sushi - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!










sushi vegetarian recipes

One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust

December 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Since this is our last recipe of 2017, we wanted to make sure that it’s a special one. It needed to check all the boxes we usually try to check with our recipes: nourishing, delicious, seasonal, beautiful, convenient, and a little bit unexpected. This veggie and lentil-centered one pan pie is all of those things. It’s very cozy and fun to prepare, too. If I had a choice, most of my savory dishes would be one-pan dishes :) Convenience is hard to beat. That little bit of initial effort you put into assembling all the ingredients for a single-pan dish pays off incredibly well when you end up with a big meal, plus a ton of leftovers for the week, having only used one pan or pot in the process. This one-pan dish is something like a vegetable pot pie, but the crust is made up of thinly mandolined winter roots – potatoes, sweet potatoes, and celery root. The filling is shredded Brussels sprouts, mushrooms, and red lentils (you can add barley, too, for a grain component) that cooks in a mixture of healing spices and coconut milk. The whole thing is packed with a great variety of plants. It’s perfect for those looking to up their intake of vegetables after the holidays, but still wanting to keep their cooking hearty and cozy. The ingredient that takes this dish into the complete meal category are the red lentils. Vegetable dishes are great on their own, but adding any kind of pulses (lentils, beans, chickpeas, dry peas) to your plant-centric meals will up their nutrition and ability to satisfy quite a bit. Pulses are incredibly nutrient-dense, like superfoods, but they are also very affordable, unlike most other superfoods, so it’s a win-win all around. Try adding about a half a cup of pulses to your meals a few times a week – your cooking will greatly benefit from them, and you’ll be on your way to discovering a whole new world of deliciousness (of you haven’t already, of course). Head here for more of our recipes using pulses, and be sure to check out Half Cup Habit. Happy New Year! Thank you so much for visiting GK, trying out our recipes, and reading up on the self-care series. It all means so much to us .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Entering Into The World Of Vegan Sushi

November 28 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

What the hell is a maki... Those were my first thoughts when I arrived at El Buda Profano in Arequipa, Peru. I feel a bit bashful admitting it, but I am no sushi connoisseur. Well, I wasnt, at least. Traveling through Peru brought a wide range of experiences. It brought me everything from a serious case of travelers flu to a serious case of spiritual awakening (long story). But maybe most importantly, it brought me awareness about the joys of vegan sushi, something that I think about now more often than most people would consider to be normal. It turns out that maki are basically just small morsels of rice with fresh veggies wrapped up in nori, which was just one piece of insight that I was to learn. The owner, Alan, was kind enough to let me come in twice a day for a whole week, sampling their entire menu and never once asking, You sure you can eat all that? My kinda guy. With every visit, I was further impressed at the wide array of not only sushi, but other traditional and not-so-traditional Japanese flavors that were coming out of their kitchen. One day I was shown the mystical […] The post Entering Into The World Of Vegan Sushi appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Biggest most influencial #WorldVeganDay #WorldVeganMonth set to Rock the World

October 31 2017 World Vegetarian And Vegan News 

Biggest most influencial #WorldVeganDay #WorldVeganMonth set to Rock the WorldYour help is need to reach over a million new potential vegans during #WorldVeganMonth which is kick-starting on #worldveganday 1st November. Please click on the link below to the one time vegan thunderclap 2017 has been a phenomenal year for the worldwide vegan community, google trends show interest in vegan in the UK has quadrupled since early 2015 Vegan interest quadrupled since Jan 2015 In 2015 there were around 30 Vegan Fairs, this year in 2017 there were 150 vegan fairs and festivals and yet despite this VegfestUK London was bigger than ever before with 280 exhibitors, hoards of caterers and a new vegan trade show tacked on. Vegan fairs and festivals more than quadrupled since 2015 I worked hard last year and the beginning of this year to encourage retailers to make sure they followed Pret's lead and stocked a vegan sandwich. I think everyone now sells a vegan sandwich or wrap apart from Asda who say they are "working on it". Marks and Spencers renowned for putting dairy in everything whether it needed it or not (even the Sushi!) now have a great vegan range. Asda now only supermarket with no vegan sandwich/­­wrap I've now turned my attention to pubs whose accessibility for vegans has been made a lot more accommodating by Guinness taking the fish fining out of their world famous stout (Yes Draught Guinness is now Vegan). Luckily BidFood (formerly Bidvest 3663) one of the biggest wholesale  distributors to the catering trade has introduced some vegan desserts, vegan cheese and some vegan savoury items which has left no excuses for the On trade/­­Pub trade. Brewers Fayre  - No Vegan Christmas OptionOther new vegan products this include new palm oil free vegan margarine by Flora , Ben and Jerrys vegan ice creams, new vegan dairy free cheeses by Tescos, Sainsburys and in Waitrose, a range of new vegan products by Quorn meat alternatives as well as a universal move to remove the egg from supermarket vegetarian products that would otherwise be vegan. Vegan pizzas are not just being sold in Pizza Express, Zizzis and Ask but also beginning to appear in supermarkets too starting with Sainsbury's. Independent vegan cafes and restaurants have had to work hard to keep up with the new level of quality and choice now available on the high street. The coconut craze has meant a whole new generation of ice creams, milks, yogurt and desserts that has left consumers with no excuses but to ditch dairy. Oat products from Oatly such as the new Creme fraiche and the barista milk has further eaten into  dairy sales making the dairy industry less and less viable every week. The advertising standards authority finding that the slogan "There's no such thing as Humane Milk" was indeed legitimate was a massive blow to Dairy Farmers who faced with Brexit and loss of subsidies are literally at the end of their tether. Smart dairy farmers in  Canada and the USA have moved on to Pea Milk which has more protein than other plant milks and more calcium than cow's milk. Look out for new brands in 2018. Omega 3 rich flax milk is also a thing now. Please help keep the momentum going and encourage all your non vegan friends to try going vegan for #WorldVeganMonth. 2-3 clicks is all it takes via facebook or twitter or just cut and paste the link More Vegan and Vegetarian News at Vegan News - Health, Diet and Nutrition News

On The Go Vegan Lunch Ideas for School Or Work (Bento Box)

October 3 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Caitlin Shoemaker has created 3 super easy and yummy vegan lunch ideas that are perfect for taking to work or school! Meal 1 is a soba noodle salad and brownies. Meal 2 is a curry chickpea wrap. Meal 3 is sushi burrito and pb&j energy bites. Caitlin shows how all 3 meals can be conveniently packed to take on the go — she used bento boxes, but any container will do! Make as much or as little as you want – these recipes are here to inspire you and get you out of the “same thing every day” rut! So check out the video below to see the recipes in action: Read the full recipes in the video description here. The post On The Go Vegan Lunch Ideas for School Or Work (Bento Box) appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Meatless Monday Restaurant Roundup

July 24 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Restaurant RoundupThis Monday, were putting the spotlight on five restaurants around the United States that are participating in Meatless Monday! Every week, they offer discounts and vegetarian specials to their customers, giving them delicious meat-free options at their favorite places. The list of restaurants that have joined Meatless Monday continues to grow, and here are five to keep an eye on! 1. Harvest Seasonal Grill & Wine Bar, Multiple Locations: With its focus on local, sustainable cuisine, Harvest Seasonal Grill & Wine Bar has a plentiful selection of healthy meal choices including several vegetarian choices. For Meatless Monday, CEO Dave Magrogan has one recommendation in particular: “I love the Spicy Tofu Stir Fry. The sweet flavors of the pineapple and coconut jasmine rice combine with spicy flavors, peppers, baby bok choy, snow peas and eggplant to create a great flavor profile. This dish is satisfying and filling without a high calorie count. The tofu gives a nice protein boost. Overall its a very well-rounded vegetarian dish for someone looking for bold flavors and solid protein content.” 2. Tattooed Mom, Philadelphia, PA: This Philly food joint can bring townies of all stripes together for cocktails and sandwiches. On Meatless Monday, the vegetarian sammies get the spotlight: “Our world famous Vegan Pickle Fried Chickn Sammy is a Meatless Monday favorite at Tattooed Mom. Our house brined vegan chicken is topped with fried pickles, lettuce, tomato, onion and crystal hot sauce mayo, all on a brioche bun. You’ll find it here, along with our full line up of 10 vegetarian and vegan delights, on special for half price EVERY Meatless Monday from noon – 10pm.” 3. Burrito San, Miami, FL: Burrito San has become famous for its sushi burrito, making it a great destination for pescatarians and sushi lovers alike. Their Meatless Monday features $10 lunch specials including vegetarian sushi options. Marketing manager Mitzi Napoles has a favorite: “The Buddhas Belly Burrito roll is the perfect Meatless Monday choice. It has a satisfying heft from the portobello mushrooms and a great contrast of flavors and textures. We also have it available as a Salad or Poke option if Giant Sushi rolls are not your thing!” 4. Forage, Cambridge, MA: Forage works with local farmers, foragers, and fisherman to bring sustainable, healthy cuisine to its Cambridge customers. But on Meatless Monday, seasonal veggies get a starring role. From owner and manager Stan Hilbert: “We love our veggies and the farmers that grow them. Meatless Monday is one way for us to support our farmer friends while highlighting seasonal and local produce and offering something different every week. We feature veggies in savory and sweet courses. We have a $39 four-course vegetarian or vegan tasting menu available every day of the week, but on Mondays we throw in another two courses for the same price!” 5. BeWiched, Minneapolis, MN: A believer in old-world culinary traditions, BeWiched certainly doesnt shy away from meat on their menu of deli sandwiches. However on Mondays, they offer up something different for their Meatless Monday specials. From Ally Dahlberg, Director of Marketing, Catering & Sales: “Every Monday, we offer a new seasonal plant-based sandwich as an ode to #meatlessmonday. This is Farmer Bob (pictured above). He comes in at least once a week and sells us fresh produce picked from his farm. He recently harvested some tomatoes that we used for a Fried Green Tomato sandwich special. It doesn’t get any more farm-to-table than that!” Honorable Mentions: We cant leave out restaurants that go meat-free every day! Here are two vegan food joints that cater to everyone who loves great, sustainable, healthy meals! Choices Café, Florida (multiple locations): Choices goes meat-free every day of the week, in case you forget to stop in on Monday! Their mission statement: “Our mission is to inspire compassionate choices by serving delicious, healthy, and organic plant-based food prepared with love for people, animals and the planet.” VO2 Vegan Café, Cambridge, MA: Another spot with all vegan offerings is VO2 Vegan Café, which welcomes diners of all preferences who just want to treat themselves to something healthy and delicious. From VO2 manager Stephanie Kirkpatrick: All our food is 100% vegan, so everything is meatless and we celebrate Meatless Monday every day! It’s so wonderful when vegans and vegetarians come in and are so excited that they don’t have to ask about ingredients because they already know everything is vegan. Many meat-eaters also love our food and look at it as an awesome and easy way to enjoy delicious food knowing they are eating healthier, for themselves and our planet. Does your favorite restaurant participate in Meatless Monday? Wed love to feature them on our site! If you own a restaurant and are considering taking part in Meatless Monday, let us know! Send us an email: info@meatlessmonday.com. The post Meatless Monday Restaurant Roundup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Meal Plan | Black Bean Noodles, Plantain Tacos & Mango Sushi Bowls

June 2 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegan meal plan includes: black bean noodle bowls with spicy sesame sauce; plantain black bean tacos with chimichurri sauce; mango sushi bowls with quick pickled vegetables; lentil taco bowls; and lentil mushroom burgers.

Vegan Unicorn Sushi Donuts

May 1 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Sushi, donuts, and unicorns – we didn’t think it was possible to combine these 3 epic things. But Sweet Simple Vegan did the impossible! She has created the coolest, most colorful […] The post Vegan Unicorn Sushi Donuts appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Penang Laksa

March 13 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Penang Laksa Incredibly, I’d been in Malaysia for almost two weeks before I got to try Laksa, the legendary noodle soup. Even before the trip, I’d read about the intensely loved, powerful and fiery, somewhat-sour soup in food blogs and food guides to Malaysia. I’d checked out plenty of recipes and seen lots of super tasty photos. Once I got to Malaysia, whenever I asked locals what dishes I had to try, I heard again and again: Laksa! Okay, great, but where? And the answer was: Penang! Penang was hands-down my favorite place to eat on the Malaysia trip. (Singapore was a fairly close second. Penang was just more artsy, soulful, and real). I collected maps with locations of the best street food in Georgetown (Penang) and scoured the web and my travel guides for addresses of must-try vegetarian restaurants. On my second day in town, I had lunch at the vegan restaurant Sushi Kitchen, and met the chef/­­owner, who made a list for me of Must-See places and dishes. That night I went to Luk Yea Yan, a vegetarian Chinese restaurant known for fantastic flavors and inexpensive eats. I ordered up the Laksa soup. Three minutes later my oversized bowl of hot, steaming, bright red soup arrived - with countless ingredients and toppings piled up to the rim. There were at least three kinds of noodles, tofu cubes, soya and seitan chunks, numerous vegetables, about four kinds of fresh herbs - and balanced on top: a soup spoon with a thick, red curry paste on it. I’d read about this… Traditionally Laksa is usually served with a generous spoonful of rempeh - spicy red curry paste for you to stir in to the hot red broth yourself. I knew what to do. I did it. A half dozen flavors immediately exploded in my mouth: tamarind, chili, lime, pineapple, cilantro, mint. This was followed by a second wave of flavors: an army of vegetables, tofu, and seitan slices. I slurped down the noodles and paddled pieces of everything with my chopsticks into my hungry jaws. I had to take a break a few times to catch my breath and cool the spice alarm with generous draws on my lemon iced tea. When I was done, my forehead was light with perspiration and my lips and tongue were tingling and alive. There was never a doubt whatsoever that I would include a vegan recipe for Penang Laksa in my new Malaysia cookbook. Several weeks later (after having tried vegan Laksa soup at least three other times in Malaysia) I was back in my kitchen in Germany and set to work. It took a few attempts to master the recipe, each try better than the last. And then I had it: my own epic Laksa recipe! Since then, I’ve made it probably ten more times, including for several dinner parties large and small, and plenty of times for lunch. It’s best on cold, cloudy days to fire up your mood and open you up! But I’ve also made it lots of other times, even in the summer, well… just because it’s so awesome and is always a dish guests talk about long after the meal. Penang Laksa classic Malaysian noodle soup recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA serves 2 to 3 /­­ time 45 min - 5 oz (150 g) seitan sliced - 3.5 oz (100 g) smoked tofu sliced - 1/­­3 cup (45 g) pineapple chopped - 1 Tbs vegetable oil  - 1 Tbs soy sauce or Vegan Fish Sauce - 7 oz (200 g) udon noodles (cooked) - 2 1/­­2 cups (600 ml) water  - 2/­­3 cup (150 ml) coconut milk  - 1 kefir lime leaf or 1 tsp lime zest  - fresh mint leaves chopped - fresh coriander leaves chopped - fresh thai basil leaves chopped - bean sprouts for garnish laksa spice paste: - 4 candlenuts or 2 Tbs cashews soaked 20 min in hot water, drained - 1 stalk lemongrass chopped - 1/­­2-1 large red chili chopped - 2 cloves garlic chopped - 1 shallot chopped - 3/­­4 in (2 cm) fresh galangal or ginger chopped - 1/­­2 tsp paprika ground (more as desired, for red color) - 1/­­2 tsp fennel seed ground - 1/­­2 tsp coriander ground - 2 tsp coconut sugar or agave syrup  - 3/­­4 tsp sea salt  - 1 tsp tamarind paste (seedless) - 2 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice  - 2 Tbs vegetable oil  - If using dried Udon: Cook, rinse, and drain 3.5 oz (100 g) noodles according to package instructions. - Blend spice paste ingredients in a small food processor until smooth. - Heat 1 Tbs oil a large pot or wok on medium high heat. Add sliced seitan and smoked tofu. Fry, turning regularly until edges are browned and crispy, 3-5 min. - Stir in chopped pineapple. Continue to stir-fry, 2-3 min. Add soy sauce (or Vegan Fish Sauce). Fry 2-3 min. Transfer to a plate or bowl. - Return pot or wok to medium high heat. Fry blended spice paste until it darkens and oil starts to separate, stirring constantly, 3-5 min. - Gradually stir in water, coconut milk and kefir lime leaf (or lime zest). Bring to simmer. Add cooked udon noodles. Return to simmer. Cook until noodles have slightly softened, 3-5 min. - Stir in fried seitan, tofu, and pineapple. Turn off heat. Cover until ready to serve. - Portion soup and noodles into bowls. Garnish with chopped herbs and bean sprouts. Serve. Panang Laksa vegan recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA (available as printed cookbook & ebook - in English & German) The post Penang Laksa appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices

January 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices This post was created in partnership with Amira. This month we are focusing on recipes that will hopefully be helpful to those wanting to hit the reset button after all the holiday eating and drinking. I wanted a very manageable weekday dinner to be the first in the series, because we haven’t had one up in a while, and because I myself have been on the hunt for some new but trustworthy, quick and wholesome meal ideas. Most of my focus right now is on completing the kitchen renovation, a good part of which my husband and I have been doing ourselves. It’s been dragging on much longer than we expected – a common theme when it comes renovations, as I hear. We are finally down to the small finishing touches, but they somehow seem to be the hardest to complete. Cooking up large batches of un-elaborate, nourishing dishes like this stew to have on hand during the week has been one of my strategies for staying sane throughout this whole process. It’s amazing how helpful a home-cooked meal can be during times of stress. When looking for inspiration for balanced winter weeknight meals, I often turn to South Indian cuisine for its array of delicious vegetarian dishes and Ayurveda-approved ingredients. This particular stew is based on a recipe for sambar – a mung dal (yellow split mung beans that are protein-rich and affordable) stew that comes in hundreds of variations. The base for sambar is most commonly made up of mung dal that’s been cooked down to a porridge-like consistency and spiced, after which almost anything goes. You can include one or many stew-friendly vegetables in season, as well as other fun add ins like desiccated coconut. I love the versatility of this dish and usually just add in whatever vegetables or greens I have on hand. For this version, I kept things simple and only added chopped butternut squash and dried coconut – it can be as simple or as involved as you’d like. The ingredient list might seem long, but it’s mostly composed of spices, which play a huge role in building flavor in this otherwise modest stew. Each spice also brings its unique healing properties to the table – fennel helps aid digestion, turmeric is anti-inflammatory, fenugreek helps with blood sugar balance and much, much more. Like many Indian dishes, sambar is traditionally served over rice, and I’ve been truly enjoying serving it over Amira’s fragrant Thai Jasmine Brown Rice. Amira sent me a few of their premium long grain rice varieties to try, and I was consistently impressed with their quality and how distinctly different each kind tasted. Besides the jasmine brown rice, the variety that stood out to me is their Smoked Basmati Rice, which has a very unique smoked flavor and is really good in salads, and as a base for all kinds of veggie bowls. I’m crazy about smoked foods, so that one really hit the spot. If you see Amira rice in your grocery store, give it a try, I think you’ll really enjoy it! Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients 3 cups water ½ cup mung dal ¼ teaspoon turmeric ¼ teaspoon cumin ¼ teaspoon whole fenugreek seeds (optional) 3 sprigs fresh curry leaves (optional) 1 small yellow onion - chopped ½ medium butternut squash - peeled and cubed ¼ cup desiccated coconut sea salt 1 tablespoon red chili powder 2 tablespoons ghee or coconut oil ¼ teaspoon whole black mustard seeds 1 whole dried red chili - torn in half ⅛ teaspoon whole fennel seeds 1 tablespoon fresh lemon or lime juice 1½ cups cooked rice of your choice - for serving cilantro - for garnish (optional) coconut milk or yogurt - for garnish (optional) Instructions Bring 3 cups of water to a boil in a medium pot. Have a tea kettle or another pot with about 1 more cup of hot water ready, in case you need more water later in the process. Once 3 cups of water in the pot are boiling, add mung dal, turmeric, cumin, fenugreek and curry leaves (if using). Lower heat to establish a steady simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Mix periodically to ensure the mung dahl doesnt stick to the pan. Discard curry sprigs, if using. Add onion, squash, desiccated coconut, and salt to the pot. If it seems like there isnt enough liquid in the pot, add a little more hot water from the tea kettle until the vegetables have room to simmer in the water, keeping the dal consistency like a soupy porridge. Continue simmering, covered, for another 20 minutes or until the vegetables are cooked through. Stir in chili powder at half time. Mix periodically to prevent any sticking. Once the vegetables are around 5 minutes away from being done, warm ghee/­­oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add mustard seeds and let toast for about 30 seconds, tossing all the while. Add the chili and fennel seeds and toast for another 30 seconds or until fennel is toasted in color and fragrant. Add the toasted spices along with the ghee/­­oil from the pan into the pot with the stew, mix it in and let simmer, covered, for another 5 minutes. Once stew is done cooking, discard the pepper and mix in the lemon/­­lime juice. Taste and adjust the salt. Serve stew over rice, garnished with cilantro and coconut milk/­­yogurt if desired. Notes 1. You can add any vegetables/­­greens you have on hand in place of the butternut squash here and simmer until done, thats what makes this stew so versatile. 2. Curry leaves are completely optional here, but if you can get your hands on some, add them - their unique flavor works very well in this stew. 3. Traditional sambar calls for hing and tamarind. If you have one or both, add ⅛ teaspoon of hing to the pan with the toasting spices, towards the end and add to the stew with the rest of the toasted spices and ghee/­­oil. Add 2 teaspoons tamarind paste in place of the lemon/­­lime juice and simmer stew for another 5 minutes to let the flavor incorporate. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Ginger Marinated Tofu with Citrus Salsa Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas Rose and Lavender Parfait and a Breakfast with Friends Strawberry and Asparagus Black Rice Sushi .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Penne Pomodoro with Vegan “Tuna”

August 3 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Penne Pomodoro with Vegan “Tuna” I have crawled up in a rusty canopy swing with the computer in my lap, spiderweb from the canopy tangled up in my hair, Mr Bojangles on repeat (I always write with a single song on repeat in my ears) and Elsa balancing on my legs. We are spending a few days at my dad’s summerhouse and while Luise is drawing with Isac, I wanted to tell you about this pasta dish that we cooked and photographed the other day. I’m trying to formulate my thoughts into words. How soaked sunflower seeds almost magically get the texture of canned tuna when mixed in a food processor. But it’s not easy. Elsa is using every muscle in her body to steal my attention from the computer screen. Her mouth is forming words (that I can’t hear because of the earplugs), her head is jumping from side to side while her eyes are actively seeking mine. She is smacking her hands together right in front of my face and she grins when I finally look up from the computer and pull out the earplugs. - Do you know what this means on sign language? She asks me with giggle in her voice while she keeps smacking her hands together and then pointing at herself. - No, tell me. - I want a saaaaandwich! - Are you hungry? - No, I’m just teaching you sign language. - Ok, nice. But I’m working right now. Maybe you can teach me more later? - Ok. Just one more. Do you know what this is? [Taps her forehead with her hand and pulls it away in a half circle.] - Ehm, maybe a unicorn? - Nooo stupid, it means thank you. Actually, I think I want a sandwich. - Maybe you can ask mom to help you? - Okaaaaaaay. She jumps down and runs into the house. Earplugs back in. I’m guessing that I have approx 5 mins to write this. Here we go. It’s not often that we create dishes that mimics meat. In fact, we often do the opposite by letting the vegetables shine in all their glory. I don’t remember eating tuna a lot before I became a vegetarian, but after having seen a few vegan sunflower seed “tuna” recipes on the web (especially this beautiful Tuna Tartine from Faring-Well) I suddenly got this weird craving for it. So we decided to give fake-tuna a try. By pulsing soaked sunflower seeds in a food processor together with salty capers, shallots, oil, apple cider vinegar, lemon and nori sheet, you actually get something that looks weirdly similar to canned tuna with a crumbly, moist texture and a flavour that reminds me of salty seas and umami. Most recipes we’ve seen use this sunflower seed tuna as a spread or as a tuna salad (often with the addition of celery and herbs) but we instead added it to a tomato sauce and served it with penne, creating a classic Italian poor mans dish. The vegan “tuna” adds a nice texture to the sauce and it improves the flavour as well. The kids loved it! It is a simple recipe if you are on a budget and it is a tad more special than your basic pasta pomodoro. So go put your sunflower seeds in water and pretend they are a fish. I can see Elsa eyeballing me from the window now so I better round this up. I have got a class in imaginative sign language up ahead with my favourite teacher. Penne Comodoro with Vegan “Tuna” Serves 4 It’s important to soak the sunflower seeds to achieve the right texture so don’t skip that step. If you’ve got some white wine opened in the fridge, you can add a glug of that for extra depth and flavour. Vegan Tuna 1 cup raw sunflower seeds, soaked in water for 6 hours or overnight 1 small shallot or red onion, minced 3 tbsp capers + brine 1 tbsp lemon juice 1 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil (coconut oil, ghee or butter) 1 tsp apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1/­­2 sheet of nori (the seaweed you use for sushi), cut into tiny pieces (optional) Pomodoro Sauce 1 onion 2 cloves of garlic 2 tbsp olive oil 3 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz cans of chopped tomatoes 1 handful fresh basil or 2 tsp dried sea salt freshly ground black pepper Serve with Pasta of choice (we use wholegrain penne or a gluten free version made from dried beans) 1/­­2 cup large capers fresh parsley, finely chopped ruccola To prepare the “tuna”, simply add all ingredients to a food processor. Pulse a few times until it you have a coarsely textured mixture. Taste and add more salt, lemon juice or vinegar. Pulse again and scoop the mixture into a bowl. Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic. Place a large sauce pan on medium heat and add olive oil. Sauté the onion and garlic for a few minutes until fragrant. Add tomatoes, basil, salt and pepper. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and simmer for about 30 minutes. Taste and adjust the flavours throughout. Add a splash of water or white wine if it starts looking dry. Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to the instructions on the package. When the tomato sauce is ready, stir in 2/­­3 of the “tuna”, saving the rest for serving. Divide the pasta in 4 bowls, top with tomato sauce, capers, fresh parsley and a drizzle of olive oil.

Saturday Six | Sushi Bowls, Carrot Cake Waffles & Tropical Tacos

April 16 2016 Oh My Veggies 

Were rounding up some of our favorite recipes from this weeks Potluck submissions, including hearty sushi burrito bowls, vegan carrot cake waffles, and tropical tofu tacos with mango salsa.

Blogger Q & A: Olives for Dinner

February 24 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Blogger Q & A: Olives for DinnerIn each issue of Vegetarian Times, we feature a talented vegetarian food blogger. Our Featured Blogger shares a little info about the blogger plus one of their tasty, meat-free recipes. In March, we highlighted Erin Wysocarski, vegan and the inspirational blogger behind Olives for Dinner. We chatted with Erin to find out more about her blog.   Subscribe now for just $10 to see our featured blogger recipe every month!      VT: What was the inspiration for your awesome blog? Erin: When I first went vegan more than 10 years ago, I wasnt much of a cook. In fact, I rarely cooked at all!  So I relied primarily upon other vegan blogs to help me know what to cook and how to cook it. Once I eventually got the hang of cooking, it became less intimidating and more like a fun adventure, and I became better with each cooking experiment. Armed with my newfound confidence, I was inspired to create my own blog similar to those blogs that inspired me--with the goal of inspiring others.   VT: What is your most popular recipe (and why do you think its popular)? Erin: Definitely my vegan crab cakes (made with hearts of palm) and vegan lox (made by salt roasting carrots). I think its appealing to those readers who want to eat in alignment with their veganism, but miss the ritual and sensory experience of piling smoky lox on top of a bagel or tapping into a crispy, flaky crab cake. Also, its kind of fun taking a plant-based ingredient like hearts of palm or carrots and manipulating it to recreate the flavor and texture of seafood. VT: How would you describe your recipes/­­cooking style? Erin: Im really drawn to the flavors, ingredients and visual components of East and Southeast Asian cuisines, and most of my recipes implement at least one element inspired by them. I especially love veganizing traditional, meat-centric dishes like pork buns (using oyster mushrooms) and sambal seitan skewers (using vital wheat gluten), as well as creating other non-traditional dishes like my spicy Thai-style pizza (using crushed and crumbled tofu) and dynamite Rolls (using king oyster mushrooms). Veganizing meat-heavy dishes is always kind of like putting a puzzle together--its fun to see how plant-based ingredients can be moved around and put together to create a dish that is not only compassionate, but also creative and delicious.   VT: You talk about debunking the myth that vegan food is inaccessible. What is some advice youve give to someone who feels like it is? Erin: Because we live in such a meat-centric world, veganism only seems difficult, but is actually very accessible once you shift your focus towards making compassionate choices. No matter where you live or what you like to eat or cook, there are so many great vegan resources, products, cookbooks, classes and recipe blogs available that make it easier than ever to become less dependent upon animal-based products in our daily lives. As far as finding specialty vegan ingredients and products, the market has exploded with online and brick and mortar shops like Food Fight! Grocery, Thrive Market, Rabbit Food Grocery, Herbivore Clothing Co. and Vegan Essentials, to name a few. There are fantastic meat alternative brands like Gardein (my favorite), Field Roast and Beyond Meat that are typically available at Target, Costco and most mainstream grocery stores. Vegan cheese alternatives like Daiya, Miyokos Kitchen (my favorite), Kite Hill and Chao are also popping up more frequently in some stores and online. And if you are looking for vegan restaurants near where you live or while travelling, HappyCow is a great resource! To help with vegan cooking, there are literally hundreds of vegan cookbook titles for every type of cooking style (from quick and easy to more advanced and involved) to choose from. I suggest checking out any of Isa Chandra Moskowitzs cookbooks (Vegan with a Vengeance was my first vegan cookbook, and I still refer to it today, 10 years later!) and visiting sites like Finding Vegan, Minimalist Baker, Vegan Richa and Oh She Glows, to name a few. The food on these sites are easy to make, beautifully photographed and inspiring! And if youd like a more comprehensive approach to plant-based cooking, there are some fantastic resources out there. Last year I completed Rouxbe’s Plant-Based Professional Certification Course and was in a virtual classroom with other like-minded students at all levels of cooking ability across the globe. I would recommend it to anyone, from beginner to the seasoned cook. (Check out VT’s new online course, Secrets to Vegan Baking: American Classics, which features vegan baking basics to professional-level techniques.) VT: What is the best comment youve received from a reader? Erin: I appreciate all comments and feedback, but the ones I like best are from readers who have tried a recipe, loved it and let me know ... and its especially awesome when a recipe or dish is shared with others. One comment that stands out was from a reader who made my carrot lox and said, This recipe turned out AMAZINGLY! Thank you so much for such a great food experience … My omni husband also raved about it, taking some to our neighbors (good friends) and insisted they try some. They also couldn’t believe it was carrot. Win, win, win! On the shortlist for dinner parties. Enthusiastic feedback like this makes all of the hard work and effort I put in behind the scenes worth it! VT: Tell us your favorite Vegetarian Times recipes. (Or ones youd like to try). Erin: 1. Tempeh Avocado Sushi 2. Moroccan-Spiced Millet-and-Lentil Salad 3. Basil Ice Cream 3. Tempeh Tacos with Ancho-Lime Sauce 4. Singapore Hawker Noodles with Golden Tofu and Coconut are all some of my favorites! VT: What is one valuable thing youve learned from vegan cooking? Erin: That it gives the opportunity to be compassionate, creative and nourished all at once! Vegan cooking isnt exclusively about removing things from your diet--its about adding and combining plant-based ingredients and flavors together to create dishes that are not only delicious, but also kind to the planet and all forms of life. Subscribe now for just $10 to see our featured blogger recipe every month!  Follow Olives for Dinner:  Facebook: https:/­­/­­www.facebook.com/­­OlivesForDinner/­­ Instagram: https:/­­/­­www.instagram.com/­­olivesfordinner/­­ Twitter: https:/­­/­­twitter.com/­­olivesfordinner Pinterest: https:/­­/­­www.pinterest.com/­­olivesfordinner/­­ Bloglovin: https:/­­/­­www.bloglovin.com/­­blogs/­­olives-for-dinner-3848756

Vegetarian Bouillabaisse

January 28 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Vegetarian Bouillabaisse We did a little survey on instagram a few days ago where we asked what type of recipes you would like to see more of here on the blog. Lots of fun and creative suggestions popped up. The sum of it was pretty clear though. There seem to be a never-ending need for Quick Family Dinners, Budget Recipes, Healthy Breakfasts and more Vegan dishes. We will certainly take these topics in mind for future updates. If you have more suggestions, go ahead and leave a comment below. To kick things off we have looked at what we have done in the past years and have chosen 3 of our favourite recipes in each category. If you haven’t tried these recipes already, they might be a good starting point. Quick Family Dinners - Filled Spinach Crepes - Summer Pasta with Smashed Tomatoes   - Fresh Pea & Mint Soup Budget - Shakshuka - Mung Bean Stew - Carrot, Tomato & Coconut Soup Healthy Breakfasts - 3 x Breakfast Oatmeals - Chia Parfait & Apple Crunch - Raw Buckwheat Porridge De Luxe Vegan Dinners - Roasted Cauliflower Salad with Dates and Almonds - The No Recipe Curry - Sweet Potato, Carrot & Red Lentil Soup Savoury Snacks also seem to be a thing that we need to make more of so that will come up soon. Today’s recipe is a vegetarian version of the French fish stew Bouillabaisse and ironically it doesn’t seem to be even close to the topics that you are asking to see more of. It is not super quick, more like an hour or so. Saffron and white wine are on the ingredient list, so not a budget recipe (although all other ingredients are quite cheap). And to be honest, the kids didn’t like it very much. Elsa picked out the carrots, parsnip and the white beans and left the rest untouched! It is vegan though, if you skip the aioli. But if we look past the fact that this apparently is an entirely unwanted recipe from your side, we do have some good news: You are going to love it anyway! And so will the guests that you invite over for a vegetarian dinner this weekend. You see, this French stew is filled with flavour from white wine, fennel, garlic and saffron, sweetness from the slow cooked tomatoes, carrots and parsnips, and it gets a mild taste of the ocean from a sheet of nori algae (the ones you use for rolling sushi). We like to keep the vegetables chunky to replace the fish and seafood. We also roast fennel slices for a fancier presentation. Our idea was that they would look like two prawns in the middle of the plate, but, ehm, I don’t know, they just look like roasted fennel to me. They do taste good, almost crusty on the outside and soft and buttery on the inside. We serve it with homemade aioli but you can also use store-bought, to save time (or simply mix mayonnaise with garlic). If anyone is reading this from Marseille, we are sorry if we have insulted your traditional recipe. I am sure we have made a bunch of wrongdoings (for example excluding the main ingredient), but we did it with good intentions and love in our hearts. Vegetarian Bouillabaisse Serves 4-6 This takes around one hour to make. You can skip the roasted fennel on top if you are in a hurry and don’t care about fancy presentations. If you prepare it in the morning, it will taste even more flavourful when you serve it in the evening (or the day after). And if you are making it for kids, you can replace the wine with more vegetable stock. 2 tbsp butter, coconut oil or olive oil 2 tsp fennel seeds 1 tsp anise seeds 2 yellow onions, peeled, one finely chopped and the other coarsely 4 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped 3 large carrots, peeled and sliced in thick coins 2 parsnips, peeled and sliced in thick coins 1 fennel bulb, coarsely chopped 250 ml /­­ 1 cup dry white wine 2 potatoes, peeled and cut in quarters 2 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tins whole tomatoes (or crushed) 2 cups vegetable stock 1 g saffron powder 1 sheet nori, crushed or finely chopped (optional) 1 tbsp fresh thyme 1 cup large white beans To serve 1 fennel bulb fresh thyme and dill zest from 1/­­2 orange (optional) 4 pieces of sourdough bread Aioli 2 egg yolks* 1 tbsp lemon juice or vinegar (+ more for seasoning) 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup cold-pressed olive oil (choose a quality oil, stored in glass bottles) 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup cold pressed rapeseed oil (choose a quality oil, stored in glass bottles) 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped or grated sea salt and pepper, to taste  Place a large sauce pan on medium heat. Melt butter or coconut oil and then add fennel seeds and anise seeds, onions and garlic. Sauté for a couple of minutes or until the onions have softened. Add carrots, parsnips and the chopped fennel and after a couple of minutes the white wine. Let simmer for five minutes and then add potatoes, tomatoes, vegetable stock, saffron, nori and thyme. Give it a good stir and then leave to simmer for 45 minutes. Meanwhile, set the oven to 435°F/­­225°C. Slice the remaining fennel in thick pieces lengthwise, drizzle with oil and salt and place on a baking sheet. Bake for 20 minutes or until soft and slightly burnt at the edges. When the cooked vegetables are soft and the stew tastes flavourful, add beans and let simmer for a few more minutes before serving. Making Aioli: Making Aioli: Whisk egg yolks* and lemon juice (or vinegar) in metal bowl to blend well. Whisking constantly (by hand with a balloon whisk) while drizzling in the oil very slowly, 1 teaspoonful at a time, until sauce is thickened. Stir in finely chopped garlic and season the aioli with lemon juice, salt and pepper. Serve the soup in wide bowls, top with roasted fennel, dill, a dollop of aioli, orange zest and a piece of sourdough bread. *Raw egg is not recommended for infants, elderly, pregnant women or people with weakened immune systems. Be sure to use pasteurized egg yolk instead.

Vinegar 101: Types of Vinegar, Health Benefits, and How to Cook With It

November 16 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Vinegar 101: Types of Vinegar, Health Benefits, and How to Cook With It Derived from the French vinaigre (meaning aged wine), vinegar is a staple in most pantries worldwide. With dozens of varieties readily available, you can use your favorite type to elevate nearly any meal – by creating marinades, emulsifying vinaigrettes, seasoning dishes to brighten flavors, or even making reductions. How its made The process of producing vinegar includes inoculation, fermentation and aging. An alcoholic liquid is acted upon by the Acetobacter bacteria to form an acidic solution. It evolves into a self-preserving substance due to its high acidity. Fermentation of wine into vinegar is triggered by a mother, or other ambient bacteria, transforming sugars into alcohol into acetic acid; a vinegar mother is a harmless cellulose structure produced by acetic acid that occurs naturally in unpasteurized vinegars. The process may take from 20 hours up to several months, depending on a variety of factors. Types of Vinegars Rice: With a 4% acidity, rice vinegar is great for pickling, dressings, or seasoning sushi rice. (Check out our Garlic and Kale Soup that uses Brown Rice Vinegar.) Balsamic: Made from the concentrated juice of white Trebbiano grapes and aged in casks, balsamic works well in glazes, reductions and marinades with its 6-8% acidity. (Try our Sicilian-Style Roasted Vegetables with Balsamic Syrup.) Apple Cider: With a 5% acidity, this ones best for seasoning more subtle dishes, as an infusion, or drizzled over grain or bean salads. (Use it to make Carolina-Style Barbecue Sandwiches.) Wine: With a 6-8% acidity, this vinegar adds a touch of umami, and works well wherever a stronger flavor is desired. (Make Minestrone with Sun Dried Tomatoes and White Beans.) Coconut: Made from fermented coconut water or sap, coconut vinegar has a 4% acidity, and is perfect for a splash of brightness when making nut-based cream sauces or a stone fruit chutney. Health Benefits Unpasteurized and unfiltered vinegar is a natural probiotic and can be used to help the body break down fats. Unfiltered apple cider vinegar is used to treat sore throats and upset stomachs, as well as topically for some skin conditions; it is also a natural liver cleanser. In addition, vinegar can get digestive juices flowing and increase appetite, which makes it a great addition to starter courses like salads and chilled soups. (Check out our article: Apple Cider Vinegar: Healing Foods) How to Buy Be sure to carefully examine labels and ingredient lists, and purchase varieties free of additives and artificial coloring. Keep in mind that aged vinegars have stronger flavors. Gradually stock your kitchen with different types of vinegars to determine which you like best for different applications. Culinary Uses Reductions: Reduce over medium heat until mixture coats the back of a spoon. Serve over fresh berries, or when plating an entrée or salad course. (Top Red Pepper Soup with a Balsamic Reduction.) Herb Infusions: Blanch herbs like tarragon, dill or basil, blend with vinegar, and allow to steep for a few days in the fridge. Marinades: Use to tenderize and flavor vegetables like mushrooms, zucchini and eggplant before grilling, along with fresh garlic, ginger and herbs. Quick Pickle: Add three parts vinegar to one part water to a small saucepan and bring to a boil, adding a splash of sweetener of your choice, a pinch of salt, and red chili flakes for extra spice.  Pour over cut produce and allow to sit for at least 30 minutes, or overnight in the refrigerator. (Try our Hot-and-Sour Celery Pickles.) Baking: Can be used as a leavener, eliciting a chemical reaction to produce carbon dioxide to give cake batters a lift. Poaching eggs: Adding a tablespoon to the cooking water with prevent eggs from spreading. Ceviche: Mix with oil, garlic and herbs, and toss with mushrooms or avocado for a refreshing twist. Serve with tortilla crisps. Enhance color: Vinegar brightens reds and purples, like cabbage and beets or red pearl onions. Chef Olivia Roszkowski is a graduate of NGIs Chefs Training Program and a full-time instructor. Olivia holds a Bachelors degree in Neuroscience and Behavior from Columbia University and has worked at various well-known NYC restaurants, including The Mercer Kitchen and Momofuku Ssam Bar. Olivia is a master at root-to-frond cooking.       

15 Crave-Worthy Vegetarian Sushi Recipes

September 4 2017 Oh My Veggies 

With fillings like eggplant, tofu, and sweet potatoes, vegetarian sushi is the best sushi! Here are 15 of our favorite recipes to get you rolling.

Cauliflower Rice Sushi Bowls with Tofu

June 26 2017 Oh My Veggies 

Baked tofu, crisp veggies, and avocado slices are served atop a bed of cauliflower rice and drizzled in tamari dressing to make these light and healthy sushi bowls.

20 Turmeric Recipes Vegan Glutenfree options

June 1 2017 Vegan Richa 

20 Turmeric Recipes Vegan Glutenfree options20 Recipes with Turmeric. Turmeric Cauliflower Rice, Turmeric Chocolate Marble Loaf, Golden Iced Tea, Turmeric Miso Soup, Turmeric brussels spouts and more. Vegan Gluten-free Turmeric Recipes. Soy-free options.  Turmeric is one of the common spices used in Indian food. We grew up eating food which had turmeric in most meals. Most Dals, curries, veggie sides have Turmeric added to them in small amounts. Some creamy white sauces, Indo- chinese food or snacks were exceptions.  Fresh turmeric is a bit more bitter than powder and can be an acquired flavor. Dried powdered turmeric root (turmeric powder) is more easily available than fresh turmeric root. Powdered turmeric in larger amounts can also add a bitter profile to the dish. The overall flavor might be pronounced for some, ok or undetectable for many. With the interest in Turmeric recently increasing because of many beneficial properties, I now experiment with Turmeric in other applications other than Indian food as well. Try a few of these to start on your Turmeric adventure. In a Sauce, soup, dals, with cauliflower rice, as Turmeric Lentil Fritters (pic above), in sushi roll, in muffins, cakes, Iced tea and more. Continue reading: 20 Turmeric Recipes Vegan Glutenfree optionsThe post 20 Turmeric Recipes Vegan Glutenfree options appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Crunchy Vegan Sushi

March 23 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

We are huge fans of vegan sushi–avocado rolls, vegetable rolls…so many options! But what if you’re in the mood for something a little…crunchier? Well, East Meets Kitchen has just the […] The post Crunchy Vegan Sushi appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl

March 10 2017 My New Roots 

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Poke seems to be everywhere these days, from fine restaurant menus, to fast-casual and even food trucks. Chefs are coming up with clever combos and creative reinterpretations - even fish-free versions for the veg set. I knew had to take a stab at it. Or at least a poke. Sorry. For those of you hearing about poke for the first time, this fresh and tasty dish (pronounced POH-kay), hails from Hawaii. In its most unadulterated form, poke is raw fish, originally combined with sea salt, candlenut and seaweed. It evolved over the years as ingredient availability increased, and the salt was replaced with soy sauce, the seaweed with spring onion, the candlenut with sesame and so on. Once it hit mainland America a few years ago, poke mania ensued and the dish evolved to become more of a meal - not just a snack. Now it is often served atop rice and garnished with all manner of innovative ingredients. Fully-focused poke restaurants have established themselves in major cities across North America. Many of these eateries allow their patrons to customize their bowls with veggies, sea weed, pickles, beans, nuts, and alt-grains, tapping into the to the fact that fast, fresh, healthy meals are becoming mainstream. Which totally rocks. I had most of the elements for my own poke-inspired version in my head...except for the fish (the most important part?). I racked my brain to come up with something that looked just like tuna or salmon, but didnt want to use fruit, like watermelon or papaya, since I didnt want the dish to be sweet. It wasnt until I was trying to fall asleep one night, that it came to me...chiogga beets! Chiogga, or candy-striped beets are gorgeously two-toned when they are raw. Sliced thin horizontally, they reveal rings of deep pink pigment and creamy white, resembling something that your grandmother keeps on her coffee table in a crystal dish. But for anyone who has ever roasted these stunning creatures will know that the magic doesnt last; the magenta bleeds into the white during cooking, resulting in an almost homogenous pale pink, with slight variegation. WHICH LOOKS EXACTLY LIKE TUNA. I almost couldnt sleep. Too excited. The next day I gathered up all the things Id like in a poke bowl: short grain brown rice (not long grain - an important distinction), spring onion for bite, carrot for crunch, edamame for pop and protein, and avo for creaminess. I took this last one a step farther and blended it with lemon and wasabi for the most boss sauce ever. This alone would be delish on most things...please try it. And for the fishy component, I thought back to the raw vegan tuna I made for my first cookbook, and how effective adding a sprinkle of nori was to boost that fresh-from-the-sea flavour. This is not a deal breaker for the overall dish, but it definitely made it taste complete. If you cant find nori flakes, just crunch up a couple sheets of the stuff that youd use to make sushi. Easy fix! I like to use wasabi powder in the avo cream since the pre-made stuff in a tube is questionable. Have you ever read the ingredient list on one of those packages? It can be scary stuff. In a pinch, use it, but tracking down the powder is worth it from a nutrition standpoint, and also a flavour one. The real stuff tastes infinitely better! What a shocker. Wasabi is Japanese horseradish, and like its western counterpart, it belongs to the Brassica family, like cabbage, broccoli and mustard. The root is dried and then pulverized, which gives us the powder that we can blend with water to create wasabi paste. It is a difficult crop to grow, which explains the high price for the genuine product. Most wasabi powders dont contain any wasabi at all, but are instead a mix of mustard powder and regular horseradish mixed with green food dye. A high-quality wasabi powder should be organic and contain only horseradish and wasabi. The colour should be pale green - not disco neon. Most health food stores carry wasabi powder. This is a good brand. Everything unfolded just as Id hoped it would. The beets came out perfectly pink with those thin white stripes that look just like fat striation. The marinade that I tossed them around in was acidic and ginger-y and just plain yum. Building the meal up with the rice, the beans, the veggies, a dollop of cream, a sprinkle of nori and roasted sesame, was ever so satisfying and fun. This healthy, fresh meal is calling you. No need to poke about, just make it. Again, sorry.     Print recipe     Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Serves 3-4 Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 200g short grain brown rice, soaked overnight if possible 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 2 cups /­­ 250g edamame beans, fresh or frozen 2 tsp. cold-pressed olive oil a couple pinches flaky sea salt Beets & Marinade 3 medium Chiogga (candy striped) beets 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1 tsp. finely grated ginger pinch fine sea salt Avocado Wasabi Cream 2 medium ripe avocados 2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1-2 tsp. wasabi powder, to taste pinch fine sea, to taste 2 spring onions, sliced lengthwise into ribbons 2 medium carrots, julienned 2 Tbsp. sesame seeds 3 Tbsp. nori flakes Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Wrap beets in aluminum foil and place on a baking sheet in the oven. Roast until tender, about 45 minutes (to check doneness, peel back the foil of one beet and insert the tip of a sharp knife. If there is little resistance, its ready). Peel back foil from each beet and let cool slightly. 2. While the beets are roasting, make the rice. Drain and rinse well. Place in a pot with 2 cups /­­ 500ml of fresh water and salt. Cover, bring to a boil and reduce to simmer. Cook until tender (add more during cooking if necessary), about 45 minutes. 3. While the rice is cooking, make the Avocado Wasabi Cream. Scoop out the flesh from both avocados and add to a food processor. Blend on high, then add the lemon juice, wasabi powder and salt. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. 4. In a medium bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil, ginger and salt. Slip the skins off the cooled beets. Cut the beets into cubes and toss in the marinade. Let sit for at least 20 minutes. 5. While the beets are marinating, bring a medium pot of water to the boil. Add a few pinches of salt and the edamame. Simmer for a couple minutes until bright green and tender (do not overcook!). Drain and rinse under cold water to halt cooking. Toss with a little olive oil and sprinkle with flaky salt. 6. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast sesame seeds, stirring often until fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside. 7. Julienne the carrots. 8. To assemble, divide the rice among the bowls. Add the marinated beets, edamame, carrots and a dollop of Avocado Wasabi Cream. Sprinkle with nori flakes, the toasted sesame seeds and top with the spring onions. Enjoy! I’m on my last few days of the North American tour now. Honestly, it’s been just magical and I am so grateful to all of you who came out to show some love and connect with the healthy community around them! I have just one more event left, and if you’re in LA, please come to The Springs tomorrow! I’ll be giving a lecture on Improving Immunity, Digestion and Detoxification, serving a delicious lunch, and launching a recipe collaboration with their chef! Hope to see you there. All love and smiles, Sarah B Show me your bowls on Instagram! #mnrpokebowl The post Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl appeared first on My New Roots.

Mango Sushi Bowls with Quick-Pickled Carrots and Cucumbers

August 9 2016 Oh My Veggies 

Making sushi rolls is a difficult skill to master, but putting all the components of sushi in a bowl? So much easier.

Strawberry and Asparagus Black Rice Sushi

June 15 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Strawberry and Asparagus Black Rice Sushi My kid is completely obsessed with sushi rolls, and I’m starting to figure out that it’s the format itself that elicits all her fondness – she will eat anything wrapped up in nori and rice. Take these rolls, for example – there are strawberries, which Paloma loves, but there is also asparagus, which, at this stage in her life, she would never consider eating on its own. But last week, I made one batch of this sushi, most of which was eaten by Paloma with no notice of asparagus, and the next day she asked me to make more of the ‘same exact thing’… If that’s what gets her eating asparagus, I’m all for it! For the adults and the less picky, these sushi rolls have it all. They are summery, light and bright, a great small meal or snack for the sunny days ahead. I used black rice, one of my favorite grains out there, for a little more bite and nutrition. There are sweet summer strawberries, tender, crisp asparagus, and spinach for that extra green. Avocado is always a great finishing touch to any vegetable sushi, its buttery texture just goes so well with rice and slightly crunchy nori. There’s a certain belief out there about sushi being difficult to make at home, but unless you are shooting for Jiro-like perfection and tradition, it’s not a big deal at all, I promise. With a casual approach, it only takes a few fun motions to roll up a mean sushi meal for yourself. Strawberry and Asparagus Black Rice Sushi   Print Serves: 32 sushi rolls Ingredients 2 tablespoons brown rice vinegar - divided 3 cups cooked black forbidden rice 1 teaspoon neutral coconut oil about 8 asparagus spears - tough ends cut off sea salt and black pepper - to taste 1 avocado - quartered 1/­­2 lemon or lime - juice 4 nori sheets - raw or toasted about 4-6 medium strawberries - sliced about 2 cups baby spinach Instructions Drizzle brown rice vinegar over cooked black rice in a medium bowl, mix to coat evenly. Warm coconut oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add asparagus to the pan, followed by a pinch of salt and black pepper and saute for about 5 minutes, until bright green and crisp-tender. Slice each avocado quarter into three wedges. Squeeze lemon or lime juice over the avocado to prevent discoloration. Place one nori sheet at a time on a sushi mat or a cutting board, shiny side down and lines going horizontally. Measure 3/­­4 cup of black rice and cover the nori with it evenly, leaving a 1-inch border at the side opposite to you, parallel to the horizontal lines of the nori. Wet your hands to prevent rice from sticking to them when distributing. Arrange 3 avocado wedges along the side of nori closest to you, slightly overlapping them. Top with about 5-6 strawberry slices, overlapping those as well. Place 2 asparagus spears next to strawberry slices, tips facing the edges, followed by a few spinach leaves. Lightly moisten the uncovered border of the nori with water. Start rolling by folding the end of nori closest to you over the filling, squeezing firmly, and continue rolling to the end. The moistened border will stick and seal the roll. Wrap the sushi mat around the roll and squeeze gently to form the roll into its final shape. If not using a mat, squeeze with your hands to stabilize. Put the roll aside, seam-side down, and repeat with the rest of nori sheets and filling ingredients. Place one roll at a time on a cutting board and slice in half with a sharp, moistened knife. Then cut each piece in half again, wiping the knife in between cuts if necessary, and repeat by cutting each of the 4 pieces in half one last time. You should have 8 pieces. Serve immediately with tamari. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle Mango Salsa and an Ayurveda Birthday Welcome Summer Multigrain Salad with Strawberries and Asparagus .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Strawberry and Asparagus Black Rice Sushi appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

How Do I Cook with Seaweed

April 12 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Sea vegetables deserve way more attention than they get from sushi bars and maki rolls.  Mineral dense and a great source of iron, magnesium and potassium, seaweed is the unique source of plant-based EPA; an omega-3 fatty acid otherwise only found in animal products.  And theres an entire world of sea vegetables out there.  Here are a few of the most common varieties. Nori: The sushi staple also makes great wraps for veggie rolls.  Dulse: After a quick soak in cold water, the brownish/­­ dark purple seaweed makes a wonderful addition to salads.  Kombu: The fat, dried strips of sea kelp are most often used as flavoring agents. They can be added to vegetable broths as they cook, then thinly sliced to add texture, umami flavor, and richness to soups.

How to Pair Beer with Vegetarian Food

February 4 2016 Vegetarian Times 

How to Pair Beer with Vegetarian FoodWhen I transitioned to a plant-based lifestyle several years ago, my mission was to smash through all the old, tired stereotypes about vegetarians and vegans. As a member of one of the countrys oldest brewing families (Straub Brewery), it was a no-brainer that my debut would be infusing plant-based food with beer, wine, and liquor for The Tipsy Vegan. More recently, I continued the buzzworthy trip with my newest cookbook, The Ultimate Beer Lovers Happy Hour, which pairs plant-based dishes and beer styles. Today, beer and food pairing is one of the hottest trends in entertaining, whether at home or for larger events. And now we vegetarians and vegans can get in on the action like never before. It even landed me on Bravo as guest bartender for Andy Cohens Watch What Happens Live. To brew up a batch of fun at your next get-together, I have three simple suggestions to follow when deciding how to pair your favorite plant-based dishes with the dozens of beer styles on shelves: Black Bean & Corn Salsa from The Ultimate Beer Lovers Happy Hour A Great Complement Goes a Long Way Pair similar flavor profiles, such as sweet foods with smoother, maltier beers like Amber Lager, Vienna Lager, Oktoberfest, or Hefeweizen. Or, foods that have stronger, sharper, or distinct flavors with hoppier beers, such as India Pale Ale, Stout, Altbier, or Porter. Opposites Attract Bring balance to a beer and food pairing by mixing and matching smoother, sweeter, or subtle flavored food with a more intense, palate-grabbing beer, and vice versa. For example, pair a Portobello burger or cauliflower mash with a rich, hoppy Bock. Or, pair a spicy buffalo dip or garlicky veggie kabobs with a traditional Pale Lager. Experiment! Everyones palate processes flavors in unique and different ways. Therefore, a really fun and easy way to pair is to offer a spectrum of beer styles--sweet/­­smooth/­­malty to sharp/­­strong/­­hop-heavy--for sampling in small glasses with each dish you serve. Then, let your guests vote on their favorite. For example, offer falafel or veggie meatballs with a range of Amber Lager, Maibock, India Pale Lager, and Stout. Or, chocolate cake with Dunkel, Cream Ale, Pilsner, and Doppelbock. And, by all means, dont be afraid to add a few or more dashes of brew to the food itself when prepping.   Vegetarian Food & Beer Pairing Below, I have curated a pairing menu of appetizers, using recipes from the Vegetarian Times kitchen archive. I matched each recipe with a beer style that complements, enhances, and/­­or adds a resounding exclamation point to every bite. Maple Pecan Spread Pair with: Vienna Lager The mildly sweet malt flavoring of a Vienna Lager will nicely complement Mother Natures toothsome duo of fresh pecans and maple syrup, especially when served with freshly sliced apples and pears. Spicy Mini Avocado Rolls Pair with: Amber Lager The smooth maltiness of an Amber Lager plays harmony to the sharp, peppery twang of the radishes and green onions, and gently tempers the accompanying pickled ginger and wasabi.   Confetti Queso Dip Pair with: Altbier This classic comfort dip--embellished here with sparks of roasted red pepper, green onions, and chipotle pepper sauce--all but begs to be partnered with a robust and hoppy brew style like Altbier.   White Bean-Artichoke Hummus with Roasted Garlic Pair with: Maibock The blend of white beans and artichokes when supercharged with roasted garlic and a citrusy twist of lemon juice and ground sumac preps the palate for refreshing follow-up swigs of a slightly-hopped Maibock.   Rosemary-Garlic Carrot and Green Bean Fries Pair with: Kölsch The aromatic rosemary and garlic coating on these veggie fries will provide a surprising opening act for the low malt and moderately hoppy--even fruity--notes of a Kölsch.     Adzuki-Beet Pate Pair with: Cream Ale The ambrosial trio of caramelized onions, beets, and adzuki beans will find a fitting ally in the light-bodied nature of a Cream Ale.   Orange-Scented Meatballs with Sweet-and-Sour Sauce Pair with: Pale Lager A good old, classic Pale Lager allows these eggplant, onion, and veggie-bacon balls in their tomato and orange sauce to remain the stars of this pairing while still bringing the buzz.   Mini Sesame-Cucumber Hand Rolls Pair with: India Pale Ale These cool cucumber sticks in consort with the nutty-sesame gomashio in this veggie sushi will be enhanced by a stronger, hop-heavy beer style like India Pale Ale.     Peanut-Stuffed Okra Fingers Pair with: Bock The spirited filling mixture of peanuts, onion, garlic, ginger, jalapeno, and seasonings finds an electrifying bar mate when paired with the roasted and caramel flavor points of a Bock.   Spicy Cashew Cheese Pair with: Brown Ale While the buttery cashews in this cheesy spread play backdrop for the lively fusion of chili powder, coriander, cumin, and garlic powder, the moderate to high maltiness of a Brown Ale will bring every bite to a memorable conclusion. Crispy Seasoned Vegetable Chips Pair with: American Pale Ale The hop-heavy boldness of an American Pale Ale will ignite the WOW-factor alongside these crispy seasoned veggie chips.   Traditional Falafel Pair with: Saison The hearty and distinct flavor of traditional falafel melds with the earthy, spicy, and fruity notes of a Saison.   Caramelized Onion, Walnut, and Spinach Savory Cake Pair with: Pilsner The Onion Marmalade starring in this scrumptious cake bread needs a sidekick that can hold its own, such as a medium-hoppy Pilsner.     Herbed Mushroom Caviar Pair with: Oktoberfest No matter the occasion, this chic amalgamation of button mushrooms, thyme, garlic, and parsley will be accentuated by the sweet malt and mild hoppiness of an Oktoberfest.   Smoky Eggplant and Melon Wraps Pair with: Rauchbier (Smoked Beer) Carry through with a theme for this appetizer combo of smoky eggplant and melon by pairing it with a traditional Rauchbier, which is created using smoked malt.   Carrot Dip with Crushed Walnuts and Olives   Carrot Dip with Crushed Walnuts and Olives Pair with: Stout The blend of carrots, toasted coriander, and pungent harissa in this spread will find an unexpected and sophisticated partner in the dark and intense, roasted maltiness of a Stout.   Brown Sugar-Cinnamon Popcorn Pair with: Doppelbock The brown sugar and cinnamon coating on this popcorn gets an extra kick when followed by the robust maltiness of a Doppelbock, with its caramel aroma and mild toastiness.   Tex-Mex Pizza Pair with: Chili Beer Fire up this Tex-Mex Pizza with a round of spicy Chili Beers.   ABOUT JOHN SCHLIMM: John Schlimm is a Harvard-trained educator, artist, activist, and award-winning writer. His newest book is an inspirational memoir titled Five Years in Heaven: The Unlikely Friendship That Answered Lifes Greatest Questions. Johns other books include Stand Up!: 75 Young Activists Who Rock the World, And How You Can, Too! and a series of plant-based cookbooks, including The Tipsy Vegan, Grilling Vegan Style, The Cheesy Vegan, and The Ultimate Beer Lovers Happy Hour. John has traveled the country speaking about inspirational/­­motivational topics, cooking and entertaining, his artwork, and public relations, including his university commencement address titled “The Road to YES is Paved with Many NOs” and his Embrace Compassion, Change the World keynote address on Capitol Hill. He also has appeared on such national media outlets as The Ellen DeGeneres Show, Bravos Watch What Happens Live, NPR, Martha Stewart Livings Everyday Food, The Splendid Table, QVC and Fox & Friends. www.Facebook.com/­­JohnSchlimm Twitter at @JohnSchlimm Instagram at @JohnSchlimm Pinterest at www.Pinterest.com/­­JohnSchlimm YouTube at www.YouTube.com/­­JohnSchlimm.  

Spicy Mini Avocado Rolls

January 5 2016 Vegetarian Times 

1 To make Rice: Bring rinsed rice and 1 cup water to a boil in large saucepan. Cover, and simmer 15 minutes, or until all liquid is absorbed. Let stand, covered, 5 minutes, then transfer to bowl. 2 Meanwhile, stir together vinegar, sugar, and salt in small bowl. 3 Transfer rice to large bowl, and stir in vinegar mixture. Cool. 4 To make Sauce: Stir ingredients together in bowl; set aside. 5 To make Rolls: Place 1 nori sheet on work surface or sushi mat. Spread half of nori sheet closest to you with 1/­­2 cup Rice. Spread 1 tsp. Sauce in center of Rice. Top with 1 Tbs. grated radishes, then a line of avocado; finish with 1 green-onion top, making sure each filling goes all the way to sides of nori sheet. 6 Roll nori sheet away from you to enclose filling and make small roll. Dampen far edge with water, then roll to seal. Repeat with remaining ingredients. Cut each roll into 8 sushi pieces with sharp knife.

Vegan Chipotle Corn Chowder – Cook The Pantry Book Giveaway

October 27 2015 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Chipotle Corn Chowder – Cook The Pantry Book Giveaway Robin Robertson’s new book Cook the Pantry: Vegan Pantry-to-Plate Recipes in 20 Minutes (or Less!) is now available to buy everywhere where books are sold.  Cook the Pantry shows you how to cook great meals with what’s in your pantry. Fast nutritious recipes using plant-based ingredients for easy delicious vegan recipes in 20 minutes or less. With recipes as Tuscan Chickpea Fritatta, Homestyle Hash Burgers, Banana Foster Dessert Nachos, Greek freekeh with white beans, Pinto bean nacho pie, Southwest Salmagundi, Minestrone soup, Suddenly sushi Salad, Paella, and Artichoke Muffaleta Po’Boys (pictured below), this book is full of quick options and ideas to use to create your own dishes.  I don’t know how Robin does it. I am exhausted with just one cookbook :). The publisher Vegan Heritage Press is giving away a copy of the book to one of the blog readers. See end of the post for instructions to enter.  Continue reading: Vegan Chipotle Corn Chowder – Cook The Pantry Book GiveawayThe post Vegan Chipotle Corn Chowder – Cook The Pantry Book Giveaway appeared first on Vegan Richa.


You will enjoy these as well ...

Found an error?
Help to fix it! Tell it us!



Our sites missing something? Suggest new content or features!



Have you any comments?
Send it us!