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tarragon vegetarian recipes

Baked Lentil Empanadas

September 9 2019 Meatless Monday 

Lentils, cremini mushrooms, and pimento-stuffed olives give these baked empanadas flavor to spare. This recipe comes to us from chef Jodi Taffel , one of the finalists in the Western Foodservice Show Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Makes 24 empanadas - 7 eggs - 1 cup yellow onion, roughly chopped - 1 cup sliced carrots - 1/­­2 cup diced celery - 8 oz sliced cremini mushrooms - 2 tbl olive oil - 1 tbl minced garlic - 2 tsp Kosher salt - 1 tsp cracked black pepper - 1/­­2 tsp paprika - 1 cup dry green lentils - 2 tsp dried tarragon - 4 cups vegetable stock - 1 cup martini olives (green with red pimentos), roughly chopped - 24 empanada wrappers - 2 tbl water, divided - 1/­­2 cup toasted garlic & avocado finishing oil   Directions 1. Submerge 6 eggs in a pot of water set over medium heat and bring to a boil. Remove from the heat, cover with a tight fitting lid and let sit 12 minutes. Remove eggs and place in an ice bath. When cool enough to touch, peel and roughly chop. 2. While eggs are cooking, set a heavy bottomed soup pot over medium heat and sauté onion, carrots, celery and mushrooms the olive oil until softened. 3. Add the garlic, salt, pepper and paprika and cook 1 additional minute, or until fragrant. 4. Add the lentils and toss with the vegetables, then add the tarragon and stock. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. 5. Simmer 30 minutes, stirring every few minutes, or until lentils are tender and all the liquid has been absorbed (if lentils are still a bit crunchy after liquid is absorbed, add another cup of stock and continue to cook until they are tender). 6. Transfer lentil mixture to a large bowl and allow to cool 15 minutes while you preheat the oven to 400 degrees. 7. Fold eggs and olives into lentil mixture. 8. Working with 1 at a time, place 3-4 tablespoons lentil mixture in the center of each empanada wrapper. Dab your finger in water and moisten all around the outer edge of the empanada wrappers. Fold empanadas in half, seal the edges with the tines of a fork, and place on a parchment or silicone lined sheet pan. 9. Beat remaining egg with remaining tablespoon of water and paint the tops of the empanadas with it. 10. Bake 30-40 minutes, or until beautifully browned. 11. Remove empanadas from the oven and pain tops with finishing oil while still hot. The post Baked Lentil Empanadas appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Fruit Shrub, The Most Refreshing Summer Drink

June 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Fruit Shrub, The Most Refreshing Summer Drink And just like that, summer is here, and so is the very first heat wave. I’m deeply devoted to having warm and cozy drinks every day, but I’ve definitely been icing my matcha and superfood lattes for the past week or so. It also feels very nice to have something chilled and bubbly in the early evening, when it’s still light outside, and the sky is just beginning to turn pretty sunset colors. It’s those little details that make summer so special. For me, that something bubbly is usually kombucha, but I recently learned about fruit shrubs and fell in love. A shrub is a drinking vinegar syrup, which is delicious served over ice with seltzer or as a cocktail component. Today I’m specifically talking about fruit shrubs, which are so easy to make and last a while in the fridge. The flavor is definitely reminiscent of kombucha – fruity with a vinegary acidity, but the preparation requires much less patience than homemade booch. This is very much a no-recipe recipe, since it can be interpreted so many ways, with so many different fruit and aromatics. There’s a video explaining the whole process as well! Follow the ratio provided in the recipe below, using a combination of any of these ingredients. Experimenting with the flavors is the most fun part. Fruit Berries Blueberries Raspberries Strawberries Blackberries Etc. Stone Fruit Plums Peaches Nectarines Cherries Mangoes Etc. Other Apples Pears Pineapple Rhubarb Etc. Aromatics Spices Cinnamon Cloves Ginger (ideally fresh) Peppercorns (black or pink) Star anise Nutmeg Etc. Herbs Basil Mint Cilantro Rosemary Lemon thyme Lemon verbena Tarragon Etc. Citrus Lemon Lime Orange + their zest Etc. Fruit Shrub, The Most Refreshing Summer Drink   Print Serves: about 10-12 oz shrub syrup Ingredients 1 lb fruit of choice (see above for suggestions) ¾ - 1 cup sugar (I like to use raw cane sugar here) any aromatics of choice (see above for suggestions) - to taste 1 cup apple cider vinegar Instructions In a large bowl, combine the fruit and sugar, mixing well. Use a potato masher to gently mash up the fruit in order to get it to start releasing its juices and to break up the skins if present. Add the aromatics like bruised or chopped herbs, spices, citrus juice/­­zest, etc. Cover and set aside for at least 4 hours, or ideally refrigerate overnight, especially if using tougher fruit like apples, pears, rhubarb. Strain the fruit mixture through a fine mesh strainer, making sure to squeeze all the juices out of the pulp. Add the vinegar and mix well. Transfer to an airtight container and keep refrigerated. Enjoy your shrub by filling a glass with ice, adding a splash of the shrub, and topping it with seltzer and/­­or liquor of choice. Notes Most traditional shrub recipes call for a ratio of 1 cup sugar to 1 lb of fruit, but I find that ¾ cup of sugar is enough for me in most cases. This also largely depends on the initial sugar content of the fruit youre using. Experiment and see what you like! 3.5.3226 The post Fruit Shrub, The Most Refreshing Summer Drink appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett

May 5 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett Rachelle Robinett is an Herbalist, Holistic Health Practitioner, and founder of Supernatural, a company dedicated to real-world plant-based wellness. Rachelle has been studying the relationship between plants and people her entire life – be that on a farm in the Pacific Northwest (where she grew up) to time with healers, specialists, and shaman in farther-away places. She now provides functional plant-based wellness services, products, and education to empower people to understand their health, and lean into it, naturally. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? This has changed a lot for me since launching my company and having total control of my schedule. I do schedule every thing, but also move through life very intuitively. For example, on a day off Ill plan to ride my bike but once Im on it, it doesnt matter to me where I go. There are things I do routinely (meal preparation, exercise, rituals, sleep) but I never ignore instincts or anything my body is telling me. I love to be surprised but also care so much about how I spend every moment that planning is a big part of my life. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. No more alarm clock! Or, infrequently, which isnt something I would have predicted for my life. Ill wake up to open windows and the sounds of birds on a breeze. A glass of water with a tincture and probiotics. If its a day off, Ill skip caffeine and head out for a run while Im still sleepy. I love waking up while I run. A work day means a small cup of cold-brew with MCT oil and (currently, though it changes as I work with different herbs) mucuna pruriens and L-theanine. I practice intermittent fasting daily so dont typically eat until 11am or later but in the morning Ill make a broth or giant green juice and also a smoothie, which becomes brunch. A meditation ritual with some South American plants Ive come to love and then its off to the races. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Getting away from blue light! If Im near screens, they have physical filters and apps (like flux) installed to reduce the effect. Dimmed lights, incense, my Zen Spa Stuff playlist, and something to drink. There are always herbs at night as my energy tends to run very high, naturally. I cycle between kava kava, skullcap, valerian, poppy, lavender, and more. Also very in love with a relaxing face-washing routine. :) -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Im working diligently at becoming a more regular meditator. Its most days now, but Id like to deepen it. Otherwise, yoga, running and long bike rides silence my mind. I can practice yoga (ashtanga) for hours a day and be thrilled. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – A giant smoothie made with fresh tropical fruits and fats, ideally picked from a jungle farm that morning. Lunch – All the vegetables, fresh and raw and local. Amazing olive oil, avocado, or coconut. Maybe some seeds. Seaweed too. Every color of the rainbow. Snack – 100% cacao. Local. Dinner - See lunch. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Currently I have about 1/­­2 cup of cold-brew coffee that we make at home. Im so high energy naturally that I often dont finish it. Green juice is my favorite energy support. Otherwise I use water, food, sunlight and breath to adjust my energy. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? Dark chocolate – often homemade but if bought its 92 – 100%. Ill eat that for breakfast, honestly. My sugar intake is so low that sweets cravings are rare but if they get aggressive Ill have extra cacao in smoothies or elixirs, or eat more fruit, sweet potatoes/­­yams, etc. Chocolate chip cookies are dear to my heart though. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? This evolves as I learn and grow too but ... – An excellent probiotic – Personalized herbs. For me those are mood-supportive and nervous-system soothing. I use a combination of herbal teas (infused overnight), tinctures (HerbPharm are my favorite!) and well-sourced powders. – Supplements depending on bloodwork, body composition and lifestyle. – Im seeing the greatest overall health changes in my clients who are working on gut health. It just affects so much! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I live to move. Every single day if possible! If I skip more than two days, I get really restless. Running and yoga are my favorite, but I need both. I joke that running is my church; I treasure it and find it extremely cathartic. Yoga keeps everything balanced and I hope to have the practice for life. Weather permitting, Ill ride my bike for hours but that just feels like play. Im also into strength training (aka lifting weights at the gym, which surprises people). Overall, I consider exercise as essential as good food, water, and sleep. My preference for high-intensity exhaustive stuff comes from my high-energy personality but isnt necessary for everyone. Ive seen some of the fastest changes in my body with a daily yoga practice, some walking, and an excellent diet. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? Absolutely heavenly. Excellent playlists are essential! Also, just do it. ;) Beauty -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I think people doubt me when I say greens, and especially green juice, are responsible for the glow but I really mean it. Veggies veggies veggies, healthy fat, tons of water, and sweat! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Aside from food, water, rest, and sweat, I find that a consistent routine of gentle exfoliation and good quality rehydration (topically, that is) work best for me. Continually renewing the surface, allowing skin to breathe, and keeping it nourished with really simple ingredients (I love Egyptian Magic and fruit enzyme or honey-based masks) gives really great face. That said, Im not an esthetician and have increasingly more respect for what I dont know about skincare (thanks to spending more time with the professionals at CAP Beauty, especially) and it will differ for everyone. What wont differ is the value of a right diet to help reduce inflammation, increase circulation, maintain hydration, and provide enough energy for both exercising and rest. :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Exercise and sleep have always been stress-reliefs for me. Ive recently integrated more meditation, and herbs of course (especially nervines). Whats making the greatest difference, though, is - as with most things - addressing the root cause or source of the stress. Rather than just trying to breathe between emails, Im looking at how to reduce email overall. Setting timers, limits on the number of meetings Ill take each day, inbox pausing, and scheduling (and sticking to) more time truly offline. Personal days, screen-free evenings or weekends, etc. If doing this, its important to prepare for there to be more to address when you return to it, so another part of the practice may be letting go of how much we want to engage with and choosing quality over quantity. Much harder said than done. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Heat and spice! I completely eliminate all sugar including fruit and yes, honey too. I put on three extra layers to get warm and stay warm. Garlic, ginger, and all sorts of spice. And rest. Essentially, Im aiming to help my body reach a sort of break-point with the cold/­­flu, or to sweat it out before it even reaches a peak, which Ive had a lot of success with. Medicinal mushrooms can also be great for cold/­­flu season. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? Im working on this. (See above regarding stress avoidance!) My work is my play is my passion is my love so whats not work is sometimes very hard to determine. My hypnotherapist friend suggests that if it makes me happy, perhaps its not important to distinguish. My partner has inspired me to take in information from sources entirely outside of my usual bubble, which is great for play, and avoiding a filtered or algorithmic existence. This is a new practice for me. I grew up in a home that didnt allow for play so its something Im creating space for and learning how to do as an adult. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Ive found that its just impossible to be my best self when Im not taking care. Its really priority number one (and two, and maybe three) at this point. That said, there are times when life when its worth compromising different things. Like, in my twenties when I worked my ass off (and loved it) in order to achieve certain things. Now, I feel freer to play and rest. These bodies are our only homes in this life. I am so grateful to have one; I really think of it like my best friend and partner in existence. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Learning how to eat entirely plant-based, and well. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Thankfully, I dont have these. But, the opposite side of that spectrum is overworking, under-socializing, or burnout. And, existential crises which seem to strike when things are best. Rest and changes of scenery can do wonders. (Lately, I have been exploring procrastination from the perspective of mindfulness, though. This is an enlightening talk on it.) -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Instead Ill choose a couple of people: My mom, who as a Dietician gave me the greatest start in understanding nutrition, but more importantly taught me how to listen to my body. Rather than bandaging symptoms, she showed us how to ask why and follow the clues to root causes. My dad, an Anaesthesiologist who - much the opposite of Mom - taught us about medicine yes, but of more value he gave me the travel bug and experiences with wild nature that started and perpetuate my relationship with earth. And, Wendy Green, who I met at the perfect time in my journey. She helped direct my then multitudinous health practices into a more singular approach, which Ive honed and deepened since we met years ago. She also showed me how much I love ashtanga yoga, which is the gift of a lifetime. Ill be back to her retreat for the third time this summer. Knowledge -- Do you have any recommendations for those thinking of taking their career in a similar direction? Where does one start, where to find the education, how important is certification, etc. This is one of the most common questions I receive! I appreciate Mountain Rose Herbs list of resources for those looking into schools, teachers, or even just books. Its worth knowing which certifications are recognized by The American Herbalists Guild, though many people disregard the value of that and choose to study from great herbalists or schools that exist outside of the system. Id recommend as much exploration and direct experience as possible in the form of classes, workshops, and apprenticeships before then committing to a longer-term study. Find someone whose approach you respect and identify with and learn from them in whatever ways are available. -- Tell us about HRBLS, your beautiful herb infused chew line! Woo, HRBLS! These are my babies! Long story short, I wanted to give people an easy, delicious, beautiful but still very effective form of herbs. The HRBLS are gummies, or chews, that are equivalent to a dose of a tincture, a strong cup of herbal tea, or some capsules. Theyre a marriage between functional food and herbal remedies. A snack medicine or treat with benefits. Nerve Less is the first flavor (honeyed lavender tarragon) and includes my favorite herbs for daytime stress and anxiety relief, which so many folks come to me for help resolving. In the near future, well announce the next flavor – okay flavor s. :) -- And a last, fun one: what are your three favorite plants for the spring season and why? – Nettle! Because its my bff (we grew up together) and the coolest combination of edible green, super-green plant medicine, and a natural antihistamine. – Dandelion: I love the multi-taskers and like nettle, dandelion is an edible flower and bitter green (great for digestion), and medicinal top to root. – Mimosa. The tree of happiness which blooms more in the summer than spring, but close enough. Aside from looking magical, its full of medicine – everything from antioxidants to DMT. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Deep massages – two hours with the strongest hands I can find please! Acupuncture. Running, yoga, riding. TRAVEL. The post Self-Care Interview Series: Rachelle Robinett appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder

December 30 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder Erin Lovell Verinder is a herbalist, nutritionist and energetic healer living in the wilds of the Byron Bay hinterland in Australia, working with clients locally in her Sydney clinic and worldwide via Skype. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I honestly love both. I keep certain parts of my day very structured especially around work days and where I can, I claim open space. I follow structure to bring in the foundations of support that are essential for me to thrive and maintain my balance. Like slow mornings, connecting to nature, enjoying a whole nourishing breakfast. But then I open up my days where possible to flow & allow spontaneity. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I keep my mornings slow and sacred, it’s been a very intentional movement towards this over the years. I wake with the sunlight pouring into our bedroom, we live in an old church and the light in here is just next level serene. I always keep the blinds open to allow my body rhythms to harmonize with the sun and moon cycle. This regulates your cortisol and melatonin in such a fundamental way. I allow myself to wake slowly, no rush, no jump out of bed, no alarms, no startle response! I will then take time to do some stretching sequences with conscious breath, and then sit for a 20 minute meditation. Followed by a morning dog walk around our very green country town. Other mornings it’s a swim in the ocean with my husband and a lazy lay on the sand. After this, it’s breakfast time. I brew a tea, or make a tonic and take that out into the garden. I really feel it’s so important to have a whole breakfast, and we really honour that in our household, we sit and chat and connect over a meal before the day unfolds. I do my absolute best to only engage in anything work related after 8am and completely screen free before then is the daily goal. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Yes! I am super ritualistic about the evening wind down. I ensure I am off all screens at least two hours before sleep. I feel this is so greatly important to allow our bodies to align and flow into the yin cycle of the night. I switch off all overhead lights and only use very warm low light lamps as the sun sets. This is another trick to converse with your body to wind down, let go of any tasks and prep for rest. I read, write, listen to music and savour evenings for creative flow and conversation with my husband. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Many. I practice conscious breath and meditation as my main allies. But I also spend A LOT of time with plants, growing, making, conversing and in nature scapes. This is for me the ultimate mindfulness practice of oneness, presence and connection. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Scrambled eggs with turmeric, garlic and greens, avocado and some home fermented veggies on the side.  Lunch – Wild caught Mahi Mahi with tarragon, parsley, lemon and garlic cooked in ghee, on top of a bed of greens with some roasted sweet potato on the side. (Literally one of my favourite dishes ever) Snack – I love smoothies. Often a smoothie, my current fav is Strawberries, cashew nut butter, cashew nut mylk, collagen, hemp seeds, tocos, cinnamon, vanilla powder & ashwaganda powder. Dinner - San choy bow, with a rainbow of veggies & lots of bold ginger flavour in vibrant cos lettuce cups. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I actually do not, I am completely stimulant free. I have not always been, but just find myself so very sensitive to any stimulants these days. I used to love love love a great spicy black chai tea but since going caffeine free I have replaced it with a dandelion chai blend I make myself that is just so warming and grounding I adore it. Plus no crazy energy spikes and lows, so thats a plus! -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? At the same time when I let go of stimulants, I completely let go of sweets- even natural sweeteners. In the past I have been an avid lover of raw chocolate and quite the connoisseur (ha) but these days I make my own carob chocolate that has no sweetener in it at all. I love carob as it’s very sweet naturally so you can get away with no added sweeteners. I pair it with vanilla powder and they work synergistically to give a natural sweetness that I find so comforting. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I do utilize supplement support as needed, this shifts as my body shifts. I love Vitamin C on so many levels but particularly for its adrenally restorative healing elements, so it is absolutely in my daily supplement routine, alongside Magnesium citrate on the daily. With herbs, I will vary what I am taking depending on my needs. I add herbal powders and medicinal mushrooms to my tonics and smoothies. Currently my favourites are Withania (Ashwaganda) and Reishi. I also am a huge lover of infusions (long loose leaf herbal brews) and always have a big jar of an overnight infusion with me to sip throughout my day. My most utilized blend would be Nettle leaf, Oat straw and Hibiscus. Earthy, calming, tangy and nourishing. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Years go I had a heinous back injury, I herniated multiple discs from overexercising. My approach and relationship to body movement completely shifted after this, from rigorous to gentleness. It is still an area of my life I have to encourage myself back to and approach more as an act of self love. Taking care of my temple. I walk my pups daily, I love pilates and swimming, I have begun the be.come project and absolutely LOVE the approach to body movement with body positivity, inclusivity, no need for any equipment and in the comfort of my own home. This all feels really supportive and a mix of gentle yet effective support for me and my body. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I am not a natural athlete by any measure! I have recently connected to how emotional it can be to return to body movement when you have been through a big physical injury/­­body change/­­life change. So for me the way I psyche myself up to do a session is to come from self love, to know this is a loving act of care for my body. That really helps me so much. Also knowing there are no rules to how you must move your body, allow exercise to meet your vibration- yin, yang and all between. Shifting the type of body movement I do with my menstrual cycle/­­hormones is so key. Be your own compass. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Authenticity, when someone is just purely themselves and at ease with it. I find it absolutely stunning. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Oils, oils and more oil. I swear by the dewy hydration of oils. I am pretty low maintenance with skin care, and have noticed I need a lot less intervention since moving to the sea and swimming in the ocean most days. The salt magic is so nourishing for the skin. I also find the sun very healing, contrary to the fear of UV rays we have been indoctrinated with! I use a homemade herbal balm for a lot of applications, hair mask, makeup remover, and moisturizer. It is a power packed plant based mix, and such a heavenly blend. I also use Ritual oil, a moringa and blue lotus oil as a body moisturizer.  I am in my mid 30s and really notice my skin responds so well to the dewy goodness of oils. I practice dry body brushing also, which I feel is so wonderful to aid stagnation and lymphatic flow. I use a jade roller which I keep in the fridge for extra lymphatic cooling, and use on my face every few days with oil. I always end my showers with cold water, to add in a hydrotherapy element. I wear very little makeup, but when I do it is always natural, as clean as can be. I love RMS and Ere Perez. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? The importance of a vibrant whole foods diet and hydration is EVERYTHING! So many compounds in our foods, fruit + veggies are anti aging and collagen boosting anti oxidant heros. I drink 3+ litres of filtered water daily and do my very best to eat a rainbow of seasonal organic fruit/­­veggies daily and honestly I rely on this to support my health, skin and hair primarily. I do add in a marine based collagen daily to either smoothies or tonics. Also I am in a stage of encouraging my hair to grow, and am using nettle, rosemary and horsetail infusions as a hair rinse. I also massage in olive oil and rosemary oil into my scalp, truly it is so simple and aids hair growth. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? A low tox life is key. Keep your stress in check, move your body, eat as clean as possible – mostly plants, organics or pesticide free produce, clean water and clean air. The most incredibly glowy humans I know follow this ethos. This has been my guideline and I am often told I really do not look my age. I am so at ease with ageing but it is always nice to hear you are maintaining a youthful glow! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  I really do. I work for myself and direct all of my offerings at this point. This can be demanding and means work can have a never-ending feel. There are always so many thoughts, needs and energy streams flowing into my work life. I also feel when you work as a space holder and in the healing realms, your energy output can be hefty. Burn out is high in this line of work, as you truly want to assist so deeply to aid others, we can often throw our needs to the side. I have learnt this many times in my years as a clinician/­­healer. I implement a lot of consistency with a structured clinic week~ limiting the amount of clients I see weekly to where I feel my energy is at and how many clients I can truly be present for. I balance myself with time off, away from screens, in nature and welcome in receiving energy to counteract my giving energy. My self care practice is the core of how I seek balance. I am actually freakily good at giving back to myself, which I believe enables me to do what I do! -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? For me, it is much healthier to come at it head on.. (typical Aries answer!) I do my finest to address the stressors, and clear the way. Whether this means a mountain of admin,  which is often a stressor for me as I not a natural lover of admin. I bunker down, switch off all other distractions, play some flute music or chants, burn some incense and get in the zone. When I exit that zone I feel so accomplished and reward myself with an ocean swim, or a nature walk to balance out the mental space I have been in. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? First and foremost I rest. Immunity can be a very strong conversation our bodies communicate to us with the message of needed REST. My go to supplement and herbal approach is to take a high dose of Vitamin C consistently in divided doses throughout my day, I also add in zinc supplements. I always have an immune focused liquid herbal tonic in my first aid support cabinet, so I begin this at a high frequent dose to meet the acute presentation of a cold/­­virus~ generally dosing up to 4 x daily. Usually it will have Echinacea, andrographis, elderberry, manuka, thyme in it. I love medicinal mushrooms to support immunity so I will take a blend of Reishi and Chaga in higher doses. I avoid raw foods and focus on lots of cooked warming nourishing food to feed the cold, congees, broths, soups, stew. I also make fresh oregano, thyme with sliced lemon &  ginger tea. If I really honour the rest that is needed, the cold/­­rundown feelings will shift very swiftly. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? The best thing I ever did was to get a separate work phone. I have a dedicated phone that my clients can contact me on, so in my free time it is left at home or on silent. This has helped me enormously create healthy boundaries. I also do not have my work emails on my phone, so I do not check them at all unless I am sitting down at my computer to work. It is so important to be available to your own process and own life, especially when you are in the field of assisting others. These simple interventions help fortify those boundaries greatly for me. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I return to softness with myself if I lose my way a little. I do my best to not judge or engage in negative self talk. I soften and return to my centre. We all have patterns we are cycling. Although I feel I am quite a master of my own self care practice I definitely can get caught up in my workload a fair bit. One thing I do consciously do is to book a treatment in weekly in some form, usually a bodywork-massage session. I find this tactile healing so restorative. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? I recently moved from the mountains to the sea, although they are both completely beautiful nature rich locations I was very much in need a big environment change for my own health and wellbeing.  Having lived in a very cold environment mountain side for 10 + years I was craving the warmth, the salt and the sun. Being by the ocean and soaking up the sun rays has been so fundamentally healing for me at this point. Total game changer! The power of changing your environment is so potent when you feel the call to do so. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I acknowledge that this too shall pass, it is transient. I do my best to trust my own creative genius. I am quite a forward motion person, so when I am feeling uninspired it absolutely can get me down. I am naturally a procrastinator in many ways, which can be so frustrating but saying that I also have the ability to then smash out the tasks in an uncanny way! I often find when I am not in such a wonderful place with myself I feel that sense of stagnation, so I do my very best to get to the roots of that stagnation. Often it takes me getting into nature to be re inspired, crafting out some quiet space to re energize and tackle the task head on. I try to ask myself what is the block, and unpack the block to free up the energy flow. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. As cheesy at it sounds I LOVED Practical Magic, the witchy plant potions and the apothecary Sandra Bullocks character opened was a total inspiration for me as teenager.. & still is now (lol). Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a herbalist, nutritionist, and energetic healer? How do all of those practices interweave for you? I was always drawn to the esoteric realms and the mystery of nature. As a little girl I loved being outside, I loved the flowers, the trees, the plants, the grasses, the oceans, the mountains. I loved being an observer and always felt so held when I was in nature. As soon as I began to understand that plants could have a positive effect on our health, it just fascinated me. Learning about folklore of plant medicine, applications and remedies drew me into a language I wanted to be fluent in. I believe that much of our call to the plant path is remembering, these plants  have been with us through our ancestral lines for eons. My career began really at the age of 16 with energetic healing, I met a group of wild women up north in Australia and was welcomed into circles, introduced to the concepts of healing, and recognized as a student of these realms. I learnt reiki which led to crystal healing, then to sound healing, colour therapy, kinesiology.. I went to a college for 2 years to learn energetic healing in depth and graduated by the age of 19 holding full in depth sessions on auric healing and clearing energetic blockages. For me it felt too much too soon. So I went and travelled, met my husband in the USA and studied a whole lot more. When I returned to Australia I wanted to anchor my knowledge of healing with more grounded modalities so I began studying Naturopathic medicine. I forked off into a Bachelor of Western Herbal Medicine and Nutritional Medicine. I loved learning about plants and food as medicine, I loved the union of science and grass roots knowledge. Over years of being in practice, I have found that there is no way or no need to seperate these modalities. I weave them all in together to ultimately support the client in a very holistic way. I approach my practice with this lens of perception. I lead with intuition, and merge functional testing, pathology testing, traditional folk medicine, evidence based plant medicine, nutritional medicine, and energetics all to support. I believe there are always energetics involved in a health presentation, along with the demand for nutritional healing as powerful ally, and herbal medicine to assist, shift and support. Aligning these healing modalities is a potent combination. Essentially the basis of Naturopathic Medicine is individualised care, no one case is the same. This ethos rings true to me, there is not one client I have worked with that is the same as any other. How can we approach health in one way, or believe there is one remedy for one presentation? It goes against the nature of our uniqueness! My practice is about honouring the individuals path, story and health goals. -- You put a lot of emphasis on gut health in your practice and believe it to be the root to all balanced health. Can you talk a little bit about why you see this as such an important aspect of wellbeing?  All diseases begin in the gut – Hippocrates had it right! So many issues stem from the gut, it is the root of our health. With the emergence of continued evolving science we are seeing so much more information come to light around the microbiome/­­microbiota, which is truly wonderful. Much of our immunity is linked with gut health, it impacts mental health greatly with our second brain residing in the gut producing neurotransmitters, it is involved in the auto immune expression, it defines our ability to absorb and produce nutrients/­­vitamins/­­minerals, it impacts our metabolism, it is directly connected to our stress response and digestion responds accordingly.. And so much more... I work very closely with digestive healing with each and every one of my clients as I believe this is a key element to balanced health and shifting imbalanced symptoms. Many of my clients present with poor digestion and we dig like detectives to get to the roots, often it is a leaky gut like picture – with parasites, yeast overgrowths or SIBO which we generally detect via functional testing. Once we have a good sense of what is actually happening in the gut, we go in with a supportive treatment plan – lifestyle, supplemental, nutritional and herbal interventions. It always astounds me how health can transform so greatly, from imbalanced to balanced with the right support, intention and dedication. Our bodies are so wise, and so willing to transform. -- What is your favorite way of incorporating herbal medicine into your (or your clients) everyday life? I personally incorporate it in so many ways. I make my own products and use them on my skin and in my home on the daily, I drink herbal teas and infusions daily and use tonic herbs to support my body/­­being. I have a herbal garden that is buzzing right now, so connecting with the plants via gardening is medicine to me. There is something so potent about growing and caring for a plant and utilising her healing, knowing the story of the plants beginnings enhances the healing power I believe. For clients~ it really depends but I do always advise infusions to become a part of their everyday lives. They are so very simple and accessible, basically a long brewed overnight tea! If you are working with me in a session we will touch on many ways to incorporate plant medicine into your life, from the herbs that are suitable for your current process, to cleaning up your skin care with more plant love, to working with herbal tablets/­­liquid tonics for marked support. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? This next year feels so full of creativity, as I expand and launch multiple new offerings. Right now I am in a potent brewing stage, so I look forward to it all coming to fruition! -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Days off at the beach, going into the bush, gardening in my medicinal plant patch, reading a great book, screen free days, massages, hugs with my husband & dogs. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Braiding Sweetgrass – Robin Wall Kimmerer Song –  Stay – Cat Power/­­ Ba Movie –  Call me by your name Piece of Art –  A oil pastel pencil drawing gifted to me by my husband and family by my dear friend and incredible creator Chanel Tobler called Curves like jam -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Emily Lami from Bodha, she is a scent magician. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff Self-Care Interview Series: Lucy Vincent Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce

November 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce I love galette. It really is the lazy wo/­­man’s pie. I love that galette crust requires the least amount of fuss of all the crusts, and that the messier it looks, the better. I love that galette filling can be any good combination of vegetables, fruit and herbs, and that it can be as minimal or grand as one wants. This sweet potato version falls on the minimal side of the galette spectrum, yet it is completely lovely and delicious. There are layers of caramelized onions, thinly sliced sweet potato, and sage, all enveloped by a rustic spelt dough. We love to eat it with our favorite, magic green sauce, which is a savior for any leftover herbs in your refrigerator that are fated to end up in the trash or compost.  The green sauce is something I make every week. It’s sort of a cross between pesto and chimichurri, but made with pumpkin seeds as a more affordable alternative to pine nuts, and umami-fied with a bit of miso. You can make it with pretty much any herbs you have on hand. I usually make mine with parsley, but it also does well with the addition of cilantro, basil, tarragon, sage, and even rosemary. You can add in things like carrot or radish tops, too, which normally get thrown away, but are perfectly good to eat. I don’t discriminate against soft herb stems in this sauce either, and whirl them all in. For instance, if I’m using parsley leaves for a recipe, I’ll save the stems for this sauce instead of throwing them away. I’ll do the same with most other herbs. The sauce is a nice brightener for pretty much any savory dish. It’s great on toast, in pasta, on roasted vegetables, with eggs, and it’s absolutely delicious on this galette. I hope you’ll give it a try :) Sweet Potato Galette   Print Serves: two 7 galettes Ingredients for the filling 1 large yellow onion - halved and sliced lengthwise about 3 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil - divided 1 medium sweet potato - mandolined or thinly sliced into rounds sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons chopped sage leaves for the dough 1½ cups (150g) sprouted spelt flour or whole spelt flour, plus more for rolling the dough 1 teaspoon coconut sugar pinch of sea salt 3 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons hot purified water 1 tablespoon finely chopped sage Instructions to caramelize the onions Start by caramelizing the onions. Heat 1 tablespoon of coconut oil in a sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add the onions and sauté until translucent, for 3-5 minutes. Add a pinch of salt, turn down the heat to medium low and cook the onions, stirring periodically, for 30-40 minutes, until caramelized and golden brown. Make the dough while the onions are caramelizing. to make the dough While the onions are caramelizing, place the flour in a medium mixing bowl, add the sugar and salt, and mix with a fork to combine. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture, and pour in the oil. Pour the hot water over the oil, stirring with a fork and slowly incorporating the flour into the liquid. Add the chopped sage and mix it in. When all the flour has been incorporated, turn out the dough onto a floured surface and knead with your hands until smooth. Add more water, 1 teaspoon at a time, if the dough appears too dry. Take care not to add too much water, give the flour a chance to absorb the initial amount of water first. Divide the dough in half. Flatten each piece into a round disc, wrap them in plastic wrap or place into a floured bowl and cover with a damp kitchen towel. Let rest at room temperature for 30 minutes. to assemble and bake Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Line a large baking sheet or two medium baking sheets by covering them with parchment paper. Roll out the dough on a floured surface, one portion at a time, into ⅛-thick circular sheets, about 9 in diameter. Place one sheet of dough on the prepared baking sheet, keeping it to one side to make room for the second galette (if you are using two baking sheets, you dont have to worry about this). Brush the dough with the remaining melted coconut oil and sprinkle it with about ½ tablespoon of chopped sage. Arrange half of the caramelized onions in the center of the sheet of dough, followed by half of the sweet potato slices (arrange those in a spiral or any other pattern you prefer), leaving a 1-2 inch border of dough all around. Brush the sweet potato slices with melted coconut oil as you arrange them, in small sections, making sure that they are well oiled. Once arranged, generously sprinkle the sweet potato with sea salt and pepper, and another ½ tablespoon of chopped sage. Fold over the edges of the galette, working circularly, until the galette has a folded border. Brush the edges with melted coconut oil. Repeat this process with the second portion of the dough and remaining sweet potato and sage. Drizzle any leftover melted oil over the filling of both galettes. Trasnfer the baking sheet(s) to the oven and bake for about 45 minutes, until the potatoes are cooked through and golden. Remove the galettes from the oven, let them cool slightly, slice and serve with the magic green sauce (recipe below). 3.5.3226     Magic Green Sauce   Print Serves: about 1½ cups Ingredients 1 large or 2 small bunches of parsley - roughly chopped, including stems 7 or more sprigs of sage - roughly chopped, including stems ½ cup toasted pumpkin seeds 2 tablespoons lemon juice (from about half a lemon) ¼ cup olive oil 1 heaping tablespoon white miso generous pinch of red pepper flakes sea salt - to taste splash of red wine vinegar (optional) 1 clove garlic - roughly chopped (optional) Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a high-speed blender or a food processor until smooth. Keep the sauce refrigerated in an air-tight container, it will last for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Colour Wheel Wraps Peach and Raspberry Summer Tart and a Guest Post for Scandi Foodie Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso Caramel and Chocolate - Ice Cream Sund... Welcome Summer Multigrain Salad with Strawberries and Asparagus .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Green Potato Salad

July 4 2017 Veganpassion 

Green Potato Salad The last weeks I've been traveling for the PLANT BASED INSTITUTE between Munich and Berlin. I don't get to enjoy my balcony that often. On my first free evening I took the chance to have a wonderful BBQ with my friends enjoying the weather. Everyone cooks the dish they want and we really don't want to miss a traditional german potato salad. I like it most with some greens in it. The recipe is from my new book VEGIONAL What do you like most for a BBQ evening? If you like, comment below and maybe the next recipe will be your wish! Makes 4-6 portions. Preparation time: 40 minutes For the remoulade: 100 ml soy milk (you will need soy milk because of it's lecithin) 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar 1/­­2 tsp. mustard salt, black pepper 1 onion 2 small pickles 1 bunch of fresh herbs of your choice (chives, parsley, tarragon, chervil) For the salad: 4,4 lbs waxy potatoes  10 oz frozen green peas 1 small zucchini 5,2 oz smoked tofu 3 spring onions 2 pickles homemade remoulade 3 tbsp. white wine sugar smoked salt, black pepper Mix soy drink and vinegar in a blender until the soy drink builds flakes. Blend at medium speed and add oil until you reached favoured consistency. Flavor with mustard, salt and pepper. While blending the mixture is a little warm and it will get thicker when it cools off. Cut onion and pickles into small cubes, chop the herbs and stir all in.  Cook potatoes in salted water for about 20 minutes. Then drain potatoes and let them cool off. Cut beans into pieces and leave to cook with the peas in some salted water. Darin afterwards. Peel the potatoes (or not) and cut them in slices. Put them in a salad bowl. Cut small cubes of zucchini and smoked tofu, slice spring onions and add to the potatoes. Also add beans and peas. Chop pickles and stir with remoulade and vinegar. Add the dressing to the salad and mix everything. If you like add smoked salt and pepper. 

Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules & a Giveaway

November 13 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules & a Giveaway Ending an emotional week with a light, fizzy drink and a giveaway for the beautiful Moscow Mule copper mugs you see in these photos. I very rarely drink alcohol anymore, not because I have much against having a drink on a special occasion, but because it throws me completely off track for the next couple of days – it’s a feeling of zero balance and uselessness in anything I try to do. A few years ago, I decided to take the matter into my own hands and not let myself feel that way anymore, thus the no drinking. During the holidays, though, I do like to make myself a special something to cheers with and sip on to get into a festive mood. My homemade kombucha always comes to the rescue in this department. This is the drink I’ll be making with it this year, with all the foundations of a Moscow Mule – ginger, lime, mint, plus some warming winter spices to add a bit of interest and a holiday spark. I use fresh ginger juice here, which adds that extra bit of kick and brightness to this drink. Before you get discouraged, making a small portion of ginger juice is super easy. All you have to do is run some grated ginger through a fine mesh strainer or cheesecloth to extract a little bit of the juice. You can definitely make this mule into a boozy drink as well, just reduce the amount of kombucha and add vodka, about 1 part vodka to 3 parts kombucha, or whatever ratio you prefer. Now onto the giveaway. The very nice people at Knooop are giving away a set of their beautiful, 100% copper, hammered Moscow Mule Mugs to two GK readers. The set also comes with a copper shot glass. To enter the giveaway, leave a comment here telling us about one special person in your life. It can be anyone from your mom to your neighbor, your pharmacist, or someone you encounter on your commute. Let’s spread some love! Giveaway is U.S. and Europe only and open until November 20, 2016. Some links after the jump. Enjoy your Sunday :) Remembering Leonard Cohen – this interview, this documentary, this video conversation, this song .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules & a Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chickpea Salad Niçoise Sandwiches

July 11 2016 Meatless Monday 

Step away from the stove, these summery sandwiches are both meatless and no-cook! Instead of a Niçoise salad’s traditional tuna, this dish features protein-packed chickpeas in a tangy tarragon-shallot dressing. This recipe is part of Meatless Monday’s No-Cook Summer Recipe video series. Watch the video! Serves 4-6 - 1 shallot, minced - 1 small bunch tarragon, chopped - 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil - 2 tablespoons white-wine vinegar - 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard - 1 (15 oz.) can chickpeas, rinsed and drained - 1 round loaf country bread - 2 hard-boiled eggs, sliced - 1 small head Bibb lettuce - 1 ripe tomato, sliced - 1/­­3 cup jarred olive tapenade - Salt and pepper, to taste In a medium bowl, add shallot, tarragon, extra-virgin olive oil, white wine vinegar, Dijon mustard and salt and pepper to taste. Stir to combine and set aside. In a large bowl, crush chickpeas with a fork. Add shallot and tarragon mixture and stir to combine. Season with additional salt and pepper as desired. Set aside. Carefully slice country bread horizontally to create a top and bottom half. Using your fingers, remove desired amount of the breads interior from both halves to create room for the filling. Fill the bottom slice with the chickpea mixture. Top with sliced eggs and add salt and pepper to taste. Continue building the sandwich with sliced tomatoes and lettuce leaves. Spread olive tapenade across the top slice of bread. Place the top slice of bread on top of the sandwich and cut into four slices. Optionally, use a toothpick to hold each piece of the sandwich together. The post Chickpea Salad Niçoise Sandwiches appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt - Ice Cream Sunday

May 22 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt - Ice Cream Sunday I think I first got the desire to make rhubarb frozen yogurt when I saw a photo of Nigel Slater’s Rhubarb Eton Mess. Slater always does the most amazing things with rhubarb, making me dream about the days when the blushing pink bunches will appear at the market. Since those days are fully upon us, I went ahead and made this treat for the weekend, in celebration of rhubarb season and its elusiveness. I couldn’t resist appointing rose as a component of this frozen yogurt for two reasons – for one, rhubarb and rose has always sounded like the most magical combination that I’ve been thinking about for years, and secondly, I’ve had some beautiful dried roses sitting in my pantry without getting any use for too long. Yogurt is a complete weakness for me and all members of my family – we always have some in the fridge to use for breakfast and snacks. I like to make my own, whether with real milk or coconut, but I also love trying new brands. There seem to be many great yogurt companies out there today, which make it very easy to be a happy consumer – if you’re curious, I like Maple Hill, Wallaby, Seven Stars and Anita’s Coconut Yogurt is a delicious vegan variety. Frozen yogurt is one of the easiest frozen treats to make, especially if you have an ice cream maker (I’ve had an older model of this ice cream maker for years and it’s one of my favorite kitchen appliances). All it takes is some good yogurt, whatever secondary ingredients you choose for flavor, and a quick whirl in the machine. With this possibility in mind, you are always less than an hour away from a dessert that many consider to be a treat to only acquire outside of the home. This batch matched my very high expectations. The first spoonful I had made me stop in my tracks and close my eyes for a second or two. I’ve always found rose flavor to be very invigorating, and combined with the subtle tartness of the rhubarb and creamy tanginess of the yogurt, this is dessert and aromatherapy all in one bowl. Since I make so much ice cream/­­popsicles/­­frozen yogurt, we’ve decided that Sunday posts will be reserved for frozen treats of all kinds. We hope that will make you smile. Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt   Print Serves: 6-10 Ingredients 1½ lb rhubarb - sliced ½ cup dried rose petals (optional) ½ cup maple syrup - divided 32 oz Greek yogurt (I used Wallaby for this batch) 2 tablespoons rose water Instructions In a medium saucepan, combine rhubarb with rose petals, if using, and ¼ cup maple syrup. Bring to a boil over medium heat, reduce to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes, until rhubarb is soft. Let cool to room temperature and chill in the refrigerator for about an hour. Combine well-chilled yogurt with half of the rose-rhubarb mixture, remaining ¼ cup of the maple syrup and rose water. Process in an ice cream maker for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Spoon into a container, alternating between layers of frozen yogurt and the remaining rose-rhubarb mixture. Eat right away as soft serve or place in the freezer and make sure to remove from the freezer 10-15 minutes before serving. Notes If you dont have an ice cream maker, you can make popsicles. Just pour the final rhubarb-yogurt mixture into popsicle molds and freeze. Rose petals are optional, rose water gives plenty of flavor. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Lavender Ice Cream with Apricots Poached in Blueberry Sauce Homemade Yogurt and Frozen Yogurt Lemongrass Raspberry Pops Tarragon and Mint Ice Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt - Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vinegar 101: Types of Vinegar, Health Benefits, and How to Cook With It

November 16 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Vinegar 101: Types of Vinegar, Health Benefits, and How to Cook With It Derived from the French vinaigre (meaning aged wine), vinegar is a staple in most pantries worldwide. With dozens of varieties readily available, you can use your favorite type to elevate nearly any meal – by creating marinades, emulsifying vinaigrettes, seasoning dishes to brighten flavors, or even making reductions. How its made The process of producing vinegar includes inoculation, fermentation and aging. An alcoholic liquid is acted upon by the Acetobacter bacteria to form an acidic solution. It evolves into a self-preserving substance due to its high acidity. Fermentation of wine into vinegar is triggered by a mother, or other ambient bacteria, transforming sugars into alcohol into acetic acid; a vinegar mother is a harmless cellulose structure produced by acetic acid that occurs naturally in unpasteurized vinegars. The process may take from 20 hours up to several months, depending on a variety of factors. Types of Vinegars Rice: With a 4% acidity, rice vinegar is great for pickling, dressings, or seasoning sushi rice. (Check out our Garlic and Kale Soup that uses Brown Rice Vinegar.) Balsamic: Made from the concentrated juice of white Trebbiano grapes and aged in casks, balsamic works well in glazes, reductions and marinades with its 6-8% acidity. (Try our Sicilian-Style Roasted Vegetables with Balsamic Syrup.) Apple Cider: With a 5% acidity, this ones best for seasoning more subtle dishes, as an infusion, or drizzled over grain or bean salads. (Use it to make Carolina-Style Barbecue Sandwiches.) Wine: With a 6-8% acidity, this vinegar adds a touch of umami, and works well wherever a stronger flavor is desired. (Make Minestrone with Sun Dried Tomatoes and White Beans.) Coconut: Made from fermented coconut water or sap, coconut vinegar has a 4% acidity, and is perfect for a splash of brightness when making nut-based cream sauces or a stone fruit chutney. Health Benefits Unpasteurized and unfiltered vinegar is a natural probiotic and can be used to help the body break down fats. Unfiltered apple cider vinegar is used to treat sore throats and upset stomachs, as well as topically for some skin conditions; it is also a natural liver cleanser. In addition, vinegar can get digestive juices flowing and increase appetite, which makes it a great addition to starter courses like salads and chilled soups. (Check out our article: Apple Cider Vinegar: Healing Foods) How to Buy Be sure to carefully examine labels and ingredient lists, and purchase varieties free of additives and artificial coloring. Keep in mind that aged vinegars have stronger flavors. Gradually stock your kitchen with different types of vinegars to determine which you like best for different applications. Culinary Uses Reductions: Reduce over medium heat until mixture coats the back of a spoon. Serve over fresh berries, or when plating an entrée or salad course. (Top Red Pepper Soup with a Balsamic Reduction.) Herb Infusions: Blanch herbs like tarragon, dill or basil, blend with vinegar, and allow to steep for a few days in the fridge. Marinades: Use to tenderize and flavor vegetables like mushrooms, zucchini and eggplant before grilling, along with fresh garlic, ginger and herbs. Quick Pickle: Add three parts vinegar to one part water to a small saucepan and bring to a boil, adding a splash of sweetener of your choice, a pinch of salt, and red chili flakes for extra spice.  Pour over cut produce and allow to sit for at least 30 minutes, or overnight in the refrigerator. (Try our Hot-and-Sour Celery Pickles.) Baking: Can be used as a leavener, eliciting a chemical reaction to produce carbon dioxide to give cake batters a lift. Poaching eggs: Adding a tablespoon to the cooking water with prevent eggs from spreading. Ceviche: Mix with oil, garlic and herbs, and toss with mushrooms or avocado for a refreshing twist. Serve with tortilla crisps. Enhance color: Vinegar brightens reds and purples, like cabbage and beets or red pearl onions. Chef Olivia Roszkowski is a graduate of NGIs Chefs Training Program and a full-time instructor. Olivia holds a Bachelors degree in Neuroscience and Behavior from Columbia University and has worked at various well-known NYC restaurants, including The Mercer Kitchen and Momofuku Ssam Bar. Olivia is a master at root-to-frond cooking.       

Summer Vegetable Saute

September 10 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Summer Vegetable Saute It’s been a month since we came home from our stay in Russia. School is back in session (second grade for Paloma), and the vacation seems like a long gone dream. Now that we are all situated, I’m finally finding the time to talk about Sochi – the last stop of our trip, where we had a chance to fully relax. I’ve been visiting Sochi every summer, with small breaks here and there, ever since I can first remember myself. My aunt and cousins have an old, wooden house there, built on the slope of a hill, dating all the way back to the 1940s. The narrow street, on which it stands, is shaded by dense growths of cypresses, palm and fruit trees, which are abundant all over the city. To me, Sochi is a magical place. There is something special about the mix of sweet mountain air and salty Black Sea breeze, tropical vegetation, clear and refreshing seawater, pebbled beaches and busy ethnic markets that surround one at all times. I can never can get enough. Last year’s winter Olympics brought about major updates to Sochi. The old house on the hill, however, remains the same. The city has been threatening to demolish that whole street for decades, as the houses there have seen their better days, but to our delight, the family house is still there, as welcoming as ever. Traditionally, generations of cats guard the house. They are tough and self-sufficient like street cats, but also social and friendly like house pets. Each one has a big personality, and all are treated with much respect. Paloma was in heaven, playing in the charming courtyard at the footsteps of the old garden surrounded by cats of all sizes, just like I had done as a kid. And although we live on the beach in Florida, Paloma can’t stop talking about Black Sea beaches, where she would not leave the water for longer than two minutes at a time, turning into quite the little mermaid. I’ve talked about food from the Caucasus region last year here and here. The markets there supply a wealth of colorful pickles (pictured above on the yellow table), endless fermented dairy and pretty treats like churchkhela. Local cuisine is rich in herbs and spices, and the vegetables are commonly cooked and served whole, or in large chunks, as opposed to Russian cooking, which favors mincing and shredding everything very finely. In the summer, eggplant is present at any table, and there are hundreds of ways to prepare it. The most common and simple eggplant dish is a mixture of vegetables charred over open fire or hot coals, dressed with tons of fresh herbs and garlic. The dish is smoky and fresh at the same time. In the absence of open fire, the recipe below is an alternative way of showcasing eggplant and other summer vegetables in a vegetable dish to complete any table. Summer Vegetable Saute 3-4 small eggplants – sliced lengthwise, 1/­­4-inch thickness 2-3 bell peppers – seeded and sliced lengthwise 1-2 onions – sliced lengthwise about 7 small tomatoes or 2 cups cherry tomatoes coconut oil or other vegetable oil sea salt and freshly ground pepper – to taste 3-4 cloves garlic – minced good amount of fresh herbs – parsley, dill, basil, mint 1. Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium high heat and fry eggplant slices in batches, on both sides, until golden brown. Add oil as needed and sprinkle with salt and pepper as you go. Remove eggplant slices from the pan onto paper towels to absorb excess oil, set aside. 2. Saute peppers until soft, add salt to taste, set aside. 3. Saute onions until golden, add salt to taste, set aside. 4. Increase the heat to high. Add whole tomatoes to the pan. Let them sit for about 2 minutes, until they begin to  blister, stir and leave to sit for another 2 minutes or longer, until cooked through, but with a bite remaining. Add salt and pepper. 5. Arrange vegetables on a large platter. Top eggplant slices with onion and pepper, finish with tomatoes. Sprinkle with garlic and herbs, more salt and pepper, if desired. Alternatively, you can mix them in a bowl.

Butternut Squash & Swiss Chard “Lasagna”

January 23 2015 VegKitchen 

Butternut Squash & Swiss Chard “Lasagna”In this hearty vegan and gluten-free lasagna I used a mixture of shiitake and white button mushrooms, fresh rosemary and tarragon, swiss chard, homemade sauce (so easy!!!), tofu cheese, and squash. The flavor and texture are excellent, everything youd want from a meal on a cold winter day.  This lasagna, like most, is done in parts. Youve got your roasted squash, sauce, veggies, and tofu cheese. If you like to cook, this meal with bring you lots of joy in the kitchen. If you dont think of yourself as a cook, give it a try anyway. Each step is easy as pie, and the result is well worth the minimal effort and time.  Cant get your hands on swiss chard-or any other chard? Use spinach, kale, or collards. If youre not a fan of butternut squash, use zucchini instead. Recipe contributed by Jenné Claiborne from Sweet Potato Soul . Photos by Sydney Bensimon.  Serves: 4 generous portions Olive oil Sea salt 1 large butternut squash, peeled, halved and thinly sliced in half-moon shapes (about 1/­­4 inch thick); or two small butternuts (note, if your knives aren’t sharp enough to cut raw squash, see tips for a workaround in this post) 14-oz can plain tomato sauce 4 garlic cloves, minced 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast 2 teaspoon Italian herb dried spice 1 teaspoon fresh black pepper 4 cups of your favorite mushrooms (I used shiitake and white button), sliced 4 cups swiss chard, ribs removed, washed, & chopped 1 tablespoon fresh tarragon, minced 1 tablespoon fresh rosemary, minced 1 teaspoon red chili flakes (if you like heat) 1 block firm organic tofu 1/­­2 cup nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 1/­­2 teaspoon sea salt Preheat oven to 350°, and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Toss ysliced butternut squash with a couple tablespoons of olive oil, and spread the squash onto the baking sheet. If it doesnt all fit use a second baking sheet, or layer it. Roast for 30 minutes, until tender, but not too mushy. Sauce: Heat a tablespoon of olive oil in a sauce pan over medium-high heat. Add the minced garlic, and cook until golden (be careful not to burn it). Reduce the heat, and carefully pour the tomato sauce into the pan. It might start to pop, so keep the lid nearby. Stir the garlic and sauce, then add the nutritional yeast, herbs and black pepper. Cover, and allow the sauce to cook while you work on the next part. Swiss Chard & Mushrooms: Heat a tablespoon, or two, of olive oil in a skillet on medium-high heat. Add the mushrooms and a generous pinch of sea salt, and stir. The cooking will draw the moisture out of the mushrooms, so dont worry if the pan seems too dry. Once theyve begun to sweat (moisten), add the swiss chard, tarragon, and rosemary. Stir well, and remove from heat. Tofu Cheese: Break the tofu up and place it in a food processor. Process until smooth, then add the nutritional yeast, vinegar and salt. Process again to incorporate it all, and taste to see if you need to add any more salt. Assemble the Lasagna: Now that youve got all the parts complete you can assemble the lasagna. To do this you will place a layer of squash on the bottom of the baking dish. Follow that with some of the cheese, follow that with some of the mushroom mix (squeeze excess liquid from the mushrooms and greens before layering), then the sauce, then the squash again. Continue to layer the ingredients until youve used them all.  Use about 1/­­2 cup of cheese, sauce and mushrooms on each layer. I like my top layer to have all the ingredients visible. Place the lasagna back in the oven and bake for 40 minutes (or 30 if you just cant wait). Jenné Claiborne is a  vegan personal chef in NYC. She also creates recipes, videos, and share my passion for healthy vegan eating on this blog. She has created an online program called the  21-Day Vegan Blueprint, and an e-cookbook,  5 Ingredient Vegan. - Here are more of VegKitchens Hearty Pasta Dishes. - Find more of VegKitchens  Vegan Dinner Recipes  and more  C asseroles And Other Comfort Foods.

The With or WithoutMeat Cookbook By Jackie Newgent

September 29 2014 Meatless Monday 

The With or WithoutMeat Cookbook By Jackie NewgentIn the With or Without Meat Cookbook there are two sides to every recipe--veggies up for Meatless Monday, meat up for another day. But either way you flip it this cookbook is a healthy, whole food, flavor-forward collection compiled with the diabetic in mind. Though you need not be diabetic to enjoy what this collection has to offer. Jackie Newgent, RDN, CDN is a classically trained chef, a dietitian, a television personality, and a Meatless Monday friend and now shes delivered a book that could possibly answer that age-old question how does a vegetarian date a meat eater? Or--for you--maybe shes just answered the question how can I maintain a health-conscious, flexitarian lifestyle and keep it delicious? Each recipe offers first a vegetarian take and then a meat-fish-or-poultry add-in--so indecision need not prevent you from opening the book to the Tarragon White Bean Salad. Nor should different dietary wants demand that you make two separate dishes to please both the veg and the meat eater. The cookbook features 125 recipes, largely in the style of the Mediterranean diet. The recipes put fruits and vegetables forward, limit unhealthy fats, and prefer whole grains. Its nutrition that promotes your cardiovascular health and your overall health. The books is especially great for those with diabetes, pre-diabetes, heart-health issues, or really for anyone simply looking to improve their diet. This flexitarian approach to eating provides the best of both worlds. Each recipe includes nutrition information and follows the American Diabetic Association’s nutritional guidelines. And, The With or Without Meat Cookbook has a familiar, friendly tone that makes it feel more like a conversation than a numbered list of instruction. Check out the Red Onion Soup with Shiitake Broth recipe from the With or Without Meat Cookbook. The post The With or Without Meat Cookbook By Jackie Newgent appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Grilled Corn Bruschetta

August 11 2014 Meatless Monday 

Corn is grilled and sautéed with shallots and roasted garlic, then purred with fresh chives and tarragon. Bread is grilled and topped with a delightful contrast of the rustic and the refined as corn tarragon puree is garnished with a few freshly grilled corn kernels and tarragon leaves. This recipe comes to us from Ashley of Sprouts. Serves 8 - 5 ears corn, shucked - 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon black pepper - 1 loaf multigrain bread, sliced 1/­­2 thick - 1 shallot, thinly sliced - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 1/­­3 cup dry white wine - 4 cloves garlic, roasted - 1/­­4 cup fresh tarragon - 1/­­4 cup fresh chives - 1 tablespoon nondairy creamer Preheat a grill to medium high heat. Coat the corn in grapeseed oil and season with the salt and pepper. Grill for about 15 minutes, or until the kernels are slightly charred on all sides, turning every 5 minutes to ensure all sides of the corn cobs are evenly cooked. Set aside to cool. Brush the slices of bread with a light coating of olive oil and season with a sprinkling of salt. Grill or broil the bread for 3-5 minutes, turning to ensure even cooking, or until the bread is golden. Set aside. Shave the corn kernels off the ears by holding the ears vertically over a large bowl and cutting down with a knife, allowing the bowl to catch the kernels. Place the olive oil in a skillet over medium high heat. Add the shallots and sauté for 3-5 minutes, or until golden brown. Deglaze the shallots with the white wine and cook for 1-2 minutes more, or until most of the liquid has been absorbed. Add 2 cups of the corn kernels and roasted garlic to the skillet. Set the remaining grilled corn kernels aside. Sauté the kernels and garlic for another 2-3 minutes or until the corn and garlic is heated through. Transfer the corn garlic shallot mixture to a food processor. Add the tarragon, chives and creamer. Pulse until the corn mixture reaches desired consistency. Taste and adjust seasoning as desired. Top each slice of grilled bread with a heaping tablespoon of corn tarragon garlic spread. Garnish with a teaspoon grilled corn kernels and a few tarragon leaves. Repeat with the remaining bread, divide into 8 portions and enjoy! The post Grilled Corn Bruschetta appeared first on Meatless Monday.

English Garden Salad

August 7 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

English Garden SaladLittle gem lettuce has spoiled me for other types of lettuce--its everything we love about butter and romaine lettuce, all in one compact little head-- and it’s perfect for this English Garden Salad. If you cant find Little Gem lettuce, substitute another type of lettuce, such as Boston or Bibb. English Garden Salad Little gem lettuce has spoiled me for other types of lettuce--its everything we love about butter and romaine lettuce, all in one compact little head. If you cant find Little Gem lettuce, substitute another type of lettuce, such as Boston or Bibb. - 4 ounces thin asparagus or young green beans trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces - 1 cup green peas, fresh or frozen - 2 to 3 heads Little Gem lettuce or other tender lettuce, coarsely chopped (about 5 cups total) - 4 cherry or grape tomatoes, halved lengthwise - 1/­­2 English cucumber, thinly sliced - 4 red radishes, trimmed and thinly sliced - 1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon leaves - 1 tablespoon snipped fresh chives - 1 tablespoon torn small fresh mint leaves - 3 tablespoons olive oil - 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice or white wine vinegar - 1/­­4 teaspoon salt - 1/­­8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper - Pinch sugar - Steam the asparagus and peas over boiling water, using a steamer pot with a perforated insert until crisp-tender, 2 to 3 minute. Run cold water over the vegetables to stop the cooking process, then drain and pat dry. - Transfer the cooled vegetables to a large bowl. Add the lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, radishes, and fresh herbs. - In a small bowl, combine the oil, lemon juice, salt, pepper, and sugar. Drizzle over the salad and toss gently to combine. Serve immediately. This recipe is from Vegan Without Borders (C) Robin Robertson, 2014, Andrews McMeel Publishing, photo by Sara Remington.   The post English Garden Salad appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Stuffed Squash with Brazil Nuts and Pistachios

November 7 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Stuffed Squash with Brazil Nuts and Pistachios This flavorful and colorful Stuffed Squash with Brazil Nuts and Pistachios makes an attractive entrée for a Thanksgiving dinner. Use a dense, sweet, orange-fleshed squash such as buttercup, acorn, or kabocha for the best results with this recipe. I like to use Brazil nut butter, but you can use any type of nut butter that you prefer. Stuffed Squash with Brazil Nuts and Pistachios  This flavorful and colorful Stuffed Squash makes an attractive entrée for a Thanksgiving dinner.  - 1 tablespoon olive oil or 1/­­4 cup water - 1 yellow onion, minced - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 2 cups cooked brown rice - 1 cup cooked wild rice - 1/­­3 cup Brazil nut butter - 1/­­4 cup sweetened dried cranberries - 2 tablespoons chopped pistachio nuts - 2 tablespoons chopped Brazil nuts - 1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley - 1 teaspoon dried tarragon - Salt and ground black pepper - 1 large winter squash, halved and seeded (such as buttercup, acorn, or kabocha) - 1 1/­­2 cups hot water - Preheat the oven to 350°F. Heat the oil or water in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion, cover, and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. - Stir in the rice, wild rice, Brazil nut butter, cranberries, nuts, parsley, tarragon, and salt and pepper to taste. Mix well and spoon the mixture into the squash cavities -  Place the squash halves in a baking dish, stuffing sides up. Add the water to the bottom of the baking dish and cover tightly with a lid or aluminum foil. Bake until the squash is tender, about 1 1/­­2 hours. From The Nut Butter Cookbook by Robin Robertson. (C)2014 Robin Robertson. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Lori Maffei. Save Save The post Stuffed Squash with Brazil Nuts and Pistachios appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Spring Ragu

May 1 2017 Meatless Monday 

A ragu is basically a well-seasoned stew. This one takes its flavor from the tarragon, which brings out the best in the array of seasonal vegetables. This recipe was created by Stephanie Alexander and can be found in The Meat Free Monday Cookbook. Serves 3-4 - 8 garlic cloves, whole and unpeeled - 2 pounds fresh fava beans in pods, shelled - ice cubes - 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, chopped - 4 trimmed and cooked artichoke hearts, - halved or quartered, depending on size - 12 baby turnips, peeled - 1 cup vegetable stock - 1 pound peas in pods, shelled - 2 teaspoons coarsely chopped - French tarragon - 1 tablespoon finely chopped flat-leaf parsley - freshly ground black pepper Put the garlic in a saucepan and cover with water. Bring slowly to a boil over low-medium heat, then drain. Repeat this process and then slip the skins off each clove and set aside in a bowl. Refill the saucepan with water and return to a boil over high heat, and drop the fava beans into the boiling water for 1 minute only. Immediately drain in a colander and tip into a bowl of ice-cold water. Then peel the beans. Reserve until needed. Melt half of the butter in a sauté pan over a medium heat. Once it starts to froth, add the artichoke pieces, turnips, and peeled garlic, and sauté until the artichoke pieces become golden flecked with brown. Add the vegetable stock and peas, then cook, covered, for 5 minutes. Uncover, scatter with the beans and herbs, and shake gently to mix; there should be very little liquid remaining in the pan. If it still looks sloppy, increase the heat to high and continue to shake the pan. Add the remaining butter to form a small amount of sauce. Taste for seasoning; there probably wont be any need to add salt. Grind over some black pepper and serve at once. The post Spring Ragu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Giveaway)

August 31 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Giveaway) Hey friends, this is Masha. I usually do the photos and editing around here, but I am now venturing into doing some full posts as well. Today I’m excited to share some photos I took this past weekend in magical Woodstock, NY and its surrounding areas, along with a dish my boyfriend and I cooked there from Kristin Donnely’s beautiful new cookbook, Modern Potluck. True to its title, the book offers plenty of original, make-ahead recipes for gatherings, where contribution in the form of food is encouraged, along with useful potluck prep tips. Despite this wonderful theme, however, the recipes are very appealing to make and eat at home just as well. The book is not vegan or vegetarian (perfect for omnivores), but offers plenty of vegetarian, vegan, dairy-free and gluten-free options. Some of the recipes that caught our eye include Potato Salad with Fennel and Pickly Things, Miso and Molasses Baked Beans, Samosa-Filling Stuffed Poblanos, Vegetarian Borscht Salad, and Vegan Caprese Salad. All the photography is done by Yossi, who is one of our favorite food photographers in this whole wide world. We are giving away a copy of the book too, so read on for the giveaway details. I live in NYC, and my man and I have been thinking about getting away from the city to explore Upstate New York for a while. We finally got it together on one of the last weekends of summer and had the most incredible time. Woodstock exceeded all my expectations – I knew it would be nice, but didn’t expect it to be as breathtaking as it was, and now I daydream about one day moving there. The whole town seems to be woven into the woods, and this time of year, the forest is thick with green leaves and sweet summer air, accompanied by bird and cricket songs, scurrying chipmunks, and majestic deer. At night, it’s dark enough to see the Milky Way, of which we are very deprived in the city. We rented this Airbnb – a cottage built by the owner, an artist, and secluded in the woods, right off his main property. The place was amazing, from the layout and tree-filtered light streaming through the windows all day, to all the well-considered, hand-crafted details. The kitchen was very well equipped for all the cooking we did, and there is an outside grill, as well as a fire pit. It’s technically in the town of Saugerties, but very close to the main stretch in Woodstock, The Big Deep and Opus 40. Big Deep  A popular swimming hole in the area. You leave your car in an unpaved parking lot in the woods and follow a short trail to the water. We were there right around golden hour and I felt like I was in a fairy tale – the water was clear and refreshing, with sunrays streaming through the surrounding tall trees. As we witnessed, it can get crowded at the immediate entrance off the trail, but if you walk away from the main area a bit, you can find plenty of quieter, semi-private spots for taking a dip. Opus 40 A huge environmental sculpture, built by sculptor Harvey Fite over the course of 37 years in an abandoned bluestone quarry. Fite originally planned out the space as an outdoor sculpture gallery, and had a 40 year plan for finishing it, but died on the 37th year of completion. The structure is composed of curving steps, levels, passageways and water pools, and the entire thing is built without cement, inspired by ancient Mayan building techniques, and using old quarrymen’s tools. Everything about Opus 40 is incredibly impressive, and the whole time, I felt like I was walking around an alien-built playground. It’s also a great spot for eating lunch – there are plenty of places to sit down and enjoy the view. Kaaterskill Falls A 260 ft waterfall, one of the highest in New York. We overheard someone talking about it at a cafe and decided to check it out, and so glad we did. It’s a drive away from Woodstock, around 20 minutes, up a serpentine road and into the Catskills. The amazing thing about this waterfall is that there are trails leading to both the crest of the waterfall, where it first begins to drop, and the bottom, where it makes a nicely-sized pool, and you can swim in both places. As in, you can stand under a waterfall (!) and you can swim in river pools, in water which will be dropping hundreds of feet after it brushes past you. Insane. This was the last thing we did before heading back to the city, and it was the perfect closing to our trip. Some food-related places we liked: Kingston Farmer’s Market There are plenty of farmers markets in the area, but we only got to try out this one. A very nice, medium-sized farmer’s market with a good number of produce stands. The August produce was absolutely beautiful – heirloom tomatoes the size of a baby’s head, jewel-colored eggplants, ground cherries, peaches, shiso leaf (!), purslane, etc, etc. Open Saturdays 9am-2pm. Bread Alone We buy this company’s bread in NYC and were interested in visiting one of their home stores, since the company originated in the Catskills. This location sells many different varieties of their bread, a ton of pastries, coffee (Irving Farm) and sandwiches. Good for breakfast and lunch. Shindig Good burgers (they do have a brown rice and beet veggie burger for the veggie-inclined) and sandwiches (veggie melt), but I liked the watermelon gazpacho special I got the most. The cocktails are also fun, generously sized, and unique – their booze of choice seems to be soju and sake. Provisions Went here for lunch. A modern deli that bakes its own bread, pickles their own veggies and uses local produce. Lots of interesting sandwich options and a few salads. Sunflower Natural Foods Market A very well stocked local health food store. Fruition Chocolate  A local bean to bar chocolate company that offers a variety of chocolate bars for all tastes. They even sell a 100% cacao bar! Vinnie’s Farm Market A crazy place we stopped at on the way back from Kaaterskill Falls. A family-owned produce stand and store with a TON of homemade canned goods, from pickles to jams to hot pepper spreads, pastries and bread, homemade butter, farm eggs and milk. The amount of product they have is almost overwhelming, and the whole place feels like a step back in time. Since the cottage we rented was so cozy, we had no problem staying in for dinner and cooking with all the amazing produce we got at the farmer’s market. I’d been flipping through Modern Potluck the week prior, and was really attracted to the cover recipe for Spice-Roasted Carrots Over Lentils, which seemed perfectly simple, and like a good accompaniment to the grilled pizza we were planning on making in Woodstock. We loved the dish, it was a breeze to make and had all the elements I love in a side dish – substance from lentils and carrots, sweetness from dates, complexity from the spices and a fresh finish from the herbs. I imagine that bringing a platter of these lentils to a potluck would definitely earn you a status of a famous cook among your friends. Giveaway: For a chance to win a copy of Modern Potluck, leave a comment with your favorite potluck dish and a working email until Wednesday, September 7th, 2016. Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck   Print Serves: 8-16 Ingredients for the carrots 3 pounds real baby carrots or other small carrots - scrubbed if organic, peeled if not 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon ground coriander 1 teaspoon paprika 1 teaspoon ground cumin salt and freshly ground black pepper ½ cup tender fresh herb leaves - cilantro/­­dill/­­tarragon/­­mint/­­basil - roughly chopped, plus more for garnish ¼ cup finely sliced pitted medjool dates, dried figs or prunes for the lentils 1 pound dried black beluga or french green lentils salt and freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil 1 large onion - quartered lengthwise, peeled and thinly sliced crosswise 1 tablespoon minced garlic (about 2 large cloves) 1 teaspoon ground coriander 1 teaspoon ground cumin ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 1 cup fresh cilantro leaves - roughly chopped plain yogurt or cashew cream for serving (optional) Instructions prepare the carrots Preheat oven to 425°F. Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment paper. In a large bowl, toss the carrots with olive oil, coriander, paprika and cumin, and season generously with salt and pepper. Spread the carrots out on the baking sheets. Roast, rotating the baking sheets halfway through and shaking the carrots, for 20 to 30 minutes, until the carrots are nicely browned and tender. Let the carrots cool slightly, then transfer to a large bowl and toss with the herbs and dates. prepare the lentils In a medium saucepan, cover the lentils with water by 2 inches and bring to a boil. Simmer over medium heat until tender, 20 to 25 minutes. Drain the lentils, reserving ½ cup of the cooking liquid and season with salt. In a deep skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onion and season generously with salt. Cook, stirring frequently until lightly browned, about 15 minutes. Add the garlic, coriander, cumin, and cinnamon, and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the lentils and reserved cooking liquid, and cook until heated through, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in the lemon juice and the cilantro. Arrange the lentils on a platter and top with the carrots. Garnish with more herb leaves and dollops of yogurt/­­cashew cream and serve warm or at room temperature. potluck prep The lentils and roasted carrots, without the herbs and dates, can be refrigerated separately, overnight; bring to room temperature before serving. Bring the dish to the potluck already assembled with the vegetables on top of the lentils, then garnish with yogurt/­­cashew cream and herbs just before serving. Notes I halved the recipe for two people, but giving you a whole one here as per the book. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Pineapple and Mango Tart Raw Zucchini Spaghetti with Marinara Sauce Summer Market Salad .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Giveaway) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday

June 12 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday To continue with the herbal/­­floral theme from last week, this Sunday, we’ve got Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream. We’ve been having quite a steady supply of fresh chamomile at the local market, and those bouquets fill the house with the most calming, quiet aroma, which I usually associate with bedtime and all things peaceful, due to the herb’s well-studied chill-out properties. I’ve had a note to make chamomile ice cream ever since I made chamomile sorbet years ago, which was essentially frozen chamomile tea and honey – sounds so simple, but its refreshing flavor left quite an impression for all these years. Chamomile, honey and lemon are flavors that seem to have been made for one another. In this ice cream, they unite into a subtle taste that I can only describe as soothing, steadying and balancing. There’s that unmistakably floral quality from the chamomile, sweetness from the honey, a sour citrus note from the lemon, all combined in a cooling and smooth ice cream. Read on for the recipe and some weekend links, and have a chill Sunday :) Is sugar really bad for you? – starting in 2018, nutrition labels on packaged foods will have to list the amount of added sugars in addition to total sugars, and this article answers some important questions in regards to that. Obviously, we love sweets, so – everything in moderation :) Aloe Vera – summer beauty food The Voyageur – a favorite, dreamy online travel journal All You Need, You Already Have – an inspiring post on Zen Habits Kid Friendly Herbs – to go with the theme of this post, a round up of herbs that are ok to give to children Sarah Britton interview – “It was about three years before I got a comment from someone whose last name wasn’t mine.” One Part Podcast – been listening to this while doing things around the kitchen. So far loved episodes with Bryant Terry, Dana Shultz, Laura Wright. Blog love – we are in complete awe of The Artful Desperado’s food photography, green caesar non-alcoholic cocktail, soft meringue s’mores with blood orange, roasted artichoke and cauliflower with creamy harissa dip. Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 cans full fat Thai coconut milk ¼ cup dried chamomile flowers ¼ cup honey - divided, plus more for drizzling juice and zest of 1 lemon 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder Instructions Combine coconut milk and chamomile in a medium saucepan. Bring to a gentle simmer, preferably on a double boiler, or over regular heat. Simmer for 15 minutes. Remove from heat, cover and let infuse and cool to room temperature. Strain chamomile milk. In a blender, combine milk with 2 tablespoons honey, lemon juice and arrowroot. Blend until smooth. Chill the mixture well in the refrigerator, preferably overnight. Process mixture in an ice cream machine for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Spoon ice cream into a container in layers, drizzling the remaining honey between the layers. Serve immediately as soft serve or place in the freezer to harden further for at least 4 hours. Remove from freezer 10-15 minutes before serving. Garnish with lemon zest and more honey when serving. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Tarragon and Mint Ice Cream Raw Blackberry and Lime Miniature Tarts with Cardamom Ice Cream Bee Pollen and Manuka Honey Ice-Cream Beet Tahini Snack Bars .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Fresh Herb Potato Rösti

November 24 2015 Vegetarian Times 

1 | Squeeze as much liquid as possible out of grated potatoes, then place in bowl, and toss with chives, parsley, and tarragon. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. 2 | Heat 1 Tbs. oil in 9-inch skillet (preferably cast iron) over medium heat. Press potato mixture into pan, and cook 10 minutes, or until bottom of rösti is golden brown. Loosen bottom and sides of rösti, then slide onto plate. Add remaining 1 Tbs. oil to pan, flip rösti back into pan (browned side up), and cook 10 to 15 minutes more, or until second side of rösti is golden brown. Loosen rösti, then slide onto serving plate. Cut into wedges or squares, and serve warm.

Wild Rice-and-Sage Stuffing with Crunchy Croutons

October 20 2015 Vegetarian Times 

1 | Preheat oven to 375°F. Coat 8-inch-square baking dish with cooking spray. 2 | Toast walnuts in dry skillet over medium heat 5 minutes, or until fragrant, shaking skillet often. Set aside. 3 | Toss bread cubes with 21/­­2 Tbs. oil, salt, and pepper in bowl. Transfer to baking sheet, and bake 12 to 14 minutes, or until golden brown. Set aside, and keep oven on. 4 | Heat remaining 2 Tbs. oil in large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, and cook 12 minutes, or until soft and translucent. Add garlic, and sauté 2 minutes. Add broth, and bring to a boil. Stir in wild rice, and return to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 40 minutes. Stir in toasted walnuts, and simmer, covered, 10 minutes more. Remove from heat, and season with salt and pepper, if desired. 5 | Spread in prepared baking dish, and bake 10 to 20 minutes, or until beginning to brown and crisp on top. Serve sprinkled with croutons and tarragon.

Creamy Beans on Toast

June 13 2015 Vegan Dad 

Creamy Beans on Toast We are having an actual spring this year--regular rain and cool nights. Its days like these that make me seek out something warm, hearty and comforting. Best to enjoy this dish before it gets too hot.  INGREDIENTS - 1/­­4 cup margarine, or oil - 1 large onion, diced - 2 cloves of garlic, chopped - 1 tsp tarragon - 2 cups diced cremini mushrooms - 1 tbsp light tamari or soy sauce - 1/­­3 cup all purpose flour - 2.5 to 3 cups warm vegetable stock - 1 19oz can mixed beans, rinsed and drained (about 2 cups) - 2 cups peas, fresh or frozen - salt and pepper to taste - toast METHOD 1. Heat margarine or oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Sauté onions for 5-7 minutes, until translucent. Add garlic and sauté for 1 minute.  2. Add the tarragon and the mushrooms with a pinch of salt. Sauté for 3-5 mins, or until the mushrooms begin to soften. Add tamari and cook for another 5 mins. The mushrooms should be soft. 3. Add flour and mix well. Cook for a minute or so, stirring constantly.  4. Stream in 1.5 cups of the stock, stirring constantly so that the sauce remains smooth. 5. Transfer to a blender and blend until smooth. (NOTE: I do this because my kids are picky about pieces of mushroom. You can blend just half of the mixture.) 6. Return the blended mixture to the pan, add the remaining stock, the beans, and the peas. Bring to bubbling, stirring constantly.  7. Serve over thick slices of toasted hearty bread. 

Bee Pollen and Manuka Honey Ice-Cream

September 30 2014 Golubka Kitchen 

Bee Pollen and Manuka Honey Ice-Cream This past summer was a summer of ice cream for us. Since I bought an ice cream machine five years ago, I haven’t been buying ice cream in stores  - it all seems too sweet to me. The only exception is specialty, like mochi and other types of Japanese ice cream. This summer, it all began with Tarragon and Mint Ice Cream inspired by my home region in the springtime. Then I came across these amazingly perfumy guavas and turned them into ice cream. There were also Balsamic-Strawberry, Basil and Blackberry frozen treats. I believe that there is very little limit when it comes to flavors in ice cream – so many things take on an intriguing taste when frozen. Bee pollen is one of my breakfast staples – I sprinkle it on yogurt, smoothies or porridge and love its taste and magical immune boosting, digestive aiding health benefits. The idea of including it into an ice cream came to me recently, when I tried Manuka honey for the first time. Generally, I’m not crazy about eating honey straight up and the most important quality that I look for is subtle sweetness – the kind of sweetness I remember from my childhood, when tasting young spring honey. Manuka honey, a honey made by New Zealand bees from the nectar of the native manuka tree, has the kind of flavor I crave – a complex and subtle taste. Apparently, it’s exceptionally good for you when it comes to types of honey, especially when combined with bee pollen. And if you’re anything like me, the first chill in the air won’t stop you from making a batch of this, dare I say, warming ice cream. Manuka Honey and Bee Pollen Ice Cream 2 cans full fat Thai coconut milk scant 1/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoons Manuka honey 2 tablespoons bee pollen 1/­­2 teaspoon xanathan gum or 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder pinch of sea salt 1 tablespoon vanilla extract – optional 1. Blend coconut milk, 1/­­4 cup Manuka honey, 1 tablespoon bee pollen, xanathan gum, salt and vanilla (if using) in a blender until smooth. Chill well in the refrigerator for several hours or overnight. 2. Process in an ice cream machine according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Spoon 1/­­3 of the ice cream into a chilled container, even it out and drizzle some of the remaining 2 tablespoons Manuka honey over. Sprinkle with some of the remaining bee pollen. Repeat with the rest of the ingredients. 3. Freeze for at least 4 hours or overnight. Let sit at room temperature for 10-15 minutes before scooping and serving.

Dovga – Azerbaijani Wedding Soup

August 20 2014 Golubka Kitchen 

Dovga – Azerbaijani Wedding Soup I recently talked a bit about my home region in Russia, and its array of food cultures and cuisines. Its unique geographical positioning near the republics of the Caucasus mountains allowed me to form all kinds of connections with people from the neighboring areas, while living there most of my life. My sister-in-law, Alla’s, family resided in Azerbaijan for many years. Visiting their home for lunch is always a treat, as the table is guaranteed to feature some authentic Azerbaijani dishes, learned first-hand during their stay. This time around, Alla’s mother introduced me to Dovga, an Azerbaijani wedding soup that is traditionally served at the celebratory table between meat dishes, as a vitamin and digestion boost. I couldn’t believe I’d never tried the soup before – it is exactly the kind of thing I want to eat during the summer. The base for dovga is made up of several types of fermented milk beverages, refreshing and healthy probiotic drinks, such as matsoni, ayran, and kefir. All of these cultured dairy drinks originate from the mountains of Caucasus. As it turns out, kefir, which nowadays is one of the most beloved beverages in Russia, was not introduced there until the beginning of the 20th century. People from the Caucasus have always been known for their incredible longevity. In 1908, the Russian royal scientists were determined to unveil the mountain people’s fountain of youth. They sent a young woman scientist by the name of Irina Sakharova down South, to fetch some kefir grains from Bek-Mirza Baichorov, a Karachai prince who was rumored to have the goods. Baichorov did not want to give up his people’s secret, but legend has it that upon seeing Irina, he fell in love and proceeded to kidnap her, which is a customary courting routine in those parts. Later, in court, the freed Ms. Sakharova offered to drop the charges if Baichorov gave up some of his kefir grains, to which he agreed. Soon after, the nation, and later the world, fell in love with the miraculous drink. Who knows how much of this legend is true, but I like thinking of it as fact – a beautiful story of kefir and unreturned love. Back to Dovga – it is packed with a great amount of herbs and leafy greens. Now is the time to eat as many greens as you can, while they are still fresh and abundant at markets, before fall sneaks up on us. Dovga can be served hot, right after making it, or cold. It is not recommended to reheat it after it’s been chilled. It is delicious either way, but the cold version is my favorite.   The photos you are seeing here are from Sochi and its surrounding areas – a magical place where the Caucasus Mountains meet the Black Sea, where the climate is subtropical and summer nights are lit up by fireflies. Dovga makes a big batch/­­large pot of soup Notes: 1. If you do not have authentic matsoni, feel free to use kefir or yogurt, or a mixture of both. Whey (leftover liquid from ricotta cheese making among other things) is also a great addition. You can substitute the herbs and greens according to your taste. 2. Back home, there is a type of rice that is typically used in dovga, which cooks very fast. Therefore, the rice is added in uncooked rice, and it’s ready by the time the dovga is done. Here, I used cooked rice because none of the rice available to me would cook so quickly. 3. Alla’s mom also adds 1 1/­­2 tablespoons of flour, but I left it out. Adding the egg helps to make this soup creamy and prevents the liquid from separating. I haven’t yet tried making it without the egg. If anyone tries it, please let me know how it goes. 2 large bunches spinach 2 bunches cilantro 1 large bunch parsley 1 large bunch dill 5 green onions handful of mint leaves plus more for garnish handful of basil leaves plus more for garnish 2  liters mixed fermented milk beverages – kefir, yogurt, whey, or just kefir/­­yogurt  (the ideal mixture would be: 1 liter kefir, 1/­­2 liter yogurt or matsoni, 1/­­2 liter whey or water ) 1 cup cooked rice (I used brown rice) 1 egg – beaten 1 generous cup cooked chickpeas – optional sea salt to taste 1. Chop the spinach and herbs, set aside. 2. Whisk together all of the beverages in a large pot. Add in the rice, egg and chickpeas, and whisk everything together. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring frequently. 3. Add spinach, herbs add salt. Turn the heat down to medium-low and simmer for 15 minutes, continuing to stir. Remove from heat. 4. Serve immediately or chill at room temperature and then in the refrigerator to served chilled. Garnish with mint, basil and cilantro leaves. Enjoy!

Spring Salad Dressed with Avocado A?oli

May 13 2014 Vegetarian Times 

1. Bring potatoes and enough water to cover by 3 inches to a boil in large saucepan. Reduce heat to medium-low, and boil 8 to 10 minutes, or until potatoes are easily pierced with knife. Remove potatoes with slotted spoon, and dunk them in large bowl of ice water. Set aside to drain. Add asparagus to cooking water, and cook 1 to 2 minutes, or until asparagus is bright green. Dunk in ice water, and drain. 2. Blend avocado, 1/­­4 cup chives, lemon juice, tarragon, honey, and garlic in blender until smooth. Pour oil into blender while machine is running, and process until emulsified. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. 3. Spread 2 Tbs. avocado sauce in thick streak on large salad plates with back of spoon. Divide asparagus among plates. Halve potatoes lengthwise, and arrange 6 halves on each plate. Garnish with radish slices and remaining chives.


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