size of the mushrooms. (Button mushrooms are fine and usually easily available, feel free to select shiitake or other exceptionally tasty varieties.) In a mixing bowl, add 1/­­4 cup of oil, 1 TBS of liquid smoke, salt or soy sauce. Mix the ingredients, and then add the fresh mushrooms and mix until they are coated. Spread sliced mushrooms across a baking sheet and bake for 20-30 minutes at 375 degrees F. Check after 15 minutes and turn over ones that are browned and crisp. Once crispy, turn off the oven and let cool slowly in oven. Rice: If you have a rice cooker, prepare as usual. If not, wash 1 cup of rice under running cold water to remove any excess dust, etc. Boil in 2 cups of water until soft (usually 25-30 min). Final Preparations: Place 1/­­4 cup of rice in the middle of a shallow soup bowl. Pour gumbo around the rice, making sure that there are equal amounts of greens and liquid. Take the dried, crispy mushroom bacon from the cooled oven and add a handful on top of the rice, and serve. Invite your friends and family to celebrate a plant-based Mardi Gras with this Green Gumbo recipe. If youre looking for other meatless recipe inspiration throughout the Lenten season, check out our recipe gallery . Happy Mardi Gras! Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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