thyme - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Dal vada recipe | mix dal vada recipe | dalwada recipe | parippu vada

Tofu Parmesan

Kesar burfi recipe | kesar barfi with milk powder | kesar khoya barfi

Potato, Beet and Lentil Salad










thyme vegetarian recipes

Meatless Brown Rice Jambalaya

April 8 2019 Meatless Monday 

Here’s a vegan take on a southern classic. This brown rice jambalaya gets a Tex-Mex-inspired flavor from an assortment of spices, including paprika, cayenne and cumin. Black-eye peas and collard greens add both texture and nutrients to the dish that makes for a filling and dinner. Maybe best of all, this recipe serves six, which means it can make plenty of leftovers if you’re feeding a smaller group. This recipe is from Phoebe Lapine for Think Rice . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - 4 Tbsps Olive Oil, divided - 1 Bunch Collard greens, thick stems removed and thinly sliced - Sea Salt & Pepper - Small Yellow Onion - Red Bell Pepper, finely diced - 2 Celery Stalks, thinly sliced - Large Jalapeno, minced, seeds & ribs removed - 2 Cloves Garlic, minced - 1 Tsp Smoked Paprika - 1 Tsp Paprika - 1/­­2 Tsp Ground Cumin - 1/­­4 Tsp Cayenne - 2 Cups Chopped Tomatoes - 2 Bay Leaves - 4 Sprigs Fresh Thyme - 8 Cups Vegetable Stock - 2 Cups Dried Black-Eyed Peas, soaked overnight - 2 Cups U.S. Long Grain Brown Rice - 1 Bunch Scallions, thinly sliced - 2 Tbsps Chopped flat-leaf parsley   In a large pot over medium-high heat, add 2 tablespoons of the olive oil. Add the collard greens and stir-fry until wilted and tender, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and remove to a plate. Set aside. Add the remaining olive oil along with the onions, bell pepper, and celery, and sauté until soft, about 5 minutes. Stir in the jalapeno, garlic, smoked paprika, regular paprika, cumin, cayenne, and salt. Cook for 2 minutes more, until very fragrant, then add the tomatoes, bay leaves, and thyme. Bring to a simmer and allow the tomato mixture to thicken slightly. Pour in the stock, black-eyed peas, and brown rice. Bring to a boil, partially cover, and reduce the heat to medium-low. Simmer for 35 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the peas and rice have grown in size, but still have quite a bite to them. Cover the pot completely and continue cooking over low heat, undisturbed, until tender (but not mushy) and all of the liquid has been absorbed, another 20 minutes. Fold in the collard greens and half the scallions. Cover and cook until the rice has absorbed all the liquid and the veggies are tender, about 10 minutes longer. Remove from the heat. Season the vegetarian jambalaya with parsley, the remaining scallions, and serve warm. Note: If you dont have time to soak the peas in advance, you can a) cover them with boiling water for 10 minutes, or b) start with canned black-eyed peas. For the latter, simply cut the amount of stock in half, and add the rinsed beans to the pot when you fold in the collard greens in step 4. The post Meatless Brown Rice Jambalaya appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Blueberry Muffins (during a mandatory evacuation: crochet a mandala, knit a sweater)

March 17 2019 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Blueberry Muffins (during a mandatory evacuation: crochet a mandala, knit a sweater) I began baking like a fiend this week. Remarkably, everything I've cooked/­­baked or attempted to do in lieu of checking myself into some place for a "respite" has turned out to be exactly what I needed to function just one minute longer, one hour longer, then an afternoon and finally an evening longer. Because that's how I'm operating here: in moments--with really good food. I stumbled across this recipe for blueberry muffins in a mad search for a morning treat for the workers in the yard and DH and me (because who doesn't love blueberry muffins?). I have dozens of amazing blueberry muffin recipes throughout my collection. But the need to seek and find just the right recipe was urgent and a nice Google distraction. Trusty King Arthur Flour was the answer to my prayers. I landed on the Famous Department Store Blueberry Muffin recipe. If you've got five minutes, cupcake liners and blueberries (frozen are fine), I highly recommend you give these a shot. Mine were made with a flax egg and vegan butter--that's all the substitution needed to re-create the recipe. I know I'll be making these again, possibly adding lemon zest next time, and subbing some whole wheat flour in the mix as well--making a gluten free version would work well, too. It's quite a forgiving recipe: so simple, plain and lovely. If you'd like a taller muffin, you can always up the baking powder by a 1/­­8-1/­­4 teaspoon. My kitchen once again became my sanctuary.  Vegan Blueberry Muffins  *Adapted from Famous Department Store Blueberry Muffin Recipe by King Arthur  2 cups all-purpose flour 2 1/­­4 t. baking power 1/­­4 t. salt (I adjusted down the amt. with salted vegan butter) 1/­­2 cup vegan butter 1 cup sugar 4 t. ground flax seed with 4 T. water and 2 t. EVOO (flax egg subbing for 2 eggs) 1 t. vanilla extract 1/­­2 cup almond milk 2 cups frozen blueberries  *a little sugar for sprinkling on top of muffins before baking Preheat oven to 375. Prepare muffin tin lined with cupcake wrappers, spray wrappers with nonstick spray. Measure out flour, salt and baking soda in bowl and sift together. Set aside. In medium bowl, mix butter for about two minutes. Add sugar, mixing until light and fluffy--about a minute longer. Add vanilla and flax egg, then mix a bit more. Then add flour and milk alternately mixing lightly after each addition--just until the dry flour is mixed in. Then fold in the blueberries. Fill cupcake liners about 3/­­4 full with batter, then sprinkle about a 1/­­2 teaspoon of sugar on top. Bake for 30-40 minutes. *I found baking for a little longer yielded a nice golden brown top. I used a toothpick to test if batter was baked through.   So why all this baking urgency, kitchen therapy? Well, last week this happened: continued treatment for winter poison ivy outbreak, major demolition of yard, my sister scheduled for surgery in a week...oh and there was the mandatory evacuation of our home IMMEDIATELY owing to our gas line being hit during yard excavation--(not owing to our crew, rather something to do with "marking" of line). With barely enough time to spare to grab my purse, phone and two Great Pyrenees--knocking on neighbor's doors to warn them of potential doom--again with TWO seventy pound white Thunder Wolves on my wrists--it's a miracle I've made it to Sunday. ALL this while DH went about calmly managing the entire surreal afternoon as the fire department, gas, water and line inspectors arrived. (Wonder how I held up? Picture exactly what I've described here, sprinkle in screaming, crying, blaming and more crying. Okay, so I'm not exactly Mother Teresa during a crisis.) It's all I could do to keep my heart from simply stopping in my chest. Alas, the crisis was averted, things repaired and life returned to somewhat normal conditions. Above--as the demolition began. Below, the calm after the "evacuate" storm: Dr. Thyme checking on the progress with the workers. I was inside at this point--rocking back in forth in a chair chanting some illegible crap about "There's no place like home...there's no place like home." So yes, there be baking happening. All through this, I'm trying to remain calm. Lending positive affirmations to my sister who is about to face a really tough trial (as if she hasn't faced enough already).  It's been one thing after another.  Luckily I have friends (dear, dear friends) who've received texts with probably too-long-while-also-trying-not-to-be-overly-dramatic explanations of all that's transpired. Then there's been two- and three-hour phone conversations with these women and my sister as well. Truthfully, everyone I know has A LOT happening, but I don't know what I'd do without them. I guess we've hit the age in life where the proverbial sh*t hits the fan fairly regularly. But honestly, enough already. "Pass the muffins, please!" Helping along the way are my needlework projects--working with my hands while my mind tries to make order out of chaos.  Projects I've found incredibly blissful. The Sunny Spread blanket. Using my stash yarn for this. It's a mandala with a square finish. Such a calm one-mandala-at-a-time escape. I'll need to make about 25 of these to create a nice throw.  Oh boy do I have a long way to go, but my Great Love Cardigan will be SO lovely when it's finished. I can't wait. I've been working on this while listening to an audiobook: Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens.  This is the Adirondack Wrap crochet project. It's very relaxing to work on. Three triangles sewn together for final assembly. I just love it in my Mandala yarn. 

Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Soup (and my gardener's lament: winter poison ivy!)

March 3 2019 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Soup (and my gardener's lament: winter poison ivy!) Dear Soup, Thank you for always reminding me there are better days ahead. Soups are mainstays around here, especially with snow on the ground and temps hovering in low twenties to single digits tonight, plus more cold on the horizon this week. And poison ivy. (Yup.) I've probably made six batches of this already this winter. It involves a food processor and a soup pot. That's it. Comes together in approximately five minutes and is satisfying, warm and delicious. Here's my take on this soup, which was originally inspired by this. Here's how I made my Vegan Pasta e Fagioli: 4 carrots 1 leek 6 cloves garlic 1 celery stalk 1/­­2 onion sliced thin 2 bay leaves 1/­­2 head of cabbage 1 can of cannellini beans (drained, rinsed) 1 can diced tomatoes 1/­­3 cup ditalini pasta (cooked in separate pot, then added to soup just before serving) 2 T. nutritional yeast 1 qt. veggie stock olive oil thyme oregano red pepper flakes salt & pepper to taste Add chopped veggies--carrots, leeks, garlic to food processor, pulse about ten times. Prep the soup pot with the olive oil over medium heat, add chopped veg. Cook till just tender. Add remaining ingredients and broth and seasonings, salt and pepper. Cover and let simmer two hours over low heat. Serve with a side of your best homemade bread. (Mine is Jim Lahey's --I made the ciabatta version). After a visit with the folks at Urgent Care yesterday for a infernal outbreak of poison ivy, I am now awaiting an agonizing three weeks for this painful mess to clear up. Or longer. Why does Mother Earth require such an evil, toxic plant? What purpose does it serve? I've been struck by this havoc on only a handful of times in my life because I am so gawdawful afraid. Sounds impossible. But trust me when I tell you: only to me, the Master Gardener, and in winter no less. And above is the culprit.  Our home is undergoing a transformation of sorts in a few weeks which will finally rid us of these old railroad timbers and be replaced with a more substantial wall of stone. (That will hopefully outlive us and beyond.)  So I found myself outside on a warm-ish day earlier last week in a bit of a snit over the demise of some cherished plants I couldn't bear to loose. I've spent fifteen years tending and planting, so obviously there are plants I want to keep. Out with the shovel and buckets and pots. Everything's dormant, ground was soft, sun was out: perfect. Until later that night when I woke with what I imagined to be some sort of bug bite. Then to the next afternoon when my arm reached up to scratch my wrist (pulling the long sleeve back and discovering to my horror what really had happened). OMG. WTH? Could this be? . . . is this? Noooooo!  And then began the seven stages of grief: shock, denial, guilt, anger and bargaining, depression and loneliness to reconstruction (the UC visit) and finally acceptance. Yes, I accept that I have the rash of the spring and summertime, of gardeners, campers, hikers and landscapers, the poisonous fury of: Leaves of Three Let it Be! Ah, but what about the roots?  I had come in contact with said dormant plant--through the roots. I had oh-so carefully lifted plants and divided, setting each clump aside. Gloves and long sleeves. I have replayed this moment back through my mind a hundred times: as I reached under one of my plants, I must have accidentally, on an exposed part of my wrist, come in contact with the worst plant root on the planet, unbeknownst to me.  I am more allergic than most and so, this lovely little visitor and its prescribed remedy dosed out (the horrid steroid treatment) is, well. It's hell. The rash has traveled from my left wrist, up my right arm, to my abdomen, and leg. There's a perfect dot-to-dot landscape you can follow if you wanted. I can see the entry at every point. It's like an incredibly cruel irony and one I will face with tears, determination, agitation and regret. As for the remainder of the plants. They'll be destined for demolition. 

Corn-Stuffed Zucchini

January 14 2019 Meatless Monday 

Zucchini stuffed with corn is a delicious and healthy combination. This recipe is low in sodium, which helps keep blood pressure control in check, providing less stress on the kidneys. It is also low in saturated and total fat, helping blood vessels supply necessary oxygen and nutrients to the heart and kidneys. This recipe comes to us from the National Kidney Foundation. Serves 4 - 3/­­4  tsp, leaves  Dried Thyme - 1/­­2  tsp, ground  Black Pepper - 1/­­2  cup pieces  Mushrooms, White, Raw - 2  ounce  Cheddar Cheese – Low Fat - 4  tbsp chopped  Chives - 1/­­4  cup, chopped  Onion - 1 1/­­2  cup  Frozen Corn - 6  medium  Squash – Zucchini Cut zucchini in halves lengthwise. Cook in boiling water for 10 minutes. Carefully remove pulp. Drain corn and zucchini pulp well and combine with onion, mushrooms, pepper, chives, and thyme. Pile mixture in zucchini shells and place in a 13 X 9 inch pan. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake, uncovered, at 350 F for 20 minutes. The post Corn-Stuffed Zucchini appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Cauliflower + Tips for Roasting

January 12 2019 Vegan Richa 

Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Cauliflower + Tips for RoastingRoasted Brussels Sprouts and Cauliflower with fresh herbs and black pepper. Roasted Veggies Bowl with rosemary, thyme, garlic, black pepper. Vegan Glutenfree Nutfree Soyfree Recipe  Jump to Recipe Roasted Veggies make a great addition to any bowl, a side to a meal or just a light meal by themselves! There is more to roasting than just tossing in oil, salt and pepper. Roasted vegetables can turn out bland, overly roasted with chewy edges, under roasted, can get crinkly/­­dry and not enjoyable.  This is how I roast veggies like Brussels sprouts and cauliflower. I use a stoneware baking dish. This allows for even heat distribution and less charring chewyness. Cover the dish for some portion of the bake time. This reduces the moisture loss during baking which is especially helpful when using less oil or no oil. Moisture loss can dry out the veggies making them feel dry and chewy. Fresh herbs like rosemary and thyme, minced garlic and freshly ground black pepper, large pepper flakes preferably, and a good amount adds just the perfect flavor! Serve with just some lemon juice + pepper or gravy or my garlic sauce.  More tips below on how to roast these veggies for the perfect crisp as well as keeping them vibrant and hearty. If you try this recipe, do let me know how it worked out. Got more tips for roasting? do share!Continue reading: Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Cauliflower + Tips for RoastingThe post Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Cauliflower + Tips for Roasting appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Green Christmas 2018 -- Vegan Edition

December 19 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Christmas 2018 -- Vegan Edition The tree is already covered with colorful glass balls, small hand drawn paper Santas and tinsels, we have got light strands hanging around the windows, the presents are wrapped and Sinatra is playing from the kitchen speakers. It’s five days left to Christmas Eve and I don’t think we have ever prepared ahead for the holidays like this before. We have even cooked all the Christmas food. Twice! Well, three times actually. One was for our early celebration with David’s family. The other was to shoot these photos. And the third time because David is manic about testing recipes three times. We’ve got this. Sharing Christmas recipe roundups seems almost obligatory when you work with food. This year we asked what type of recipes you were looking for and many mentioned more vegan dishes for your holiday feasts, so that is what we have done here. I am not going to pretend that we are good at organizing big dinner parties, we are truly not. But we do have one method that we live by: Focus on having a good base of dishes and then ask guests to each bring a small side dish, drink, snack or dessert. That way you can have a generous buffet of food without the accompanying stress meltdown. Our cabbage parcels make a beautiful centerpiece with delicious mustard roasted roots and crispy smashed potatoes as warm sides. Because all of these dishes are quite rich, we also like to serve a fresh, tangy and crunchy salad on the side. Along with red cabbage Christmas krauts from our Green Kitchen at Home book. You’ll find the recipes here below. A few other favorites from the archives are our vegan Aubergine Polpette (perhaps with a gravy on the side), our Mushroom & Hazelnut Loaf, this one-tray Hasselback Potatoes with Kale and Pesto, the Pumpkin, Kale and Buckwheat Salad that we had for our wedding, this Black Quinoa & Kale Salad from dinosaur time (we’ve been making this for Christmas almost every year), and this Crispy Red Cabbage & Grape Salad (red cabbage salads are obligatory for all Danes on Christmas). We actually have one more recipe that we haven’t had time to post yet. It’s a really good gingerbread bundt cake and we’ll do our best to post the recipe before Christmas Eve (if you have our app, it is already available on there). Happy holidays! /­­Luise, David and all the kids! Stuffed Cabbage Parcels Makes 8 parcels These pretty little parcels are stuffed with rice, lentils, walnuts and raisins and cooked in a holiday spiced tomato broth. They are a little fiddly to make but super flavorful and well worth the effort. This recipe is vegan but you could also add feta cheese to the parcels if you feel like it. Filling – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked red rice (see note) – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked puy lentils – 500 ml /­­ 2 cups water – 1/­­2 tsp sea salt – 1 tbsp olive oil – 1 large red onion, peeled and finely chopped – 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped – 1 cup walnuts, finely chopped – 4 tbsp raisins – 2 tbsp lemon juice – 4 tbsp chopped parsley Tomato Broth – 750 ml /­­ 3 cups vegetable stock – 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tin crushed tomatoes – 1 tsp whole cloves – 1 tsp whole allspice – 2 star anise – 2 cinnamon sticks – 1 pinch sea salt Assembling – 1 savoy cabbage – 8 pieces of cooking string – 1 tbsp olive oil to fry in Instructions 1. Rinse rice and lentils in a sieve under running water. 2. Transfer to a saucepan and add water and salt. Bring to a boil, lower the heat and let simmer until tender, for about 35 minutes or according to the time on the package. 3. Place another sauce pan with the Tomato Broth ingredients on the stove, bring to a boil and then turn the heat down and let it slowly simmer under a lid for 20 minutes on low heat. 4. Meanwhile, add oil to a large skillet and sauté onion and garlic for 10 minutes on medium heat or until soft and translucent. 5. Transfer the onion to a bowl and wipe out the pan (you will use it to fry and cook the parcels in later on). 6. Drain any excess water from the rice and lentils. Add the onion and garlic, walnuts, raisins, lemon juice and parsley and stir to combine. 7. Carefully break off 8 leaves of the savoy cabbage. Trim off the thickest part of the stalk. 8. Blanch the savoy cabbage leaves in a sauce pan with salted boiling water for 2-3 minutes. Drain and lay out on a tea towel. 9. Spoon 3 tablespoons of filling into the center of each cabbage leaf. Fold up and tie with the string. Repeat with the remaining seven. 10. Place all parcels in a heated skillet with a little oil added. Fry on both sides until browned. 11. Pour the broth into the pan with the cabbage parcels (the pan should be half filled). Put a lid on and let simmer for about 30 minutesor until the cabbage feels soft and tender (you can cook the parcels for a shorter time if you prefer them a little crunchier). 12. Serve the parcels with a little broth poured on top. Remove the strings before eating ;) Note – We cook the rice and lentils for the filling together, just make sure that they have similar cooking times. If not, start with the one with the longest time and then add the other accordingly. Or cook in separate pans. Smashed Balsamic Potatoes Serves 4 as a side This rustic potato recipe combine three different potato methods into one - boiled, mashed and roasted. They are crispy on the outside, soft on the inside with a sweet tanginess added from balsamic vinegar. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb small potatoes – 2 tsp salt – 3 tbsp olive oil – 1 1/­­2 tbsp balsamic vinegar – 1 clove garlic, finely chopped – a few sprigs fresh thyme Preparation 1. Set the oven to 225°C /­­ 450°F. 2. Wash the potatoes (keep the skin on) and place in a large sauce pan. 3. Cover with water and add 1 tsp salt. Cook for about 20 minutes (longer if you use bigger potatoes) or until easily pierced with a fork. 4. Drain the water and leave to cool for a bit. 5. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and place the potatoes on it. 6. Smash the potatoes by pressing down on them using the backside of a glass. 7. Whisk together oil, balsamic vinegar and garlic. 9. Drizzle generously over the potatoes, making sure that you get it into all the nooks and crannies. You can use a brush for this as well. 10. Sprinkle with salt and thyme leaves. 11. Place in the oven and roast for 25 minutes or until the potatoes are crispy and golden brown. Tip – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode and lower the temp slightly for more evenly distributed heat. Mustard Roasted Roots Serves 4 as a side We love a good tray of roasted roots. Here we have coated the roots in cinnamon, grainy mustard, a little vinegar and maple syrup and roasted them until they start to caramelize. We serve these with a saffron sauce which basically is this turmeric tahini sauce but with saffron instead of turmeric. But a simple yogurt based sauce could be great too. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb mixed roots (parsnip, carrots, swede, sweet potato) Dressing – 3 tbsp olive oil – 2 tbsp grainy mustard – 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar – 1 tsp ground cinnamon – 1 tsp maple syrup – 1 tsp sea salt To Serve – 2 tbsp hemp seeds or finely chopped almonds Preparation 1. Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 375°F. 2. Peel the roots and chop into batons (roughly 10 cm long and 1,5 cm thick). 3. Stir together the dressing ingredients in a large mixing bowl. 4. Add the roots and toss until all are covered. 5. Tip out on a baking sheet covered with parchment paper and spread out in an even layer. 6. Place in the oven and roast for 20 minutes. Give the sheet a toss, then crank up the heat to 225°C /­­ 450°F and bake for 20 minutes more or until golden and slightly charred. 7. Transfer the roots to a serving platter and sprinkle with hemp seeds. Tips – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode for more evenly distributed heat. – You can use any root for this but swede, carrots, sweet potato and parsnips are our favorites.   Crispy Celery and Orange Salad Serves 4 – 1 head romain lettuce or cosmopolitan – 4 celery stalks (or fennel) – 2 oranges – 4 tbsp toasted hazelnuts Mustard vinaigrette – 2 tbsp olive oil – 1 tbsp vinegar – 1 tsp Dijon mustard – 1 tsp maple syrup 1. Rinse the lettuce in water and chop into 2 inch /­­ 5 cm large pieces, discarding the stem. 2. Thinly slice the celery stalks (or mandolin the fennel of using). 3. Peel the oranges and cut in halves and thinly slice each half. 4. Place all prepped ingredients into a large mixing bowl. 5. Whisk together the vinaigrette ingredients in a small separate bowl. 6. Gently toss the dressing with the salad ingredients. 7. Chop the toasted hazelnuts. 8. Transfer to a serving bowl and scatter with hazelnuts. Serve!

Green Christmas 2018

December 19 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Christmas 2018 The tree is already covered with colorful glass balls, small hand drawn paper Santas and tinsels, we have got light strands hanging around the windows, the presents are wrapped and Sinatra is playing from the kitchen speakers. It’s five days left to Christmas Eve and I don’t think we have ever prepared ahead for the holidays like this before. We have even cooked all the Christmas food. Twice! Well, three times actually. One was for our early celebration with David’s family. The other was to shoot these photos. And the third time because David is manic about testing recipes three times. We’ve got this. Sharing Christmas recipe roundups seems almost obligatory when you work with food. This year we asked what type of recipes you were looking for and many mentioned more vegan dishes for your holiday feasts, so that is what we have done here. I am not going to pretend that we are good at organizing big dinner parties, we are truly not. But we do have one method that we live by: Focus on having a good base of dishes and then ask guests to each bring a small side dish, drink, snack or dessert. That way you can have a generous buffet of food without the accompanying stress meltdown. Our cabbage parcels make a beautiful centerpiece with delicious mustard roasted roots and crispy smashed potatoes as warm sides. Because all of these dishes are quite rich, we also like to serve a fresh, tangy and crunchy salad on the side. Along with red cabbage Christmas krauts from our Green Kitchen at Home book. You’ll find the recipes here below. A few other favorites from the archives are our vegan Aubergine Polpette (perhaps with a gravy on the side), our Mushroom & Hazelnut Loaf, this one-tray Hasselback Potatoes with Kale and Pesto, the Pumpkin, Kale and Buckwheat Salad that we had for our wedding, this Black Quinoa & Kale Salad from dinosaur time (we’ve been making this for Christmas almost every year), and this Crispy Red Cabbage & Grape Salad (red cabbage salads are obligatory for all Danes on Christmas). We actually have one more recipe that we haven’t had time to post yet. It’s a really good gingerbread bundt cake and we’ll do our best to post the recipe before Christmas Eve. Otherwise we’ll just call it a post-Christmas cake ;) Happy holidays! /­­Luise, David and all the kids! Stuffed Cabbage Parcels Makes 8 parcels These pretty little parcels are stuffed with rice, lentils, walnuts and raisins and cooked in a holiday spiced tomato broth. They are a little fiddly to make but super flavorful and well worth the effort. This recipe is vegan but you could also add feta cheese to the parcels if you feel like it. Filling – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked red rice (see note) – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked puy lentils – 500 ml /­­ 2 cups water – 1/­­2 tsp sea salt – 1 tbsp olive oil – 1 large red onion, peeled and finely chopped – 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped – 1 cup walnuts, finely chopped – 4 tbsp raisins – 2 tbsp lemon juice – 4 tbsp chopped parsley Tomato Broth – 750 ml /­­ 3 cups vegetable stock – 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tin crushed tomatoes – 1 tsp whole cloves – 1 tsp whole allspice – 2 star anise – 2 cinnamon sticks – 1 pinch sea salt Assembling – 1 savoy cabbage – 8 pieces of cooking string – 1 tbsp olive oil to fry in Instructions 1. Rinse rice and lentils in a sieve under running water. 2. Transfer to a saucepan and add water and salt. Bring to a boil, lower the heat and let simmer until tender, for about 35 minutes or according to the time on the package. 3. Place another sauce pan with the Tomato Broth ingredients on the stove, bring to a boil and then turn the heat down and let it slowly simmer under a lid for 20 minutes on low heat. 4. Meanwhile, add oil to a large skillet and sauté onion and garlic for 10 minutes on medium heat or until soft and translucent. 5. Transfer the onion to a bowl and wipe out the pan (you will use it to fry and cook the parcels in later on). 6. Drain any excess water from the rice and lentils. Add the onion and garlic, walnuts, raisins, lemon juice and parsley and stir to combine. 7. Carefully break off 8 leaves of the savoy cabbage. Trim off the thickest part of the stalk. 8. Blanch the savoy cabbage leaves in a sauce pan with salted boiling water for 2-3 minutes. Drain and lay out on a tea towel. 9. Spoon 3 tablespoons of filling into the center of each cabbage leaf. Fold up and tie with the string. Repeat with the remaining seven. 10. Place all parcels in a heated skillet with a little oil added. Fry on both sides until browned. 11. Pour the broth into the pan with the cabbage parcels (the pan should be half filled). Put a lid on and let simmer for about 30 minutesor until the cabbage feels soft and tender (you can cook the parcels for a shorter time if you prefer them a little crunchier). 12. Serve the parcels with a little broth poured on top. Remove the strings before eating ;) Note – We cook the rice and lentils for the filling together, just make sure that they have similar cooking times. If not, start with the one with the longest time and then add the other accordingly. Or cook in separate pans. Smashed Balsamic Potatoes Serves 4 as a side This rustic potato recipe combine three different potato methods into one - boiled, mashed and roasted. They are crispy on the outside, soft on the inside with a sweet tanginess added from balsamic vinegar. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb small potatoes – 2 tsp salt – 3 tbsp olive oil – 1 1/­­2 tbsp balsamic vinegar – 1 clove garlic, finely chopped – a few sprigs fresh thyme Preparation 1. Set the oven to 225°C /­­ 450°F. 2. Wash the potatoes (keep the skin on) and place in a large sauce pan. 3. Cover with water and add 1 tsp salt. Cook for about 20 minutes (longer if you use bigger potatoes) or until easily pierced with a fork. 4. Drain the water and leave to cool for a bit. 5. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and place the potatoes on it. 6. Smash the potatoes by pressing down on them using the backside of a glass. 7. Whisk together oil, balsamic vinegar and garlic. 9. Drizzle generously over the potatoes, making sure that you get it into all the nooks and crannies. You can use a brush for this as well. 10. Sprinkle with salt and thyme leaves. 11. Place in the oven and roast for 25 minutes or until the potatoes are crispy and golden brown. Tip – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode and lower the temp slightly for more evenly distributed heat. Mustard Roasted Roots Serves 4 as a side We love a good tray of roasted roots. Here we have coated the roots in cinnamon, grainy mustard, a little vinegar and maple syrup and roasted them until they start to caramelize. We serve these with a saffron sauce which basically is this turmeric tahini sauce but with saffron instead of tahini. But a simple yogurt based sauce could be great too. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb mixed roots (parsnip, carrots, swede, sweet potato) Dressing – 3 tbsp olive oil – 2 tbsp grainy mustard – 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar – 1 tsp ground cinnamon – 1 tsp maple syrup – 1 tsp sea salt To Serve – 2 tbsp hemp seeds or finely chopped almonds Preparation 1. Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 375°F. 2. Peel the roots and chop into batons (roughly 10 cm long and 1,5 cm thick). 3. Stir together the dressing ingredients in a large mixing bowl. 4. Add the roots and toss until all are covered. 5. Tip out on a baking sheet covered with parchment paper and spread out in an even layer. 6. Place in the oven and roast for 20 minutes. Give the sheet a toss, then crank up the heat to 225°C /­­ 450°F and bake for 20 minutes more or until golden and slightly charred. 7. Transfer the roots to a serving platter and sprinkle with hemp seeds. Tips – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode for more evenly distributed heat. – You can use any root for this but swede, carrots, sweet potato and parsnips are our favorites.   Crispy Celery and Orange Salad Serves 4 – 1 head romain lettuce or cosmopolitan – 4 celery stalks (or fennel) – 2 oranges – 4 tbsp toasted hazelnuts Mustard vinaigrette – 2 tbsp olive oil – 1 tbsp vinegar – 1 tsp Dijon mustard – 1 tsp maple syrup 1. Rinse the lettuce in water and chop into 2 inch /­­ 5 cm large pieces, discarding the stem. 2. Thinly slice the celery stalks (or mandolin the fennel of using). 3. Peel the oranges and cut in halves and thinly slice each half. 4. Place all prepped ingredients into a large mixing bowl. 5. Whisk together the vinaigrette ingredients in a small separate bowl. 6. Gently toss the dressing with the salad ingredients. 7. Chop the toasted hazelnuts. 8. Transfer to a serving bowl and scatter with hazelnuts. Serve!

Vegan Lentil and Sunflower Seed Meatloaf

December 8 2018 VegKitchen 

Vegan Lentil and Sunflower Seed Meatloaf What I like about this kind of recipe is that it is extremely flexible. You can keep the base and make meatballs, burgers, or stuff it into vegetables. Here, I cooked it in a muffin mold, but you can opt for a lentil loaf cooked in a bigger mold. Just dont forget to increase the cooking time! 5.0 from 2 reviews Save Print Lentil and sunflower seed meatloaf Serves: 4-6   Ingredients 2 tbsp. of olive oil 1 1/­­2 cups of onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed ⅔ cup carrots, grated 1 packet (227g) mushrooms, finely chopped 1 cup of lentils, cooked, rinsed and drained 1 1/­­2 cup sunflower seeds 2 slices of whole grain bread, shredded into small pieces ¼ cup ground flaxseed ½ cup of oatmeal 2 tbsp. of tamari 1 tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1/­­4 cup of vegetable broth 1 tbsp. oregano 1/­­2 tsp. thyme 1/­­2 tsp. dry mustard Salt and pepper, to taste 1/­­4 cup of ketchup 1/­­4 cup of unsweetened applesauce 2 tbsp. balsamic vinegar 2 tbsp. tablespoon maple syrup Instructions In a skillet, heat olive oil over medium high heat. Add onion and mushrooms. Cook until the onion has begun to turn a little golden, about […] The article Vegan Lentil and Sunflower Seed Meatloaf appeared first on VegKitchen.

Butternut Squash Pasta

December 3 2018 Meatless Monday 

How better to enjoy seasonal winter squash than with pasta! Make this dish rich by using heavy cream in the sauce, or lighten it up with almond milk. This recipe comes to us from Christopher Mohs of Pumpernickel&Rye.   Serves 4 - 1 1/­­2 lbs. butternut squash (cubed) - 1 lb. trottole pasta - 1/­­4 cup dark brown sugar - 3 tbsp olive oil - 1/­­4 tsp salt - 1/­­4 tsp pepper - 3 tbsp heavy cream (or substitute almond milk) - 1/­­4 cup pumpkin seeds - 1 tbsp fresh thyme plus sprigs for garnish   Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. In a bowl, combine the butternut squash, dark brown sugar, olive oil, salt, and pepper and toss to coat the squash evenly. Pour into a roasting dish, cover with aluminum foil and roast for 45 - 60 minutes. In the last 20 minutes of roasting, boil and cook the pasta. When the pasta has cooked, strain and return pasta to the cooking pot, remove the roasted butternut squash from the oven and place a 1/­­4 of the butternut squash into the pot with the pasta (these are chunky bits for the final dish). Put the remaining squash in a blender and puree until smooth; add the heavy cream (or almond milk) and give one quick blitz. Pour the pureed squash along with fresh thyme and pumpkin seeds to the pasta and stir to combine and coat the pasta. Serve and enjoy! The post Butternut Squash Pasta appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Poppyseed Dukkah-Stuffed Baked Apples with Coconut Caramel

November 14 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Poppyseed Dukkah-Stuffed Baked Apples with Coconut Caramel Popping in really quickly today to share the recipe for this holiday table dessert contender – baked apples! These babies are fun to make and on the healthier side as far as desserts go, but still so satisfying and festive. They are taken up to that next level with the pockets of poppyseed dukkah cozied up inside each apple, as well as a crucial drizzle of homemade coconut caramel :D I first had the idea to make sweet dukkah (Egyptian spice and nut/­­seed mix, aka a condiment from heaven) a few years ago, when I wrapped it up in these Sweet Dukkah Cigars (which is another great dessert for coffee or tea time after a holiday meal). I do a mixture of walnuts and hazelnuts, sesame seeds, poppyseeds, aromatic spices, and dates. I especially love the combination of poppyseeds and caramel, so I upped them in this particular sweet dukkah recipe. The result: delicate, warm apples with a pleasant amount of fall-appropriate spice and crunch from the dukkah and delicate sweetness from the mandatory drizzle of coconut caramel. Some vanilla ice cream would be great on the side as well! Hope you enjoy these :) Poppyseed Dukkah-Stuffed Baked Apples with Coconut Caramel   Print Serves: 6 baked apples Ingredients for the baked apples 6 small honeycrisp apples juice from ½ lemon poppyseed dukkah (recipe below) 1½ cup apple cider rosemary, thyme or other aromatic herbs for infusing the cider (optional) olive oil - for drizzling coconut sugar - for sprinkling coconut caramel (recipe linked) for the poppyseed dukkah 1 cup raw hazelnuts or walnuts, or a mix of both ¼ cup sesame seeds 4 tablespoons poppy seeds 3 green cardamom pods - crushed in mortar and pestle, green shells removed ½ teaspoon coriander seeds 1 teaspoon cinnamon ½ teaspoon nutmeg 3 soft dates - pitted and chopped pinch of sea salt Instructions to make the baked apples Preheat oven to 350° F (180° C). Cut the top off each apple (refer to photos) and set aside. Carefully core the apples using a small knife or apple corer and drizzle the lemon juice over them. Generously stuff the apples with dukkah, piling it over the top. Close the apples with the apple tops and transfer the apples into a rimmed baking dish. Pour the apple cider over the apples and add the aromatic herbs to the bottom of the dish, where the cider accumulates, if using. Drizzle the apples with olive oil and sprinkle with coconut sugar. Bake for about 1 hour, until soft throughout, drizzling with the baking liquid every 15 minutes. Take care not to overbake the apples, as they might start coming apart at the seams. Let the apples cool just a bit and serve drizzled with the coconut caramel and sprinkled with more dukkah. A scoop of vanilla ice cream wouldnt hurt either :) to make the poppyseed dukkah Preheat oven to 350° F (180° C). Spread hazelnuts/­­walnuts on a baking sheet and toast for 5 minutes. Add sesame and poppy seeds and continue to toast for another 5 minutes. Remove from the oven. Toast the cardamom and coriander seeds in a pan over medium heat until fragrant, for about a minute or so. Finely grind in a mortar and pestle. Add the hazelnuts/­­walnuts to a bowl of a food processor and pulse a few times. Add the sesame and poppy seeds, cardamom, coriander, cinnamon, nutmeg, dates and salt to the food processor. Pulse to combine to the consistency of coarse bread crumbs. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Green Mountain Parfait Lychee Sorbet and Marinated Rhubarb Compote Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bites .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Poppyseed Dukkah-Stuffed Baked Apples with Coconut Caramel appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Caribbean Greens and Beans Soup

October 16 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Caribbean Greens and Beans SoupThis Caribbean Greens and Beans Soup is inspired by a delicious Jamaican soup made with callaloo (taro) leaves in a light coconut broth. My version calls for the more readily available spinach, although cabbage, kale, or chard may be used instead. The soup has a nice heat from the jalape?os, but you can omit them for a milder flavor or increase them if you want more heat. Caribbean Greens and Beans Soup This soup is inspired by a delicious Jamaican soup made with callaloo (taro) leaves in a light coconut broth. My version calls for the more readily available spinach, although cabbage, kale, or chard may be used instead. The soup has a nice heat from the jalape?os, but you can omit them for a milder flavor or increase them if you want more heat. - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil or 1/­­4 cup (60 ml) water - 1 medium-size red onion, chopped - 3 garlic cloves, chopped - 2 medium-size sweet potatoes, peeled and diced - 1 medium-size red bell pepper, seeded and chopped - 1 or 2 jalape?os or other hot chiles, seeded and minced - 1 can (14.5 ounces, or 410 g) of diced tomatoes, drained - 1 1/­­2 cups (266 g) cooked dark red kidney beans or 1 can (15.5 ounces, or 440 g) of dark red kidney beans, rinsed and drained - 4 cups (950 ml) vegetable broth - 2 teaspoons fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dried thyme -  1/­­4 teaspoon ground allspice - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 9 ounces (255 g) baby spinach - 1 can (13.5 ounces, or 380 ml) of unsweetened coconut milk - Heat the olive oil or water in a pot over medium-high heat. Add the onion and sauté for 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute longer. Add the sweet potatoes, bell pepper, jalape?o, tomatoes, and beans. Stir in the broth, thyme, and allspice and season to taste with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until the vegetables are tender, about 30 minutes. - Stir in the spinach and coconut milk, stirring to wilt the spinach. Taste and adjust the seasonings. Cook for 5 to 10 minutes longer to wilt the spinach and blend the flavors. Taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. Serve hot. From One-Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2018 Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc. Used with permission. The post Caribbean Greens and Beans Soup appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Harvest Vegetable Tart

September 17 2018 Meatless Monday 

This tart takes advantage of the exquisite red/­­orange palate of fall by using colorful root vegetables cut into small leaf shapes using cookie cutters to create an Autumn motif. It happens to be savory and delicious too! This recipe comes to us from Joyce of Goodmotherdiet. Serves 6 - 1 single pie crust - 1 butternut squash - 1-2 purple carrots - 1-2 parsnips - 1 large sweet potato - 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided - 3 medium shallots, minced - 4 cloves garlic, minced - 1 cup vegetable broth - 2 tsp flour - 1 can full fat coconut milk - 1/­­2+ cup shredded parmesan (optional) - 1/­­2 tsp dried thyme - salt and pepper to taste Pre heat oven to 375. Peel and slice squash neck into 1/­­4 inch rings. Using a cookie cutter, press firmly into squash. I recommend using a potholder to make pressing down easier on your hands. Peel and slice remaining root vegetables, using various leaf shapes. Reserve veggie scraps. Line one or two baking sheets with parchment paper or foil. Arrange the leaves on the baking sheets. If your cookie cutters have large and small shapes, separate them as they may have different cooking times. Spray or brush with olive oil and sprinkle lightly with salt. Prebake the leaves until they are tender enough to pierce with a knife tip, but not so tender that they fall apart, about 15 minutes. Larger leaves may need another 5 minutes. Let cool. Saute shallots until lightly browned in 2 tablespoons olive oil. Add garlic. Gather the veggie scraps and dice. You should have about 6 cups of veggies. Dont include purple carrot scraps as they will turn everything pink. Add to the shallots along with vegetable broth. Simmer 10 minutes with the lid off. Add more broth if necessary but liquid should mostly evaporate. Veggies should be soft but still somewhat firm. They will cook again in the tart pan. Stir in 2 tsp of flour and then add coconut milk, herbs and parmesan (if using). Roll out pastry dough and place it in a tart pan, pressing gently into the bottom. Roll the pin over the top to cut the dough to fit the pan. Pour vegetable filling into pie crust and spread evenly with a spoon. Arrange the leaf shapes onto the top of the filling, covering any gaps until entire tart is covered. Spray or brush with olive oil. Sprinkle with parmesan, if desired. Bake tart for 35-45 minutes. Let cool slightly before cutting. Serve with a crisp green salad. Enjoy! The post Harvest Vegetable Tart appeared first on Meatless Monday.

One Soup - Three Ways

April 6 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

One Soup - Three Ways I feel extra enthusiastic about this post partly because I think we are on to something good here. But also because this headline speaks so much to my magazine-publishing-heart (my previous career). This is a dinner concept that we have played around with lately and it works particularly well for families with sensitive eaters or allergies. The idea is built around cooking one recipe base and then making some last minute add-ins to suit various preferences. Or to turn the leftovers of one dish into a new one the next day. The base can be anything from a salad, a basic stew, a cooked grain, a good sauce or, as here, a soup. In this recipe we are taking a simple tomato broth soup in three different directions. The kids love this with tortellini (or any other pasta) dropped into it. They actually prefer it to tomato sauce. Luise and I like to let a chunk of mozzarella (or burrata cheese) melt in the soup and serve it with some leftover cooked quinoa to make it more filling. Another favorite of ours is to stir chopped kale, chickpeas and a little chili paste into the broth and topping it with avocado for a chunkier vegan version. The way it usually works is that we cook one big batch of broth and then pour the kids version in a smaller sauce pan, drop in the ravioli and let it cook for another minute or two until soft. While we stir in or other add-ins to our version. It’s an excellent way to add some heat and more herbs to your own soup while keeping your kids or partners soup milder. You can of course keep it simple and just do one of these. Or mix them up, adding chickpeas to the ravioli or mozzarella to the kale. Or combine them all! Think of it as good base to build from and use the last minute add-ins to suit your personal preference. If you like this concept we might be back with the same ideas applied on other meals in a later post. Simple Tomato Broth Soup Serves 4 2 tbsp olive oil 1 onion, peeled and finely chopped 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped 2 tbsp tomato puree 1 tsp ground paprika powder 3 carrots 3 celery stalks 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz can crushed tomatoes 4 cups /­­ 1 liter vegetable stock sea salt Fresh thyme Fresh basil Heat oil in a large thick-bottomed sauce pan on medium heat. Add tomato puree, onion, garlic and ground paprika and let sauté for 5 minutes. Peel and clean the carrots and celery and chop into bite-sized dices. Add to the pan and let sauté for a few more minutes. Then add chopped tomatoes and vegetable stock and let simmer under a lid for 15-20 minutes. Taste and adjust the flavoring, adding some fresh thyme or basil towards the end. You can also add more stock, if needed. Choose your favorite way of serving this soup, see recipe ideas below. Vegan Cavolo Nero & Chickpea Soup Serves 4 1 batch Simple Tomato Broth Soup (see recipe above) 5 leaves cavolo nero or kale, coarsely chopped 1/­­2 can cooked chickpeas (approx 100 g) 1 tsp harissa or another chili paste (optional) 1 avocado, to serve lemon zest, to serve olive oil Stir in chopped cavolo nero, chickpeas and harissa to the soup during the last minutes of cooking. Laddle the soup into serving bowls and top with avocado slices, lemon zest and a splash of olive oil. Tortellini Drop Soup 1 batch Simple Tomato Broth Soup (see recipe above) 1 bag good quality fresh tortellini micro greens or sprouts, to serve grated vegetarian parmesan cheese, to serve Simply drop the tortellini straight into the soup as its cooking on the stove. After about two minutes (check the pasta package for exakt time), its ready to serve. Divide into soup bowls, grate over parmesan cheese and top with micro greens and drizzle with olive oil. Quinoa & Mozzarella Melt Soup 1 batch Simple Tomato Broth Soup (see recipe above) 2 cups cooked quinoa 200 g buffalo mozzarella or burrata cheese Laddle the soup into serving bowls and add a couple of spoonfuls cooked quinoa to each bowl. Break the cheese into smaller pieces and let it melt in the hot soup. Top with a drizzle of olive oil, black pepper and fresh thyme.

Mediterranean Brussels & Beans

December 11 2017 Meatless Monday 

Dress up winter’s favorite miniature cabbage with sweet sun-dried tomatoes and protein-packed cannellini beans. Feta cheese and thyme lend Mediterranean flavors to this simple dish. This recipe comes to us from Sarah of So Hungry I Could Blog. Serves 2 - 15 medium-large Brussels sprouts - olive oil - sea salt or kosher salt - 1 - 1 1/­­2 cups cooked cannellini beans (about 1 can) - 1/­­2 cup sun-dried tomatoes, sliced thin - 1/­­2 cup feta cheese, crumbled or cubed - leaves from 2-3 sprigs of fresh thyme - pepper Rinse the Brussels sprouts in a colander. Trim the ends of the Brussels and cut in half, length-wise. Remove the outer leaves and discard (these leaves will usually fall right off after cutting the sprouts in half). In a glass or tin baking dish, toss the Brussels in a few teaspoons of olive oil and a few pinches of salt. Roast at 400 degrees for 15-20 minutes. Toss the sprouts and roast for an additional 15-20 minutes, or until browned and slightly crisped. While the sprouts are cooking, combine the beans, feta, tomatoes and thyme -- tossing carefully so as not to break up the cheese too much. Add the warm Brussels sprouts to the bean mixture and gently combine. Drizzle with a little extra olive oil and a sprinkle of fresh pepper before serving. Makes about 4 servings as a side dish. The post Mediterranean Brussels & Beans appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Cauliflower + Tips for Roasting Veggies

January 12 2019 Vegan Richa 

Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Cauliflower + Tips for Roasting VeggiesRoasted Brussels Sprouts and Cauliflower with fresh herbs and black pepper. Tips on how to roast veggies that are perfectly crisp, vibrant, flavorful, not-dry or chewy. Vegan Glutenfree Nutfree Soyfree Recipe  Jump to Recipe Roasted Veggies make a great addition to any bowl, a side to a meal or just a light meal by themselves! There is more to roasting than just tossing in oil, salt and pepper. Roasted vegetables can turn out bland, overly roasted with chewy edges, under roasted, can get crinkly/­­dry and not enjoyable.  This is how I roast veggies like Brussels sprouts and cauliflower. I use a stoneware baking dish. This allows for even heat distribution and less charring chewyness. Cover the dish for some portion of the bake time. This reduces the moisture loss during baking which is especially helpful when using less oil or no oil. Moisture loss can dry out the veggies making them feel dry and chewy. Fresh herbs like rosemary and thyme, minced garlic and freshly ground black pepper, large pepper flakes preferably, and a good amount adds just the perfect flavor! Serve with just some lemon juice + pepper or gravy or my garlic sauce.  More tips below on how to roast these veggies for the perfect crisp as well as keeping them vibrant and hearty. If you try this recipe, do let me know how it worked out. Got more tips for roasting? do share!Continue reading: Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Cauliflower + Tips for Roasting VeggiesThe post Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Cauliflower + Tips for Roasting Veggies appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder

December 30 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder Erin Lovell Verinder is a herbalist, nutritionist and energetic healer living in the wilds of the Byron Bay hinterland in Australia, working with clients locally in her Sydney clinic and worldwide via Skype. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I honestly love both. I keep certain parts of my day very structured especially around work days and where I can, I claim open space. I follow structure to bring in the foundations of support that are essential for me to thrive and maintain my balance. Like slow mornings, connecting to nature, enjoying a whole nourishing breakfast. But then I open up my days where possible to flow & allow spontaneity. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I keep my mornings slow and sacred, it’s been a very intentional movement towards this over the years. I wake with the sunlight pouring into our bedroom, we live in an old church and the light in here is just next level serene. I always keep the blinds open to allow my body rhythms to harmonize with the sun and moon cycle. This regulates your cortisol and melatonin in such a fundamental way. I allow myself to wake slowly, no rush, no jump out of bed, no alarms, no startle response! I will then take time to do some stretching sequences with conscious breath, and then sit for a 20 minute meditation. Followed by a morning dog walk around our very green country town. Other mornings it’s a swim in the ocean with my husband and a lazy lay on the sand. After this, it’s breakfast time. I brew a tea, or make a tonic and take that out into the garden. I really feel it’s so important to have a whole breakfast, and we really honour that in our household, we sit and chat and connect over a meal before the day unfolds. I do my absolute best to only engage in anything work related after 8am and completely screen free before then is the daily goal. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Yes! I am super ritualistic about the evening wind down. I ensure I am off all screens at least two hours before sleep. I feel this is so greatly important to allow our bodies to align and flow into the yin cycle of the night. I switch off all overhead lights and only use very warm low light lamps as the sun sets. This is another trick to converse with your body to wind down, let go of any tasks and prep for rest. I read, write, listen to music and savour evenings for creative flow and conversation with my husband. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Many. I practice conscious breath and meditation as my main allies. But I also spend A LOT of time with plants, growing, making, conversing and in nature scapes. This is for me the ultimate mindfulness practice of oneness, presence and connection. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Scrambled eggs with turmeric, garlic and greens, avocado and some home fermented veggies on the side.  Lunch – Wild caught Mahi Mahi with tarragon, parsley, lemon and garlic cooked in ghee, on top of a bed of greens with some roasted sweet potato on the side. (Literally one of my favourite dishes ever) Snack – I love smoothies. Often a smoothie, my current fav is Strawberries, cashew nut butter, cashew nut mylk, collagen, hemp seeds, tocos, cinnamon, vanilla powder & ashwaganda powder. Dinner - San choy bow, with a rainbow of veggies & lots of bold ginger flavour in vibrant cos lettuce cups. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I actually do not, I am completely stimulant free. I have not always been, but just find myself so very sensitive to any stimulants these days. I used to love love love a great spicy black chai tea but since going caffeine free I have replaced it with a dandelion chai blend I make myself that is just so warming and grounding I adore it. Plus no crazy energy spikes and lows, so thats a plus! -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? At the same time when I let go of stimulants, I completely let go of sweets- even natural sweeteners. In the past I have been an avid lover of raw chocolate and quite the connoisseur (ha) but these days I make my own carob chocolate that has no sweetener in it at all. I love carob as it’s very sweet naturally so you can get away with no added sweeteners. I pair it with vanilla powder and they work synergistically to give a natural sweetness that I find so comforting. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I do utilize supplement support as needed, this shifts as my body shifts. I love Vitamin C on so many levels but particularly for its adrenally restorative healing elements, so it is absolutely in my daily supplement routine, alongside Magnesium citrate on the daily. With herbs, I will vary what I am taking depending on my needs. I add herbal powders and medicinal mushrooms to my tonics and smoothies. Currently my favourites are Withania (Ashwaganda) and Reishi. I also am a huge lover of infusions (long loose leaf herbal brews) and always have a big jar of an overnight infusion with me to sip throughout my day. My most utilized blend would be Nettle leaf, Oat straw and Hibiscus. Earthy, calming, tangy and nourishing. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Years go I had a heinous back injury, I herniated multiple discs from overexercising. My approach and relationship to body movement completely shifted after this, from rigorous to gentleness. It is still an area of my life I have to encourage myself back to and approach more as an act of self love. Taking care of my temple. I walk my pups daily, I love pilates and swimming, I have begun the be.come project and absolutely LOVE the approach to body movement with body positivity, inclusivity, no need for any equipment and in the comfort of my own home. This all feels really supportive and a mix of gentle yet effective support for me and my body. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I am not a natural athlete by any measure! I have recently connected to how emotional it can be to return to body movement when you have been through a big physical injury/­­body change/­­life change. So for me the way I psyche myself up to do a session is to come from self love, to know this is a loving act of care for my body. That really helps me so much. Also knowing there are no rules to how you must move your body, allow exercise to meet your vibration- yin, yang and all between. Shifting the type of body movement I do with my menstrual cycle/­­hormones is so key. Be your own compass. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Authenticity, when someone is just purely themselves and at ease with it. I find it absolutely stunning. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Oils, oils and more oil. I swear by the dewy hydration of oils. I am pretty low maintenance with skin care, and have noticed I need a lot less intervention since moving to the sea and swimming in the ocean most days. The salt magic is so nourishing for the skin. I also find the sun very healing, contrary to the fear of UV rays we have been indoctrinated with! I use a homemade herbal balm for a lot of applications, hair mask, makeup remover, and moisturizer. It is a power packed plant based mix, and such a heavenly blend. I also use Ritual oil, a moringa and blue lotus oil as a body moisturizer.  I am in my mid 30s and really notice my skin responds so well to the dewy goodness of oils. I practice dry body brushing also, which I feel is so wonderful to aid stagnation and lymphatic flow. I use a jade roller which I keep in the fridge for extra lymphatic cooling, and use on my face every few days with oil. I always end my showers with cold water, to add in a hydrotherapy element. I wear very little makeup, but when I do it is always natural, as clean as can be. I love RMS and Ere Perez. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? The importance of a vibrant whole foods diet and hydration is EVERYTHING! So many compounds in our foods, fruit + veggies are anti aging and collagen boosting anti oxidant heros. I drink 3+ litres of filtered water daily and do my very best to eat a rainbow of seasonal organic fruit/­­veggies daily and honestly I rely on this to support my health, skin and hair primarily. I do add in a marine based collagen daily to either smoothies or tonics. Also I am in a stage of encouraging my hair to grow, and am using nettle, rosemary and horsetail infusions as a hair rinse. I also massage in olive oil and rosemary oil into my scalp, truly it is so simple and aids hair growth. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? A low tox life is key. Keep your stress in check, move your body, eat as clean as possible – mostly plants, organics or pesticide free produce, clean water and clean air. The most incredibly glowy humans I know follow this ethos. This has been my guideline and I am often told I really do not look my age. I am so at ease with ageing but it is always nice to hear you are maintaining a youthful glow! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  I really do. I work for myself and direct all of my offerings at this point. This can be demanding and means work can have a never-ending feel. There are always so many thoughts, needs and energy streams flowing into my work life. I also feel when you work as a space holder and in the healing realms, your energy output can be hefty. Burn out is high in this line of work, as you truly want to assist so deeply to aid others, we can often throw our needs to the side. I have learnt this many times in my years as a clinician/­­healer. I implement a lot of consistency with a structured clinic week~ limiting the amount of clients I see weekly to where I feel my energy is at and how many clients I can truly be present for. I balance myself with time off, away from screens, in nature and welcome in receiving energy to counteract my giving energy. My self care practice is the core of how I seek balance. I am actually freakily good at giving back to myself, which I believe enables me to do what I do! -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? For me, it is much healthier to come at it head on.. (typical Aries answer!) I do my finest to address the stressors, and clear the way. Whether this means a mountain of admin,  which is often a stressor for me as I not a natural lover of admin. I bunker down, switch off all other distractions, play some flute music or chants, burn some incense and get in the zone. When I exit that zone I feel so accomplished and reward myself with an ocean swim, or a nature walk to balance out the mental space I have been in. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? First and foremost I rest. Immunity can be a very strong conversation our bodies communicate to us with the message of needed REST. My go to supplement and herbal approach is to take a high dose of Vitamin C consistently in divided doses throughout my day, I also add in zinc supplements. I always have an immune focused liquid herbal tonic in my first aid support cabinet, so I begin this at a high frequent dose to meet the acute presentation of a cold/­­virus~ generally dosing up to 4 x daily. Usually it will have Echinacea, andrographis, elderberry, manuka, thyme in it. I love medicinal mushrooms to support immunity so I will take a blend of Reishi and Chaga in higher doses. I avoid raw foods and focus on lots of cooked warming nourishing food to feed the cold, congees, broths, soups, stew. I also make fresh oregano, thyme with sliced lemon &  ginger tea. If I really honour the rest that is needed, the cold/­­rundown feelings will shift very swiftly. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? The best thing I ever did was to get a separate work phone. I have a dedicated phone that my clients can contact me on, so in my free time it is left at home or on silent. This has helped me enormously create healthy boundaries. I also do not have my work emails on my phone, so I do not check them at all unless I am sitting down at my computer to work. It is so important to be available to your own process and own life, especially when you are in the field of assisting others. These simple interventions help fortify those boundaries greatly for me. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I return to softness with myself if I lose my way a little. I do my best to not judge or engage in negative self talk. I soften and return to my centre. We all have patterns we are cycling. Although I feel I am quite a master of my own self care practice I definitely can get caught up in my workload a fair bit. One thing I do consciously do is to book a treatment in weekly in some form, usually a bodywork-massage session. I find this tactile healing so restorative. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? I recently moved from the mountains to the sea, although they are both completely beautiful nature rich locations I was very much in need a big environment change for my own health and wellbeing.  Having lived in a very cold environment mountain side for 10 + years I was craving the warmth, the salt and the sun. Being by the ocean and soaking up the sun rays has been so fundamentally healing for me at this point. Total game changer! The power of changing your environment is so potent when you feel the call to do so. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I acknowledge that this too shall pass, it is transient. I do my best to trust my own creative genius. I am quite a forward motion person, so when I am feeling uninspired it absolutely can get me down. I am naturally a procrastinator in many ways, which can be so frustrating but saying that I also have the ability to then smash out the tasks in an uncanny way! I often find when I am not in such a wonderful place with myself I feel that sense of stagnation, so I do my very best to get to the roots of that stagnation. Often it takes me getting into nature to be re inspired, crafting out some quiet space to re energize and tackle the task head on. I try to ask myself what is the block, and unpack the block to free up the energy flow. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. As cheesy at it sounds I LOVED Practical Magic, the witchy plant potions and the apothecary Sandra Bullocks character opened was a total inspiration for me as teenager.. & still is now (lol). Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a herbalist, nutritionist, and energetic healer? How do all of those practices interweave for you? I was always drawn to the esoteric realms and the mystery of nature. As a little girl I loved being outside, I loved the flowers, the trees, the plants, the grasses, the oceans, the mountains. I loved being an observer and always felt so held when I was in nature. As soon as I began to understand that plants could have a positive effect on our health, it just fascinated me. Learning about folklore of plant medicine, applications and remedies drew me into a language I wanted to be fluent in. I believe that much of our call to the plant path is remembering, these plants  have been with us through our ancestral lines for eons. My career began really at the age of 16 with energetic healing, I met a group of wild women up north in Australia and was welcomed into circles, introduced to the concepts of healing, and recognized as a student of these realms. I learnt reiki which led to crystal healing, then to sound healing, colour therapy, kinesiology.. I went to a college for 2 years to learn energetic healing in depth and graduated by the age of 19 holding full in depth sessions on auric healing and clearing energetic blockages. For me it felt too much too soon. So I went and travelled, met my husband in the USA and studied a whole lot more. When I returned to Australia I wanted to anchor my knowledge of healing with more grounded modalities so I began studying Naturopathic medicine. I forked off into a Bachelor of Western Herbal Medicine and Nutritional Medicine. I loved learning about plants and food as medicine, I loved the union of science and grass roots knowledge. Over years of being in practice, I have found that there is no way or no need to seperate these modalities. I weave them all in together to ultimately support the client in a very holistic way. I approach my practice with this lens of perception. I lead with intuition, and merge functional testing, pathology testing, traditional folk medicine, evidence based plant medicine, nutritional medicine, and energetics all to support. I believe there are always energetics involved in a health presentation, along with the demand for nutritional healing as powerful ally, and herbal medicine to assist, shift and support. Aligning these healing modalities is a potent combination. Essentially the basis of Naturopathic Medicine is individualised care, no one case is the same. This ethos rings true to me, there is not one client I have worked with that is the same as any other. How can we approach health in one way, or believe there is one remedy for one presentation? It goes against the nature of our uniqueness! My practice is about honouring the individuals path, story and health goals. -- You put a lot of emphasis on gut health in your practice and believe it to be the root to all balanced health. Can you talk a little bit about why you see this as such an important aspect of wellbeing?  All diseases begin in the gut – Hippocrates had it right! So many issues stem from the gut, it is the root of our health. With the emergence of continued evolving science we are seeing so much more information come to light around the microbiome/­­microbiota, which is truly wonderful. Much of our immunity is linked with gut health, it impacts mental health greatly with our second brain residing in the gut producing neurotransmitters, it is involved in the auto immune expression, it defines our ability to absorb and produce nutrients/­­vitamins/­­minerals, it impacts our metabolism, it is directly connected to our stress response and digestion responds accordingly.. And so much more... I work very closely with digestive healing with each and every one of my clients as I believe this is a key element to balanced health and shifting imbalanced symptoms. Many of my clients present with poor digestion and we dig like detectives to get to the roots, often it is a leaky gut like picture – with parasites, yeast overgrowths or SIBO which we generally detect via functional testing. Once we have a good sense of what is actually happening in the gut, we go in with a supportive treatment plan – lifestyle, supplemental, nutritional and herbal interventions. It always astounds me how health can transform so greatly, from imbalanced to balanced with the right support, intention and dedication. Our bodies are so wise, and so willing to transform. -- What is your favorite way of incorporating herbal medicine into your (or your clients) everyday life? I personally incorporate it in so many ways. I make my own products and use them on my skin and in my home on the daily, I drink herbal teas and infusions daily and use tonic herbs to support my body/­­being. I have a herbal garden that is buzzing right now, so connecting with the plants via gardening is medicine to me. There is something so potent about growing and caring for a plant and utilising her healing, knowing the story of the plants beginnings enhances the healing power I believe. For clients~ it really depends but I do always advise infusions to become a part of their everyday lives. They are so very simple and accessible, basically a long brewed overnight tea! If you are working with me in a session we will touch on many ways to incorporate plant medicine into your life, from the herbs that are suitable for your current process, to cleaning up your skin care with more plant love, to working with herbal tablets/­­liquid tonics for marked support. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? This next year feels so full of creativity, as I expand and launch multiple new offerings. Right now I am in a potent brewing stage, so I look forward to it all coming to fruition! -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Days off at the beach, going into the bush, gardening in my medicinal plant patch, reading a great book, screen free days, massages, hugs with my husband & dogs. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Braiding Sweetgrass – Robin Wall Kimmerer Song –  Stay – Cat Power/­­ Ba Movie –  Call me by your name Piece of Art –  A oil pastel pencil drawing gifted to me by my husband and family by my dear friend and incredible creator Chanel Tobler called Curves like jam -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Emily Lami from Bodha, she is a scent magician. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff Self-Care Interview Series: Lucy Vincent Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Green Christmas 2018 - vegan edition

December 19 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Christmas 2018 - vegan edition The tree is already covered with colorful glass balls, small hand drawn paper Santas and tinsels, we have got light strands hanging around the windows, the presents are wrapped and Sinatra is playing from the kitchen speakers. It’s five days left to Christmas Eve and I don’t think we have ever prepared ahead for the holidays like this before. We have even cooked all the Christmas food. Twice! Well, three times actually. One was for our early celebration with David’s family. The other was to shoot these photos. And the third time because David is manic about testing recipes three times. We’ve got this. Sharing Christmas recipe roundups seems almost obligatory when you work with food. This year we asked what type of recipes you were looking for and many mentioned more vegan dishes for your holiday feasts, so that is what we have done here. I am not going to pretend that we are good at organizing big dinner parties, we are truly not. But we do have one method that we live by: Focus on having a good base of dishes and then ask guests to each bring a small side dish, drink, snack or dessert. That way you can have a generous buffet of food without the accompanying stress meltdown. Our cabbage parcels make a beautiful centerpiece with delicious mustard roasted roots and crispy smashed potatoes as warm sides. Because all of these dishes are quite rich, we also like to serve a fresh, tangy and crunchy salad on the side. Along with red cabbage Christmas krauts from our Green Kitchen at Home book. You’ll find the recipes here below. A few other favorites from the archives are our vegan Aubergine Polpette (perhaps with a gravy on the side), our Mushroom & Hazelnut Loaf, this one-tray Hasselback Potatoes with Kale and Pesto, the Pumpkin, Kale and Buckwheat Salad that we had for our wedding, this Black Quinoa & Kale Salad from dinosaur time (we’ve been making this for Christmas almost every year), and this Crispy Red Cabbage & Grape Salad (red cabbage salads are obligatory for all Danes on Christmas). We actually have one more recipe that we haven’t had time to post yet. It’s a really good gingerbread bundt cake and we’ll do our best to post the recipe before Christmas Eve (if you have our app, it is already available on there). Happy holidays! /­­Luise, David and all the kids! Stuffed Cabbage Parcels Makes 8 parcels These pretty little parcels are stuffed with rice, lentils, walnuts and raisins and cooked in a holiday spiced tomato broth. They are a little fiddly to make but super flavorful and well worth the effort. This recipe is vegan but you could also add feta cheese to the parcels if you feel like it. Filling – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked red rice (see note) – 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked puy lentils – 500 ml /­­ 2 cups water – 1/­­2 tsp sea salt – 1 tbsp olive oil – 1 large red onion, peeled and finely chopped – 1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped – 1 cup walnuts, finely chopped – 4 tbsp raisins – 2 tbsp lemon juice – 4 tbsp chopped parsley Tomato Broth – 750 ml /­­ 3 cups vegetable stock – 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tin crushed tomatoes – 1 tsp whole cloves – 1 tsp whole allspice – 2 star anise – 2 cinnamon sticks – 1 pinch sea salt Assembling – 1 savoy cabbage – 8 pieces of cooking string – 1 tbsp olive oil to fry in Instructions 1. Rinse rice and lentils in a sieve under running water. 2. Transfer to a saucepan and add water and salt. Bring to a boil, lower the heat and let simmer until tender, for about 35 minutes or according to the time on the package. 3. Place another sauce pan with the Tomato Broth ingredients on the stove, bring to a boil and then turn the heat down and let it slowly simmer under a lid for 20 minutes on low heat. 4. Meanwhile, add oil to a large skillet and sauté onion and garlic for 10 minutes on medium heat or until soft and translucent. 5. Transfer the onion to a bowl and wipe out the pan (you will use it to fry and cook the parcels in later on). 6. Drain any excess water from the rice and lentils. Add the onion and garlic, walnuts, raisins, lemon juice and parsley and stir to combine. 7. Carefully break off 8 leaves of the savoy cabbage. Trim off the thickest part of the stalk. 8. Blanch the savoy cabbage leaves in a sauce pan with salted boiling water for 2-3 minutes. Drain and lay out on a tea towel. 9. Spoon 3 tablespoons of filling into the center of each cabbage leaf. Fold up and tie with the string. Repeat with the remaining seven. 10. Place all parcels in a heated skillet with a little oil added. Fry on both sides until browned. 11. Pour the broth into the pan with the cabbage parcels (the pan should be half filled). Put a lid on and let simmer for about 30 minutesor until the cabbage feels soft and tender (you can cook the parcels for a shorter time if you prefer them a little crunchier). 12. Serve the parcels with a little broth poured on top. Remove the strings before eating ;) Note – We cook the rice and lentils for the filling together, just make sure that they have similar cooking times. If not, start with the one with the longest time and then add the other accordingly. Or cook in separate pans. Smashed Balsamic Potatoes Serves 4 as a side This rustic potato recipe combine three different potato methods into one - boiled, mashed and roasted. They are crispy on the outside, soft on the inside with a sweet tanginess added from balsamic vinegar. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb small potatoes – 2 tsp salt – 3 tbsp olive oil – 1 1/­­2 tbsp balsamic vinegar – 1 clove garlic, finely chopped – a few sprigs fresh thyme Preparation 1. Set the oven to 225°C /­­ 450°F. 2. Wash the potatoes (keep the skin on) and place in a large sauce pan. 3. Cover with water and add 1 tsp salt. Cook for about 20 minutes (longer if you use bigger potatoes) or until easily pierced with a fork. 4. Drain the water and leave to cool for a bit. 5. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and place the potatoes on it. 6. Smash the potatoes by pressing down on them using the backside of a glass. 7. Whisk together oil, balsamic vinegar and garlic. 9. Drizzle generously over the potatoes, making sure that you get it into all the nooks and crannies. You can use a brush for this as well. 10. Sprinkle with salt and thyme leaves. 11. Place in the oven and roast for 25 minutes or until the potatoes are crispy and golden brown. Tip – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode and lower the temp slightly for more evenly distributed heat. Mustard Roasted Roots Serves 4 as a side We love a good tray of roasted roots. Here we have coated the roots in cinnamon, grainy mustard, a little vinegar and maple syrup and roasted them until they start to caramelize. We serve these with a saffron sauce which basically is this turmeric tahini sauce but with saffron instead of turmeric. But a simple yogurt based sauce could be great too. Ingredients – 1 kg /­­ 2 lb mixed roots (parsnip, carrots, swede, sweet potato) Dressing – 3 tbsp olive oil – 2 tbsp grainy mustard – 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar – 1 tsp ground cinnamon – 1 tsp maple syrup – 1 tsp sea salt To Serve – 2 tbsp hemp seeds or finely chopped almonds Preparation 1. Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 375°F. 2. Peel the roots and chop into batons (roughly 10 cm long and 1,5 cm thick). 3. Stir together the dressing ingredients in a large mixing bowl. 4. Add the roots and toss until all are covered. 5. Tip out on a baking sheet covered with parchment paper and spread out in an even layer. 6. Place in the oven and roast for 20 minutes. Give the sheet a toss, then crank up the heat to 225°C /­­ 450°F and bake for 20 minutes more or until golden and slightly charred. 7. Transfer the roots to a serving platter and sprinkle with hemp seeds. Tips – This is perfect as a side for 4 persons but you can easily double the recipe if you are cooking for a crowd. Just use two baking sheets and set the oven to fan mode for more evenly distributed heat. – You can use any root for this but swede, carrots, sweet potato and parsnips are our favorites.   Crispy Celery and Orange Salad Serves 4 – 1 head romain lettuce or cosmopolitan – 4 celery stalks (or fennel) – 2 oranges – 4 tbsp toasted hazelnuts Mustard vinaigrette – 2 tbsp olive oil – 1 tbsp vinegar – 1 tsp Dijon mustard – 1 tsp maple syrup 1. Rinse the lettuce in water and chop into 2 inch /­­ 5 cm large pieces, discarding the stem. 2. Thinly slice the celery stalks (or mandolin the fennel of using). 3. Peel the oranges and cut in halves and thinly slice each half. 4. Place all prepped ingredients into a large mixing bowl. 5. Whisk together the vinaigrette ingredients in a small separate bowl. 6. Gently toss the dressing with the salad ingredients. 7. Chop the toasted hazelnuts. 8. Transfer to a serving bowl and scatter with hazelnuts. Serve!

Tomato Cobbler

December 17 2018 Meatless Monday 

A savory cobbler is the perfect winter dish! Its comforting and packed with familiar tomatoes, which boast just the vitamin C boost you may need during the cold months! This recipe comes to us from Colavita.   Serves 4 - For the tomato base: -  - 1 medium size vidalia onion - 1 tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil - 3 garlic cloves, minced - 2 packs of diced tomatoes - 1 pint cherry or grape tomatoes - 1 tbsp aged white wine vinegar - 1 tbsp brown sugar - 1 tsp kosher salt - 1/­­2 tsp ground black pepper - 1 tsp fresh thyme leaves plus a few sprigs for garnish   - For the biscuits: -  - 1-3/­­4 cups all-purpose flour - 2/­­3 cup polenta - 2 tbsp granulated sugar - 1 tbsp baking powder - 1/­­2 tsp kosher salt -  1/­­4 cup + 2 tbsp Olive Oil - 1-1/­­2 cups buttermilk - 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese   For the cobbler:   Chop half the amount of cherry tomatoes in half. Sauté the onion in a large oven-safe skillet over medium heat for 5-6 minutes or until tender. Add all the tomatoes to the skillet (chopped, whole and diced) along with the minced garlic. Cook for 10 minutes, until the whole tomatoes burst and reduce. Add the vinegar, brown sugar, salt, pepper and thyme leaves. Mix well. Set aside while you prepare the biscuit dough.   For the biscuits:   Place the flour, polenta, sugar, baking powder and salt in a large bowl. Mix thoroughly. Add the buttermilk, olive oil, and shredded cheese and mix just until it comes together. Do not over mix the dough. Use an ice-cream scoop to scoop out the biscuit dough and place on top of the tomato mixture. Place the biscuits about 1-2 inches apart because they will spread. Bake for about 35 minutes or until the biscuits are golden brown and the tomato mixture is bubbling. Let sit for 10-15 minutes and serve warm. Garnish with extra sprigs of thyme. Enjoy!   The post Tomato Cobbler appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Lentil and sunflower seed “meatloaf”

December 8 2018 VegKitchen 

Lentil  and sunflower seed “meatloaf” What I like about this kind of recipe is that it is extremely flexible. You can keep the base and make meatballs, burgers, or stuff it into vegetables. Here, I cooked it in a muffin mold, but you can opt for a lentil loaf cooked in a bigger mold. Just dont forget to increase the cooking time! Save Print Lentil and sunflower seed meatloaf Serves: 4-6   Ingredients 2 tbsp. of olive oil 1 1/­­2 cups of onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed ⅔ cup carrots, grated 1 packet (227g) mushrooms, finely chopped 1 cup of lentils, cooked, rinsed and drained 1 1/­­2 cup sunflower seeds 2 slices of whole grain bread, shredded into small pieces ¼ cup ground flaxseed ½ cup of oatmeal 2 tbsp. of tamari 1 tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1/­­4 cup of vegetable broth 1 tbsp. oregano 1/­­2 tsp. thyme 1/­­2 tsp. dry mustard Salt and pepper, to taste 1/­­4 cup of ketchup 1/­­4 cup of unsweetened applesauce 2 tbsp. balsamic vinegar 2 tbsp. tablespoon maple syrup Instructions In a skillet, heat olive oil over medium high heat. Add onion and mushrooms. Cook until the onion has begun to turn a little golden, about 10 minutes. Add the […] The article Lentil and sunflower seed “meatloaf” appeared first on VegKitchen.

Creamy Sun Dried Tomato Pasta with Garlic Soy curls

November 28 2018 Vegan Richa 

Creamy Sun Dried Tomato Pasta with Garlic Soy curlsCreamy Sun Dried Tomato Pasta with Garlic Soy curls. 20 Gm of Protein. Vegan Tuscan Garlic “Chicken” And pasta. Vegan Recipe Can be Soyfree with Mushrooms or Seitan. 30 Mins. Gluten-free and nutfree option  Jump to Recipe  This Luscious 30 Minute pasta is a vegan version of a dish I used to get in some restaurant more than a decade ago. Wow that was specific Anywho, the Creamy garlicky sauce with sun dried tomato some grilled chickin gets a vegan makeover! The Soy curls and soaked in garlic veggie broth, then toasted with more garlic and freshly ground black pepper. Then added to the cream base. Sun dried tomato, herbs, fresh thyme, pasta such as farfalle or fettuccine. Bliss.  This sauce and pasta are flexible to taste and ingredients. Use gluten-free pasta if needed, some nutfree non dairy cream for no nuts and use seitan, tofu or mushrooms to sub soy curls.  Easy, Quick and Delicious! Lets make this Luscious Meal. Continue reading: Creamy Sun Dried Tomato Pasta with Garlic Soy curlsThe post Creamy Sun Dried Tomato Pasta with Garlic Soy curls appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Baked Whole Roasted Cauliflower

October 30 2018 Vegan Richa 

Baked Whole Roasted CauliflowerThis Baked Whole Roasted Cauliflower is marinated in flavorful herbs and spices and baked to perfection to make a fabulous Holiday table option. Vegan Glutenfree Nutfree. Can be soyfree. Jump to Recipe  You all have loved making and serving my Whole Roasted Cauliflower with Makhani Sauce (Indian Butter Sauce) many times!. It will forever be a favorite of mine too. The luscious sauce makes a thick coating on the cauliflower and adds a ton of flavor which is perfect for the Holiday season.  This roasted cauliflower uses a marinade with holiday herbs such as sage, thyme, oregano. I add some spices that add a meaty flavor profile inspired from my Baharat blend. Together the flavors come together amazingly in this delicious marinade. Use the marinade over a whole cauliflower, or toss cauliflower florets and bake, or marinate some tofu or other veggies. You have to try it! There’s so much amazing flavor, you might want to make another batch of the marinade, simmer with some broth as serve as gravy. Perfect for Thanksgiving or any Holiday. See Recipe notes for make ahead. Continue reading: Baked Whole Roasted CauliflowerThe post Baked Whole Roasted Cauliflower appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Grilled Butternut Squash with Tabasco Glaze and Crunchy Spicy Seeds

October 8 2018 Meatless Monday 

This simple preparation of butternut squash is anything but. Grilling the squash develops its sweetness and adds a hint of smoky flavor, while a spicy-sweet glaze and cooling yogurt round out the flavors and the delightful crunch of the squashs seeds finish off the dish. This recipe comes to us from Stiltsville Fish Bar. Serves 4 For the Butternut Squash: 1 Whole Butternut Squash 2 tbsp. Honey 1 tbsp. Extra Virgin Olive Oil 1/­­2 tbsp. Salt 1/­­4 tbsp. Black Pepper 7 Fresh Thyme Sprigs, chopped   For the Crunchy Seeds: Reserved seeds from Butternut Squash 1 tsp. Extra Virgin Olive Oil 1/­­4 tsp. Tabasco 1/­­4 tsp. Salt   For the Tabasco Glaze: 2 tbsp. Honey 1 tbsp. Brown Sugar 1 tbsp. Tabasco 4 tbsp. Red Wine Vinegar   To Serve: 1 cup Fat-Free Greek Yogurt 3 tbsp. Tabasco Glaze   Preheat oven to 350° F. Then, cut squash in half down the center, length-ways, and scoop out the seeds and set to the side for toasting (recipe below). Trim ends off and cut 1-inch thick slices, creating half-moon shapes. Place in a large bowl and add honey, salt, pepper, thyme and olive oil. Toss until all pieces are coated well. Place on a sheet pan and roast for 30 to 40 minutes or until tender. Clean all the flesh off the squash seeds and place in a bowl with oil, Tabasco and salt. Toss all ingredients together well and toast in the oven for about 12 to 14 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from the oven and keep at room temperature until needed for garnish. In a small sauce pan, whisk together honey, Tabasco, brown sugar and vinegar over medium heat. Cook and reduce by half. Remove from heat and reserve at room temperature until needed. Turn on grill to high heat and lightly oil grill or spray with oil. Place roasted squash on grill and re-heat over the flame. Grill evenly on both sides. Smooth Greek yogurt evenly over a serving plate with the back of spoon. Stack the grilled butternut squash on top of each other, then drizzle Tabasco glaze on top of squash and sprinkle with toasted seeds. Garnish with fresh thyme. The post Grilled Butternut Squash with Tabasco Glaze and Crunchy Spicy Seeds appeared first on Meatless Monday.

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

August 29 2018 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterThe Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl This year I traveled to Ethiopia in the weeks before Easter - one of several special times of fasting, when the majority of the country eats entirely vegan! I explored the central cities, traveled overland to the north, went trekking in the highlands and stayed with families in remote villages. As with all my travels and culinary research, I am extremely grateful for the privilege to learn, share & exchange, and be guided & supported by many families and professional cooks who invited me in their kitchens and shared amazing meals with me. Since returning to Berlin, I’ve been cooking Ethiopian and Eritrean food practically non-stop, recreating recipes and dishes, constantly inviting friends and guests to my cooking studio for lunch and dinner parties. Abebech showing me traditional village cooking in the Ethiopian Highlands. Making Injera for the first time in Ethiopia The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA is my newest cookbook with original recipes, artwork, photography and stories inspired by these latest culinary adventures. It includes over 70 recipes based on the mouth-watering meals in bustling cities & towns, at road-stop eateries, and in rural highland villages. As with my previous 5 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. The Lotus and the Artichoke is the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. The ETHIOPIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 6th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 140 pages with 70+ recipes and over 60 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by my travels and culinary adventures in East Africa - Also based on experiences with international communities of Europe (London, Paris, and Berlin) and North America (Philadelphia, New York, and Washington D.C.) and over 25 years of vegan cooking - Ethiopian & Eritrean classics, familiar restaurant & family favourites, delicious delights, wonders & surprises, and creative culinary experiments - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Doro Wat – spicy seitan stew Spinach Dinach Butecha – Chickpea “Egg” Salad Minchet Abish – spicy soy mince & walnuts Duba Wot – pumpkin stew Shimbra Asa – chickpea “fish” Asa (Jackfruit) Tibs Fosolia – green beans & carrots Pizza Lalibela Ingudai Tibs – spicy mushrooms Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping Ambasha – sweet bread Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA - Traditional Berbere spice mix (simple + advanced) - Nitir Qibe – spiced butter/­­oil - Mitmita – extra hot spice mix - Yewot Qimen – black pepper spice mix - Shiro – chickpea/­­bean spice mix - Data (Yekarya Delleh) – roasted chili, garlic, onion & herb sauce - Traditional Injera – Ethiopian sourdough crepe - Quick Injera - Ambasha - sweet raisin bread - Doro Dabo – baked stuffed bread - Difo Dabo - spiced bread - Pizza Lalibela - with tomato sauce & roasted potato topping - Sambosa – savory pastry with lentil filling - Senig Karia – roasted spicy stuffed chilies - Injera Firfir – traditional flatbread with spicy tomato sauce - Yesuf Fitfit – chopped injera & lemon sunflower seed dressing - Kita (Injekita) – sweet breakfast flatbread & jam - Chornake /­­ Pasty – fried bread - Genfo – roasted wheat & barley porridge - Selata - super simple salad - Selata Delux - with mango, dates, avocado mixed greens & lentils - Butecha - chickpea “egg” salad - Selata Timtim - tomato salad - Selata Dinich - potato salad - Selata Bekarot - carrot salad - Telba - roasted flax dressing - Shiro Wot - chickpea puree - Misir Wot – red lentils - Doro Wot – spicy seitan - Soy Tibs - spicy soymeat strips - Ingudai Wot - spicy mushrooms - Bamia - spicy okra - Minchet Abish - spicy soy mince & walnuts - Shimbra Asa – spicy chickpea “fish” - Kik Alicha – yellow lentils - Atakilt Alicha – cabbage, carrots & potatoes - Keysir - beet root - Duba Alicha - pumpkin stew - Tikr Gomen - greens with garlic - Spinach Dinich - spinach & roasted potatoes - Fosolia – green beans & carrots - Asa Tibs – lemon pepper jackfruit fritters - Tofu Alicha - batter fried tofu in mild garlic & onion sauce - Ingudai Alicha – mushrooms w/­­ creamy cashew, lemon, pepper, thyme, parsley - Peppers & Potatoes - garlic ginger stir-fry - Inkulal Firfir – spicy tofu scramble & tomatoes - Ful – fava beans - Ayib – cottage cheese - Bedergan – roasted eggplant - Vegetable Lentil Soup - Vegetable Pasta – spaghetti with mixed chopped vegetables - Macaroni Firfir – noodles with garlic onion tomato sauce on injera - Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping - Ethiopian Mashed Potatoes - Traditional Coffee Ceremony - Spiced Black Tea - Roiboos tea with lemon, ginger &cardamon - Mango Moringa Banana Smoothie - Injera w/­­ dates - Banana Bread - Fasting Muffins - Rooibos Tea Ice Cream Video: Justin P. Moore Music: Nils Kercher Nanfulle from Ancient Intimations (live) (C)2016 Ancient Pulse Music PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl The post ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Kitchen Creativity

December 12 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Kitchen Creativity In a break from my usual recipe posts, I’d like to share an excerpt from Karen Page’s new book entitled Kitchen Creativity. Beyond a cookbook, Kitchen Creativity is a guide to inventive cooking (without recipes!) that will inspire you to think, improvise, and cook like the world’s best chefs. Great cooking is as much about intuition and imagination as it is about flavor and technique. Kitchen Creativity gives insights into these creative processes from more than 100 top restaurant kitchens, including the Bazaar, Blue Hill, Daniel, and Dirt Candy. Based on four years of research and dozens of in-depth interviews, Kitchen Creativity illuminates the methods of culinary invention. Part I reveals how to learn foundational skills, including how to appreciate, taste, and season classic dishes before reinventing the classics from a new perspective. Part II’s A-to-Z entries are an invaluable culinary idea generator, with exercises to prompt new recipe ideas and combinations. While not a cookbook, nor a vegan book, for that matter (although vegan chefs and ingredients are very well represented), Kitchen Creativity has a lot to offer for cooks looking to broaden their creativity in the kitchen.  The following is an excerpt from Kitchen Creativity on one of my favorite topics, umami… “Umami” from Kitchen Creativity by Karen Page The taste of umami is imparted by glutamate, a type of amino acid discovered in 1908 by Dr. Kikunae Ikeda of Tokyo Imperial University. In studying kombu (kelp), Ikeda managed to isolate glutamate as its own compound, giving it the name of umami, which translates as savoriness. Thus, 5,000 years after the discovery of salt, and 4,000 years after the discovery of sugar, and 3,500 years after the discovery of sour (vinegar), umami is a relatively new taste concept. Japanese cooks had been using umami-rich ingredients intuitively for centuries, long before their scientific properties were discovered to enhance flavor. While we first mentioned umami in our 1996 book Culinary Artistry, it did not begin to gain more widespread acceptance until after 2000 when glutamate receptors were discovered on the tongue. The main sources of umami are those deriving from 1) the amino acid glutamate (found in, e.g., kelp); and those deriving from 2) so-called nucleotides--such as a) adenylate (aka AMP, which is found primarily in fish and shellfish), b) guanylate (aka GMP, which is found primarily in plants and fungi, e.g., shiitake mushrooms, esp. dried), and c) inosinate (aka IMP, which is found primarily in meat and fish, e.g., bonito flakes). The big umami magic happens when one or more nucleotides are combined with glutamate, as there is a synergistic affect--resulting in umami with as much as eight times the potency. Umami Dynamics Umami can enhance a bland dishs appeal with mouth-filling savoriness. Umami can also enhance a dishs perceived sweetness, while tempering its perceived bitterness. If you find yourself with too much of a good thing when it comes to umami, try balancing with salty, sweet, bitter, acidic, or piquant ingredients. Umami is a taste that tends to linger on the palate--something referred to as a long finish in the wine world. Because it contributes to the qualities of deliciousness and satiation, umami is especially prized as a taste in dishes and menus. Note: Certain herbs and spices can also emphasize a dishs savory aspects, such as bay leaf, cumin, oregano, paprika, sage, and thyme. Using Umami Chefs praise black garlic (aka fermented garlic) for its ability to add depth and earthiness to dishes ranging from vegetables to meats. If you doubt umamis importance as one of the five primary tastes, consider the fact that leading chefs like Michael Anthony, Eric Ripert, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten believe dashi to be a key component of their cooking. Some chefs use it to replace liquids in countless preparations, from brines to broths to salad dressings. Chefs have rising enthusiasm for all manner of fermented ingredients (e.g., fermented soybeans, kimchi, miso, pickles, sauerkraut), which bring umami to dishes including vegetables. The corn smut known as huitlacoche is prized as a Mexican delicacy, not only by chefs cooking in the vernacular like Rick Bayless, but also mainstream chefs who find themselves using it in quesadillas, soups, and tacos. Sean Brock declares is insanely delicious and luxurious, like black truffles. Kombu (aka kelp, the sea vegetable) is prized for its umami by Yoshihiro Narisawa. Brad Farmerie is fanatical about miso, which allows him to achieve a rich mouthfeel without butter or cream. Miso is an integral part of Farmeries roasted chile caramel Brussels sprouts, which involve caramelizing sugar (sweet) before adding chiles (hot), cilantro stems (bitter), lime juice (sour), fish sauce (salt/­­umami), and miso (richness). He adds miso to sweet potatoes + brown butter + rosemary to create another dish hes not able to take off the menu. Other chefs will add misos (e.g., white) to salad dressings or soups for an umami boost. From his time in Japan, Michael Anthony picked up a love of sea weeds and pickles. Thomas Henkelmann describes rich, flavorful stocks as essential for cooking in every season. Umeboshi paste is prized by chefs, including Isa Chandra Moskowitz of Omahas and Brooklyns Modern Love, for its umami quality. Moskowitz adds it to her Caesar salad dressing for its anchovy flavor. Even native Brits like Mark Levy fall prey to the charms of white truffles, which he prizes for their mysterious aroma and short availability. Excerpted from Kitchen Creativity: Unlocking Culinary Genius--with Wisdom, Inspiration, and Ideas from the Worlds Most Creative Chefs by Karen Page (Little, Brown, October 31, 2017). Save Save Save Save The post Kitchen Creativity appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegan Lentil Moussaka

December 6 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Lentil Moussaka This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. As our new cookbook release date approaches and we enter a really busy season of our lives (more on that soon!), we count on hearty and sustainable meals like this lentil moussaka to see us through periods of tiredness or stress. If you are feeling any kind of holiday season-related pressure, it might just be the perfect, comforting dish for you, too. I love casserole-style dishes – they take some initial effort to put together, but afterwards they turn into a meal that just keeps on giving. This moussaka is definitely like that – the portion is big enough to have dinner or lunch taken care of for a solid few days, it keeps well and only gets better with age, can be eaten hot or cold, and can even be re-imagined as, say, a toast topping, if its initial layered charm ever wears off.  Moussaka is cooked in numerous countries in the Middle East and the Mediterranean, and the recipe varies from region to region, but it usually involves layers of ground meat, eggplant or potatoes, and a béchamel or egg custard blanket on top. In our vegan version, protein-rich lentils take place of the ground meat. Once they are cooked in a mixture of mushrooms, carrots, onion, herbs, and crushed tomatoes, and layered with silky roasted eggplant, it’s incredible how savory and satisfying they become. We went with mashed potatoes for the top layer, in place of the custard or béchamel, which takes this dish even further into the cozy and wintery meal territory. The mashed potato blanket also gets the most incredible, crispy, golden crust on top after some time in the oven, which makes the whole thing even more irresistible. I suggest roasting the eggplant, making the mashed potatoes, and maybe even cooking the lentils in advance, that way assembling the moussaka will feel like a breeze. All the ingredients in this recipe are very affordable and widely available, and it’s amazing that such a satisfying meal can be made with just lentils and veggies. I generally make sure to keep a big jar of French lentils in my pantry, because they are very versatile and perfect for adding substance to all kinds of plant-based meals. Lentils fall under the category of pulses, together with chickpeas, beans and dry peas, which are all perfect vehicles for sustainable and nourishing meals. We’ve been having a ton of fun working with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada on creating accessible recipes, centered around pulses, as part of their Half Cup Habit initiative. Try adding a half cup of pulses to your meals a few times a week – they will up your whole healthy cooking game, I promise. For more of our pulses recipes, head here, as well as to the Half Cup Habit website. Enjoy :) Vegan Lentil Moussaka   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 3 medium-large eggplants - sliced in ½ inch thick rounds 4 tablespoons neutral coconut or olive oil - divided sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 cup dried French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of acv 4 medium Yukon gold potatoes - peeled and quartered 2 tablespoons olive oil or ghee, plus more for brushing the mashed potato layer 1 large yellow onion - chopped 2 medium carrots - sliced 1-2 celery ribs - sliced (optional) pinch of red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon each fresh or dried thyme, oregano and/­­or marjoram (optional) 3 garlic cloves - sliced 1 lb baby bella or crimini mushrooms - sliced 1 28 oz can of box of crushed tomatoes 1 tablespoon tomato paste ½ tablespoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon cinnamon (optional) ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg (optional) handful of toasted pine nuts (optional) chopped parsley and dill - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare two parchment paper-covered baking sheets. Arrange the eggplant slices on the baking sheets in a single layer, oil with 2 tablespoons of coconut oil/­­olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and roast for 20 minutes. Flip the slices and roast for another 15 minutes, until silky. Set aside. Lower the oven temperature to 375° F (190° C). While the eggplant is roasting, drain and rinse the lentils. Cover them with purified water in a medium pot, and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 10-15 minutes or until cooked, but not mushy. Add salt at the end. Drain over a colander and set aside. Place the potatoes in the same pot you used to cook the lentils, cover with purified water and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until soft throughout. Add salt at the end, then drain, reserving ¼ cup of the cooking water. Return the potatoes to the same pot. Mash them with 2 tablespoons of olive oil or ghee, black pepper and ¼ cup of the reserved cooking water. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Continue to mash until smooth. Set aside. Warm the remaining 2 tablespoons of coconut oil/­­olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, carrots, celery, if using, salt and pepper, red pepper flakes and oregano/­­thyme/­­marjoram, if using. Sauté for 7 minutes, until the vegetables soften up. Add the mushrooms and sauté for another 8 minutes, until the water released by the mushrooms evaporates and they begin to brown. Add garlic and stir around for another minute. Add the lentils, crushed tomatoes, tomato paste, smoked paprika, cinnamon and nutmeg, if using, to the pot with the mushrooms. Stir to combine, then cover and cook for 5 minutes for the flavors to incorporate. Arrange half of the eggplant slices on the bottom of a 9 x 9 baking dish. Top with half of the lentil mixture, followed by the remaining eggplant slices and lentils. Spoon the mashed potatoes on top, evening them out with a spoon into a smooth layer. Brush more olive oil/­­ghee over the potato layer and place the dish in the oven. Bake for 30 minutes. Remove from the oven, sprinkle with the pine nuts and herbs, if using, and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans Roasted Pepper Lasagna Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Vegan Lentil Moussaka appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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