traditional - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Manchurian gravy recipe | veg manchurian gravy | vegetable manchurian gravy

Southwestern Tofu Scramble (Migas)

Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go Bad

Asian Noodle Bowl with Spicy Almond Sauce










traditional vegetarian recipes

Southwestern Tofu Scramble (Migas)

March 30 2020 VegKitchen 

Southwestern Tofu Scramble (Migas) This tasty dish, brimming with lively southwestern flavors, is a vegan version of  a traditional southwestern egg dish. Its known as migas, a word that literally means crumbs in Spanish, in this case referring to bits of tortilla. In the original recipe, the tortilla pieces are scrambled with eggs; this version replaces eggs with tofu. The post Southwestern Tofu Scramble (Migas) appeared first on VegKitchen.

Recipe | Kale & Sweet Potato Quesadillas

March 27 2020 Oh My Veggies 

There are two things you should know about this recipe: 1. The name is a lie. There’s no queso in these quesadillas. But calling them “dillas” makes them sound like something cutesy off of a children’s menu, doesn’t it? 2. Yes, if it sounds familiar, it’s because I made these with leftovers from my Sweet Potato & Kale Wraps. I decided to save the recipe for a rainy day and its day has finally come! So yeah, about #2. We had tortillas and fillings leftover after making those wraps. But, as you saw, I am no burrito wrapper, so the second night around, I made these Kale & Sweet Potato Quesadillas for dinner. Instead of binding everything together with cheese like in a traditional quesadillas, I used mashed sweet potatoes. Is this weird? Okay, fine, maybe it sounds weird, but sweet potatoes and kale go really well together (this is one of my most popular posts, after all!) and so do sweet potatoes and black beans. Oh, and one note about the chorizo: if you can purchase Field Roast locally, use their Mexican Chipotle sausage. Their sausage is made with real vegetables, grains, and spices and it’s minimally processed. (Yes, […]

Plant-Based Pantry Meals We’ve Been Cooking, Pt. 1

March 25 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Pantry Meals We’ve Been Cooking, Pt. 1 I’ve been posting regular pantry cooking stories on our Instagram, and I thought I’d have those recipes live here in written form as well. We’ve been minimizing our grocery shopping as much as possible, mostly depending on pantry staples and some longer lasting produce for our meals. This is not your regular, well-photographed post since all the photos are just quick cellphone snapshots I took at dinner time, but hopefully you won’t mind. The recipes are also very off-the-cuff and based on what we had in the pantry, so please feel free to adjust them according to what you have on hand. That’s really what these dishes are all about! The theme here is canned tomatoes, since they are pantry royalty and can bring big flavor to all kinds of dishes, with very little effort. There are two tomato-based stews, a lush tomato pasta, a tempeh sausage recipe, and a little banana bread treat at the end. I hope to do more of these posts very soon as I continue exploring this theme. Let us know if you have any requests or need help with any particular ingredient/­­dish, etc. Sending big love as always. Few things are as easy and satisfying as a simple marinara pasta, which can be easily made with canned tomatoes. The extra garlic and extra cooking time makes this version especially lush. You can watch me make it here. Lush Marinara Pasta   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients olive oil 1 yellow onion - diced sea salt 5 cloves of garlic - thinly sliced 1 28 oz can whole peeled tomatoes - crushed up with your hands pinch of red pepper flakes - to taste a few sprigs of fresh basil, plus more for garnish 2 teaspoons sugar (only if needed) about 10 oz pasta of choice Instructions Heat a medium pot over medium heat. Add a generous pour of olive oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and saute for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic and saute for another 30 seconds or until fragrant. Add the tomatoes, red pepper flakes, basil sprigs, and more salt if your tomatoes are unsalted. Bring the mixture to a gentle simmer and simmer, stirring frequently, for 45 minutes to 1 hour, until the sauce is thickened and glossy. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. If your sauce tastes too acidic, add the sugar. Transfer about half or more of the sauce to a separate container to use later, leaving the rest in the pot. Meanwhile, boil a pot of water and cook pasta according to the instructions on the package. Save about 1 cup of the starchy pasta water. Drain your pasta and add it to the pot with the reserved sauce. Start mixing, adding small splashes of the starchy pasta water, until the sauce is well-incorporated and sticking to the pasta. Garnish with more basil and enjoy. Notes You can use leftover pasta sauce in any of the dishes in this post that call for tomatoes. 3.5.3226   Pappa al Pomodoro is a Tuscan bread and tomato soup, and it’s the coziest thing ever, plus a great way to use up stale bread. We filled this one out with white beans and kale for a more one-stop meal. You can watch me make it here. Pappa al Pomodoro with White Beans and Kale   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients 4 thick slices of crusty bread, preferably stale 2-3 slices of garlic olive oil ½ large yellow onion - diced sea salt ½-1 teaspoon dried marjoram or oregano (optional) pinch of red pepper flakes - to taste 14.5 oz can diced fire-roasted tomatoes 1½ teaspoon coconut sugar 1 15 oz can or 1½ cups cooked white beans vegetable broth 2 large handfuls of kale - chopped Instructions If your bread isnt stale, toast it. Generously rub each piece of bread with the garlic on both sides. Slice or break the bread up into smaller pieces. Mince any left-over garlic. Heat a large pot over medium heat and add a pour of olive oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt, and saute for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic, marjoram/­­oregano, if using, and red pepper flakes, and stir around for another 30 seconds. Add the tomatoes, coconut sugar, white beans, more salt to taste, and enough vegetable broth to achieve a chunky stew consistency. Bring to a simmer. Once simmering, stir in the kale. Let simmer with the lid askew for about 15 minutes. Taste for salt and spice and adjust if needed. Distribute the garlicky bread between bowls. Pour the stew over. Garnish with a drizzle of olive oil and/­­or any herbs of choice. Notes You can use any kind of canned tomatoes or even tomato sauce for this recipe, just adjust the salt and cooking times accordingly. 3.5.3226   This is not a traditional Chana Masala by any means, but it uses a similar principle of chickpeas stewed with tomatoes and spices. I think that roasted cauliflower goes really well with this dish, and the (super easy!) chutney brings a much-needed pop of green. You can watch me make this dish here. Chana Masala with Roasted Cauliflower and Cilantro Chutney   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients for the chana masala 1 head cauliflower - cut into florets avocado oil or other oil of choice sea salt black pepper 1 yellow onion - diced 1-inch piece of ginger - grated or minced 4 cloves of garlic - grater or minced 1 teaspoon curry powder, or to taste 1½ 15 oz cans or about 2¼ cups cooked chickpeas 1-1½ cups tomato sauce or other canned tomatoes purified water juice from ½ lemon for the cilantro chutney 1 bunch cilantro with stems - roughly chopped 1 serrano pepper - seeded if you prefer less spice 1 teaspoon coconut sugar sea salt juice from ½ lemon Instructions to make the chana masala Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a lined baking tray. Place the cauliflower on the tray, drizzle it with some oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast for 30 minutes, stirring halfway, or until the cauliflower is cooked through and caramelized in parts. Heat a pot over medium heat and add a pour of oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt, and saute for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the ginger, garlic, curry powder, and some black pepper, and saute for 1 more minute, until fragrant. Add the chickpeas, stir to coat, and let the chickpeas toast in the spices for 3-5 minutes. Add the tomato sauce and enough water to thin everything out to a chunky stew consistency. Add more salt if needed (this will depend on whether your chickpeas and tomatoes were salted). Bring to a simmer and let simmer for about 15 minutes, or until the cauliflower is finished roasting. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Turn off the heat and stir in the lemon juice. Serve with the roasted cauliflower and cilantro chutney (recipe follows). to make the cilantro chutney Combine the cilantro, serrano, sugar, salt to taste, and lemon juice in a high speed blender. Blend until smooth. You shouldnt need water, but add small splashes of water if your blender has a difficult time getting going. Notes If you made our freezer bouillon, you can use about 5-6 teaspoons of the fiery freezer bouillon in place of the onions, ginger, and garlic in this recipe. 3.5.3226   This is a riff on the Italian classic of sausage and peppers, except that the ‘sausage’ is made by cooking tempeh with all kinds of herbs and spices, which makes it incredibly flavorful. Feel very free to adjust the spices according to what you have on hand, you kind of can’t go wrong here! You can watch me make this dish here. Tempeh Sausage, Peppers, and Onions   Print Serves: 4-5 Ingredients avocado oil or other oil of choice 1 yellow onion - sliced sea salt 2 red and/­­or orange bell peppers - cored and sliced splash of beer (optional) 2 8 oz packages of tempeh - crumbled tamari - to taste maple syrup - to taste 2 cloves garlic - minced 1 tablespoon minced fresh sage (or use dried sage) 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 teaspoon coconut sugar ½ teaspoon garlic powder ½ teaspoon onion powder ½ teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon dried thyme ¼ teaspoon chili powder pinch of red pepper flakes pinch of smoked salt (totally optional) Instructions Heat a large pan over medium heat and add a pour of oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and saute for 1-2 minutes to give the onions a head start. Add the peppers and another pinch of salt, and saute for about 5 minutes, until starting to soften. Add a splash of beer, if using, and let it cook off for 1-2 minutes. Turn the heat down to medium-low, cover the pan, and let the onions and peppers stew for 20 minutes, or until soft and melted. If your pan gets too dry, add a splash of water. Meanwhile, put the crumbled tempeh in a bowl and drizzle some tamari and maple syrup over it. Mix to coat and let sit. Gather all your spices for the tempeh sausage by measuring them out into one bowl: garlic, sage, tomato paste, coconut sugar, garlic powder, onion powder, smoked paprika, dried thyme, chili powder, red pepper flakes, and smoked salt, if using. Once the onions and peppers are done cooking, remove them from the pan and set aside for now. Add more oil to the pan. Add the tempeh and stir to coat it in the oil. Press the tempeh into the pan in one even layer and let brown undisturbed for about 3 minutes. Stir the tempeh, press it into the pan again, and keep cooking until mostly golden brown. Stir in the prepared spice mix and cook the tempeh for another 2-3 minutes, until fragrant. Taste for salt and spices and adjust if needed. Add the onions and peppers back in, stir to incorporate, and let everything warm through together. Enjoy the sausage as is or on sandwiches, over rice, etc. 3.5.3226   In our last post, I talked about my sourdough starter and how I’ve been experimenting with recipes that use up sourdough discard from feeding the starter. So far I’ve made cookies and this banana bread, which turned out delicious, but didn’t really taste like sourdough. It’s a great way to save some flour in any case, if you have a starter. You can watch me make it here. Vegan Sourdough Banana Bread   Print Adapted from The Baking Fairy - this is a great recipe to use if you dont have sourdough! Serves: 1 standard loaf Ingredients 5 very ripe bananas - peeled, divided ½ cup sourdough discard/­­starter ¼ cup refined coconut oil - melted or soft ¼ cup non-dairy milk 2 teaspoons vanilla extract ½ cup plus 1 tablespoon coconut sugar, plus more for sprinkling generous pinch of sea salt 1½ cups all purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking soda Instructions Preheat the oven to 350° F (175° C). Prepare an oiled and parchment-lined loaf pan. Mash 4 of the bananas in a large bowl. Add the sourdough discard, coconut oil, milk, and vanilla. Use a fork to mix until smooth. Add the sugar, salt, flour, and baking soda. Mix to just incorporate. Transfer the batter to the prepared loaf pan. Slice the remaining banana in half lengthwise and use it to decorate the top of the loaf. Sprinkle more coconut sugar over the banana and top of the loaf. Bake for 50 minutes. Cover with a piece of domed parchment paper and continue baking for another 10 minutes, or until golden on top and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Let cool for at least 20 minutes in the loaf pan, then transfer to a cooling rack and let cool for another 20 minutes. Slice and enjoy. 3.5.3226   Other pantry-friendly recipes we’re cooking this week: - Cozy Pantry Stew - Next Level Lemon Miso Potatoes - Fall-Apart Caramelized Cabbage The post Plant-Based Pantry Meals We’ve Been Cooking, Pt. 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Lasagna Without Cheese? Yup, It’s Possible! [Video]

March 20 2020 Oh My Veggies 

Lasagna without meat is easy. Lasagna without cheese? Now that’s a challenge. In this video, Like a Vegan shows you how to replace traditional ricotta with a tofu-based substitute. It’s creamy, packed with plant-based protein, and you’ll never guess it’s made without dairy! [uliveplayersingle id=”8ec057fd-08e2-4d2c-b991-57551a5ae1a1″] Oh My Veggies is partnering with uLive to bring our readers recipes and tutorials from their video library. To view more veg-friendly ideas from uLive, visit our video page.

Gallo Pinto

March 9 2020 Meatless Monday 

Gallo pinto is a traditional rice and beans dish native to Costa Rica and Nicaragua. Although definitely meatless, the name translates to “spotted rooster” and is thought to reflect the speckled appearance of the dish. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 3-4 - 3 cups cooked rice - 2 cups cooked black beans - 2 tablespoons coconut oil or grape seed oil - 1 onion, finely chopped - 1 red pepper, finely chopped - 2/­­3 cup corn kernels (fresh or frozen) - 2 cloves of garlic, minced - 1 teaspoon ground cumin - 1 teaspoon ground coriander -  1/­­2 teaspoon ground ginger - 1 tablespoon vegetarian Worcestershire Sauce - 1 tablespoon soy sauce - 1 tablespoon Costa Rican Lizano sauce or salsa - several grinds salt and pepper Serve with (optional): - fresh cilantro - 1 egg per person, sunny-side up - corn tortillas, 1-2 per person Heat oil in large skillet over medium heat. Add onion and sauté until softened and translucent. Add pepper, sauté 1-2 minutes. Add corn and garlic. Add spices and sauces and mix thoroughly. Stir in rice and beans until mixture is heated through and well combined. Add salt and pepper to taste. In a separate skillet, fry one egg per person. Serve warm topped with an egg, and garnished with plenty of cilantro and additional sauces to taste. The post Gallo Pinto appeared first on Meatless Monday.

The Best Plant-Based Egg Replacers for Baking

March 1 2020 Meatless Monday 

The Best Plant-Based Egg Replacers for BakingEggs play a crucial role in many of our favorite baked goods, giving structure to cakes, color to cookies, and thickness to sauces and custards. But like other forms of intensive livestock farming, egg production also takes a toll on the health of the environment, contributing to greenhouse gas emissions, ozone depletion, and contamination of soil and water. Plant-based egg replacers are designed to give us all that we love about eggs without the environmental baggage. But, please remember that every plant-based egg alternative wont work in every application, so look for plant-based baking recipes or do some experimenting and find out what works for you -- and then share the love and post it on social with #MeatlessMonday! Aquafaba Aquafaba is a fancy term for chickpea juice. Drain a can of chickpeas into a bowl and whip up the liquid as you would egg whites. Replace one egg with a quarter-cup of aquafaba to make plant-based meringues and mousses. Check out this guide to aquafaba from Minimalist Baker . Bananas The substitution for this one is easy: Use 1/­­4 cup ripe banana in place of one whole egg. This swap works best in denser baked goods like muffins and pound cake, but be prepared for a subtle banana flavor. You can use apple sauce for a milder flavor. Chia Seeds Chia eggs are made by combing 1-tablespoon chia seed (or ground chia) and 3-tablespoons water (equals one egg), and letting the mixture sit for 5 minutes. Chia seeds will darken baked goods, making them ideal for brownies, muffins, and cookies. Flaxseed Minimal effort is required to make a flaxseed egg. Simply use the same ratio as chia seeds -- 1-tablespoon flaxseed to 3-tablespoons water to make one flax egg-- and let sit for around 5 minutes. A flaxseed eggs can be used to replace traditional eggs in pancakes, quick breads, brownies, and muffins. Silken Tofu Want moister baked goods with a bit of extra protein? Swap out an egg for a quarter-cup of silken tofu when making muffins, cakes, and quick breads. Best for baking with recipes that already have a leavening agent, like baking powder or baking soda. Vegan Egg Replacements Many supermarkets and online stores now offer a variety plant-based products developed specifically to function as vegan egg replacers. Some popular brands are Follow Your Heart , Bobs Red Mill , and JUST . Check out your local grocery store, online store, or natural foods market to see what options they offer that meet your baking needs.   Share your plant-based egg baking successes and let us know your tips. Tag @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday. Need some #inspo? Check out this Blackberry Bran Muffin recipe from the Meatless Monday recipe gallery . The post The Best Plant-Based Egg Replacers for Baking appeared first on Meatless Monday.

rava uttapam recipe | instant suji uttapam recipe | sooji uttapam

February 24 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

rava uttapam recipe | instant suji uttapam recipe | sooji uttapamrava uttapam recipe | instant suji uttapam recipe | sooji uttapam with step by step photo and video recipe. uttapam recipes are the traditional dosa variety from the popular south indian morning breakfast cuisine. it is typically made with specific dosa batter or idli batter which includes batter grounding and batter fermentation. but there are some cheat version of it which is made instantly without the overnight hassle and rava uttapam recipe is one such popular variation. The post rava uttapam recipe | instant suji uttapam recipe | sooji uttapam appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste Buds

February 17 2020 Meatless Monday 

Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste BudsUnder-seasoned food tastes of...disappointment, but you can effortlessly breathe new life into your meals with the addition of a few key seasonings and spice blends. Spices instantly elevate the subtle flavors of vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and plant-based proteins without piling on extra calories (or dirty dishes in the sink). From sea salt to shichimi togarashi, weve got the 10 spices that you need to add to your spice rack. Adobo (all-purpose seasoning) Adobo is the ultimate all-purpose seasoning, and, although its traditionally used with animal proteins, its salty-garlicy flavor can give that same savoriness to any number of plant-based dishes -- from crispy tofu to vegetarian stews. Adobo seasonings vary in their composition, but they generally include a blend of granulated garlic, salt, oregano, black pepper, and turmeric. Ancho Chile Ancho chile, known as a poblano when fresh, has a deep, smoky, slightly sweet flavor comparable to a spicy chocolate-covered raisin. Its mild-to-medium heat makes it an appropriate addition to moles, enchilada sauce, soup, traditional chili, or even pasta. Black Peppercorns (in pepper mill) Pre-ground black pepper tastes vapid and boring compared to the fresh stuff; thankfully, many spice brands offer miniature grinders complete with whole peppercorns ready to be crushed. A couple rotations of the pepper mill adds a sharp, citrusy flavor, floral-like aroma, and crunchy texture to the tops of salads, soups, pastas, and these delicious tempeh fajitas.  Cumin The fragrant seed is a member of the parsley family, but its often sold as a powder rather than in its whole form. Cumin is aromatic and complex and can add a powerful smoky flavor to black bean burgers, curried potatoes, vegetarian chili, and lentil soups. Just remember to use this strong spice sparingly. Curry Powder Curry Powder is a mixture of different seasonings that differs slightly based on what brand you buy. That being said, many contain some combination of coriander, mustard, cumin, fenugreek, cayenne, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, and turmeric, which gives curry powder its iconic yellow-orange color. Add some to roasted vegetables, blend into hummus, sprinkle on popcorn, or use as the base of this Thai tofu pumpkin curry. Everything Bagel Available at Trader Joes and a spattering of other retailers, the Everything Bagel spice blend is the ultimate compliment to any roasted potato or sautéed vegetable. Add some to a tahini dressing or sprinkle some on an avocado half with a squeeze of lemon and a squirt of sriracha. The spice mixture is a combination of all the wonderful bits youd find on the outside of an everything bagel: sesame seeds, sea salt, dried minced garlic, onion, and poppy seeds.  Red Pepper Flake Although it probably already exists somewhere on your spice rack, the raw, uncalibrated heat of red pepper flake brings a brutish pop to roasted cruciferous vegetables and elegant pastas. Sea Salt Dont roll your eyes just yet. In terms of utility in a dish, sea salt offers the same taste-enhancing qualities as traditional table salt, but when it comes to look, flavor, and texture, sea salt is in an ocean of its own. Its slightly richer flavor and crunch make it a natural fit for both savory entrees and desserts. Shichimi Togarashi Adorning the table of many ramen soup shops, shichimi togarashi is a complex spice blend that includes a combination of red chile pepper, orange peel, sesame seeds, Japanese pepper, ginger, and seaweed. Sprinkle this on literally anything -- noodles, fried rice, stir-fried tofu, soups, marinades, rubs, dressings, tempuras, roasted vegetables, etc. -- to instantly add a flurry diverse flavors and tastes. Star Anise Star anise is often sold in its ornamental whole form, but its much easier to incorporate into dishes as a powder. Its flavor is somewhere between licorice, cinnamon, and clove. Try adding it to broths, chutneys, mulled wine, or desserts, like this warm cranberry poached pear.  Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste Buds appeared first on Meatless Monday.

besan ladoo recipe | besan ke laddu | besan ke ladoo | besan laddu recipe

January 24 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

besan ladoo recipe | besan ke laddu | besan ke ladoo | besan laddu recipebesan ladoo recipe | besan ke laddu | besan ke ladoo | besan laddu recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. ladoo recipes are a traditional indian sweets made for a particular reasons. each region and state of india has its own unique variations to these generic ladoos which differ with ingredients. yet there are some common laddu recipes made across india without any alterarions to it, and besan ladoo is one such recipe. The post besan ladoo recipe | besan ke laddu | besan ke ladoo | besan laddu recipe appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry?

January 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry?A properly-stocked pantry is essential for creating delicious plant-based dishes on the fly. But what does properly-stocked really mean? Sure, you need the basics -- olive oil, white flour, rice, pasta, etc., but there are some additional ingredients that you should consider adding to your collection. Alternative flours, exotic spices, seeds, nut butters, beans (butter beans will change your life), broths, and grains can all add extra levels of depth, dimension, and texture to any variety of plant-based dishes.   Youll likely be familiar with many of the items on this list, but there are also a few lesser known ingredients -- agar-agar, tahini, nutritional yeast, etc. -- which can be used to replace many traditional animal-based ingredients. So, grab a paper and pen, and make sure these items are on next weeks shopping list. Agar-Agar The perfect vegan gelatin replacement for your puddings, jellies, or gelées, agar-agar flakes are derived from seaweed and function similarly to animal-based gelatins. Alternative Flours Were not talking your run of the mill (went there) all-purpose, bleached white flour. Play around with some alternative flours like almond, chickpea, rice, or buckwheat. Many alternative flours are also gluten-free. Beans (canned) Explore the world of beans, and reap the benefits of a healthy, satisfying plant-based protein. Lentils, black beans, butter beans, kidney beans, chickpeas -- doesnt matter; theyre all easy to use, shelf-stable, healthy, and inexpensive. Broth A box of vegetable broth is a staple of any kitchen, but you can expand your soup selection by adding some chickn bouillon cubes to your pantry. Coconut Oil A shelf-stable saturated fat, coconut oil is a healthy alternative to other vegetable oils. In most cases it can be substituted 1:1 for other oils and butters. Its got a laundry list of benefits that range from weight loss to improved cognitive functioning. Chocolate All vegetables and no sweets make everyone hangry. A little bit of chocolate can go a long way in baking as well as a post-dinner night cap. If youre feeling adventurous try some exotic bars that contain a higher percentage of cacao. Diced Tomatoes (canned) Take a simple stew, stir-fry, or sauce to the next level with a can of diced tomatoes. Theyre every home cooks secret weapon. Tip: fire-roasted tomatoes add even more flavor to your meals. Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Toss them into a blender, soup pot or sauté pan to add some inexpensive nutrients and heft to your mid-week meals. Grains Theres an endless variety of grains available for your experimenting pleasure. Whole grains are best (think brown rice), but theres also a number of lesser-known grains that have their own unique texture and flavor profile. Try getting a bag of quinoa, amaranth, or farro and simply follow the cooking instructions on the back. Granola You can make your own or buy it for cheap at the store, but theres truly an endless combination of potential granola mixes. Bring it in a baggy as a post-lunch snack or use it to top your morning yogurt. Nut Butter High in protein and healthy fats, nut butters can add complexity to savory dishes and a nutty richness to sweets. Keep a range on hand -- almond, cashew, pistachio -- to add variety to baked goods, sandwiches, and sauces. Nutritional Yeast Just trust us with this one; we swear it tastes almost exactly like Parmesan cheese. Sprinkle on pasta, popcorn or use in macaroni and cheese if youre looking to cut out the dairy or need a boost of umami flavor. Olives Olives, especially the sliced green ones in a jar, add the perfect pop of brininess to pastas, rice bowls, and stews. Theyre a great value and can seriously elevate the flavor of ordinary dishes.  Pasta Thankfully, pasta has evolved to incorporate more alternative flours into its base. Now, you can get high-fiber, high-protein pasta made of anything from lentils to chickpeas to black beans. Pesto It is one of the most versatile condiments/­­sauces out there. A jar of pesto can last unopened in your pantry for months, and it can be your saving grace if you need to whip something up in a hurry. Add some to roasted vegetables or use it to top a tomato soup. Seaweed Snacks Low in calories and nutritionally-dense, seaweed is the ultimate snack food. Oh, and cats love it too. Spices Well, this one goes without saying, but having a pantry (or cupboard) thats properly stocked with all your necessary spices will make cooking (and eating) a whole lot more enjoyable. Some lesser known spices to add are aamchur (unripe mango), star anise, zaatar, or Aleppo pepper. Seeds Seeds are powerhouses of nutrition, texture, and flavor, and there are so many different varieties to choose from -- chia, flax, hemp, sesame, sunflower. Make chia pudding, a flax egg, or toss some hemp or sunflower seeds into your next salad or smoothie. Soy Sauce Umami in a bottle, soy sauce adds an earthy meatiness to dressings, sauces, and stir-fries. Some chefs even recommend adding a dash to tomato sauce for a boost of richness. Tahini You know it from every hummus youve ever eaten, but what might surprise you is that tahini paste is made entirely from pulverized sesame seeds. Combine a tablespoon of tahini with a dash of water, a sprinkle of cumin, and some salt for a quick and creamy dressing for salad or roasted vegetables.   If you decide to make one of these delicious recipes, let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry? appeared first on Meatless Monday.

The 10 Best Vegan Restaurants Worldwide – January 2020

December 31 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

All these establishments are 100% pure vegan eateries which have at least seven or more five star dining reviews on HappyCow. From a list that’s updated daily based on reviews and ratings by HappyCow users worldwide, here are the top-rated restaurants around the globe! Shift Eatery – in Surry Hills, Australia (NSW) With house-made meats, cheeses, and sauces – all vegan – you’ll find all of your deli needs here. Additionally, you have your pick from coffee, smoothies, toasties, and more; so be sure to swing by Shift. Saido – in Tokyo, Japan Saido’s website states:  “Please enjoy the world of ‘junk’ vegan Japanese food based on the concept of gastronomic origin, which you will meet for the first time in Nanado.” With noodles, bowls, snacks and fried foods that you’re sure to love, it’s worth the trip in to Tokyo. Vegan Beat – in Athens, Greece How do you make a visit to Greece even better? Stop for lunch at a vegan restaurant! Vegan Beat offers wraps, burgers, salads, juices, among other items – so you can fill up but maintain a lightness necessary to continue your days of tourist traipesing. AtayaCaffe – in Berlin, Germany Blending traditional, bold Senegalese cuisine “with the depth and elegance of Italian gastronomy.” Ataya […] The post The 10 Best Vegan Restaurants Worldwide – January 2020 appeared first on HappyCow.

Anja Schwartz Rothe

December 15 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Anja Schwartz Rothe Anja Schwartz Rothe is an herbalist, gardener, medicine maker, and writer, based in New Yorks Hudson Valley. Anja is the alchemist behind Fat of the Land, a small batch herbal apothecary with a focus on cultivating connection to self, environment, and the cycles by which we live. We interviewed Anja about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, her work and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? A nice balance of both! I need to exist inside a structured, but flexible container. A little bit of routine allows me to make the most of my time, while feeling free and inspired. -- Do your routines change with the seasons? Definitely, it is one of the biggest factors that informs the way I live – acknowledging the seasonal shifts within and without and using that information to alter how I show up to take care of myself. -- What do your mornings look like? I dont like alarms, so I usually wake up naturally, somewhere between 6:30 and 8, depending on the time of year. Then I drink a bunch of water, sometimes with lemon and sometimes not. I try to get out in nature almost immediately. I live right next to a bird sanctuary on the Hudson River, so I bring a hot bevvie and do a long walk there. I always leave my phone at the house so I have a chance to really check in with myself, do some breathing, and connect before the day starts. After that, its breakfast and usually emails. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I usually wash my face and do some facial gua sha. Its so relaxing and helps me unwind. Then, I have little ritual of turning down the house, where I close the curtains, turn off the lights, and say goodnight to everything. It sounds like a small detail, but its a gesture I really like, acknowledging the animacy of the home energies, thanking them, and setting it all to rest for the day. In my bedroom, I try to keep good sleep hygiene, which for me means low technology and minimal artificial lighting. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice? Honestly, I think my whole life is a mindfulness practice. Isnt that what mindfulness is all about, practicing showing up in the mundane of the day-to-day in the fullest capacity? Sustenance -- Describe your typical or favorite meal for each of these: Breakfast – Usually some combination of eggs and ferments. In the summer, hard-boiled with smoked salmon and sauerkraut. Right now, Im on a scallion and ginger congee kick – a simple Chinese rice porridge served with a soft boiled egg and miso. Its so good. Lunch – Sometimes an open-face sandwich or leftovers from the night before. Lately, Ive been working through lunch and having an early dinner. Snack – Fruit and chocolate. Its apples, pears, and citrus right now. Dinner – Currently: soup and sourdough bread with lots of ghee. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I make myself a matcha latte with oat milk and a couple droppers of our brain tincture almost every day. On weekends, I might have a cup of coffee and I sometimes do a mushroom tea/­­dandy blend/­­cacao mixture as an afternoon pick me up. I really try not to have too much caffeine though, it makes me a bit of a mess and dehydrates me way too much, always trying to find that balance. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your basket? Its pretty broken up between farmers markets, the local food shop, and the co-op in the next city over. In the summer, primarily farmers markets for that good good fruit and veg. Right now, my staples are eggs, potatoes, citrus, oatly, broccoli, and cauliflower. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? Definitely. I like to keep my kitchen stocked with what I call hippie treats and lots of fruit. I dont buy a lot of packaged food, which means if I want to have sweets in the house I have to prepare them myself. I love baking, and will usually make a treat at least once a week – recently, its been sticky apple ginger date cake and berry crisps from a stocked freezer of gleaned summer berries. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do, but with much variability. In the past, I’ve been really into running, yoga, and rock climbing — and these things come back in waves. In the summer, I’m cycling a lot, and right now I’m getting back into my ephemeral winter gym flow. Sometimes, my exercise is just doing squats in the kitchen while waiting for the kettle to boil. Thats actually my favorite kind. Beauty -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I definitely subscribe to the less is more skincare model. I wash with just warm water, am very liberal with hydrosols, and then use a serum and/­­or balm. I make all my own hydrosols in my garden during the summer and offer some of them in the apothecary. Im currently really loving Dragon Balm by Apis Apotheca, a farm and skincare line run by my friend Aviva, who really knows her shit. Most days I also do a quick little gua sha facial massage afterwards – I always see instant results and it feels too good. -- Do you have any beauty tricks that you’ve found to be especially useful? Drinking lots of water and herbal infusions. My present go-to is nettle, raspberry leaf, goji berry, and fresh ginger root. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress? Big Calm tincture in every pocket, purse, and drawer. I lean heavily on nervines and deep breathing. Getting outside is also really important — and socializing! -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? To be honest, I havent gotten so much as a cold in more than ten years! I owe this mostly to a naturally strong constitution, but also a pretty large emphasis on tonic, preventative medicine and lifestyle. Cooking with medicines, like infused vinegars, dank broths, and elderberry syrup, are big, but getting enough rest is the biggest. Im constantly doing micro check-ins throughout the day to see how I can best give myself what I need to prevent burnout, fatigue, and illness. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? Theyre so fluid in my life. I enjoy the hell out of the work I do, and I’d probably be doing most of it even if it wasnt my job, but Im also pretty good at allowing myself to turn off when I’m tired and not place undue expectations on myself all the time. I find allowing myself to take frequent mini vacations is the most helpful — getting out of my environment is the only thing that really turns off my work brain, plus it brings in a fresh influx of new inspiration and perspective. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming an herbalist? My first job in high school was at the local health food store. There were a couple older women who worked there and would walk me through the vitamin and bulk aisles, teaching me all about the different herbs and supplements. This was a sort of epiphany for me, viewing plants in this way. I then studied anthropology in university, focusing mostly on traditional sustenance and healing practices. After finishing school, I knew I needed to immerse myself in plant medicine, so I enrolled in an herbal medicine program in Appalachia. -- How do you approach foraging the ingredients for your apothecary and seasonal wellness boxes? Do you have a plan in mind for each season or is it more about going with the flow? I definitely have a plan in mind, but I usually have to surrender it while remaining open to new inspiration. It can be a challenge to have expectations for a season, nature doesnt really work that way, and thats been both a constant source of inspiration for me, as well as a lesson in boundaries and respect. I could be inspired to make one thing, but if its not a particularly fecund year for a certain plant, I have to cede to that. Making things from intuition and by listening to the seasons and cycles is probably not the best business model, but its the only way I want to work with plant medicine. -- What are some offerings youre working on currently? Im getting ready to re-release a little book I wrote last year, Always Coming Home: a guide to seasonal wellness, with some edits and new content. Im also refining the 2020 Seasonal Wellness Box subscription that will soon be available. -- How were you able to grow a business with your interests and loves in mind? Its been a very slow chipping away for me to remain really clear on the things that matter and the things that dont in growing my business. It turns out, remaining true to creating medicine that is intimate, small batch, and well cared for is much more important than being able to mass produce things or being on every shelf in the country. I want my values to be foremost and my business to be second. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Going full hibernation this January. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Put my legs up the wall, get a massage, go hiking with a friend, sweat, travel, in the summer I go swimming multiple times of day in various bodies of running water, thats my favorite. -- We love the Catskills so much. What are some of your favorite places to visit in the area? Montgomery Place farm stand for all your fruit and veg needs, there are so many great trails in the mountains, Colgate Lake for a swim, Talbott and Arding picnic at the Saugerties lighthouse for lunch and Lil Debs Oasis for dinner. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Im reading The Overstory by Richard Powers right now, and it is SO GOOD. A vignette of short stories written about trees and so much more. Song/­­Album – Hildegard von Bingen forever. Movie – Fantastic Fungi! Just saw and highly recommend, mushrooms will save the world. Piece of Art – All things Andrew Wyeth. Photos by Jenn Morse, Gabrielle Greenberg and Anja herself. The post Anja Schwartz Rothe appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Joy Bauer’s Tips for Getting Kids to Eat More Vegetables

December 9 2019 Meatless Monday 

Joy Bauer’s Tips for Getting Kids to Eat More VegetablesEvery parents predicament: How do I get my children to eat more vegetables? Although theres no secret sauce (sorry ketchup), there are tried and true methods to get your kids to eat more adventurously. But what are they? The team at Meatless Monday spoke with Joy Bauer, bestselling author and health and nutrition expert on The Today Show, about her new book, Yummy Yoga: Playful Poses and Tasty Treats , and her creative ways to encourage kids to eat healthier. Yummy Yoga pairs healthy, kid-friendly recipes with fun yoga positions, giving the whole family the opportunity to get in the kitchen and on the yoga mat. But what sets this book apart is the collection of adorable yoga sculptures made out of fruits and vegetables that accompany each recipe (warning: they definitely encourage playing with your food). To celebrate the launch of her book, Joy shared with us some easy-to-apply tips and tricks that will spark a passion for veggies in even the pickiest of eaters. This Monday, follow Joys words of wisdom and help your kids establish a loving relationship with plant-based foods. Tip # 1: Make Healthy Food Fun The key to encouraging kids to eat healthfully is to make food fun and exciting. Thats the whole point of Yummy Yoga. The pages are filled with tasty, kid-friendly recipes -- smoothies, fruit skewers, veggie pizzas, super food ice pops, etc. -- and playful yoga poses to entertain and excite little ones as they discover healthy, new habits.   Tip #2: Eat More Produce Yourself Kiddie see, kiddie do. If your little ones (and big ones) see you eating a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, theyre more likely to do it, too. A study from the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, found that preschool age kids were more likely to eat bell peppers (and prefer them in the future) after being shown a video of people eating the veggie compared to kids who didnt see the veggie video. Encourage your children to eat more fruit and vegetables by enjoying them yourself, and by pointing out other people (grandparents, siblings, cousins, friends, babysitters, and so on) who enjoy them, too!   Tip #3: Think Out of the Box If a picky spouse or child doesnt like steamed broccoli, dont give up. Instead, try another spin. Whip up a batch of Broccomole Dip (I mash steamed broccoli florets into guacamole), Roasted Broccoli , Creamy Broccoli Soup , Broccoli Tots , or top it with cheese sauce or marinara...you get the idea. Be creative and experiment until you find a recipe that your picky eater does like.   Tip #4: Give Them the Power of Choice Give picky eaters the power to choose--a fun recipe, a new fruit or a veggie to prepare as a side dish, or even the theme of the meal. Its a simple equation that will make mealtimes less fraught: more freedom = less fussing. When you involve picky eaters with planning and prep a few nights each week, youll find theyre less likely to argue about finishing their veggies. Good food, good mood...sounds appetizing, right?   Tip #5: When in Doubt, Hide it Sometimes, its easier to just slip veggies into their favorite foods. You can add a handful of kale or spinach into smoothies; add chopped broccoli, diced carrots or yellow bell peppers into mac and cheese (no brainer!); swap out standard noodles for veggie noodles, like spaghetti squash or zucchini linguini (aka zoodles); mix cauliflower rice with traditional rice; blend canned pumpkin puree into marinara sauce and taco meat -- the options are limitless!   Tip #6: Try it on a Monday Monday follows the weekend, which is when most people do their shopping and prep work-the veggies have been purchased, cleaned, peeled and chopped. Plus, its the perfect way to reset and reboot for a healthy and energizing new week ahead. Try Joy’s recipe for Heart-y Artichokes, Green Beans, and Leeks from the book and check out Yummy Yoga for more delicious recipes!   Want some more plant-based cooking tips for you and your picky eaters? Check out The Kids Cook Monday for more recipe inspiration and fun kitchen activities for you and your children to do together. The post Joy Bauer’s Tips for Getting Kids to Eat More Vegetables appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Celebrity Chef Meatless Holiday Recipes

December 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

Celebrity Chef Meatless Holiday Recipes   Meatless Monday has created our dream-team celebrity chef meatless holiday menu, featuring a plant-based take on traditional recipes created by Bobby Flay, Gordon Ramsay, Giada de Laurentiis, Martha Stewart, Rachael Ray, Jamie Oliver, Nigella Lawson and Carla Hall. From our kitchen to yours, please click the links below to enjoy these delicious, decadent, jaw dropping, and, of course, festive plant-based holiday recipes.   Appetizers Artichoke Arancini Wild Mushroom & Pomegranate Salad Cannellini & Kale Soup Sides Lemon Smashed Potatoes Persimmons & Roasted Chicories  Grilled Brussels Sprouts & Hazelnut Vinaigrette Entrees Epic Veg Lasagne Beet Wellington Stuffed Squash  Desserts  Sumptuous Chocolate Cake Deconstructed Vegan Pecan Pie Vegan Apple Pie   Interested in adding some more plant-based recipes to your repertoire? Click here for more Meatless Monday inspiration. The post Celebrity Chef Meatless Holiday Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Classic St. Patrick’s Day Dishes Made Plant-based

March 16 2020 Meatless Monday 

Classic St. Patrick’s Day Dishes Made Plant-basedFor many Americans, St. Patricks Day is a day to celebrate Irish culture -- the traditions, the people, and the cuisine. Youre likely familiar with many of the iconic dishes: shepherds pie, soda bread, braised cabbage, potatoes colcannon, corned beef, etc., but you may not be aware that many classic St. Patricks Day recipes can be made completely plant-based -- yes, even corned beef. Dont believe us? Read on to see how you can make Meatless Monday versions of your favorite St. Patricks Day dishes. Braised Cabbage Cabbage is a humble ingredient, but when gently braised it becomes nice and tender. Cook in butter (non-dairy), vegetable stock, dry wine, and apple cider vinegar for a flavorful side dish. Add a little sugar and carroway seeds for a livelier dish. For the Braised Cabbage recipe, click here. Meaty Mushroom Stew with Garlic Mashed Potatoes Straight from The Meatless Monday Cookbook , this recipe uses cremini and shiitake mushrooms and tamari to recreate the rich umami flavor iconic of traditional slow-cooked Irish stews. Pair the stew with a topping of garlic mashed potatoes and dinner is set. For the Meaty Mushroom Stew recipe, click here. Orange Cranberry Scone The scone is a welcomed reprieve from all of that rich St. Patricks Day food. This recipe is completely plant-based, utilizing coconut oil and coconut milk in place of dairy. Adding pumpkin spice, maple syrup, and orange zest to the sweet scone glaze makes this recipe perfect for any holiday. For the Orange Cranberry Scone recipe, click here.   Potatoes Colcannon A classic Irish side dish, colcannon is a marriage of creamy mashed potatoes and crispy green cabbage. Although traditional recipes call for butter and cream, colcannon can easily be made plant-based by swapping out the butter and heavy cream for plant-based alternatives. For the Potatoes Colcannon recipe, click here .   Shepherds Pie This completely plant-based version of Shepherds Pie can serve as the centerpiece of a St. Patricks Day feast. A smooth, creamy potato topping covers a hearty filling of lentils, cremini mushrooms, and diced veggies. For the Vegan Shepherds Pie recipe, click here. Soda Bread A variety of cuisines have their own version of soda bread, which gets its name from the use of sodium bicarbonate as a leavening agent rather than traditional yeast. This version uses plant-based milk and dairy-free butter to achieve a firm but delicate texture. For the Vegan Irish Soda Bread recipe, click here . Plant-based Corned Beef Yes, it is possible to make corned beef meatless. This recipe uses a seitan-substitute that is heavily spiced and mixed with a homemade beet puree. The loaf is then rubbed with spices and submerged in a slow-cooker brine with mushrooms, garlic, all spice, mustard, beet puree, and white wine vinegar. For the Vegan Corned Beef recipe, click here .   Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation.   The post Classic St. Patrick’s Day Dishes Made Plant-based appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Here’s How You Can Use Tofu to Recreate Your Favorite Comfort Foods

March 9 2020 Meatless Monday 

Here’s How You Can Use Tofu to Recreate Your Favorite Comfort FoodsInexpensive, packed with protein, and easy to store, tofu is an indispensable wonder food that you simply must have in your refrigerator at all times. Tofu is sold in different levels of firmness, which can range from silken (pillowy and custard-like) to extra firm (spongy). The less-firm varieties have higher water content, making them better for cream and dairy replacements. Tofu can also be used to boost the nutritional quality of your favorite dishes; blend a block of silken tofu into your typical roux-based cheese sauce for a plant-based protein boost, and no one will notice the difference. This Monday, experiment with tofu by incorporating this versatile ingredient into some of your favorite classic comfort foods. Our top tofu tips and hacks: o Press your tofu to remove water before cooking or marinating o Freeze and thaw tofu to achieve a texture more similar to meat o Marinate tofu with your favorite sauces, avoid oil-based marinades o Press, cube and air-fry or bake tofu with your favorite seasonings for easy and delicious toss-ins for salads, stir fry, burritos and beyond Alfredo Sauce Traditional Alfredo sauce is heavy, rich, but oh so delicious. Try using tofu for a version thats light, creamy, lower in calories, and higher in protein. Whats the secret? Just blend together silken tofu, vegetable broth, Italian seasoning, vegan butter, and a healthy amount of nutritional yeast. Liberally coat some fettuccine and enjoy. Buffalo Wings When battered, breaded, and baked, tofu becomes crisp on the outside, just like your favorite chicken wings. To make tofu wings, simply dredge extra-firm tofu blocks in cornstarch, dip them in a plant-based milk, coat in bread crumbs, seasonings and bake or air-fry until brown. You can create your own Buffalo sauce by mixing together hot sauce (Franks RedHot is the classic), butter or non-dairy butter substitute, and granulated garlic. Drooling for more? Check out this Crispy Tofu Finger recipe. Caesar Dressing No eggs or anchovies required to make this plant-based Caesar dressing . Blend together silken tofu, lemon juice and zest, garlic cloves, capers, Dijon mustard and nutritional yeast. Pour over some grilled romaine lettuce, and your first course it ready to go. Chicken Fried Tofu Chicken fried steak is a southern staple, but the technique, which involves a thinly sliced protein thats been breaded and pan-fried, can be made with tofu to produce the same crispy, comforting outcome. The recipe is straightforward : Simply drain, slice, and press tofu to remove as much moisture as possible; dip slices into a batter (use plant-based milk, flour, and some vinegar or lemon juice); and, finally, cover in your breading. Put the finished steaks on a wire cooling rack and bake, air-fry or sauté until golden and crispy. Jalapeno Poppers Ideal for game days and gatherings, the jalapeno popper has achieved mythical status as one of the ultimate appetizers. For a plant-based version , swap out the cream cheese for a tofu cream cheese -- which you can buy or easily make on your own . To make these plant-based bites, seed the jalapenos, slice down the middle, stuff with your tofu cream cheese and whatever other goodies you have available -- non-dairy cheese, scallions, chile powder -- and give them a quick roast in the oven until nice and charred, and top with some crushed potato chips for a little texture. Jamaican Jerk Tofu This is the kind of miracle dish that can convert anyone to tofu. The Jamaican jerk seasoning is sure-to-please. Its sort of like barbeque and sort of like curry, savory and sweet at the same time. The recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu is super simple: Just press and slice the tofu, submerge in the jerk marinade, and cook in a hot skillet. Lasagna Food doesnt get more comforting than lasagna. Approach this dish as you would your favorite lasagna recipe , but instead of ricotta cheese, blend together pressed tofu, nutritional yeast, garlic powder, and salt and pepper. Tofu Parmigiana   Italian night has never been easier. Press, bread, and sauté slices of tofu until their golden brown; add some tomato sauce to the bottom of a baking dish, line it with the lightly-fried tofu, top with remaining sauce, top with traditional or non-dairy mozzarella, and pop into the oven. Check out one of our favorite recipes here .   Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Here’s How You Can Use Tofu to Recreate Your Favorite Comfort Foods appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Gulab Jamun Cake

March 1 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Gulab Jamun Cake (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Gulab Jamun Cake Gulab Jamun is one of the most well-liked and popular desserts in India. Gulab Jamun has a special place in my heart as it was my very first video showcased on my YouTube channel. I never thought I would be able to parlay my passion into doing something like "Manjula's Kitchen". Gulab Jamun also happens to be a family favorite so it is always a go-to dessert I prepare. My daughter-in-law, who also loves Gulab Jamun, wanted me to try out a variation of the traditional recipe. She saw a recipe online for a Gulab Jamun cake and asked me to try making my version of this recipe. She suggested that I bake the Gulab Jamun instead of frying them, but to also try and preserve the original taste. I decided to stick with all the original ingredients for this recipe. However, I did have to experiment with the measurements of the ingredients to maintain the cake texture. Because of the delicious cardamom flavor, another name for this recipe can be "Cardamom Cake". After experimenting with this recipe for some time, I was finally satisfied with the results. I serve the Gulab Jamun cake, adding a layer of chocolate ganache and sliced nuts. You can really experiment with this recipe and make it into a version you love. The cake tastes best if you let it sit for a few hours after baking as the texture improves the longer it sits. It also has a long shelf life when kept at room temperature for several days. Enjoy this variation on a classic dessert! This recipe will serve 8. Course Dessert Cuisine Indian Keyword bake gulab jamun, Balushahi, cake, cardamom, cardamom cake, Cooking Video, delicacy, delicious, Dessert, diwali, easy cooking, Eggless, eggless cake, holi, Home Cooking, Home Made, indian donut, indian sweet, jalebi, Mithai, no frying, popular sweet, royal taste of india, saffron, Sweet, valentine Prep Time 10 minutes Cook Time 30 minutes Total Time 40 minutes Servings 8 people Equipment9 1/­­2 by 5 1/­­2 loaf pan Ingredients2 cup milk powder 1/­­2 cup all-purpose flour – plain flour or maida 1/­­2 tsp baking soda 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 1/­­2 tsp cardamom powder 1 Tbsp sugar 8 Tbsp unsalted butter 3/­­4 cup whole milk syrup1 1/­­2 cup sugar 1 cup water 1/­­4 tsp cardamom powder 1/­­4 tsp saffron thread 1 tsp lemon juice For serving1 Tbsp pistachio sliced 1/­­4 cup chocolate gnash Also need9 1/­­2 by 5 1/­­2 loaf pan InstructionsTo make Gulab Jamun Cake first mix all the dry ingredients together in a bowl. Milk powder, all-purpose flour, baking soda, baking powder, sugar and cardamom powder. Mix it well In another bowl take butter, butter should be at room temperature not melted, whip the butter until it is fluffy. About 1 minute. Now add the dry ingredients with butter and mix it well. Slowly add the milk, milk should be at room temperature, mix it for about 2 minutes, batter consistency should be like cake mx. Grease the loaf pan. Pour the Gulab Jamun batter in the pan. Pre heated the oven at 300-degree Fahrenheit. Bake the cake for about 25-30 minutes, Cake should be light brown the Gulab Jamun color, from the top and when you insert the knife in the center of cake should pulls out clean. Keep the cake aside and now make the syrup add all the ingredients for syrup, sugar, water, lemon juice, cardamom, and saffron, in a saucepan. Bring it to a boil over medium-high heat. After syrup comes to boil lower the heat to medium and let it simmer for 2 about minutes. Remove the pot from the heat. Before poring the syrup over the cake, Poke holes in the cake with a fork, several places. Pour the syrup over the cake while it is still warm in the pan. Save about 1/­­2 cup of syrup. It will look like a lot of syrup, but the cake will soak it all up. Let the cake rest for 10 minutes, then invert it onto a plate. You can garnish the Gulab Jamun Cake in a variety of different ways. I am garnishing with chocolate ganache I have done the chocolate Ganache recipe see the recipe for chocolate cake and sliced pistachios. This recipe has wonderful flavor and appeals to all ages. NotesIt also has a long shelf life and can be kept at room temperature for several days. Butter and milk should be at room temperature. Extra syrup you can use if you like to serve the cake as Gulab Jamun with the syrup. The post Gulab Jamun Cake appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

dry fruit chikki recipe | kaju badam chikki | mixed nuts chikki

February 21 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

dry fruit chikki recipe | kaju badam chikki | mixed nuts chikkidry fruit chikki recipe | kaju badam chikki | mixed nuts chikki with step by step photo and video recipe. chikki recipes are popular nut based sweet snack from the popular south indian or western indian cuisine. the most famous or the traditional one is to make with groundnuts in a jaggery sauce, but lately there has been many variations to it and has on boarded many other nuts. one such popular variation is dry fruit chikki recipe, made with myriad choice of dry fruits. The post dry fruit chikki recipe | kaju badam chikki | mixed nuts chikki appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Pithla (Besan Curry)

February 9 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Pithla (Besan Curry) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Pithla (Besan Curry) Pithla is a variation of Kadhi. Kadhi is made in many ways. In North India, Kadhi is made like a thick soup with pakoras dumplings. Another popular variation is Gujarati Kadhi, which is sweet and sour and made watery with a soup-like consistency. When first time I had gujrati Kadhi, I thought it was yogurt hot and spicy drink, and enjoyed very much, still my perception has not changed. Pithla, however, is thick in consistency. Sometimes I call this is Besan Ki Sabji. This is a quick and easy recipe to make. Pithla is made with few ingredients. It's also gluten-free and vegan. Traditionally Pithla is served garnished with hot ghee (clarified butter). Pithla is a complete and satisfying meal. I always thought that Pithla was a dish from the state of Bihar. Whenever we visited our grandparents in Bihar, we would make sure to enjoy this dish. However, I've heard from friends that Pithla is also a popular dish from the state of Maharashtra. Regardless of where this dish originates from, it is one of my favorites! My mom was from Bihar and my dad was from North India. We always lived in North India. My mom's cooking was a mix of traditional Bihari and North Indian food. For me, North Indian cooking tends to be more spicy while Bihari dishes are more simple. My mom tried to adopt elements from both Bihar and North India in her dishes. Her unique blending of the foods from these very different parts of India kept her and my dad both happy. I have fond memories of enjoying Pithla. Even today, when I visit my sisters in India, they will make sure they make the dishes we used to enjoy with our mom. Of course, Pithla was one of many dishes we enjoyed! We would gather around for lunch and reminisce about our old memories while enjoying delicious Pithla served with rice. It truly is comfort food at its best! This recipe will serve 2. Course Main Course Cuisine Indian Keyword Besan Kadhi, Bihari Kadhi, Cooking Video, Curry Recipe, Gatte Ke Kadhi, Gluten Free, Gujrati Kadhi, Homemade, Jain Food, Maharashtrian Dish, Main Dish, Mandir Food, No Garlic, No Onion, Panjabi Kadhi, Quick And Easy, Satvik Food, Swaminarayan, vegan, Veshno Cooking Prep Time 5 minutes Cook Time 10 minutes Total Time 15 minutes Servings 2 people Ingredients1 cup besan Bengal gram flour 2 Tbsp oil 1 tsp cumin jeera 1/­­2 tsp mustard seeds rai 1/­­8 tsp asafetida hing 1/­­2 tsp turmeric haldi 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder 1 tsp salt 1 1/­­2 tsp mango powder aam choor 2 Tbsp cilantro finely chopped, hara dhania 4 cup water For Garnishing2 Tbsp ghee clarified butter, this is optional 1/­­4 tap red chili powder InstructionsIn a bowl add the 1-1/­­2 cups of water slowly to besan to make a smooth batter (batter should be consistency of pancake batter or dosa batter). Open the heat on medium high, oil should be moderately hot, when you add the cumin seeds to oil seeds should crack right of way. Add cumin seeds, mustard seeds, asafetida, turmeric, and chili powder to oil, stir and turn off the heat. Add the besan batter and open the heat to medium heat. Keep whipping the batter and batter will start thickening. Add salt and keep adding the water slowly and keep mixing about 2-1/­­2 cups of water. After Pithla comes to boil besan will start splattering. Reduce the heat to low, cover the pan and let it simmer for about 5 to 8 minutes. Pithla will become thick, add chopped cilantro and mango powder mix and let it cook for 2 more minutes. Pithla should be quite thick in consistency thats why sometimes I will call Pithla Besa ki Sabji. Pithla is served hot before serving, traditionally Pithla is served garnished with hot ghee (clarified butter). And sprinkle of red chili powder. If you are vegan skip ghee, clarified butter. NotesServing suggestions: Serve Pithla with Rice, Roti, Kurkuri Bhindi. The post Pithla (Besan Curry) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

horlicks mysore pak recipe | horlicks burfi | horlicks milk powder barfi

January 21 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

horlicks mysore pak recipe | horlicks burfi | horlicks milk powder barfihorlicks mysore pak recipe | horlicks burfi | horlicks milk powder barfi with step by step photo and video recipe. south indian sweets are known for its mouth melting flavour it has to offer. typically it is due to the combination of sugar and clarified butter used in its most of the traditional recipes. to these traditional sweets, there are some adulteation to make it even better, and horlicks mysore pak is one such easy dessert recipe. The post horlicks mysore pak recipe | horlicks burfi | horlicks milk powder barfi appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Your Fool-Proof Guide to Eating More Plants in 2020…Start with Meatless Monday!

January 6 2020 Meatless Monday 

Your Fool-Proof Guide to Eating More Plants in 2020…Start with Meatless Monday!Theres no better time to commit to healthier habits than the New Year. But making a resolution is easy; keeping it, now thats the hard part. We believe going meatless on Monday should be as simple and delicious as possible. Thats why were offering up our top 20 tips for incorporating more plant-based foods into your diet. Armed with this toolbelt of tricks, techniques, pantry staples, swaps, gadgets, and apps, youll be able to approach every Meatless Monday with the confidence and culinary gusto of a seasoned gourmand. And remember, you can sign up for our Meatless Monday newsletter to receive weekly recipes, tips, articles, and food-industry updates that will help keep you focused, full, and on track.   1. Always keep an avocado on hand. Add to sandwiches instead of cheese, top your toast or bulk up a smoothie. 2. Learn to love your oven; it has a magical effect on vegetables - roast, bake or crisp! 3. Use condiments (pesto, salsa, hummus, harissa, tapenade) LIBERALLY! 4. Stock your freezer with frozen fruits, vegetables, and plant-based burgers. 5. Try different legumes (black beans, lentils, chickpeas, pigeon peas, butter beans, cannellini beans). Tip: dried legumes are very inexpensive and go a long way. 6. Go with whole grains like brown and wild rice, farro, quinoa, and bulgur. 7. Fortify your cupboard with plant-based snacks like popcorn, nuts, roasted chickpeas, dried fruit, granola, and dark chocolate. 8. Get familiar with tofu. When prepared properly (press it before cooking), its an excellent source of plant-based protein. You can also blend it into smoothies or batters. 9. Experiment with plant-based meats and burgers. Its usually pretty hard to tell the difference vs beef burgers. 10. Find a favorite nut-milk and try using it in your coffee, cereal, and recipes. There are plenty to choose from. 11. Keep coconut oil close by and use it as an alternative to butter. 12. Stock-up your spice rack. Spices from different regions of the world will add flavor and complexity to ordinary recipes and ingredients. 13. Working out? Invest in some plant-based protein powders. 14. Find fast-food and quick-service restaurants that offer up a variety of plant-based options. 15. Expand your culinary scope: Many global cuisines put greater emphasis on plant-based dishes. Look at some Indian, Thai, Mediterranean, Chinese, or Japanese cookbooks for inspiration. 16. Pump up pasta with a mix of vegetables and legumes. 17. Keep a bag of corn meal in the cupboard and use for sweet polenta, polenta fries, cornbread, and griddle cakes. 18. Invest in gadgets: Tofu press, immersion blender, juicer, spiralizer, and mandolin can add some flare to traditional vegetables. 19. Download apps for meatless eating. Happy Cow, Fork Over Knives, Vanilla Bean, and Food Monster are all great ways to find meatless options and get some recipe inspiration. 20. Catch a meatless movie like The Game Changers, What the Health, Cowspiracy, or Food Inc to learn more about the food system and plant-based eating.   Want more of tips, hacks and recipes? Follow us at @MeatlessMonday on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter! Find great plant-based recipes in our recipe gallery!   The post Your Fool-Proof Guide to Eating More Plants in 2020…Start with Meatless Monday! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

The 10 Best Vegan Restaurants Worldwide

December 31 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

All these establishments are 100% pure vegan eateries which have at least seven or more five star dining reviews on HappyCow. From a list that’s updated daily based on reviews and ratings by HappyCow users worldwide, here are the top-rated restaurants around the globe! Shift Eatery – in Surry Hills, Australia (NSW) With house-made meats, cheeses, and sauces – all vegan – you’ll find all of your deli needs here. Additionally, you have your pick from coffee, smoothies, toasties, and more; so be sure to swing by Shift. Saido – in Tokyo, Japan Saido’s website states:  “Please enjoy the world of ‘junk’ vegan Japanese food based on the concept of gastronomic origin, which you will meet for the first time in Nanado.” With noodles, bowls, snacks and fried foods that you’re sure to love, it’s worth the trip in to Tokyo. Vegan Beat – in Athens, Greece How do you make a visit to Greece even better? Stop for lunch at a vegan restaurant! Vegan Beat offers wraps, burgers, salads, juices, among other items – so you can fill up but maintain a lightness necessary to continue your days of tourist traipesing. AtayaCaffe – in Berlin, Germany Blending traditional, bold Senegalese cuisine “with the depth and elegance of Italian gastronomy.” Ataya […] The post The 10 Best Vegan Restaurants Worldwide appeared first on HappyCow.

Marzipanstollen

December 15 2019 seitan is my motor 

MarzipanstollenThis marzipanstollen is my version of the traditional German Christmas bread. Its dense and sweet and its flavour increases the longer you store it. No raisins, no candied citrus peel. The post Marzipanstollen appeared first on seitan is my motor.

eggless bread omelette recipe | vegetarian omelette | no egg omelette

December 6 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

eggless bread omelette recipe | vegetarian omelette | no egg omeletteeggless bread omelette recipe | vegetarian omelette | no egg omelette with step by step photo and video recipe. besan or the chickpea flour has become one of the integral part of inidian cuisine. it is not only used to make most of the dishes, but also used to make some mock dishes and replicate the traditional ones. one such simple and easy mock recipe is the eggless bread omelette recipe known for its similarity with the traditional one. The post eggless bread omelette recipe | vegetarian omelette | no egg omelette appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Mediterranean Spinach with Pine Nuts and Raisins

December 2 2019 VegKitchen 

Mediterranean Spinach with Pine Nuts and Raisins Spinach with pine nuts and raisins is a traditional Mediterranean side dish that’s both elegant and easy. Its mild and slightly sweet flavor provides a nice counterpoint to boldly-flavored Italian pasta dishes. But really, this Mediterranean side dish goes well with most any kind of meal, including those featuring grain dishes and curries. The post Mediterranean Spinach with Pine Nuts and Raisins appeared first on VegKitchen.


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