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thyme vegetarian recipes

Corn and Zucchini Bisque with Paprika Oil

August 31 2021 Golubka Kitchen 

Corn and Zucchini Bisque with Paprika Oil This delicate, silky bisque is all about the intersection of summer and fall. Corn and zucchini are summer epitomized, yet here we use them to help us ease into the chillier evenings and shorter days of September by making soup! The paprika oil makes for a lovely, piquant finish that balances the subtle and velvety nature of the soup. You can even adapt the technique for the paprika oil and make all kinds of other flavored oils. For example, use turmeric to make a sunny, yellow oil, or whole spices like cumin or fennel seeds, for a crunchy, toasty spiced oil. Use dried chilis or chili flakes to make a spicy oil, and so on and so forth. Hope you’re doing well and enjoying the glory of late summer! Corn and Zucchini Bisque with Paprika Oil   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1/­­4 cup olive oil, plus more for sautéing 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon maple syrup 4 ears of corn, kernels removed, cobs reserved 1 large yellow onion, diced sea salt 4-6 garlic cloves, minced 1/­­2 teaspoon dried thyme freshly ground black pepper 1/­­2 cup white wine 1 1/­­4 lb/­­570 g (about 2-3 medium) zucchini or summer squash 1/­­2 cup cashews 3 bay leaves handful of basil, plus more for garnishing Instructions Combine 1/­­4 cup olive oil and the paprika in a small saucepan, bring to a slight shimmer over medium heat, whisking to combine. Once shimmering, turn off the heat and stir in the maple syrup. Let the oil sit and infuse while making the soup. The paprika will settle to the bottom, and you will be left with a beautiful, red oil. Reserve 1/­­4 cup of the raw corn kernels, set aside for now. Heat a large pot over medium heat, add enough olive oil to coat the bottom. Add the rest of the corn kernels, onion, and a pinch of salt. Saute until the onion is translucent and the corn is bright yellow, about 7 minutes. Add the garlic, thyme, and black pepper to taste, saute for 1 more minute, until fragrant. Add the wine, bring it up to a simmer and let reduce for 5 minutes. Add the reserved corn cobs (not kernels!), zucchini/­­summer squash, cashews, bay leaves, 6 cups of water, and more salt to taste. Increase the heat to high, cover the pot, and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and simmer, covered, for 15 minutes. Remove and discard the corn cobs and bay leaves. Transfer the contents of the pot to an upright blender, along with the basil, blend on high until smooth. You will likely need to do this in batches. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Return the blended soup back to the pot. Serve the soup warm, garnished with the reserved raw corn kernels and basil, and drizzled with the paprika oil. 3.5.3226 The post Corn and Zucchini Bisque with Paprika Oil appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Yellow Squash and Corn Casserole

July 25 2021 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

Vegan Yellow Squash and Corn Casserole Golden slices of summer squash and kernels of corn are baked in a creamy sauce and topped with bread crumbs in this Southern-style vegan squash casserole. It’s the perfect summer side dish. Hi, my name is Susan, and I’m a vegan. It’s been so long since I updated this blog that I only half-humorously feel like I need to introduce myself again. For those of you who don’t know me, you can find my real introduction on my About page. For those who do know me and worried that I had fallen off the planet, I’m happy to report that I’m alive and well and now living in Louisiana.  My husband and I had been thinking of moving back to our home state to be closer to family, but when the pandemic hit, we put that idea on hold. So we hadn’t been actively looking for a house when, in January, we practically stumbled on the perfect house just a mile from my parents. Of course, there were complications–someone else had a contract on it–but when that contract fell through, we had to act fast to make sure it didn’t get away from us. Since we hadn’t really been expecting to move, we had a lot of packing up and cleaning out to get 21 years of accumulated junk out of our old house and a bunch of repairs, painting, and sprucing up the yard to get that house ready to sell. It all seems in retrospect to have happened so quickly–all except the unpacking. It took months of emptying boxes, but we’re finally settled into our house in the country. And we love it! The boxes have been recycled, the ancient stove and dishwasher have been replaced, and I’m starting to feel like my old self again, the self that likes cooking food and writing about it. The thing I love most about the move is that I get to spend more time with my parents. After living in other states for the past 30+ years, it’s a joy to be able to get to know them all over again. It was with that family connection in mind that I chose this squash and corn casserole as my first “coming back home” recipe. Its based on the squash casserole my mother often made when I was growing up. I’d always considered it her recipe, but she says she got it from my grandmother. I’m happy to put my own twist on it and hopefully pass it down to my daughter for further adaptation. In its original incarnation, it was made with canned creamed corn. In my updated vegan version, I created a cream using frozen organic corn, vegetable broth, and nutritional yeast and herbs for added flavor.  How to Make the Best Squash Casserole Squash casseroles are a great way to use up some of the abundance of summer squash. You can even make them with zucchini or patty pan squash instead of the traditional yellow squash. While it’s a fairly simple dish, there are a few things you need to know to be sure that it comes out perfect every time: - First, and most importantly, you need to pre-cook the squash before mixing it in with the other ingredients and baking it. If you don’t cook it first, the squash will exude all of its moisture into the dish and your casserole will be watery. You also would have to bake it longer, heating up your summer kitchen for longer than is necessary. I prefer to sauté the squash and onion first (without oil), which not only cooks them but also adds flavor. - The creamed corn you buy in cans doesn’t usually contain any cream and is often completely vegan. But I like to make my own with organic corn and add creaminess and flavor to it by including cashews or tofu. Use the cashews if you can, but if they are too high in fat for your diet, light silken tofu or even regular tofu makes an acceptable substitute. - If you’re using the cashews and don’t have a high-speed blender, soak them first in water for a couple of hours and drain them completely before blending. - Seasoned panko makes the best casserole topping; look for an oil-free brand (Whole Foods makes one) or use gluten-free panko or bread crumbs instead. But feel free to omit the topping if you want. Im happy to report that the vegan squash and corn casserole was a big hit with the family. I served it with cornbread and pink-eye peas for a southern meal befitting our new country home. Print Add to Collection Go to Collections Vegan Yellow Squash and Corn Casserole Golden slices of summer squash are baked in a creamy sauce and topped with crunchy panko bread crumbs. It's plant-based and oil-free, too! Course Side Dish, Vegetable Cuisine Southern Keyword oil-free, plant-based casserole, southern squash casserole, vegan squash casserole Allergen Gluten-Free, Nut-Free, Soy-Free Prep Time 15 minutes Cook Time 40 minutes Total Time 55 minutes Servings 6 Calories 158 kcal Author Susan Voisin Ingredients1 medium onion chopped 4 medium yellow squash sliced into 1/­­4-inch rounds 2 cloves garlic minced 1 1/­­2 cups organic frozen corn divided 3/­­4 cup vegetable broth 1/­­4 cup raw cashews or 1/­­4 cup tofu 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast 1 tablespoon cornstarch 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves 1 teaspoon salt omit or reduce for lower sodium 1/­­4 teaspoon ground black pepper Optional Topping1 cup panko (or gluten-free bread crumbs) 1/­­2 teaspoon dried basil 1/­­2 teaspoon dried oregano InstructionsUsing a non-stick skillet on medium-high heat, sauté onion for 2-3 minutes, until it begins to soften and brown on a few edges. Add squash and garlic and cook, stirring, until squash is softening. Add 1 cup corn and remove from heat. Preheat oven to 350F. Line a 1 1/­­2 to 2-quart baking dish with parchment paper or oil it lightly. Blend 1/­­2 cup corn, vegetable broth, cashews/­­tofu, salt, cornstarch, and seasonings (nutritional yeast, oregano, basil, black pepper) in a blender until smooth. TIP: If you don't think your blender will blend raw cashews, soften them first by soaking in water for 2 hours and then draining before use.) Place half the squash mixture in a single layer in the casserole dish; spoon half of the sauce over it. Repeat with remaining squash and sauce. Sprinkle the top with seasoned panko, if desired. Bake at 350 for 25-30 minutes. If the top isn't completely browned, heat it under the broiler for a minute or two but watch it carefully to make sure it doesn't burn. Serve hot. NotesFor gluten-free, use gluten-free bread crumbs or omit the topping. Nutritional Info below includes cashews and salt. When made with firm tofu instead of cashews, these are the correct values: 119 Calories 1.3g Total Fat .24g Saturated Fat WW points (Blue plan):  - With cashews and panko: 3 points - With cashews but no panko: 1 point - With tofu and panko: 2 points - With tofu and no panko: 0 points Points vary on other plans.   NutritionServing: 1 serving | Calories: 158 kcal | Carbohydrates: 24 g | Protein: 7 g | Fat: 4.35 g | Saturated Fat: 0.9 g | Trans Fat: 0 g | Cholesterol: 0 mg | Sodium: 492 mg | Potassium: 396 mg | Fiber: 3 g | Sugar: 6 g Please pin and share!   The post Vegan Yellow Squash and Corn Casserole appeared first on FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

Vegan Lentil, Apple & Pecan Stuffed Butternut Squash

February 12 2021 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Lentil, Apple & Pecan Stuffed Butternut SquashVegan Stuffed Butternut Squash with Lentil & Apple filling is a hearty and satisfying plant-based main course for any winter dinner and makes for a showstopping holiday meal! Easy to make ahead of time! Even though it’s February already I am still craving all things squash and pumpkin! And trust me, you too will love this easy Stuffed Butternut Squash recipe all fall and winter long. It’s a tasty vegan and vegetarian main dish with a flavorful stuffing made of lentils, apples, onions and pecans. It’s seasoned with plenty of spices and herbs and baked inside a halved butternut squash making for a beautiful presentation. Obviously this is a great healthy vegan meal for Christmas, Thanksgiving but really any dinner that calls for an eye-catching main. I love me a hearty and meaty main dish that is meat-free (obviously). And this lentil stuffed butternut squash is a great way to show your family and friends that plant-based recipes can be incredibly satisfying. Nobody’s gonna leave the table hungry here and we don’t compromise on flavor either. The apple, pecan and lentil filling is wonderfully savory and packed with such incredible flavor thanks to fennel seeds, sage, thyme and rosemary. Thanks to the brown lentils, the filling honestly tastes and feels a bit meaty, and sausagey which is crazy because theres not even any meat substitute in it. More Vegan Butternut Squash recipes: - Vegan Butternut Squash Stuffed Shells - Butternut Squash Carbonara - Squash & Red Lentil Curry  More Vegan Fall & Winter recipes: - Jalape?o Cornbread chili Casserole  - Pumpkin Mac and cheese Bake  - Vegan Pumpkin Sage Biscuits - Easy Pumpkin Cornbread - Pumpkin Sage pasta with Crisp Sage Continue reading: Vegan Lentil, Apple & Pecan Stuffed Butternut SquashThe post Vegan Lentil, Apple & Pecan Stuffed Butternut Squash appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Big Hugs Chickn & Rice Soup

January 25 2021 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Big Hugs Chickn & Rice Soup Serves 4-6 Call me an iconoclast but, but I prefer Chickn & Rice Soup to Chickn Noodle! Especially buttery jasmine rice. This soup has all the huggy ingredients: celery, dill, poultry seasoning with sage and thyme and, of course, garlic and onion. As it cooks your kitchen will fill up with the most nurturing aromas, like someone you love is cooking for you. And that someone, dear reader, is you. I used homemade Chickn Seitan, but you can use whatever vegan chicken you like. Or even thinly slice tofu or yuba. Just make sure to brown it nicely first. I also use some vegan butter here, for body and richness, but use all olive oil if you prefer. Its gonna be good! Recipe notes: ~ If the pot youre cooking in is wide enough, like a dutch oven, you should be able to brown the chickn in there before preparing the rest of the soup. Save yourself a dish, plus create little crispy bits that get swept up into the soup when you saute everything else. If youre using a stainless steel pot that is more tall than wide, its probably wiser to saute the chickn in a skillet and prepare the soup separately. Ingredients 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 cups chickn seitan, pulled into 1 to 2 inch pieces (8 oz) 2 tablespoons vegan butter (I used Miyokos) 1 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced 2 cups carrots, in 1/­­2 inch chunks 2 ribs celery, thinly sliced 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 teaspoon poultry seasoning 1 teaspoon salt Fresh black pepper 1/­­2 cup white jasmine rice, rinsed 8 cups broth 1/­­4 cup fresh dill, chopped, plus extra for garnish Directions Preheat a 4 quart pot over medium heat. Saute chickn in olive oil with a pinch of salt until nicely browned. Remove from pot and set aside.  Saute onion in butter with a pinch of salt for about 5 minutes, until translucent. Add carrots and celery and cook for about 5 minutes. Add garlic and saute until fragrant, about a minute, using a little extra butter if you like. Add poultry seasoning, salt and pepper and saute a minute more. Add rice and broth. Cover and bring to a boil. Once boiling, bring down to a simmer, and let cook for about 15 more minutes, until rice is cooked and carrot is tender. Stir in the chickn and dill and taste for salt and pepper. This definitely tastes better the longer you let it sit, but it can be enjoyed right away, too. Garnish with extra dill and serve!

Cast Iron Seitan Steak & Onions

December 30 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Cast Iron Seitan Steak & Onions Serves 2 to 4 If youre from Brooklyn — and youre probably not even though you say you are — then you celebrate with steak. Everyone knows this from every movie. Cavernous steakhouses that date back to the last, last century lurking all over the city, tucked under bridges or beside a forgotten waterway, with their historical plaques, creaky wood floors, and signed Frank Sinatra portraits on the wall.  Well, 2020 is over and its time to celebrate Brooklyn style. Whether its a night of somber reflection or one of dancing and drinking (in your own home with only your household members and/­­or just your cat) this recipe works. Its a visceral activity unto itself, injected with whatever meaning you need it to have.  Basically, youll work a pliable ball of gluten until its goth red and gristle-y. Then you roll and pound it. Throw it into a hissing cast iron pan to sear. Smoke. Fire. Sizzles. Who needs fireworks? I was striving for something that could come together in one pot. I like baking seitan, but it does tend to dry things out and I wanted this to be juicy (pronounced JUSAY). Enter sear/­­braise. The steaks are cooked, removed from the pan then you create a rich au jus with onions, garlic and red wine. Some miso for that savory je ne sais quoi. And the seared steaks are placed back in to cook through. The end result is some of the best seitan I have ever had! Seared and smoky, firm but tender. And totally juicy (pronounced JUSAY). Plus it comes with its own sauce, perfect for slathering. Serve with mashed potatoes or crinkle cut fries. Or anything starchy and awesome. Happy New Year.  Recipes Notes ~ I tested this recipe using tamari, but something was missing. The Braggs Liquid Aminos really upped the flavor game here, adding nuance and just kind of this steak sauce flavor that really popped. I recommend it! Not only because you get a bottle with Patricia Braggs floral hat printed on it, but its a nice ingredient to have around for when youre like This rice needs to taste more hippy. ~ Beet powder is another fabulous ingredient. It honestly doesnt have much flavor in small quantities but adds so much color! You can try to use whole beets or whatever you are going to do but I didnt try that and any adjustments to liquid and dry ingredients in this recipe will change the texture dramatically. Ive found it in stores but Amazon is evil and the most reliable place to get it.  ~ If you dont have a cast iron pan, then….wait, why dont you? Get one. You need that hot sizzle when it hits the pan and nothing else will give you that.  ~ The broth you use will affect the outcome. Make sure it isnt too salty because the sauce reduces a lot. If youre using a concentrated bullion mixed with water, that is fine, but go light with it and taste as you go to see if it needs more. ~ I used Bobs Vital Wheat Gluten. If you use a different one, results may vary. Why? Protein content, probably. Not all VWG has the same amount. They should standardize this for our vegan future. ~ I really cant see one person eating a full steak like this, so I dont know, prove me wrong. Aesthetically I wanted it to be this big, but realistically, it serves four. Ingredients For the Steaks 1 1/­­4 cups vital wheat gluten 2 tablespoon nutritional yeast 2 tablespoons beet powder 2 teaspoons lemon pepper (salt free) 1 teaspoon onion powder 1/­­2 teaspoon mild mustard powder 2/­­3 cup water at room temp 3 tablespoons Braggs liquid aminos 2 tablespoons tomato paste 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 teaspoons red wine vinegar Everything else: Olive oil for cooking 1 medium onion, sliced 4 cloves garlic, minced 1/­­2 cup dry red wine 2 tablespoons red miso 3 bay leaves Fresh black pepper 1/­­4 teaspoon dried thyme 4 cups veggie broth Fresh parsley for garnish To serve: Mashed potatoes or crinkle cut fries. Instagram seems to go gaga over crinkle cut fries. Or any potatoes, really. A baked potato would be just fine! Also a green veggie. Nothing with too much flavor because this has a lot! Directions In a large mixing bowl, combine wheat gluten flour, nutritional yeast, lemon pepper, onion powder and mustard powder. Make a well in the center. In a small bowl, mix together water, aminos, tomato paste, olive oil and vinegar until the tomato paste is incorporated.  Add wet ingredients to the well and mix until a lumpy ball forms. It will appear a bit dry. Now, use your hands (with gloves if you have them) to knead the mixture until all ingredients are incorporated and there are no dry spots. If its very cold in the kitchen, you may have a harder time kneading. Moisten your hands with warm water and keep going, it should take about 3 minutes and appear very stretchy.  Divide the ball in half with a knife. Again, if its cold, the seitan might spring back more so this process will take a big longer. On a large cutting board, flatten the dough into a kidney shape that is roughly 3/­­4 inch thick and 8 inches in length. Use a rolling pin to roll, flatten and form. Let the first one rest while you do the second one.  Let both doughs rest about 10 minutes, for the gluten to relax a bit, then repeat the rolling process. Again, its more resistant if your kitchen is very cold so you might need to let it rest one more time.  As the steaks rest the surfaces will get a little smoother, which if what you want for the sear and appearance.  Preheat the cast iron grill over medium high. It should be very hot and water should immediately evaporate. This is important because you want the steak to hiss immediately so that is sears and does not stick.  Pour in a thin layer of olive oil to coat the bottom of the pan. Add the steaks and sear until dark brown, but not burnt, about a minute and a half per side. Use a thin metal spatula to flip steaks. Once they are seared, lower the heat to medium and let them cook until somewhat firm, about 10 more minutes, flipping and pressing down on them with the spatula.  Now we are going to remove the steaks and cook the sauce in that same pan. Place steaks on a plate.  Turn heat up to medium high. Drizzle about 2 tablespoons of olive oil into the pan. Add onions and a small pinch of salt and sear the onions for about 3 minutes. Add the garlic and a little more oil if needed and cook for about 2 more minutes, stirring often.   Add the wine and stir to deglaze and reduce, about 3 minutes. Mix in the miso to dissolve. Add bay leaves, a healthy dose of fresh black pepper (1/­­2 teaspoon or so), thyme and veggie broth. Let the broth warm, reduce heat to medium. Once warm, return the steaks to the brothy pan and submerge, spooning broth and onions over. Cover the pan and let cook for about 30 minutes. The broth should be simmering this whole time, but not boiling too rapidly.  OK were almost done! Remove the cover and flip the steaks. Turn the heat up and let sauce reduce for about 15 minutes uncovered. The broth will get really boily and active. Spoon sauce over the steaks while they cook. The steaks should no longer appear submerged and the sauce should be thickened a bit and really flavorful. Taste for salt.  Let sit for 10 minutes or so before serving. Remove bay leaves and garnish with parsley.

Vegan Pumpkin Chipotle Fried Rice (Instant Pot)

November 28 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Pumpkin Chipotle Fried Rice (Instant Pot)Smoky Vegan Pumpkin Chipotle Fried Rice made within minutes using the Instant Pot! A seasonal twist on restaurant-style fried rice your whole family will love! Glutenfree soyfree Nutfree, stove top option in notes Pumpkin Chipotle Fried Rice – a seasonal twist on traditional Chinese Fried Rice Pumpkin Chipotle Fried Rice is definitely not the traditional fried rice. It’s not even fried per se as we prepare it in the Instant Pot but let me tell you, this seasonal twist is amazing. Its what I call, use up the veggies and remaining pumpkin fried rice! Its so finger-licking good, I might have made it several times even when I didnt have any pumpkin to use up! The best thing – it’s all made in the Instant Pot within just 5 minutes of cooking time and 10 minutes of natural steam release. The prep work is minimal – just remember to soak the rice before you add it to the Instant Pot to get the perfect “fluffiness”. The slight heat from the chipotle chili powder goes to well with this dish. I use a chipotle chili blend and also add some cumin and thyme to seal the deal – all spices that pair beautifully with the sweet pumpkin puree, FOR MORE VEGAN RICE DISHES CHECK OUT THESE RECIPES: - Turmeric Lemon Rice - Vegetable Carrot Fried Rice - Instant Pot Black Eyed Peas Rice Pulao - Masala Fried Rice with Turmeric Onion Raita - Peanut Sauce Fried Rice Which rice shall I use for making fried rice? Use long grain rice for making this fried rice recipe.Why? Because long-grain rice holds its shape better and stays separate when cooked. Basmati rice is my top choice but you can also go for Jasmine rice which has a delicate and light floral aroma. You can also use long grain brown rice. Pressure cook for 20 mins and use hearty veggies as otherwise they will be too soft and overcookedContinue reading: Vegan Pumpkin Chipotle Fried Rice (Instant Pot)The post Vegan Pumpkin Chipotle Fried Rice (Instant Pot) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Creamy Corn and Broccoli Soup

September 2 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Creamy Corn and Broccoli Soup Warm soups have regained their appeal over the last couple of weeks, with the changed, silvery light, cooler mornings and evenings, and earlier sunsets. This time of year is magical, as is any time when a seasonal shift is especially evident and new. The prospect of winter squash, warm drinks, and general coziness that fall brings still feels exciting, although it might be hard to believe once we’re in the depths of it. This soup has one foot in the summer, utilizing the sweetness of corn, and another in the fall, with its warmth and creaminess. We prepare a quick, flavorful broth using some aromatics, corn cobs, and spices, making sure to introduce plenty of savory ingredients to balance out the sweetness of the corn. We cook broccoli right in the broth and blitz everything up in a blender. The result is lovely, subtle, and packed with veggies. Hope you’ll give it a try! Creamy Corn and Broccoli Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients olive oil 4 ears of corn - kernels removed, cobs reserved sea salt 1 large yellow onion - diced 4 garlic cloves - minced ½ teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon dried thyme freshly ground black pepper ½ cup white wine 3 bay leaves 8 oz broccoli florets (from about 2 medium heads) ½ cup cashews chives or other herbs - for garnishing (optional) Instructions Heat a large pot over medium heat, add enough olive oil to lightly coat the bottom. Add the corn kernels and a pinch of salt. Saute until the corn is bright yellow and slightly caramelized, about 7 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl and set aside. Add more oil to coat the bottom of the pot. Add the onion and a pinch of salt, saute for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic, paprika, thyme, and black pepper to taste, saute for 1 more minute, until fragrant. Add the wine, bring it up to a simmer and let reduce for 5 minutes. Add the reserved corn cobs to the pot, along with the bay leaves, 6 cups of water, and more salt. Increase the heat to high, cover the pot, and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and simmer, covered, for 30 minutes. Remove the corn cobs and bay leaves from the broth, discard. Add the broccoli and cashews to the pot, bring it back up to a simmer, and simmer, covered, for another 5-7 minutes, until the broccoli is tender. Add about half of the sautéed corn kernels to the pot. Transfer the contents of the pot to an upright blender and blend on high until smooth. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. You might need to do this in batches. Return the blended soup back to the pot. Mix in the rest of the corn kernels. Serve the soup warm, garnished with chives or other herbs of choice and drizzled with olive oil. 3.5.3226 The post Creamy Corn and Broccoli Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Popcorn Broccoli

March 8 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Popcorn Broccoli Maybe I’m crazy, but I think that anyone would love broccoli if they tried it this way. Plain roasted broccoli has always kind of tasted like popcorn to me, and then I started adding nutritional yeast and spices to amp up the popcorn effect. I can easily eat a whole bowl of this stuff in one sitting and often make it as a snack. This broccoli also works well as a side to pretty much any meal – we love having it with rice and baked tofu or tempeh. Wondering what to do with all the leftover broccoli stems? I recently made a creamy broccoli stem soup and it turned out delicious – you can watch me make it step by step on our IG here. Also, try this broccoli stem tartare and these latkes. Happy Women’s Day and wishing you a great rest of the weekend :) Popcorn Broccoli   Print Serves: 4 as a side Ingredients 1½ lbs broccoli florets - from about 7-9 small heads of broccoli 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon onion powder (optional) ½ teaspoon dried thyme (optional) ¼ teaspoon smoked paprika (optional) pinch of red pepper flakes (optional) sea salt freshly ground black pepper 2-3 tablespoons avocado oil or olive oil Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a lined baking sheet. Put the broccoli florets on the sheet. In a small bowl, combine the nutritional yeast, garlic powder, onion powder, thyme, smoked paprika, and pepper flakes, if using. Add salt and pepper to taste. Whisk in the olive oil until smooth. Pour the spice and oil mixture over the broccoli and massage it in with your hands, making sure to coat the florets well. Alternatively, you can sprinkle all the spices right on the broccoli and drizzle the oil over top, then massage everything in. Roast the broccoli for 25-30 minutes, stirring halfway, until the florets are cooked through and charred in parts. This popcorn broccoli is best enjoyed right away. Notes If your broccoli has leaves, roast them as well, they will crisp up like kale chips. 3.5.3226 The post Popcorn Broccoli appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Mushroom Bourguignon

February 6 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom Bourguignon This Mushroom Bourguignon is one of my favorite things to cook on a winter weekend. It’s so fun to put together (makes you feel a little bit like Julia Child), it fills the house with the most incredible, cozy smells, and the result is a savory, earthy dream. My husband and I cooked this for Valentine’s Day last year, and I shared the whole process on our Instagram stories. The amount of recipe requests I got afterwards had me thinking that I should write it up for the blog. Finally sharing it a whole year later! Make this with your love or friend, or just for yourself on Valentine’s day or any other day when you’ve got some time to cozy up in the kitchen. I think you will really love it. I find that this recipe does well with some time and care – it’s not really a weeknight type of deal, and that’s truly the fun of it. For one, I highly suggest making your own mushroom, veggie and miso broth for this stew. You can use store-bought broth and your Bourguignon will still be really delicious, but the homemade broth will take it to that next, next level. This dish is all about layers of deep flavors, and the broth is a true backbone of that. Making your own broth is also not hard at all – it’s just a matter of throwing things in the pot and letting them do their own thing. When I made the Mushroom Bourguignon pictured here, I made the broth in the morning, and it was there waiting for me when I started cooking the stew later in the day. No big deal. I love that this dish is made mostly with very straightforward, common, pantry and crisper-friendly ingredients, but the flavor is so special and so much greater than the sum of its parts. These kinds of recipes are always my favorites. You can see how this Bourguignon comes together step-by-step on our Instagram stories later today. Enjoy! Mushroom Bourguignon   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the mushroom bourguignon olive oil or avocado oil 1 lb crimini or other mushrooms of choice - stemmed if necessary, sliced sea salt 20 Cipollini or pearl onions 1 yellow onion - diced 2 medium carrots - sliced 2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves - chopped ½ teaspoon smoked paprika freshly ground black pepper 5 cloves garlic - minced 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 cup red wine 3½ cups mushroom veggie broth (recipe below) or store-bought broth, plus more if needed 2 bay leaves 1½ tablespoon all-purpose flour mashed or smashed potatoes - for serving parsley - for garnish for the mushroom veggie broth 1 oz dried porcini 1 large carrot 2-3 celery ribs 1 yellow onion - skin on 1 leek - white and green parts 5 cloves of garlic - smashed handful fresh thyme 1-2 pitted dates - for deeper flavor (optional) sea salt 1 tablespoon white miso Instructions to make the mushroom bourguignon Heat a soup pot over medium heat. Add enough oil to coat the bottom of the pot, letting it heat up. Add the mushrooms and begin browning. Stir once to coat the mushrooms in the oil, then let sit completely undisturbed. Depending on the variety of mushrooms youre using, they will likely release lots of water. Wait for the water to cook off almost completely before stirring, about 10 minutes, that way the mushrooms will brown properly. Stir, add a generous pinch of salt, and let the mushrooms cook for a few more minutes. Transfer the mushrooms to a bowl and set aside until later. Wipe the bottom of the pan if necessary and add another generous pour of oil. Add the Cipollini/­­pearl onions, stir to coat in the oil and let shimmer for the undersides to brown, about 2-3 minutes. Stir to flip and let brown for another 2-3 minutes. Add the yellow onion, carrots, thyme, smoked paprika, a generous pinch of salt, and lots of of black pepper. Sauté until the vegetables are soft, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and tomato paste, and sauté for 1 more minute. Add the cooked mushrooms back to the pot and stir to incorporate with the other ingredients. Add the wine to the pot, bring it up to a simmer and let simmer and reduce for 3-5 minutes. Add the broth, bay leaves, and another pinch of salt, making sure to add enough broth to achieve a chunky stew consistency. Bring the stew up to a simmer and simmer, covered, for 1 hour, adding more broth if necessary. Discard the bay leaves at the end. Put the flour in a small bowl. Take a small ladle-full of the broth from the stew and pour over the flour. Whisk together until smooth. Pour the slurry back into the stew, mix, and let simmer for another 5 minutes for the stew to thicken. Serve the Mushroom Bourguignon over mashed or smashed potatoes, garnished with parsley. to make the mushroom veggie broth Combine all the ingredients in a large pot with at least 10 cups of purified water. Salt well. Its not necessary to include all the vegetables listed, but the more you include, the more flavorful the broth. You can also include any other ingredients that you like in your veggie broth like peppercorns, bay leaf, etc. Bring up to a boil, reduce to a simmer and simmer, covered, for about 1 hour. Put the miso in a small bowl and pour a little bit of the broth over it. Whisk together until you have a smooth paste. Pour it back into the pot with the broth and mix well. You will have leftover broth after making the bourguignon. Its delicious to sip on its own or in any other stew or soup, and it freezes very well. Notes We used crimini and white beech mushrooms for the Mushroom Bourguignon pictured here. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom Bourguignon appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Miso Kale Scalloped Potatoes

November 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Miso Kale Scalloped Potatoes Before we get into these delicious potatoes, we want to thank you for your support on our new desserts ebook! It truly means the world to see you guys enjoying it. And in case you missed it, we just released an ebook, filled with our favorite vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes that are great for the holidays and beyond. You can learn more about it and buy yours here. And these potatoes! There’s no such thing as too many ideas for carby vegetable sides in our book, and this one is so tasty. We layer thinly mandolined potatoes with silky kale and bake them in a miso-pine nut sauce, until golden and crispy on top and soft and creamy inside. The result is pure coziness. Wishing all our American friends a great holiday and a great rest of the week to everyone else

Whipped Mashed Potatoes With White Bean Gravy

November 22 2019 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Whipped Mashed Potatoes With White Bean Gravy photo by Joshua Foo, styling by me Feeds about 10 Let’s face it. The most important thing at the holiday table is going to be mashed potatoes. Hot on its heels is going to be gravy. So why mess around with anything less than the creamiest, fluffiest, lushest most dreamy taters? The secret here is twofold: Fold 1) Ingredients. Lots of cashew cream and buttery coconut oil. And fold 2) Method: whipping it all to high heaven with a hand mixer. You incorporate air, plus remove all the clumps without overmixing. No one will be able to resist these! The gravy I’ve used here is akin to a white pepper gravy. Thick and creamy with a lil’ kick. It starts with a roux (that’s toasted flour and oil to you, bub) for a deep sultry flavor and velvety thickness. It’s a really nice customizable recipe in that if you want to make it a mushroom gravy you can certainly add sautéed mushrooms before or after blending. If you want to make it a sausage gravy chop up some sausages and add them at the end. And so on! These recipes are from Superfun Times. Ingredients For the potatoes: 5 pounds russet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1 1/­­2 inch chunks 3/­­4 cup cashews, soaked in water for at least 2 hours (if you have a high speed blender soaking is not necessary) 3/­­4 cups vegetable broth, at room temp 1/­­3 cup refined coconut oil, at room temp 1/­­3 cup olive oil 1 1/­­4 teaspoons salt Fresh black pepper Thinly sliced chives for garnish, if desired For the gravy: 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium yellow, roughly chopped 4 garlic cloves, chopped 2 teaspoons dried thyme 2 teaspoons dry rubbed sage Several dashes fresh black pepper 3 cups vegetable broth, plus additional for thinning 2/­­3 cup all purpose flour 3 cups cooked navy beans (2 15-oz can, rinsed and drained) 1/­­3 cup tamari or soy sauce Salt to taste For the gravy: Directions Place potatoes in a pot and submerge in cold water by about an inch. Sprinkle about a teaspoon of salt into the water. Cover and bring to a boil. In the meantime, drain cashews and place in a blender with vegetable broth and blend until completely smooth, scraping the sides with a spatula occasionally to make sure you get everything. If you have a high speed blender this will take about a minute. In a regular blender it will take around 5 so give your blender a break every now and again. Back to the potatoes, once boiling, lower heat to a simmer, uncover and cook for about 12 minutes, until fork tender. Drain potatoes, then place back in the pot. Do a preliminary mash with a potato masher, just to get them broken up. Add half of cashew mixture, coconut and olive oil, salt and pepper and mash with a potato masher until relatively smooth and no big chunks are left. Now comes the creamiest part. Add the remaining cashew mixture, mix it it, then use a hand blender on high speed to whip the ever loving life out of them. They should become very smooth, fluffy and creamy. Taste for salt and pepper along the way, transfer to a serving bowl, garnish with chives and serve! Preheat a saucepan over medium-high heat. Sauté the onion and garlic in the oil for about 5 minutes. Add the thyme, sage and black pepper (I like a lot of black pepper in this) and cook for about 3 minutes more. While that is cooking, stir the flour into the broth until dissolved. If you have an immersion blender, then add the beans, broth mixture, and tamari to the saucepan. Blend immediately and lower the heat to medium. Stir the gravy often for about 10 minutes while it thickens. Use broth to thin as necessary.  If you are using a regular blender, add the beans, broth mixture, and tamari to the blender and blend until smooth. Transfer the onion and the other stuff from the pan to the blender. Puree again until no big chunks of onion are left. Add back to the pot and stir often over medium heat to thicken. Once the gravy thickens, reduce the heat to low. Now you can decide exactly how thick you want it by whisking in extra broth, anywhere from 1/­­2 cup to 3/­­4 cup. Cook for about 10 more minutes to let the flavors deepen, stirring occasionally, adding broth as necessary. Taste for salt. Keep gravy covered and warm until ready to serve.

Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes

November 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

This recipe comes to us from The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook by Jenn Sebestyen. Jenn says: “This recipe reminds me a bit of pot roasts from my childhood. Of course, back then, it was beef, not mushrooms, but the flavor profiles are similar and both dishes are warm comfort food that make me want to curl up on the couch with a big bowl.” Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - For the Garlic Mashed Potatoes: - 2 pounds (900 g) Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and diced -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt, or to taste - 2 tablespoons (28 g) plant-based butter or (28 ml) extra-virgin olive oil -  1/­­2 cup (120 ml) lite coconut milk, plus more as needed -  1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder, or to taste   - For the Meaty Mushroom Stew: - 2 tablespoons (28 ml) olive oil - 1 yellow onion, diced - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 2 carrots, peeled and diced - 10 ounces (280 g) sliced cremini mushrooms - 10 ounces (280 g) sliced shiitake mushrooms - 1 tablespoon (16 g) tomato paste - 2 tablespoons (28 ml) tamari, coconut aminos, or soy sauce (gluten-free, if desired) - 2 teaspoons dried thyme - 2 teaspoons dried sage - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons salt, or to taste -  1/­­4 teaspoon black pepper, or to taste - 1 1/­­2 cups (355 ml) low-sodium vegetable broth - 1 cup (130 g) frozen green peas   For the Mashed Potatoes: Add the potatoes to a large pot on the stove. Cover the potatoes with water by 2 to 3 inches (5 to 7.5 cm). Add 1/­­2 teaspoon of salt. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to low. Simmer for 15 to 20 minutes until the potatoes are tender and easily pierced with a knife. Drain and add the potatoes back to the pot. Add the butter and coconut milk. Using a potato masher, mash the potatoes until smooth. Add additional milk 1 tablespoon (15 ml) at a time if you like your mashed potatoes a thinner consistency. Add the garlic powder and additional salt to taste. Switch to a spatula or wooden spoon to stir and incorporate the seasonings well. Set aside.   For the Meaty Mushroom Stew: Meanwhile, heat the olive oil over medium heat in a large pan. Add the onion and sauté for 5 to 6 minutes until soft and translucent. Add the garlic and carrots and sauté for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the mushrooms and sauté for 8 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the tomato paste, tamari, thyme, sage, salt, pepper, and vegetable broth. Increase the heat to bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to low to simmer for 10 minutes. Add the green peas, stir to incorporate, and simmer for 1 to 2 minutes to heat through.   Serve the Meaty Mushroom Stew over the Garlic Mashed Potatoes. The post Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day

October 4 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day Happy October! Today we’ve got the coziest recipe for ushering in the first full month of fall – a cauliflower bake from Amy Chaplin’s beautiful new cookbook, Whole Food Cooking Every Day. This recipe has everything we ever want in a comforting, fall dish: mushrooms, caramelized onions, chickpeas, and hearty greens, all covered by a fluffy, almost cheesy blanket of vegan cauliflower souffle. We’ve been so excited for the release of this cookbook, being huge fans of Amy’s work. Her first book is a true bible of whole food cooking, filled with kitchen wisdom and an incredible variety of plant-forward recipes. We learned so much from that volume, like the fact that it’s best to cook beans with a sheet of kombu for better digestion and that making a curry spice blend at home is very much worth it for the unbelievable flavor. Much like Amy’s first cookbook, Whole Food Cooking Every Day is monumental and thorough, with beautiful photography woven throughout. The book is organized in a brilliant way – each chapter presents a base recipe, which is then elaborated on with different ingredient variations. The Cauliflower Bake chapter that we worked from features a recipe for a fluffy cauliflower topping, which can go over a number of different fillings. Here are some examples of other base recipe chapters: Genius Whole-Grain Porridges, Gluten-Free Breads, Simple and Healing Soups, Baked Marinated Tempeh, Seeded Crackers, Easy Cakes. Don’t all of those sound amazing? If you’re ever in the market for a trusted resource on colorful, everyday whole food cooking, look no further. We hope you’ll enjoy the cozy bake Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day   Print recipe from Whole Food Cooking Every Day by Amy Chaplin Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the cauliflower topping 1 large head (2½ lbs) cauliflower - cut into 1½ florets ½ cup raw pine nuts, cashews, or macadamia nuts 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 3 tablespoons nutritional yeast, plus more to taste ½ teaspoon fine sea salt, plus more to taste for the mushroom and onion filling 3 tablespoons extra-virgin coconut oil 1½ lbs shiitake mushrooms - stems removed and caps thinly sliced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme 3 medium onions - quartered and thinly sliced lengthwise ½ teaspoon fine sea salt, plus more to taste 6 cups (6 oz) sliced Swiss chard - tough stems removed 1½ cups cooked chickpeas (1/­­4 cup cooking liquid reserved) or 1 15 oz can (drained) 1 tablespoon tamari 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar ¼ cups filtered water if using canned chickpeas 2 teaspoons arrowroot powder 1 tablespoon filtered water freshly ground black pepper Instructions to make the cauliflower topping Set up a steamer pot with about 2 inches of filtered water in the bottom (the water shouldnt touch the bottom of the basket) and bring to a boil over high heat. Arrange the cauliflower florets in the steamer basket, cover, and steam for 10-12 minutes, until the cauliflower is cooked through but not falling apart. Remove from the heat and set aside. Put the nuts, olive oil, yeast, and salt in a high-powered blender and add the steamed cauliflower. Starting on low speed and using the tamper stick to help press the cauliflower down, blend, gradually increasing the speed to high, until completely smooth and thick; use the tamper stick to keep the mixture moving and to scrape down the sides as you go. This will take a couple of minutes. Season with more nutritional yeast and salt to taste and blend to combine. to make the mushroom and onion filling, and assemble Preheat the oven to 375°F (190° C). Warm a large skillet over medium-high heat and pour in 1 tablespoon of the oil. Add half the shiitakes and the thyme, stir to coat with oil, and cook for 10-12 minutes, stirring only every minute or two (to allow the mushrooms to brown), until the shiitakes are golden brown. Transfer to a bowl and set aside. Repeat with another tablespoon of oil and the remaining mushrooms. Wash and dry the skillet if there are blackened bits on the bottom. Add the remaining tablespoon oil to the pan, then add the onions and cook over medium heat for 8 minutes, or until beginning to brown. Cover the pan, reduce the heat to low, and cook for 10 minutes, or until the onions are soft and lightly browned. Remove the lid, add the salt, and cook uncovered for another 5 minutes, or until the onions are caramelized. Add the chard, cover, and allow to steam for 3 minutes, or until tender. Add the chickpeas, cooked mushrooms, tamari, balsamic vinegar, and chickpea cooking liquid or ¼ cup water, raise the heat, and bring to a simmer. Dissolve the arrowroot in 1 tablespoon water, stir, and drizzle into the simmering mixture, stirring constantly. When the mixture has returned to a simmer, remove from the heat and season to taste with pepper and more salt. Transfer the mixture to an 8-inch square or equivalent baking dish and smooth the surface. Spread the cauliflower topping evenly over the filling. Bake for 30 minutes, or until the filling is bubbling and the topping has begun to set. Turn on the broiler and broil the bake for 3 to 6 minutes, until the topping is golden and browning in parts. Remove from the oven and allow to sit for a few minutes before serving. Once cooled, leftovers can be stored in the fridge in an airtight container for up to 3 days. To reheat, put the bake in a baking dish, cover, and warm in a 400° F (200° C) oven until heated through. Notes Here are some modifications we made while making the recipe based on what we had on hand. It turned out delicious this way as well. - We used half shiitakes and half crimini mushrooms. Crimini take a little longer to brown but otherwise work well here. - We used sage instead of thyme and also topped the bake with some crispy fried sage. - We used coconut aminos instead of tamari - those two are pretty interchangeable. - When baking, the filling tends to bubble up and drip out of the dish, so its helpful to set the baking dish over a baking sheet, to catch the drippings and avoid a smoking oven. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Shepherd’s Pie

September 30 2019 Meatless Monday 

Theres nothing more comforting on a cool autumn day than a heaping scoopful of shepherds pie. This recipe is a blessing for those who want to recreate the decadent taste and texture of this classic dish without using any animal products. A layer of creamy mashed potatoes sits atop a rich filling of diced cremini or baby Portobello mushrooms, lentils, and vegetables. This recipe comes from Anne Hernandez, co-founder of Urban Homestead, an online magazine that focuses on holistic remedies and healthy eating, and one of the finalists of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 8 - Mashed Potato Topping - 5 Pounds Russet Potatoes peeled & cut into 1-inch cubes - 1/­­2 Tablespoon Salt - 2-4 Tablespoons Vegan Butter - 1 teaspoon Dry Mustard Powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon Pepper or to taste - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons Salt to taste   - Filling - 2 1/­­2 Tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil - 1 Medium Onion diced - 3 Cloves Garlic minced - 1 Cup Baby Portobello/­­Crimini Mushrooms diced small - 2 Tablespoons Flour - 1 teaspoon Parsley dried - 1 teaspoon Thyme dried - 1/­­2 teaspoon Rosemary dried - 1 Bay Leaf - 1 Cup Red Wine - 2 1/­­2 Tablespoons Tomato Paste - 1 1/­­2 Cups Vegetable Broth or Stock - 1 Pound Lentils cooked - 28 Ounce Frozen Mixed Vegetables - Salt & Pepper to taste   Instructions Mashed Potato Topping Cover the peeled & cubed potatoes with cold water in a large saucepan. Sprinkle with 1/­­2 Tablespoon of salt and turn the heat to high. Once the water starts to boil, partially cover with the lid, reduce the heat to low and simmer for about 10 minutes or until the potatoes are soft. Put a colander over a heat-proof bowl and drain the potatoes, reserving the potato water. Return the potatoes to the saucepan and mash with a potato masher. Stir in the dry mustard, salt, pepper, and vegan butter. Add the potato water 1/­­2 cup at a time, mixing thoroughly with each addition, until the mashed potatoes have a slightly loose consistency (but not runny). Set aside. Filling Preheat oven to 400 F. In a large oven-proof skillet, heat olive oil until shimmering over medium heat. Add the onions and cook for 2 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for a minute longer. Add the mushrooms, season all with salt & pepper, and cook for 2 more minutes. Stir the flour, parsley, thyme, and rosemary into the mushroom mixture until evenly coated for at least a minute to cook the flour. Add the wine and cooked lentils (I used Trader Joes). Cook until most of the wine is reduced and absorbed. Whisk the tomato sauce into the vegetable broth and add with the frozen vegetables and bay leaf, stirring to combine. Simmer for 5 minutes then remove from the heat. Discard the bay leaf. If youre feeding a large crowd, leave the mixture in the skillet. If youd rather split the recipe into 2 pie plates, now is the time to do it. Follow the recipe but only bake one of the pies and freeze the other for another day. Top the filling with the mashed potatoes. You can spoon it on and spread carefully as to not mix in the filling or gravy, or use a piping bag to get fancy. Bake in the pre-heated oven for 15 minutes or until the potatoes are lightly browned. Remove the pie from the oven and let it rest for 15 minutes before serving. The post Vegan Shepherd’s Pie appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Tempeh Meatballs & Spaghetti

January 7 2021 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Tempeh Meatballs & Spaghetti Serves 2 to 4 Photo By VK Rees So many of my best memories revolve around a big juicy meatball, and lots of slurpy, garlicky marinara. My grandmas dinner table with a big platter of her meatballs right in the center of it, always featuring a few burnt ones that everyone in the family tried to grab before anyone else could. My best friends mom, a beautiful Italian woman with jet black hair and catlike blue eyes, feeding me almost every night of the week. And later, when I went vegetarian, cooking tofu balls and spaghetti with my mom and sis. Even decades later, when I lived in a loft with no heat, every Sunday night my roommates and I would watch Sopranos and eat spaghetti and meatballs, made from some storebought soy sausage stuff.  Well, this recipe is none of those exactly, but its a mishmash of all those experiences. I love the texture of tempeh in meatballs, its succulent and satisfying. A few condiments and pantry spices give me the childhood flavors that I crave. Definitely double this recipe if you feel like it, and dont forget to burn a few…those are always the best loved.  The method of simmering tempeh here is one that is so useful when you want a more neutral flavor! Learn it, live it. This recipe is from Isa Does It. Ingredients For the meatballs: 16 ounces tempeh 1 cup water 1 tablespoon tamari or soy sauce 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 cloves garlic, minced 3 tablespoons ketchup 1 tablespoon dijon mustard 1/­­2 teaspoon dried oregano 1/­­2 teaspoon dried thyme 1/­­2 teaspoon salt Several dashes fresh black pepper 1/­­2 cup very finely chopped yellow onion 1 cup panko breadcrumbs Olive oil for pan frying For the rest: 8 oz spaghetti 4 cups marinara, storebought or homemade Red pepper flakes Fresh black pepper Directions Boil a pot of salted water for spaghetti.  Meanwhile, crumble tempeh in small pieces into a 2 quart pot. Submerge in a cup of water, a tablespoon soy sauce and one tablespoon olive oil. Cover and bring to a boil. Once boiling, lower heat and simmer, with the lid slightly ajar so that steam can escape, for 15 minutes. Most of the water should be absorbed. If there is excess water, drain and place tempeh in a mixing bowl and place in the freezer to cool It should take 10 minutes or so, give it a stir after 5 minutes to make it cool evenly. In the meantime, prepare your onions. Once cool, add garlic, ketchup, mustard, oregano, thyme, salt and pepper then mix well. Mix in the onions. Now add the breadcrumbs and use your hands to mix until it holds together very well. If it seems loose, add extra breadcrumbs by the tablespoon until you can form very tight, compact balls. Scoop up about golfball sized amounts and roll between your hands to form the balls. Your water should be boiling at this point, so cook the spaghetti now. When its ready, drain and toss with marinara in the pot you boiled it in. Keep covered and hot until ready to eat. Preheat a large non-stick pan (preferably cast iron) over medium heat. Coat the pan with a thin layer of olive oil. Add meatballs one by one, rolling them in the pan to coat in oil. If your pan is not big enough to fit all of the balls comfortably, then do them in two batches. Pan fry for about 10 minutes, rolling them frequently, to cook evenly.  Serve spaghetti in big bowls, with three or four meatballs each. Top with extra red pepper flakes or fresh black pepper and slurp it up!

Vegan White Beans and Kale Skillet

December 17 2020 VegKitchen 

Vegan White Beans and Kale Skillet This white bean and kale recipe makes for the perfect hearty, healthy meal. Complemented by fire-roasted tomatoes, sweet onions, and artichoke hearts, these Italian white beans are both delicious and 100% vegan.  This one skillet meal is ready in less than 20 minutes and requires minimal clean up! Just throw everything in the skillet to cook and serve it along with some warm bread. If youre craving an Italian-style recipe without leaving the house, this is the perfect recipe for you! Feel free to add extra spices, such as fresh parsley, basil, rosemary, oregano, and thyme. You may even add a couple bay leaves to the mix once youve added in the liquid.  This Italian white beans recipe is…  vegan vegetarian plant-based Italian-inspired ready in 20 minutes an easy weeknight meal How to Make White Beans and Kale Heat up the olive (or avocado) oil in a large skillet on the stove.  Add onions to the skilled and cook until they are softened. Add the garlic and sun-dried tomatoes to the skillet and cook.  Deglaze the skillet with either white wine or vegetable broth. Throw the beans, fire-roasted tomatoes, artichoke hearts, and Italian spices to the skillet.  Stir to combine […] The post Vegan White Beans and Kale Skillet appeared first on VegKitchen.

Members Only Vegan Meatloaf

October 25 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Members Only Vegan Meatloaf Serves 6 to 8-ish Autumn for Gen X means Member’s Only jackets and meatloaf This is for our elite members ONLY. Member that can handle lentils, TVP (textured vegetable protein) and seitan. And if it makes you think of Members Only jackets, that means you are over 40. So lets talk the 80s. It was a time where the only thing we were allowed to eat was meatloaf. And it was specifically this kind of meatloaf: hearty and meaty, not dry but not tooooo juicy, a smoky, sweet glaze (ok sometimes it was just ketchup), and delicately seasoned, straight off the 80s spice rack – paprika, thyme, onion and garlic. We literally had no other spices. And although this very meal was the punchline in lots of Sunday comics, who doesnt crave the hell out of this meatloaf? Its amazing in a sandwich the next day. Its the perfect accompaniment for peas and mashed potatoes. And its still as comforting as ever, which is just what we need right here and now in 2020. Recipes Notes ~ The lentils should be overcooked and bordering on mushy! Canned lentils that are drained will work just perfectly. ~ This recipe is easy, but does require some attention so that it cooks correctly. There’s about an hour and 20 minutes of baking time total. So just read the directions carefully when it comes to flipping. Basically, you’re gonna bake for a bit, flip it once, then flip it again. Then, you’re gonna unwrap it and bake for a bit. THEN you’re gonna transfer it to parchment, glaze it and bake it again. It’s easy but your eyes might GLAZE over while reading the directions. ~ I really suggest storebought breadcrumbs here because moisture content is going to be key. You can try homemade but don’t say I didn’t warn you. ~ I used Bob’s textured vegetable protein and wheat gluten. If you have a wheat and/­­or soy allergy, this isn’t the recipe for you! I love making wheat and soy-free recipes but this just isn’t one of them. If, however, you are part of a cult that believes that soy is part of the deep state, please find yourself another chef to harass. Ingredients 3/­­4 cup textured vegetable protein 2 bay leaves 1 cup overcooked brown or green lentils (see note) 1/­­2 cup vegetable broth 2 tablespoons tomato paste 3 tablespoons tamari or soy sauce 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon smoked paprika (not spicy) 1 1/­­2 teaspoons dried thyme 1 teaspoon onion powder 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­2 teaspoon black pepper 1/­­4 teaspoon salt 1 cup vital wheat gluten 3/­­4 cup grated or very finely chopped yellow onion 1/­­2 cup storebought breadcrumbs For the glaze: 1/­­3 cup tomato paste 3 tablespoons water 1/­­4 cup brown sugar 1 tablespoon smooth dijon mustard 1/­­8 teaspoon nutmeg Pinch salt Directions In a small pot, bring 3 cups of water to boil with 2 bay leaves. Turn off the heat, mix in the TVP and let it sit for about 10 minutes until soft and spongy. Pour into a fine mesh strainer and let cool. Remove bay leaves. Preheat oven to 350 F.  In a mixing bowl mash the lentils into a puree then add the vegetable broth. You can also, if you prefer, simply puree lentils with vegetable broth in a blender then add to the bowl. Mix in the tomato paste, tamari, and olive oil and beat until the tomato paste is incorporated. Add the smoked paprika, rub the dried thyme between your fingers and add along with the onion powder, garlic powder, pepper and salt.  When the TVP is cool enough, press it against the strainer to release as much moisture as possible. Add it to the mixing bowl and mix well, mushing it up to make sure it soaks up the liquid.  Lightly mix in the chopped onion and breadcrumbs. Add vital wheat gluten and use your hands to knead for about 2 minutes, then form into a ball. You might want to wear kitchen gloves for that to keep your hands fresh and clean.  Spray an 18-inch sheet of tin foil with cooking oil. Place the ball of meatloaf in the center of the tinfoil, and form it into an 8×3 inch loaf that is rectangular and as flat as you can make it on all sides. Wrap the tin foil around the loaf and transfer to a baking sheet.  Ok, now comes an important part about flipping so pay attention. Bake for 30 minutes then flip upside down and bake for another 20 minutes. Then flip again to the original position. This time, unwrap the tin foil. Bake for 10 more minutes just to get it a little crusty.  While all this baking is happening, make the glaze. Simply vigorously mix all ingredients for the glaze together in a mug, using a fork to do the mixing. Set aside.  After the loaf bakes with the tin foil open, you are going to transfer it to parchment. So place the baking sheet somewhere safe where it wont burn you or anything (on the stovetop works for me) and layout a kitchen towel as close as possible. Use oven mitts or towels to lift the loaf in the tin foil onto the towel. Now line the baking sheet with parchment and spray it with cooking oil. Use a wide spatula to get the loaf back onto the parchment lined sheet. Pour the glaze all over and use the back of a spoon to make sure you get it good and coated.  Place back in the oven and bake for 20 minutes. Remove and let cool slightly before slicing serving!

Plant-Based Pantry Meals We’ve Been Cooking, Pt. 1

March 25 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Pantry Meals We’ve Been Cooking, Pt. 1 I’ve been posting regular pantry cooking stories on our Instagram, and I thought I’d have those recipes live here in written form as well. We’ve been minimizing our grocery shopping as much as possible, mostly depending on pantry staples and some longer lasting produce for our meals. This is not your regular, well-photographed post since all the photos are just quick cellphone snapshots I took at dinner time, but hopefully you won’t mind. The recipes are also very off-the-cuff and based on what we had in the pantry, so please feel free to adjust them according to what you have on hand. That’s really what these dishes are all about! The theme here is canned tomatoes, since they are pantry royalty and can bring big flavor to all kinds of dishes, with very little effort. There are two tomato-based stews, a lush tomato pasta, a tempeh sausage recipe, and a little banana bread treat at the end. I hope to do more of these posts very soon as I continue exploring this theme. Let us know if you have any requests or need help with any particular ingredient/­­dish, etc. Sending big love as always. Few things are as easy and satisfying as a simple marinara pasta, which can be easily made with canned tomatoes. The extra garlic and extra cooking time makes this version especially lush. You can watch me make it here. Lush Marinara Pasta   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients olive oil 1 yellow onion - diced sea salt 5 cloves of garlic - thinly sliced 1 28 oz can whole peeled tomatoes - crushed up with your hands pinch of red pepper flakes - to taste a few sprigs of fresh basil, plus more for garnish 2 teaspoons sugar (only if needed) about 10 oz pasta of choice Instructions Heat a medium pot over medium heat. Add a generous pour of olive oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and saute for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic and saute for another 30 seconds or until fragrant. Add the tomatoes, red pepper flakes, basil sprigs, and more salt if your tomatoes are unsalted. Bring the mixture to a gentle simmer and simmer, stirring frequently, for 45 minutes to 1 hour, until the sauce is thickened and glossy. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. If your sauce tastes too acidic, add the sugar. Transfer about half or more of the sauce to a separate container to use later, leaving the rest in the pot. Meanwhile, boil a pot of water and cook pasta according to the instructions on the package. Save about 1 cup of the starchy pasta water. Drain your pasta and add it to the pot with the reserved sauce. Start mixing, adding small splashes of the starchy pasta water, until the sauce is well-incorporated and sticking to the pasta. Garnish with more basil and enjoy. Notes You can use leftover pasta sauce in any of the dishes in this post that call for tomatoes. 3.5.3226   Pappa al Pomodoro is a Tuscan bread and tomato soup, and it’s the coziest thing ever, plus a great way to use up stale bread. We filled this one out with white beans and kale for a more one-stop meal. You can watch me make it here. Pappa al Pomodoro with White Beans and Kale   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients 4 thick slices of crusty bread, preferably stale 2-3 slices of garlic olive oil ½ large yellow onion - diced sea salt ½-1 teaspoon dried marjoram or oregano (optional) pinch of red pepper flakes - to taste 14.5 oz can diced fire-roasted tomatoes 1½ teaspoon coconut sugar 1 15 oz can or 1½ cups cooked white beans vegetable broth 2 large handfuls of kale - chopped Instructions If your bread isnt stale, toast it. Generously rub each piece of bread with the garlic on both sides. Slice or break the bread up into smaller pieces. Mince any left-over garlic. Heat a large pot over medium heat and add a pour of olive oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt, and saute for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic, marjoram/­­oregano, if using, and red pepper flakes, and stir around for another 30 seconds. Add the tomatoes, coconut sugar, white beans, more salt to taste, and enough vegetable broth to achieve a chunky stew consistency. Bring to a simmer. Once simmering, stir in the kale. Let simmer with the lid askew for about 15 minutes. Taste for salt and spice and adjust if needed. Distribute the garlicky bread between bowls. Pour the stew over. Garnish with a drizzle of olive oil and/­­or any herbs of choice. Notes You can use any kind of canned tomatoes or even tomato sauce for this recipe, just adjust the salt and cooking times accordingly. 3.5.3226   This is not a traditional Chana Masala by any means, but it uses a similar principle of chickpeas stewed with tomatoes and spices. I think that roasted cauliflower goes really well with this dish, and the (super easy!) chutney brings a much-needed pop of green. You can watch me make this dish here. Chana Masala with Roasted Cauliflower and Cilantro Chutney   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients for the chana masala 1 head cauliflower - cut into florets avocado oil or other oil of choice sea salt black pepper 1 yellow onion - diced 1-inch piece of ginger - grated or minced 4 cloves of garlic - grater or minced 1 teaspoon curry powder, or to taste 1½ 15 oz cans or about 2¼ cups cooked chickpeas 1-1½ cups tomato sauce or other canned tomatoes purified water juice from ½ lemon for the cilantro chutney 1 bunch cilantro with stems - roughly chopped 1 serrano pepper - seeded if you prefer less spice 1 teaspoon coconut sugar sea salt juice from ½ lemon Instructions to make the chana masala Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a lined baking tray. Place the cauliflower on the tray, drizzle it with some oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast for 30 minutes, stirring halfway, or until the cauliflower is cooked through and caramelized in parts. Heat a pot over medium heat and add a pour of oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt, and saute for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the ginger, garlic, curry powder, and some black pepper, and saute for 1 more minute, until fragrant. Add the chickpeas, stir to coat, and let the chickpeas toast in the spices for 3-5 minutes. Add the tomato sauce and enough water to thin everything out to a chunky stew consistency. Add more salt if needed (this will depend on whether your chickpeas and tomatoes were salted). Bring to a simmer and let simmer for about 15 minutes, or until the cauliflower is finished roasting. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Turn off the heat and stir in the lemon juice. Serve with the roasted cauliflower and cilantro chutney (recipe follows). to make the cilantro chutney Combine the cilantro, serrano, sugar, salt to taste, and lemon juice in a high speed blender. Blend until smooth. You shouldnt need water, but add small splashes of water if your blender has a difficult time getting going. Notes If you made our freezer bouillon, you can use about 5-6 teaspoons of the fiery freezer bouillon in place of the onions, ginger, and garlic in this recipe. 3.5.3226   This is a riff on the Italian classic of sausage and peppers, except that the ‘sausage’ is made by cooking tempeh with all kinds of herbs and spices, which makes it incredibly flavorful. Feel very free to adjust the spices according to what you have on hand, you kind of can’t go wrong here! You can watch me make this dish here. Tempeh Sausage, Peppers, and Onions   Print Serves: 4-5 Ingredients avocado oil or other oil of choice 1 yellow onion - sliced sea salt 2 red and/­­or orange bell peppers - cored and sliced splash of beer (optional) 2 8 oz packages of tempeh - crumbled tamari - to taste maple syrup - to taste 2 cloves garlic - minced 1 tablespoon minced fresh sage (or use dried sage) 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 teaspoon coconut sugar ½ teaspoon garlic powder ½ teaspoon onion powder ½ teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon dried thyme ¼ teaspoon chili powder pinch of red pepper flakes pinch of smoked salt (totally optional) Instructions Heat a large pan over medium heat and add a pour of oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and saute for 1-2 minutes to give the onions a head start. Add the peppers and another pinch of salt, and saute for about 5 minutes, until starting to soften. Add a splash of beer, if using, and let it cook off for 1-2 minutes. Turn the heat down to medium-low, cover the pan, and let the onions and peppers stew for 20 minutes, or until soft and melted. If your pan gets too dry, add a splash of water. Meanwhile, put the crumbled tempeh in a bowl and drizzle some tamari and maple syrup over it. Mix to coat and let sit. Gather all your spices for the tempeh sausage by measuring them out into one bowl: garlic, sage, tomato paste, coconut sugar, garlic powder, onion powder, smoked paprika, dried thyme, chili powder, red pepper flakes, and smoked salt, if using. Once the onions and peppers are done cooking, remove them from the pan and set aside for now. Add more oil to the pan. Add the tempeh and stir to coat it in the oil. Press the tempeh into the pan in one even layer and let brown undisturbed for about 3 minutes. Stir the tempeh, press it into the pan again, and keep cooking until mostly golden brown. Stir in the prepared spice mix and cook the tempeh for another 2-3 minutes, until fragrant. Taste for salt and spices and adjust if needed. Add the onions and peppers back in, stir to incorporate, and let everything warm through together. Enjoy the sausage as is or on sandwiches, over rice, etc. 3.5.3226   In our last post, I talked about my sourdough starter and how I’ve been experimenting with recipes that use up sourdough discard from feeding the starter. So far I’ve made cookies and this banana bread, which turned out delicious, but didn’t really taste like sourdough. It’s a great way to save some flour in any case, if you have a starter. You can watch me make it here. Vegan Sourdough Banana Bread   Print Adapted from The Baking Fairy - this is a great recipe to use if you dont have sourdough! Serves: 1 standard loaf Ingredients 5 very ripe bananas - peeled, divided ½ cup sourdough discard/­­starter ¼ cup refined coconut oil - melted or soft ¼ cup non-dairy milk 2 teaspoons vanilla extract ½ cup plus 1 tablespoon coconut sugar, plus more for sprinkling generous pinch of sea salt 1½ cups all purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking soda Instructions Preheat the oven to 350° F (175° C). Prepare an oiled and parchment-lined loaf pan. Mash 4 of the bananas in a large bowl. Add the sourdough discard, coconut oil, milk, and vanilla. Use a fork to mix until smooth. Add the sugar, salt, flour, and baking soda. Mix to just incorporate. Transfer the batter to the prepared loaf pan. Slice the remaining banana in half lengthwise and use it to decorate the top of the loaf. Sprinkle more coconut sugar over the banana and top of the loaf. Bake for 50 minutes. Cover with a piece of domed parchment paper and continue baking for another 10 minutes, or until golden on top and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Let cool for at least 20 minutes in the loaf pan, then transfer to a cooling rack and let cool for another 20 minutes. Slice and enjoy. 3.5.3226   Other pantry-friendly recipes we’re cooking this week: - Cozy Pantry Stew - Next Level Lemon Miso Potatoes - Fall-Apart Caramelized Cabbage The post Plant-Based Pantry Meals We’ve Been Cooking, Pt. 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet Potato Peanut Stew

March 2 2020 Meatless Monday 

Sweet potato peanut stew, or groundnut stew, is called Mafe in West Africa. The stew uses a savory sauce made from peanut butter and tomatoes and is common throughout West and Central Africa. This recipe is based on one from Iba Thiam, chef and owner of Cazamance restaurant in Austin, Texas, and it is one of the recipes in Oldways A Taste of African Heritage cooking program. The sweet potato, a much-loved African heritage food, is a featured ingredient. Serves 4 - 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil - 1 medium-size yellow onion, diced - 2 garlic cloves, minced - 1 large sweet potato, chopped into medium-size cubes - 2 large carrots, cut into thin rounds - 2 green zucchini, cut into thin half-rounds - 1 small can (15oz) of diced tomatoes, no salt added - 2 cups low sodium vegetable broth - 1 tablespoon curry power - 1/­­4 cup natural peanut butter - 3 sprigs of fresh thyme, minced, or 1 teaspoon dried thyme - Sea salt to taste   Heat the oil in one of the soup pots on medium heat and sauté the onion and garlic until translucent (3-4 minutes). While the onions and garlic cook, chop up the sweet potato, carrots, and zucchini. Add sweet potato and vegetables to the pot; saute for 3-4 minutes. Add the diced tomatoes, vegetable broth, and curry powder, and bring to a boil. Cover and simmer for 10 minutes. After 10 minutes, add the peanut butter and the thyme to the stew. Let it cook, covered, for another 3-5 minutes. Salt to taste, serve and enjoy!   Active time: 20 minutes Total time: 30 minutes The post Sweet Potato Peanut Stew appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Jamaican Jerk Tofu

January 13 2020 Meatless Monday 

Makes 6 servings This is the kind of miracle dish that can convert anyone to tofu. The Jamaican “jerk” seasoning is sure-to-please. It’s sort of like barbeque and sort of like curry, savory and sweet at the same time. Just make sure you allow plenty of time for the pressing and marinating. The drier the tofu gets before you put it in the marinade, the better. It will soak up more flavor and be nicely chewy. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! - 1 pound extra firm tofu, drained, sliced and pressed (see directions) - 1/­­2 large sweet onion, roughly chopped - 4 cloves garlic - 2 tablespoons fresh ginger, grated - Juice of 2 limes - Zest of 1 lime - 2 tablespoons soy sauce - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 3 tablespoons pure maple syrup - 1 tablespoon dried thyme - 2 teaspoons allspice - 1/­­2 teaspoon cayenne - 1 teaspoon nutmeg - 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon - 2 jalapeno peppers, seeded and chopped (you can cut back to one or omit entirely if you don’t like it spicy) Directions Slice the tofu into thick slabs then lay the slices on several layers of paper towels or on a clean dish towel and place a heavy plate or skillet on top. Let it sit for an hour or two. Pressing the tofu is a way to get the extra moisture out – and the drier you can get the tofu, the more of the flavorful marinade it can absorb. Puree all the rest of the ingredients in a blender or food processor to create the marinade. Place the tofu slices in a bowl, pour in the marinade, making sure to coat all the slices, and cover. Let it sit for an hour or two, flipping the slices about halfway through Heat a skillet with a small amount of olive oil over medium high heat. When the pan is hot, lay the tofu slices in a single layer and saute until crispy and browned. That will take 8-10 minutes on each side. (Photo credit: Vegan Style) The post Jamaican Jerk Tofu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Pumpkin Risotto Instant Pot

November 27 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Pumpkin Risotto Instant PotVegan Pumpkin Risotto Instant Pot. Easy Pumpkin Risotto with Wild Rice Brown Rice Blend and Mushrooms. Make it in an Instant Pot pressure cooker or Saucepan.  Vegan Glutenfree soyfree Recipe, Oil-free option Jump to Recipe This easy risotto is comfort food with seasonal winter squash. There is squash in the risotto and and roasted squash mixed in to serve! Herbs such as sage and thyme add wonderful flavor. This risotto is cooked in an Instant pot, but you can easily cook in a saucepan as well, see recipe below for details. I use wild rice blend in this risotto for a hearty option. Use arborio for variation. Fresh sage and thyme with mushrooms and pumpkin or squash puree together add wonderful flavor to this risotto. Dont have pumpkin puree? roast the pumpkin or butternut squash,mash and use. Change up the herbs to preference, omit the mushrooms, add other veggies in this versatile Instant Pot Pumpkin/­­Butternut Squash risotto and serve garnished with some vegan parm!Continue reading: Vegan Pumpkin Risotto Instant PotThe post Vegan Pumpkin Risotto Instant Pot appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Pumpkin Maple-Glazed Penne with Roasted Fall Vegetables

November 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

This pasta dish is fall in a bowl! While there is quite a bit of peeling and chopping involved, the final result is so worth it. You can find prechopped butternut squash in most stores these days, so feel free to take advantage of that time-saver if you wish. The subtle sweetness of the sauce pairs beautifully with the roasted vegetables. If you have picky eaters who wont eat some of these veggies, feel free to leave them out and double up on the ones they like. This recipe comes to us from The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook by Jenn Sebestyen. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 5 - For the Roasted Fall Vegetables: - 1 cup (140 g) peeled and chopped butternut squash - 1 cup (130 g) peeled and chopped carrots - 1 cup (110 g) peeled and chopped parsnips - 1 cup (88 g) halved Brussels sprouts - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil -  1/­­2 teaspoon dried thyme -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt -  1/­­8 teaspoon black pepper   - For the Pasta: - 16 ounces (455 g) penne pasta (gluten-free, if desired) -  1/­­2 cup (123 g) pure pumpkin purée (NOT pumpkin pie filling) - 1 cup (235 ml) lite coconut milk - 2 tablespoons (40 g) pure maple syrup -  3/­­4 teaspoon salt, or to taste - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil (optional)   For the Roasted Fall Vegetables: Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C, or gas mark 6). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside. Toss the vegetables in a large bowl with the olive oil, thyme, salt, and pepper. Spread out onto the prepared baking sheet in an even layer. Roast for 15 minutes, stir, and roast for 10 to 15 more minutes until the vegetables are tender and browning on the sides.   For the Pasta: Meanwhile, cook the penne according to package directions. Be sure to salt your cooking water well. When your pasta and vegetables have about 10 minutes cooking time left, whisk all the sauce ingredients in a large skillet over medium heat. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to low to simmer for 5 to 10 minutes until thickened a bit.   Add the cooked pasta and roasted vegetables to the skillet with the sauce and toss well to coat. Add the olive oil, if using. Season with extra salt and pepper, if desired. The post Pumpkin Maple-Glazed Penne with Roasted Fall Vegetables appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup

November 17 2019 Meatless Monday 

This recipe comes to us from The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook by Jenn Sebestyen. Jenn says, “This thick and creamy soup reminds me a bit of potpie filling, but in soup form. The small ditalini pasta rings are the same size as the diced vegetables, making it easy for kids to scoop up a bit of everything in one bite. Made with no cream, not even homemade cashew cream, you wont believe how creamy it is. Youll be heading back for seconds in no time.” Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - 2 tablespoons (28 ml) olive oil - 1 yellow onion, diced - 3 carrots, peeled and diced - 2 ribs celery, diced - 1 red bell pepper, seeded and diced - 1 tablespoon (1 g) dried parsley - 1 teaspoon dried basil - 1 teaspoon dried thyme -  1/­­2 teaspoon dried dill - 1 1/­­4 teaspoons salt, or to taste -  1/­­4 cup (32 g) all-purpose flour - 2 cups (475 ml) unsweetened almond milk or milk of choice, divided - 4 cups (946 ml) low-sodium vegetable broth - 2 tablespoons (8 g) nutritional yeast (optional) - 1 cup (110 g) dry ditalini pasta or similar small pasta shape (gluten-free, if desired)   Heat the olive oil in a soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion and sauté for 5 to 6 minutes until soft and translucent. Add the carrots, celery, and bell pepper and sauté 4 to 5 minutes until starting to soften.   Add the parsley, basil, thyme, dill, salt, and flour and stir to combine, scraping up any bits of flour on the bottom of the pot. Slowly pour in 1/­­2 cup (120 ml) of milk while whisking continuously, again scraping up any bits of flour on the bottom; a flat whisk is convenient here, but a balloon whisk will work as well. Whisk until the flour is completely incorporated.   Add the remainder of the milk, vegetable broth, and nutritional yeast, if using. Whisk to combine. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil. Once boiling, add the pasta, and then reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes until the pasta is cooked through, stirring often to prevent the pasta from sticking.   Taste and adjust the seasoning, if necessary.   Swap it! For a gluten-free option, use brown rice flour instead of all-purpose flour. The post Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Mac and Cheese Blog Tour

October 2 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Mac and Cheese Blog TourTo celebrate the release of Vegan Mac and Cheese, I’m having a blog tour! Over the next few weeks, you can visit some fantastic blogs to check out some sample recipes, photos, and reviews of Vegan Mac and Cheese. You’ll also be able to enter giveaways for a chance to win a copy of the book. Heres a list of dates and locations of the blog tour, beginning with Spabettie, where youll find my recipe for Mom’s Baked Mac & Cheese. Check back here frequently for changes, updates, and direct links to the posts as they happen.  Thanks in advance to everyone participating in this blog tour to celebrate the publication of Vegan Mac and Cheese! Vegan Mac and Cheese Blog Tour: October 1 - Spabettie October 2 - Thyme & Love October 4 - Vegan Atlas October 4 - Vegan Street October 7 - The Real Vegan Housewife October 9 - V Nutrition October 10 - StephanieDreyer.com October 11 - My Pure Plants October 14 - Lisa’s Project Vegan October 15 - This Healthy Kitchen October 16 - Vegan Mos October 17  - Go Dairy Free October 21 - Chic Vegan October 23 - FranCostigan.com October 28 - Bad to the Bowl November 4 - Veggie Fun Kitchen November 1 - Kelli’s Vegan Kitchen The post Vegan Mac and Cheese Blog Tour appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Thyme-Scented Sweet Potatoes with Black Olives and Garlic

September 20 2019 VegKitchen 

Thyme-Scented Sweet Potatoes with Black Olives and Garlic If candied sweet potatoes are too cloying for your palate, try them prepared in a savory rather than sweet way. This recipe, fragrant with garlic and thyme and studded with black olives, may change your mind about sweet potatoes if they’ve never been your veggie of choice. This recipe doubles easily for a larger crowd. The post Thyme-Scented Sweet Potatoes with Black Olives and Garlic appeared first on VegKitchen.


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