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Wild Rice and Butternut Blessings

October 5 2021 My New Roots 

Wild Rice and Butternut Blessings Hello friend. Its been a while. I sincerely hope that these words find you getting by as best you can in this strange world we find ourselves in. Staying centered and grounded these days is no small feat, and Im grateful to find myself here again, with the energy and space to share.  This post is actually two years in the making. The experience Im about to tell you about deserves thought, healing, and humility, and though I made a delicious recipe, I needed ample time to learn from, and honour the situation. Almost like with rich decadent food, your body and mind needs time to digest emotion and experience, and over the past 20 months of intense turmoil, discovering and uncovering, and worldly change, there is no better occasion or cultural climate than this moment to share one of my lifes most potent experiences. I hope youll join me on the entirety of this journey and take the time to read and digest it for yourself too. I welcome conscious comments and will receive your words gracefully and with humility in regards to my personal history and ask kindly that the inevitable missteps, mistakes, and /­­ or insensitivities in my story shared below are highlighted with respect and with the intention of learning, inspiring community and healing, and are supportive of a better and more just future.   The People Ill begin by introducing the people of the story that span many generations, many places of origin, and many cultures: The Anishinaabeg – an Indigenous community made up of the Ojibwa, Odawa, Potawatami, Chippewa, Mississauga, Algonquin, and Delaware peoples who stewarded the Great Lakes Basin before and through the late 1600s. A man named James Whetung of the Black Duck clan, Anishinaabe who has called this land home for his lifetime and the many generations before him. My European ancestors who arrived in this same area (Upper Canada then, and what is now known as Southern Ontario) in the early-to-mid 1800s. A young man named Mossom Boyd, my great-, great-, great-grandfather, who landed in 1833. He purchased 100 acres of land and cleared it himself in the hopes of building a prosperous life. After farming for a few years, he wasnt making the income hed hoped for, and sought work at a local sawmill, eventually taking it over, on the site which is now Bobcaygeon, Ontario.   As Boyd continued to work the land, benefitting from the abundant natural resources, he experienced great success with his lumbering enterprise. He later went on to cut forests in great swathes across Ontario, then moved out west to Vancouver Island with his son, Martin Mossom Boyd, who eventually took over the business. Needless to say, the familys enterprise had an indelible impact on the Canadian landscape and the Indigenous peoples. Me, a white, privileged woman who benefits from this history in seen and unseen ways with a mission to inspire health to the people of this world through conscious choices. Heres one of my many stories...  My Family I spent my summers in the Kawartha Lakes, just 12 kilometers upstream from the reserve where James lived and lives. My grandparents lived on the canal at the mouth of Pigeon lake, on the Trent-Severn Waterway. My grandfather owned a substantial portion of the land there (how we understand owned in our modern world), and a 1085-acre island just off the shoreline.  I was a very lucky kid to have so much wild land to explore, play with, and learn from. To say I feel connected to nature, to the earth and water, to the elements there, would be an understatement. That forest and lake are inside of me, just as much as I am inside of it – I knew every rock, nook, cranny, and crevice. I knew the plants, the poison ivy, the lichen, the cedar; the shallow soil, dry and bare rocks, the limestone; I can evoke the alchemical aroma of it all in an instant. My hideaways along the shoreline in giant rock fractures were coated in moss and gnarled cedar roots, and there I would live in worlds of my imagination, connected to natures creations and its magnetic energy. The sensation of being there, on every level, is burned into my being. It is cellular memory.    Mossom Boyd 1814-1883 /­­ My father and I canoeing on Pigeon Lake /­­ Fishing on Pigeon Lake, 1990 There is a museum in town, named after my great-great-great grandfather Mossom, honouring his vision and entrepreneurial genius (as our culture recognizes). This history was one to celebrate, an empire that spanned the country, a legacy to be proud of. We would visit the museum almost every summer when I was growing up, so that I could better understand where I came from. These truths coexisted within me — nature and empire. As I began to see the complexities of this place that is deeply a part of me, I sought out a way to understand the same land, water, air, forest through the eyes, hands, and hearts of the people with a completely different history to the shared nature and to the empire of my lineage.  The Whetungs James family has been living with the land known as the Michi Saagig Anishinaabeg territory for approximately 4,000 years, dated by wild rice fossils found by geologists. This being the same land, that Mossom Boyd purchased 3,780 years later.  When I drove up to Curve Lake First Nations to experience a wild rice (known as manoomin) harvest two years ago, I met James Whetung and his family. The man whose name I had heard before, but was admittedly afraid to come face to face with, as I had some idea of how my lineage had impacted his. At least I thought I knew. When the group of us had all arrived and settled, James introduced himself, and told his story – the side that I had never heard before. They cut all the trees, floated them down river using the highways of my people. They needed clearer waterways, so they dredged the lakes and removed the rice beds that had provided our food. The First Nations peoples were forcefully moved to reserves, and confined there, needing written permission to leave, and only in order to work for local farmers at slave wages. You had to be Christian to live on the reserve, and Natives were not allowed to practice their own spirituality or pass it on to subsequent generations. The people were starving. Listening to James, and hearing first-hand what his ancestors had gone through because of my ancestors, was heartbreaking, and it filled me with bitter shame and confusion. What was once a celebrated history of my family, became tainted and disgraceful. When he was finished, I raised my hand to speak, compelled to admit that I came from the family he was talking about. The lineage and industry that changed the landscape of his ancestors’ home. That I was deeply remorseful. He responded graciously by inviting me to canoe out with him to harvest manoomin. He said that those on the reserves eventually were able to take the remaining rice seeds and plant them. By 1920, the yields were up but only until the 1950s when destructive colonial farming practices began using chemicals (many of which still are in use today), which created chemical run-off causing imbalances in the lakes, soil, air, and water, further affecting the aquatic grasses; the nutritious, traditional food source.   Wild Rice on Pigeon Lake Canadian cottage culture took off in the area around this time as well, motor boat traffic increased destroying the rice beds, and leaked oil and gas into the water. Septic beds were added for sewage treatment, but none were regulated and leaching into lakes was a regular occurrence. In the years between 1950 and 1980, the Trent Severn Waterway underwent a weed eradication program using agent orange (a highly toxic herbicide) to make swimming more enjoyable for the cottagers. Shortly after, James started planting seeds to feed his family and community despite the many cultural and environmental concerns out of his control. Wild rice as a traditional food source is highly nutritious and is known to help prevent diabetes — a huge problem within Indigenous peoples due to a forced disconnection from their traditional practices and nourishment sources. James started sowing seeds on Pigeon lake, where his grandfather had seeded and harvested for many generations. He was healing his people, and as demand increased, he started to invent technologies to make his work easier and faster. The increased production meant that he could not only feed his community, but start selling his wild rice at local farmers markets.  Unfortunately, not everyone is as enthusiastic about the wild rice increase in Pigeon and surrounding lakes. Since 2007, a group of cottagers have been fighting against Whetungs seeding of wild rice, claiming that the shoreline is their property and that the rice beds impede recreational boating. Theyve gone so far as to form a protest group, called Save Pigeon Lake, which asks James to harvest without the use of a motorboat (he did this to increase efficiency) and to stop seeding the rice.  Canada and Curve Lake First Nation are both signatories to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. This Declaration states that Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain and develop their political, economic and social systems or institutions, to be secure in the enjoyment of their own means of subsistence and development, and to engage freely in all their traditional and other economic activities (Article 20). And further, that Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain, control, protect and develop their cultural heritage, traditional knowledge, and traditional cultural expressions, as well as the manifestations of the sciences, technologies and cultures, including human and genetic resources, seeds, medicines, knowledge of the properties of fauna and flora... (Article 31). The rice beds run along the TSW in the tri-lakes area, which includes Buckhorn, Chemong and Pigeon lakes. Despite the concerns of waterfront property owners, Whetung says the land falls under Treaty 20 and is therefore not under the jurisdiction of the TSW, which is operated by Parks Canada.  About James Im going to keep doing what I am doing. Why would I stop? Our people have starved for thousands of years. This is food; this is a livelihood, says Whetung. And personally, as an advocate for healthy food access for all, for a thriving world, and supported communities, I whole-heartedly agree. For more about James and his community’s work, please visit the Black Duck Wild Rice website. I am deeply grateful for James time, energy, heart, perseverance, and spirit. This is a forever healing journey and one I intend to continue with the peoples intrinsically linked to my own familys history here in Canada. Wild Rice Harvesting and Preparation Let’s talk about this beautiful offering, manoomin, or wild rice. Having always been drawn to this remarkable plant, I knew that when I moved back to Ontario, Canada, I had to learn more about it firsthand, and perhaps even how to harvest and process it. That is what led me to James and Black Duck Wild Rice. Every year around the September full moon, the manoomin harvest takes place, and he and his community welcome those who want to join and learn. Harvesting James taught us the traditional way, in canoes, all by hand. With two people per boat, one navigates and steers, while the other uses two long, thin sticks (bawa’iganaakoog); one to bend the rice into the canoe and the other to beat the grasses until the rice seeds fall into the hull of the canoe. Once you get the hang of it, it’s rhythmic and meditative, but still a physical and time-consuming ritual that requires community. As with most traditional food cultivation practices its a closed loop cycle, for whatever rice that doesnt fall into the canoe to be processed falls into the water, planting next years crop at the same time! Curing Once on shore, the canoes are emptied by hand onto large sheets which are transferred to a cool dark place so the rice can cure. Two or three times a day for a week or so, the rice is turned and aerated, left to dry.  Toasting /­­ Parching The rice was traditionally toasted in a cast-iron cauldron over an open fire. James showed me how to use an old canoe paddle to turn the rice constantly so as not to scorch it — its texture and scent slowly transformed. This takes about an hour of constant stirring with a keen eye on the fire so it remains at the perfect temperature for toasting. If you stop for even a second, the rice will burn. James could tell from the smell, and how the rice felt between his fingers when it was ready the mark of a true artisan, energetically connected to his craft. Nowadays, James uses a machine that he designed and built himself, that stirs the rice automatically over open flames and gets the rice toasty faster and with less manual labour. Toasting the rice increases the flavour, and helps preserve it. If properly toasted and dry, wild rice can last in storage for five years or more (a necessity to help balance the yearly ebbs and flows of the harvest).  Dancing /­­ Jigging This was my favourite part of the process because it involved several people working together, and having the pleasure and honour of wearing beautiful, specially-designed moccasins just for this process. The toasted rice is put into another large cauldron (or sometimes a hole in the ground lined with leather cloth or a tarp) while three people sit around it, with our feet in the center. Once we had our soft shoes laced all the way up, we vigorously twisted and swooshed our feet around on the rice to loosen some of the chaff from the rice kernels — this was extremely hard work! We rotated through the group as people got tired, and eventually we were ready for the last step. Winnowing The danced rice is then turned out onto a large fabric sheet, with everyone holding the edge with both hands. Count to three and up the rice goes into the air, the breeze blowing the chaff away. This needs to be repeated countless times to separate the rice from the chaff completely. This is unbelievably time-consuming work and experiencing it first hand made me appreciate every grain so much more! At the end of a grounding day of traditional work, you are gifted a few cups of cleaned wild rice. The appreciation I felt to see the yield of the countless hours by many people, not to mention the effort and contribution of this Earth truly became overwhelming. The experience solidified how food has the unparalleled ability to bring people together — requiring many enthusiastic, hard-working hands (and feet!) to get the job done, start to finish. At the end of the journey, everyone is rewarded with delicious food, straight from the Earth, her waters, her people. It is so simple, and so powerful. Wildly Nutritious Wild rice is not related to true rice nor is a grain at all in fact, but the seed of aquatic grass that grows along the shores of freshwater lakes in Canada and the Northern US. Its a little more expensive than other varieties, as it is often harvested by hand.  Wild rice is also, of course, wildly nutritious and is no surprise that Indigenous peoples made a point to cultivate this true super food. Containing high levels of protein, fiber, iron, and calcium, wild rice is also gluten-free. It is extremely high in folic acid, an essential B-complex vitamin lacking in many peoples diets. Just half a cup of cooked wild rice yields 21.3 mcg of folic acid – necessary for cardiovascular support, red blood cell production, brain and nervous system health, and of particular importance during pregnancy – where brown rice by comparison offers only 3.9 mcg. The niacin content of wild rice is also notably high with l.06 mg for every 1/­­2 cup cooked rice. Potassium packs an 83 mg punch, and zinc, which is usually available in trace amounts, registers 1.1 mg. Wild rice is a wonderful alternative to any grain that you would use in either hot or cold dishes. My favourite is to enjoy it in veggie bowls, soups and stews, as well as hearty salads. Its rich, nutty flavour pairs well with other earthy-sweet foods like beets, sweet potato, pumpkins and squash, making it the perfect ingredient to add to your fall recipes, already full of abundance and gratitude. It lasts for about a week after cooking, so making a large batch at the beginning of the week will give you the honour to grace your meals with a serious boost of nutrition and spirit with every grain! Wild Rice & Butternut Blessings This recipe was born from the desire to combine the elements that James and I had a hand in growing: wild rice from his lake, and butternut squash from my garden, coming together for one beautiful meal. Stacking the squash rounds makes for a grand, dramatic, and eye-catching presentation where the simple ingredients are made into something very special. This would be the most stunning main dish for a harvest celebration meal, or even into the winter holidays. It has the perfect balance of flavours, textures, and nutrition, so youll feel satisfied on every level. Try to find a butternut squash with a long and hefty neck. Since we are after nice big rounds, the longer your neck, the more rounds youll have! And try to source your wild rice from a local reserve or farmers market, if possible. There are several components to this recipe, but Ive written it in a way that you can juggle all the elements with seamless management of your time.    Print Wild Rice and Butternut Blessings with Mushrooms, Toasted Walnut Garlic Sauce, and Sumac Author Sarah Britton Ingredients4 lb. /­­ 2kg butternut squash about 1 large, try to find one with a long neck! 1 cup /­­ 175g wild rice soaked for at least 12 hours 9 oz. /­­ 250g mixed wild mushrooms or any mushroom of your choice 3 cloves garlic minced a couple sprigs fresh thyme and rosemary 1/­­2 cup /­­ 13g chopped flat-leaf parsley 1 batch Toasted Walnut Sauce recipe follows 1 Tbsp. sumac divided freshly cracked black pepper handful of walnuts for garnish if desired Toasted Walnut Garlic Sauce1 cup /­­ 125g raw walnuts 1 garlic clove 2 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 4 tsp. apple cider vinegar 2 tsp. pure maple syrup 2 generous pinches of fine sea salt plus more as needed InstructionsStart by cooking the wild rice: drain and rinse the soaked rice well, place in a pot. Add 3 cups /­­ 750ml of fresh water, a couple pinches of sea salt, then bring to a boil, and reduce to simmer. Cook until rice is chewy-tender - about 45 minutes. While the rice is cooking, preheat the oven to 350°F /­­ 180°C. Spread the walnuts in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet. Toast for 7 to 10 minutes, watching them carefully so they do not burn, until they are golden and fragrant. Remove from the oven and let cool slightly. Turn the oven heat up to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Give the butternut squash a good scrub, making sure to remove any dust or dirt. Leaving the skin on, slice the squash neck into rounds about 1 /­­ 2.5cm thick. Place on a baking sheet, sprinkle with a little salt, and roast in the oven for 20-30 minutes, flipping once halfway through cooking, until the squash is fork tender. Remove from the oven and drizzle with olive oil and a little more salt, if desired.  While the squash is roasting, make the Toasted Walnut Sauce. Place the toasted walnuts, garlic, olive oil, apple cider vinegar, and maple syrup in a blender. Blend on high, adding up to 1 cup /­­ 250ml of water to thin the dressing as needed--you are looking for the consistency of melted ice cream. Season with salt. Store in an airtight glass container in the fridge for up to 5 days. Lastly, prepare the mushrooms. Clean and cut the mushrooms as desired (I used king oyster mushrooms, sliced in half lengthwise and scored diagonally). Add a knob of your favourite cooking fat to a large skillet, and once melted add the mushrooms and a couple pinches of salt. Cook the mushrooms without crowding them, and do not move them about in the pan too much. Youre looking for a nice sear and that comes after the mushrooms have been in constant, direct contact with high heat. Once golden on one side, flip, and continue cooking until golden on the other. In a large bowl, combine the wild rice and parsley. Drizzle a touch of the sauce and about 1/­­2 Tbsp. of the sumac, a few grinds of black pepper, and fold to incorporate. To assemble, drizzle or puddle some sauce on the bottom of your serving plate. Add a round of butternut squash, followed by the wild rice mixture, a couple mushrooms, then repeat the layers of squash, rice, mushrooms. Drizzle remaining sauce over top, sprinkle with additional sumac and black pepper, and a handful of walnuts. Say thank you and enjoy each bite, each grain. NotesServes 4 Makes approximately 1 cup /­­ 270ml of Sauce In Closing I would love to hear your thoughts about how we can better respect and heal our pasts culturally, together. I wanted to open up the conversation here, not try to offer some kind of solution. This is a complicated, complex, deeply layered issue that has deep roots, well beyond us here today. I feel really lucky to have had the opportunity to be in a canoe with James himself, to witness how to harvest with intention and gratitude. It felt deeply meaningful to be there with him, the place our two family lines have crossed in many ways for many years, finally converging in a peaceful, cooperative, and hopefully reciprocal way. This extends far beyond James and I, and takes many more hands and hearts. The first step of many, I am forever grateful to James for sharing the story of his family and community as it has been silenced for too long. Thank you for taking the time to read this today. Id also like to add for those who havent seen Canadian news over the past few months, that there has been uncovering of more extreme darkness in this country in relation to the Indigneous people of this land. The residential school system removed children from their Indigenous culture, communities, families, and ways of being. These Anglo-Saxon, Christian boarding schools are sites of mass unmarked graves where thousands of children’s bodies were found, taken from their families. There are many agencies working towards healing, remediation, and reconciliation in response to these unfathomable atrocities in our history. One of them is the Downie Wenjack Foundation, which aims to to aid our collective reconciliation journey through a combination of awareness, education, and action. This link will take you to their page about Reconcili-ACTION, and a list of ways to catalyze important conversations and meaningful change, recognizing that change starts with every one of us and each person can make an impact. The post Wild Rice and Butternut Blessings appeared first on My New Roots.

Mediterranean Chickpea Salad – Balela Salad

September 22 2020 Vegan Richa 

Mediterranean Chickpea Salad – Balela SaladThis colorful Mediterranean Chickpea Salad known as Balela salad is hearty, refreshing, and bursting with fresh herbs and zesty flavor from the fresh lemon garlic dressing. So easy, so delicious, and so satisfying! Turn it into an easy weeknight meal by serving it with pita bread! Jump to Recipe Coming at you with a protein-packed power salad that is as satisfying as delicious: Balela Salad! A very popular salad in the Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cuisine. Don’t you love how fresh and festive it looks? In Arabic, the word balela means cooked chickpeas and they are indeed the main ingredient in this salad. However, we also add some extra crunch from cucumbers, peppers and a zesty sumac lemon garlic dressing takes this salad to the next level.  It is simple, wholesome, bright, and flavor-packed and you will LOVE every bite of it.Continue reading: Mediterranean Chickpea Salad – Balela SaladThe post Mediterranean Chickpea Salad – Balela Salad appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes

January 1 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes Lauren Haynes is a folk herbalist, medicine maker, plant enthusiast, and the founder of Wooden Spoon Herbs, a small apothecary line based in the Appalachian mountains. Take a look at Lauren’s shop offerings, and you’ll be immersed in a world of plant-powered tinctures, salves, oxymels, and teas, each one more magical than the other. In this interview, Lauren tells us about self-care as a form of self-respect, kindness as a form of beauty, her favorite plants for stress, beauty, and colds (and more!), the importance of sourcing her ingredients locally and working with what’s available, as well as exercise, sustenance, inspiration, procrastination, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Oh, open and free, absolutely. Since I work from home, things end up being pretty routine: tea, emails, breakfast. But if I have my way I love to see how the day unfolds uninhibited. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. Most mornings start with a hot tea or something creamy with raw milk and occasionally marshmallows. I check and return emails first thing, then Ill meditate and make some breakfast and get to work. On lazier mornings well go into the small town nearby and eat eggs benedict and read the paper. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My new favorite nighttime tool is the Flux app for my computer. It gradually turns your screen from blue light to orange with the arc of the day, so the blue light doesnt deter melatonin production come bedtime. Other than that, just reading a great book until my eyes get tired. Living out in the county where its dark and quiet helps me sleep soundly every night. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – smoked salmon omelette with sauteéd greens Lunch – egg salad sandwich with a bowl of good soup Snack – fruit or hummus or a little chocolate Dinner – soul food: pinto beans, cornbread, a baked sweet potato and collard greens, topped with hot sauce and ferments and a slice of blue cheese -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink tea most mornings. Sometimes matcha or Earl Grey, or sometimes just ginger and lemon balm, to ground and calm myself before a hectic day. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Um... yes, check. I have a major sweet tooth and Lilys stevia-sweetened chocolate bars save my life. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Right now my regimen includes fish oil, Mothers Best beef liver pills, a tincture of medicinal mushrooms, and evening primrose oil. I also love using lymphatic herbs steeped in vinegar throughout the year. Every spring I steep whatever edible herbs are coming up naturally in raw apple cider vinegar: plantain, violet leaf, dead nettle, dandelion greens, chickweed and cleavers. That lasts me all year and keeps me feeling vital, just a spoonful a day. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I try to exercise but if I have a full schedule its the first thing I cut out. I live on a tract of wilderness, so walking a few miles a day is super easy and I do that interspersed with yoga when Im feeling too tired to get outside. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? A little bit of both! Its definitely hard to make the time for it since I work from home and just go, go, go. I definitely find walking in the woods pleasurable, so that keeps me motivated to exercise. I cant even imagine going to a gym... Maybe someday. Exercise is something Im starting to get excited about. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? True beauty is when someone makes you feel like your soul is illuminated by the way that they treat you. Thats what is beautiful to me. If I want external beauty, Ill just scroll Instagram for a bit, you know? But true kindness is actual beauty. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Laidback is how I would describe my skincare routine. See also: erratic. I use a rosewater and witch hazel toner daily (Poppy & Someday), followed by a blend of rosehip and carrot seed oil (Zizia Botanicals). Sometimes I use a gentle rose quartz scrub on my face (Aquarian Soul), followed by oil cleansing, but usually Im pretty lowkey. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Yes! Nettle and alfalfa infusions, and also evening primrose oil internally. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Drink tons of water, sleep as much as you can, and wear red lipstick. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Consistent routines are hard for me, but I am constantly checking in to make sure I dont get overwhelmed by stress, even if that means five minutes of yoga in the middle of the day. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I really love regular acupuncture treatments and massage, as well as daily meditation and moxibustion. Calming teas that ease tension, like ginger and chamomile. Also just goofing off as much as I can get away with. You cant be silly and stressed at the same time. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? My first line of defense is a few dropperfuls of fire cider. I make one called Sunshine Cider with turmeric and rosehips, but my friend Gretchen made me some with habanero peppers and that always helps me stay on the right side of health. Fire cider, a shot of elderberry syrup and then some red root tincture, an amazing lymphatic herb that relieves a sore throat. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely bleed together, as I work from home and run my business with my partner. I try to take the weekends off and get out of the house daily to break up the work mode, even if its just a drive to the post office. Luckily, I love my work because its a huge part of my life. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Honestly, mindfulness is key. Just checking in with myself constantly to see how Im feeling, why Im feeling that way and what I need. I just take little tea or chocolate breaks or go put some sun on my face or make a nourishing meal. A hot shower if Im feeling cold. Self massage if Im feeling anxious. Shutting the computer if Im getting tired. And making time for the little things that make me happy, like reading a book. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Cleaning up my diet was key for me in resolving a lot of health issues. In college I was just eating garbage and drinking alcohol and doing all the teenage things. Once I realized that youre literally what you eat, and started treating my body with respect, a lot shifted for me. I really feel like that small change helped align me with the path Im on now, which is 100% what Im supposed to be doing. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Im usually brimming with ideas and running myself ragged trying to make them all happen, so if I struggle with anything its occasional procrastination. Usually this looks like doing the easier things on my to-do list before the hard-hitting work chores, which isnt such a bad thing. I just kind of let myself have some slower times, because I work really hard. I may sip tea and pull tarot cards and then eventually get a burst of energy. Or sometimes I do nothing for like two full days. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. So, so many. I love The Gift of Healing Herbs by Robin Rose Bennett and Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz, as well as so many books from the 70s by obscure hippies and natural living advocates. Living on the Earth by Alicia Bay Laurel, for example. Knowledge -- What was your path to studying herbology and founding Wooden Spoon Herbs? I came to herbs when looking for a path to self-sufficiency. I romanticized living off the land, providing all that I would need for myself through my connection to the earth. And thats basically how it happened. I got all the books I could find about herbalism, read them, and started making herbal remedies. I started selling them slowly and it just kind of took off. Then I got to put my business hat on and thats been such a rewarding challenge. -- Can you talk a little bit about your decision to work only with herbs native to your home region of Appalachia? Theres so much to say about this. When I started opening my eyes to the bounty that surrounded me, it struck me as absurd to order herbs from suppliers that sourced from the far corners of the earth, when we had so many of the same herbs that could be sourced from the bioregion of Appalachia. For example, why am I going to order nettle that comes from Croatia when my friend has an acre of it on her farm? And no offense to Croatia or the herbalists that use those sources, but it just wasnt for me. I saw the opportunity to create a righteous supply chain and source from local farmers and forage my materials. To this day I still source directly from small organic farms around the country. Appalachias medicinal herbs are legendary: ginseng, goldenseal, bloodroot. People from all over the world use these herbs exclusively. And many of the herbs used in Traditional Chinese Medicine grow in Appalachia, because when the continents were Pangea parts of what is now China and parts of Appalachia were the same land. The geography of these regions is still very similar, and that is really special. So I wanted to learn about these plants for myself, because they are my neighbors and we share the same space. Not to mention that my family has been on this land for at least five generations, probably more. Its my most recent ancestral tradition, and I think its really important to learn about the traditions of your own ancestors so that youre not co-opting someone elses. Our pasts are precious. Finally, I believe in slow, local medicine for the same reasons I believe in slow, local foods – because theyre more potent and they taste better. -- What are some of your best-selling products and what herbs is your customer most excited about at the moment? My bestsellers are the Anxiety Ally, Brain Tonic, Moontime Magic and Migraine Melter tinctures. Elderberry Sumac Syrup is always a hit, as well as the Golden Cocoa (adaptogenic golden milk meets hot chocolate). I also have some new, more esoteric offerings based on the elements, and the Spirit one has been selling really well. I think my customers are just always after herbs that ground and expand the spirit, which is super beautiful. That and herbs for stress, always. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment?  Podcasts! All the podcasts: Medicine Stories, Thats So Retrograde, So You Wanna Be A Witch, Being Boss. That and the color cobalt blue. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love seeking out hot springs, getting massages and acupuncture, going to the movies with my partner and eating at good restaurants. In the summer, swimming in the river behind my house and lying in the sun. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Caravan by Stephen Gaskin Song/­­Album – Tried So Hard by Gene Clark Piece of art – the entire Motherpeace tarot deck -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? My favorite mohair cardigan, a striped shirt, high-waisted leggings and denim, Poppy & Somedays Gypsy Rose Toner, whatever books Im reading, a notebook and Uniball pen, magazines, calming tinctures, bagged tea, thermos, Ricardo Medina botines, charcoal toothbrush -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Jess Fuery, Beatrice Valenzuela, Shiva Rose, the founders of Cap Beauty, Ashley Neese, Connie Matisse of East Fork Pottery, jeweler Annika Kaplan, Erica Chidi Cohen, Rachel Craven, Beth Kirby of Local Milk, Rachel Budde of Fat and the Moon, Kristen Dilley of Nightingale Acupuncture, and, naturally, Ilana Glazer Photos by Beth Kirby and Lauren Haynes You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Rainbow Root Tangles

April 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Rainbow Root Tangles Apart from discussing important topics like if it’s worth climbing a mountain of bureaucracy to change baby Gabriel’s name (long story…), if we would be much happier running a smoothie bar on a small tropical island than living in a cold and dark Stockholm (obviously that is a yes), and how ALL of Elsa’s leggings suddenly have huge tears around the knees (she swears that she is innocent), we have also spent the past week playing around with this super simple recipe based on root shoestrings. It turns out that if you spiralize (check notes below if you don’t have a spiralizer) root vegetables, toss them in a little bit of oil and salt, arrange into tangled nests and roast for 25 minutes, you get something similar to rösti or hash browns. These little root tangles are quick, cheap and easy, they are crispy towards the edges and soft in the middle, contain a lot more nutrients than just potatoes and since they are baked instead of pan-fried, they don’t cause a smoke alarm situation in the kitchen. Not to mention how pretty they look with the different colors combined. Our kids devour them straight from the plate (they call them root fries) and we have been using these root tangles as a base for a bunch of meals lately. In this recipe we’ve topped them with yogurt and a herby chickpea salad, which is perfect as you get something creamy, a few greens and proteins along with the roots. But they also work well paired with avocado mash, hummus or with a poached egg, asparagus and spinach on top, for an Easter twist. Instead of trying to convince you with words, we did a little recipe video for our youtube channel that shows how it’s done. Press play! We always have so much fun making these videos, can’t believe it’s been seven months since we last did one - that needs to change. You can basically use any roots or hard vegetable of preference to make these - beetroot, potato, sweet potato, carrot, parsnip, turnip and even butternut squash. If you choose organic, you don’t have to bother peeling them. It actually tastes better with the peel left on, just like sweet potato fries. You can obviously flavor these root tangles in lots of ways. Try tossing them with cinnamon or sumac, or add vinegar for an acidic twist. If you prefer them crisp all the way through, you can spread them out on the trays instead of arranging them like nests. If you don’t have a spiralizer, you can use a julienne peeler or the coarse side of a box grater instead (you can place the grated roots in muffin tins if you like them to hold together better). Although a spiralizer is pretty fun tool to have at home. It doesn’t cost much and it’s great for making vegetable noodles and slices that can be used in pasta dishes, salads or thai noodle dishes. Roasted Root Tangles with Yogurt and Chickpea Salad Serves 4 1 1/­­2 lb /­­ 750 g mixed roots (we used 1 sweet potato, 3 beetroots, 1 parsnip) 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tsp salt Herby Chickpea Salad 2 cups mixed baby leaf lettuce 4 sprigs cilantro /­­ coriander 4 sprigs fresh mint 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g can chickpeas /­­ garbanzo beans 2 tbsp toasted sesame oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice To serve 1 cup Turkish yogurt or coconut yogurt 1 avocado 2 tbsp mixed sesame seeds sauerkraut (fermented cabbage), store-bought or homemade (we are sharing three varieties in our new book) Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F and grease or place baking paper on two baking trays. Rinse the roots and scrub off any dirt. Trim off the edges, attach to a spiralizer and make noodles/­­ribbons/­­shoestrings (or use a julienne peeler or box grater). Drizzle with olive oil and salt and toss and mix so all root ribbons are combined. If you have very long ribbons, you can cut them with a scissor to make it easier to mix. Arrange the tangled ribbons into nests and place on the baking tray, make sure that there aren’t too many loose ribbons on the sheet or they will burn quicker. Roast for 25-30 minutes or until crispy on the outside but not yet burnt. While the roots are roasting, prepare the salad. Chop the herbs and mix with the lettuce. Rinse the chickpeas thoroughly and add them to the lettuce. Drizzle with toasted sesame oil, lemon juice and sea salt. Toss and mix. Divide the avocado into quarters, remove the stone and use a sharp knife to slice each quarter thinly. Remove the roots from the oven. Arrange 2-3 root tangles on each plate. Add a dollop of yogurt on each root tangle, top with salad, sliced avocado, sesame seeds and a spoonful of sauerkraut. Enjoy! *********** PS! Today Green Kitchen At Home is released in Australia! And in just three weeks it will launch in the UK and next month in the US. Exciting! Here are some links in case you would like to order or pre-order it: Amazon.co.uk (UK). Amazon.com (USA). Booktopia.com (Australia & NZ).

Vegan Meatballs

November 4 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Vegan Meatballs Hey friends! We’re happy to be back with a new post after some away-time. The reason for our absence is that we have been busy cuddling with our new family member. We are calling him Little Brother until we have decided on his real name (so difficult this time!). We are all feeling well and are mighty happy (even though our mornings have become a tad more chaotic) .  He’s a sleepy little fella. For today’s recipe we decided to revive a section on the blog that we started last year and then forgot all about. We call it Homemade Whole Food Staples and today’s recipe fits right in. In our preparations for little brother’s arrival we have been filling our freezer with food and these vegetarian meatballs/­­ vegan polpette have proved themselves really useful. They are quick to make, freeze well and are easily heated. We use them as a protein rich supplement to many dishes (see a few examples below) or as a simple main dish with pasta and a sauce.  Since we have so many egg-based patties in the archive, we made these vegan, using chickpeas as the protein source and binder. They are literally filled with vegetables and have almond flour and potato starch as thickener. Kind of like a vegetable packed baked falafel. Not only are they really healthy but they are absolutely delicious too, with sweetness from the carrots and peas a savouriness from the spices.  Just like with our apple cake recipe, we have been experimenting quite a bit to get the amounts right as we wanted to have the option to both cook them in a frying pan (for times when you just want to fry up a few) or in the oven (for larger batches). They get smoother texture in the frying pan but it is a bit more fiddly to get them evenly fried. My favorite method is however to make a huge batch (double batch if you can fit it into your blender), roll them and place on two trays. I then under bake them slightly and let them cool entirely before filling the freezer with them. Because they are slightly under baked, I can reheat them without risking that they get dry and boring. They can be reheated either in a pan or in the oven. Here we have served them with some quinoa and a vegetarian lentil bolognese. They work really well with a pesto sauce as well. Here they appear in one of our #gksbowls with, golden krauts, garlic-fried kale, carrot ribbons, mushrooms, tomatoes, avocado, a sunny egg, za’atar and a drizzle of tahini. Insanely good! And here we’re about to roll them inside a wrap. There are lots of other possibilities. Isac prefers munching on them as a hand-held snack (although he is pretty tired of them at this point as we have served them with almost every meal for the past couple of weeks ...). Vegan Polpette Makes 30 We use nutritional yeast to add extra depth to the flavour. It can be found in health food stores or online. If you are not vegan, it can be replaced with some grated cheese. Or simply leave it out. We kept the spices quite simple but you can try adding cayenne, sumac or curry to them for different flavour variations. 1 onion, peeled 2 garlic cloves, peeled 1 inch /­­ 2,5 cm fresh ginger, peeled 2 medium carrots or 3-4 smaller (200 g /­­ 7 oz), peeled 1 cup /­­ 130 g frozen sweet peas, slightly thawed 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tin chickpeas OR 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 230 g cooked chickpeas, rinsed a handful kale, coarsely chopped and thick stems discarded  1/­­2 cup /­­ 50 g almond flour (can be replaced with breadcrumbs) 4 tbsp potato starch 1 tbsp nutritional yeast (optional) 1 1/­­2 tsp salt 1/­­2 tsp cumin 1/­­2 tsp allspice black pepper Set the oven to 360°F /­­ 180°C (if you are baking them) and cover a baking sheet with baking paper. Grate onion, ginger and carrots on a box grater or using the grating attachment on a food processor. Switch to the regular knife attachment on the food processor. Add the rest of the ingredients and mix until the chickpeas have been mashed, with small bits and pieces of the peas and carrots still intact. With moist hands, roll the  into balls using roughly 1 tbsp of batter for each ball and place on the baking sheet. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until golden. You can flip them a few times if you like them rounder but I usually skip this and settle for one slightly flatter side. It’s easier. If you are freezing them right away, let them bake for a few minutes shorter, then let cool completely (they firm up as they cool down), transfer to freezer containers or bags and place in the fridge or freezer. To make them in a frying pan, simply fry with a little oil on low/­­medium heat (they melt and get flat on too high heat) for about 10-15 minutes. Flip/­­roll them often to get them evenly fried. PS! Make sure to check back next week as we have an exciting give-away coming up together with Vitamix!

Roasted Cauliflower & Za’atar Salad

April 7 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Cauliflower & Za’atar Salad As the cauliflower was roasting in the oven and I was busy preparing the other vegetables, the smell of burnt plastic started oozing through the kitchen. I could hear our pyromanic son laughing as he ran from the crime scene into the next room. All the dials for the stove top were switched on to full heat and our poor old spatula was melting away on the stove. I had barely scraped it clean before I could hear him giggling again, this time from our bedroom. In less than a minute, he had managed to pull out every pair of clothing he could possibly reach from our wardrobe and was currently bathing in a sea of trousers. “No harm in that” I thought and left him for a minute to check on the cauliflower and continue preparing the vegetables and chickpeas. All of a sudden it went quiet in the bedroom and then ... “squeeeeak” the sound of pebbles scraping against glass, cut through the apartment. Isac had just figured out that he could use our iPad as a skateboard and was skating away in the hallway. He’s an awesome little guy but sometimes he is simply a hooligan with more energy than the sun. This cauliflower salad, however, turned out perfectly regardless of how much he tried to disrupt it. Anyone following us on instagram must have noticed our love for the Middle-Eastern spice blend Za’atar. We always keep it within reach and use it on avocado toasts, salads, soups and omelets. The slight tartness from the dried and ground sumac berries is well balanced with nuttiness from toasted sesame seeds and herbiness from thyme. We have been collaborating and creating recipes with spice company Santa Maria and when they asked what spice blend we thought was missing from their product range, the obvious answer was za’atar. So now we have created a Green Kitchen Stories special edition Za’atar blend for them and it’s available through this competition on their site (only in Sweden, sorry!). This recipe is however available for everyone, regardless if you are using our za’atar blend or another one (often available in spice shops, delis and Middle-Eastern food stores). You can also make your own by combining 4 tbsp sumac, 4 tbsp toasted sesame seeds, 2 tbsp dried thyme, 1 tbsp dried oregano and 2 tsp cumin. In this recipe, roasted cauliflower florets are sprinkled with za’atar and mixed into a fresh salad with avocado, spinach, parsley and cucumber slices and topped with small pomegranate jewels. It is served with creamy chickpeas drenched in yogurt and tahini and also sprinkled with za’atar. If pomegranate isn’t in season, it can be replaced with raisins (preferably yellow). Roasted Cauliflower with Za’atar & Yogurty Chickpeas Serves 2 very hungry persons or 4 normal 1 head of cauliflower 1 good drizzle of olive oil 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1/­­2 large cucumber, seeded 1 avocado 1 x 400 g /­­14 oz tin chickpeas (or 200 g cooked) 50 ml /­­ 1/­­4 cup natural yogurt 1 tbsp tahini 1-2 tbsp za’atar spice blend 1 handful parsley 1 handful spinach seeds from 1/­­2 pomegranate Preheat the oven to 220°C /­­ 450°F. Divide the cauliflower into florets and place on a baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and salt and toss until all is combined. Roast for 20-25 minutes, until soft and golden and with slightly crispy edges. Meanwhile, prepare the other vegetables. Divide the cucumber in half. Use a teaspoon to scrape out the seeds and cut into 1 cm /­­ 1/­­3 inch slices. Cut the avocado in half, remove the stone and use a spoon to scoop out the flesh. Cut into large chunks. Rinse the chickpeas thoroughly. Pour them into a bowl and mix with yogurt and tahini until all is mixed. Remove the cauliflower from the oven and sprinkle generously with za’atar. Add all salad ingredients to a large bowl and toss carefully to combine. Make space in the side and add the yogurt chickpeas. Top with pomegranate seeds and a sprinkle of za’atar. Enjoy! Thank you Santa Maria for the fun opportunity to create this spice blend and for sponsoring this post. All words and opinions are our own.

15 Exceptional Eggplant Recipes for Meatless Monday

August 17 2015 Meatless Monday 

15 Exceptional Eggplant Recipes for Meatless MondayTry a New Twist on Eggplant this Meatless Monday Fresh vegetables make for delicious meatless meals, especially now that eggplant is in season. If youve never had eggplant before, now is the time to try it - and if you have had it before, now is the time to try it in one of these exciting recipes!   Hearty and versatile, eggplant compliments a huge variety of spices and blends perfectly into a number of classic, multi-cultural recipes. Weve collected eggplant recipes from Meatless Monday bloggers to help get you started exploring all the culinary possibilities this meatless staple has to offer. Get them now while theyre in season to enjoy their sun-ripened flavor at the peak of freshness! Summer Ratatouille | Cearas Kitchen   General Tsos-Style Eggplant Stir-Fry | Jackie Newgent, RDN   4-Ingredient Vegan Eggplant Balls | C it Nutritionally   Eggplant Rollatini | The Mountain Kitchen   Eggplant Fries with Tzatziki Sauce | Food, Pleasure & Health   Grilled Eggplant Quinoa Stacks | Craving Something Healthy   Superfood Eggplant Lasagna | Fuel Your Future with Tina Muir   Grilled Onion Eggplant Sandwiches | Grab A Plate   Kale Salad with Crispy Eggplant | Bean a Foodie   Turkish Eggplant Casserole | Feed Me Phoebe   Persian Eggplant Stew | In My Bowl   Sumac Grilled Chinese Eggplant | Joy Foodly   Hot Caponata over Spaghetti | The Fit Foodie Mama   Baingan Aloo Methi in Coastal Korma Curry | SimplyVegetarian777   Pine-Nut-Crusted Eggplant and Sauteed Broccolini | Cooking PlanIt   Hungry for some more excellent eggplant recipes? Download the Meatless Monday Eggplant e-cookbook from our friends at Dominex Natural Foods! The post 15 Exceptional Eggplant Recipes for Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Whole Grain Za’atar Tomato Flatbread for Virtual Vegan Potluck 2014!

December 12 2014 Vegan Richa 

Whole Grain Za’atar Tomato Flatbread for Virtual Vegan Potluck 2014! Its that time of the year again. Virtual Vegan Potluck is back. Today hundreds of bloggers are posting Vegan recipes and linking up to form a chain where you can easily navigate to get to the other participating blogs.  This year I am bringing this 100% whole grain flatbread topped with juicy tomatoes and a good load of Za’atar. Za’atar is a middle eastern condiment which has sumac, dried herbs, sesame seeds and other spices. I use Israeli Za’atar from our local World Spice store. We ate the whole thing with some hot sauce. The flatbread comes together within minutes and is ready quickly too. White whole wheat flour produces a less dense bread than regular whole wheat flour and works great for this flatbread. No dense, wheaty looking bread! Continue reading: Whole Grain Za’atar Tomato Flatbread for Virtual Vegan Potluck 2014!The post Whole Grain Za’atar Tomato Flatbread for Virtual Vegan Potluck 2014! appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Skhug

December 21 2016 My New Roots 

Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Skhug If youve been reading My New Roots for a while, youll be familiar with my obsession with Middle Eastern cuisine. Ingredients like tahini, lemon, pomegranate, sumac, zaatar, cardamom, thyme, and sesame have big, bold flavours, and act as strong backbones for plant-based recipes, so I enjoy them on a regular basis and rely on them heavily in my recipe development. And if I am out and about in the world, I seek out restaurants serving this style of food, knowing that theyll have a solid selection of vegetarian options with satisfying flavours. Speaking of which, whenever I am back home in Toronto, I love going to a restaurant called Fat Pasha. Its an Israeli place that serves the most decadent, delicious, over-the-top versions of all my favourites: falafel, hummus, fattoush, pickles, salatim, shakshuka...but the menu show-stopper is their whole roasted cauliflower. Brought to the table like a holiday roast, a giant knife sticking out of the top, ready to be carved, I love the ceremony of the entire thing, and the myriad of flavours and textures that it delivers. Slathered in tahini sauce, topped with glistening pomegranate jewels and golden toasted pine nuts, it is savoury, salty, sweet, herby, spicy, crunchy, creamy, nutty, BAM. Stunningly beautiful and deliciously satisfying. At Fat Pasha, they also serve the whole roasted cauliflower with an incredibly spicy, tasty concoction called skhug. Skhug is a Yemeni hot sauce made from chilies, spices and fresh herbs, mainly cilantro. It ranges from wicked hot to warmly herbaceous, with cumin, coriander, cloves, and black pepper providing added depth and complexity. I friggin love this stuff (*pours skhug over entire life*). Its delicious with hummus and pita, but also yummy folded into a grain salad, stirred into soups and stews, and drizzled over roast veggies, and to whisked into dressings and sauces. Skhug comes in two varieties, red (skhug adom) and green (skhug yarok). Both are delicious, but I chose green for my version since it tends to me more common, and I was trying to get into the festive spirit and looking for a contrast to the pommies, which were so assertively red. Use the kinds of chilies you can get your hands on, and add them to suit your taste. I (embarrassingly) only used one green Thai chili for my sauce, but I also wanted to enjoy the other flavours coming through (and also because I am a wuss). It was still very spicy, but not so much so that I couldnt generously dollop it on my cauliflower. Trying to recreate the whole roasted cauliflower dish at home is all too easy and the results are extraordinary. First, the cauliflower is doused in a spice-infused coconut oil before being roasted to golden perfection (this on its own is waaaay delish). But taking it to the next level is easy with a simple tahini sauce and the skhug, followed by a generous topping of toasted pine nuts and pomegranate seeds. This thing becomes unreasonably beautiful, just a warning, and if youre looking for something truly special to serve at a holiday meal this year - whether youre vegetarian or not - this recipe will impress the pants off anyone.     Print recipe     Whole Roasted Cauliflower with Skhug Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 large head cauliflower 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. coconut oil 1/­­2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp. ground paprika 1/­­4 tsp. ground turmeric 1/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1/­­4 cup /­­ 30g pine nuts 1 small pomegranate, seeds removed Skhug: 2 bunches cilantro (about 3 cups chopped) 1 clove garlic, minced 1-2 green chilies, minced (add more to taste) 1/­­2 tsp. cumin 1/­­4 tsp. ground cardamom Pinch ground cloves a couple grinds black pepper 1/­­4 – 1/­­2 tsp. fine grain sea salt, to taste 1 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 2 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 2 Tbsp. water, or more as needed Simple Tahini Sauce: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml tahini 1 Tbsp. lemon juice 1 small clove garlic, minced pinch salt 1 tsp. honey or other liquid sweetener 4-6 Tbsp. water, as needed Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F/­­200°C. 2. In a small saucepan over low-medium heat, melt coconut oil and add spices and salt. Stir to combine and remove from heat. 3. Remove any outer leaves from the cauliflower and wash it well. Pat dry with a clean towel, then pour the coconut oil and spice mixture over the top and rub it in to all the nooks and crannies, making sure to coat the bottom as well. Place on a baking sheet and in the oven to roast for about 45 minutes. If it is getting too much colour before it is cooked, place a piece of foil over the top to prevent it from burning. The cauliflower is finished when it is tender. 4. While the cauliflower is roasting, make the sauces. Start by washing the cilantro well and spinning it dry. In a food processor or blender, add all the skhug ingredients and blend on high to make a smooth sauce, or pulse to make a chunkier one. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary. (Store any leftovers in the fridge for up to one week.) 5. To make the tahini sauce, combine all ingredients together in a blender and blend on high until smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary. (Store any leftovers in the fridge for up to one week.) 6. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast the pine nuts, stirring often, until they are slightly golden. Remove immediately from the heat and set aside. 7. When the cauliflower is cooked through, remove it from the oven and place on a serving plate. Top with the various sauces, and sprinkle with the pine nuts and pomegranate seeds. Serve immediately and enjoy. This will be my last post before 2017, so I want to wish all of you out there a warm, happy, healthy holiday and an abundant new year! Thank you for all for your love and support with all of my projects this year: the My New Roots app, Naturally Nourished, the Gourmet Print Shop and the blog too. You will never know how much you all mean to me! For real. In health and happiness, Sarah B. *   *   *   *   *   * Exciting announcement! The Gourmet Print Shop is officially open! My vision of creating affordable and beautiful art for your walls is now a reality. After so many of you have requested high-res images of my food photography to print, Ive answered the call with larger-than-life photo files that you can download and print yourself. Its a fast, easy, and inexpensive solution to fill that blank space above the sofa, add some colour to the desk at your office, and keep you inspired in the kitchen. Did I mention it makes the most perfect holiday or hostess gift? Obviously. Check out the Gourmet Print Shop today and get printing! The post Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Skhug appeared first on My New Roots.

Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream Sunday

July 17 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream SundayThis post was created in partnership with Crafted Honey. It’s been so hot! Every summer, without fail, my general appetite decreases, while cravings for all things fresh, crisp, light, and, most importantly, juicy go through the roof, and I know I’m not alone in this. Thankfully, summer produce is full of all the hydrating qualities we require, and that’s one example for why eating with the seasons is a graceful way to go through life. Mid-summer sun is finally warm enough to give blush and sweetness to all kinds of stone fruit, and peach harvest – the most luscious and anxiously awaited of the bunch – is finally sweeping across the Northern hemisphere. These peach, honey and thyme lemonade popsicles, with a bit of zing from ginger, have been in my beat-the-heat arsenal for many summers now – a dessert for the toastiest of days, requiring minimal effort. We are in the middle of renovations right now, and I’ve been taking old coats of paint off our stairs and railings, which has turned out to be much more involved than it sounds. Having one of these popsicles at the end of the day, once I dust off, has been very therapeutic. The lemonade can also be had in its original, un-frozen state, and is an incredibly refreshing, summery drink. When I got the chance to try Crafted Honey’s raw, small batch honey, I knew that its addition would take the flavor of these pops to the next level of sophistication, and it truly did. Crafted Honey is a husband and wife-run company out of North Carolina, with bee farms situated at the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, and producing some of the most unique honey varieties I’ve ever tasted. I chose to use their Strawberry Henbit for these popsicles, made by honeybees that gather nectar from the both strawberry and henbit (plant belonging to the mint family) blossoms, making for a delicious and complex, berry-flavored and lightly colored honey that sings of summer. Crafted Honey has all the ideals one would want from a honey brand – the honey is pure, made with no additives and not over-heated, the hives are never chemically treated and always handled with bee welfare in mind – all practices we feel passionate about supporting. Today also happens to be the Crafted co-owner Erica’s birthday, so we are wishing her the happiest of days :) Read on for some weekend links and have a sweet Sunday. Como Como – just discovered Fernanda de la Puente’s fun health and wellness website Jonathan Safran Foer & Natalie Portman – loved reading this email exchange interview between the two, big fan of both Herb Infused Oil – a great idea for not letting your herbs go to waste, with an instructional video Escape to Bro-topia – about Foster Huntington’s newest project, a treehouse Valeda Beach Stull’s Instagram – love this photographer’s instagram, and enjoyed this interview with her about her process and moving Upstate from California The First Image Sent Back from Juno – gives me goosebumps 10 Rules for Students, Teachers and Life – by John Cage and Sister Corita Kent Blog Love – Peach and Rosemary Water, Farro Salad w/­­ Crispy Chickpeas and Sumac Vinaigrette, Slow Cooked Apple Tart Overnight Oats, Easy No-Bake Cookies This post was created in partnership with Crafted Honey, with all opinions being genuine and our own. Thank you for considering the sponsors that help keep Golubka Kitchen going. Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles   Print Serves: 10 popsicles Ingredients 1 bunch thyme - divided 3 cups purified water about 1½-inch piece ginger - peeled and roughly chopped 3 large or 5 small ripe and sweet peaches - pitted, plus more whole slices for decoration 1 cup juice from about 5 organic lemons ¼ cup honey Instructions Soak wooden popsicle sticks in water for a few hours or overnight. Reserve a few sprigs of thyme for decoration and place the rest into a medium saucepan. Muddle with a wooden spoon to release oils. Add ⅔ of the ginger and smash it with the back of a spoon. Add water and bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat to a simmer and let simmer for 1 minute. Remove from heat, cover and let cool to a room temperature. Combine peaches, remaining ginger, lemon juice and honey in a blender, blend until smooth. Strain puree through a fine mesh strainer over a pitcher or bowl. Pour the ginger and thyme-infused water through a strainer into the puree, discard cooked thyme and ginger. Stir to combine. Chill well and serve over ice as a lemonade or make popsicles. Fill the popsicles molds with the lemonade, ½ mold at a time. Add peach slices and thyme sprigs, if desired, then fill the rest, making sure to leave some room for expansion. Cover with the lid and insert soaked wooden sticks. Place into the freezer and let freeze completely. Briefly run molds under hot water before removing popsicles. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Curry Coconut Ice Cream Gingery Rutabaga and Pear Handpies Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

How to Pair Beer with Vegetarian Food

February 4 2016 Vegetarian Times 

How to Pair Beer with Vegetarian FoodWhen I transitioned to a plant-based lifestyle several years ago, my mission was to smash through all the old, tired stereotypes about vegetarians and vegans. As a member of one of the countrys oldest brewing families (Straub Brewery), it was a no-brainer that my debut would be infusing plant-based food with beer, wine, and liquor for The Tipsy Vegan. More recently, I continued the buzzworthy trip with my newest cookbook, The Ultimate Beer Lovers Happy Hour, which pairs plant-based dishes and beer styles. Today, beer and food pairing is one of the hottest trends in entertaining, whether at home or for larger events. And now we vegetarians and vegans can get in on the action like never before. It even landed me on Bravo as guest bartender for Andy Cohens Watch What Happens Live. To brew up a batch of fun at your next get-together, I have three simple suggestions to follow when deciding how to pair your favorite plant-based dishes with the dozens of beer styles on shelves: Black Bean & Corn Salsa from The Ultimate Beer Lovers Happy Hour A Great Complement Goes a Long Way Pair similar flavor profiles, such as sweet foods with smoother, maltier beers like Amber Lager, Vienna Lager, Oktoberfest, or Hefeweizen. Or, foods that have stronger, sharper, or distinct flavors with hoppier beers, such as India Pale Ale, Stout, Altbier, or Porter. Opposites Attract Bring balance to a beer and food pairing by mixing and matching smoother, sweeter, or subtle flavored food with a more intense, palate-grabbing beer, and vice versa. For example, pair a Portobello burger or cauliflower mash with a rich, hoppy Bock. Or, pair a spicy buffalo dip or garlicky veggie kabobs with a traditional Pale Lager. Experiment! Everyones palate processes flavors in unique and different ways. Therefore, a really fun and easy way to pair is to offer a spectrum of beer styles--sweet/­­smooth/­­malty to sharp/­­strong/­­hop-heavy--for sampling in small glasses with each dish you serve. Then, let your guests vote on their favorite. For example, offer falafel or veggie meatballs with a range of Amber Lager, Maibock, India Pale Lager, and Stout. Or, chocolate cake with Dunkel, Cream Ale, Pilsner, and Doppelbock. And, by all means, dont be afraid to add a few or more dashes of brew to the food itself when prepping.   Vegetarian Food & Beer Pairing Below, I have curated a pairing menu of appetizers, using recipes from the Vegetarian Times kitchen archive. I matched each recipe with a beer style that complements, enhances, and/­­or adds a resounding exclamation point to every bite. Maple Pecan Spread Pair with: Vienna Lager The mildly sweet malt flavoring of a Vienna Lager will nicely complement Mother Natures toothsome duo of fresh pecans and maple syrup, especially when served with freshly sliced apples and pears. Spicy Mini Avocado Rolls Pair with: Amber Lager The smooth maltiness of an Amber Lager plays harmony to the sharp, peppery twang of the radishes and green onions, and gently tempers the accompanying pickled ginger and wasabi.   Confetti Queso Dip Pair with: Altbier This classic comfort dip--embellished here with sparks of roasted red pepper, green onions, and chipotle pepper sauce--all but begs to be partnered with a robust and hoppy brew style like Altbier.   White Bean-Artichoke Hummus with Roasted Garlic Pair with: Maibock The blend of white beans and artichokes when supercharged with roasted garlic and a citrusy twist of lemon juice and ground sumac preps the palate for refreshing follow-up swigs of a slightly-hopped Maibock.   Rosemary-Garlic Carrot and Green Bean Fries Pair with: Kölsch The aromatic rosemary and garlic coating on these veggie fries will provide a surprising opening act for the low malt and moderately hoppy--even fruity--notes of a Kölsch.     Adzuki-Beet Pate Pair with: Cream Ale The ambrosial trio of caramelized onions, beets, and adzuki beans will find a fitting ally in the light-bodied nature of a Cream Ale.   Orange-Scented Meatballs with Sweet-and-Sour Sauce Pair with: Pale Lager A good old, classic Pale Lager allows these eggplant, onion, and veggie-bacon balls in their tomato and orange sauce to remain the stars of this pairing while still bringing the buzz.   Mini Sesame-Cucumber Hand Rolls Pair with: India Pale Ale These cool cucumber sticks in consort with the nutty-sesame gomashio in this veggie sushi will be enhanced by a stronger, hop-heavy beer style like India Pale Ale.     Peanut-Stuffed Okra Fingers Pair with: Bock The spirited filling mixture of peanuts, onion, garlic, ginger, jalapeno, and seasonings finds an electrifying bar mate when paired with the roasted and caramel flavor points of a Bock.   Spicy Cashew Cheese Pair with: Brown Ale While the buttery cashews in this cheesy spread play backdrop for the lively fusion of chili powder, coriander, cumin, and garlic powder, the moderate to high maltiness of a Brown Ale will bring every bite to a memorable conclusion. Crispy Seasoned Vegetable Chips Pair with: American Pale Ale The hop-heavy boldness of an American Pale Ale will ignite the WOW-factor alongside these crispy seasoned veggie chips.   Traditional Falafel Pair with: Saison The hearty and distinct flavor of traditional falafel melds with the earthy, spicy, and fruity notes of a Saison.   Caramelized Onion, Walnut, and Spinach Savory Cake Pair with: Pilsner The Onion Marmalade starring in this scrumptious cake bread needs a sidekick that can hold its own, such as a medium-hoppy Pilsner.     Herbed Mushroom Caviar Pair with: Oktoberfest No matter the occasion, this chic amalgamation of button mushrooms, thyme, garlic, and parsley will be accentuated by the sweet malt and mild hoppiness of an Oktoberfest.   Smoky Eggplant and Melon Wraps Pair with: Rauchbier (Smoked Beer) Carry through with a theme for this appetizer combo of smoky eggplant and melon by pairing it with a traditional Rauchbier, which is created using smoked malt.   Carrot Dip with Crushed Walnuts and Olives   Carrot Dip with Crushed Walnuts and Olives Pair with: Stout The blend of carrots, toasted coriander, and pungent harissa in this spread will find an unexpected and sophisticated partner in the dark and intense, roasted maltiness of a Stout.   Brown Sugar-Cinnamon Popcorn Pair with: Doppelbock The brown sugar and cinnamon coating on this popcorn gets an extra kick when followed by the robust maltiness of a Doppelbock, with its caramel aroma and mild toastiness.   Tex-Mex Pizza Pair with: Chili Beer Fire up this Tex-Mex Pizza with a round of spicy Chili Beers.   ABOUT JOHN SCHLIMM: John Schlimm is a Harvard-trained educator, artist, activist, and award-winning writer. His newest book is an inspirational memoir titled Five Years in Heaven: The Unlikely Friendship That Answered Lifes Greatest Questions. Johns other books include Stand Up!: 75 Young Activists Who Rock the World, And How You Can, Too! and a series of plant-based cookbooks, including The Tipsy Vegan, Grilling Vegan Style, The Cheesy Vegan, and The Ultimate Beer Lovers Happy Hour. John has traveled the country speaking about inspirational/­­motivational topics, cooking and entertaining, his artwork, and public relations, including his university commencement address titled “The Road to YES is Paved with Many NOs” and his Embrace Compassion, Change the World keynote address on Capitol Hill. He also has appeared on such national media outlets as The Ellen DeGeneres Show, Bravos Watch What Happens Live, NPR, Martha Stewart Livings Everyday Food, The Splendid Table, QVC and Fox & Friends. www.Facebook.com/­­JohnSchlimm Twitter at @JohnSchlimm Instagram at @JohnSchlimm Pinterest at www.Pinterest.com/­­JohnSchlimm YouTube at www.YouTube.com/­­JohnSchlimm.  

Saturday Six | Chickpea Salad, Peach Stuffed Scones and a Healthy Banana Split

August 15 2015 Oh My Veggies 

Were rounding up some of our favorite recipes from this weeks Potluck submissions, including flavorful chickpea salad with sumac, juicy peach stuffed scones and a banana split thats healthy enough to eat for breakfast.


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