sweets - vegetarian recipes

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Vegan Ravioli with Pink Beans

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Masala Paratha (Besan Ka Masala Paratha)

Vegan Ceviche










sweets vegetarian recipes

Restaurant Review: Spirit in Rotterdam, Netherlands

September 7 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Visiting the Rotterdam Markthal was one of the hotspots on my wish list. And I loved the building, especially the very colorful ceiling. Truly beautiful. To make the experience even better, we had a great vegan/­­vegetarian option nearby; Spirit. Located in the Green Passage of Rotterdam, Spirit serves a fully vegetarian (and mostly vegan, I think about 75-80% is vegan) buffet. The concept reminded me of LEtto in Napoli — you compose your own breakfast, lunch or dinner and pay by weight. There is also the option to do take-away. Somebody called it a ‘vegetarian valhalla served in the form of a high end buffet. And I couldnt agree more. Spirit has a huge buffet with a variety of fifty different breakfast, lunch or dinner dishes, juices and patisserie to choose from. There are beautiful bowls filled with salads, hot dishes, soups, all kind of toppings and dips. And there is also a great selection of sweets, cakes and ice-cream. Every dish is accompanied by a card with all the ingredients and there a little signs that tell if a dish is vegan, gluten-free, contains nuts and so on. For me that is a very relaxing way to eat. You […] The post Restaurant Review: Spirit in Rotterdam, Netherlands appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Meatless Monday Book Roundup

August 7 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Book RoundupMeatless Monday is always happy to provide new tips and recipes on going meat-free. But were also happy to give great chefs and experts the chance to share their recipes and opinions! This week, Meatless Monday is putting five authors in the spotlight with new books that will help to make vegetarian cooking even more delicious and easy. Love Thy Legumes by Sonali Suratkar Legumes are known to be a great source of protein for people who want to replace meat in their meals, but there are even more benefits to eating them. Nutritionist and Johns Hopkins graduate Sonali Suratkar is using her first cookbook to celebrate legumes and educate people on how they may improve blood sugar, assist in weight loss, and ease the digestive system. She also describes how to prepare dried legumes so people can make the switch from the canned and processed versions. With tons of recipes and beautiful pictures, Suratkar is sure to entice any reader curious about one of the healthiest plant-based food varieties! 28-Day Plant-Powered Health Reboot by Jessica Jones, MS, RD, CDE and Wendy Lopez, MS, RD If youre thinking about giving your diet an overhaul, then the 28-Day Planet-Powered Health Reboot might be the cookbook for you! Written by Registered Dieticians Jessica Jones and Wendy Lopez of the blog Food Heaven Made Easy, this new cookbook has four weeks of breakfasts, lunches, and dinners that are all purely plant-based. Made with health - and not dieting - in mind, Jones and Lopez outline a completely customizable menu of meals that put the focus on rebooting the body with balanced meals without animal proteins. They even have a few sweets! Vegan: The Cookbook by Jean-Christian Jury We love this cookbook by Master Chef Jean-Christian Jury so much that were giving it an encore! After a health scare, Jury was inspired to share what he learned during his recovery - how to change his diet to include more plant-based, healthy foods. As the owner of several restaurants around the world, Jury knows global cuisine better than most. Vegan: The Cookbook includes 450 vegan recipes from several different countries such as France, Italy, India, and Papua New Guinea. Read more about it in our feature article from May! Bowls of Goodness: Vibrant Vegetarian Recipes Full of Nourishment by Nina Olsson Available (in the US) September 2017 Food blogger Nina Olsson is already well-known for her popular blog Nourish Atelier. Earlier this year, she released Bowls of Goodness in her native UK and this September it will arrive on our side of the pond! The book is a celebration of simple, delicious, and undeniably healthy meals in bowls, all of which are vegetarian. In addition to giving bowls a boost, Bowls of Goodness acknowledges the history of bowls tracing back to our most ancient human ancestors. And what better food to put in bowls than the healthiest, prettiest produce and grains? If youre an author of a new vegetarian-focused book or you just found a great roundup of meat-free recipes, contact Meatless Monday at info@meatlessmonday.com - we love to showcase new books on our site! The post Meatless Monday Book Roundup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight

July 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight This post was created in partnership with Whole Earth Sweetener Co. Turkish delight is one of those old-school sweets that was always around during my childhood in the Soviet Union, which is surprising because treats were scarce and mainly homemade. There was a tiny store a short walk away from our home, where they carried neat, white paper boxes, lined with tissue and filled with delicate pink, sugar-dusted Turkish Delight squares. We called the treat rahat lokum (just another commonly used name for Turkish Delight). I spent my childhood convinced that it was fairy food, and cherished every pleasantly jelly-like, aromatic bite from the magical paper box. I’ve since completely forgotten about rahat lokum, dismissing it as an outdated sweet of my semi-hungry childhood, until I was in Moscow a few months ago. There is a high-vibe sweets brand sold in some grocery stores in Russia, which makes chocolate, wafers and such, with surprisingly wholesome ingredients, cool herbal add-ins, and a pleasantly low amount of non-refined sugar. I always make a point of hunting down some of their stuff to bring back home. This time around, I discovered a new product of theirs, which was a healthier, green tea-flavored Turkish Delight. It was delicious and disappeared in no time once my family got a taste of it back in Florida. I quickly got the urge to figure out my own recipe, as I often do with these types of obsessions. Thankfully, I’m no stranger to the thickening and gelatinizing properties of arrowroot (starch from a tropical tuber) and agar-agar (sea vegetable). Both make for the perfect, allergy-friendly and healthful alternative to cornstarch, which is traditional to Turkish Delight recipes. After some consideration, I decided to color my delight with hibiscus tea, as a tribute to the pink treats of my childhood, and because I’m generally obsessed with hibiscus and its million health benefits. For an extra aromatic finish, I added some orange blossom water instead of the more commonly used rose water, which truly takes this treat to the next level. When coated in arrowroot powder, this Turkish Delight looks surprisingly professional, as though it was store-bought. The cool thing is that in reality it’s pretty easy to make at home, just take a look at the video above to see the whole process. For sweetener in this recipe, I used an organic blend of stevia and honey from Whole Earth. I’ve had a pretty turbulent relationship with stevia over the years. I’ve always wanted to get into it as a sugar substitute, knowing that it’s totally natural, free of calories, and a zero on the glycemic index, but I just cannot get used to its potent, powerful flavor (when extracted it’s something like 200 times sweeter than sugar!). Any time I add pure stevia extract to anything, it’s all I can taste, and that flavor lingers in my mouth for hours in an unpleasant way. Thankfully, Whole Earth Sweetener Co. figured out that when mixed with other, more traditional sweeteners, stevia is barely distinguishable, and they offer a few carefully considered stevia blends. The neat thing is that because of stevia’s potency, you only need half of the amount of their sweetener in any given recipe. In other words, this Turkish Delight recipe only calls for 1/­­4 cup of the honey and stevia blend, while you would need twice the amount (1/­­2 cup) of pure honey or maple syrup to achieve the same sweetness without the stevia. After trying the Whole Earth stevia-honey blend, as well as their stevia-raw sugar blend, I’m totally on board. I love being able to use less sugar in my sweet recipes, and I’m hoping that these products can help me ease into a love affair with pure stevia, some day :) I’m curious to hear about your guys’ experience with stevia. Do you use it? Did it take you some time to get used to it? Any tips and stories are much appreciated! Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight   Print Serves: about 48 pieces Ingredients 3½ cups purified water 2 tablespoons dried hibiscus flowers ⅔ cup plus ¼ cup arrowroot powder, divided ¼ cup stevia-honey blend or ⅓ - ½ cup pure honey or maple syrup 4½ tablespoons agar agar powder (not flakes) 1¼ teaspoon orange blossom water or rose water Instructions Combine the water with the hibiscus in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, cover and let the tea steep for 30 minutes. Prepare an 8 x 8-inch square, rimmed dish by lining it up with parchment paper. Set aside. Strain the hibiscus tea. Mix ½ cup of the tea with ⅔ cup of the arrowroot powder in a medium bowl. The mixture will be quite thick and difficult to mix at first. Set aside. Pour the rest of the hibiscus tea into the same saucepan used for brewing the tea. Add the sweetener and the agar agar powder, whisk to combine and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and simmer for 5 minutes, whisking periodically. At the end of the 5 minutes, give the prepared arrowroot mixture a good stir and slowly pour it into the saucepan with the agar mixture, stirring vigorously. The mixture will be very thick and stretchy. Remove from heat and add in the orange blossom water, whisking to combine. Immediately spoon the mixture into the prepared dish, evening it out as much as you can. Place the dish into the refrigerator for 1-2 hours, until the mixture is completely set. Once set, lift the delight square out of the dish onto a cutting board, using the extending ends of the parchment paper. Slice into around 48 cubes and roll them in the remaining ¼ cup arrowroot powder to coat. Store refrigerated in an airtight container. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles Almost Savory Raw Chocolate Raw Honey Maca Pancakes, a Weekend Breakfast Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

July 7 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

INDIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterMy newest cookbook, The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the the INDIA cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2uGbsog My new INDIA cookbook has been years in the making - with recipes, stories, artwork & photographs inspired by 8 trips to my most favourite country. It’s a culinary love story of my favorite cuisine - based on a total of nearly two years in India and 25 years of devotion to Indian cooking. My first trip to India was in 2001: mostly North India and Nepal. I spent 4 months on that journey, then another 6 weeks in South India in 2006. I visited twice more, in 2009 & 2010, followed by living and working for a year (as an art teacher) in Central India, returning to Berlin in 2011. In Autumn 2016 & Spring 2017, I went back to India to taste and explore the last regions (and cuisines) of India still waiting for me. I traveled across Kashmir & Ladakh, trekking through mountain villages and exploring towns and cities, staying mostly with families and cooking together in their kitchens. Then I went deep into the Northeast: West Bengal, Assam, Sikkim, and Nagaland. I even met with world famous chefs at their restaurants - and homes - for incredible eats and great times in the kitchen. Now I’m back in Berlin, recreating the culinary wonders of the Indian subcontinent in my own kitchen. As with my previous 4 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. It’s a labor of love and the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. I’m back on Kickstarter for my 5th international cookbook project. You can join the crowdfunding which makes everything possible. It’s an adventure in itself, complete with backer-only updates, behind the scenes sneak peaks, exclusive travel videos & stories, recipe testing groups, and more. Pre-order a signed copy of The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA (including worldwide shipping, stickers & e-book for EUR25!) My INDIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 5th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 192 pages with 90+ recipes and over 70 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by 8 trips /­­ 21+ months of travel around India and over 25 years vegan cooking experience - Total variety of regional cuisines: Rajasthani, Gujarati, Punjabi, Kashmiri, Sindhi, Maharashtrian, Tamil, Kerelan, Karnatakan, Goan, Hyderbadi, Bengali, Assamese, Sikkimese, Ladakhi, Tibetan, Nepali - Indian classics & family favorites, timeless treats, new culinary wonders, mind-blowing mega-metropolitan snacks, fabulous village feasts, scrumptious street food, and insanely delicious desserts - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and awesome cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Shahi Bengan – Roasted Stuffed Eggplant Gobi Pakoras – Batter-fried Cauliflower Saag Paneer – Spinach & Fried Tofu Cubes Pani Puri – Street Food Favorite Aloo Paratha – Grilled Potato-Stuffed Flatbreads Shahi Paneer – fried tofu cubes in creamy tomato sauce Seitan Vindaloo – Goan Tangy Curry Samosas! Fried Potato-Stuffed Pastries Gajur Halava – Bengali Carrot Pudding Gulab Jamuns – Doughballs in Rose Syrup Berry Halava – Fruity Semolina Dessert Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA: - Garam Masala, Sambar Masala, Chaat Masala & Panch Puran - Tamarind Ginger, Pineapple, Tomato, Coconut, Chili & Bhang Chutneys - Aam Achar – Mango Pickle - Amitar Khar – Assamese papaya starter - Handvo – Gujurati zucchini cake - Uttapam – South Indian rice & lentil pancakes with tomatoes - Idly Paper Dosa – Karnatakan crispy rice & lentil crepes - Rava Dosa – Tamil semolina crepes - Dahi Vada Chaat – lentil cakes with yogurt & chutney - Hariali Paneer Tikka – Punjabi tofu skewers with spices & herbs - Gobi Pakora – batter-fried cauliflower - Mirchi Vada – Rajasthani batter-fried chillies - Aloo Tikka – spicy, fried potato cakes - Samosa – vegetable-stuffed fried pastry - Pani Puri – potato-stuffed fried pastry with tamarind spice water - Pav Bhaji - spicy vegetable mash with fresh baked buns - Momos – Tibetan vegetable dumplings - Shapaley – Tibetan vegetable pies - Kolkota Kathi Roll – spicy soymeat & shredded cabbage wrap - Sambar Bandhgobi Rolls – stuffed cabbage leaves - Aloo Dum – Kashmiri tomato potato curry - Shahi Tamatar – roasted stuffed tomatoes - Shahi Bengan – roasted stuffed eggplant - Shahi Mirch – roasted stuffed peppers - Shahi Paneer – tofu cubes in creamy, tomato curry - Paneer Jalfrezi – spicy tofu cubes - Saag Paneer – spinach & tofu cubes - Mutter Paneer - peas & tofu cubes - Xaak – Assamese greens, potatoes & cherry tomatoes - Bengan Bhartha – Kashmiri roasted aubergine - Malai Kofta – potato dumplings in creamy tomato curry - Bindi Aloo Tawa Masala – spicy stir-fried okra & potatoes - Khumb Kaju Makhani – Rajasthani cashew mushroom curry - Shukto – Bengali eggplant, potato & plantains - Pumpkin Posto – Bengali squash in creamy poppy seed curry - Seitan Vindaloo – Goan tangy curry - Black Sesame Seitan – Assamese spicy curry - Tamatar Pitika – Assamese tomatoes with herbs & spices - Aloo Pitika – Assamese potatoes with herbs & spices - Bol Tenga – Assames lentil dumplings in tangy curry - Mas Tenga – Assamese tangy jackfruit curry - Chupke – Tibetan dumpling soup - Tarka Dal – Punjabi lentil curry - Chana Masala – spicy chickpeas - Rajma - Kashmiri red kidney bean curry - Lobia Palak – black-eyed peas with lemon & spinach - Golden Rice - with turmeric & spices - Chana Pulao – rice with chickpeas - Pulihora – Tamil tamarind rice with peanuts & spices - Classic Biryani – Kashmiri rice dish with vegetables, nuts & spices - Jackfruit Biryani – Tamil coconut rice dish with spicy jackfruit - Tupula Bhaat – Assamese sticky rice steamed in banana leaves - Aloo Paratha – grilled flatbread stuffed with potatoes - Tibetan Bread – fried breakfast snack - Makki Roti – grilled cornbread - Roti – wholewheat grilled flatbread - Garlic Naan – traditional baked flatbread - Poori – deep-fried flatbreads - Date Ladoo – date & nut sweets - Besan Ladoo – chickpea sweet - Gajur Halava – spiced carrot pudding - Berry Halava – strawberry & blueberry semolina sweet - Mysore Pak – traditional sweet squares - Gulab Jamun – deep-fried dough balls in rose syrup - Rasmalai – cheese balls in saffron mango milk - Jalebi – fried, syrupy sweet - Peda – lemon cashew creamy sweet - Kheer – Kashmiri rice pudding with cardamom, nuts & raisins - Mishti Doi - Bengali sweet curd - Shrikand - Maharashtran yogurt dessert - Pista Kulfi – pistachio ice cream - Pitha – Bengali sesame & date pastry - Narikol Ladoo – Assamese shredded coconut balls - Kadala Parippu – Keralan sweet chana dal dessert - Ginger Chai – spiced black tea - Kahwa – Kashmiri green tea with almond & saffron - Badam Dudh – almond milk with cardamom & cinnamon - Anjoor Kaju Dudh – cashew shake with fig & date - Strawberry Mint Lassi – yogurt smoothie The post INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Chocolate Pudding Pie with Seed Crust

June 9 2017 VegKitchen 

Chocolate Pudding Pie with Seed Crust I dont know if you remember this, but many years ago, Im talking the 70s, I think every mom in America was required to make her children chocolate pudding pie in a graham cracker crust and slather it with whipped cream. This was actually something I really loved to eat. Of course, I had to […] The post Chocolate Pudding Pie with Seed Crust appeared first on VegKitchen.

Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway

May 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway My first experience with South Indian fare was in Toronto, in a buzzing, cafeteria-style restaurant that looked like a food court in any American mall, but instead of fast food, the offering consisted of the most mind-blowing, bold-flavored South Indian dishes that weren’t like anything I’d ever tasted before. That ended up being one of the most memorable meals of my life. Since then, I’ve continued to seek out restaurants that specialized in South Indian cuisine, but rarely considered trying my hand at any of the dishes at home. Chitra Agrawal’s debut cookbook Vibrant India changed all of that for me. Chitra has spent years documenting her family’s traditionally vegetarian South Indian recipes on her blog, as well as adapting them to use the local, seasonal produce that she comes across in Brooklyn, where she lives. Her cookbook is a stunning collection of modern recipes, which honor her mother’s South Indian heritage, rooted in the ayurvedic tradition. The cookbook truly opens up a whole new world of cooking to those of us used to a more Western approach to food (and we are giving away a copy, see below :D ). In a her intro, Chitra explains the difference between North and South Indian cooking, and chances are, the Indian food you’ve tried likely originated in the North – think naan, samosas and curries. Cuisine from the South is generally characterized by the use of lentils, rice and specific spice mixtures in dishes like dosa and sambar – delicious stuff that doesn’t get nearly as much attention in the West. The book is filled with Chitra’s super comprehensive explanations of Indian cooking techniques like tempering spices, etc., which takes the intimidation factor out of the recipes. Turns out, making flavorful and authentically rooted South Indian dishes at home is totally doable. I’ve already made the Dosa, Lemony Lentil Soup, Banana, Coconut and Cardamom Ice Cream, as well as a few of the rices, and each one came out explosive in flavor, as well nourishing to the core. One of my favorite chapters turned out to be the Rice and Bread chapter, which offers a ton of ideas on preparing rice to be enjoyed as a main dish. Who would have thought that basmati rice could be so flavorful and substantial?! There are recipes for Lemon Peanut Rice, Fragrant Eggplant and Green Pepper Rice, Coconut Rice with Cashews, and Yogurt Rice with Pomegranate and Mint, but my favorite one of all turned out to be the Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios, which I’m sharing here. Chitra talks about often getting a hefty bunch of dill from her farm share and not knowing what to do with the volume, which sparked the idea for this recipe that uses up plenty of dill. The result is rice so fragrant that it’s nothing short of heavenly. Chitra explains that she aims to achieve a balance of sweet, sour, bitter, spicy, and savory flavors in her recipes, which is what I mean when I describe her dishes as explosive, and that very much applies to this rice recipe as well. Other chapters within the book include Breakfast and Light Meals, Salads and Yogurts, Stir-Fries and Curries, Soups, Stews and Lentils, Festive Bites and Snacks,  Sweets and Drinks, Chutneys and Pickles – basically a ton of deliciousness packed into a beautiful cookbook. Well done, Chitra! In case you are wondering, the book does call for specialty Indian ingredients that you might not be able to find at your mainstream supermarket. However, if you enjoy cooking and learning about new ingredients, it’s SO worth seeking out a local Indian market in your area. I rely on our nearby Indian market for stocking up on ghee, fresh spices, rice and a variety of lentils, all at an affordable price. All the ingredients are also available online. Giveaway: To enter to win a copy of Vibrant India, leave a comment here letting us know if you would be interested in seeing weekly plant-based meal plans, complete with recipes and shopping lists as a new series on this site. We are thinking of starting up a conversation about meal prep, and would love to gauge your interest! The winner will be selected at random on Wednesday, May 24th. Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the turmeric rice 1 cup basmati rice (makes about 4 cups cooked) ⅛ teaspoon turmeric powder for the lime and dill rice with pistachios 4 cups cooked turmeric rice 2 tablespoons mild-flavored oil such as canola (I used coconut) ½ teaspoon black mustard seeds pinch of asafetida (hing) powder 1 teaspoon chana dal 1 teaspoon urad dal 5 fresh curry leaves 1 dried red chile, broken in half 1 large shallot or ½ medium yellow onion - finely chopped small bunch of dill - tough stalks removed, chopped ½ to ¾ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon sambar powder (optional) ¼ cup shelled pistachios - lightly toasted and coarsely chopped juice of half a lime (about 1½ tablespoons), plus more as needed serving options raita or plain yogurt hot pickle or Brooklyn Delhi (Chitras company!) achaar Instructions to make the turmeric rice Wash the rice in several changes of water until the water runs clear. Soak the rice in water, generously covered, for at least 30 minutes. Drain thoroughly, using a fine-mesh sieve. Place rice and 1¾ cups water in a medium saucepan. Mix in the turmeric powder. Place the saucepan over high heat and bring to a boil. Once the water is boiling, cover the saucepan and turn the heat to the lowest setting on your stove. Cook until the rice in tender and there is no water left in the pan, about 15 minutes. Turn off the heat. Remove the saucepan from the stove and leave it covered for 10 minutes, to allow the grains to separate. Fluff with a fork. to make the lime and dill rice with pistachios Coat the bottom of a wok (I used a large sauté pan w/­­ a lid) with the oil and place over medium heat. When the oil is hot and shimmering, add one black mustard seed. When the seed sizzles and pops, add the rest of the mustard seeds and asafetida. Keep a lid handy to cover the pan while the mustard seeds are popping. When the popping starts to subside (a few seconds), immediately add the chana dal and urad dal. Stir to coat with oil, and turn the heat to medium-low. Continue to stir the dals so they evenly roast, until they turn a reddish golden brown and smell nutty, less than a minute. Rub the curry leaves between you fingers a little to release their natural oils, and drop them and the dried red chile into the oil. Cover immediately, as moisture from the curry leaves will cause the oil to spatter. Then stir to evenly coat everything with oil, a few seconds. Add the shallot to the wok and fry over medium heat until softened, less than a minute. Add the dill, ¼ teaspoon of the salt, and a couple tablespoons of water. Turn the heat to medium-low, cover, and cook for 10 to 15 minutes. Stir from time to time. When cooked, the dill should be darker in color and not have as strong a flavor as raw dill. Add the sambar powder. Fry for another minute. Stir in the cooked rice and season with ¼ to ½ teaspoon salt. Stir-fry for 1 to 2 minutes. Mix in the pistachios, reserving a few for garnish. Turn off the heat. Stir in the lime juice and garnish with the reserved pistachios. Taste for salt and adjust as needed. Serve hot with yogurt and hot pickle. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways Summer Vegetable Saute Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Simple & Sweet Vegan Tartlets

May 8 2017 VegKitchen 

Simple & Sweet Vegan Tartlets  Lets say youre not much of a baker or cook, but you want to make an impressive treat for a special person -- say, your sweetie for Valentines Day or a birthday, or mom for Mothers Day. These tiny sweet vegan tartlets are delectable, yet incredibly easy to make. Hannah Kaminsky presents four creative ways to […] The post Simple & Sweet Vegan Tartlets appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Peanut Butter Granola Cookies

April 26 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Peanut Butter Granola Cookies These easy vegan peanut butter granola cookies pass an important test -- if a sweet treat is actually healthy, will it still get eaten? Happily, these tasty cookies disappear quickly. Use whatever kind of granola you prefer -- there are so many great varieties! These sturdy cookies are perfect or packing in the school or […] The post Vegan Peanut Butter Granola Cookies appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Easter Desserts and Treats

March 21 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Easter Desserts and Treats As part of the beloved spring celebration, vegan Easter desserts and treats are a must! Enjoy this list of delectable dairy-free sweets

Veganize It!

February 8 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Veganize It! My new cookbook is called VEGANIZE IT! Easy DIY Recipes for a Plant-Based Kitchen.  It officially hits the shelves on March 7, so I wanted to give you a sneak peek of whats inside. My goal in writing this book was to provide the ultimate guide for making homemade vegan foods from everyday ingredients — and share great ways to use those ingredients.  Like all my cookbooks, the recipes are geared to busy home cooks who want to get a great dinner on the table but dont want to spend all day in the kitchen.  With VEGANIZE IT, you can be as DIY as you want to be, or not.  For example, if you want to make lasagna completely from scratch, there are recipes for homemade ricotta, a melty mozzarella-like cheese, homemade pasta, and a wonderful baked tomato sauce.  If you dont have time to make all the components, you can simply pick and choose what you want to make from scratch and what you prefer to buy ready-made - such as making homemade ricotta and tomato sauce, but using storebought lasagna noodles and vegan mozzarella. In that sense, VEGANIZE IT is really two cookbooks in one:  all the DIY vegan basics such as dairy-free sour cream, mayonnaise, butter, and plant-based meats and seafood made from wheat, soy, beans, and vegetables.  But what makes this book really special is that each chapter goes one step further to include recipes that incorporate one or more of those basic recipes, all made inexpensively, using simple cooking methods and easy-to-find ingredients — so, for example, you can use the cashew cream cheese to make Spinach-Artichoke Dip or Chocolate Cheesecake.  Make the andouille sausage, and youre just one step away from a great jambalaya. Im really excited about VEGANIZE IT and I hope you will be too.  Sample recipes (and a blog tour!) are coming soon.  For now, though, Id like to give you a brief tour around the recipe chapters with a list of just some of the recipes youll find inside along with a few of the gorgeous photos by William and Susan Brinson. DIY DAIRY-FREE AND EGGLESS... Cheesy Broccoli Soup Spinach and Mushroom-Bacon Quiche Chickpea Flour Omelets Breakfast Nachos with Smoky Queso Sauce Bacon-Topped Mac UnCheese  PLANT-BASED MEATS... BBQ Seitan Ribs Burmese Tofu Iron Kettle Chili Better Made Tacos with Avocado Crema Seitan Oscar with Béarnaise Sauce       FLOUR POWER... Cheesy Crackers Handcrafted Lasagna Perfect Pot Pie Cheesy Sausage Biscuits Benedict Pizza VEGAN CHARCUTERIE... Maple Breakfast Sausage DIY Jerky Banh Mi Sandwich Haute Dogs Wellington Join the Club Sandwich       INSTEAD OF SEAFOOD... Lobster Mushroom Bisque Clam-Free Chowder Vegan Crab Louis Fish-Free Tacos Tof-ish and Chips with Tartar Sauce       SWEETS FROM SCRATCH... Luscious Lava Cakes Strawberry Shortcake Lemon Meringue Pie Tiramisu Bellini Trifle         VEGANIZE IT is available for pre-order now…. The post Veganize It! appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Brown Rice Kheer Recipe. Vegan Rice Pudding

October 24 2016 Vegan Richa 

Brown Rice Kheer Recipe. Vegan Rice PuddingBrown Rice Kheer Recipe. Vegan Rice Pudding. Indian Kheer for Diwali festival. Brown Rice simmered in almond cashew milk with cardamom, roasted nuts and currants or raisins. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe.  Diwali is this weekend! And that means sweets, savories, chivda, lighting oil lamps, prayers for prosperity and happiness and meeting everyone to share wishes.  Kheer is one of the favorite desserts in the festive season. It is easy, delicious with a dash cardamom or saffron and simmered for a long time till the rice is soft and almost dissolving into the milk. One of my aunts makes amazing kheer with soft rice that has soaked up all the milk and flavor, which would be slow cooked, chilled and served. I know rice pudding can be a like or dislike dish depending on memories and flavors. But for me memories around kheer are about all the extended family getting together, celebrating festivals and enjoying thick and fresh Indian Rice Pudding.  Continue reading: Brown Rice Kheer Recipe. Vegan Rice PuddingThe post Brown Rice Kheer Recipe. Vegan Rice Pudding appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Besan Halwa – Chickpea flour Spoon fudge

October 3 2016 Vegan Richa 

Besan Halwa – Chickpea flour Spoon fudgeBesan Halwa is a fudgy Indian dessert made with chickpea flour or besan. Chickpea flour Spoon fudge with cardamom and nuts. Use other grain or bean or lentil flours for variation. Vegan Gluten-free Grain-free Dessert Recipe.  6 Ingredients, 15 minutes! Festive season began this weekend with Navratri celebrations, prep for Dussehra, KarwaChauth and then will be rounded up end of this month with Diwali. In India, this month would be more like December in the US, where everyone is generally in a festive spirit. People visit each other, there are potlucks and dinners. Lots of cooking and sweets, Dressing up and shopping. In the US, the spirit of these festivals is mellow. With each year, it is an extra effort to plan and celebrate some of the events. Probably because there is some competition with the October holidays and pumpkin :). But we always make some festival sweets and snacks for this festive Indian season, however busy the month.  Today’s amazing dessert is brought to you by chickpea flour. Chickpea flour is used in various ways in Indian cuisine. Be it a snack cornbread like cake, or savory pancake , or a sweet ladoo ball, a Burfi fudge, or to make a veggie soup, or many other ways. This dessert uses chickpea flour to make a thick custard, that cools to a halwa state. The whole cardamom seeds in the halwa make this one delectable spoon fudge.  Continue reading: Besan Halwa – Chickpea flour Spoon fudgeThe post Besan Halwa – Chickpea flour Spoon fudge appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Einkorn Cocoa Walnut Cookies

July 20 2016 VegKitchen 

Einkorn Cocoa Walnut Cookies These vegan nutty chocolate cookies are made with einkorn flour, which gives them a nice texture and light flavor. Extra-virgin olive oil adds a subtle and seductive charm. See more about

Bengali Mixed Veggies – Charchari Recipe

May 4 2016 Vegan Richa 

Bengali Mixed Veggies – Charchari RecipeBengali Mixed Veggies – Chorchori /­­ Charchari Recipe. Cauliflower Potato Green Beans Peas with Bengali (Eastern Indian) Spices. Panch Phoron Phulkopi Recipe. Easy Veggie Side. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe. Pin this Post.  Panch phoron is the name for Bengali 5 spice. Bengal is a state in Eastern India and is famous for its own specialties and cuisine. Rasgullas, Sandesh and other dairy sweets, fish, rice, mustard seeds and mustard oil and spice blends specific to the regional cuisine. 5 whole spices are mixed and stored as Panch Phoron and use whole or ground in many dishes. This simple veggie side has the 5 spices, some turmeric, heat and a dash of water or broth and cooked until done. Gobi Aloo Bengali Style. Make this and serve with the 6 ingredient Mango Dal or other Dals or serve in wraps like Gobi aloo Wraps with chutneys and crunchy lettuce.  This recipe has no onion and garlic, but still has that onion+garlic flavor. The flavor comes from nigella seeds and asafetida. Nigella seeds are not as commonly used in some regional cuisines in India. You will find them stuck on Naans, or added to spice blends or pastes esp marinade pastes. They are also used in Ethiopian cuisine. They are a whole spice, so definitely get some as the seeds will last a long time.  Continue reading: Bengali Mixed Veggies – Charchari RecipeThe post Bengali Mixed Veggies – Charchari Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Almond Joy Chia Pudding

June 14 2017 VegKitchen 

Almond Joy Chia Pudding Chocolate chia pudding with almonds and coconut (that tastes like a candy bar!) is a super healthy treat that can be served for either breakfast or dessert. This combination of almonds and shredded coconut had me singing, sometimes you feel like a nut, sometimes you dont, like in the old candy bar commercials, so Ive […] The post Almond Joy Chia Pudding appeared first on VegKitchen.

Famous Raw Brownies with Velvet Chocolate Icing

May 18 2017 VegKitchen 

Famous Raw Brownies with Velvet Chocolate Icing Finally, an easy wholesome raw brownies recipe that tastes like real brownies! Nuts, dates, coconut, cocoa powder, maple syrup, and salt combine to create a shockingly divine traditional-style brownie. Although the ingredients sound virtuous (and they are), your taste buds will only register one flavor: chocolate. Its the most popular recipe on Laura-Janes blog, probably […] The post Famous Raw Brownies with Velvet Chocolate Icing appeared first on VegKitchen.

Cocolate Chai Banana Cake

May 13 2017 Veganpassion 

Cocolate Chai Banana Cake Mama deserves something really good for Mother's Day! Yes, she really deserves it - and I'm not there to hug her *baddaughter* That's why I thought: chocolate always helps and my mother loves chocolate banana cakes. It might seem awful to expect your mother to bake her own cake on her special day but maybe the cute looking pictures will comfort her a little. So you can do better as I and spoil your mom on Mother's Day here's one of my new favorite recipes. And still Mother's Day is not the only day to spoil your mother! Makes one cake (7 inch diameter/­­18cm diameter) Preparation time: 2 hours Soak time: 4 hours  Baking time: 25 minutes For the biscuit: 3 3/­­4 cup spelt flour 1 1/­­4 cup raw cane sugar 2 tbsp. vanilla sugar 1/­­3 cup hazelnuts 1 tbsp. baking powder 1/­­3 cup cocoa 1 pinch cinnamon 1 tsp. chia spice 1 can aquafaba (chickpea water) 1/­­2 cup oil 2 1/­­2 cup water with gas Preheat oven to 356°F (180°C) Upper-/­­Lower heat. In a mixing bowl mix together flour, sugar, vanilla sugar, hazelnuts, baking powder, cocoa, cinnamon and chai spice. Whip the aquafaba 10-15 minutes until its stiff.  Mix Oil and water to the flour mixture and stir until the dough is smooth. Carefully fold in the aquafaba. Divide dough on three spring pans and bake at 356°F for 25 minutes. Take the cake out of the oven and let it cool off. Carefully unstick the cake out of the form and cut off the top to straighten the cake.  For the chocolate cashew cream: 3/­­4 cup cashews 1/­­2 cup + 2 tbsp. water with gas 2 bananas, ripe 1 2/­­3 cup chocolate decorations Soak in the cashews over night or at least 4 hours. Pour off and wash the nuts. Mash the nuts with one banana. Chop the chocolate and add to it. Blend until the cream is smooth. Put the cream in the fridge to keep it cold until it is solid enough to decorate with a tube.  Take the other banana and cut it in small pieces. Spread the pieces on the lower bottom of the biscuit. Spread some cream on it and put the next biscuit on top. Again spread with cream and put the last biscuit on top. Spread the rest of the cream around the cake and decorate with sweets, cream or fresh berries. Have lots of fun with baking and enjoy!!

2-Ingredient No-Sugar Date Caramel Sauce

May 3 2017 VegKitchen 

2-Ingredient No-Sugar Date Caramel Sauce The typical caramel sauce recipe consists of a cup of sugar, half a cup of butter, and some milk or cream. Um, no. As in, no, our 2-ingredient no-sugar date caramel sauce contains none of those. Weve hacked all the bad ingredients out of it -- sugar included-- by making it from dates and almond milk. Thats it! […] The post 2-Ingredient No-Sugar Date Caramel Sauce appeared first on VegKitchen.

Almost Savory Raw Chocolate

April 2 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Almost Savory Raw Chocolate We are so excited to share our very first cooking video today! This has been a dream of ours for years now, but it has stayed on the back burner for way too long due to the laborious nature of video-making. We loved the process so much, and will have more step-by-step videos to share in the near future. The idea for this *almost* savory raw chocolate came about from me having daily chocolate cravings, but not wanting to eat sweets every day. I’m one of those people who is okay with eating very dark and bitter chocolate, and I will even eat a 100% cacao bar if I get the chance. So I knew that loading up a chocolate bar with all kinds of savory goodies from my pantry and adding a minimal amount of sweetener would result in a treat that I could get behind. In my favorite batch, I included toasted seeds, spices, seaweed, tahini and miso. There are also a ton of optional add-ins like bee pollen and spirulina that I added for their nutritional content, simply because I had them on hand, but they can be left out and other things from your pantry can be added in. This recipe is very forgiving and customizable. As far as the flavor goes, this chocolate still reads as a treat, and a square or two with tea satisfies all of my chocoholic cravings perfectly. It’s texturally rich from all the crunchy add-ins, and the salty notes from the seaweed, miso and nutritional yeast play well with the rich flavor of raw chocolate. Enjoy and have a great Sunday :) Almost Savory Raw Chocolate   Print Serves: about 8 3 x 7 chocolate bars Ingredients 200 grams (about 2 cups shredded) raw cacao butter - shredded or chopped ½ cup sesame tahini 4 tablespoons maple syrup or date syrup 1 tablespoon unpasteurized miso paste 1 cup raw cacao powder ½ cup mesquite powder 4 tablespoons maca powder ⅓ cup hemp hearts ⅓ cup pumpkin seeds - toasted ¼ cup chia seeds ¼ cup dulse flakes ¼ cup nutritional yeast 1 tablespoon turmeric 3 sheets nori - cut or torn into small pieces other add-ins: ¼ cup cacao nibs 1 tablespoon spirulina ½ tablespoon moringa powder ½ tablespoon bee pollen ½ teaspoon ground ginger sweet and/­­or smoked paprika for sprinkling Instructions In a large bowl, gently melt the cacao butter on a double boiler over medium to medium-low heat. To the bowl, add the tahini, maple/­­date syrup and miso, and whisk to incorporate. To the same bowl, add the cacao, mesquite and maca powders, and whisk until well incorporated. To the same bowl, add the hemp, pumpkin and chia seeds, dulse, nutritional yeast, and turmeric. If using, also add cacao nibs, spirulina, moringa, bee pollen and ginger. Mix everything with a spoon to combine well and fold in the nori until incorporated evenly. Optionally, sprinkle the bottom of your chocolate mold with sweet and/­­or smoked paprika, moringa, turmeric, hemp hearts and pumpkin seeds for decoration. Spoon the chocolate mixture into the mold, evening it out with the back of a spoon. Place into a the freezer for about 5 minutes, until the chocolate hardens completely. Remove from the mold and enjoy. Store in an air-tight container in the freezer or refrigerator. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw New Year Doughnuts Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice... Temaki-zushi Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Almost Savory Raw Chocolate appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Spelt Pumpkin Donuts

March 12 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Spelt Pumpkin Donuts Pumpkin, like other winter squashes, is an excellent source of vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin B6. Vegan spelt pumpkin donuts are a fun way to celebrate the flavor of the season when the weather starts to get cooler. If you need gluten-free donuts, simply substitute oat flour and sorghum flour for the spelt flour, as noted below.The post Vegan Spelt Pumpkin Donuts appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Badam Burfi – Almond Fudge And Basundi

October 31 2016 Vegan Richa 

Badam Burfi – Almond Fudge And BasundiBadam Burfi – 5 min Almond fudge with Cardamom and Vegan Basundi – thickened milk with saffron and nuts. Basundi or Rabri with almond milk. Indian Vegan Sweets for Diwali. Vegan Dairy-free Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe. Its a 2 in one post today! I whipped up some new sweets for Diwali and wanted to post them all yesterday. But life is a bit busy as we are fostering a 6 month old bundle of energy (Peppen), who is available to adopt in the state of WA. He is incredibly cute, foxy, frisky, and also a lap dog, who loves to just be outside and go for walks.  This Badam Burfi is super quick. Warm up the vegan butter and maple syrup then mix in almond butter. Fold in sugar and almond flour to make a soft dough, pat onto parchment. Chill, slice and serve! I use finely granulated sugar in the burfi for texture. Burfis generally are very sweet as the cooking method (using loads of dairy products) often causes the sugar used to crystallize during cooking adding a slightly crunchy texture. Here no long cooking times, no dairy, and burfi ready within 5 minutes. Chill for another few to set, then slice. You can also drizzle chocolate on top to make Halloween Candy instead.  Continue reading: Badam Burfi – Almond Fudge And BasundiThe post Badam Burfi – Almond Fudge And Basundi appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Syrian Yogurt Soup + More Than Food

October 17 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Syrian Yogurt Soup + More Than Food The recipe for this soup is at the end of this post, but we hope that you will take the time to read this text as well. It is slightly longer but way more important than our usual posts. Let’s start from the beginning. The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and the European Commission asked if we would be interested in meeting Syrian refugees living in and outside of camps in Turkey to bring home some of their stories, learn how modern food aid is working and explore the different aspects of food. It was doubtless the most meaningful request we have ever received and something we really wanted to do. Timing wise it wasn’t perfect. I had to leave Luise alone with the kids while she was 36 weeks pregnant, but she gave her blessing. So a few weeks ago, I went on this mission. I flew to Istanbul, Turkey on an early flight and then on to a domestic flight to Hatay, a few miles from the Syrian border. During my days there, I visited a refugee camp to see how it works and talk to some of the people living there. I got to know the WFP staff and was amazed by their compassion. I was also invited home to a few Syrian families living outside of camps. Their situation is often a lot more difficult than inside the camps, as they have more costs and less support but the families were incredibly friendly and inviting. We talked, drank tea, cooked together and shared food. If you follow me on instagram, you might already have read the stories of some of the people I met. I have included the story from one of the families in this post, and I have also recreated one of the dishes that I learnt to cook together with them. It is very easy to look away from the horrible situation that is going on in Syria. But I hope that by reading these stories that do have bright moments in the midst of all the darkness, you will get a better understanding and openness towards the millions of Syrian people that have been forced from their homes and don’t wish anything more than being able to return to them one day. It was a very emotional trip and it affected me a lot deeper than I was prepared for. I am still trying to figure out what to comes next. Obviously, we want to continue working with recipe development and food photography as it is something we love doing. But it’s my hope and intention that we also will continue working more actively with human aid and support this cause any way we can in the future. Enough about this. Here is Suad. (1/­­5) I had everything before the war. My husband and I were the owners of a supermarket in Aleppo. We lived in a large and beautiful two-story house in a rural area. All my furniture was new - nothing was second hand - and we had many rooms. There was a big courtyard outside our house where the children played and rode their bicycles. ***** This is the story of Suad. She is Syrian and fled from her home together with her family when the conflict came to her town, 4 years ago. Suad is nine months pregnant and lives with her husband, their two sons Ahmed (10 years) and Muhammed (6 years) and their daughter Nurulhuda (12 years) in a small one-bedroom apartment in a rundown building in the old town of Antakya in Turkey, close to the Syrian border. Her parents and sisters live in an apartment one floor up. Her husband now works as a tailor so they can pay the rent. Even though they have lost everything, Suad is not broken. Her strength and pride really got to me. They cant afford decorating their home but have instead made paper and textile decorations and drawings that are covering the walls inside, making it less a lodging and more of a home. I had the honour to be welcomed into her home and I spent a day together with her and her family, listening to their story, drinking many cups of tea, going to the supermarket and preparing a dinner together. (2/­­5) Back in Aleppo, we renovated our kitchen entirely when we got married. It looked very nice. It was a big, bright kitchen with a large marble countertop. The kitchen was the colour of cappuccino and some of the cabinets had glass doors. I used to place some of my finest colourful vases and glasses there, so you could see them through the glass. ***** I was invited into Suads kitchen to assist her in dinner preparations. There were no marble countertops. And no glass doors. But she still placed her best looking glasses and plates on the shelf above the sink, hiding the rest behind a curtain her husband had sewn. Due to the small space, we did all chopping and preparations while sitting on the living room rug. The family laughed at my difficulties sitting with my legs crossed on the floor doing the chopping and they kept telling me that the tomatoes needed to be more finely chopped for the tabbouleh. Her mother also pointed out that I had very thorough knife skills (meaning slow). (3/­­5) My mother-in-law taught me most of these recipes in Aleppo, as she was living in our house. And cooking this reminds me of our life there. Now, my mother lives in the same house as us, so I am actually passing these recipes on to her and my daughter as well. Food means sharing to me - with my neighbours, friends and family. Before the conflict, we were a couple of families that took turns inviting each other over. We baked sweets, cooked food, ate and sang together. Now, the most important thing is to make sure my children arent hungry, but we still share food with our neighbours, even if it just is a small plate or the smell of our cooking. When we first arrived, we didnt have any money to buy ingredients and therefore we had to eat whatever food was provided for us. But after we were approved for the e-food card we were able to buy our own ingredients, so now I can cook food that reminds me of home. ***** We prepared a Syrian version of Tabbouleh with cucumber, tomatoes, lemon, lettuce, fresh parsley, fresh and dried mint, pomegranate syrup, tomato paste and a finely textured bulgur. We also did a delicious yogurt, rice and mint soup called Lebeniyye, a fried eggplant dish with tomato sauce called Mutabbaqa and a vegetarian version of Kepse, which is a flavorful long-grain rice dish topped with toasted almonds and walnuts instead of meat. (4/­­5) Me being a man, a stranger in their house and also a foreigner, I was aware that my visit would be an awkward situation and a difficult environment for everyone to be relaxed in. And the first hours of conversation were quite honestly very polite and trembling. But something happened when we started cooking. Once we gathered around the ingredients and Suad started explaining the dishes we were making, she suddenly began smiling. In the complete sadness of their situation, food definitely brings out a spark of joy. It connected us. In-between exchanging chopping boards and mincing vegetables, they suddenly started asking me questions about how we eat in my country, how my kitchen looks and how we take care of the elderly in our families in Europe (her father gave me a disapproving mutter, when hearing my response). We started sharing photos of our children and all of a sudden, we werent strangers anymore. We finished preparing the last recipe just as it got dark outside. Nurulhuda placed all the food on a large tray on the rug in the living room. Suad invited her children, parents, all her sisters and even the driver of our car to join. And with one spoon each, we all shared from the same plates. It is a very intimate way of eating, sitting on the floor, dipping our spoons into the same bowls of soup. They also ended the meal with a traditional Arabic saying: Now that we have shared bread and salt, we are like relatives. (5/­­5) My story is the story of every Syrian ***** The Syria conflict is the worlds largest humanitarian crisis since World War II. There are currently over 2,7 million Syrian refugees living in Turkey. Only about 10% are living in refugee camps and have guaranteed access to food, shelter and basic needs. The rest are living off-camps - in small apartments, basements, garages and even caves. If you found this story interesting, please also read Emira’s story. And the story of Semira, who works as a Field Monitor Assistant for WFP. I have also written about the E-cards that WFP have developed with help from the European Commission to support refugees and give them the ability to shop and choose food themselves. The trip was part of a initiative that WFP call More Than Food. Pauline and Rens will also be going on similar trips. Here is a short video that explains the project and the E-card a bit more. Thank you for following along! Lebaniyye - Syrian Yogurt Soup Serves 4  I was particularly intrigued by Suad’s Yogurt Soup as I had never tried anything similar before. I have now been cooking it a few times since I returned. Warm yogurt might sound awkward but I found its tanginess really tasty when combined with the mint and rice. Suad served it more as a starter (traditionally I believe it is served with meatballs) but I have taken the liberty to add a bit more topping to make it even more nourishing and flavourful. Suad also cooked the rice and yogurt together from the start but I found that if you dont stay focused and stir continuously, there is a risk that the yogurt will curdle. So I instead cook the rice until its almost done before slowly stirring in the yogurt mixture. Make sure to check the cooking time for the rice. Our rice cooks in 30-35 minutes, but some are pre-steamed which would half the cooking time for the soup. Yogurt Soup 1 cup /­­ 200 g wholegrain rice or brown rice 5 cups /­­ 1,25 liter vegetable stock (or water) 1 garlic clove, grated or finely chopped 4 cups /­­ 1 liter full fat yogurt (we use Turkish yogurt) 1 egg 1 tbsp cornstarch 1 tbsp dried mint 1 tsp salt black pepper   Garlic & Chili Oil 1/­­4 cup olive oil 2 garlic cloves 2 tsp chili flakes    To serve 2 cups /­­  500 ml cooked puy lentils (or chickpeas) 1 large handful fresh spinach 1 large handful fresh mint 1 large handful fresh parsley Rinse the rice and add it to a large, thick-bottomed sauce pan along with vegetable stock and garlic. Bring to a boil and then turn the heat down slightly until it simmers. Meanwhile, add yogurt and egg to a mixing bowl and whisk rapidly until combined and smooth. After the rice has cooked for about 20 minutes, add the cornstarch to the yogurt and then use a soup spoon to ladle some of the warm stock into the yogurt mixture while using your other hand to stir (this is to slowly heat the yogurt and prevent it from curdle when mixed with the rest of the stock and rice). Then pour the yogurt mixture slowly back into the large saucepan with rice and stock while stirring. Add mint, salt and black pepper. Keep the heat on low/­­medium, so it just barely simmers and keep stirring slowly but frequently. When the rice is cooked through and the soup has thickened slightly, it is ready. Taste and adjust the flavours to your liking (I find that it needs quite a bit of salt to balance the tanginess). Remove from the heat and prepare the Garlic & Chili Oil. Heat oil in a small sauce pan on low/­­medium heat. When warm, add garlic and chili flakes, let sauté for about 45 seconds and then remove from the heat. Let steep while you ladle the soup into bowls and chop the spinach and herbs. Top the soup with a generous scoop of lentils, chopped fresh spinach, mint, parsley and a drizzle of the Garlic & Chili Oil.

Raw Chocolate Macaroons 

August 23 2016 VegKitchen 

Raw Chocolate Macaroons  These raw chocolate macaroons are a perfect snack for your sweet tooth! With a hint of sweetness, chocolate and coconut these cookies will become your new favorite go to snack.Recipe and photo by Laura Marquis, from

Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday

June 12 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday To continue with the herbal/­­floral theme from last week, this Sunday, we’ve got Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream. We’ve been having quite a steady supply of fresh chamomile at the local market, and those bouquets fill the house with the most calming, quiet aroma, which I usually associate with bedtime and all things peaceful, due to the herb’s well-studied chill-out properties. I’ve had a note to make chamomile ice cream ever since I made chamomile sorbet years ago, which was essentially frozen chamomile tea and honey – sounds so simple, but its refreshing flavor left quite an impression for all these years. Chamomile, honey and lemon are flavors that seem to have been made for one another. In this ice cream, they unite into a subtle taste that I can only describe as soothing, steadying and balancing. There’s that unmistakably floral quality from the chamomile, sweetness from the honey, a sour citrus note from the lemon, all combined in a cooling and smooth ice cream. Read on for the recipe and some weekend links, and have a chill Sunday :) Is sugar really bad for you? – starting in 2018, nutrition labels on packaged foods will have to list the amount of added sugars in addition to total sugars, and this article answers some important questions in regards to that. Obviously, we love sweets, so – everything in moderation :) Aloe Vera – summer beauty food The Voyageur – a favorite, dreamy online travel journal All You Need, You Already Have – an inspiring post on Zen Habits Kid Friendly Herbs – to go with the theme of this post, a round up of herbs that are ok to give to children Sarah Britton interview – “It was about three years before I got a comment from someone whose last name wasn’t mine.” One Part Podcast – been listening to this while doing things around the kitchen. So far loved episodes with Bryant Terry, Dana Shultz, Laura Wright. Blog love – we are in complete awe of The Artful Desperado’s food photography, green caesar non-alcoholic cocktail, soft meringue s’mores with blood orange, roasted artichoke and cauliflower with creamy harissa dip. Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 cans full fat Thai coconut milk ¼ cup dried chamomile flowers ¼ cup honey - divided, plus more for drizzling juice and zest of 1 lemon 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder Instructions Combine coconut milk and chamomile in a medium saucepan. Bring to a gentle simmer, preferably on a double boiler, or over regular heat. Simmer for 15 minutes. Remove from heat, cover and let infuse and cool to room temperature. Strain chamomile milk. In a blender, combine milk with 2 tablespoons honey, lemon juice and arrowroot. Blend until smooth. Chill the mixture well in the refrigerator, preferably overnight. Process mixture in an ice cream machine for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Spoon ice cream into a container in layers, drizzling the remaining honey between the layers. Serve immediately as soft serve or place in the freezer to harden further for at least 4 hours. Remove from freezer 10-15 minutes before serving. Garnish with lemon zest and more honey when serving. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Tarragon and Mint Ice Cream Raw Blackberry and Lime Miniature Tarts with Cardamom Ice Cream Bee Pollen and Manuka Honey Ice-Cream Beet Tahini Snack Bars .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables

April 15 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables I’m a savories-for-breakfast type of person, although you wouldn’t be able to tell when looking at the breakfast section in our recipe index. I’m working on correcting that and including more non-sweets in the mix. I enjoy an occasional smoothie bowl or porridge with dried fruit, especially when making them for Paloma, but having a breakfast that’s not too sugary always sets me up for the day in the best way possible. During the Flordia growing season, when I go to the farmer’s market every weekend, I like to have a salad for breakfast. I can make it filling or light, depending on my needs that day, but I just cannot resist those super fresh greens any time of the day. When it’s a bit chillier outside, I love a savory porridge with any seasonal add ins, which is where these creamy steel cut oats come in. Steel cut oats have a longer cooking time than their rolled counterparts, but, in my opinion, their superior flavor and texture makes it all worth it. They have a potential to be very creamy, but not too mushy, and to maintain a nice bite, which I’m crazy about. Consider making this breakfast this weekend. It takes a little more time and attention than a quick weekday breakfast, and it’s loaded with all the green and crunchy things that spring provides to us this time of year – sugar snaps, snow peas, asparagus, greens and broccoli. There are mushrooms and pine nuts too, for ultimate indulgence. The great thing about this recipe is that you can customize it according to what you have, to your mood, or time of year. Add fruit instead of veggies, sprinkle with favorite crunchy toppings, include spices, and so on. Enjoy the weekend! Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables serves 4 -6 2 tablespoon neutral coconut oil or ghee – divided 1 cup steel cut oats 3 cups hot water sea salt – to taste 1 cup homemade almond milk or canned coconut milk 1/­­4 cup pine nuts 1/­­2-1 lb shiitake – stems removed, caps sliced about 1 1/­­2 cup broccoli florets large handful sugar snaps/­­snow peas – strings removed if present about 5 asparagus sprigs – tough ends removed, sliced diagonally about 1 cup green peas – fresh or frozen about 2 cups baby spinach/­­arugula/­­dandelion/­­watercress 1 tablespoon tamari 1. Warm 1 tablespoon coconut oil/­­ghee in a medium saucepan over medium heat until melted. Add steel cut oats and toast until golden and fragrant. 2. Add 3 cups of hot water and salt. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a slow simmer and let cook, covered, for 25 minutes. Stir periodically to prevent oats from sticking to the bottom of the pan. Add almond/­­coconut milk and simmer, partially covered, for another 15 minutes. Keep stirring periodically to prevent any sticking. Use this time to prep vegetables. 3.When the porridge is about 10 minutes from being done, warm the remaining 1 tablespoon of oil in a medium saute pan over medium low heat. Add a pinch of salt and pine nuts and toast them for about 2 minutes, until golden. Remove with a slotted spoon and set aside. 4. Increase heat to medium. Add shiitake, broccoli, sugar snaps, asparagus and a pinch of salt and saute for about 5 minutes, until vegetables are bright green. Add peas and spinach, stir until spinach just wilted. Stir vegetables and tamari into the porridge, once its cooked. Remove from heat and let stand for a couple of minutes. 5. Distribute between bowls to serve, garnish with toasted pine nuts.


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