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High-Vibe Condiment Classics

May 23 2020 My New Roots 

High-Vibe Condiment Classics Summer is fast-approaching (at last!) and I dont know about you, but to me this means grilling, eating outside, and enjoying all of the classic, warm-weather treats. But wait! Did you know that there are all kinds of funky ingredients hiding in the most innocuous places, like your ketchup, mustard and relish?! We shouldnt have to forgo these truly classic condiments just because were walking on the whole foods path. No way! So I decided to do a high-vibe makeover all of the condiments that youd find at a barbecue, picnic, or baseball game: ketchup, mustard, honey mustard, Dijon, relish, mayo and secret sauce, without any refined ingredients, colours, or preservatives. They are entirely vegan (except for the honey mustard), and taste absolutely incredible.  Making your own condiments from scratch is empowering, and you too will see that by whisking up your very own mustard, or blending your very own ketchup that you are incredibly capable in the kitchen! Its a serious delight to realize that youre not only qualified to make things you thought you needed to buy, but that youre also doing yourself a giant favour in cutting questionable ingredients out of your life. When I was a kid, I loved hotdogs with mustard and relish (not ketchup, that was for burgers). The vinegary tang of the yellow mustard with the sweetness of pickle relish perfectly offset the salty squishiness of a microwaved wiener. This was a typical Saturday lunch, with doughnuts for dessert, all washed down with a giant glass of milk. I wanted to recreate that nostalgia, minus pretty much everything else. The flavours bring me back to simple times and simple food. But simple food is not always so simple. Have you read the ingredients on a squeeze bottle of relish lately? Its a complicated collection of chemicals that I certainly wouldnt want in my body. High-fructose corn syrup, natural flavour, and food colouring are just a few of the ingredients that plague most tasty toppings. Food additives are everywhere, especially in shelf-stable products. If youre not going to refrigerate something or preserve it properly, it has to have things in it to prevent it from spoiling. It also has to look appealing and taste good, even after months (or years!) on a grocery store shelf. That is why it is so important to read labels and be discerning about what you choose to buy. This is not to say that these additives are inherently harmful, but they are far from natural, and Im a believer in eating as close to the earth as possible! Luckily my condiments are not only based on whole foods, but they taste amazing and are actually good for you.    Here is a small list of the food additives to watch out for and avoid, if possible. Remember to check the packages of your other summer favourites, like chips, salad dressings, sparkling beverages, soda and juice, ice cream, popsicles, and frozen yogurt.  High Fructose Corn Syrup Sometimes labeled HFCS, this highly-refined artificial sweetener has become the number one source of calories in North America. It is found in almost all processed foods, since it is cheap to make, shelf-stable, super sweet, and highly addictive. Excessive consumption has been linked to obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Watch out for it in condiments, salad dressing, bread, candy, soda, yogurt, breakfast cereals, even canned vegetables and fruit.  Natural Flavours This is a sneaky term meant to throw you off. When you see these words on an ingredient list, they refer to a naturally-derived flavouring agent that has to be extracted from plant or animal sources, designed to enhance the taste of food. Conversely, artificial flavours are synthetically created, with their original sources being manmade chemicals. Natural flavours however, are still made in laboratories by food chemists who can add any numbers of chemicals, including preservatives, solvents and other substances, which are defined as incidental additives, to what they are creating. Food manufacturers are not required to disclose whether these additives come from natural or synthetic sources, and as long as the original flavouring comes from plant or animal material, they can be classified as natural. The point is, natural flavours dont appear to be any healthier than artificial flavours, and they can still contain ingredients that may cause reactions in sensitive individuals, especially children. To avoid them, cut back on packaged products and stick to the real-deal whole foods!  Food Dyes /­­ Colours To make food look bright, fresh, and especially appealing to children, food manufacturers add dyes to obvious things like candy, sports drinks and baked goods, but also not-so-obvious things like condiments (!), pickles, cereals, salad dressing, yogurt, and chocolate milk. Some of these dyes are approved for use in certain countries, while others have banned them, making it challenging for consumers to navigate. The safety of food dyes is controversial, especially in regards to children. Studies have linked them to hyperactivity in sensitive kids, and they may cause allergic reactions in some people. Because most food dyes are found in unhealthy processed foods, its easy to avoid them if youre sticking to a more natural diet.  Hydrogenated /­­ Partially Hydrogenated Oils You know when the World Health Organization plans on eliminating these fats from the global food supply, they must be pretty problematic. Created by forcing hydrogen gas into vegetable fats under extremely high pressure to turn liquid into solid, hydrogenation creates trans fats, which increases the amount of LDL cholesterol, lowers HDL cholesterol, therefore significantly increasing the risk of coronary heart disease. Whats more is that these fats are pro-inflammatory. Although their use has been banned in several countries, trans fats still lurk in many processed foods.  As long as there is less than .5% per serving, it isnt required in to be listed in the ingredients or nutritional information. The best way to avoid them is by cutting out processed foods, especially margarine, coffee creamer, chips and crackers, frozen pizza, fast foods, baked goods, and microwave popcorn.   Health Claims – these are put on the front of the box to lure you in, and can include buzz words like natural, whole grain, low-fat, no added sugar, organic, light, low calorie, gluten-free, and enriched. Terms like these should be a red flag for you, so read the entire label, including the ingredient list, the serving size, the amount and types of sweetener and fat used. Think critically and be selective – if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.  The bottom line?! Stick to whole, or minimally-processed foods and ingredients as often as possible. Its better for you, and your family to make your own from scratch whenever possible. Not to mention, its fun to brag to everyone that youre a condiment master, a yogurt wizard, or a salad dressing whisperer.  I had so much FUN with these recipes! It was a blast to brainstorm which condiments I would attempt to health-ify, experiment with, and eventually master to make them all easy-to-make and delicious. My condiments wont last years in the fridge, but all of them passed the two-week mark with flying colours (all of them natural, of course). As long as youre using clean utensils to scoop out your servings, you shouldnt have a problem keeping these toppings around for a few weeks – ya know, if you can ration them for that long!  Yellow Mustard This was in fact my first attempt at making yellow mustard and it proved to be ridiculously easy! I think Id built it up in my head to be some complicated project, but wow was I mistaken. Just a few simple ingredients, and a little stovetop whisking will get you the brightest, tangiest, most beautiful ballpark mustard of your dreams! I must warn you, from one condiment-master to another, that the bubbling mixture gets darn hot and tends to splatter when its cooking. To avoid scalding yourself, use the pot lid as s shield (insert laughing emoji here).      Print recipe     Yellow Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients:  1 cup /­­ 250ml cold water 3/­­4 cup dry mustard powder 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 tsp. ground turmeric 1/­­2 tsp. garlic powder 1/­­8 tsp. ground paprika 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar Directions: 1. In a small saucepan, whisk together water, dry mustard, salt, turmeric, garlic, and paprika until smooth. Cook the mixture over medium-low to low heat, stirring often, until it bubbles down to a thick paste, 30 to 45 minutes. 2. Whisk the apple cider vinegar into the mustard mixture and continue to cook until its thickened to the desired consistency – this can take between 5 and 15 minutes depending on how thick you like it.  3. Let the mustard cool to room temperature. Transfer the mustard to an airtight glass jar or container, and refrigerate for up to 3 months.  Honey Mustard Depending on how sweet you like your honey mustard, its just the above yellow mustard recipe with as much honey stirred in as you like! I added two tablespoons and it was perfect for me, but if you want even more, got for it. I recommend avoiding very runny honey, since this will loosen the mustard. Instead, opt for something on the thicker side to maintain the consistency. If youre vegan, brown rice or date syrup would be the best choices, since they are more viscous than maple syrup, for example. I love this on sandwiches with lots of fresh veggies and sprouts!     Print recipe     Honey Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients: 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 Tbsp. raw honey Directions: 1. Combine the mustard and the honey. Taste and add more honey if desired. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 months.  Grainy Dijon Mustard This style of Dijon is a whole-seed one, which is my favourite because of the great texture and colour variations. Its spicy and complex, and will only get better with time. Keep in mind that this recipe is in two stages, the first one requiring you to soak your mustard seeds the night before you plan on blending.      Print recipe     Grainy Dijon Mustard Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml  Ingredients: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g yellow mustard seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g black mustard seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. ground mustard 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml white wine vinegar 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml apple cider vinegar 2 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 tsp. sea salt Directions: 1. Combine all ingredients and refrigerate overnight (for 12-24 hours) to allow the mustard seeds to soften and absorb the flavours. 2. Place mixture in blender and mix on high for a minute or two, until the seeds have broken and the mustard thickens. 3. Transfer contents to a clean jar and enjoy! Dijon will keep for about one month in the refrigerator. Sweet Pickle Relish This was the most anticipated condiment to try and make myself, since its one of my favourites, but also one of the worst offenders for additives. I successfully recreated that gorgeous tang, and succulent texture of commercial relish that I loved so much as a kid. The taste of this one is off the charts! My recipe uses coconut sugar instead of refined sugar and syrups, so the colour is a little darker and browner than the conventional types, but I dont think youll notice – and you certainly wont miss the food colouring!     Print recipe     Sweet Pickle Relish Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 340g finely diced cucumber 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g finely diced yellow onion 1 tsp. salt, divided  1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar  1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g coconut sugar 1/­­4 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. yellow mustard seeds 1 tsp. dried dill 1/­­4 tsp. turmeric 1/­­4 red bell pepper, finely diced 1 tsp. arrowroot, dissolved in 2 tsp. water Directions: 1. Toss the cucumber and onion with 3/­­4 teaspoon of salt in a sieve set over a bowl, and let drain for about 3 hours. Next, press the ingredients against side of sieve to release as much liquid as possible, then discard liquid from bowl.  2. Bring the vinegar, coconut sugar, and remaining 1/­­4 teaspoon of salt to a boil in a small saucepan, stirring until sugar has dissolved, then simmer until reduced to about a 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml (just eyeball it), about 3 to 4 minutes. Add the garlic, mustard, dill, and turmeric, stir until fragrant, about 1-2 minutes. 3. Add the drained cucumber and onion mixture, plus diced red bell pepper, and simmer, stirring for about 2 minutes. Make the arrowroot slurry, then whisk it into the relish. Simmer, stirring, 2-3 minutes until noticeably thickened. Turn off the heat and transfer relish to a glass jar or storage container and leave uncovered until it cools to room temperature, then put in the fridge. The relish will keep for up to a month in the fridge.  Tomato Ketchup This ketchup was an old blog post that I revisited and revised. I used to make this recipe in the oven, but my new method eliminates the need to crank up the heat when its probably the last thing you want to do. Instead, the whole thing is made on the stove, then blitzed up in the blender. Its deeply spiced and complex, so much more interesting than store-bought ketchup. The first time I made the new version, I used a good portion of it for a soup base, then added more to a dip – both were delicious, so if you have leftovers, put it to use in an unexpected place. Its tasty with everything!      Print recipe     Tomato Ketchup Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil (expeller-pressed, flavour neutral)  3 star whole anise (make sure they are whole to remove easily!) 3 bay leaves 1 tsp. ground coriander pinch of chili flakes  1 large onion, chopped  3/­­4 tsp. sea salt  1/­­4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 3 cloves garlic, minced 2.2 lbs. /­­ 1 kg tomatoes  2 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 Tbsp. maple syrup  Directions: 1. Melt the coconut oil in a medium stockpot, then add the star anise, bay leaves, coriander, and chili flakes. Cook until fragrant about 2 minutes, then add the onions, salt and pepper, and cook until slightly browned, about 10 mins. Next add the add garlic, cook for 1-2 minutes, then add balsamic vinegar, scraping any stuck bits off the bottom of the pot. Add tomatoes and their juices, then bring to a simmer.  2. Cook on low heat for about 60 mins or until reduced and starting to caramelize on the bottom of the pot.  3. Turn off heat and remove bay and anise, add maple syrup. Let cool slightly and transfer to a blender, blend until smooth. Taste, and adjust seasoning to suit your taste.  4. Let cool to room temperature, then transfer to an airtight glass container and store in the fridge. Keeps for about one month.   Aquafaba Mayonnaise This was the most exciting discovery to make: vegan mayo using aquafaba! Aqua faba translates to bean water and its the cooking liquid from chickpeas. Although any can of chickpeas will have this, I make my own, since there are no additives or chemicals that have leached from the can itself. If you cook your own chickpeas from dried, you have aquafaba. Although I wouldnt normally consume large amounts of aquafaba, in this case its used in such a small amount that I think its fine. Plus, did I mention it makes vegan mayo?! The results are so unbelievably shocking and delightful that Im a convert, even though I eat eggs! I highly suggest using the most neutral-tasting olive oil you can find for this recipe. Since it makes up the majority of the flavour of the mayonnaise, a strong-tasting olive oil will overpower the delicate nature of this condiment. I used the one from Pineapple Collaborative, which works perfectly. I also tried avocado oil, grapeseed, and sunflower, but didnt like the results as much as mild olive oil. Its up to you! You can really use whatever you have on hand, just keep in mind that it will really dictate the taste of the final result.      Print recipe     Aquafaba Mayonnaise Makes about 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3 Tbsp. aquafaba 1/­­4 tsp. Dijon mustard 1/­­4 tsp. fine salt 1 1/­­2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml mild olive oil (or other light-tasting oil) Directions: 1. Place the aquafaba in the bottom of a wide-mouth jar. Add the mustard, salt, lemon juice, vinegar, and the olive oil. Allow a minute for the oil to separate into a distinct layer. 2. Insert an immersion blender all the way to the bottom of the jar. (Note: this will not work with an upright blender) Start the blending process on medium speed and do not lift the blender until the mixture has thickened and turned white at the bottom of the jar. Only then, slowly move the blender up, waiting for the oil to incorporate as you go, until you get the texture of mayonnaise. Use immediately; refrigerate leftovers in a tightly sealed jar for up to 1 month. The mayonnaise will thicken slightly once cooled in the fridge. Smoky Secret Sauce This is the creamy, tangy, and perfectly seasoned sauce that most famously adorns the Big Mac burger from McDonalds. Whats best about my version is that it has zero secrets...nothing weird to hide here! I had the most fun with this recipe, since it required a number of the condiments that Id already made as ingredients. I did deviate a tad from the original and added smoked paprika, since I love the added dimension of smoke flavour to anything thats going on grilled food, but Ive also found this to be a stellar salad dressing, especially for chop-style salads that have chunky, less delicate ingredients. I hope you find some fun things to slather it on this summer. Its lip-smakingly tasty!      Print recipe     Smoky Secret Sauce Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml aquafaba mayonnaise (recipe above) 1 tablespoon yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish (recipe above) 1 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 teaspoon white wine vinegar 1/­­2 teaspoon paprika 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (not traditional, but delicious!) 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon onion powder Directions: 1. Fold all ingredients together in a small bowl or jar. Enjoy immediately, and store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for 2-3 weeks.    As a bonus, Ive included this stellar recipe for carrot hot dogs – since youll need a high-vibe wiener to put your condiments on! Hahaaa! I realize that carrot hot dogs are pretty 2018, but Id never tried them before and it was a very amusing undertaking. I looked at a number of recipes online and my version is a mash-up of the ones that sounded the most delicious. My method is also much easier and faster than other versions Ive seen, since its just a braise on the stove and a quick grill (no marinating, steaming, roasting, etc).  The important thing to keep in mind for this recipe, is that the amount of time you braise the carrots for,Im  will be dictated by the girth of the carrots. Mine were more sausage-sized (approx 1.5 or 3.5-3.75 cm) than a typical hot dog wiener, and a 20-minute simmer was the perfect amount. If your carrots are smaller, Id go down to 15 minutes. Insert a sharp knife to check on the doneness after 10 minutes or so, and take them out when they are tender, but way before they get mushy. Remember that youre also going to be grilling them for 10 minutes so they will cook even more, and you dont want them too soft. The final result should be tender all the way through, but shouldnt fall apart in your mouth.     Print recipe     Carrot Hot Dogs Serves 8 Ingredients: 8 large hot dog-sized carrots 8 hot dog buns 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml tamari 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml apple cider vinegar  1 cup /­­ 250ml vegetable broth or 1 tsp. vegetable bullion powder + 1 cup water 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 2 Tbsp. coconut oil (preferably expeller-pressed, flavour neutral) 1 Tbsp. liquid smoke 2 tsp. yellow mustard 1 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. paprika 1/­­2 tsp. onion powder 1/­­2 tsp. ground black pepperWash and peel carrots. Round the edges of the carrot to look more like wieners, if desired.  Direcitons: 1. Whisk all marinade ingredients together in a large stockpot with a lid. Add the peeled carrots and bring to a boil, reduce to a gentle simmer, and cook with the lid on for about 20 minutes (less if your carrots are on the thin side, see headnote). Remove from heat and turn on the grill.  2. Grill the carrots over medium-high, turning every couple of minutes, basting them with the remaining braising liquid if desired. Cook until slightly charred and fragrant, 10 minutes total. Grill or toast the buns. Place a carrot on each bun and enjoy with all of the condiments! I wish you all an incredible summer ahead! I recognize that this season is going to look very different from years past, but as long as were all healthy and the sun is shining, weve got it pretty good. Stay safe out there, and keep fuelling your body with the whole foods it needs to thrive and feel alive!  All love and happy condiment-making, Sarah B The post High-Vibe Condiment Classics appeared first on My New Roots.

Chana Masala Kale Bowl

May 11 2020 Meatless Monday 

The seasoned chickpea dish chana masala, while traditionally meatless, gets a new twist in this recipe. Served over a kale alongside shredded beets and sunflower seeds, it’s part salad, part curry and totally delicious. This recipe comes to us from Alexandra of The New Baguette. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4. For the chana masala: - 1 tablespoon organic canola oil - 2 medium onions, diced - 2 teaspoons grated ginger - 1 clove garlic, grated - 1 hot green chili pepper, minced - 1 tablespoon ground coriander - 2 teaspoons ground cumin - 2 teaspoons cumin seeds, toasted - 2 teaspoons paprika - 1 teaspoon ground turmeric - 1 teaspoon garam masala - 1/­­4 teaspoon cayenne pepper - 1 15-ounce can whole tomatoes with their juices, finely diced - 2/­­3 cup water - 4 cups cooked chickpeas OR 2 15-ounce cans chickpeas, drained and rinsed - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - Juice of 1 lemon (about 2 tablespoons) For the bowl: - 1 teaspoon grated ginger - 1 garlic clove, grated - 2 teaspoons lemon juice - 1 tablespoon sunflower OR extra virgin olive oil - 1/­­2 teaspoon sea salt - 3/­­4 large bunch curly kale, stemmed, and torn into bite-size pieces - 1 large beet, peeled, and shredded/­­spiralized - 1/­­4 cup hulled sunflower seeds, toasted To make the chana masala: Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onion, garlic, ginger and pepper and sauté until browned, about 5 minutes. Turn heat down to medium-low and add the spices. Cook for 1 minute. Then add tomatoes with their juices, scraping up any bits that have stuck to the bottom of the skillet. Add water and chickpeas. Simmer uncovered for 10 minutes, then stir in salt and lemon juice. To make bowls and assemble: In a small bowl, whisk together ginger, garlic, lemon juice, oil and salt. In a large bowl, massage kale with ginger dressing for 1 minute, until kale has softened and wilted a little. To serve, divide kale among 4 bowls, top with shredded beets, chana masala and sunflower seeds. Do ahead: The chana masala, dressing and vegetables may be prepared separately and kept in the fridge for up to 4 days. The post Chana Masala Kale Bowl appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Kale Caesar With Brussel Sprout Croutons

May 5 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Kale Caesar With Brussel Sprout Croutons Serves 4 Caesar is the mother of all salads, vegan or not. But especially vegan! Who can deny a briny, lemony, creamy, garlicky dressing? I think the reason that Kale Caesars in particular are so popular (besides the fact that it sounds like hail, Caesar I suppose), is that the acidic dressing really breaks down the kales mask of toughness, revealing its true, velvetty nature. It still retains its crunch and heartiness but after the massage its, well, relaxed a bit! This dressing uses nori as a seasoning, adding that ocean flavor to the mix. I love roasted Brussels instead as croutons, for their toasty crunch. If youd like to add protein, toss in some chickpeas or top with tempeh or tofu, a chickpea cutlet or even some storebought fake chickn sliced up. Avocado, of course, never hurts either.  This is originally from I Can Cook Vegan. If you buy that book I promise to do only good things with the money. Recipes Notes ~ Lacinato kale is my fave for salads because its at once crunchy and a little more delicate than other kale varieties. But use what you got! ~ And yeah you can totally just use this dressing on romaine, too. Like, duh, why not. Just skip the massaging part ~ If you dont have a highspeed blender like viamix or blendtec, you can make this using a regular blender. Soak cashews them overnight first, or, if you dont have that kind of time, boil in water for 30 min and drain. You will have to scrape down the sides with a rubber spatula and give your blender a rest from time to time, and it could take like 5 minutes to get it totally smooth. Just be patient. Ingredients For the brussels: 1 lb brussels, quartered 2 to 3 tablespoons olive oil 1/­­2 teaspoon salt For the dressing: 3 cloves garlic 1 cup whole unroasted cashews 1/­­2 sheet nori, torn to pieces 1/­­4 cup tablespoons nutritional yeast 3/­­4 cup water 1/­­4 cup fresh lemon juice 1 tsp whole grain dijon mustard 3/­­4 teaspoon salt Several dashes fresh black pepper For the salad: 1 lb lacinato kale, rough stems removed, torn into 2 inch pieces or so Optional: Roasted pepitas or sunflower kernels for garnish Sliced lemon for squeezing Directions 1 – Preheat the oven to 425 F for the brussels. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside.  2 – Toss the quartered brussel sprouts with olive oil and a dash of salt. Bake for 15 minutes, until lightly browned. No need to flip them, just let em roast. 3 – Make the dressing. Place garlic in a high-speed blender and pulse to chop up. Add remaining ingredients and blend until completely smooth, about a minute, scraping down the sides with a rubber spatula every now and again.  4 – Pour about 3/­­4 of the dressing into a large mixing bowl. Add the kale and massage it into the dressing for about a minute. Dont be afraid to really get in there like youre kneading dough.  5 – Top with roasted brussels and drizzle on more dressing. Finish with seeds, a little extra black pepper and serve with a lemon!

Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward Eating

March 10 2020 Meatless Monday 

Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward EatingThe recent COVID-19 outbreak has caused concern across the world, and many people are taking measures to make sure they do not fall sick. Besides washing your hands and staying home if youre sick, theres a lot you can do from a nutrition standpoint to boost your immune system  – eat more vegetables and fruits, legumes and whole grains .  Vegetables and fruits especially, have nutrients and special natural compounds called phytochemicals that serve as antioxidants to neutralize damage to cells and fight nasty pathogens like COVID-19, the flu and the common cold. Will they prevent you from getting sick? Maybe not. But a healthy diet can help strengthen your immune system to help fight the virus and recover quickly. Below are some nutrients found in plant-based foods that are vital for a strong and robust immune system: Vitamin C An antioxidant that increases production of white blood cells, is key to fighting infections. Citrus fruits, papaya, dark green and yellow vegetables, red bell pepper, strawberries, tomatoes and watermelons are great sources of Vitamin C. Try this recipe.  Vitamin E An antioxidant that protects your cells from free radical damages, enhances the immune system to fight off bacteria and viruses. Foods high in vitamin E are sunflower seeds, nuts and green vegetables. Try this recipe. Vitamin A Functions mainly by keeping the skin, vision, and tissues of the mouth, stomach, intestine, and respiratory system healthy. Its anti-inflammatory properties enhance the immune system. Good sources of vitamin A are sweet potatoes, spinach, pumpkins, carrots, peppers, cantaloupes. Try this recipe. Zinc An important mineral that helps in wound healing, functions in the development of immune cells, which is needed for the immune system to work properly. Food sources of zinc are legumes, whole grains, nuts and seeds. Try this recipe.  Dietary protein Plays a major role in the bodys immune response. They activate cells that help fight off infections in the body. Good plant sources of dietary protein are: legumes, beans, peas, soy, and nuts. Try this recipe.    Overall, if pondering about which vegetable or fruit to eat, think of colors – purple, blue, red, yellow and orange, because it usually means they are packed with antioxidants that are great for your health and immune system.     Resources: 1. Zinc in Human Health: Effect of Zinc on Immune Cells. https:/­­/­­www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/­­pmc/­­articles/­­PMC2277319/­­ . Accessed March 5, 2020 2. Health Professional Fact Sheet. NIH, Office of Dietary Supplement. https:/­­/­­ods.od.nih.gov/­­factsheets/­­VitaminA-HealthProfessional/­­ . Accessed March 5, 2020 3. Li P, Yin YL, Li D, Kim SW, Wu G. Amino Acid and Immune Function. Br J  Nutr, 2007 Aug:98(2):237-52.  4. Protect your Health with Immune-Boosting Nutrition. https:/­­/­­www.eatright.org/­­health/­­wellness/­­preventing-illness/­­protect-your-health-with-immune-boosting-nutrition . Accessed March 5, 2020 The post Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward Eating appeared first on Meatless Monday.

How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry?

January 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry?A properly-stocked pantry is essential for creating delicious plant-based dishes on the fly. But what does properly-stocked really mean? Sure, you need the basics -- olive oil, white flour, rice, pasta, etc., but there are some additional ingredients that you should consider adding to your collection. Alternative flours, exotic spices, seeds, nut butters, beans (butter beans will change your life), broths, and grains can all add extra levels of depth, dimension, and texture to any variety of plant-based dishes.   Youll likely be familiar with many of the items on this list, but there are also a few lesser known ingredients -- agar-agar, tahini, nutritional yeast, etc. -- which can be used to replace many traditional animal-based ingredients. So, grab a paper and pen, and make sure these items are on next weeks shopping list. Agar-Agar The perfect vegan gelatin replacement for your puddings, jellies, or gelées, agar-agar flakes are derived from seaweed and function similarly to animal-based gelatins. Alternative Flours Were not talking your run of the mill (went there) all-purpose, bleached white flour. Play around with some alternative flours like almond, chickpea, rice, or buckwheat. Many alternative flours are also gluten-free. Beans (canned) Explore the world of beans, and reap the benefits of a healthy, satisfying plant-based protein. Lentils, black beans, butter beans, kidney beans, chickpeas -- doesnt matter; theyre all easy to use, shelf-stable, healthy, and inexpensive. Broth A box of vegetable broth is a staple of any kitchen, but you can expand your soup selection by adding some chickn bouillon cubes to your pantry. Coconut Oil A shelf-stable saturated fat, coconut oil is a healthy alternative to other vegetable oils. In most cases it can be substituted 1:1 for other oils and butters. Its got a laundry list of benefits that range from weight loss to improved cognitive functioning. Chocolate All vegetables and no sweets make everyone hangry. A little bit of chocolate can go a long way in baking as well as a post-dinner night cap. If youre feeling adventurous try some exotic bars that contain a higher percentage of cacao. Diced Tomatoes (canned) Take a simple stew, stir-fry, or sauce to the next level with a can of diced tomatoes. Theyre every home cooks secret weapon. Tip: fire-roasted tomatoes add even more flavor to your meals. Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Toss them into a blender, soup pot or sauté pan to add some inexpensive nutrients and heft to your mid-week meals. Grains Theres an endless variety of grains available for your experimenting pleasure. Whole grains are best (think brown rice), but theres also a number of lesser-known grains that have their own unique texture and flavor profile. Try getting a bag of quinoa, amaranth, or farro and simply follow the cooking instructions on the back. Granola You can make your own or buy it for cheap at the store, but theres truly an endless combination of potential granola mixes. Bring it in a baggy as a post-lunch snack or use it to top your morning yogurt. Nut Butter High in protein and healthy fats, nut butters can add complexity to savory dishes and a nutty richness to sweets. Keep a range on hand -- almond, cashew, pistachio -- to add variety to baked goods, sandwiches, and sauces. Nutritional Yeast Just trust us with this one; we swear it tastes almost exactly like Parmesan cheese. Sprinkle on pasta, popcorn or use in macaroni and cheese if youre looking to cut out the dairy or need a boost of umami flavor. Olives Olives, especially the sliced green ones in a jar, add the perfect pop of brininess to pastas, rice bowls, and stews. Theyre a great value and can seriously elevate the flavor of ordinary dishes.  Pasta Thankfully, pasta has evolved to incorporate more alternative flours into its base. Now, you can get high-fiber, high-protein pasta made of anything from lentils to chickpeas to black beans. Pesto It is one of the most versatile condiments/­­sauces out there. A jar of pesto can last unopened in your pantry for months, and it can be your saving grace if you need to whip something up in a hurry. Add some to roasted vegetables or use it to top a tomato soup. Seaweed Snacks Low in calories and nutritionally-dense, seaweed is the ultimate snack food. Oh, and cats love it too. Spices Well, this one goes without saying, but having a pantry (or cupboard) thats properly stocked with all your necessary spices will make cooking (and eating) a whole lot more enjoyable. Some lesser known spices to add are aamchur (unripe mango), star anise, zaatar, or Aleppo pepper. Seeds Seeds are powerhouses of nutrition, texture, and flavor, and there are so many different varieties to choose from -- chia, flax, hemp, sesame, sunflower. Make chia pudding, a flax egg, or toss some hemp or sunflower seeds into your next salad or smoothie. Soy Sauce Umami in a bottle, soy sauce adds an earthy meatiness to dressings, sauces, and stir-fries. Some chefs even recommend adding a dash to tomato sauce for a boost of richness. Tahini You know it from every hummus youve ever eaten, but what might surprise you is that tahini paste is made entirely from pulverized sesame seeds. Combine a tablespoon of tahini with a dash of water, a sprinkle of cumin, and some salt for a quick and creamy dressing for salad or roasted vegetables.   If you decide to make one of these delicious recipes, let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry? appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cardamom Maple Pecan Granola Recipe (No Oil)

November 1 2019 Vegan Richa 

Cardamom Maple Pecan Granola Recipe (No Oil)Cardamom Maple Pecan Granola Recipe with Pumpkin Seeds. Use other spices of choice in this delicious granola with pumpkin or sunflower seeds. It makes a great gift. No Refined Sugar or oil. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe. Jump to Recipe Snacking can sometimes be the harder to figure out, compared to meals. Its the in between meal time when you dont want something heavy but still satisfying enough. Granola and granola bars made from scratch work out really well for those times. Homemade granola has sugar you can control and oil you can omit. Granola over vegan yogurt, porridge, chia pudding or as is from the jar, is amazing to have around. Whether you like a sweet Date Caramel Granola  , or a granola bar (Sunbutter Granola Bars), or want spicy savory snack with this Sriracha Orange Quinoa Peanut Granola or get adventurous with this Lentil cranberry Granola! There are plenty of options and variations! This easy granola has oats, pumpkin or sunflower seeds and pecans. The maple and pecans add a buttery caramel like flavor, the pecans get candied when covered with maple and cardamom complements the flavor profile amazingly. Change it up with seeds or nuts of choice. Lets make some granola.Continue reading: Cardamom Maple Pecan Granola Recipe (No Oil)The post Cardamom Maple Pecan Granola Recipe (No Oil) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Don’t Get Spooked by Sweets — Try These 10 Better-for-You Halloween Treats

October 28 2019 Meatless Monday 

Don’t Get Spooked by Sweets  —  Try These 10 Better-for-You Halloween TreatsHalloween season is here, so its time to bust out the bloody bandages, clean out the old cast-iron cauldron, and study up on your seances. And theres no better way to honor the scariest holiday of the year than with a proper Halloween bash (or monster mash, or graveyard smash)? Whether its a spooky soirée for you and your friends or a party for some little monsters , the focal point of the celebration (as with all parties) is the finger food -- minus the fingers, of course. You can always go with the traditional frightening fare -- candy apples, ants-on-a-log, popcorn balls, devils food cake -- but we wanted to offer some more imaginative options that are not only tasty, easy to make, and freaking cute, but theyre also better-for-you! Check out the list below for some hauntingly yummy Halloween treats. Peanut Butter Apple Monsters With sunflower-seed teeth and a strawberry tongue, these gremlin-looking green apples are the perfect snack for guests who are scared of eating too much sugar. Photo courtesy of @nutriacure . Fiendishly Frightening Fruit Platter Ghostly red peppers, Frankenstein kiwis, and cantaloupe tombstones make for a very frightening fruit platter. Photo courtesy of @foodbites . Ghostly Chocolate Cupcakes These are not your ordinary cupcakes. Tucked away within each fluffy chocolate cake is a hint of tangy guava and sweet beet puree. Topping each cupcake is a crown of coconut-milk frosting. Drizzle some thinned out guava juice over the top for an even more ghastly effect. Photo courtesy of Goya . Mummys Favorite Jalape?o Poppers These jalape?o poppers are almost too cute to eat... almost. Photo courtesy of @thepurplepumpkinblog . Ghastly Gluten-Free Zombie Fingers These are almost as scary as someone with a gluten intolerance eating a piece of bread. Made primarily from dates, peanut butter, and oats, these zombie fingers are easy to assemble, and they most definitely look the part. Photo courtesy of Recipes from a Pantry . Boo-nana Popsicles The ideal non-dairy frozen treat for your guests. Not too messy, these popsicles will be gone so fast youll begin to wonder if they ever existed at all... Photo courtesy of Well Plated . Candy Corn Parfait These have the candy-corn look, but with added tropical flavor. Just layer some pineapple, tangerine, and a shot of whipped cream to capture the aesthetic of classic candy corn.  Photo courtesy of Family Fresh Meals . Bat Energy Bites All you need is 20 minutes, a microwave, and a mixing bowl to put these scary snacks together. These ones are just as fun to make as they are to eat. Photo courtesy of Chelsea’s Messy Apron . Tangerine Pumpkins Rushing to complete the Halloween party preparations? These tangerine pumpkins dont require much assembly: Just peel and pop a little wedge of celery on top to give them that pumpkin look. Photo courtesy of Bren Did . Ahhhhh Vegetables! For some, nothing is scarier than a platter of roasted vegetables, but we think these spooky shaped beets, carrots, and squash are just devilishly delightful. Photo courtesy of Live Eat Learn .   Making one of these creepy creations? Tag @meatlessmonday and well repost the scariest photos (and maybe the cutest). The post Don’t Get Spooked by Sweets — Try These 10 Better-for-You Halloween Treats appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Savory Fruit Recipes to Spice up Your Summer Meals

August 5 2019 Meatless Monday 

Savory Fruit Recipes to Spice up Your Summer MealsGrilled and savory fruit recipes are a great way to mix-up your summer menu with new flavors. Watermelon, peaches and pineapple are fantastic grilling options that are easy to make and add a delicious pop of sweet and smoky taste to a variety of dishes. Berries, mangoes and citrus fruits ramp up the style and flavor of any salad, grain bowl or soup. The possibilities are endless. Check out a few of our favorite savory summer fruit recipes that are packed with fresh and enticing tastes sure to impress your friends, family and dinner guests. Grilled Pineapple Watermelon Salad from Sweet Potato Soul   Grilled Watermelon Pineapple Teriyaki Burger from Beyond Meat   Strawberry Kale Salad with Almonds from Apples & Onions Apple Basil Paninis from the Verdant Life Mango Chayote Sunflower Seed Salad from Sprouts in the Hood Sunrise Citrus Salad from Healthy Happy Life Pineapple Ginger Tofu over Edamame from The Pink Apron Curried Red Quinoa and Peach Salad from Oldways Want more recipe inspiration? Weve got tons of plant-based recipes to keep you cooking all summer long. Check them out here . Let us know which recipes are your favorites by tagging @MeatlessMonday in your plant-based cooking posts! #MeatlessMonday Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Savory Fruit Recipes to Spice up Your Summer Meals appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Raw Mock Tuna

March 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Nuts, seeds, seaweed, and kelp come together to create a convincing plant-based take on tuna that can be enjoyed in a lettuce wrap on a sandwich, or wherever you’d use tuna salad. This recipe comes to us from Heidi Liv Tompkins, Co-Founder, CFO, product development manager, Heidis Health Kitchen . It was the winning entry in the Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge at the 2019 International Restaurant & Foodservice Show of New York. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - Ingredients: - 1 cup sunflower seeds, raw - 1 cup almonds, raw - 1/­­3 cup water - 1/­­4 cup lemon juice, fresh - 2-3 tbsp vegan fish sauce substitute (such as Fysh Sauce) - 1/­­2 tsp garlic powder - 1/­­2 tsp dulse powder - 1 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 cup cashew mayo (recipe below) - 1/­­4 cup onion, chopped - 1/­­4 cup celery, chopped - 1/­­4 cup fresh parsley, chopped - 2 tsp kelp powder - 1/­­1/­­2 tsp garlic, minced - Yum Yum Ginger Sauce (recipe below)   - Cashew Mayo -  1/­­2 cup water -  1/­­2 cup fresh-squeezed lemon juice - 1 cup raw macadamia nuts - 1 cup raw cashews - 1 Tbsp. garlic - 1 1/­­2 tsp. Celtic sea salt   - Ginger Yum Yum Sauce -  1/­­2 cup fresh lemon juice -  1/­­2 cup water -  1/­­2 cup coconut aminos -  1/­­2 cup coconut nectar -  1/­­2 cup tahini - 2 inches ginger root, peeled - 2 cloves garlic - 1/­­2 bunch mint leaves   Directions: 1. Soak almonds, sunflower seeds, cashew, and macadamia nuts in water, separately, overnight. 2. In a food processor, process almonds, sunflower seeds, water, lemon juice, fysh sauce, garlic powder, dulse, & salt until fairly smooth. 3. Transfer to mixing bowl. Add Cashew Mayo and incorporate thoroughly. 4. Fold in finely chopped onion, celery, parsley, powdered kelp and freshly minced garlic. 5. Serve in lettuce wraps with Yum Yum Ginger Sauce, on sandwiches or on toast.   For the Cashew Mayo: 1. Blend ingredients until smooth. 2. Store in a glass jar & refrigerate.   For the Ginger Yum Yum Sauce: 1. Blend ingredients until smooth. 2. Store in a glass jar & refrigerate. The post Raw Mock Tuna appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Lentil and Sunflower Seed Meatloaf

December 8 2018 VegKitchen 

Vegan Lentil and Sunflower Seed Meatloaf What I like about this kind of recipe is that it is extremely flexible. You can keep the base and make meatballs, burgers, or stuff it into vegetables. Here, I cooked it in a muffin mold, but you can opt for a lentil loaf cooked in a bigger mold. Just dont forget to increase the cooking time! 5.0 from 2 reviews Save Print Lentil and sunflower seed meatloaf Serves: 4-6   Ingredients 2 tbsp. of olive oil 1 1/­­2 cups of onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed ⅔ cup carrots, grated 1 packet (227g) mushrooms, finely chopped 1 cup of lentils, cooked, rinsed and drained 1 1/­­2 cup sunflower seeds 2 slices of whole grain bread, shredded into small pieces ¼ cup ground flaxseed ½ cup of oatmeal 2 tbsp. of tamari 1 tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1/­­4 cup of vegetable broth 1 tbsp. oregano 1/­­2 tsp. thyme 1/­­2 tsp. dry mustard Salt and pepper, to taste 1/­­4 cup of ketchup 1/­­4 cup of unsweetened applesauce 2 tbsp. balsamic vinegar 2 tbsp. tablespoon maple syrup Instructions In a skillet, heat olive oil over medium high heat. Add onion and mushrooms. Cook until the onion has begun to turn a little golden, about […] The article Vegan Lentil and Sunflower Seed Meatloaf appeared first on VegKitchen.

Sunflower Seed Basil Pesto

October 22 2018 Meatless Monday 

Pasta with pesto sauce is the perfect meatless meal, since pesto typically contains both nuts and cheese for protein. But for those with a nut allergy, pesto sauce is usually a no-go. So this recipe uses sunflower seeds instead, which contain a similar amount of protein and healthy fats and even have a bit of a nutty flavor! This recipe comes to us from Diana K. Rice, RD, The Baby Steps Dietitian, who created this recipe in light of her daughters nut allergy. Makes 3 1/­­2 cup batches (4 servings each) - 2 cups packed basil leaves - 3-4 cloves garlic or garlic dots - 1/­­2 cup raw unsalted sunflower seeds - 1/­­2 cup extra virgin olive oil - 2 tbsp. lemon juice - 2 oz. un-grated or 1/­­2 cup grated Pecorino Romano or Parmesan cheese* - Salt to taste   Add all ingredients to the bowl of a food processor and pulse until well-combined, scraping down sides as necessary. Serve immediately over cooked pasta or portion into freezer-safe containers for later use. *Depending on the saltiness of the cheese you use, you may not need to add salt at all. The post Sunflower Seed Basil Pesto appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Aubergine Polpette -- Three Ways

October 12 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Vegan Aubergine Polpette -- Three Ways Our first thought was to do a classic Lady and the Tramp Spaghetti and Meatball dish with this polpette recipe, but then we decided that it was too expected. So here is instead another spin on our one makes three-series. Where we use one staple food in three different recipes. We really love this series because it reflects so much how we actually eat. It’s not always an entirely new meal every day but more of a flow where the same components are repeated with new pairings. These polpette or vegan meatballs are perfect for this. They are good on their own - tender and very flavorful. And they are also insanely versatile, rolled into a wrap, tangled into pasta, paired with a spicy tomato sauce and hummus or tossed in a crunchy vegan take on a caesar salad. Vegan Aubergine Polpette Makes around 40 balls 2 medium sized aubergines 2 red onions 4 tbsp olive oil 100 g /­­ 1 cup almond flour 120 g /­­ 1 cup cooked lentils 4 tbsp pickled capers, drained and finely chopped 2 tbsp raisins zest from 1 lemon 15 leaves basil leaves salt Preheat the oven to 200°C  /­­ 400°F. Peel and chop the onion finely and chop the aubergine into small dices. Stir fry both in a large skillet with the oil for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until very soft. When soft, add to a food processor with the rest of the ingredients. Pulse a few times to mix everything together. You want a very chunky sticky texture but dont pulse too much or youll end up with a mushy mixture. Remove the knife blades and shape 30-40 small balls with your hands. Place them on a baking tray covered with baking paper and bake for 25 minutes. Store in the fridge or freeze them. Scroll down for three ways to serve them. Hummus with spicy tomato sauce, polpette and cucumber salad 1 batch vegan aubergine polpette (see recipe above) 1 batch Hummus, see this recipe or store-bought hummus Spicy tomato sauce Serves 4 1 tbsp olive oil 1 red onion 1 garlic clove 1 tsp cumin 1 tsp harissa paste (or 1 red chili) 2 x 400 g tins tomatoes 1/­­2 tsp sea salt, to taste Heat the oil in a large sauce pan on medium heat. Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic and add them to the sauce pan  together with the spices. Let sauté for a few minutes until soft not browned and then add  the tomatoes and salt. Let cook for at least 20 minutes, until rich and fragrant. It will become sweeter and rounder in flavour the longer you leave it on. Store the sauce you are not using tonight in glass bottles in the fridge. Cucumber salad 1/­­2 cucumber 2 tsp olive oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice + zest 1 pinch sea salt 1 small handful fresh dill Finely dice the cucumber and place in a bowl. Add olive oil, lemon juice and zest, salt and dill and toss to combine. Arrange the hummus in shallow bowls and make a well in the middle. Place a couple of spoonfuls tomato sauce in the well, add a few aubergine polpette and a few spoonfuls cucumber sallad. Vegan Wrap with Polpette, Ajvar and Krauts Serves 4 4 wrap breads /­­ tortilla breads, gluten free or whole grain 4 lettuce leaves 4 cavalo nero or kale, stems removed 1 cup cooked white quinoa 4 tbsp ajvar dressing 1/­­2 cucumber, cut into sticks 4 tbsp sauerkraut (see recipe here) 1 batch aubergine polpette (see recipe above) Place one lettuce leave and one kale leave on each tortilla bread, then place 2-3 tbsp quinoa in the middle, a dollop ajvar, cucumber slices, sauerkraut and top with a couple of aubergine polpette. Fold the top and bottom edges over the filling. Roll the whole tortilla from left to right to wrap in the filling. Roll some parchment paper around them and tie with a string to hold them together. Vegan Ceasar Salad with Polpette Serves 4 1 head Cosmopolitan lettuce 1 batch aubergine polpette (see recipe above) 2 avocados, stone/­­peel removed and sliced 2 small apples, cored and sliced 2 tbsp sunflower seeds, toasted Dressing 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml cold pressed neutral oil (organic rapeseed) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml soy milk, unsweetened 2-3 tsp lemon juice 1 tsp dijon mustard 1 tbsp pickled capers, drained 1 large pinch salt Add all dressing ingredients to a tall glas or blender cup. Mix with a stick blender on high speed for about 15 seconds or until you have a creamy white dressing. Taste and adjust the flavours to your preference. Add more oil and blend again if you like it thicker. Tear the lettuce into bite size pieces and place in a mixing bowl. Add 2 tbsp vegan mayo dressing and toss to cover. Then transfer to a serving platter and arrange avocado slices, apple slices and aubergine polpette and last, scatter over toasted sunflower seeds.

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

August 29 2018 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterThe Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl This year I traveled to Ethiopia in the weeks before Easter - one of several special times of fasting, when the majority of the country eats entirely vegan! I explored the central cities, traveled overland to the north, went trekking in the highlands and stayed with families in remote villages. As with all my travels and culinary research, I am extremely grateful for the privilege to learn, share & exchange, and be guided & supported by many families and professional cooks who invited me in their kitchens and shared amazing meals with me. Since returning to Berlin, I’ve been cooking Ethiopian and Eritrean food practically non-stop, recreating recipes and dishes, constantly inviting friends and guests to my cooking studio for lunch and dinner parties. Abebech showing me traditional village cooking in the Ethiopian Highlands. Making Injera for the first time in Ethiopia The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA is my newest cookbook with original recipes, artwork, photography and stories inspired by these latest culinary adventures. It includes over 70 recipes based on the mouth-watering meals in bustling cities & towns, at road-stop eateries, and in rural highland villages. As with my previous 5 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. The Lotus and the Artichoke is the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. The ETHIOPIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 6th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 140 pages with 70+ recipes and over 60 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by my travels and culinary adventures in East Africa - Also based on experiences with international communities of Europe (London, Paris, and Berlin) and North America (Philadelphia, New York, and Washington D.C.) and over 25 years of vegan cooking - Ethiopian & Eritrean classics, familiar restaurant & family favourites, delicious delights, wonders & surprises, and creative culinary experiments - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Doro Wat – spicy seitan stew Spinach Dinach Butecha – Chickpea “Egg” Salad Minchet Abish – spicy soy mince & walnuts Duba Wot – pumpkin stew Shimbra Asa – chickpea “fish” Asa (Jackfruit) Tibs Fosolia – green beans & carrots Pizza Lalibela Ingudai Tibs – spicy mushrooms Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping Ambasha – sweet bread Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA - Traditional Berbere spice mix (simple + advanced) - Nitir Qibe – spiced butter/­­oil - Mitmita – extra hot spice mix - Yewot Qimen – black pepper spice mix - Shiro – chickpea/­­bean spice mix - Data (Yekarya Delleh) – roasted chili, garlic, onion & herb sauce - Traditional Injera – Ethiopian sourdough crepe - Quick Injera - Ambasha - sweet raisin bread - Doro Dabo – baked stuffed bread - Difo Dabo - spiced bread - Pizza Lalibela - with tomato sauce & roasted potato topping - Sambosa – savory pastry with lentil filling - Senig Karia – roasted spicy stuffed chilies - Injera Firfir – traditional flatbread with spicy tomato sauce - Yesuf Fitfit – chopped injera & lemon sunflower seed dressing - Kita (Injekita) – sweet breakfast flatbread & jam - Chornake /­­ Pasty – fried bread - Genfo – roasted wheat & barley porridge - Selata - super simple salad - Selata Delux - with mango, dates, avocado mixed greens & lentils - Butecha - chickpea “egg” salad - Selata Timtim - tomato salad - Selata Dinich - potato salad - Selata Bekarot - carrot salad - Telba - roasted flax dressing - Shiro Wot - chickpea puree - Misir Wot – red lentils - Doro Wot – spicy seitan - Soy Tibs - spicy soymeat strips - Ingudai Wot - spicy mushrooms - Bamia - spicy okra - Minchet Abish - spicy soy mince & walnuts - Shimbra Asa – spicy chickpea “fish” - Kik Alicha – yellow lentils - Atakilt Alicha – cabbage, carrots & potatoes - Keysir - beet root - Duba Alicha - pumpkin stew - Tikr Gomen - greens with garlic - Spinach Dinich - spinach & roasted potatoes - Fosolia – green beans & carrots - Asa Tibs – lemon pepper jackfruit fritters - Tofu Alicha - batter fried tofu in mild garlic & onion sauce - Ingudai Alicha – mushrooms w/­­ creamy cashew, lemon, pepper, thyme, parsley - Peppers & Potatoes - garlic ginger stir-fry - Inkulal Firfir – spicy tofu scramble & tomatoes - Ful – fava beans - Ayib – cottage cheese - Bedergan – roasted eggplant - Vegetable Lentil Soup - Vegetable Pasta – spaghetti with mixed chopped vegetables - Macaroni Firfir – noodles with garlic onion tomato sauce on injera - Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping - Ethiopian Mashed Potatoes - Traditional Coffee Ceremony - Spiced Black Tea - Roiboos tea with lemon, ginger &cardamon - Mango Moringa Banana Smoothie - Injera w/­­ dates - Banana Bread - Fasting Muffins - Rooibos Tea Ice Cream Video: Justin P. Moore Music: Nils Kercher Nanfulle from Ancient Intimations (live) (C)2016 Ancient Pulse Music PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl The post ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Smörg?st?rta - Savory Rye Sandwich Cake

June 23 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Smörg?st?rta - Savory Rye Sandwich Cake Hey friends and happy midsummer! We spent midsummer eve at a friends house, dancing like frogs around a flower covered midsummer pole. It’s one of many weird traditions that we do in Sweden on this longest day of the year. Today we are off to Noma (as in one of the coolest restaurants on earth) to test their new plant focused menu that is launching next week. We’re very excited - obviously for Noma, but also for eating a fancy dinner together with zero kids around. Before we are leaving, I wanted to post this little recipe that we uploaded to our youtube a few days ago. Just like frog dance, this savory layered sandwich cake is also a very Swedish thing. It is called smörg?st?rta and is traditionally made by layering white bread with mayonnaise, creme cheese, whipped cream, dill, chives, shrimps, salmon and a bunch of other stuff. It’s basically like a sandwich gone wild. Even if we are not completely sold on the very heavy traditional version, there is something intriguing about the concept of a sandwich cake. So we made our own version, using rye bread and three colorful and fresh (but still quite rich) spreads in between. One green spread with avocado, dill and peas. One white spread with egg, sauerkraut and creme fraiche. And one purple spread with beans, beetroot and sunflower seeds. We cover it with cream cheese with a sting of horseradish and lots of finely sliced veggies and flowers. It looks great, is fun to make and really delicious. Sandwich cake FTW! Check out this recipe video to see how we make it. This is the perfect savory dish to make for a party, brunch or gathering with friends. You can easily half the recipe or make it vegan by skipping the egg layer and replacing the cream cheese with coconut cream. If you want to try a gluten-free version of this cake you could either simply use a gluten free bread, or bake 4 trays of our vegetable flatbreads (this option is a little time consuming but would probably taste amazing). Smörg?st?rta (Savory Rye Sandwich Cake) Serves 12-16 Green Spread 300 g /­­ 2 cups cup green peas 1 small lemon, juice 1 bunch dill, chopped 2 avocados, flesh scooped out 2 tbsp olive oil 1 large pinch salt White Spread 6 hard-boiled eggs 250 g /­­ 1 cup creme fraice or sour cream 2 tbsp capers 4 tbsp sauerkraut a pinch black pepper Purple Spread 1 cup sunflower seeds, soaked for an hour in water 1 x 400 g tin white beans, drained and rinsed 2 cooked beetroots, roughly chopped 1 small lemon, juice 4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil salt and pepper Assembling 36 slices of sourdough rye bread (or bread of choice), thinly sliced 500 g cream cheese 1 tbsp grated horseradish Decoration 1 avocado, sliced or shaped into a rose 1/­­2 cucumber, sliced thinly 1 small bunch of asparagus, thinly shaved 1 lemon, halved and thinly sliced mache lettuce chives, finely chopped Start by making the spreads. Add all the ingredients for the green spread to a food processor and mix until smooth (or use a bowl and a hand blender). Taste and adjust the flavour to your liking. Transfer to a bowl and clean the food processor. For the white spread, peel and roughly chop the eggs, place in a bowl and gently stir through cr?me fraiche, capers, sauerkraut and a little black pepper. Set aside. Drain and rinse the sunflower seeds for the purple spreads and add them to the food processor (or use bowl and hand blender) along with beans, beetroot, lemon juice, olive oil and a good grind of salt and pepper. Pulse a couple of times until combined but still a little chunky. To assemble: Trim any hard ends off the bread and line up the rye slices so you have a rectangle, 3 slices wide and 3 slices long. Spread the green spread evenly on top and then place another layer of bread. Now layer they white spread evenly on top. Place another layer of bread, followed by the purple spread. Place the final 9 slices of rye on top. Add cream cheese to a mixing bowl and grate in the horseradish. Whisk to make sure it’s incorporated, taste and add more if desired. Use a palette style knife to cover the cake with a layer of cream cheese. Decorate with an avocado rose, ribbons of cucumber, shaved asparagus, machet lettuce, slices of lemons, chives and flowers. Or whatever you think looks good. Tip: You can make this cake 12-24 hours ahead and store in the fridge to let the spreads soak into the bread and soften it up a bit. Then add the cream cheese and decorations right before serving.

Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins

January 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

Top 20 Plant-Based ProteinsWill I get enough protein? is one of the most common questions asked by people looking to add more plant-based foods to their diet. The short (and long) answer is -- YES. Check out our Plant Protein Power Kit for downloadable social media graphics, plant-protein GIFs and printable posters. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the recommended dietary allowance for individual daily protein intake is 0.8 grams per of protein per every 2 pounds of body weight. Although this is an approximate calculation -- other factors such as age, sex, body type, and lifestyle must be considered for a precise nutrient recommendation -- it provides a reliable benchmark to measure your daily protein requirements.  This amounts to around 56 grams of protein per day for the average sedentary man and 46 grams per day for the average sedentary woman. So, how do you reach that daily number eating only plant-based foods? Easy, check out our guide below and discover which seeds, nuts, legumes, vegetables, and plant-based products pack the biggest protein punch. Still have questions? Learn more about plant-based protein from the nutritional experts at Johns Hopkins University. Broccoli One of the most popular vegetables is also one of the most protein dense, with one cup of cooked broccoli containing 6 grams of protein. Roast it, sauté it, or steam it for a quick and nutritious side dish. Chia Seeds Small but mighty, 1 ounce of chia seeds packs nearly 5 grams protein. Drop a spoonful into a smoothie or combine with a liquid like juice or nut milk to make a fun-textured chia pudding. Chickpeas Cooked chickpeas are the main ingredient in hummus and boast nearly 15 grams of protein per cup. And remember, when using canned chickpeas, save the liquid -- also known as aquafaba -- for a terrific, plant-based egg white replacement. Edamame Popular in Japan and other areas of East Asia, edamame is as close you can get to a perfect food: One cup of cooked edamame contains 8 grams of fiber, 17 grams of protein, and is only 189 calories. Farro One of the lesser known ancient grains, farro needs to be on your radar. A quarter cup of uncooked farro contains 6 grams of protein. Its toothsome texture adds a pleasant chew to grain bowls and salads. Frozen Veggie Burgers There are tons of different types of pre-made frozen veggie burgers varying in ingredients, texture, and flavorful, and although their nutritional profiles differ, you can generally expect between 10 - 15 grams of protein per patty. Try a range of brands and see which one(s) fit your palate. Hemp Seed Heralded as a superfood, hemp seeds have a subtle, nutty flavor similar to pine nuts. In baking, hemp seeds can be used as a nut replacement, but it can also be added to smoothies, with 2 tablespoons containing over 6 grams of protein. Jackfruit Jackfruit is often marketed as a plant-based alternative to pulled pork, with a meaty, stringy texture fit for faux barbecue platters and sandwiches. Jackfruit is rarely sold whole, but there are a handful of brands selling products made with jackfruit in the refrigerated section of supermarkets. Jack fruit is not the most protein-dense item on this list, but it still contains 3 grams per cup. Kidney Beans These hefty beans are dense, nourishing, and nutrient-packed. One cup of cooked kidney beans contains roughly 13 grams of protein (as well as 13 grams of fiber). Lentils With tons of fiber and almost no saturated fat, look to use lentils as the foundation of multiple meals throughout the week. A cup of cooked lentils contains 18 grams of protein and more than half your recommended daily value of fiber. Mung Beans Mainly cultivated in East and Southeast Asia, the mung bean is often used as the foundation of stews, vegetable patties, or dal. One cup of cooked mung beans contains 14 grams of protein. Note: mung beans are easier to find dry rather than cooked and canned. Nut Butters Although not all nut butters are considered equal when it comes to protein content (or flavor), they generally contain around 4 grams of protein per tablespoon. Oatmeal A cup of cooked oatmeal contains 6 grams of protein; pair it with a scoop of peanut butter and a sprinkling of hemp or chia seeds for a protein-packed breakfast. Plant-Based Meat Thanks to plant-based meat, sources of vegan protein are all the rage. A typical plant-based burger patty contains 20 grams of protein. Many quick-service restaurant chains now offer versions of their classic menu items featuring some variety of plant-based meat. Quinoa The trendiest of grains (well, its technically a seed), quinoa is a splendid source of protein that can serve as the foundation of any meatless meal. A cup of cooked quinoa boasts around 8 grams of protein. Seitan The original plant-based meat replacement, seitan -- which is made from wheat gluten -- is packed with protein and can be quite tasty when properly prepared. A 3-ounce serving of seitan includes between 15 - 20 grams of protein, a number that is comparable to most animal proteins. Soy Milk The market for non-dairy nut milks has exploded in recent years, but soy milk remains the most nutritious option. One cup of soy milk has 8 grams of protein, which makes it a nice base for smoothies and shakes. Sprouted Bread Sprouted bread is a certain category of bread made from grains that have been allowed to germinate (aka sprout) before being milled into flour. Ezekiel Bread -- a common brand of sprouted bread -- contains 4 grams of protein and only 80 calories per slice. Sunflower Seeds Who wouldve thought that the innocent little sunflower seed could pack such a protein punch? A half-cup of sunflower seeds has 15 grams of proteins. Bring some in a little baggy and keep with you for a quick and nutritious snack. Tofu There are imitators and then there are originators. Tofu -- made from soy beans -- is sold in a variety of textures and forms, but no matter the type, youre guaranteed to get a solid dose of plant-based protein, with a half-cup offering around 10 grams. Our recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu (the most popular recipe on our website) will make you a lifelong tofu loyalist.   Below, weve curated a sample a menu to demonstrate how easy it is to hit your daily protein target eating only plant-based foods. Breakfast: Overnight Pumpkin Pie Oats (17 grams of protein) Lunch: Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast (13 grams of protein) Dinner: Veggie Meatballs (27 grams of protein) No time to cook? No problem. Meatless Monday On-the-Go is easier than ever. Creating a plant-based Meatless Monday masterpiece? Let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sesame Tofu

December 7 2019 VegKitchen 

Sesame Tofu Quick, easy, and tasty--this is the perfect recipe for when you are in a hurry, but still want to eat something healthy.   Save Print Sesame Tofu Serves: 4   Ingredients 250 g firm tofu 1 clove garlic, finely chopped 2 tbsp soy sauce 1 tsp sesame oil 2 pinches cayenne pepper 1 tbsp sunflower oil 2 tbsp sesame seeds Instructions Drain the firm tofu and sponge it with a paper towel. The post Sesame Tofu appeared first on VegKitchen.

Cardamom Maple Pecan Granola

November 1 2019 Vegan Richa 

Cardamom Maple Pecan GranolaCardamom Maple Pecan Granola. Use other spices of choice in this delicious granola. It makes a great gift. No Refined Sugar or oil. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe. Jump to Recipe Snacking can sometimes be the harder to figure out, compared to meals. Its the in between meal time when you dont want something heavy but still satisfying enough. Granola and granola bars made from scratch work out really well for those times. Homemade granola has sugar you can control and oil you can omit. Granola over vegan yogurt, porridge, chia pudding or as is from the jar, is amazing to have around. Whether you like a sweet Date Caramel Granola  , or a granola bar (Sunbutter Granola Bars), or want spicy savory snack with this Sriracha Orange Quinoa Peanut Granola or get adventurous with this Lentil cranberry Granola! There are plenty of options and variations! This easy granola has oats, pumpkin or sunflower seeds and pecans. The maple and pecans add a buttery caramel like flavor, the pecans get candied when covered with maple and cardamom complements the flavor profile amazingly. Change it up with seeds or nuts of choice. Lets make some granola.Continue reading: Cardamom Maple Pecan GranolaThe post Cardamom Maple Pecan Granola appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Grilled Sweet Potato & Herb Salad

September 23 2019 Meatless Monday 

Serve this plateful of goodness with a bowl of vegetarian chili or black bean soup. Its a delightfully hearty meal thats ideal for fall. This recipe comes to us from Jackie Newgent .   Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 1 - 1 (8- to 9-oz) sweet potato, unpeeled, cut into 1/­­2-thick rounds - 2 teaspoons avocado oil or high-oleic sunflower oil - 1/­­8 teaspoon sea salt - 1/­­8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper - 3 tablespoons spicy avocado dressing (see below) - 1 scallion, thinly sliced - 1/­­4 cup loosely-packed fresh herb leaves, such as small basil leaves and cilantro leaves - 1 tablespoon pan-toasted pine nuts or roasted pumpkin seeds   Directions: Add the sweet potato rounds to a saucepan and cover with cold water. (Hint: Salt the water for extra taste.) Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer uncovered until nearly tender, about 8 minutes. Drain the sweet potato rounds well. Brush both sides of the sweet potato rounds with the oil. Grill or pan-grill the rounds over medium-high heat until rich grill marks form on both sides, about 8 minutes total. Sprinkle with the salt and pepper. Set aside to cool. Arrange the grilled sweet potato rounds* on a plate. Drizzle with the spicy avocado dressing. Sprinkle with the scallion, herb leaves, and pine nuts. Adjust seasoning and serve.   If you’d like to make the spicy avocado dressing that goes with the salad the recipe is: 1/­­4 of a large avocado 1/­­4 cup chilled unsweetened (jasmine) green tea 1 tablespoon lime juice 1 teaspoon cider vinegar 1/­­8 teaspoon each sea salt ground cayenne pepper Blend all ingredients together. Adjust seasoning. Makes 2 servings, about 3 tablespoons each.     The post Grilled Sweet Potato & Herb Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Three Great Summer Spreads

May 27 2019 Green Kitchen Stories 

We created these crisp bread topping recipes for a celebration last week and thought you might enjoy them too. A Swedish summer spread, a herby green pea hummus with a sting and the classic bell pepper and sunflower seed spread from our first book.

Earl Grey Tea Sandwich Cookies, Vegan and Gluten-Free + Giveaway

February 20 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Earl Grey Tea Sandwich Cookies, Vegan and Gluten-Free + Giveaway This post was created in partnership with Arbor Teas /­­ Giveaway below! We come from a culture, where tea is everything. In Russia, tea is probably the most commonly consumed beverage. It’s like water, but much more popular than water. Everyone drinks it – adults, kids, and even coffee lovers. It’s acceptable to have tea after every meal, as well as as during breaks throughout the day, any time of day. If you attempt to stop by someone’s house for a quick second, you will most likely end up staying for tea. And tea time is sacred. It’s when 90% of conversations happen (or at least it seems that way). Tea time is never just tea, either, there’s always some kind of treat involved. It can really be anything sweet: hard candy, chocolate, cookies, waffles, cake, powdered sugar-dusted cranberries… Dessert is so intertwined with tea for us, that to this day we can’t enjoy anything sweet without a hot beverage. It just doesn’t taste good. We’d rather have no dessert than dessert without tea. This is especially true for cookies. Today we are super excited to be collaborating on a tea time-ready, sandwich cookie recipe with Arbor Teas, a Michigan-based tea company that carries the loveliest selection of organic and fair-trade loose leaf tea. There’s a giveaway, too! When we were dreaming up these cookies, we immediately thought about tea sandwiches – you know, those miniature, crustless sandwiches that usually accompany fancy tea. With that format in mind, we went for a layered ‘sandwich’ cookie. Earl Grey tea is probably our favorite, most nostalgia-inducing black tea, and since the Arbor Teas Earl Grey smelled so incredibly fresh (the best we’ve ever had!), we were very excited to incorporate that flavor in some way. The result: buttery, vegan and gluten-free cookies, layered with a luxurious Earl Grey cream, with a kiss of dark chocolate. They are the perfect cross between virtuous and indulgent. And of course, they are best enjoyed with or dipped in tea. Arbor Teas is one of those dream sponsors that we feel lucky to work with. Not only do they take pride in the quality of their product, but they also put a huge emphasis on sustainability. They source only organic and fair-trade tea, package it in backyard-compostable packaging, and run their facility on solar power. We like to believe that companies like this are the future. Besides their earl grey, we’ve been loving the Chaga Chicory, Makaibari Estate Silver Tips, and Golden Ginger Turmeric teas. G i v e a w a y  :  Today’s giveaway is for one 4 oz Earl Grey tea and a stainless steel infuser from Arbor Teas, as well as one copy of our cookbook, Simply Vibrant. To enter, leave a comment on this post telling us about your favorite kind of tea or a tea that intrigues you from the Arbor Teas shop, until February 28th, 2019. Giveaway is U.S. only. Earl Grey Tea Sandwich Cookies, Vegan and Gluten-Free   Print Serves: about 12 complete cookies Ingredients for the Earl Grey cream heaping ¼ cup cashews - soaked in boiling water for 10 min and drained ½ tablespoon arrowroot powder ⅓ cup very strong Earl Grey tea 1 tablespoon lemon juice 2 tablespoons maple syrup 2 tablespoons coconut oil fat from one 13.5 oz can full fat coconut milk for the cookies 1/­­2 packed cup pitted dates 2 tablespoons flax/­­chia meal (aka ground flax/­­chia) 1 cup old-fashioned gf rolled oats 1/­­2 cup ground walnuts/­­almond meal + 1/­­2 cup ground oats/­­oat flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/­­2 teaspoon baking soda 1 tablespoon loose leaf Earl Grey tea - ground in a mortar and pestle (optional) pinch of sea salt - to taste 1 cup nut butter like almond, cashew, peanut, sunflower or tahini 1/­­4 cup plus 1 tablespoon melted neutral coconut oil, divided 1 cup dairy-free dark chocolate chips Instructions to make the Earl Grey cream Place the cashews, arrowroot, tea, lemon juice, maple syrup, and coconut oil in an upright blender. Blend until smooth. Place the coconut fat in a medium bowl and whisk it with a whisk to make it a little fluffier. Add the blended mixture to the bowl and whisk it in. Place the bowl in the refrigerator for about 1 hour, until the cream is hardened but scoopable. You will likely have some cream left over after making the cookies. You can freeze it and use it as cupcake/­­cake icing, serve on the side of pancakes, waffles, crepes, etc. to make the cookies Place the dates into a small, heat proof bowl and pour hot purified water over them, then leave to soak for 10 minutes. Place the flax/­­chia meal into another small bowl and add 6 tablespoons of purified water. Whisk to combine and let sit to gel for 15 minutes. Preheat oven to 350° F (180° C). Combine the oats, flour or meal, baking powder, baking soda, Earl Grey powder (if using), and salt in a large bowl, mix well. Combine the nut butter, ¼ cup of coconut oil, drained soaked dates and the gelled flax/­­chia in a bowl of a food processor fit with an S blade. Process until smooth. Add the mixture into the bowl with the oats and flours, and stir to combine. The mixture will be stiff and sticky. Prepare a baking sheet by covering it with parchment paper. Use a small ice cream scoop to scoop uniform batter portions onto the baking sheet. If you dont have an ice cream scoop, portion out about 2 tablespoons of batter for each cookie. Leave enough space between each portion for flattening. Using a lightly oiled hand, flatten each cookie into uniform circles, about ¼ in thickness. Bake for 10-12 minutes, or until the outside of the cookies is dry to the touch. Let the cookies cool for about 5-7 minutes on the baking sheet, then transfer to a cooling rack to cool completely. You will probably need to bake the cookies in 2 batches. To make the cookie sandwiches, place a generous amount of the Earl Grey cream into the center of a cookie, then use another cookie to sandwich the cream and let it spread out to the sides, pressing gently. The cookies should be facing bottom side in. Repeat with the rest of the cookies, placing them back on their baking sheet. Place in the refrigerator while you prepare the chocolate, for the Earl Grey cream to harden a little. Prepare a drying rack, lined with parchment paper underneath. Melt the chocolate chips in a small saucepan or bowl on a double boiler, together with the remaining 1 tablespoon of coconut oil. Dip each cookie into the melted chocolate about half way, letting the excess chocolate drip off. Place on the drying rack. Repeat with the rest of the cookies. Transfer the rack to the refrigerator for a few minutes for the chocolate to harden. Keep the cookies in an airtight container in the refrigerator or a cool room. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles Melon Basil Summer Rolls Creamy, Garlicky Fettuccine with Roasted Green Vegetables .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Earl Grey Tea Sandwich Cookies, Vegan and Gluten-Free + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Lentil and sunflower seed “meatloaf”

December 8 2018 VegKitchen 

Lentil  and sunflower seed “meatloaf” What I like about this kind of recipe is that it is extremely flexible. You can keep the base and make meatballs, burgers, or stuff it into vegetables. Here, I cooked it in a muffin mold, but you can opt for a lentil loaf cooked in a bigger mold. Just dont forget to increase the cooking time! Save Print Lentil and sunflower seed meatloaf Serves: 4-6   Ingredients 2 tbsp. of olive oil 1 1/­­2 cups of onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed ⅔ cup carrots, grated 1 packet (227g) mushrooms, finely chopped 1 cup of lentils, cooked, rinsed and drained 1 1/­­2 cup sunflower seeds 2 slices of whole grain bread, shredded into small pieces ¼ cup ground flaxseed ½ cup of oatmeal 2 tbsp. of tamari 1 tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1/­­4 cup of vegetable broth 1 tbsp. oregano 1/­­2 tsp. thyme 1/­­2 tsp. dry mustard Salt and pepper, to taste 1/­­4 cup of ketchup 1/­­4 cup of unsweetened applesauce 2 tbsp. balsamic vinegar 2 tbsp. tablespoon maple syrup Instructions In a skillet, heat olive oil over medium high heat. Add onion and mushrooms. Cook until the onion has begun to turn a little golden, about 10 minutes. Add the […] The article Lentil and sunflower seed “meatloaf” appeared first on VegKitchen.

Matcha Butter Balls + Changes

October 15 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Matcha Butter Balls + Changes Hey friends! It’s been a little while. We took a break from posting, while we were in Italy hosting our first Abruzzo retreat. It was a dream come true, and we’ll be sharing more about that very soon. Before we get into our favorite snack lately, we wanted to talk a little bit about growth and evolution as it relates to this space. We’ve been posting recipes here for close to nine years. It’s a practice that has almost unfailingly kept us inspired and excited about the daily ritual of cooking and nourishing ourselves and others. This whole blog is sort of a family album at this point, since we can pinpoint certain posts to the life events that were happening around us while cooking the dishes. It’s also surreal to be able to put something out there and know that a certain number of people will check out the recipe or even cook it in their own kitchens. It’s a special form of connection that we have with the world, and every time we hear from someone who has made and enjoyed one of the recipes is amazing. It never feels normal or old, truly. Throughout these years, our interests have expanded beyond but not away from cooking. There are so many things that have had a magical effect on our lives in the same way that healthy, plant-based food made with our own hands has. These things range from small daily practices or rituals, to life-changing books that we’ve read and dog-eared excessively. At this point, we feel compelled to share more about those things here, as well as about some of our struggles, and expand the type of things we talk about. The food is not going anywhere, though! We already do a little bit of that with the self-care interviews, which you seem to enjoy, but we now feel ready to share from our own perspectives as well. We toyed around with the idea of making a whole new website for this stuff, but in the end, Golubka Kitchen is where our hearts are, and it feels right to have it grow alongside us. Here are the things you can expect to see on here going forward. We hope you’ll follow along, but if some of this is not your cup of tea, that’s ok too. - Weekly plant-based recipes - Seasonal meal plans - Self-care interviews - Skin-care and home-care recipes - Rituals/­­practices that we find supportive to our wellbeing - Book Club (read along with us, our first book of the month is Renegade Beauty by Nadine Artemis) - More videos! Onto the matcha butter balls. Keeping nourishing snacks at arm’s reach is definitely a priority around here, since it helps prevent things like: snacking on handfuls of chocolate chips, impulse purchases of expensive and/­­or less than healthy snacks with wasteful packaging, hangriness, lightheadedness, etc. etc. I’m absolutely in love with cacao butter as an ingredient and use it in desserts and snacks (and even in homemade skincare products) all the time. This generally involves gently melting the cacao butter in order to incorporate it into the other ingredients. It was Elenore who recently turned me onto the idea of skipping the melting step for recipes that involve a food processor. For example, in this recipe, the chopped up cacao butter just gets thrown into a food processor with the rest of the ingredients for a few minutes, where it gets melted by the heat of the motor and makes a beautiful, quick snack ball batter. I love this shortcut. These balls are full of good stuff, like essential fatty acid-rich seeds and energy-boosting matcha powder. The texture is velvety thanks to the cacao butter, and the flavor is only slightly sweet and a bit grassy, thanks to the matcha. One to two of these balls usually work well as a mid-afternoon pick-me-up (be careful with the amounts if you are sensitive to caffeine), and they are kid-approved as well. I use this matcha. It’s definitely not the best ceremonial grade matcha out there, but it’s the best one I’ve found for the price, since good matcha can be very pricy. Hope you’ll give these a try! Matcha Butter Balls   Print Ingredients 1 cup raw pumpkin seeds ⅔ cup raw sunflower seeds ¼ cup hemp hearts ¼ cup flax seeds 1 cup chopped or shredded cacao butter 3 tablespoons maple syrup, or more to taste 2 tablespoons maca powder 2 teaspoons matcha powder 1 teaspoon ashwagandha powder (optional) Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a food processor and process for 3-4 minutes, or until the heat of the motor melts the cacao butter completely, and you have a nicely formed batter. Taste for sweetness and adjust if needed. Shape the batter into bite-sized balls or bars. Sprinkle with more matcha, if desired. Keep in an airtight container in a freezer or refrigerator. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Vegan Aubergine Polpette - Three Ways

October 12 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Vegan Aubergine Polpette - Three Ways Our first thought was to do a classic Lady and the Tramp Spaghetti and Meatball dish with this polpette recipe, but then we decided that it was too expected. So here is instead another spin on our one makes three-series. Where we use one staple food in three different recipes. We really love this series because it reflects so much how we actually eat. It’s not always an entirely new meal every day but more of a flow where the same components are repeated with new pairings. These polpette or vegan meatballs are perfect for this. They are good on their own - tender and very flavorful. And they are also insanely versatile, rolled into a wrap, tangled into pasta, paired with a spicy tomato sauce and hummus or tossed in a crunchy vegan take on a caesar salad. Vegan Aubergine Polpette Makes around 40 balls 2 medium sized aubergines 2 red onions 4 tbsp olive oil 100 g /­­ 1 cup almond flour 120 g /­­ 1 cup cooked lentils 4 tbsp pickled capers, drained and finely chopped 2 tbsp raisins zest from 1 lemon 15 leaves basil leaves salt Preheat the oven to 200°C  /­­ 400°F. Peel and chop the onion finely and chop the aubergine into small dices. Stir fry both in a large skillet with the oil for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until very soft. When soft, add to a food processor with the rest of the ingredients. Pulse a few times to mix everything together. You want a very chunky sticky texture but dont pulse too much or youll end up with a mushy mixture. Remove the knife blades and shape 30-40 small balls with your hands. Place them on a baking tray covered with baking paper and bake for 25 minutes. Store in the fridge or freeze them. Scroll down for three ways to serve them. Hummus with spicy tomato sauce, polpette and cucumber salad 1 batch vegan aubergine polpette (see recipe above) 1 batch Hummus, see this recipe or store-bought hummus Spicy tomato sauce Serves 4 1 tbsp olive oil 1 red onion 1 garlic clove 1 tsp cumin 1 tsp harissa paste (or 1 red chili) 2 x 400 g tins tomatoes 1/­­2 tsp sea salt, to taste Heat the oil in a large sauce pan on medium heat. Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic and add them to the sauce pan  together with the spices. Let sauté for a few minutes until soft not browned and then add  the tomatoes and salt. Let cook for at least 20 minutes, until rich and fragrant. It will become sweeter and rounder in flavour the longer you leave it on. Store the sauce you are not using tonight in glass bottles in the fridge. Cucumber salad 1/­­2 cucumber 2 tsp olive oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice + zest 1 pinch sea salt 1 small handful fresh dill Finely dice the cucumber and place in a bowl. Add olive oil, lemon juice and zest, salt and dill and toss to combine. Arrange the hummus in shallow bowls and make a well in the middle. Place a couple of spoonfuls tomato sauce in the well, add a few aubergine polpette and a few spoonfuls cucumber sallad. Vegan Wrap with Polpette, Ajvar and Krauts Serves 4 4 wrap breads /­­ tortilla breads, gluten free or whole grain 4 lettuce leaves 4 cavalo nero or kale, stems removed 1 cup cooked white quinoa 4 tbsp ajvar dressing 1/­­2 cucumber, cut into sticks 4 tbsp sauerkraut (see recipe here) 1 batch aubergine polpette (see recipe above) Place one lettuce leave and one kale leave on each tortilla bread, then place 2-3 tbsp quinoa in the middle, a dollop ajvar, cucumber slices, sauerkraut and top with a couple of aubergine polpette. Fold the top and bottom edges over the filling. Roll the whole tortilla from left to right to wrap in the filling. Roll some parchment paper around them and tie with a string to hold them together. Vegan Ceasar Salad with Polpette Serves 4 1 head Cosmopolitan lettuce 1 batch aubergine polpette (see recipe above) 2 avocados, stone/­­peel removed and sliced 2 small apples, cored and sliced 2 tbsp sunflower seeds, toasted Dressing 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml cold pressed neutral oil (organic rapeseed) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml soy milk, unsweetened 2-3 tsp lemon juice 1 tsp dijon mustard 1 tbsp pickled capers, drained 1 large pinch salt Add all dressing ingredients to a tall glas or blender cup. Mix with a stick blender on high speed for about 15 seconds or until you have a creamy white dressing. Taste and adjust the flavours to your preference. Add more oil and blend again if you like it thicker. Tear the lettuce into bite size pieces and place in a mixing bowl. Add 2 tbsp vegan mayo dressing and toss to cover. Then transfer to a serving platter and arrange avocado slices, apple slices and aubergine polpette and last, scatter over toasted sunflower seeds.

Creamy Spinach Penne with Watermelon

August 11 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Creamy Spinach Penne with Watermelon Hi friends, hope you’ve had a great summer. We took a little break from the blog as we have been in Copenhagen and Barcelona. But we are back now with a great little dinner recipe. It’s a version of something we have been eating all summer. It has been record-breaking hot in Europe so pairing lukewarm buckwheat penne with juicy and crunchy watermelon has been feeling very right, very often.  Satisfying, simple and soothing. Our kids love this buckwheat penne and that also plays a part why it’s been on repeat. In fact, our little Noah (soon two years old!) starts crying if we serve him spaghetti or any other pasta: “Noooooh, [I want] my pasta“. In this version we are dressing (almost drenching) the pasta in a herby spinach, herb and almond milk sauce that is inspired by something we saw in Deliciously Ella’s feed a while back. Its very good, creamy and quick! We then stir in chickpeas and avocado and top everything with watermelon, feta cheese, almonds and heirloom tomatoes. It is a pretty awesome little dinner that can come together in 15 minutes if you are quick with the knife and good at multitasking. There are plenty of ways to spin this. o If you cannot find buckwheat penne you can of course use regular or whole wheat penne. o Vegans can just skip the cheese (and perhaps add in a little nutritional yeast for extra flavour). o Fresh or roasted corn could be a great addition when they are in season. o You can swap basil and mint for cilantro and parsley for a more Middle Eastern take. o If you are allergic to nuts, use oat milk or regular milk and swap the almonds for toasted sunflower seeds or pumpkin seeds. o For a wintery version of this, you can add in roasted broccoli and pomegranate seeds instead of watermelon. Buckwheat Penne with Creamy Spinach Sauce & Watermelon Serves 4 Buckwheat pasta penne for 4 persons (approx 400 g /­­14 oz) Creamy Spinach Sauce 1 onion 2 garlic cloves 1 tbsp olive oil 125 g /­­ 3 packed cups fresh spinach 400 ml /­­ 1 1/­­2  cups almond milk a good handful each of fresh basil and mint 1-2 tsp maple syrup 1 small lemon, juice a large pinch sea salt & pepper To Serve 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tin cooked chickpeas 1/­­2 watermelon 1 avocado 10 heirloom cherry tomatoes 15 toasted almonds 10 fresh mint 100 g feta cheese Boil salted water in a large saucepan, add the pasta and cook according to the instructions on the package. Meanwhile prepare the sauce. Peel and chop onion and garlic. Heat olive oil in a saucepan. Sauté onions and garlic on medium high heat until translucent and light brown. Then lower the heat, add spinach and let it wilt down, pour in almond milk and let simmer for a couple of minutes. Add the remaining ingredients, take it off the heat and use a stick (immersion) blender to mix it smooth. Taste to check that the flavours are balanced. You can add more lemon juice, herbs, salt or maple syrup if you prefer. When the pasta is ready, drain the water in a sieve, give it a quick rinse and transfer the pasta back to the saucepan along with a splash of olive oil. Pour the spinach sauce over the cooked pasta and stir to combine. Drain the chickpeas and cut the avocado into cubes and add them to the creamy pasta. Cut the watermelon into cubes, divide the tomatoes in halves, chop almonds and mint and crumble the feta cheese. Arrange all those ingredients on top of the creamy pasta penne. Serve and dive in!

Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats

March 21 2018 My New Roots 

Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats So the big move-in happened, but we are far from moved in. I am writing this from my dirty dining room table, watching and listening to a collection of relative strangers drill, saw, spackle, sand, stain, and paint around me, like a tornado of humans in tool belts. Drywall dust dances in the shafts of light pouring into our new space, as I try to ignore the deafening screech from a floor sander behind a paper-thin plastic partition a few feet away from my head. Ahhh...home renovation. I could go on about the frustrations of living in a construction site, how my filth-tolerance has reached unthinkable heights, and how if I hear someone tell me that it should all be complete in two more weeks I may collapse, but I know that whenever it is done, it will all be worth it. Really and truly. I made these Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats a few days before we relocated from our rental to our home, knowing that I would need to have a stockpile of snacks that didnt require refrigeration, or even cutting, since we would be living without electricity, and I had no idea where to locate a knife in the unpacked boxes stacked high in the basement. Since then, Ive thanked myself every time Ive sunken my teeth into each chewy-crunchy-sticky bite, the cacao releasing its relaxation-inducing alkaloids and minerals into my frazzled bloodstream, the hemp seeds delivering their much-needed anti-inflammatory omega-3s, and the nut butter grounding my nerves with all its protein and healthy fat. In these uncertain times, Ive been certain that a delicious snack was ready to satisfy me at the drop of a hammer. My original inspiration for these bars came from my fellow Canadian health-food blogger and vegan recipe guru Angela Liddon, of Oh She Glows fame. Her Almond Butter Crisp Rice Treats were a fun Sunday afternoon snack project for my four-year old son and I, and since then Ive been making many variations of them. My goal was to add more protein, healthy fats and filling fiber to the bars, so I tossed in heaps of hemp and chia seeds until I found the right balance. Losing their chewy-crisp goodness would have been a real shame, since its the texture of these treats that is so very crave-able! So I tinkered a few times, and found the exact right amount that maintained the satisfying chew. I also wanted to add chocolate. Because chocolate. After nailing the additions, I knew that top needed some flair: not just visually, but something to cut the richness a tad. I had some freeze-dried raspberries kicking around my pantry that I had bought on a whim in the US some months back, and immediately knew that they would be the perfect supplement with their vibrant pink hue and bright acidity. Bingo! Freeze-dried fruit (and vegetables) have been popping up all over the place lately, since they taste incredible, have a long shelf life, and are a nutritiously convenient way of getting another serving of produce a day, especially for kids. However, if you cant find freeze-dried raspberries, or any substitute for that matter, you can easily replace them in this recipe with more traditional dried fruit like goji berries, roughly chopped figs, apricots, or even raisins. You could also top the bars with toasted nuts or seeds, coconut or cacao nibs. Think of these as a blank canvas for your favourite add-on flavours and textures, or keep it as simple as you like. The bars are also delicious as is, and if youre into a dark and rich flavour above all else, simply leave the toppings off. But do not under any circumstance skip the flaky salt – it is key.  Hemp hemp, hooray! Since being back in the homeland and trying to buy as much locally-produced food as possible, Ive been loving on hemp seeds lately - even more than usual! Because of their mild, nutty flavor, they blend so effortlessly with just about any food, sweet or savory. And what they lack in flavor, they make up for in protein and healthy fats, specifically those essential Omegas. Weve all heard about Omega-3s and how important they are for the health of our entire body, helping to prevent cancer asthma, depression, obesity, diabetes and so on. But! There is another star on the block, Omega-6, which seems to be less talked about due to the fact that many of us get enough (or in some cases, too much) of this essential fatty acid. Omega-3 and Omega-6 fasts are essential, meaning that our bodies dont produce them and we need to obtain them from the foods we eat. Sources of Omega-3 fats include flax seeds, pumpkin seeds, walnuts, chia, dark leafy greens, some sea vegetables and cold-water fish. Omega-6 sources include soybean, canola, corn, peanut, sunflower, and sesame oils. You can see from this list that most people in the Western world at least, are getting their fair share of Omega-6 fats, and lacking in Omega-3s. In fact, in North America it is estimated that the population consumes 10 to 20 times more Omega-6 than Omega-3, due to the popularity of processed foods. Although the correct ratio of these fats is still a matter of debate, researchers in this field agree that this ratio is far too high. We should be aiming for an Omega-6 to Omega-3 ratio between 2:1 and 4:1. So why is the balance so important? Because the ratio of Omega-6s to Omega-3s helps determine the flexibility of our cell membranes, meaning that ALL communication throughout the body depends on at least in part on this balance being correct. Coronary heart disease, chronic inflammation, obesity, and healthy genetic processes have all been linked to the delicate equilibrium of essential fatty acids. How can we improve the situation then? Just making simple, small changes to our diets will greatly improve the balance of fats in our bodies. Instead of relying solely on foods high in Omega-6s like peanut butter and foods made with vegetable oils (like corn, sunflower and soybean oil) swap them with foods high in Omega-3s like walnut butter and flaxseed oil, and sprinkle chia seeds on your breakfast bowl or a salad. For omnivores replacing chicken, beef and pork with wild-caught, cold water fish will make a big difference too. But the most ideal food to choose when trying to achieve that perfect balance of these fats then, is hemp! Hemps Omega-6 to Omega-3 ratio is a healthy 3.75:1. You can find hemp in many forms these days: un-hulled and hulled seeds (also known as hemp hearts), hemp oil, hemp flour, hemp protein powder, hemp milk, and hemp seed butter. Remember that choosing hemp in its most natural form (the un-hulled or hulled hemp seeds) is your best bet to ensure a high-quality, whole food product. I like to sprinkle hemp seeds on just about everything, from my breakfast porridge to my salads and sandwiches. They add an amazing creaminess to smoothies, raw custards and cheesecakes. You can even make your own milk from hemp and you dont even need to soak the seeds first! Simply blend 1 part hulled hemp seeds to just under four parts water, with an optional sweetener like maple syrup, dates, or honey, and enjoy. Simple and delicious. You can get the full hemp milk recipe here. The last thing I want to mention is the crisp brown rice. There are a few types of it on the market, and one reason Im happy to be back in Canada, is because they have the right kind. By that I mean really crispy rice crisps. For whatever reason, the ones I found in Europe would always get soggy very quickly, whereas the ones here maintain their crunch even after combining them with wet ingredients like maple syrup and brown rice syrup. Ive also found high-vibe sprouted brown rice crisps over here from a company called One Degree (not sponsored). They work really well too, but cost a fortune. I alternate between those, and the ones Ive found at my local bulk food store that arent sprouted or even organic, but they get the job done when Im renovating a house and feeling strapped for cash. You may need to experiment with a couple kinds before finding the one. In the end, the bars should be relatively crunchy-crisp - not mushy at all (even though they will still be delicious). If you like Rice Crispy Treats, youre going to love these bars. Theyre the grown-up version of your favourite childhood treat, with a mega boost of nourishing superfoods. Its an indulgence you can feel good about feeding both you and your family...but I wont tell anyone if you hide them and eat them all yourself. Ive definitely never done that before. Nope. Never.     Print recipe     Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats Makes about 16 bars Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. virgin coconut oil, plus a little more for greasing 2/­­3 cup /­­ 160ml unsalted nut or seed butter of your choice 2/­­3 cup /­­ 160ml brown rice syrup 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 tsp. vanilla extract heaping 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­3 cup /­­ 40g raw cacao powder (or cocoa powder) 4 cups /­­ 200g puffed brown rice crisps 1 cup /­­ 150g hulled hemp seeds 3 Tbsp. chia seeds a few pinches flaky sea salt (Maldon works perfectly) 3-4 Tbsp. freeze-dried raspberries Directions: 1. Rub a little coconut oil in an 7″x11″ (20x30cm) baking pan. 2. Melt the coconut oil in a large saucepan over low heat. Add the nut butter, brown rice syrup, maple syrup, vanilla and fine salt, and stir to combine. Remove from heat. Stir in the cacao powder until thoroughly incorporated. 3. Add the puffed brown rice, hemp seeds, chia, and stir quickly to combine, then pour the mixture into your baking pan and press firmly (using the back of a large spoon or spatula rubbed with a little coconut oil really helps). Once smooth and even, generously sprinkle the top with the freeze-dried raspberries and flaky salt. Place in the fridge or freezer to firm up, then slice into bars or squares and enjoy. Store the bars in a tightly sealed container in the fridge or freezer. Show my your bars on Instagram: #cacaohempcrispytreats *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Toronto! I’ve just launched my first collaborative project since moving back to Canada, with my friends at ELXR Juice Lab: the Activated Power Bowl! This delicious breakfast (or snack!) is made lovingly with activated grains, superfood stir-ins, and tasty toppings. There are three mouthwatering varieties to choose from, or you can build your own bowl. I am so thrilled to offer my fellow Torontonians a vegan, gluten-free, whole food breakfast with activated grains – this is truly the first of its kind! The Activated Power Bowl is available at all four ELXR locations across the city, so if you’re in town go pick one up and enjoy. We had a very successful launch over the weekend – huge thanks to everyone who came out to taste and support! The post Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats appeared first on My New Roots.


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