summer - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Vegan Pizza Snack Bites

Pin wheel sandwich recipe | pinwheel sandwich | pinwheel sandwiches

Vegetarian Thai Veggie Burgers

Baked Falafel with Smoky Tahini Dressing










summer vegetarian recipes

Spring Berry Salad with Lemon Verbena Vinaigrette

yesterday 13:00 Oh My Veggies 

This light salad recipe is made with fresh spring berries and a lemon verbena vinaigrette. It’s the perfect way to use lemon verbena from the garden! All I Want is Salad We got back from Georgia on Monday night and I’m now ready for my next vacation. I think after you travel, you’re supposed to feel well-rested and satisfied, but traveling only makes me want to travel more. I spent most of the car ride home Googling hotels in Hawaii and the cost of airfare to the Florida Keys. So I guess I haven’t had my fill of travel this summer. But I did leave Georgia with my fill of fabulous desserts, courtesy of my Aunt Darlene. (You’re watching her on The American Baking Competition, right?!) She made mini-cheesecakes and gorgeous stenciled cookies and brownies topped with gold leaf for my cousin’s wedding. Oh, and there was cake too, of course. And then the next day, we got to eat the rejects--more cookies, more brownies, and orange blossom macarons. So! Much! Food! Bingeing on sweets is always the best motivation for getting back on track with my diet. When we were leaving Savannah, I told Chris that all I wanted […]

New Ebook: Weeknight Magic Vol. 1

May 27 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

New Ebook: Weeknight Magic Vol. 1 Our new ebook is here! It’s a collection of straightforward, plant-based recipes for busy people who love to cook. Each recipe was developed to be weeknight-friendly, with shorter cooking times and easier prep. Whole, plant foods are featured prominently throughout the ebook and make up the bulk of the meals within. We’ve been working on this project since last summer, and it’s so exciting to finally share it with you. We spent a lot of time putting every recipe through a weeknight filter, streamlining the ingredients and techniques and much as possible without sacrificing flavor. We are in love with every recipe, and we hope that they’ll bring some ease and joy to your weeknight dinners and beyond. You can check out a few sneak peek photos from the ebook, plus the full recipe index below. Click Here to Buy Recipe Index *all recipes are vegan and can be gluten-free if needed - Staple Red Lentils with Crispy Coconut and Chili Oil - Creamy Tomato Pasta - Baked Tofu with Crispy Kale - Cauliflower, Tomato and Chickpea Stew - Portobello and Red Lentil Bolognese - Sweet Potato Nachos - Cauliflower Caesar Salad with Chickpea Croutons - Weeknight Chili - Zucchini Mac & Cheese - Zaatar-Roasted Vegetables and Chickpeas with Tahini Sauce - Saag Tofu - Quinoa Pilaf with Lemony Green Beans - Cold Nut Butter Noodles - Maple-Mustard Baked Tempeh and Broccoli Bowls - Brothy Coconut Turmeric Noodles - Ratatouille-ish Summer Stew - Creamy Polenta with Smoky Mushrooms and Chickpeas - The Coziest Rice and Beans - Braised Lentils with Mushrooms, Leeks and Potatoes - Minestrone with Rosemary Walnuts - Coconut Rice - Coconut Bacon - Knife Salsa Verde - Cashew Crema - Cheesy Cashew Dust Click Here to Buy The post New Ebook: Weeknight Magic Vol. 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

The Absolute Best Recipes You Can Make with Your Forgotten Pantry Staples

May 25 2020 Meatless Monday 

The Absolute Best Recipes You Can Make with Your Forgotten Pantry StaplesYour pantry is full of forgotten treasures: the can of kidney beans hiding behind the rigatoni; the unopened pouch of quinoa tucked off in the corner; the lonely tin of canned corn... But these ingredients, along with other overlooked pantry staples, can be used to make some pretty marvelous meals -- if you know how to prepare them. As more people are cooking at home, the Meatless Monday team set out to ask our followers which of their pantry items theyve found to be the trickiest to cook. Our surveys have revealed that people arent quite sure what to do with canned corn, quinoa and canned kidney beans. We sought the assistance from some of our favorite chefs, bloggers, and Instagram influencers to help us compile a list of superb plant-based recipes featuring popular, yet underutilized, pantry staples. Check out the list below and get cooking! Corn Recipes   TexMex Chickpea Corn Fritters from Kevin Curry - Fit Men Cook When it comes to plant-based patties, fritters always have more fun. These Tex-Mex chickpea corn fritters from Fit Men Cook become nice and crisp after a quick spin in the air fryer (or oven). Canned or frozen corn work for this one, but the big spice blend -- smoked paprika, chili powder, cumin, oregano -- is definitely a must. Source: Fit Men Cook Corn, Avocado, and Tomato Salad from Rachel Paul - The College Nutritionist Want something a little lighter for the summer season? Try this corn, avocado and tomato salad from the College Nutritionist . Source: College Nutritionist Garlicky Corn and Tuna Pasta from Lenny Wu - Vegamelon This isnt you moms tuna casserole. Pairing a vegan protein with sweet corn and spices makes this garlicky corn & tuna pasta from Vegamelon a must try. Source: Vegamelon Easy Vegan Jalape?o Cornbread from Jenn Sebestyen - Veggie Inspired This recipe for vegan jalape?o cornbread from Veggie Inspired uses canned corn and jalape?o for a sweet punch of heat. Source: Veggie Inspired Crockpot Chili from Makenna Hale Corn and chili were meant for each other. This crockpot chili from Makenna Hale is vegan and free of both soy and gluten. Source: Makenna Hale   Vegan Lentil Shepherds Pie from Naturally Zuzu Hearty and delicious, this vegan lentil shepherds pie from Naturally Zuzu will keep your taste buds craving more. Source: Naturally Zuzu Pro tip from Karla Dumas and the Humane Society Culinary Team: Roast canned corn to naturally caramelize it and bring out the sweetness. Season with salt, pepper and lime juice; add beans and cilantro for a quick side dish. Quinoa Recipes   Instant Pot Vegan White Bean Quinoa from Nisha Vora - Rainbow Plant Life You can never have enough chili recipes. This recipe for instant pot vegan white bean quinoa chili from Rainbow Plant Life uses coconut milk and cannellini beans, making it extra creamy and delicious. Source: Rainbow Plant Life Sweet Potato Quinoa Latkes from Joy Bauer Holidays, brunch, late-night snack, doesnt matter; these savory sweet potato latkes from Joy Bauer are the perfect place to put that quinoa. The original recipe calls for egg whites, but to make these latkes completely plant-based, use one of these vegan egg replacements . Source: Joy Bauer Fig and Raisin Quinoa Couscous from My Organic Diary Completely gluten free, this recipe from My Organic Diary marries the flavors of North Africa with protein-packed quinoa. Golden raisins, cinnamon, and figs makes this flavorful side dish perfect for pool-side dining. Source: My Organic Diary Cherry Mint Quinoa Salad from Lisa Drayer In addition to her cherry mint quinoa salad , Lisa Drayer covered the Meatless Monday pantry challenge in her recent CNN article, How to eat less meat and more plants , that also featured Chef Adam Kenworthy s quinoa recipe suggestion and physician and chef Dr. Robert Grahams advice on the health benefits of plant-based eating. Source: Lisa Drayer Peanut Butter Quinoa Cookies from DJ Blatner These peanut butter quinoa cookies from DJ Blatner are seriously inventive and delicious. By using a combination of quinoa, oats, and flax seeds, youre getting a solid helping of fiber packaged in a sweet, nutty cookie. Source: Dawn Jackson Blatner Teriyaki Fried Quinoa from The Foodie Takes Flights Skip the takeout and sauté your own version of fried rice, or, in this case, teriyaki fried quinoa . Throw in a colorful collection of vegetables: corn, carrots, peas, purple cabbage, and youve got yourself a rainbow of a meal courtesy of The Foodie Takes Flight . Source: The Foodie Takes Flight Kidney Bean Recipes   Easy Pantry Pasta Bake from Delicious and Healthy by Maya Clean out the pantry while making a filling family dinner. Use kidney beans (but any can of beans will do), spinach, tomato sauce, and a spice racks-worth of seasonings for this better-for-you easy pantry pasta bake from Delicious and Healthy by Maya . Source: Delicious and Healthy by Maya Comforting Black and Kidney Bean Chili from James - Healthy Living with James Cocoa powder? Cinnamon? Coriander? The unique blend of spices makes this comforting black and kidney bean chili  from Healthy Living with James a unique spin on the classic. Source: Healthy Living with James Zucchini Oat Veggie Patties from Sharon Palmer With a base of kidney beans, shredded zucchini, oats, and seeds, no two bites of these spicy zucchini oat veggie patties from Sharon Palmer will be the same. Source: Sharon Palmer Best Vegan Chili from Hannah - Two Spoons CA Is it really the best vegan chili ? Try this recipe from Two Spoons CA and decide for yourself! Source: Two Spoons CA BBQ Kidney Bean Kale Burgers from Jenn Sebestyen - Veggie Inspired These kidney bean kale burgers from our friend Jenn Sebestyen at Veggie Inspired develop a nice crunchy crust after 40 minutes in the oven. A mixture of tahini, apple cider vinegar, molasses, and liquid smoke give these patties that beloved barbecue flavor without the grill. Source: Veggie Inspired Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post The Absolute Best Recipes You Can Make with Your Forgotten Pantry Staples appeared first on Meatless Monday.

High-Vibe Condiment Classics

May 23 2020 My New Roots 

High-Vibe Condiment Classics Summer is fast-approaching (at last!) and I dont know about you, but to me this means grilling, eating outside, and enjoying all of the classic, warm-weather treats. But wait! Did you know that there are all kinds of funky ingredients hiding in the most innocuous places, like your ketchup, mustard and relish?! We shouldnt have to forgo these truly classic condiments just because were walking on the whole foods path. No way! So I decided to do a high-vibe makeover all of the condiments that youd find at a barbecue, picnic, or baseball game: ketchup, mustard, honey mustard, Dijon, relish, mayo and secret sauce, without any refined ingredients, colours, or preservatives. They are entirely vegan (except for the honey mustard), and taste absolutely incredible.  Making your own condiments from scratch is empowering, and you too will see that by whisking up your very own mustard, or blending your very own ketchup that you are incredibly capable in the kitchen! Its a serious delight to realize that youre not only qualified to make things you thought you needed to buy, but that youre also doing yourself a giant favour in cutting questionable ingredients out of your life. When I was a kid, I loved hotdogs with mustard and relish (not ketchup, that was for burgers). The vinegary tang of the yellow mustard with the sweetness of pickle relish perfectly offset the salty squishiness of a microwaved wiener. This was a typical Saturday lunch, with doughnuts for dessert, all washed down with a giant glass of milk. I wanted to recreate that nostalgia, minus pretty much everything else. The flavours bring me back to simple times and simple food. But simple food is not always so simple. Have you read the ingredients on a squeeze bottle of relish lately? Its a complicated collection of chemicals that I certainly wouldnt want in my body. High-fructose corn syrup, natural flavour, and food colouring are just a few of the ingredients that plague most tasty toppings. Food additives are everywhere, especially in shelf-stable products. If youre not going to refrigerate something or preserve it properly, it has to have things in it to prevent it from spoiling. It also has to look appealing and taste good, even after months (or years!) on a grocery store shelf. That is why it is so important to read labels and be discerning about what you choose to buy. This is not to say that these additives are inherently harmful, but they are far from natural, and Im a believer in eating as close to the earth as possible! Luckily my condiments are not only based on whole foods, but they taste amazing and are actually good for you.    Here is a small list of the food additives to watch out for and avoid, if possible. Remember to check the packages of your other summer favourites, like chips, salad dressings, sparkling beverages, soda and juice, ice cream, popsicles, and frozen yogurt.  High Fructose Corn Syrup Sometimes labeled HFCS, this highly-refined artificial sweetener has become the number one source of calories in North America. It is found in almost all processed foods, since it is cheap to make, shelf-stable, super sweet, and highly addictive. Excessive consumption has been linked to obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Watch out for it in condiments, salad dressing, bread, candy, soda, yogurt, breakfast cereals, even canned vegetables and fruit.  Natural Flavours This is a sneaky term meant to throw you off. When you see these words on an ingredient list, they refer to a naturally-derived flavouring agent that has to be extracted from plant or animal sources, designed to enhance the taste of food. Conversely, artificial flavours are synthetically created, with their original sources being manmade chemicals. Natural flavours however, are still made in laboratories by food chemists who can add any numbers of chemicals, including preservatives, solvents and other substances, which are defined as incidental additives, to what they are creating. Food manufacturers are not required to disclose whether these additives come from natural or synthetic sources, and as long as the original flavouring comes from plant or animal material, they can be classified as natural. The point is, natural flavours dont appear to be any healthier than artificial flavours, and they can still contain ingredients that may cause reactions in sensitive individuals, especially children. To avoid them, cut back on packaged products and stick to the real-deal whole foods!  Food Dyes /­­ Colours To make food look bright, fresh, and especially appealing to children, food manufacturers add dyes to obvious things like candy, sports drinks and baked goods, but also not-so-obvious things like condiments (!), pickles, cereals, salad dressing, yogurt, and chocolate milk. Some of these dyes are approved for use in certain countries, while others have banned them, making it challenging for consumers to navigate. The safety of food dyes is controversial, especially in regards to children. Studies have linked them to hyperactivity in sensitive kids, and they may cause allergic reactions in some people. Because most food dyes are found in unhealthy processed foods, its easy to avoid them if youre sticking to a more natural diet.  Hydrogenated /­­ Partially Hydrogenated Oils You know when the World Health Organization plans on eliminating these fats from the global food supply, they must be pretty problematic. Created by forcing hydrogen gas into vegetable fats under extremely high pressure to turn liquid into solid, hydrogenation creates trans fats, which increases the amount of LDL cholesterol, lowers HDL cholesterol, therefore significantly increasing the risk of coronary heart disease. Whats more is that these fats are pro-inflammatory. Although their use has been banned in several countries, trans fats still lurk in many processed foods.  As long as there is less than .5% per serving, it isnt required in to be listed in the ingredients or nutritional information. The best way to avoid them is by cutting out processed foods, especially margarine, coffee creamer, chips and crackers, frozen pizza, fast foods, baked goods, and microwave popcorn.   Health Claims – these are put on the front of the box to lure you in, and can include buzz words like natural, whole grain, low-fat, no added sugar, organic, light, low calorie, gluten-free, and enriched. Terms like these should be a red flag for you, so read the entire label, including the ingredient list, the serving size, the amount and types of sweetener and fat used. Think critically and be selective – if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.  The bottom line?! Stick to whole, or minimally-processed foods and ingredients as often as possible. Its better for you, and your family to make your own from scratch whenever possible. Not to mention, its fun to brag to everyone that youre a condiment master, a yogurt wizard, or a salad dressing whisperer.  I had so much FUN with these recipes! It was a blast to brainstorm which condiments I would attempt to health-ify, experiment with, and eventually master to make them all easy-to-make and delicious. My condiments wont last years in the fridge, but all of them passed the two-week mark with flying colours (all of them natural, of course). As long as youre using clean utensils to scoop out your servings, you shouldnt have a problem keeping these toppings around for a few weeks – ya know, if you can ration them for that long!  Yellow Mustard This was in fact my first attempt at making yellow mustard and it proved to be ridiculously easy! I think Id built it up in my head to be some complicated project, but wow was I mistaken. Just a few simple ingredients, and a little stovetop whisking will get you the brightest, tangiest, most beautiful ballpark mustard of your dreams! I must warn you, from one condiment-master to another, that the bubbling mixture gets darn hot and tends to splatter when its cooking. To avoid scalding yourself, use the pot lid as s shield (insert laughing emoji here).      Print recipe     Yellow Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients:  1 cup /­­ 250ml cold water 3/­­4 cup dry mustard powder 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 tsp. ground turmeric 1/­­2 tsp. garlic powder 1/­­8 tsp. ground paprika 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar Directions: 1. In a small saucepan, whisk together water, dry mustard, salt, turmeric, garlic, and paprika until smooth. Cook the mixture over medium-low to low heat, stirring often, until it bubbles down to a thick paste, 30 to 45 minutes. 2. Whisk the apple cider vinegar into the mustard mixture and continue to cook until its thickened to the desired consistency – this can take between 5 and 15 minutes depending on how thick you like it.  3. Let the mustard cool to room temperature. Transfer the mustard to an airtight glass jar or container, and refrigerate for up to 3 months.  Honey Mustard Depending on how sweet you like your honey mustard, its just the above yellow mustard recipe with as much honey stirred in as you like! I added two tablespoons and it was perfect for me, but if you want even more, got for it. I recommend avoiding very runny honey, since this will loosen the mustard. Instead, opt for something on the thicker side to maintain the consistency. If youre vegan, brown rice or date syrup would be the best choices, since they are more viscous than maple syrup, for example. I love this on sandwiches with lots of fresh veggies and sprouts!     Print recipe     Honey Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients: 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 Tbsp. raw honey Directions: 1. Combine the mustard and the honey. Taste and add more honey if desired. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 months.  Grainy Dijon Mustard This style of Dijon is a whole-seed one, which is my favourite because of the great texture and colour variations. Its spicy and complex, and will only get better with time. Keep in mind that this recipe is in two stages, the first one requiring you to soak your mustard seeds the night before you plan on blending.      Print recipe     Grainy Dijon Mustard Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml  Ingredients: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g yellow mustard seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g black mustard seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. ground mustard 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml white wine vinegar 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml apple cider vinegar 2 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 tsp. sea salt Directions: 1. Combine all ingredients and refrigerate overnight (for 12-24 hours) to allow the mustard seeds to soften and absorb the flavours. 2. Place mixture in blender and mix on high for a minute or two, until the seeds have broken and the mustard thickens. 3. Transfer contents to a clean jar and enjoy! Dijon will keep for about one month in the refrigerator. Sweet Pickle Relish This was the most anticipated condiment to try and make myself, since its one of my favourites, but also one of the worst offenders for additives. I successfully recreated that gorgeous tang, and succulent texture of commercial relish that I loved so much as a kid. The taste of this one is off the charts! My recipe uses coconut sugar instead of refined sugar and syrups, so the colour is a little darker and browner than the conventional types, but I dont think youll notice – and you certainly wont miss the food colouring!     Print recipe     Sweet Pickle Relish Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 340g finely diced cucumber 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g finely diced yellow onion 1 tsp. salt, divided  1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar  1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g coconut sugar 1/­­4 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. yellow mustard seeds 1 tsp. dried dill 1/­­4 tsp. turmeric 1/­­4 red bell pepper, finely diced 1 tsp. arrowroot, dissolved in 2 tsp. water Directions: 1. Toss the cucumber and onion with 3/­­4 teaspoon of salt in a sieve set over a bowl, and let drain for about 3 hours. Next, press the ingredients against side of sieve to release as much liquid as possible, then discard liquid from bowl.  2. Bring the vinegar, coconut sugar, and remaining 1/­­4 teaspoon of salt to a boil in a small saucepan, stirring until sugar has dissolved, then simmer until reduced to about a 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml (just eyeball it), about 3 to 4 minutes. Add the garlic, mustard, dill, and turmeric, stir until fragrant, about 1-2 minutes. 3. Add the drained cucumber and onion mixture, plus diced red bell pepper, and simmer, stirring for about 2 minutes. Make the arrowroot slurry, then whisk it into the relish. Simmer, stirring, 2-3 minutes until noticeably thickened. Turn off the heat and transfer relish to a glass jar or storage container and leave uncovered until it cools to room temperature, then put in the fridge. The relish will keep for up to a month in the fridge.  Tomato Ketchup This ketchup was an old blog post that I revisited and revised. I used to make this recipe in the oven, but my new method eliminates the need to crank up the heat when its probably the last thing you want to do. Instead, the whole thing is made on the stove, then blitzed up in the blender. Its deeply spiced and complex, so much more interesting than store-bought ketchup. The first time I made the new version, I used a good portion of it for a soup base, then added more to a dip – both were delicious, so if you have leftovers, put it to use in an unexpected place. Its tasty with everything!      Print recipe     Tomato Ketchup Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil (expeller-pressed, flavour neutral)  3 star whole anise (make sure they are whole to remove easily!) 3 bay leaves 1 tsp. ground coriander pinch of chili flakes  1 large onion, chopped  3/­­4 tsp. sea salt  1/­­4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 3 cloves garlic, minced 2.2 lbs. /­­ 1 kg tomatoes  2 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 Tbsp. maple syrup  Directions: 1. Melt the coconut oil in a medium stockpot, then add the star anise, bay leaves, coriander, and chili flakes. Cook until fragrant about 2 minutes, then add the onions, salt and pepper, and cook until slightly browned, about 10 mins. Next add the add garlic, cook for 1-2 minutes, then add balsamic vinegar, scraping any stuck bits off the bottom of the pot. Add tomatoes and their juices, then bring to a simmer.  2. Cook on low heat for about 60 mins or until reduced and starting to caramelize on the bottom of the pot.  3. Turn off heat and remove bay and anise, add maple syrup. Let cool slightly and transfer to a blender, blend until smooth. Taste, and adjust seasoning to suit your taste.  4. Let cool to room temperature, then transfer to an airtight glass container and store in the fridge. Keeps for about one month.   Aquafaba Mayonnaise This was the most exciting discovery to make: vegan mayo using aquafaba! Aqua faba translates to bean water and its the cooking liquid from chickpeas. Although any can of chickpeas will have this, I make my own, since there are no additives or chemicals that have leached from the can itself. If you cook your own chickpeas from dried, you have aquafaba. Although I wouldnt normally consume large amounts of aquafaba, in this case its used in such a small amount that I think its fine. Plus, did I mention it makes vegan mayo?! The results are so unbelievably shocking and delightful that Im a convert, even though I eat eggs! I highly suggest using the most neutral-tasting olive oil you can find for this recipe. Since it makes up the majority of the flavour of the mayonnaise, a strong-tasting olive oil will overpower the delicate nature of this condiment. I used the one from Pineapple Collaborative, which works perfectly. I also tried avocado oil, grapeseed, and sunflower, but didnt like the results as much as mild olive oil. Its up to you! You can really use whatever you have on hand, just keep in mind that it will really dictate the taste of the final result.      Print recipe     Aquafaba Mayonnaise Makes about 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3 Tbsp. aquafaba 1/­­4 tsp. Dijon mustard 1/­­4 tsp. fine salt 1 1/­­2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml mild olive oil (or other light-tasting oil) Directions: 1. Place the aquafaba in the bottom of a wide-mouth jar. Add the mustard, salt, lemon juice, vinegar, and the olive oil. Allow a minute for the oil to separate into a distinct layer. 2. Insert an immersion blender all the way to the bottom of the jar. (Note: this will not work with an upright blender) Start the blending process on medium speed and do not lift the blender until the mixture has thickened and turned white at the bottom of the jar. Only then, slowly move the blender up, waiting for the oil to incorporate as you go, until you get the texture of mayonnaise. Use immediately; refrigerate leftovers in a tightly sealed jar for up to 1 month. The mayonnaise will thicken slightly once cooled in the fridge. Smoky Secret Sauce This is the creamy, tangy, and perfectly seasoned sauce that most famously adorns the Big Mac burger from McDonalds. Whats best about my version is that it has zero secrets...nothing weird to hide here! I had the most fun with this recipe, since it required a number of the condiments that Id already made as ingredients. I did deviate a tad from the original and added smoked paprika, since I love the added dimension of smoke flavour to anything thats going on grilled food, but Ive also found this to be a stellar salad dressing, especially for chop-style salads that have chunky, less delicate ingredients. I hope you find some fun things to slather it on this summer. Its lip-smakingly tasty!      Print recipe     Smoky Secret Sauce Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml aquafaba mayonnaise (recipe above) 1 tablespoon yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish (recipe above) 1 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 teaspoon white wine vinegar 1/­­2 teaspoon paprika 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (not traditional, but delicious!) 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon onion powder Directions: 1. Fold all ingredients together in a small bowl or jar. Enjoy immediately, and store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for 2-3 weeks.    As a bonus, Ive included this stellar recipe for carrot hot dogs – since youll need a high-vibe wiener to put your condiments on! Hahaaa! I realize that carrot hot dogs are pretty 2018, but Id never tried them before and it was a very amusing undertaking. I looked at a number of recipes online and my version is a mash-up of the ones that sounded the most delicious. My method is also much easier and faster than other versions Ive seen, since its just a braise on the stove and a quick grill (no marinating, steaming, roasting, etc).  The important thing to keep in mind for this recipe, is that the amount of time you braise the carrots for,Im  will be dictated by the girth of the carrots. Mine were more sausage-sized (approx 1.5 or 3.5-3.75 cm) than a typical hot dog wiener, and a 20-minute simmer was the perfect amount. If your carrots are smaller, Id go down to 15 minutes. Insert a sharp knife to check on the doneness after 10 minutes or so, and take them out when they are tender, but way before they get mushy. Remember that youre also going to be grilling them for 10 minutes so they will cook even more, and you dont want them too soft. The final result should be tender all the way through, but shouldnt fall apart in your mouth.     Print recipe     Carrot Hot Dogs Serves 8 Ingredients: 8 large hot dog-sized carrots 8 hot dog buns 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml tamari 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml apple cider vinegar  1 cup /­­ 250ml vegetable broth or 1 tsp. vegetable bullion powder + 1 cup water 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 2 Tbsp. coconut oil (preferably expeller-pressed, flavour neutral) 1 Tbsp. liquid smoke 2 tsp. yellow mustard 1 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. paprika 1/­­2 tsp. onion powder 1/­­2 tsp. ground black pepperWash and peel carrots. Round the edges of the carrot to look more like wieners, if desired.  Direcitons: 1. Whisk all marinade ingredients together in a large stockpot with a lid. Add the peeled carrots and bring to a boil, reduce to a gentle simmer, and cook with the lid on for about 20 minutes (less if your carrots are on the thin side, see headnote). Remove from heat and turn on the grill.  2. Grill the carrots over medium-high, turning every couple of minutes, basting them with the remaining braising liquid if desired. Cook until slightly charred and fragrant, 10 minutes total. Grill or toast the buns. Place a carrot on each bun and enjoy with all of the condiments! I wish you all an incredible summer ahead! I recognize that this season is going to look very different from years past, but as long as were all healthy and the sun is shining, weve got it pretty good. Stay safe out there, and keep fuelling your body with the whole foods it needs to thrive and feel alive!  All love and happy condiment-making, Sarah B The post High-Vibe Condiment Classics appeared first on My New Roots.

Pesto Quinoa & White Bean Cakes with Roasted Tomatoes

May 15 2020 Oh My Veggies 

Now that I have basil growing in the garden again, I’m on a quest to use up my frozen pesto because I’ll be able to make it fresh whenever I want to. If making a big batch of pesto and freezing it for fall and winter marks the end of summer for me, then frantically trying to use up that pesto is a sure sign of spring. It happens every year, like clockwork. It’s a good thing this recipe took a few tries to get right--I think I used half of my pesto supply perfecting it. The first time I made it, I only used cannelini beans. It was not good. I’ve realized that I only like cannelini beans as a component of a dish, not as the main ingredient. White bean cakes with just white beans, pesto, panko, and egg were definitely meh. So then I used half the beans and more ingredients each subsequent trial. Cheese! Why not? A zucchini? Of course! And then quinoa. Sometimes less is more, but sometimes more is more. And this is a more is more recipe. But even with more, it’s still not a lot. If you make this, don’t skip the […]

Vegan Sourdough Chocolate Chip Cookies

March 22 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Sourdough Chocolate Chip Cookies I’ve been thinking about making a sourdough starter and baking bread ever since I finally got a Dutch oven this summer. Spending all our time at home recently opened up space for all kinds of long-term kitchen projects. I finally mixed up a 100% rye, 100% hydration starter last week and it’s been so fun to see it develop. Keeping my hands busy with rewarding cooking tasks has been so helpful in terms of getting out of my head lately. Cooking has always been a source of solace around here, but I never realized how much I depend on it as meditation. Highly recommend! The seemingly counterintuitive thing about keeping up a sourdough starter is that you have to discard a good amount of it when you ‘feed’ it, which for me is twice a day. Without getting rid of some starter at every feeding, you’ll quickly build up way too much of it, which in turn will require way too much flour to feed it. But there does come a point, about a week in or so, when your starter is mature and the stuff you’re discarding can totally be used for baking. That’s where sourdough discard recipes come in. There are lots of them on the internet, and you can make anything from pancakes (we have a recipe for that here) to waffles, banana bread to English muffins. The other day, I wanted to use up my discard that I’d been saving in the fridge, but I was also really craving chocolate chip cookies, so I went for it and made these. Once my starter got going, I saved my discard in a covered container in the fridge instead of composting it and about 5 days in, I had enough to make these cookies. The 100% rye 100% hydration starter recipe that I’ve been following is here (it’s super detailed), but I think that you could use any starter discard for these cookies. The flavor of the cookies will vary depending on the flour you use for your starter and how sour it is. My rye flour starter brought a lovely earthiness and depth to the flavor of the cookies. In terms of sourness, my discard was pretty young and barely sour, so there was just a hint of sourness that read more like complexity than straightforward sourdough flavor. Vegan Sourdough Chocolate Chip Cookies   Print Serves: makes about 12 4-inch cookies Ingredients ½ cup refined coconut oil - solid or semi-solid ¼ cup + 2 tablespoons coconut sugar ½ cup sourdough starter/­­sourdough discard (I used this method) 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1¼ cup all purpose flour generous pinch of sea salt, plus more for sprinkling on top ½ teaspoon baking powder ½ cup dark dairy-free chocolate chips Instructions Preheat the oven to 360°. Prepare a parchment-covered baking sheet. In a mixing bowl, combine the coconut oil and sugar, and mix with a fork until evenly incorporated. Add the sourdough discard and vanilla, and mix well. Add the flour, salt, and baking powder, and mix until you have a unified cookie dough. Fold in the chocolate chips. Using an ice cream scoop or a spoon, scoop out even portions of the dough and place on the prepared baking sheet. Flatten the dough with the palm of your hand and shape it into round cookies (these cookies will not expand on their own in the oven). Bake for 15-17 minutes, until the cookies are golden and the surface is somewhat dry to the touch. Start checking at 10-12 minutes. Sprinkle with more salt if desired. Let cool for 20-30 minutes, preferably on a cooling rack. Enjoy! Notes These cookies are on the more subtly sweet side, depending more on the sweetness of the chocolate chips. If you like your cookies sweeter, increase the amount of sugar to ½ cup. 3.5.3226 The post Vegan Sourdough Chocolate Chip Cookies appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Anja Schwartz Rothe

December 15 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Anja Schwartz Rothe Anja Schwartz Rothe is an herbalist, gardener, medicine maker, and writer, based in New Yorks Hudson Valley. Anja is the alchemist behind Fat of the Land, a small batch herbal apothecary with a focus on cultivating connection to self, environment, and the cycles by which we live. We interviewed Anja about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, her work and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? A nice balance of both! I need to exist inside a structured, but flexible container. A little bit of routine allows me to make the most of my time, while feeling free and inspired. -- Do your routines change with the seasons? Definitely, it is one of the biggest factors that informs the way I live – acknowledging the seasonal shifts within and without and using that information to alter how I show up to take care of myself. -- What do your mornings look like? I dont like alarms, so I usually wake up naturally, somewhere between 6:30 and 8, depending on the time of year. Then I drink a bunch of water, sometimes with lemon and sometimes not. I try to get out in nature almost immediately. I live right next to a bird sanctuary on the Hudson River, so I bring a hot bevvie and do a long walk there. I always leave my phone at the house so I have a chance to really check in with myself, do some breathing, and connect before the day starts. After that, its breakfast and usually emails. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I usually wash my face and do some facial gua sha. Its so relaxing and helps me unwind. Then, I have little ritual of turning down the house, where I close the curtains, turn off the lights, and say goodnight to everything. It sounds like a small detail, but its a gesture I really like, acknowledging the animacy of the home energies, thanking them, and setting it all to rest for the day. In my bedroom, I try to keep good sleep hygiene, which for me means low technology and minimal artificial lighting. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice? Honestly, I think my whole life is a mindfulness practice. Isnt that what mindfulness is all about, practicing showing up in the mundane of the day-to-day in the fullest capacity? Sustenance -- Describe your typical or favorite meal for each of these: Breakfast – Usually some combination of eggs and ferments. In the summer, hard-boiled with smoked salmon and sauerkraut. Right now, Im on a scallion and ginger congee kick – a simple Chinese rice porridge served with a soft boiled egg and miso. Its so good. Lunch – Sometimes an open-face sandwich or leftovers from the night before. Lately, Ive been working through lunch and having an early dinner. Snack – Fruit and chocolate. Its apples, pears, and citrus right now. Dinner – Currently: soup and sourdough bread with lots of ghee. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I make myself a matcha latte with oat milk and a couple droppers of our brain tincture almost every day. On weekends, I might have a cup of coffee and I sometimes do a mushroom tea/­­dandy blend/­­cacao mixture as an afternoon pick me up. I really try not to have too much caffeine though, it makes me a bit of a mess and dehydrates me way too much, always trying to find that balance. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your basket? Its pretty broken up between farmers markets, the local food shop, and the co-op in the next city over. In the summer, primarily farmers markets for that good good fruit and veg. Right now, my staples are eggs, potatoes, citrus, oatly, broccoli, and cauliflower. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? Definitely. I like to keep my kitchen stocked with what I call hippie treats and lots of fruit. I dont buy a lot of packaged food, which means if I want to have sweets in the house I have to prepare them myself. I love baking, and will usually make a treat at least once a week – recently, its been sticky apple ginger date cake and berry crisps from a stocked freezer of gleaned summer berries. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do, but with much variability. In the past, I’ve been really into running, yoga, and rock climbing — and these things come back in waves. In the summer, I’m cycling a lot, and right now I’m getting back into my ephemeral winter gym flow. Sometimes, my exercise is just doing squats in the kitchen while waiting for the kettle to boil. Thats actually my favorite kind. Beauty -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I definitely subscribe to the less is more skincare model. I wash with just warm water, am very liberal with hydrosols, and then use a serum and/­­or balm. I make all my own hydrosols in my garden during the summer and offer some of them in the apothecary. Im currently really loving Dragon Balm by Apis Apotheca, a farm and skincare line run by my friend Aviva, who really knows her shit. Most days I also do a quick little gua sha facial massage afterwards – I always see instant results and it feels too good. -- Do you have any beauty tricks that you’ve found to be especially useful? Drinking lots of water and herbal infusions. My present go-to is nettle, raspberry leaf, goji berry, and fresh ginger root. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress? Big Calm tincture in every pocket, purse, and drawer. I lean heavily on nervines and deep breathing. Getting outside is also really important — and socializing! -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? To be honest, I havent gotten so much as a cold in more than ten years! I owe this mostly to a naturally strong constitution, but also a pretty large emphasis on tonic, preventative medicine and lifestyle. Cooking with medicines, like infused vinegars, dank broths, and elderberry syrup, are big, but getting enough rest is the biggest. Im constantly doing micro check-ins throughout the day to see how I can best give myself what I need to prevent burnout, fatigue, and illness. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? Theyre so fluid in my life. I enjoy the hell out of the work I do, and I’d probably be doing most of it even if it wasnt my job, but Im also pretty good at allowing myself to turn off when I’m tired and not place undue expectations on myself all the time. I find allowing myself to take frequent mini vacations is the most helpful — getting out of my environment is the only thing that really turns off my work brain, plus it brings in a fresh influx of new inspiration and perspective. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming an herbalist? My first job in high school was at the local health food store. There were a couple older women who worked there and would walk me through the vitamin and bulk aisles, teaching me all about the different herbs and supplements. This was a sort of epiphany for me, viewing plants in this way. I then studied anthropology in university, focusing mostly on traditional sustenance and healing practices. After finishing school, I knew I needed to immerse myself in plant medicine, so I enrolled in an herbal medicine program in Appalachia. -- How do you approach foraging the ingredients for your apothecary and seasonal wellness boxes? Do you have a plan in mind for each season or is it more about going with the flow? I definitely have a plan in mind, but I usually have to surrender it while remaining open to new inspiration. It can be a challenge to have expectations for a season, nature doesnt really work that way, and thats been both a constant source of inspiration for me, as well as a lesson in boundaries and respect. I could be inspired to make one thing, but if its not a particularly fecund year for a certain plant, I have to cede to that. Making things from intuition and by listening to the seasons and cycles is probably not the best business model, but its the only way I want to work with plant medicine. -- What are some offerings youre working on currently? Im getting ready to re-release a little book I wrote last year, Always Coming Home: a guide to seasonal wellness, with some edits and new content. Im also refining the 2020 Seasonal Wellness Box subscription that will soon be available. -- How were you able to grow a business with your interests and loves in mind? Its been a very slow chipping away for me to remain really clear on the things that matter and the things that dont in growing my business. It turns out, remaining true to creating medicine that is intimate, small batch, and well cared for is much more important than being able to mass produce things or being on every shelf in the country. I want my values to be foremost and my business to be second. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Going full hibernation this January. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Put my legs up the wall, get a massage, go hiking with a friend, sweat, travel, in the summer I go swimming multiple times of day in various bodies of running water, thats my favorite. -- We love the Catskills so much. What are some of your favorite places to visit in the area? Montgomery Place farm stand for all your fruit and veg needs, there are so many great trails in the mountains, Colgate Lake for a swim, Talbott and Arding picnic at the Saugerties lighthouse for lunch and Lil Debs Oasis for dinner. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Im reading The Overstory by Richard Powers right now, and it is SO GOOD. A vignette of short stories written about trees and so much more. Song/­­Album – Hildegard von Bingen forever. Movie – Fantastic Fungi! Just saw and highly recommend, mushrooms will save the world. Piece of Art – All things Andrew Wyeth. Photos by Jenn Morse, Gabrielle Greenberg and Anja herself. The post Anja Schwartz Rothe appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

New Plant-Based Meatless Monday Cookbook Will Get the Whole Family to Eat Their Veggies

November 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

New Plant-Based Meatless Monday Cookbook Will Get the Whole Family to Eat Their VeggiesLooking for some culinary inspiration for your next round of Meatless Monday meals? Well, we have some EXCITING news: The first Meatless Monday cookbook is finally here, and with over 100 delicious, better-for-you plant-based recipes youll be able to whip up a meat-free meal for any type of eater -- from experimental flexitarians to new vegans to the staunchest of carnivores. The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook , by Jenn Sebestyen, emphasizes the limitless potential of plant-based cooking. The recipes are nutritious, easy-to-prepare, and mimic the look, taste, and texture of comfort-food favorites (youve got to check out the lentil Bolognese, butternut-squash mac and cheese, and meaty mushroom stew). The book, whose foreword is written by Sid Lerner, founder of the global Meatless Monday initiative and The Monday Campaigns, is based on the Meatless Monday philosophy of cutting out meat one day a week for your health and the health of the planet. And as its title suggest, The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook is designed for the whole family, because when kids are involved in the prepping and cooking process, they develop a greater appreciation, understanding, and respect for the food in front of them. The cookbook officially goes on sale November 19, but weve included a few recipe highlights to share with you. And with Thanksgiving right around the corner, these plant-based recipes might just be what you need to round out the holiday dinner table.     Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast with BBQ Drizzle This recipe marries the best traits of avocado toast with the enticing aroma and flavor of cannellini beans slowly sautéed with fresh garlic and olive oil. The mixture is spooned on to the avocado-smeared toast and drizzled with a sweet and tangy homemade barbecue sauce. Pumpkin Maple-Glazed Penne with Roasted Fall Vegetables With butternut squash, carrots, parsnips, and Brussels sprouts, youre getting all the best that autumn has to offer. The subtle maple glaze adds a surprisingly subtle sweetness that pairs nicely with the fall vegetables. Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes Theres nothing cozier than a hearty stew and some mashed potatoes. This recipe, which uses cremini and shitake mushrooms and a healthy dose of tamari, is an homage to umami. Ladle it over a scoop of mashed potatoes for some pure plant-based bliss. Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup Its like a chicken potpie -- minus the chicken and the pie. No animal products are necessary for this smooth and sultry creamy vegetable noodle soup. Vegetable broth, almond milk, nutritional yeast, and a whole lot of seasonings and aromatics make this soup satisfying and delicious. Very Berry Quinoa Salad with Cinnamon Toasted Pecans This salad is light and fresh yet has plenty of protein from the quinoa and pecans. Fresh summer berries are little powerhouses of vitamins and are super kid-friendly. The toasted pecans take this dish to the next level. Rice and Bean Pan Grilled Burritos A burrito is engineered to include an entire meals worth of goodies wrapped in one, warm, fluffy package. Chocked full of smoky pinto beans, cilantro rice, lettuce, and an avocado green chile sauce, be prepared for requests for seconds. BBQ Chickpea Veggie Bowls Channeling the hot smoke of the barbecue pit, this BBQ chickpea veggie bowl is charred, sweet, and tangy with a satisfying crunch. The recipe calls for roasted broccoli, red peppers, onions, and chickpeas, but you can top your brown rice bowl with any variety of vegetables. Just dont forget to drizzle over some homemade sweet-and-spicy barbecue sauce. Sweet-and-Spicy BBQ Sauce The proper blend of sweet and heat, this BBQ sauce uses smoky chipotles, tart apple-cider vinegar, maple syrup, and a blend of spices. Squeeze a little bit any meatless Monday meal to take it to the next level. About the author: Jenn Sebestyen is the creator of VeggieInspired.com. She was inspired to write The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook to help moms and dads get both picky kids and die-hard carnivores to eat more veggies. She offers tips and tricks that have worked for getting her kids on board with a veggie-heavy Meatless Monday plan.   Interested in learning more about Meatless Monday? Click here for more recipes, cooking tips, and ways that you can spread the Meatless Monday message to your community. For a chance to be featured in our next recipe roundup, make sure to tag @MeatlessMonday or use the hashtag #meatlessmonday the next time you post a meatless or plant-based recipe. The post New Plant-Based Meatless Monday Cookbook Will Get the Whole Family to Eat Their Veggies appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Behind the Scenes with Facebook HQ’s Plant-Based Chef, Anthony Moraes

September 30 2019 Meatless Monday 

Behind the Scenes with Facebook HQ’s Plant-Based Chef, Anthony MoraesFacebook has always been a pioneer in the world of technology, but thanks to Anthony Moraes, Head Wellness Chef at Facebooks headquarters in New York City, the company is now a shining example of how plant-based eating can be integrated into corporate dining services. Meatless Monday had the opportunity to speak with Chef Moraes about Facebooks fully plant-based café, Ceci et Cela, and how people simply cant stop talking, tweeting, and Instagramming about the innovative meatless meals he and his team are cooking up. What was the motivation behind having an entirely plant-based cafe in Facebooks HQ? Do other cafes at Facebook also serve vegetarian options? The motivation for having an entirely plant-based café came from our desire to provide interesting and innovative plant-based concepts that complement our mainstream cafes.  We always have our finger on the pulse of what is happening in the world of food and drink, and as more people switch to alternative diets, we wanted to accommodate those preferences by creating a place that offers food that is healthy, cutting edge, and suitable for all eating lifestyles. Our daily menus incorporate vegan, vegetarian, Meatless Monday, keto, paleo, juicing, and healthy-living options. How have employees reacted to Ceci et Cela?  Ceci et Cela opened up to rave reviews from our employees, and it continues to receive amazing feedback after nearly two years in operation. How do you entice employees to choose a plant-base option over a meat-centric dish? We post some mouthwatering pictures of the food on our internal Facebook page, and these photos tend to draw in both plant-based diners and meat eaters, but most of the time its word-of-mouth that gets the line started. Whats the most popular dish at Ceci et Cela? Its hard to say, since our menu changes weekly and we try to never repeat a dish. But I guess if we had to pick, there is one salad that I created for our opening menu that is so immensely popular that someone created a Fan Page for it; its called All Hail The Kale.  Lol... It has many followers. So funny... Plant-based has become more popular, what plant-based cuisine trends or insights can you share from your success with Cecis? Have you seen more traffic on Mondays? Running a plant-based café allows us to be creative, but it also enables us to see which types of plant-based foods outshine the others. Currently, theres a trend towards trying different varieties of nut milks. We make all of our own nut milks in-house, and Ive noticed a growing interest in other plant-based milks beyond the common almond and soy. Oat milk has grown in popularity, but we also experiment with walnuts, macadamia nuts, various dried legumes, and seeds.   I also see that more people are concerned with their gut health. We offer kombucha on tap as well as house-made probiotic foods and drinks. As for a traffic boost on Mondays, we do have a healthy Monday service due to our steady flow of plant-based eaters and our committed Meatless Monday diners. Ironically, we see an even bigger spike on Tuesdays, as all of our Monday guests go back and tell their friends and co-workers about their incredible meal at Ceci et Cela. A third trend that started off as more of a feeling is the correlation between clean nutrition and beauty (I believe theyve coined a word for it now, Nutraceuticals). So, I put together a Beauty Bar within our café that is set up like a makeup station complete with a lighted mirror, compact cases, perfume bottles, blush brushes, etc. But instead of makeup, I filled all of these cases and jars with superfood additives like, acai powder, maca, chlorella, camu-camu, pine oil, and matcha so that guests can come up to the bar and add an extra boost of super foods to their food or drink. At the Beauty Bar, Ive also included a nicely-framed legend explaining what additives are good for your hair, your nails, your skin, eyes, etc... It has become immensely popular and is a very Instagram-able station. Have employees started eating more plant-based meals as a result of trying new foods at Cecis? Any stories you can share? There are so many stories of employees coming to us and thanking us for re-introducing them to the delicious potential of vegetables. Our team does such an incredible job at making all of our offerings attractive and appealing to everyone, not just the vegans and vegetarians. I am grateful for the many stories and accolades we receive each week. One employee came to me and said that he has strictly only eaten at Ceci et Cela for the past 6 months and lost 30 pounds. A few employees have brought in their personal trainers and nutritionists to see everything we do. Another employee said that Ceci et Cela was an official part of her wedding plan this summer! Follow the Facebook plant-based food trends via Chef Anthony Moraes on Instagram . Keep us posted on your #MeatlessMonday meals by posting your favorite plant-based dishes and tagging @MeatlessMonday .   Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Behind the Scenes with Facebook HQ’s Plant-Based Chef, Anthony Moraes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Chocolate Granola Clusters from 5-Ingredient Vegan

September 24 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Chocolate Granola Clusters from 5-Ingredient Vegan When I heard my friend and fellow vegan cookbook author, Nava Atlas, had come out with her first cookbook in five years, I was excited to participate in the blog tour for the book.  Especially so, since this book, 5-Ingredient Vegan:175 Simple, Plant-Based Recipes for Delicious, Healthy Meals in Minutes consists of my favorite kind of recipes: FAST and EASY! Nava has developed these delicious recipes especially for people who are busy and dont want to spend a lot of time in the kitchen, but still want to enjoy delicious vegan food. As these recipes show, with a few well-chosen ingredients, a simple meal can be just as delicious as a more elaborate one, with the added convenience of getting easy 5-ingredient plant-based meals on the table quickly. For this post, I chose an easy-peasy dessert recipe for Chocolate Granola Clusters. I love this recipe not only because its simple, quick, and delicious, but also because its made with ingredients I always have on hand.  As Nava says, Sometimes, when Im making a fairly elaborate meal (and for me, elaborate is a relative term) for company, I lose momentum when it comes to dessert. Thats when I turn to this clever dessert that results my culinary genius proclaimed by guests. This needs just ten minutes of prep, no machines, and no baking -- just a short time in the fridge to re-solidify the chocolate.  I hope you enjoy this recipe (and Navas new book) as much as I do!   Chocolate Granola Clusters Serve with pears or apples in fall, oranges in winter, strawberries in spring, and raspberries in summer.  Reprinted with permission from 5-Ingredient Vegan (C) 2019 by Nava Atlas, Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. Photo by Hannah Kaminsky.   1 cup vegan chocolate chips 2 tablespoons vanilla or plain nondairy milk 1 1/­­2 cups granola (see note)   To cook on the stovetop: Combine the chocolate chips and nondairy milk in the top of a double boiler or in a bowl perched over a saucepan in which water is gently boiling. Cook over very low heat until the chocolate is melted, stirring often. Remove from the heat and stir in most of the granola, reserving a little for topping. To cook in the microwave: Combine the chocolate chips and nondairy milk in a microwave-safe bowl. Start with 45 seconds, stir, and add 15 seconds at a time until the chocolate is melted. Stir in most of the granola, reserving a little for topping. Line a large plate with wax paper or baking parchment. Spread the chocolate mixture onto it fairly evenly, to a thickness of no more than half an inch. Sprinkle the reserved granola over the top. Refrigerate for an hour or so, or until the chocolate has completely solidified. Break the mass into bite-sized chunks, and arrange on an attractive platter to serve. Store any not eaten at once in a covered container in the refrigerator, where theyll keep for at least a week. Note: Use a variety of granola that has a nice mixture of oats, seeds, nuts, and dried fruits. Its best to use granola thats fresh and crisp for better texture.   The post Chocolate Granola Clusters from 5-Ingredient Vegan appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Savory Tomato and Onion Jam

September 4 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Savory Tomato and Onion Jam We’ve been making this lush, jammy spread on repeat lately. It’s been such a hit! This is a more low-maintenance version of a true jam that lasts a long time. This one comes together with more speed, doesn’t require too much sugar, and is meant to be enjoyed within a week or so (we think you won’t have a problem with this!). The reasonable amount the recipe makes reflects that as well. It’s no secret that things on toast make for the easiest, laziest, and most satisfying weeknight meals. This savory jam, spread over toast with a layer of cashew cheese (we’ve been loving Treeline) has been just that for us – a comforting weeknight lifesaver for a particularly busy time in the life. We hope it will be the same for you :) This jam looks like it’s all about the tomatoes, but it’s really about the marriage of slowly cooked, sweet red onion and the umami bomb that are late summer tomatoes. Both are cooked gently on the stovetop, melding their flavors and caramelizing until thick, glossy, and sweet. Punchy white wine vinegar and a little bit of coconut sugar help take all the flavors to their peak, but in the end it’s really all about these two magical vegetables. Here’s to late summer, its still vibrant produce, longer shadows, cooler evenings, and balmy days

Recipe | Spicy Cantaloupe Cucumber Salad

September 2 2019 Oh My Veggies 

I wasn’t going to post this recipe, but since it’s the end of the summer, it’s kind of our last opportunity to get locally grown cantaloupe and cucumbers. So why not stretch out summer a little bit longer and make fruit salad? I wasn’t sure how this recipe would turn out, to be honest. It sounded like a mishmash of flavors and I couldn’t imagine how it would taste. Since I have so many Hungarian black peppers and mint leaves to use, I thought I’d take a risk and try it anyway. I’m glad I did–it’s so different and it makes a refreshing, light side for a heavier meal. Of course, it helps that I managed to pick out the perfect cantaloupe to use in this–any recipe involving melon is only as good as the fruit you use! Last summer, a vendor at the farmers market taught me how to tell which melons were ripe and which ones weren’t and I’m getting good at it now. (The secret, in case you were wondering, is not thumping the side, but smelling the blossom-end. You might look like a crazy sniffing all the cantaloupes at the supermarket, but it works. Really!) Print […]

Vegan Eggplant Pizza with Fresh Tomatoes and Olives

August 30 2019 VegKitchen 

Vegan Eggplant Pizza with Fresh Tomatoes and Olives Make a simple vegan eggplant pizza special by adding fresh tomatoes and olives to the topping. It’s a perfect pizza to make on cool summer evenings, though you can enjoy it year round as long as you can find decent tomatoes. Use tomatoes that are ripe yet firm, and dense and fleshy rather than seedy. The post Vegan Eggplant Pizza with Fresh Tomatoes and Olives appeared first on VegKitchen.

Arugula Pesto Mac UnCheese

August 23 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Arugula Pesto Mac UnCheese Just a few more weeks until Vegan Mac & Cheese hits the shelves.  To make the wait a bit easier, I’m sharing a recipe from the book that’s perfect for late summer: Arugula Pesto Mac UnCheese.  In addition to a fragrant and delicious pesto, the recipe features chopped fresh tomatoes which are now in abundance.  If you’re not a fan of arugula, you can swap it for spinach or go with a more traditional all-basil pesto. BONUS RECIPES:  If you pre-order Vegan Mac & Cheese, you can receive Bonus Recipes.  Here’s how.   Arugula Pesto Mac Uncheese Makes 4 to 6 servings This recipe is from Vegan Mac & Cheese by Robin Robertson (c) 2019, Harvard Common Press. Pasta 16 ounces ziti, or other small pasta Sauce 3 tablespoons vegan butter 1/­­4 cup unbleached all-purpose flour 4 cups plain unsweetened nondairy milk, or more 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon white miso paste 1 teaspoon almond butter 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder 1/­­2 teaspoon ground turmeric 1/­­4 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice 1/­­2 cup nutritional yeast 1/­­2 cup Arugula Pesto (recipe follows) 1 cup chopped fresh tomatoes 1/­­2 cup Nut Parm (recipe follows) 1/­­2 cup chopped fresh basil To make the pasta: Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Add the pasta and cook according to the package directions until just al dente. Drain the pasta well and return it to the pot. Set aside.To make the sauce: In a saucepan over medium heat, melt the butter. Whisk in the flour and cook for about 1 minute. Whisk in the milk, salt, miso, almond butter, garlic powder, onion powder, turmeric, and pepper. Cook, whisking, for 1 to 2 minutes to blend.Whisk in the lemon juice, nutritional yeast, and pesto. Add more milk or pesto to achieve desired flavor and consistency. Pour the sauce over the pasta.Add the tomatoes and toss to combine. Place the pot over low heat and cook for 2 minutes, or until the pasta is hot. Transfer to a serving dish and sprinkle with the nut parm and basil Arugula Pesto Makes about 1 1/­­2 cups Arugula makes a flavorful pesto that can also be used on pizza or in salads, dressings, or soups. Portion and freeze any leftover pesto for later use. 3 garlic cloves, crushed 1/­­4 cup toasted walnut pieces 1/­­2 teaspoon salt 2 cups coarsely chopped arugula 1 cup fresh basil leaves 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 1/­­4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper Warm water, as needed In a food processor, combine the garlic, walnuts, and salt and process to a paste. Add the arugula, basil, olive oil, lemon juice, and pepper and process to a paste. If needed, add a little warm water, 1 tablespoon at a time, to reach the desired consistency. If not using right away, transfer to a container with a tight-fitting lid, cover, and refrigerate until needed.   Nut Parm 1 cup unsalted blanched almonds, or unsalted raw cashews 1/­­3 cup nutritional yeast 1/­­2 teaspoon salt 1/­­4 teaspoon onion powder Combine all the ingredients in a food processor and pulse until the mixture has a fine crumbly texture, stopping to scrape down the sides, as needed. Transfer to a shaker jar or other container with a tight lid. Store in the refrigerator. The post Arugula Pesto Mac UnCheese appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Bean, Pesto, and Quinoa Cakes with Roasted Tomatoes

May 15 2020 Oh My Veggies 

I got the idea for this Bean, Pesto, and Quinoa Cakes with Roasted Tomatoes recipe in a roundabout way. Now that I have basil growing in the garden again, I’m on a quest to use up my frozen pesto because I’ll be able to make it fresh whenever I want to. If making a big batch of pesto and freezing it for fall and winter marks the end of summer for me, then frantically trying to use up that pesto is a sure sign of spring. It happens every year, like clockwork. It’s a good thing this recipe took a few tries to get right--I think I used half of my pesto supply perfecting it. The first time I made it, I only used cannelini beans. It was not good. I’ve realized that I only like cannelini beans as a component of a dish, not as the main ingredient. White bean cakes with just white beans, pesto, panko, and egg were definitely meh. So then I used half the beans and more ingredients each subsequent trial. Cheese! Why not? A zucchini? Of course! And then quinoa. Sometimes less is more, but sometimes more is more. And this is a more […]

Lightly Sweetened Sparkling Meyer Lemonade

April 24 2020 Oh My Veggies 

This Lightly Sweetened Sparkling Meyer Lemonade is bright, tart, and effervescent. It’s impossible to be in a funky mood when you’re drinking sparkling lemonade. Impossible! Use this recipe to make yourself a tall glass of sunshine on a summer day or a day that you just need a reason to smile.

Soba Noodles with Green Beans and Almonds

January 27 2020 VegKitchen 

Soba Noodles with Green Beans and Almonds Perfect green beans seem to be available only for a month or two in the summer. This dish is a nice way to highlight them during that brief window. However, Im so fond of them, that I use frozen green beans so I can make this easy soba noodle dish regularly. The post Soba Noodles with Green Beans and Almonds appeared first on VegKitchen.

Lisa O’Connor

December 8 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Lisa O’Connor Lisa O’Connor is a Toronto-based Holistic Nutritionist, Healing Alchemist, and host of the Glow Deep Podcast. We interviewed Lisa about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, healing and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Both! Im a naturally disciplined soul, so I have no problems at all committing to something. I thrive off of routine, but Ive been learning to be way more in flow these past few years. Especially with creating my own schedule and building my business /­­ practice, and now with the arrival of our puppy. My schedule got shifted around quite a bit, as he needs A LOT of attention and training at this moment! Im learning to find my own rhythm between routine, and free flow. Which I believe is always a dance for us as we transition through different seasons, and times of our lives. -- What do your mornings look like? Now with a puppy things have shifted! -We are morning people – getting up anywhere between 5-6am -A liter of water first thing -A walk in nature with the pup -A little play time with him & then putting him in his crate for a nap, so I can have me time -Kundalini -Meditation -Matcha latte -Reading – I commit to 30-45 min daily reading in the morning -Smoothie or whatever else Im feeling -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? To be honest, I dont have a lot of bedtime rituals, as I dont really have a problem with sleep. Whats important for me is turning my phone on airplane mode a good 45min- 1 hour before sleep, having a shower to shift my energy, magnesium cream, and reading a book in bed with my husband, or sometimes we watch a little something on Netflix to just switch completely off! -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  -Meditation -Walking in nature and being present -Kundalini -Im not a massive journal writer, but when it calls I listen! Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Smoothie & homemade matcha latte (I have the matcha first, and probably wait an hour or so and then have the smoothie!) Lunch – Honestly on client days I often keep it light and just snack – green juice here, smoothie there, some veggies, coconut water! And some days I just have liquids (juices, smoothies, water until dinner) on other days it could be a light salad, or a lunch out with a friend at a local healthy restaurant Snack – Im not too much of a snack person! But I would say nuts /­­ seeds, green juice, maybe a piece of fruit in the summer Dinner - Green salad, roasted veggies, curries, soups, brown rice -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do :) I drink matcha during the week, and on the weekend when I can savour a beautiful organic Americano when Im at a cafe with my husband, its just that much more special. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your cart? We do our big haul on Saturdays at a place here called Organic Garage. Everything is organic, and is so reasonable in price. In the summer I also add in local markets, and farmers markets. That being said, I feel like Im always grocery shopping on the daily, as Im always picking up fresh greens, or picking up supplemental things for dinner that we didnt get during our big shop on Saturday morning. Things that we always include: -Variety of leafy greens -Olives -Bananas -Apples -Mushrooms -Celery -Lemons -Frozen berries -Avocados -Brown Rice -Fresh herbs -Variety of proteins -Cucumbers -ACV -Pumpkin seed butter -Zucchinis -White & Sweet potatoes -Garlic -Ginger -Dates -Variety nuts & seeds -Seasonal vegetables -Hemp seeds +++ More but those are always staples!  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? I know people wont like this answer, but I actually dont! I can eat 95-100% chocolate, and feel super satisfied. If Im sweetening anything I use dates, bananas, and/­­or a touch of raw honey. -- Are there any particular foods that you find to be helpful with your energy levels and general wellness? Greens!!! I am a greens monster, and feel so deeply connected to them. I love to consume their liquid sunshine properties. Potatoes are also a huge staple for me, as they are easily digested, high in fiber, and the natural sugars are burned as energy for me. Berries – I love wild blueberries and raspberries Spices /­­ herbs – Ginger, garlic, cayenne, nettle, turmeric Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I dont have anything particular right now! My favourite form of exercise is walking! Its highly underrated in my opinion. I live in a big city, without a car, so my mode of transport is Me. I find it meditative, calming, and great exercise. I also practice Kundalini yoga, and will sometimes do some resistance work (P.Volve). -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I find it to be an extension of me, and I dont ever have to force it. I trust my body and flow with what it wants and feels in the season of life that Im in. At the moment Ive been the least active Ive ever been, but its what feels best for me, and my body is welcoming it, and responding beautifully to it. In other seasons of my life Ive done intense and hard workouts at least 4 -5 x per week, and other times Ive done daily exercise. If there is anything Ive learnt along the way, is that nothing good comes from force. When we practice, and learn to tune- in, we will always be guided to what our body needs. In 2020 I want to get back into doing Ballet Beautiful though, as I did it for over two years and felt so graceful, feminine, yet toned. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty, both internal and external? My idea of beauty will always be that is stems from within. And not just the foods that we eat, or supplements we take, but the thoughts we think, our mood, mental state, stress levels, how kind we are...etc. I struggled with really bad acne for years, and addressing all of the above, with nutrition + curated herbs /­­ supplements, actually brought my skin back better than before! Beauty in my eyes is always a projection, and energetic force with regards to whats going on inside. When things are aligned within, I feel beauty just radiates regardless of how we *think* we look. This beautiful energetic force truly knows no bounds. I do still enjoy to take care of my external skin, and body, but I would say its only about 10% of my regime. Everything else stems from internal work! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? MINIMAL. People are so surprised how little I do, as I really do practice what I preach. When we focus on the internal, the external will always reflect that. I use all natural products – Face wash, rose spray, and oil (I rotate a few of my favourite brands – including Living Libations, F. Miller & Marie Veronique) In the summer I mask more (May Lindstrom or just the Aztec Clay mask) I find them too harsh for the winter, so I love a good Manuka honey mask during the winter. -- Do you have any beauty tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Less is more. When I was healing my skin I tried EVERYTHING. I used too many products, stripped my skin, and it all just made it worse. I find my skin is the best the less that I do. Sweating is key, so are hot /­­ cold (contrast showers), kundalini (breathwork) and again coming back to nurturing and feeding (Physical & Mental) your Internal Self, which then shows up Externally. The key is to get things moving & flowing. Digestion, lymph, liver, as this ultimately shows up on the skin. No flow, no glow. Stress, Etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress?  -Meditation (nothing fancy, or prescriptive, just sitting with myself) -Dog walks in nature -Kundalini Yoga -Reading -Nutrition -Seeing loved ones -Spending time with my husband, and puppy -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? -REST /­­ SLEEP – seriously the simplest thing one can do, I just believe we feel as a society that we cant just Be, or cant just take a break -Green juicing -Hot /­­ cold showers to stimulate lymph flow and detoxification -Ginger tea -Broths /­­ soups Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Im quite simple, easy-going, yet Ive always been disciplined, and my husband might say stubborn (my Ukrainian genes :) ). I dont find it that difficult to honour my body, mind, and soul. Ive also been on a deep healing journey since 2006 (got diagnosed with Lyme Disease in 2012), so truly these arent even actions or steps I take, they are just Me. I dont force anything, and allow for flow, ease, while still knowing, and honouring when I need to heal something deeper, take a new direction, and take care of my inner child. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Hmmmm I dont think there is just one thing, as I see things very holistically, and connected. I would say mind work. Focusing on mental strength, vitality, and honouring my subconscious mind, as this is where all of our habits, programs, and deep belief systems live. Our mind is everything, as the body is the unconscious mind.  -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Take a break! It could be an afternoon, a day or even a few. I have a tendency to force things, and when I do nothing flows. Ive learned this the hard way many times over, so I create space to go within. On the other hand, I can get inspired easily via images, nature, people, environments, so its always there for me. Its cheesy, but inspiration can hit at any moment, so I stay open. But when Im stuck, I take a step back or I schedule a brainstorming session with my husband. Just so I can talk things through, get a different perspective ( hes very smart, yet practical). In my business its just me, myself, and I, so it can get pretty insular. Although my goal for 2020 is to hire my first employee!  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. To be honest, nothing outside of myself influenced this or my view. It was losing my health, and healing on a deep level that has brought me to where I am with self-care. Its never been anything to do, if anything its how I practice Being. Ive come to see, and know deeply that our relationship to Self – On a body, mind, and soul level is everything. If we dont show up for ourselves, than we cant for others. But if I were to pick anything in terms of external energy, I would say the book Magdalen Manuscript, its a channeled script of Mary Magdalen. It speaks about Ka energy (life force), and the power of energy that courses through all of Us. The only way to channel this energy, is to nourish ourselves from the inside out. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a holistic nutritionist? When I started to become ill in 2006, it set me on my path. At first it started with my own experiments, lifestyle changes, and reading /­­ self-knowledge for close to six years. Then from there, I took it further to get certified, and study formally. While Im a HN, Ive expanded my view of my work, as I go *much* deeper than just food. My story is WILD, so I wont go into all the details, but when you experience something so deep, intense, and beautiful on your own, you want to help others heal via your journey, knowledge, and gifts (which I believe we all have! Its just up to us to cultivate them). I dont believe I chose this profession, as Ive never felt more called to something. Knowing how crazy, and wild it is to lose one’s health, its my mission to help others tap themselves into their own innate healer. -- What is your healing philosophy? How do you approach working with clients? Ive come to see healing as alchemy. As a society weve been taught that we should just focus on one body part, one thing, one pill, and weve become so singular in our view point and scope of healing /­­ practice. I.E. if we are having back pain, focus on the back. Where as I see everything, and I mean everything holistically. I see the alchemy, and connection between it all – Body, Mind, and Spirit. While we might be having physical pain some place (i.e. back), yes we must look and take care of the cellular body (which I do), but we also have to look at our emotions, trauma, history, and deeper work into the soul, and subconscious. While this isnt the easy work, to me its the only way I know! So when taking on a client, this is where we go. I look at each soul as a unique and individual being. No one is alike, so there isnt a pill or protocol that fits just because someone has been diagnosed with X, and so has their friend. Those two people are so different, have been raised uniquely, have most likely experienced trauma in their own way, and are navigating different life pathways, and stressors. We navigate the deeper parts, so we can heal holistically, sustainably, and in connection with our whole Self. We arent just a body, we are so much more. When we focus on just the body, I dont believe we do ourselves any favours. This is whats often missing in chronic care of  humans and why so many people are just living and coping with pain and dis-ease. We are seeking greater depth, purpose, and fulfilment, yet were left confused, hopeless, and overwhelmed. If I can just bring someone to see that they DO have the power to heal, than man oh man, it just means everything to me! Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Our new puppy Rumi! Hes a Rhodesian Ridgeback, so he will grow to be a big boy, but we are soaking up all the puppy cuddles right now. Also ending off a decade, ushering in a new one , and entering into the year 2020. There is a lot of potent energy coming forth, and Im feeling really charged, clear, and ready for it all. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Nothing really special, I love just the simple things in life. A hot shower, getting into my robe or a grey sweat suit, eating a nourishing dinner, and cuddling with my husband & puppy! Sometimes I will treat myself to a facial, and when I can infrared sauna sessions.  -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Anatomy of the Spirit and Course in Miracles Song/­­Album –   Anything by Bon Iver or Ben Howard or White Sun Movie –   Dirty Dancing (forever & always my favourite) Piece of Art –  I adore a lot of art  /­­ creative work, but some of my favourites include: Renaissance art, Matisse, Unconditional Magazine, Picasso, Christiane Spangsberg. This post contains Amazon Affiliate Links Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post Lisa O’Connor appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Very Berry Quinoa Salad with Cinnamon Toasted Pecans

November 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

This salad is light and fresh yet has plenty of protein from the quinoa and pecans. Fresh summer berries are little powerhouses of vitamins and are super kid-friendly. The toasted pecans take this dish to the next level. This recipe comes to us from The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook by Jenn Sebestyen. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - For the Quinoa: - 1 cup (173 g) tri-color dry quinoa, rinsed well with cold water (or any color quinoa) - 1 1/­­4 cups (295 ml) water   - For the Cinnamon Toasted Pecans: - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons (30 g) pure maple syrup - 1 tablespoon (9 g) coconut sugar or (15 g) brown sugar -  1/­­2 teaspoon ground cinnamon - Pinch of salt - 1 cup (110 g) pecan halves - 1 teaspoon coconut oil   - For the Salad: - 6 cups (330 g) mixed baby salad greens - 2 cups (weight will vary) fresh mixed berries (blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, strawberries, etc.)   - For the Maple Dijon Vinaigrette: - 3 tablespoons (45 g) Dijon mustard - 2 tablespoons (40 g) pure maple syrup, or to taste - 2 tablespoons (28 ml) apple cider vinegar -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt, or to taste -  1/­­2 cup (120 ml) extra-virgin olive oil   For the Quinoa: Combine the quinoa and water in a small pot and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce the heat to medium-low, and simmer for 12 to 15 minutes until the quinoa is tender and the liquid is absorbed. Fluff with a fork.   For the Cinnamon Toasted Pecans: Line a large plate with parchment paper and set aside. In a small bowl, whisk together the maple syrup, sugar, cinnamon, and salt. Add the pecans and stir to coat evenly. Heat the coconut oil in a nonstick skillet over medium heat. Pour the pecans in the skillet, spreading them out in an even layer. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until toasted. Nuts can burn quickly, so dont walk away at this point! Youll know the pecans are done when you start to smell them. Pour them out onto the parchment-lined plate and spread in an even layer. Let them cool. They will crisp up as they cool.   For the Salad: Combine the mixed baby greens, mixed berries, cooked quinoa, and toasted pecans in a large salad bowl. Mix well. To serve, divide among 4 bowls and drizzle with the Maple Dijon Vinaigrette.   For the Maple Dijon Vinaigrette: In a small bowl, whisk together all the ingredients until smooth. Heat the coconut oil in a nonstick skillet over medium heat. Pour the pecans in the skillet, spreading them out in an even layer. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes, stirring frequently, until toasted. Nuts can burn quickly, so dont walk away at this point! Youll know the pecans are done when you start to smell them. Pour them out onto the parchment-lined plate and spread in an even layer. Let them cool. They will crisp up as they cool.   Swap it! Try using romaine, red leaf lettuce, or arugula instead of the mixed baby greens to change it up. The post Very Berry Quinoa Salad with Cinnamon Toasted Pecans appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Meet the Winner of the 2019 Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge in Orlando, Florida

September 30 2019 Meatless Monday 

Meet the Winner of the 2019 Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge in Orlando, FloridaOn Monday, September 16, three finalists competed to be crowned the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Champion. Finalists were chosen from a pool of chefs who submitted original meatless recipes and videos. The competition was judged by a panel of experts including (from left to right) Hari Pulapaka, Ph.D., C.E.C., Executive Chef & Co-Owner, Cress Restaurant; Kristine Palkowetz, Chief Wellness Officer, Joyful Goodness; Kendra Lott, Publisher, Edible Orlando; and Dana Smith, Campaign Director, Meatless Monday. The three competing finalists were: Carly Paige, Founder, FitLiving Eats ; Author, “Simply Swapped Everyday” Chris Dancesia, Owner/­­Chef, Nick’s Bistro Anne Hernandez, Founder, Our Urban Homestead Chefs had 20 minutes to prepare their dishes while discussing the ingredients, flavors, and health benefits. Each chef prepared their favorite meatless dish for the panel of judges. Carly Paige kicked off the competition by preparing her Lentil Walnut Tacos , which she said she knows are good because even her meat and potato loving brother enjoys them. Lentil Walnut Tacos with Cashew Sour Cream & Pineapple Avocado Salsa Anne Hernandez then prepared her Vegan Shephards Pie , a recipe that isnt giving up anything by going plant-based, as it allows you to enjoy a lighter version of a traditional comfort food. Vegan Shepherds Pie Finally, Chef Chris Dancesia prepared Summer Squash and Rice Noodles with Caribbean Gremolata and Coconut Oil , a favorite vegetarian dish at his restaurant. Rice Stick Noodle with Caribbean Gremolata Although a tough decision, the judges awarded Chef Chris as the winner of the Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge. Judges enjoyed the variety of flavors in his dish, as well as the presentation. Growing up in a Slovak Ukrainian family, Chris learned how to cook from a young age. Starting at age 15 as a dishwasher, Chris has spent his career working in restaurants, learning all aspects - from bar back to waiting tables to eventually moving into the kitchen. From 2008 to 2012, Chris worked in a restaurant in Belize before returning to Florida. Earlier this year, his lifelong dream came true as he and a business partner opened Nicks Bistro. Congratulations to Chef Chris! Try all the chefs’ recipes this Meatless Monday and let us know how they came out on Facebook , Instagram , and Twitter . The post Meet the Winner of the 2019 Meatless Monday Rapid Fire Challenge in Orlando, Florida appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sweet Corn, Sausage & Thyme Pizza

September 9 2019 Oh My Veggies 

It has come to my attention that other bloggers have already started posting pumpkin and apple recipes. Sorry guys, I’m not letting go of summer produce that easily. You’re going to have to drag me away from corn and zucchini the same way you have to drag your 3-year-old out of the toy department at Target–crying, kicking, and screaming, “I HATE YOU! YOU’RE THE WORST MOM IN THE WORLD!” So yeah, while everyone else gets a jump start on fall, I’m going to spend the next two weeks enjoying the last bit of summer. I like to cook seasonally and summer produce is still in season! I promise you it is! Sure, you could be eating apples and pumpkin right now, but you’ll have many months to eat apples and pumpkin. What about corn?! You’re going to miss fresh corn in a month when you can’t buy it anymore. You know what you should do? Make this Sweet Corn, Sausage & Thyme Pizza. I make my Fresh Corn, Poblano and Cheddar Pizza at the beginning and end of every summer, but I wanted to try something different, so I threw together this recipe last weekend. I love thyme and corn […]

Chickpea Tahini Salad Sandwich

September 2 2019 Vegan Richa 

Chickpea Tahini Salad SandwichAmazing Chickpea Tahini Salad Sandwich. Summery, crunchy and refreshing Chickpea Salad with pecans, celery, onion, tahini and shawarma spice! Serve in lettuce wraps or sandwiches. Vegan Soyfree Recipe. Can be made nut-free Gluten-free  Jump to Recipe Try these easy Chickpea Tahini Salad Sandwiches just before we say bye to the Summer! Chickpeas are mashed with some tahini, then mixed with crunchy celery and onion and some toasted pecans. The flavors from herbs, shawarma spice and lime bring everything together for a delicious refreshing and spiced summer sandwich! The herbs and spice infuse the salad as it sits, so chill for some time before serving. Serve the salad as is or in lettuce cups for gluten-free. It takes just 15 minutes to put together makes for a protein filled meal. Hubbs scarfed it down with a drizzle of sriracha. because… Sriracha.Continue reading: Chickpea Tahini Salad SandwichThe post Chickpea Tahini Salad Sandwich appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Recipe | Brown Sugar Peach French Toast Cups

August 30 2019 Oh My Veggies 

I know I post a lot of recipes with peaches. And I fully intended to make this recipe with blueberries or blackberries. Blueberries and blackberries! Two fruits that I’ve completely neglected on my blog. But a little nagging voice in my head kept saying, “No! Use peaches! Peaches will be better!” Usually the voice in my head is too busy singing Poison songs to get involved in my cooking process, so I figured I better listen. If nagging inner voice can take a break from “Every Rose Has Its Thorn” on endless repeat for hours at a time, this must be important! So I went with peaches. Again. I promise, next summer will be the summer of blueberries. Blueberry everything! All summer! You have my word. And my word? It’s gold. If you’ve been reading Oh My Veggies for a while, maybe you remember my Sweet Potato French Toast Cups recipe. I wanted to do that again, but with fruit. The thing I love most about making little individual French toasts in muffin tins is that they’re portion-controlled and easy to freeze. Bake ’em, freeze ’em, and heat ’em in the microwave for breakfast. It doesn’t get much easier than […]

Favorite Tomato Recipes

August 28 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite Tomato Recipes Tomatoes are everywhere right now, every color and shape imaginable, and tasting like the most concentrated sunshine. This abundance always feels a little bittersweet, knowing that they will be gone as fast as they came, and that we’ll be moving on to heartier fall fare like squashes and roots soon enough. While they last though, it’s a very good idea to incorporate tomatoes into every meal imaginable. Today we’re sharing a round-up of our favorite tomato-centric recipes that we’ve posted over the years

No-Cook Marinara Sauce

August 21 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

No-Cook Marinara Sauce We became obsessed with this recipe back in our raw food days and have been making it every summer since. It’s the epitome of August cooking – effortless and completely reliant on the sun-fed brightness of peak season tomatoes. This marinara goes well with zucchini noodles for a totally raw meal, but if you’re over zoodles, it’s great tossed with real pasta as well. It also makes for an amazing cold pasta salad dressing. We hope you’re enjoying these toasty days of late summer. We’ll be posting a little less frequently until September, just to soak it all in. Sending you all the love and hugs! P.S. Click here for a bonus recipe for the easiest, most satisfying Summer Curry that we posted over on Instagram. No-Cook Marinara Sauce   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 3 large heirloom or beefsteak tomatoes, or the equivalent in cherry tomatoes - cut in chunks 2-3 halves sun-dried tomatoes - soaked in hot water for a few min if not oil-packed 1-2 soft Medjool dates - pits removed 1-2 garlic cloves - roughly chopped 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice ¼ cup olive oil 1 packed cup fresh basil leaves, plus more for garnish 1-2 leaves or 1 teaspoon of fresh oregano (optional) sea salt and freshly ground black pepper - to taste more halved cherry tomatoes - for serving (optional, we love using Sun Golds here) Instructions Combine the tomatoes, sun-dried tomatoes, dates, garlic, lemon juice, olive oil, basil, oregano (if using), sea salt, and black pepper in a food processor. Process in short pulses, so as to not whip too much air into the marinara, until smooth. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the marinara over pasta or noodles of choice, garnished with more basil and halved cherry tomatoes, if using. Keep refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226 The post No-Cook Marinara Sauce appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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