traditional - vegetarian recipes

traditional vegetarian recipes

pathrode recipe | how to make patrode | pathrode konkani recipe

January 14 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

pathrode recipe | how to make patrode | pathrode konkani recipepathrode recipe | how to make patrode | pathrode konkani recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. the coastal place of udupi and mangalore are known for its satvik based cuisine. is is widely popular for its breakfast, deep fried snacks or the colourful banana leaf based meal. but the pathrode recipe recipe is traditional snack recipe made with a tropical plant known as colocasia or also known as kesu yele. The post pathrode recipe | how to make patrode | pathrode konkani recipe appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

rava pongal recipe | semolina pongal | sooji ka pongal recipe

January 11 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

rava pongal recipe | semolina pongal | sooji ka pongal reciperava pongal recipe | semolina pongal | sooji ka pongal recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. pongal recipe is a versatile recipe which can be made with different types of rice alternatives. traditionally pongal is often made with rice, but there are other alternatives like poha, broken wheat, oats have taken over. one such popular alternative is rava or semolina which makes a perfect rava pongal for breakfast. The post rava pongal recipe | semolina pongal | sooji ka pongal recipe appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Homemade Garam Masala Spice Blend Recipe

January 1 2019 Vegan Richa 

Homemade Garam Masala Spice Blend RecipeThis quick Garam Masala spice blend takes 2 mins to make at home with everyday spices. Use it in Indian dishes, with roasted veggies, in soups, stews, cookies and more. Jump to Recipe Garam means hot and Masala in this context means a blend of spices. The spice blend itself is not generally hot. It has black pepper but no cayenne or chili powders. It can however feel hot once you eat some because of the pepper and cloves. The spices together will warm you up from the inside.  Garam masala recipes vary by family recipes, regions, states within India and of course personal preference. There are several regional versions of the spice blend and they have their own names like kashmiri garam masala, goda masala, sambhar powder etc.  This is the basic garam masala to use in Indian curries, stir fries, veggie dishes, dals and more. I have the traditional whole garam masala mix on the blog here. The whole masala stays fresh for much longer. I grind a portion of it and use it for a month or 2 and then grind more. For smaller quantity spice blend, use this quick recipe with ground everyday spices.  Use it in Butter Tofu , Cauliflower Tikka Masala,  Masala Pot Pie, lentil sweet potato dal curry. And many more Indian dishes! or add to soups, stews, to veggies to roast, cookies, yes cookies work too.  Curry powder is not the same as garam masala. Get the recipe and Read more about it here.Continue reading: Homemade Garam Masala Spice Blend RecipeThe post Homemade Garam Masala Spice Blend Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder

December 30 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder Erin Lovell Verinder is a herbalist, nutritionist and energetic healer living in the wilds of the Byron Bay hinterland in Australia, working with clients locally in her Sydney clinic and worldwide via Skype. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I honestly love both. I keep certain parts of my day very structured especially around work days and where I can, I claim open space. I follow structure to bring in the foundations of support that are essential for me to thrive and maintain my balance. Like slow mornings, connecting to nature, enjoying a whole nourishing breakfast. But then I open up my days where possible to flow & allow spontaneity. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I keep my mornings slow and sacred, it’s been a very intentional movement towards this over the years. I wake with the sunlight pouring into our bedroom, we live in an old church and the light in here is just next level serene. I always keep the blinds open to allow my body rhythms to harmonize with the sun and moon cycle. This regulates your cortisol and melatonin in such a fundamental way. I allow myself to wake slowly, no rush, no jump out of bed, no alarms, no startle response! I will then take time to do some stretching sequences with conscious breath, and then sit for a 20 minute meditation. Followed by a morning dog walk around our very green country town. Other mornings it’s a swim in the ocean with my husband and a lazy lay on the sand. After this, it’s breakfast time. I brew a tea, or make a tonic and take that out into the garden. I really feel it’s so important to have a whole breakfast, and we really honour that in our household, we sit and chat and connect over a meal before the day unfolds. I do my absolute best to only engage in anything work related after 8am and completely screen free before then is the daily goal. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Yes! I am super ritualistic about the evening wind down. I ensure I am off all screens at least two hours before sleep. I feel this is so greatly important to allow our bodies to align and flow into the yin cycle of the night. I switch off all overhead lights and only use very warm low light lamps as the sun sets. This is another trick to converse with your body to wind down, let go of any tasks and prep for rest. I read, write, listen to music and savour evenings for creative flow and conversation with my husband. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Many. I practice conscious breath and meditation as my main allies. But I also spend A LOT of time with plants, growing, making, conversing and in nature scapes. This is for me the ultimate mindfulness practice of oneness, presence and connection. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Scrambled eggs with turmeric, garlic and greens, avocado and some home fermented veggies on the side.  Lunch – Wild caught Mahi Mahi with tarragon, parsley, lemon and garlic cooked in ghee, on top of a bed of greens with some roasted sweet potato on the side. (Literally one of my favourite dishes ever) Snack – I love smoothies. Often a smoothie, my current fav is Strawberries, cashew nut butter, cashew nut mylk, collagen, hemp seeds, tocos, cinnamon, vanilla powder & ashwaganda powder. Dinner - San choy bow, with a rainbow of veggies & lots of bold ginger flavour in vibrant cos lettuce cups. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I actually do not, I am completely stimulant free. I have not always been, but just find myself so very sensitive to any stimulants these days. I used to love love love a great spicy black chai tea but since going caffeine free I have replaced it with a dandelion chai blend I make myself that is just so warming and grounding I adore it. Plus no crazy energy spikes and lows, so thats a plus! -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? At the same time when I let go of stimulants, I completely let go of sweets- even natural sweeteners. In the past I have been an avid lover of raw chocolate and quite the connoisseur (ha) but these days I make my own carob chocolate that has no sweetener in it at all. I love carob as it’s very sweet naturally so you can get away with no added sweeteners. I pair it with vanilla powder and they work synergistically to give a natural sweetness that I find so comforting. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I do utilize supplement support as needed, this shifts as my body shifts. I love Vitamin C on so many levels but particularly for its adrenally restorative healing elements, so it is absolutely in my daily supplement routine, alongside Magnesium citrate on the daily. With herbs, I will vary what I am taking depending on my needs. I add herbal powders and medicinal mushrooms to my tonics and smoothies. Currently my favourites are Withania (Ashwaganda) and Reishi. I also am a huge lover of infusions (long loose leaf herbal brews) and always have a big jar of an overnight infusion with me to sip throughout my day. My most utilized blend would be Nettle leaf, Oat straw and Hibiscus. Earthy, calming, tangy and nourishing. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Years go I had a heinous back injury, I herniated multiple discs from overexercising. My approach and relationship to body movement completely shifted after this, from rigorous to gentleness. It is still an area of my life I have to encourage myself back to and approach more as an act of self love. Taking care of my temple. I walk my pups daily, I love pilates and swimming, I have begun the be.come project and absolutely LOVE the approach to body movement with body positivity, inclusivity, no need for any equipment and in the comfort of my own home. This all feels really supportive and a mix of gentle yet effective support for me and my body. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I am not a natural athlete by any measure! I have recently connected to how emotional it can be to return to body movement when you have been through a big physical injury/­­body change/­­life change. So for me the way I psyche myself up to do a session is to come from self love, to know this is a loving act of care for my body. That really helps me so much. Also knowing there are no rules to how you must move your body, allow exercise to meet your vibration- yin, yang and all between. Shifting the type of body movement I do with my menstrual cycle/­­hormones is so key. Be your own compass. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Authenticity, when someone is just purely themselves and at ease with it. I find it absolutely stunning. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Oils, oils and more oil. I swear by the dewy hydration of oils. I am pretty low maintenance with skin care, and have noticed I need a lot less intervention since moving to the sea and swimming in the ocean most days. The salt magic is so nourishing for the skin. I also find the sun very healing, contrary to the fear of UV rays we have been indoctrinated with! I use a homemade herbal balm for a lot of applications, hair mask, makeup remover, and moisturizer. It is a power packed plant based mix, and such a heavenly blend. I also use Ritual oil, a moringa and blue lotus oil as a body moisturizer.  I am in my mid 30s and really notice my skin responds so well to the dewy goodness of oils. I practice dry body brushing also, which I feel is so wonderful to aid stagnation and lymphatic flow. I use a jade roller which I keep in the fridge for extra lymphatic cooling, and use on my face every few days with oil. I always end my showers with cold water, to add in a hydrotherapy element. I wear very little makeup, but when I do it is always natural, as clean as can be. I love RMS and Ere Perez. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? The importance of a vibrant whole foods diet and hydration is EVERYTHING! So many compounds in our foods, fruit + veggies are anti aging and collagen boosting anti oxidant heros. I drink 3+ litres of filtered water daily and do my very best to eat a rainbow of seasonal organic fruit/­­veggies daily and honestly I rely on this to support my health, skin and hair primarily. I do add in a marine based collagen daily to either smoothies or tonics. Also I am in a stage of encouraging my hair to grow, and am using nettle, rosemary and horsetail infusions as a hair rinse. I also massage in olive oil and rosemary oil into my scalp, truly it is so simple and aids hair growth. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? A low tox life is key. Keep your stress in check, move your body, eat as clean as possible – mostly plants, organics or pesticide free produce, clean water and clean air. The most incredibly glowy humans I know follow this ethos. This has been my guideline and I am often told I really do not look my age. I am so at ease with ageing but it is always nice to hear you are maintaining a youthful glow! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  I really do. I work for myself and direct all of my offerings at this point. This can be demanding and means work can have a never-ending feel. There are always so many thoughts, needs and energy streams flowing into my work life. I also feel when you work as a space holder and in the healing realms, your energy output can be hefty. Burn out is high in this line of work, as you truly want to assist so deeply to aid others, we can often throw our needs to the side. I have learnt this many times in my years as a clinician/­­healer. I implement a lot of consistency with a structured clinic week~ limiting the amount of clients I see weekly to where I feel my energy is at and how many clients I can truly be present for. I balance myself with time off, away from screens, in nature and welcome in receiving energy to counteract my giving energy. My self care practice is the core of how I seek balance. I am actually freakily good at giving back to myself, which I believe enables me to do what I do! -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? For me, it is much healthier to come at it head on.. (typical Aries answer!) I do my finest to address the stressors, and clear the way. Whether this means a mountain of admin,  which is often a stressor for me as I not a natural lover of admin. I bunker down, switch off all other distractions, play some flute music or chants, burn some incense and get in the zone. When I exit that zone I feel so accomplished and reward myself with an ocean swim, or a nature walk to balance out the mental space I have been in. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? First and foremost I rest. Immunity can be a very strong conversation our bodies communicate to us with the message of needed REST. My go to supplement and herbal approach is to take a high dose of Vitamin C consistently in divided doses throughout my day, I also add in zinc supplements. I always have an immune focused liquid herbal tonic in my first aid support cabinet, so I begin this at a high frequent dose to meet the acute presentation of a cold/­­virus~ generally dosing up to 4 x daily. Usually it will have Echinacea, andrographis, elderberry, manuka, thyme in it. I love medicinal mushrooms to support immunity so I will take a blend of Reishi and Chaga in higher doses. I avoid raw foods and focus on lots of cooked warming nourishing food to feed the cold, congees, broths, soups, stew. I also make fresh oregano, thyme with sliced lemon &  ginger tea. If I really honour the rest that is needed, the cold/­­rundown feelings will shift very swiftly. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? The best thing I ever did was to get a separate work phone. I have a dedicated phone that my clients can contact me on, so in my free time it is left at home or on silent. This has helped me enormously create healthy boundaries. I also do not have my work emails on my phone, so I do not check them at all unless I am sitting down at my computer to work. It is so important to be available to your own process and own life, especially when you are in the field of assisting others. These simple interventions help fortify those boundaries greatly for me. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I return to softness with myself if I lose my way a little. I do my best to not judge or engage in negative self talk. I soften and return to my centre. We all have patterns we are cycling. Although I feel I am quite a master of my own self care practice I definitely can get caught up in my workload a fair bit. One thing I do consciously do is to book a treatment in weekly in some form, usually a bodywork-massage session. I find this tactile healing so restorative. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? I recently moved from the mountains to the sea, although they are both completely beautiful nature rich locations I was very much in need a big environment change for my own health and wellbeing.  Having lived in a very cold environment mountain side for 10 + years I was craving the warmth, the salt and the sun. Being by the ocean and soaking up the sun rays has been so fundamentally healing for me at this point. Total game changer! The power of changing your environment is so potent when you feel the call to do so. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I acknowledge that this too shall pass, it is transient. I do my best to trust my own creative genius. I am quite a forward motion person, so when I am feeling uninspired it absolutely can get me down. I am naturally a procrastinator in many ways, which can be so frustrating but saying that I also have the ability to then smash out the tasks in an uncanny way! I often find when I am not in such a wonderful place with myself I feel that sense of stagnation, so I do my very best to get to the roots of that stagnation. Often it takes me getting into nature to be re inspired, crafting out some quiet space to re energize and tackle the task head on. I try to ask myself what is the block, and unpack the block to free up the energy flow. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. As cheesy at it sounds I LOVED Practical Magic, the witchy plant potions and the apothecary Sandra Bullocks character opened was a total inspiration for me as teenager.. & still is now (lol). Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a herbalist, nutritionist, and energetic healer? How do all of those practices interweave for you? I was always drawn to the esoteric realms and the mystery of nature. As a little girl I loved being outside, I loved the flowers, the trees, the plants, the grasses, the oceans, the mountains. I loved being an observer and always felt so held when I was in nature. As soon as I began to understand that plants could have a positive effect on our health, it just fascinated me. Learning about folklore of plant medicine, applications and remedies drew me into a language I wanted to be fluent in. I believe that much of our call to the plant path is remembering, these plants  have been with us through our ancestral lines for eons. My career began really at the age of 16 with energetic healing, I met a group of wild women up north in Australia and was welcomed into circles, introduced to the concepts of healing, and recognized as a student of these realms. I learnt reiki which led to crystal healing, then to sound healing, colour therapy, kinesiology.. I went to a college for 2 years to learn energetic healing in depth and graduated by the age of 19 holding full in depth sessions on auric healing and clearing energetic blockages. For me it felt too much too soon. So I went and travelled, met my husband in the USA and studied a whole lot more. When I returned to Australia I wanted to anchor my knowledge of healing with more grounded modalities so I began studying Naturopathic medicine. I forked off into a Bachelor of Western Herbal Medicine and Nutritional Medicine. I loved learning about plants and food as medicine, I loved the union of science and grass roots knowledge. Over years of being in practice, I have found that there is no way or no need to seperate these modalities. I weave them all in together to ultimately support the client in a very holistic way. I approach my practice with this lens of perception. I lead with intuition, and merge functional testing, pathology testing, traditional folk medicine, evidence based plant medicine, nutritional medicine, and energetics all to support. I believe there are always energetics involved in a health presentation, along with the demand for nutritional healing as powerful ally, and herbal medicine to assist, shift and support. Aligning these healing modalities is a potent combination. Essentially the basis of Naturopathic Medicine is individualised care, no one case is the same. This ethos rings true to me, there is not one client I have worked with that is the same as any other. How can we approach health in one way, or believe there is one remedy for one presentation? It goes against the nature of our uniqueness! My practice is about honouring the individuals path, story and health goals. -- You put a lot of emphasis on gut health in your practice and believe it to be the root to all balanced health. Can you talk a little bit about why you see this as such an important aspect of wellbeing?  All diseases begin in the gut – Hippocrates had it right! So many issues stem from the gut, it is the root of our health. With the emergence of continued evolving science we are seeing so much more information come to light around the microbiome/­­microbiota, which is truly wonderful. Much of our immunity is linked with gut health, it impacts mental health greatly with our second brain residing in the gut producing neurotransmitters, it is involved in the auto immune expression, it defines our ability to absorb and produce nutrients/­­vitamins/­­minerals, it impacts our metabolism, it is directly connected to our stress response and digestion responds accordingly.. And so much more... I work very closely with digestive healing with each and every one of my clients as I believe this is a key element to balanced health and shifting imbalanced symptoms. Many of my clients present with poor digestion and we dig like detectives to get to the roots, often it is a leaky gut like picture – with parasites, yeast overgrowths or SIBO which we generally detect via functional testing. Once we have a good sense of what is actually happening in the gut, we go in with a supportive treatment plan – lifestyle, supplemental, nutritional and herbal interventions. It always astounds me how health can transform so greatly, from imbalanced to balanced with the right support, intention and dedication. Our bodies are so wise, and so willing to transform. -- What is your favorite way of incorporating herbal medicine into your (or your clients) everyday life? I personally incorporate it in so many ways. I make my own products and use them on my skin and in my home on the daily, I drink herbal teas and infusions daily and use tonic herbs to support my body/­­being. I have a herbal garden that is buzzing right now, so connecting with the plants via gardening is medicine to me. There is something so potent about growing and caring for a plant and utilising her healing, knowing the story of the plants beginnings enhances the healing power I believe. For clients~ it really depends but I do always advise infusions to become a part of their everyday lives. They are so very simple and accessible, basically a long brewed overnight tea! If you are working with me in a session we will touch on many ways to incorporate plant medicine into your life, from the herbs that are suitable for your current process, to cleaning up your skin care with more plant love, to working with herbal tablets/­­liquid tonics for marked support. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? This next year feels so full of creativity, as I expand and launch multiple new offerings. Right now I am in a potent brewing stage, so I look forward to it all coming to fruition! -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Days off at the beach, going into the bush, gardening in my medicinal plant patch, reading a great book, screen free days, massages, hugs with my husband & dogs. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Braiding Sweetgrass – Robin Wall Kimmerer Song –  Stay – Cat Power/­­ Ba Movie –  Call me by your name Piece of Art –  A oil pastel pencil drawing gifted to me by my husband and family by my dear friend and incredible creator Chanel Tobler called Curves like jam -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Emily Lami from Bodha, she is a scent magician. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff Self-Care Interview Series: Lucy Vincent Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Edamame Hummus with Coriander

December 19 2018 VegKitchen 

Edamame Hummus with Coriander Hummus is traditionally prepared with chickpeas, however this hummus is prepared with edamame beans. Serve hummus with grilled pitas, tortilla chips, or raw vegetables. Save Print Edamame Hummus with Coriander Serves: 2 cups   Ingredients 1 bag (375 g) shelled edamame beans 2 cloves garlic, minced ½ cup tahini ½ cup water ½ cup chopped fresh cilantro ¼ cup lemon juice 3 tsp extra virgin olive oil 1 tsp kosher salt 1 tsp sesame seed Instructions Place the edamame beans in a saucepan with enough salted water to cover them. Boil over medium-low heat and cook until tender, about 5 minutes. Purée garlic with food processor. Add cooked beans, tahini, water, coriander, lemon juice, olive oil, and salt until the texture is smooth. Sprinkle with sesame seeds. 3.3.3077   The article Edamame Hummus with Coriander appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegetables Tajine

December 15 2018 VegKitchen 

Vegetables Tajine There are no rules for this recipe. Use vegetables you have on hand, according to the season: legumes, green beans, turnips, chard, tomatoes, etc. Vary the spices according to your preference: nutmeg, ginger, caraway, cinnamon, cloves, saffron, red pepper, etc. If you do not have a traditional “tajine” dish, a pot or wok will work very well too. Save Print Vegetables Tajine Serves: 3-4   Ingredients 2 potatoes 2 carrots 2 zucchini 1 cup celery 1 can chickpeas 1 onion 1 clove of garlic 3 tbsp olive oil 1 tsp paprika 1 tsp coriander 1 tsp turmeric Salt Pepper 2 cups vegetable broth Instructions Heat the oil in a pot. Peel the garlic and onion, slice, and pour into the pot. Add the spices (paprika, coriander, and turmeric), salt, and pepper. Mix. Brown for a few minutes until the onion is tender. If necessary, fill the bottom of the pot with water. Wash, peel, and slice vegetables. Pour the carrots, potatoes, zucchini, and celery into the pot and mix with the spices. Add broth and bring to boil under cover. The broth should cover the vegetables for good cooking. When the broth boils, remove the lid and lower the heat. Simmer […] The article Vegetables Tajine appeared first on VegKitchen.

Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Mushrooms (Pasta Alfredo, Minestrone, Gravy)

December 12 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

I’ve noticed a pattern that I fall into every fall. At the very start of it, right as there’s the first serious chill in the air, I get in the mood for all the cozy fall foods. For me, those always involve tons of root vegetables and winter squashes, and I enjoy them very, very thoroughly for the next month or two. That must be why I’m generally already sick of roasted root vegetables and almost can’t look at another squash right around the holidays. Meanwhile, there’s still January, February, and March (maybe even some of April?) to endure. I’m pretty sure I’m not alone in this :) Thankfully, there are mushrooms. They have all the elements needed for fall/­­winter cooking: they are earthy, versatile, satisfying, do well with wintery preparations, and pair well with cozy spices and herbs (and they are decidedly unlike root vegetables or squash). So today we are sharing a meal plan, consisting of 3 distinctly different, umami-bomb mains, centered around a batch of sautéed mushrooms: pasta alfredo, minestrone, and gravy with mash. And as usual, there’s a shopping list and step-by-step prep tips. Hope you guys enjoy this one! Menu - Mushroom Pasta Alfredo - Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone - Mushroom Gravy over Potato-Parsnip Mash *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free if needed, see the recipes for serving sizes Shopping List (Print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan mini. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Add whatever other ingredients you’ll need for the week here, if doing shopping for the whole week. Produce 2 large yellow onions 2 lbs mushrooms of choice (ex: crimini and shiitake) 1 large head of garlic 2 medium-large Russet or Yukon Gold potatoes 2 large parsnips 2 lemons 1 small bunch kale of choice 1 large bunch of parsley rosemary (2 sprigs) Bulk 1 cup chickpeas 1/­­2 cup cashews Staples/­­Other sea salt olive oil or other oil of choice miso balsamic vinegar kombu (optional) 10-12 oz penne pasta (gluten-free if needed) Basic Prep Complete these three steps on the weekend (or whenever you have the time), and these meals will be a breeze to put together during the week, thanks to all the prepared components. 1) Cook the Mushrooms Here, we are cooking our mushrooms with onions and garlic (don’t worry, 2 lbs of mushrooms cook down quite a bit) to use as a base for all three of our meals. Half of them will be left whole and the other half will be blended into the creamy Mushroom Alfredo sauce. Sautéed Mushrooms   Print Ingredients oil of choice 2 large yellow onions - chopped sea salt 2 lbs any mushrooms of choice (we used a mix of crimini and shiitake) - sliced 3 cloves of garlic - minced Instructions Heat a generous glug of oil in large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onions and a pinch of salt, and cook for about 10 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms and another pinch of salt. If your large pan is still not large enough to fit all the mushrooms, add them in batches, they will cook down significantly. Cook for another 10-15 minutes, until all the liquid released by the mushrooms evaporates. Store refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226   2) Cook the Chickpeas and Vegetables for the Mash + Make Veggie Broth all in one go I love this step so much. Cooking beans (don’t forget to soak them overnight) is such a perfect opportunity to also make delicious, homemade veggie broth, and maybe even to boil a few vegetables for another dish in the process (which only further deepen the broth flavor). Here, we are cooking chickpeas for the Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone, boiling potatoes and parsnips for the Potato-Parsnip Mash and magically making a very flavorful broth in the meantime. The broth will be used in the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce and the Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone. Chickpeas, Potatoes, Parsnips & Broth   Print Ingredients 1 cup chickpeas - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2 medium-large potatoes, Russet or Yukon Gold - peeled and cut into large chunks 2 large parsnips - peeled and cut into large chunks 2 cloves garlic - smashed 2 bay leaves 1 sprig of rosemary 1 small sheet of kombu seaweed (optional) any other vegetable scraps that you might have on hand (leek tops, onion skins, etc.) 14 cups purified water sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the chickpeas. Place them in a soup pot, along with the potatoes, parsnips, garlic, bay leaves, rosemary, kombu and any other vegetable scraps, if using. Cover with 14 cups of water. Place the pot over high heat and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook covered, for 30 minutes, or until the chickpeas, potatoes, and parsnips are all cooked. Generously salt the broth towards the end of cooking. Tasting is very important here - the broth should taste very flavorful and well-salted. Remove the potatoes and parsnips with a slotted spoon. Store them away in an air-tight container in the refrigerator, until you are ready to make the Potato-Parsnip Mash. Remove the bay leaves, rosemary, kombu, and any vegetable scraps, if using, and discard. Measure out 9-9½ cups of the broth and leave it in the pot with the chickpeas. This will be your base for the Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone. Store the rest of the broth in a separate airtight container, you will be using it for the Alfredo and gravy and mash. Keep the broth and chickpeas refrigerated right in the soup pot if possible, since youll be using it for minestrone later in the week. Notes Chickpea cooking times vary depending on their age, so you might have to cook them longer than 30 minutes. If you find yourself having to cook the chickpeas much longer, take out the potatoes and parsnips with a slotted spoon to avoid the vegetables getting mushy. 3.5.3226   3) Make the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce This is a play on a creamy pasta sauce, complete with the earthy and sweet flavors of sautéed mushrooms and onions. Other flavor superstars like balsamic, miso, and lemon juice take this vegan ‘Alfredo’ to the next level. We’ll be using this sauce in the Pasta, Minestrone, and the Mushroom Gravy. Mushroom Alfredo Sauce   Print Ingredients half of the sautéed mushrooms and onions (from above, about 2¾ cups) ½ cup cashews - soaked in purified water for 2-4 hours, or boiling water for 10 minutes 1 tablespoon miso 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons olive oil juice from ½ lemon salt and pepper - to taste about ¾ cup chickpea broth (from above) - to achieve a saucy consistency Instructions Combine the mushrooms and onions, cashews, miso, balsamic, olive oil, lemon juice, salt, and pepper, in a high-speed blender and pulse until smooth. Stream in the chickpea broth with the blender still running, until you achieve a good sauce consistency. The sauce shouldnt be too thick or too runny, aim for the sweet spot in between. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Store the sauce refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226   Recipes This dreamy pasta dish comes together in a flash, thanks to all the weekend prep from above. It’s so cozy and full of deep, wintery flavors from the Mushroom Alfredo and meaty slices of sautéed mushrooms. Lemon juice and fresh parsley provide some necessary brightness, and a dusting of nutritional yeast gives that final, cheesy finish. Mushroom Pasta Alfredo   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients 10-12 oz penne pasta - gluten-free if needed ⅔ of the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce (from above, about 2 cups) ⅔ of the remaining cooked mushrooms and onions (from above) 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast, plus more for sprinkling juice from ½ lemon ½ large bunch of parsley - chopped Instructions Cook the pasta al dente, in a large pot of well-salted water, according to the instructions on the package. Reserve ¼ - ½ cup of pasta water before draining. Meanwhile, place a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce, cooked mushrooms and onions, nutritional yeast, and reserved pasta water. Stir to mix and heat through. Once the pasta is done, add it to the pan with the sauce and gently stir to coat. Add the lemon juice and parsley and carefully stir to incorporate. Enjoy right away, reserving 2¼ cups of the mushroomy pasta for the minestrone (recipe below). Keep the reserved pasta refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226     This Minestrone gives a second life to the Mushroom Pasta Alfredo from above. Minestrone is traditionally a soup made of whatever ingredients are around, and a perfect fridge-clean-out dish. We are honoring that here by adding some of our reserved mushroomy pasta to the flavorful chickpea broth and chickpeas that we cooked during prep. The sauce from the pasta gives even more depth to the broth, and the pasta makes the dish perfectly filling and satisfying. There’s also rosemary, kale, lemon juice, and black pepper. All simple ingredients that come together to make a layered and comforting soup, perfect for any winter meal. Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 cup cooked chickpeas (from above) 9-9½ cups vegetable broth (from above) 1 tablespoon chopped rosemary 1 bunch kale - stems removed, torn into bite-size pieces 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast, plus more for serving 2¼ cup reserved mushroom pasta (from above) freshly ground black pepper juice from 1 lemon parsley - for serving Instructions Combine the chickpeas and broth in a soup pot (if not already combined). Optionally, add ½ cup of the chickpeas, ½ cup of the broth, and the rosemary to an upright blender and blend until smooth. Pour the mixture back into the soup and mix it in for a creamier consistency. Bring the broth up to a boil and reduce the heat to a simmer. Add the kale to the simmering broth and cook, covered, for about 10 minutes, until soft. Also add the rosemary with the kale if you didnt blend it in earlier. Stir in the nutritional yeast, reserved mushroom pasta, and black pepper to taste, and bring the soup back up to a boil once again. Turn off the heat, stir in the lemon juice, and enjoy, garnished with parsley. 3.5.3226   Continuing on our journey of giving a new life to leftovers, we are turning the Mushroom Alfredo into a gravy and serving it over a potato and parsnip mash. The mash is quickly thrown together with the vegetables we boiled while making the chickpeas and broth during prep day. Easy and so satisfying! Mushroom Gravy over Potato-Parsnip Mash   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients for the potato-parsnip mash olive oil 1 large clove of garlic - minced 2 boiled medium-large potatoes, Russet or Yukon Gold (from above) 2 boiled large parsnips (from above) about ¼ - ½ cup warmed chickpea broth (from above) sea salt and black pepper - to taste for the mushroom gravy remaining Mushroom Alfredo Sauce (from above, ⅓ of the total) remaining cooked mushrooms and onions (from above, ⅓ of the total after sauce) about ¼ cup chickpea broth (from above) salt and black pepper - if needed, to taste parsley - for serving Instructions to make the potato-parsnip mash Warm a generous glug of olive oil on a medium pot over medium heat. Add the garlic and stir around for about 30 seconds, until fragrant. Mash the potatoes and parsnips in the same pot with a masher. Add the broth and more olive oil to taste, and continue mashing to a desired consistency, incorporating the garlic and oil from the bottom of the pot and warming the mash over medium heat. You can make the mash smooth or a bit chunky, however you prefer. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve right away. to make the mushroom gravy In a small saucepan, combine the Mushroom Alfredo, cooked mushrooms and onions, and just enough of the chickpea broth to achieve a gravy consistency. Warm the gravy over medium heat. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the gravy right away, on top of the potato-parsnip mash, garnished with parsley. Notes Any leftover broth can be frozen for future use. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage No-Recipe Healing Soup Daikon Radish Pasta With Corn and Tomatoes in Creamy Coconut Sauce One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Mushrooms (Pasta Alfredo, Minestrone, Gravy) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Instant Pot Baingan Bharta Recipe – Spiced Mashed Eggplant

December 4 2018 Vegan Richa 

Instant Pot Baingan Bharta Recipe – Spiced Mashed EggplantInstant Pot Baingan Bharta Recipe – Spiced Mashed Eggplant. 1 Pot 30 Min. Serve as dip with flatbread or with curries or Dals. Add chickpeas to make a meal Vegan Glutenfree Nutfree Soyfree Recipe Stovetop option Jump to Recipe   Baingan Bharta translates to eggplant mash. The traditional bharta is a long process, Large eggplants are roasted over a flame or grill to char the skin. The skin is them removed and the partially cooked eggplant is mashed. Then added to a spiced onion tomato base and cooked to roast the eggplant with the spices and base.  In this instant pot version, cubed Eggplant gets pressure cooked with the onion tomato base, then mashed and cooked a bit to roast. Pressure cooking reduces the steps and also uses less bowls, vessels! I add some smoked paprika that adds a fresh smoked flavor that is  generally there in this dish if the eggplant was charred and cookes. Some liquid smoke will do that too, although I find that a bit too strong.  This spiced eggplant mash also makes a great dip with some hot pita bread. Add some chickpeas to make this into a meal or serve with a side of chickpea curry or dals.  This bharta is 1 Pot, needs just 15 mins active time, is Easy and Delicious!Continue reading: Instant Pot Baingan Bharta Recipe – Spiced Mashed EggplantThe post Instant Pot Baingan Bharta Recipe – Spiced Mashed Eggplant appeared first on Vegan Richa.

tomato shorba recipe | tamatar shorba | tamatar dhania ka shorba

November 26 2018 hebbar's kitchen 

tomato shorba recipe | tamatar shorba | tamatar dhania ka shorbatomato shorba recipe | tamatar shorba | tamatar dhania ka shorba with detailed photo and video recipe. soup recipes are generally the most underrated recipes in indian cuisine. there are many traditional and modern unique recipes but does not get the attention and visibility like other recipes. one such traditional and ancient soup recipes is tomato shorba recipe inherited from the persian cuisine. The post tomato shorba recipe | tamatar shorba | tamatar dhania ka shorba appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Split Pea Pesto Spread

November 12 2018 Meatless Monday 

This flavorful spread pairs split peas with pine nuts, basil and garlic, adding a punch of protein to the traditional pesto recipe! Its perfect to serve on crostini with your choice of toppings. This recipe comes to us from our friends at USA Pulses. Serves 4 - 1/­­2 cup cooked split peas - 1/­­4 cup pine nuts, toasted - 2 cups fresh basil - 2 cloves garlic, roughly chopped - 1/­­2 cup Parmesan cheese, shredded - 1 tsp salt - 1/­­2 cup olive oil   Combine the split peas, pine nuts, basil, garlic, Parmesan and salt in a food processor. Pulse for about 10 seconds until roughly chopped and combined. Slowly add the olive oil with the food processor running, stopping to scrape down the sides of the bowl as needed. Continue to pulse until mixture reaches desired consistency. Use immediately as pasta sauce, or spread on crostini or crackers with your toppings of choice. Transfer unused portion to air-tight container and store in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. The post Split Pea Pesto Spread appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Crispy Shakarpara (Almond Biscuit) Recipe

November 11 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Crispy Shakarpara (Almond Biscuit) Recipe (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Crispy Shakarpara A traditional tea-time biscuit-like snack often made during festive occasions, shakarpara is the perfect sweet for any gathering. They are deep-fried sugar crisps with almonds and hint of cardamom, which adds to their unique flavor. This is one of those snacks that you wont be able to stop munching on.  - 1 cup all-purpose flour (maida, plain flour) - 2 Tbsp fine sooji (semolina) - 1/­­8 tsp salt - 1/­­8 tsp baking soda - 2 Tbsp oil - 1/­­4 tsp cardamom powder (ilachi) - 3 Tbsp sliced almonds - 4 Tbsp sugar - 1/­­4 cup water (use as needed) -  Mix flour, sooji, sugar, salt, baking soda, cardamom powder, almonds and oil in a bowl and make a stiff dough adding water slowly as needed. Knead it well. Cover the dough and set aside for 15 minutes or more. - Take the dough and make a flat ball shape. Rolling into about 9-inch square, then with fingers try to give a square shape. Fold in fours, roll it again and fold, do this three times. Use dry four as needed to help rolling. - Cut the rolled dough into about inch square. Note: you can cut them in your desire shape. - Heat the oil in a frying pan on low medium heat. - The frying pan should have at least 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put a small piece of dough in the oil. The dough should make the oil sizzle and come up slowly. Dont over crowed the frying pan, you should be able to turn them easily. -  Keep stirring occasionally, fry the shakkar paras until both sides are golden-brown. Frying time should be about 6-8 minutes. -  Let the shakkar paras comes to the room temperature,  they should be crisp. Notes: don’t fry shakerparas on high heat otherwise they will be soft.  Shakarpara are a perfect gifting idea for the holiday season since they have a long shelf life. The post Crispy Shakarpara (Almond Biscuit) Recipe appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

ghee mysore pak recipe | soft mysore pak | sweet mysore pak

November 1 2018 hebbar's kitchen 

ghee mysore pak recipe | soft mysore pak | sweet mysore pakghee mysore pak recipe | soft mysore pak | sweet mysore pak with step by step photo and video recipe. indian cuisine gets really busy especially during the festival seasons like diwali and navaratri. most of them either get busy in preparing traditional sweets or savoury to be distributed with friends and family. one such popular mouth watering sweet recipe is ghee mysore pak recipe from besan flour. The post ghee mysore pak recipe | soft mysore pak | sweet mysore pak appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

pindi chole recipe | pindi chana masala | how to make chole pindi masala

October 28 2018 hebbar's kitchen 

pindi chole recipe | pindi chana masala | how to make chole pindi masalapindi chole recipe | pindi chana masala | how to make chole pindi masala with step by step photo and video recipe. punjabi cuisine are known for its rich and spicy curries offered as side dish for flat breads. more often it is either a paneer based or meat based curries with a cream toppings. but this recipe is a traditional kabuli chana based curry popularly known as pindi chole recipe. The post pindi chole recipe | pindi chana masala | how to make chole pindi masala appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegan Parmesan

October 20 2018 VegKitchen 

Vegan Parmesan Here is a recipe that will replace Parmesan cheese. Fast and very easy to make, this vegan parmesan does not contain any products of animal origin. The taste is, of course, different from the traditional Parmesan, but once you get used to it there is no way you will put cow’s milk cheese on your pasta. This vegetable Parmesan is really delicious and you can use it on all your preparations. I added in some sesame seeds (rich in calcium) and yeast powder (naturally rich in vitamins B1, B2, B5, B6, B9, PP, magnesium, zinc, phosphorus, protein and fiber, source of iron and vitamin B12).   Save Print Vegan Parmesan Prep time:  10 mins Total time:  10 mins   Servings: 1 cup Ingredients 1 cup of cashews 4 tablespoons yeast 1 pinch of pink Himalayan salt, otherwise your usual salt 1 pinch of white pepper Instructions Add all the ingredients to a blender or a food processor Pulse and mix at regular intervals for a few seconds and not continuously. You must get a powder. Keep your Parmesan in a glass jar that you can close. Leave it in the fridge. To use on all dishes, instead of Parmesan! 3.3.3077 […] The post Vegan Parmesan appeared first on VegKitchen.

Gingerbread and Lingonberry Bundt Cake

December 24 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Gingerbread and Lingonberry Bundt Cake Just putting this up here before we are checking out for some Christmas celebrations with Luise’s family. This is a  our gingerbread bundt cake that we have been making a couple times in December leading up to Christmas. It’s a gluten free, spice heavy, bundt cake with a touch of sweet banana bread. Very soft and moist and very, very good. We add tangy nordic lingonberries to the cake and the glaze to give it a pop in flavor and color but you can leave them out if you like. Or replace them with other berries like cranberries or raspberries. The glaze is rather untraditional, made on dates, plant milk, coconut oil and berries. It doesn’t shine as the ones made on sugar but super delicious nevertheless. Perfect if you are trying to keep the sugar down. You could of course add any glaze of choice to it. Try this for Christmas Day or New Year’s Eve with a little glaze on top and some extra on the side. Happy holidays everyone! Gingerbread and Lingonberry Bundt Cake Dry ingredients – 90 g /­­ 250 ml /­­ 1 cup rolled oats – 100 g /­­ 250 ml /­­ 1 cup almond flour – 135 g /­­ 250 ml /­­ 1 cup rice flour – 2 tsp baking powder – 1 tbsp ground cinnamon – 2 tsp ground cardamom – 2 tsp ground ginger – 1/­­2 tsp ground cloves – A pinch of salt Wet ingredients – 2 ripe bananas – 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup maple syrup – 3 eggs – 125 g /­­ 1 stick /­­ 4 oz butter, room tempered – 200 ml /­­ 3/­­4 cup yogurt – 120 g frozen lingonberries or cranberries (optional) Lingonberry & Date Glaze – 10 soft dates – 250 ml /­­ 1 cup oat milk or almond milk – 2 tbsp coconut oil – 60 g /­­1/­­2 cup lingonberries Making the cake 1. Set the oven to 180°C. 2. Place the oats in a food processor and pulse into a flour. 3. Add the rest of the dry ingredients and pulse a few times until combined. Transfer to a large bowl. 4. Add all wet ingredients except the lingonberries to the food processor and mix on high speed until smooth and creamy. 5. Pour the wet mixture into the bowl with dry ingredients and stir around until combined. 6. Stir through the berries. 7. Grease a bundt pan with oil or butter. 8. Pour the batter into the pan and bake on the lower rack for [55 minutes](55 “The cake is ready if an inserted toothpick comes out clean”) or until a toothpick comes out clean. 9. Let cool in the pan for 15 minutes, then flip onto a wire cooling rack, carefully lift the bundt pan off and let cool completely. Making the Glaze 1. Pit the dates and add to a sauce pan on medium heat. 2. Add milk and coconut oil and let simmer for a few minutes until thickened. 3. Remove from the heat and add the berries, leave for a couple of minutes to cool off a bit. 4. Transfer to a blender or use a hand blender to mix completely smooth with a dusty pink color. Add more liquid if it looks too thick. 5. Pour half of the glaze over the cake before serving and serve the rest on the side.

american chop suey recipe | veg american chopsuey | veg chopsuey recipe

December 17 2018 hebbar's kitchen 

american chop suey recipe | veg american chopsuey | veg chopsuey recipeamerican chop suey recipe | veg american chopsuey | veg chopsuey recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. chopsuey recipes are popular across america and are mainlay prepared with pastas. traditionally it is made with meat, particularly the grounded beef with sauteed onions and tomato based thick sauce. but this recipe is vegetarian alternative to the popular american chop suey recipe. The post american chop suey recipe | veg american chopsuey | veg chopsuey recipe appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Recipe | Grasshopper Brownie Cookies

December 14 2018 Oh My Veggies 

I always make a few batches of cookies for the holidays, but it’s been several years since I did a lot of holiday baking. You know, the three-day baking marathons that leave you with flour in your hair and flecks of buttery sugar stuck to your face–that kind of holiday baking. But I am doing it this year! The last time I did this kind of holiday baking, I decided to make healthy cookies. Shockingly, healthy cookies do not go over very well with a crowd. So I am going all out this time. I left the grocery store last weekend with bags full of butter and chocolate chips of every variety. No whole wheat flour, no applesauce instead of butter. Not this year! And the first recipe I tackled is one I came up with myself: Grasshopper Brownie Cookies. I guess candy cane would be a wee bit more traditional for this time of year, but grasshopper brownies are one of my favorite desserts and I had the idea to make a sandwich cookie out of them. Chocolate ganache and minty cream are sandwiched between two chewy brownie cookies. I made them small because these little guys are rich. […]

Tuscan Ribollita

December 10 2018 Meatless Monday 

Ribollita is a traditional Tuscan stew featuring a mix of dark leafy greens, tomatoes, carrots, celery and aromatic herbs. Serve this dish alongside a loaf of warm, crusty bread for the perfect winter meal! This recipe comes to us from Cindy of Cindys Table. Serves 4   - 1/­­2 cup extra virgin olive oil, divided - 1 large yellow onion, diced - 2 carrots, peeled and sliced - 2 large stalks, celery, chopped - 1 large white sweet potato, chopped - 2 cups cabbage, coarsely chopped - 5 kale leaves, trimmed and chopped - 4 Swiss chard leaves, trimmed and chopped - 4 cloves garlic, minced - 1 teaspoon sea salt, plus more - 1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper, plus more - 8 cups low sodium vegetable broth - 1 (28 ounce) can petite diced tomatoes - 3 sage leaves - 3 bay leaves   In a large cast iron pan or soup pot over medium high heat, add 3 tablespoons of olive oil. Once hot, add in onion and cook for about 5 minutes until translucent. Add in carrots, celery and sweet potato. Continue cooking for 5 minutes. Add in cabbage, kale, swiss chard and garlic. Then stir together with a wooden spoon. Cover and continue cooking for 10 minutes. Pour in vegetable broth and petite diced tomatoes. Drop in the sage and bay leaves. Bring to a boil then cover and lower to a simmer for 20 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool. Refrigerate over night and reheat for 20 minutes over a medium temperature. Ladle each bowl and drizzle with extra virgin olive oil for serving. The post Tuscan Ribollita appeared first on Meatless Monday.

thekua recipe | khajur recipe | bihari khasta thekua recipe

December 3 2018 hebbar's kitchen 

thekua recipe | khajur recipe | bihari khasta thekua recipethekua recipe | khajur recipe | bihari khasta thekua recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. each state of india has its own unique traditional recipes which have been carried by generations. some recipes are either savoury, dessert recipes or it could be a morning breakfast. one such easy and simple sweet snack recipe is known as thekua recipe or khajur recipe made with wheat flour. The post thekua recipe | khajur recipe | bihari khasta thekua recipe appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

batata nu shaak recipe | bateta nu shaak | rasawala batata nu shaak

November 21 2018 hebbar's kitchen 

batata nu shaak recipe | bateta nu shaak | rasawala batata nu shaakbatata nu shaak recipe | bateta nu shaak | rasawala batata nu shaak with step by step photo and video recipe. curry or sabzi recipes are essential recipes for many indian households which are made with wide variations of veggies and pulses. each region and state has its own unique and traditional recipes which meets it demographics and taste buds. batata nu shaak recipe is one such easy curry from the gujarati cuisine made with potatoes or batata. The post batata nu shaak recipe | bateta nu shaak | rasawala batata nu shaak appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegetarian Slow Cooker Lentil Sloppy Joes with Spaghetti Squash

November 12 2018 Meatless Monday 

Rather than traditional buns, these sloppy joes are served with spaghetti squash for a plant-based twist. And this hearty meatless meal is super simple to prepare - just toss protein-packed green lentils along with everything else in a slow cooker and turn it on! This recipe comes to us from our friends at USA Pulses. Serves 4 - 1 1/­­4 cups uncooked green lentils, rinsed and drained - 1 white onion, finely diced - 1 red pepper, finely diced - 1 carrot, thinly sliced (carrot is optional) - 3 cloves garlic minced - 1 1/­­2 tbsp chili powder, - 1 tsp cumin - 1/­­2 tsp onion powder - 1/­­4 tsp cayenne pepper - 1 can tomato sauce (15 oz) - 1 can diced tomatoes (15 oz) - 1 1/­­2 cups water plus more if necessary - 2 tbsp organic ketchup - 1 tsp yellow mustard - 1 tsp gluten free soy sauce - 1 spaghetti squash, washed - salt and pepper to taste   In a large slow cooker, add in all ingredients except spaghetti squash. Stir to combine. Cut the washed spaghetti squash in half around the middle and scoop out the seeds. Place the squash halves face down in the slow cooker right on top of the lentils. Cover and cook on high for 4 hours or until squash is tender and lentils are cooked completely. If the lentils seem dry in any way, just stir in some water until it reaches a nice thick, consistency. Remove spaghetti squash and shred inside with a fork. Divide among bowls and add lentil sloppy joe topping. Sprinkle with cheese, if desired. The post Vegetarian Slow Cooker Lentil Sloppy Joes with Spaghetti Squash appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale and Lentils

November 6 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale and Lentils More than just a sandwich, this is better described as a warm and wintery mushroom and kale salad on top of a slice of freshly baked sourdough bread and it is every ounce as heavenly as it sounds. But before we talk more, let’s watch a movie. We have been taking an involuntary break from making our youtube videos as we have been finishing up our next book, but we are back with a bunch of new videos now. We are starting off with this sandwich this week and have a few more in the upcoming weeks. If you’ve been following my stories on instagram, you might have noticed that we’ve been picking up a new (but old) love for baking rye sourdough bread. It’s been years since we baked bread more regularly and I remember giving up the last time after having killed our third starter. Apparently (luckily), we are better at keeping children alive than sourdough starters and plants. Anyway, I felt a streak of boldness and got back on it again a few weeks back. Instead of making our own starter, we asked if we could buy a rye starter from a sourdough bakery close to us. They handed us a paper cup with a wobbly and bubbly starter and we went home and started baking. It’s been alive for a month now and whenever we are not baking, we simply let it sleep in the fridge. Many sourdough breads are complicated stories involving a checklist with tasks. This is a simpler method where we bake the bread in a crockpot to help it develop a thick crust and soft centre. Its a version of the classic No-Knead Bread but with sourdough bread and the addition of rye flour to give it more tang. The dough is more moist than traditional bread doughs and needs longer proofing time so it develops its tangy sourdough flavor. We use 30/­­70 per cent rye/­­wheat ratio. We have been experimenting with various ratios but find that this is optimal for a bread that can rise well and still provide a lot of rye character. We have been using the bread for lunch sandwiches and this mushroom sandwich is our very favorite at the moment. It’s very very simple, you just fry mushrooms in a pan with a bit of garlic, fold down kale and cooked lentils and add a little vinegar to balance the flavors. We serve it with a herby vegan spread between the bread and the topping that we make from Zeta BreOliv, capers and parsley. BreOliv is a spreadable olive oil that can be used instead of butter. It is made from just olive oil, shea oil, water and salt. This recipe is sponsored by Zeta and you can find the recipe in Swedish on their site. And the English version below. Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale & Lentils Makes 4 slices BreOliv Herb Spread 4 tbsp Zeta BreOliv 1 tbsp capers 1 small bunch parsley Mushroom Topping 2 tbsp Olive Oil 300 g /­­ 11 ounces (3 cups) mixed mushrooms 1 clove garlic 1 tbsp white wine vinegar 2 large kale leaves, stalk discarded 1 cup /­­ 100 g cooked lentils salt & black pepper To serve 4 slices sourdough bread (see recipe below) - Make the herb spread by chopping capers and parsley and stirring it together with Zeta BreOliv In a bowl. - Clean and divide the mushrooms into large bits. Peel and crush the garlic. - Heat a large skillet with olive oil. - Add mushroom and garlic and let sizzle for a few minutes. Then add white wine vinegar. - Chop the kale and rinse the lentils and stir them into the pan. Let saute until the kale has softened. - Taste and season with salt and pepper. - Cut a few slices bread and add a layer of the herb spread. Top with the mushroom and kale mixture and a grind of black pepper. Rye Sourdough Makes 1 loaf Before we make this bread we feed the starter a few hours ahead so it’s alive and kicking. 100 ml (1/­­3 cup) rye sourdough starter 400 ml (1 1/­­2 cup) water 1 1 /­­2 tsp salt 330 g (2 1/­­3 cups) organic all purpose flour 170 g (1 1/­­2 cup)  organic rye flour 6-8 green olives - Stir together sourdough, water and salt in a large bowl, and the two flours in a separate bowl. - Chop the olives coarsely. - Fold the olives and the flour mixture into the sourdough liquid and use a wooden spoon to stir it into a sticky dough. Sprinkle over more flour if needed. You can also dip your hands in flour and use them if you prefer. The dough is ready when it can be shaped to a ball that is smooth on the outside and sticky on the inside. - Cover the bowl with plastic and leave in room temperature for 12 hours (can be more or less depending on how warm your room is. - It should have expanded at this point and be very sticky and bubbly. Fold it out on a floured table. Sprinkle extra flour on top and pull and fold the dough around itself a few times. It will be pretty sticky. - Flour a proofing basket or bowl and transfer the dough to it with the folds and ends facing upwards and the smoother (dont worry if its not super smooth) facing down. - Leave to proof for two more hours. - Set the oven to 250°C/­­500°F and place a Dutch oven with lid in the oven. - Use oven mittens to remove the hot Dutch oven. Sprinkle the bottom with flour and carefully flip out the dough into it. - Put the lid back on, place in the oven and let back for 30 minutes. Remove the lid, lower the temp to 230°C/­­450°F and let bake for 20 more minutes. - The bread is ready when it has a neice crust and a hollow sound when tapped on. - Let cool wrapped in a cloth before you slice it and it will stay moister. This post is sponsored by Zeta. All words and opinions are our own.

spinach corn sandwich recipe | spinach and corn sandwich recipe

October 29 2018 hebbar's kitchen 

spinach corn sandwich recipe | spinach and corn sandwich recipespinach corn sandwich recipe | corn spinach sandwich | spinach and corn sandwich with step by step photo and video recipe. indian street food recipes have adapted as per the local needs. and rather than just sticking around traditional deep-fried snacks, it has embraced the sandwich recipes as evening snacks. The post spinach corn sandwich recipe | spinach and corn sandwich recipe appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

litti chokha recipe | how to make bihari litti chokha | baati chokha

October 20 2018 hebbar's kitchen 

litti chokha recipe | how to make bihari litti chokha | baati chokhalitti chokha recipe | how to make bihari litti chokha | baati chokha with step by step photo and video recipe. traditional recipes are always healthy and tasty with full of flavours. each state in india has its own variations and unique traditional recipes with native ingredients matching its taste buds. one such hugely known recipe is litti chokha from the central part or from the state of bihar. The post litti chokha recipe | how to make bihari litti chokha | baati chokha appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Best Vegetarian Indian Cookbooks You Should Have in Your Kitchen

October 18 2018 Oh My Veggies 

As an aspiring vegetarian, you should definitely get ahold of an Indian cookbook or two. Indian cuisine is a treasure trove of delicious healthy recipes that might become a staple in your plant-based diet. This cuisine utilizes bunches of plants, herbs, and spices to create mouth-watering vegetarian goodies. Indian vegetarian cookbooks can also teach you some new cooking techniques. You will probably start mixing odd ingredients to create unique Indian-style flavors. However, choosing the right Indian cookbook that perfectly fits your vegetarian preferences might be tricky. To make your choice a bit easier, take a look at this list of the best vegetarian Indian cookbooks that can add just the right spice to your diet. Saffron Soul: Healthy Vegetarian Heritage Recipes from India Among the best vegetarian Indian cookbooks, Saffron Soul by Mira Manek should be on top of your list. The lovely introduction traces the Manek family journey from India to London and gives the entire cookbook a special personal touch. However, the introduction is not the only personal touch this cookbook has to offer. Mira Manek provides a unique set of recipes that feature her own take on traditional Indian staples. Each recipe is a vegetarian interpretation of […]


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