stomach - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Kayi holige recipe | naariyal puran poli | kayi obbattu | coconut poli

Vegan Oreo Cookies

Curry Popcorn and Nuts

Sabudana falooda recipe | sago royal falooda | sabudana dessert | sago drink










stomach vegetarian recipes

Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward Eating

March 10 2020 Meatless Monday 

Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward EatingThe recent COVID-19 outbreak has caused concern across the world, and many people are taking measures to make sure they do not fall sick. Besides washing your hands and staying home if youre sick, theres a lot you can do from a nutrition standpoint to boost your immune system  – eat more vegetables and fruits, legumes and whole grains .  Vegetables and fruits especially, have nutrients and special natural compounds called phytochemicals that serve as antioxidants to neutralize damage to cells and fight nasty pathogens like COVID-19, the flu and the common cold. Will they prevent you from getting sick? Maybe not. But a healthy diet can help strengthen your immune system to help fight the virus and recover quickly. Below are some nutrients found in plant-based foods that are vital for a strong and robust immune system: Vitamin C An antioxidant that increases production of white blood cells, is key to fighting infections. Citrus fruits, papaya, dark green and yellow vegetables, red bell pepper, strawberries, tomatoes and watermelons are great sources of Vitamin C. Try this recipe.  Vitamin E An antioxidant that protects your cells from free radical damages, enhances the immune system to fight off bacteria and viruses. Foods high in vitamin E are sunflower seeds, nuts and green vegetables. Try this recipe. Vitamin A Functions mainly by keeping the skin, vision, and tissues of the mouth, stomach, intestine, and respiratory system healthy. Its anti-inflammatory properties enhance the immune system. Good sources of vitamin A are sweet potatoes, spinach, pumpkins, carrots, peppers, cantaloupes. Try this recipe. Zinc An important mineral that helps in wound healing, functions in the development of immune cells, which is needed for the immune system to work properly. Food sources of zinc are legumes, whole grains, nuts and seeds. Try this recipe.  Dietary protein Plays a major role in the bodys immune response. They activate cells that help fight off infections in the body. Good plant sources of dietary protein are: legumes, beans, peas, soy, and nuts. Try this recipe.    Overall, if pondering about which vegetable or fruit to eat, think of colors – purple, blue, red, yellow and orange, because it usually means they are packed with antioxidants that are great for your health and immune system.     Resources: 1. Zinc in Human Health: Effect of Zinc on Immune Cells. https:/­­/­­www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/­­pmc/­­articles/­­PMC2277319/­­ . Accessed March 5, 2020 2. Health Professional Fact Sheet. NIH, Office of Dietary Supplement. https:/­­/­­ods.od.nih.gov/­­factsheets/­­VitaminA-HealthProfessional/­­ . Accessed March 5, 2020 3. Li P, Yin YL, Li D, Kim SW, Wu G. Amino Acid and Immune Function. Br J  Nutr, 2007 Aug:98(2):237-52.  4. Protect your Health with Immune-Boosting Nutrition. https:/­­/­­www.eatright.org/­­health/­­wellness/­­preventing-illness/­­protect-your-health-with-immune-boosting-nutrition . Accessed March 5, 2020 The post Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward Eating appeared first on Meatless Monday.

fada ni khichdi recipe | daliya khichdi | broken wheat khichdi

January 8 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

fada ni khichdi recipe | daliya khichdi | broken wheat khichdifada ni khichdi recipe | daliya khichdi | broken wheat khichdi with step by step photo and video recipe. khichdi recipes are one of the popular and sought after meal across india. it is generally made and served for various purpose like if you have stomach indigestion or crave for something lite to have. one such popular daliya based gujarati cuisine khichdi is fada ni khichdi recipe, known for its taste and simplicity. The post fada ni khichdi recipe | daliya khichdi | broken wheat khichdi appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Tempeh Tacos from Betty Goes Vegan

February 8 2019 Oh My Veggies 

I get migraines. Crazy migraines. Migraines that make me see strange glowing orbs. Migraines that make me leave hair salons in ambulances. But the worst thing about my migraines is that they cause me to have weird aversions to certain foods. So, for example, when I had a peanut butter and jelly sandwich for lunch and got a migraine a few hours later, suddenly I could no longer stomach PB&Js. The very thought of them would make me feel sick to my stomach. Usually I get over these aversions after a few months, but then there was the time I got a migraine after eating tacos–oh, it was bad. And I wasn’t able to eat tacos for a full year. The Year Without Tacos will go down as one of the worst years ever. Because along with veggie burgers and pasta, tacos were part of the trifecta of easy go-to meals in our household. I felt a little bit lost without taco night. Tacos are fast! They’re delicious! And putting them together is kind of fun too, right? It was a happy day when I finally found myself thinking, “Hey, you know what? I feel like tacos for dinner! I […]

Golden Broth Rice Noodles + Favorite Natural Cold Remedies

November 3 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Golden Broth Rice Noodles + Favorite Natural Cold Remedies It seems like everyone around has been sick with a cold recently, so we thought it our duty share another recipe involving our favorite golden broth formula that’s helped numerous friends and family fight so many colds. The broth is infused with all kinds of anti-inflammatory and mineral-rich ingredients that are said to be immunity powerhouses – think ginger, turmeric, black pepper, garlic, kombu, shiitake, bay leaf, and more. It also tastes deeply nourishing and delicious, and has the most beautiful color. There are so many ways it can be served, too. Drink it on its own, use it as a base for dahl or curry, or very simply pour it over noodles and top with some seasonal vegetables, like in this recipe. Today we are also sharing some natural cold remedies that we find to be powerful, especially when employed during the very first signs of a scratchy throat. Oregano Oil This stuff is serious! It’s both anti-viral and anti-inflammatory, and works wonders when taken consistently during the first signs of sickness. It’s incredibly potent and should be diluted with a carrier oil (I use this one), and it burns quite a bit when going down. You do get used to it though. I usually hold it under my tongue for about 15 seconds before swallowing. Salt Water Gargle This is an ancient folk remedy that’s still prescribed by modern doctors…enough said. If I wake up with a scratchy throat, I make a point of gargling with salt water every few hours, which feels incredibly soothing, helps take down any swelling, thins down mucus build up, and more. I use the ratio of about 1/­­2 teaspoon of salt to 1 glass of water. Sang Ju Yin Sang Ju Yin is a Chinese herbal formula recommended to us by our acupuncturist. I’ve had a few instances, where it completely healed me of an early cold. I’m a total convert now, and make sure to keep it on had at all times. Vitamin C All Day It’s great to eat Vitamin C-rich foods during cold season, but I find that supplementing with lots of Vitamin C is especially helpful when showing the first signs of a cold. Since you can’t really overdose on Vitamin C, I take it very often, about every 1-2 hours when fighting a cold. Just a warning that taking a bunch of Vitamin C can cause an upset stomach, which doesn’t happen to me personally, but I know that it’s a common side effect. I also make sure that I’m getting sufficient Vitamin D, either from the sun or supplements. Garlic The natural antibiotic that’s in everyone’s kitchen! I know a lot of people who will chew on a whole clove of garlic when they start feeling sick. I’m not brave enough for that, but I did realize from Trinity’s self-care interview that you can just swallow a whole clove or garlic like a really large pill (how did I not think of that?). My tip is to choose a very small clove of garlic, since they can be pretty uncomfortable to swallow, and to score it a tiny bit before swallowing. I also recently tried Amanda’s trick of putting a clove of garlic in my ear (kind of feels like iphone headphones), which really wasn’t as big of a deal as I thought it would be, and it helped. Probiotic Foods The link between our gut health and overall health is undeniably strong. I try to uptake my intake of things like sauerkraut, kimchi, and other living foods when feeling under the weather. Neti Pot For me, the worst part of having a cold is the stuffed and runny nose. Once my nose starts down this path, it doesn’t stop for at least a week, and it’s total agony. Rinsing my nasal passages with the help of a neti pot right before bed makes a world of difference when I’m sick. I’m also currently on the market for a nice, handmade ceramic neti-pot. There’s so many good ones on Etsy! Diffuse Essential Oils Purify the air in your living space and show some love to your nasal pathways and throat by diffusing pure essential oils. It’s helpful to have an ultrasonic diffuser (I have one from Saje), but you don’t have to have one. You can heat up a pot of water, drop some essential oils in the heated water, and stand over the pot, inhaling the steam. Or you can put some essential oils on the floor and walls of your shower while taking a hot shower, which will give a similar effect to the diffuser. My favorite essential oils to breathe in during a cold are: eucalyptus, lavender, and lemon. Liquid Gold Up your intake of turmeric any way you can! Make the recipe in this post, or try our Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy, or Fresh Turmeric Moon Milk. Check out Diaspora Co. for some super-potent, organic, heirloom turmeric powder. Hydrate and Rest These two are such no-brainers, but sometimes none of the other stuff works, and you just need to go to bed early, sleep in, and drink liters and liters of lemon water in between. I love rubbing some vetiver essential oil on the soles of my feet before bed for deep, quick relaxation. What do you do to help your bod fight and heal when you feel a cold coming on? We’d love to hear! Golden Broth Rice Noodles   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 small yellow onion - chopped sea salt pinch of red pepper flakes 3 garlic cloves - minced 1½-inch piece of fresh ginger - minced 1 tablespoon turmeric powder 2 dried shiitake caps 2-inch piece kombu 2 bay leaves 8 cups purified water 1 small or ½ large butternut squash - peeled, seeded, and cubed 1 broccoli head juice from 2 limes - divided 10 oz rice noodles cilantro - for garnish toasted sesame oil and sesame seeds - for garnish (optional) Instructions Warm the oil over medium heat in a soup pot. Add onion, salt and red pepper flakes, and sauté for 5 minutes. Add garlic, ginger and turmeric, and stir around for 2 more minutes. Add shiitake, kombu, bay leaves, water and more salt to taste, and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 10 minutes. If you have time, turn off the heat and let the broth infuse for another 30 minutes. Remove the rehydrated shiitake caps, slice, and return to the pot. Remove the kombu and discard. Add butternut squash to the pot, adjust the heat back to a simmer and cook for 7 minutes. Add broccoli and cook for another 5-7 minutes, until crisp-tender. Add half of the lime juice. Check for salt, adjust if needed. Soak the rice noodles in well-salted hot water according to the instructions on the package. Drain the noodles, divide between plates, and ladle the soup over the noodles. Squeeze more lime juice over each bowl, and garnish with cilantro. Optionally, drizzle with some sesame oil and sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Yellow Split Pea Chowder from Power Plates Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1 Smooth Vegetable Gazpacho with Watermelon Pieces .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Golden Broth Rice Noodles + Favorite Natural Cold Remedies appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford

December 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford Trinity Mouzon Wofford is the founder of GOLDE Turmeric, a line of high-quality turmeric blends for golden milk, lattes, and more. We are in love with everything GOLDE, and were so excited to get a peek at its radiant founder’s wellness routine. In this interview, Trinity tells us about her rule-free approach to self-care, her path to self-acceptance, and the importance of giving the body exactly what it’s craving, as well as a Geisha-approved moisturizer that works wonders for her skin, her number one cold remedy that’s likely in your kitchen right now, exercise, beauty, stress, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think having some form of a routine is crucial to your mental health when you run a business from home. It’s been sort of tricky as of late because we’re in transition from our home in Upstate New York to moving back down to Brooklyn. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. On an ideal day, I’m up around 6:30am and checking my phone for email and GOLDE‘s social media. Following that, I’ll do a bit of stretching to loosen up, and then hop in the shower. After I’ve gotten ready, I’ll sit down to work and make a to-do list for the day -- this is crucial for me. I forget things and get really anxious about what I’m forgetting if I don’t bother to organize my thoughts and tasks in advance. I’ll usually dig into whatever those tasks are for an hour or so before pausing for breakfast. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My partner, Issey, and I always make sure to have a cut-off time for work, barring emergencies. Once that point rolls around (it varies day-by-day), I’m usually catching up on the news or my favorite blogs while Issey preps dinner. We’ll eat together and then usually end off binging some TV show. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Issey’s miso soup with tons of mushrooms and seaweed. He makes it completely from scratch using his mom’s recipe. Lunch – Lunch is usually whatever is leftover from dinner that week  -- lately its a lot of hearty stews. Snack – We’ll do a little crudite plate with raw veg from the farmer’s market: carrots, turnips, radishes, persian cucumbers. Always with some cheese and seed crackers. Sometimes also with wine. Dinner – Tibetan food from our favorite spot in Jackson Heights, Queens. It’s a lot of dumplings (momos), noodles, and warming soups. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I can’t, really. I love the taste of coffee, but it turns me into a shaking, anxious mess. I always start the day with a turmeric tonic made with one of our blends -- usually cacao or original because the matcha also makes me a bit hyper. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Yes, yes, yes. I try not to “keep it in check” so much as listen to it with a variety of foods. Sometimes it’s fruit or homemade popcorn with coconut sugar. Sometimes it’s half a box of Dots eaten while laying on the couch. Refined sugar is trash for your system, but so is getting too regimented with your foods. I keep it light (emotionally) and eat what I’m craving. When junk food isn’t off limits, you’re not going to crave it every day. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Well, turmeric, of course. It makes such a difference in my skin and immunity. Issey loves it for instant allergy relief. There are apparently over 10,000 medical studies on its effects on the body --it’s really incredible. We’re also huge proponents of ashwaghanda in our household. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Upstate New York is not exactly the land of boutique fitness, so it can be more challenging to get in a sweat on the regular. I focus mostly on stretching and going on walks/­­hikes on the weekend. I think I’ve probably gained a bit of weight since I’ve been up here because I’m not moving as much as I did in NYC, but I don’t really mind. It’s okay for your body to fluctuate with your circumstances, as long as you’re treating it with respect. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? It varies. I really like working out as a method to clear my head, so often I do look forward to it. But that said, I don’t really try to push myself too much. If you want to be a world-class athlete, then by all means, train 2+ hours a day. I’m just looking to keep my body and psyche in good health, so if I don’t feel like making it to my workout, I don’t feel the need to punish myself later. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I grew up black in a very white town, so I’ve had a lot of really emotional moments coming to terms with what beauty means for me. At the moment, I like to keep things really natural with my curls out and minimal makeup. It took a while to accept my looks for exactly what they are, so now I’m really openly embracing it. I feel more beautiful now than I did 5 years ago, mostly due to opening myself up to the concept that I’m perfectly fine just as I am. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I try to keep my routine relatively simple. I’ll wash my face with raw African black soap or something gentle like Cerave. I love Drunk Elephant products, and I apply their C-Firma and B-Hydra serums every day. They help a lot with keeping my skin clear and getting rid of dark marks. After that I’ll moisturize with raw shea butter, or a cream that has that. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Turmeric, again. Because it’s anti-inflammatory, I’ve found it to be really helpful in clearing up redness or breakouts. Besides that, I try not to get too bogged down with a ton of supplements. I focus mostly on eating a variety of plants every day. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Shea butter is amazing for my skin. My partner’s Japanese mother recently put me on to this cream called Secret de Maiko. It contains shea butter and a few other natural, organic ingredients. Apparently this is what young Geisha girls would use as a moisturizer/­­makeup base. This cream is better than pure shea butter because it won’t leave you greasy at all. I use it twice daily. It’s great for keeping your skin clear and calm. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Well, cannabis helps. I use a vaporizer pen so there’s no smoke-related health detriments/­­lingering smell. I really want to try the Hmbldt pen because I’m a sucker for sharp design. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? There’s going to stress sometimes. I try to deal in healthy ways like going for a walk to clear my head, or talking to a close friend about whatever I’m dealing with. But life isn’t perfect, so sometimes you just end up being a bit tense for a few days. I think that’s normal and natural -- I try not to fight it too much. You have to let yourself feel it so that you can process it and move past it. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Garlic!! At my old job, everyone in the office knew about this because I would practically through bulbs of raw garlic at anyone who complained of illness. Nothing works better for immediately beating a bad cold. If I feel something coming on, I take 2-3 whole cloves (swallowed like horse pills) with a ton of water. That can save you in just a couple hours -- it’s crazy. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I really like to work, so what I consider to be a healthy work/­­life balance might not be the right approach for someone else. I genuinely enjoy spending my free time dreaming up new campaigns, product ideas, or designs for GOLDE. I guess that’s the benefit to doing your own thing -- it doesn’t always feel like work. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I’ve gotten a lot better with this with age. I try not to have any food or exercise rules. Being militant about your body is not self-care, and it can really easily spiral into disordered behavior that veers on the edge of “orthorexia.” I mostly just listen to my body and allow itself what it wants, whether that has to do with food, movement/­­exercise, socializing vs. indulging my natural introvert, etc. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? I really think doing away with rules (re: food, etc.) has been the most important change I’ve made. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with avoiding gluten or dairy because it upsets your stomach or causes breakouts, but don’t complicate your life with structure that does not serve you. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Usually moments like these mean I need to re-focus myself. I’ll start by making to-do lists, and go from there. Knowledge -- What was your path to starting GOLDE? I was pre-med at NYU, with plans to practice holistic medicine. By my senior year of college, I wasn’t so sure about spending more time and money on schooling, and sort of fell into a marketing role at a tech startup. I really loved the creative aspects of marketing, and found that GOLDE was a way of combining my interests in sharp branding with making holistic health more accessible. The interest in turmeric actually came from my mom, who has Rheumatoid Arthritis. She noticed a huge difference in her overall levels of inflammation when she started incorporating it into her daily routine -- that’s when I started paying attention. -- How do you approach the sourcing of your ingredients for GOLDE? We actually just started sourcing all of our turmeric with a company called Diaspora Co. They focus 100% on supporting ethical and high-quality spice trade that empowers rather than disenfranchises the people of color who have been growing and ingesting medicinal plants like turmeric for generations. The turmeric that we’re going to be using is an heirloom variety with almost twice the typical amount of curcumin. It’s grown on a fourth-generation, family-owned farm in India, and farmers are paid 6X the standard commodity prices to ensure truly fair wages. We’re really excited to be featuring a product that’s not only incredibly high-quality, but also works to re-build lingering inequality left in the wake of colonialism. -- What’s your favorite way to use your wellness blend? I love to have it just with hot water and raw honey in the morning. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Heading to the Union Square Greenmarket is one of my favorite activities. When I’m in the city, I like to go every Monday morning when it’s not too crowded. It’s mostly just you and the chefs (or their assistants?) shopping for what they’ll be preparing that day. I also love infra red sauna. I go to Higher Dose in the East Village. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Americanah – Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie Song/­­Album – Songs in the Key of Life – Stevie Wonder -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I am nowhere near as regimented as our dear Joan. Usually my suitcase is packed haphazardly with whatever clothing is clean and well-suited for the weather. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? More people of color, please! A few of my favorites: Diane Chang Yaminah Mayo Dr. Tiffany Lester Latonya Yvette Nikisha Brunson Alex Elle Lauren Ash Sana Javeri Kadri Photos by Sana Javeri Kadri, Issey Kobori and Nico Behnzukeh. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London

June 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London We love yogurt in our family*. The unsweetened, thick, creamy and tangy kind. We enjoy yogurt for breakfast (with fruit) and sometimes dessert (with dates + chocolate + nuts). We top our soups with yogurt, we add it to smoothies and ice pops and we also dress our salads with it (Isac likes to dress himself with it as well). Yogurt works remarkably well both with sweet and savory flavors. And yet, the thought of making a yogurt bowl with savory toppings instead of sweet, had never struck us before. But as we were playing around with this crunchy cucumber and melon salad with spiced chickpeas, we (and with we, I humbly mean ME, MYSELF and I - as in, not David) had the simple idea to put them on a bed of yogurt instead of doing the usual yogurt dressing. In theory, it’s more or less the same thing but in reality it’s so much better. The warm, rich and spicy chickpeas on a bed of cold, thick and tangy yogurt, with the addition of a fresh salad with lots of crunch. It’s simple but yet so very good. And quick too. I’m sure there are plenty of savory yogurt bowls all over internet, but now they are also in our kitchen. *David and Isac are actually intolerant to dairy but yogurt is their weak spot. We buy oat yogurt for them but David often chooses a day of stomach ache just to enjoy a bowl of plain yogurt. And Isac has literally been caught with his hand in the yogurt jar more than once. Coconut yogurt has a fantastic taste and consistency but is simply too expensive to enjoy more than as an occasional treat (very keen on giving Ashley’s versions a try though!). Hey hey hey, wait a sec. This is David acting as proofreader today and I just noted Luise’s attempt at hijacking my idea. This recipe = my idea. Just wanted to make that clear. I’ll give the word back to her now. The salad is super quick as you just need to chop everything up. We found that crunchy vegetables like cucumber, celery, sturdy roman lettuce and radishes work really well here, with the avocado and melon adding softness and sweetness. The yogurt is, well, just yogurt. It needs to be quite thick to hold up the topping - our preference is Greek yogurt but choose whatever you prefer. The only thing that needs a little more preparation and heat are the spiced chickpeas. Even if the ingredient list looks long, it’s simply spices, oil and chickpeas and the result tastes way better than just using plain chickpeas. They have a rich, spicy and slightly nutty flavor which works so well with the freshness from the yogurt and the crunchy and sweet salad. VARIATIONS There are plenty of ways to vary this recipe and we’re going to leave you with a few ideas. - Whisk some creamy goat’s cheese into the yogurt. It will dissolve, become smooth and give the yogurt a more mature flavor. - If you don’t have all the spices at home for the chickpeas, use what you find. A bread spice mix works great along with a little cayenne. A turmeric or curry version would be interesting too. - You can skip the salad and pour the yogurt into small sealable jars with spiced chickpeas on top. Store them in the fridge for a quick snack. - Vegans can of course use a vegan yogurt option or simply settle for the salad with warm chickpeas stirred through. - Roasting the chickpeas in the oven together with eggplant or pumpkin could be amazing on top of the yogurt as well. Let us know if you have any other favorite variations on savory yogurt bowls and we can include them in this list. Savory Yogurt Bowl with Spicy Chickpeas & Cucumber Salad Serves 4, or 2 very hungry persons Cucumber & Melon Salad 1 cucumber 1 small (or 1/­­2 regular) melon (we used Piel de Sapo but honeydew would also work) 1 spring onion 2 celery stalks 10-15 fresh mint leaves 1 avocado 6 radishes 1/­­2 roman lettuce 1/­­2 lemon, juice 1 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil Spiced warm chickpeas 2 tbsp sunflower seeds 1 tbsp sesame seeds 2 tsp fennel seeds  1 tsp coriander seeds 1 tsp cardamom seeds 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1/­­2 tsp ground cayenne 1/­­2 tsp ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp ground paprika powder 1/­­4 cup – 1/­­2 cup cold-pressed olive oil 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g can cooked chickpeas, drained and rinsed For serving 2 cups plain full-fat Greek yogurt  For the cucumber & melon salad:  Wash all produce. Cut cucumber and melon in large bite-size pieces. Trim and finely slice spring onion, celery and mint leaves. Cut the avocado in half and remove the stone, then cut into cubes. Trim the radishes and thinly slice them. And chop the roman lettuce. Place all prepared ingredients in a mixing bowl, squeeze over lemon juice, drizzle with olive oil and a little salt, give it a good toss and set aside. For the spiced warm chickpeas:  Add all seeds and spices (except for the ground spices) to a dry skillet, heat gently for a couple of minutes while stirring. When the spices starts to pop and smell fragrant, they’re done. Pour into a mortar and give them a few bashes with the pestle (alternatively on a cutting board and use the back of a chef’s knife). Transfer the seeds and spices back to the skillet. Now add oil (start with the lesser amount and add more later on if it looks dry), ground spices  and chickpeas and heat on low temperature for 2-3 minutes. Stir to combine. When the chickpeas are warm and covered in spices and seeds, remove from the heat. Dollop the yogurt into four bowls. Use the back of a spoon to smooth it out. Arrange the salad on one side of the yogurt and the spiced warm chickpea on the other side. Drizzle a little extra oil on top. Enjoy immediately while the chickpeas are still warm. ********* LONDON + BATH In all my excitement over a simple bowl of yogurt, I almost forgot to mention that we are coming to London and Bath next week for a couple of book events. We’re very excited and can’t wait to meet some of you! We’re having a supper club at Grace Belgravia on Monday 5 June, 7-10 pm. More info here. We’ll do talk and Q&A at Whole Foods Market in Kensington on Wednesday 7 June, 6.30 pm. More info and tickets here. We’ll also do a talk and cooking demo at Topping & Company Booksellers in Bath on Friday 9 June, 7.30 pm. More info and tickets here. Finally, we’re having a hands on cooking class at Bertinet Kitchen in Bath on Saturday 10 June, 10 am. Tickets here (only one left). Big love!

Essential Vegan Foods To Bring While Traveling

June 6 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Essential Vegan Foods To Bring While Traveling We asked best-selling cookbook author and passionate vegan chef Julie Morris to give us her best tips for traveling as a vegan. Were thrilled to partner with Julie on our exciting new online course, Go Vegan! 30 Days to a Plant-Based Lifestyle. This intensive, interactive course features vegan cooking skills, tips on getting proper nutrition and thriving on a vegan lifestyle, and more than 70 recipes for a vegan meal plan to get you started. Check it out now. TWV, or Traveling While Vegan, may not be a trending hashtag acronym yet, but at the rate of increasing popularity of a vegan diet, its only a matter of time before its a well-known term! Its a situation I understand well. I travel a good bit for my job, and remember the anxiety I faced during my early days as a vegan when it came time to hit the road. Although enjoying a vegan diet has always been easy within the security of my own kitchen, a different city (or country) doesnt always offer the same safety net of healthy plant-based options. Dont get me wrong -- theres a surprising amount of vegan food in the world to enjoy (hint: most of the time its not called vegan food, its just food ... that happens to be vegan!), but for the occasions when time or patience runs out, I rely on a few things that Ive actually brought with me. Packing a light, pared-down kit of key vegan foods while traveling can make all the difference in how you feel on a trip: You wont have to compromise your energy, health, or values. Over the years Ive refined my kit into a system that covers all the fundamental vegan bases in a hyper-condensed form.  So the next time you pack a suitcase, you consider bringing a small supply of these Plan B essential vegan foods: Energy Bars: As a condensed mini-meal, an energy bar can feel like its truly saving the day. Look for varieties that contain as many natural ingredients as possible, or for best results (and significant financial savings), make your own! Homemade energy bars are surprisingly easy to create using a food processor, and can be cut into bars and wrapped in plastic or parchment for single servings. Pack one for each day. Something Green: Fresh green foods are a foundation of any healthy diet, but can be surprisingly difficult to find when traveling to a new city. This is where green powders or tablets can be your best energizing friend! Made out of freeze-dried nutritious greens, such as kale, broccoli, wheatgrass, or spirulina, these superfoods are hyper-concentrated (a little goes a long way). You can bring spirulina tablets (a few for each day), or single-serve packets of your favorite green powder blend to add to a bottle of water. Something Protein: While its getting easier to find great-tasting vegan meals, not every restaurant offers a good nutritional balance. Traveling with vegan protein can help satisfy cravings and allow you to be more relaxed with other meals (bonus points if it includes vitamin B12). Bring a stash of vegan protein powder that you can shake inside of a water bottle for a quick smoothie. Or just make sure the energy bars you choose are high in protein - look for 10 grams or above. Crackers & Almond Butter: While its easy to grab the sweet stuff, packing a little something savory is good for both your taste buds and your health! A box of crackers can help satisfy an unruly stomach, while a little bit of nut butter makes this snack more nutritionally balanced with healthy fats and easy-to-digest protein. Look for crackers that are made of nutrient-dense whole grains and seeds (they will be the most satisfying), as well as single-serve pouches of nut butter that are perfect for packing. A Treat: TWV is an enjoyable and easy experience 99% of the time. On the rare occasion that its not quite as epic from a delicious standpoint (hello, airplane food), having a treat you can look forward to can be a complete game-changer in your mood! Keep a small stash of one of your favorite treats, such as a go-to chocolate bar, a bag of fruit gummies, or homemade cookies. This little pick-me-up is a great reward for sticking to your values.

Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard

April 28 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard Mung beans have been my legume of choice as of late. I love them for their versatility, good nutrition record (protein of course, manganese, potassium, magnesium, zinc, etc.), brief cooking time, and a very fair price tag. They work well for falafel, with very similar properties to chickpeas, albeit lighter in every way. Soaking the mung beans overnight and baking the falafel instead of frying makes them easy on the stomach – I say this because even though I love to get traditional fried falafel when out, it always makes me feel unwell. These mung bean falafels are made with my favorite spice mix that goes well with their bright, lemony flavor. When I go to the farmer’s market, I often have the eyes bigger than the stomach problem, especially with greens. Last week, there was lots of beautiful rainbow chard at the stand, and I carried away more bunches than we could ever eat. Pickling was the next best choice and I was pleasantly surprised by the result. The marinade I came up with is very mild and simple, and the pickling only takes a day. It seems that in our little health food community, bowl format has become the default lunch format, and we are right there with everyone, happy to enjoy a veggie loaded and colorful lunch bowl, any time of day really. As usual in spring, I can’t get enough of quickly sautéed, crispy and tender asparagus, which complements any grains or legumes. A base of quinoa, which can be substituted with any grain, tangy tahini sauce, crunchy nuts, herbs, and pickles complete this meal. All these components are, of course, suggestions, and dishes like these are highly customizable. I do very much recommend trying all the parts – the falafel, the pickles and tahini sauce – if not together, then independently, added to sandwiches, salads, and the like – you won’t regret it. Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard serves 4-6 for the mung bean falafel bowl 1 cup rainbow quinoa or other grain of choice – cooked sea salt – to taste 1/­­2 tablespoon neutral coconut oil about 20 asparagus – tough ends removed freshly ground black pepper – to taste mung bean falafel – recipe below pickled rainbow chard – recipe below large hadful baby spiach/­­other salad greens handful cilantro leaves/­­pea shoots/­­other microgreens tahini sauce – recipe below sesame seeds – for garnish (optional) chopped pistachios/­­other nuts – for garnish (optional) to assemble the falafel bowls Distribute quinoa between bowls. Warm coconut oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add asparagus to the pan, sprinkle with a pinch of salt and black pepper and cook, undisturbed, for 3 minutes. Flip and cook for another 3-4 minutes, until soft and bright green. Divide asparagus between bowls on top of quinoa. Arrange falafels on top, followed by chard pickles, if using. Add spinach or other salad greens, herbs/­­microgreens. Drizzle with tahini sauce, sprinkle with sesame seeds and nuts. Mung Bean Falafel makes about 18 falafels 1 cup mung beans – soaked overnight 1/­­2 cup pumpkin seeds juice of 1 lemon 2 tablespoons sesame tahini 2 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil or olive oil 1/­­2 tablespoon cumin seeds – freshly ground 1/­­4 teaspoon red pepper flakes sea salt – to taste freshly ground black pepper – to taste 1. Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). 2. Drain and rinse mung beans and cook them in plenty of salted water for about 7 minutes, or until soft but not mushy. Drain over a colander and set aside. 3. Coarsely grind pumpkin seeds in a food processor. Add mung beans and the rest of ingredients. Pulse to combine. 4. Shape about 18 small falafels and arrange them on a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Bake for 10 minutes on each side. Keep covered and warm, if using right away. Otherwise, keep refrigerated in an airtight container and reheat in the 350° F (180° C) oven for about 10-15 minutes. Pickled Rainbow Chard 1 large bunch rainbow chard – leaves and stems separated 4 garlic cloves – sliced pinch red pepper flakes roughly chopped dill and cilantro – to taste (optional) Thinly slice chard stems and leaves into bite sized pieces. Place into a large water-proof bowl, and pour purified water over them to just cover. Drain water, reserving it, and measure it, as you will need to prepare the marinade according to these proportions: 5 cups water 1/­­2 cup apple cider vinegar 2 1/­­2 tablespoons sea salt 1 teaspoon coconut sugar 2 bay leaves 3 whole cloves 1/­­2 teaspoon coriander seeds 1/­­4 teaspoon black peppercorns to pickle Combine measured water with other marinade ingredients in a medium saucepan. If you have more or less water than the recipe calls for, adjust the amount of vinegar, salt and spices accordingly – it doesn’t have to be exact. Bring the marinade to a boil over medium high heat, lower the heat to a simmer and simmer for 3 minutes. Meanwhile, add garlic, red pepper flakes and herbs to the chard, mixing to distribute evenly. Pour hot marinade over the chard and place a plate over it to keep all the chard emerged in the marinade. You can use a heavy object to weigh the plate down, such as a jar filled with water. Pickles will be ready the next day. Keep refrigerated. Best within 1 week. Tahini Sauce 1/­­4 cup sesame tahini 1/­­4 cup purified water juice of 1 lemon 1 garlic clove – chopped sea salt – to taste tiny pinch red pepper flakes (optional) Combine all the ingredients in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated for up to 1 week.

How to Eat Healthy for Your Gut and Feel Better

January 11 2016 Vegetarian Times 

How to Eat Healthy for Your Gut and Feel BetterWe asked healthy cooking expert and “Skinny Chef” Jennifer Iserloh for tips on feeling our best in the new year. Jennifer is the author of numerous best selling health books including, 50 Shades of Kale, Secrets of a Skinny Chef, and Healthy Cheats. She’s also the instructor for our easy-to-follow online course, Gentle Cleanse, which features recipes and guidelines for gently detoxing with healthy recipes and making lifelong dietary changes to feel your best. Sign up for exclusive free tips and discounts for the Gentle Cleanse course! If youre lacking energy after the holidays, it may not only be stress or lack of sleep thats slowing you down. Getting more energy could be as simple getting good eats for your gut! Thats right, there are foods and meals that are especially healing for the colony of bacteria that live in your large intestines, called the microbiome. When your bacteria are unbalance (more bad than good) it could mean lack of energy, poor digestion, weakened immune system and brain fog.  Eating good things for your gut start by noshing on a plant based diet! Fiber and Prebiotic Foods Fiber isnt just important for weight loss and digestion, its crucial for our gut flora since thats what they eat.  And we cant be our healthiest without them - since these good bacteria are responsible for manufacturing B vitamins, vitamin K,  as well as strengthening our immunity, and breaking down complex carbohydrates.  So how do you make sure they get what they need?  Its easy –  add plenty of prebiotics foods like carrots, asparagus, and artichokes. They are rich in a particular fiber called inulin, that the good bugs love. Limit Gluten Not everyone has gluten sensitivities but giving gluten a rest for a few days when youre feeling slow, limiting gluten when you feel the drag is a good idea since gluten has been show to activate allergies, and can be tough to digest for those with sensitive stomachs.  Dont go for the package gluten free products since they can be loaded with sugar, unhealthy fats and salt.  Enjoy naturally gluten free grains instead like millet, quinoa, and brown rice.  If you want to learn the 101 on these grains while you go gluten free follow my 3 day mini cleanse.

Vinegar 101: Types of Vinegar, Health Benefits, and How to Cook With It

November 16 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Vinegar 101: Types of Vinegar, Health Benefits, and How to Cook With It Derived from the French vinaigre (meaning aged wine), vinegar is a staple in most pantries worldwide. With dozens of varieties readily available, you can use your favorite type to elevate nearly any meal – by creating marinades, emulsifying vinaigrettes, seasoning dishes to brighten flavors, or even making reductions. How its made The process of producing vinegar includes inoculation, fermentation and aging. An alcoholic liquid is acted upon by the Acetobacter bacteria to form an acidic solution. It evolves into a self-preserving substance due to its high acidity. Fermentation of wine into vinegar is triggered by a mother, or other ambient bacteria, transforming sugars into alcohol into acetic acid; a vinegar mother is a harmless cellulose structure produced by acetic acid that occurs naturally in unpasteurized vinegars. The process may take from 20 hours up to several months, depending on a variety of factors. Types of Vinegars Rice: With a 4% acidity, rice vinegar is great for pickling, dressings, or seasoning sushi rice. (Check out our Garlic and Kale Soup that uses Brown Rice Vinegar.) Balsamic: Made from the concentrated juice of white Trebbiano grapes and aged in casks, balsamic works well in glazes, reductions and marinades with its 6-8% acidity. (Try our Sicilian-Style Roasted Vegetables with Balsamic Syrup.) Apple Cider: With a 5% acidity, this ones best for seasoning more subtle dishes, as an infusion, or drizzled over grain or bean salads. (Use it to make Carolina-Style Barbecue Sandwiches.) Wine: With a 6-8% acidity, this vinegar adds a touch of umami, and works well wherever a stronger flavor is desired. (Make Minestrone with Sun Dried Tomatoes and White Beans.) Coconut: Made from fermented coconut water or sap, coconut vinegar has a 4% acidity, and is perfect for a splash of brightness when making nut-based cream sauces or a stone fruit chutney. Health Benefits Unpasteurized and unfiltered vinegar is a natural probiotic and can be used to help the body break down fats. Unfiltered apple cider vinegar is used to treat sore throats and upset stomachs, as well as topically for some skin conditions; it is also a natural liver cleanser. In addition, vinegar can get digestive juices flowing and increase appetite, which makes it a great addition to starter courses like salads and chilled soups. (Check out our article: Apple Cider Vinegar: Healing Foods) How to Buy Be sure to carefully examine labels and ingredient lists, and purchase varieties free of additives and artificial coloring. Keep in mind that aged vinegars have stronger flavors. Gradually stock your kitchen with different types of vinegars to determine which you like best for different applications. Culinary Uses Reductions: Reduce over medium heat until mixture coats the back of a spoon. Serve over fresh berries, or when plating an entrée or salad course. (Top Red Pepper Soup with a Balsamic Reduction.) Herb Infusions: Blanch herbs like tarragon, dill or basil, blend with vinegar, and allow to steep for a few days in the fridge. Marinades: Use to tenderize and flavor vegetables like mushrooms, zucchini and eggplant before grilling, along with fresh garlic, ginger and herbs. Quick Pickle: Add three parts vinegar to one part water to a small saucepan and bring to a boil, adding a splash of sweetener of your choice, a pinch of salt, and red chili flakes for extra spice.  Pour over cut produce and allow to sit for at least 30 minutes, or overnight in the refrigerator. (Try our Hot-and-Sour Celery Pickles.) Baking: Can be used as a leavener, eliciting a chemical reaction to produce carbon dioxide to give cake batters a lift. Poaching eggs: Adding a tablespoon to the cooking water with prevent eggs from spreading. Ceviche: Mix with oil, garlic and herbs, and toss with mushrooms or avocado for a refreshing twist. Serve with tortilla crisps. Enhance color: Vinegar brightens reds and purples, like cabbage and beets or red pearl onions. Chef Olivia Roszkowski is a graduate of NGIs Chefs Training Program and a full-time instructor. Olivia holds a Bachelors degree in Neuroscience and Behavior from Columbia University and has worked at various well-known NYC restaurants, including The Mercer Kitchen and Momofuku Ssam Bar. Olivia is a master at root-to-frond cooking.       

Kale Day Chat Recap: 12 Kale Questions Answered

October 8 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Kale Day Chat Recap: 12 Kale Questions AnsweredDid you miss our live Facebook Chat for National Kale Day? Don’t worry; we’ve got you covered. Here’s a recap of 12 questions our Facebook fans asked Kale Day co-founder and author of 50 Shades of Kale, Chef Jennifer Iserloh. The “Skinny Chef” loves kale so much that it’s a featured ingredient in our new online course, Gentle Cleanse. Kale is the ideal ingredient to go along with the 7-day detox plan and 21-day meal plan, to get you looking and feeling your best. Ready to start your journey on the Gentle Cleanse course? Use code KALE25 to save 25% off just for a special National Kale Day promotion. Q: What are your favorite ways to use kale in the kitchen? A: Smoothies, sauces, salads, tacos, in soups and stews, the ways are endless! Q: Do you think kale is really here to stay? Or is it just a fad? A: Definitely here to STAY!! The studies are so positive, kale is cheap, it’s versatile – mild tasting, thank goodness we have an affordable health food. Q: Is there anything to look for when SHOPPING for fresh kale or other greens? A: Definitely – make sure the greens aren’t wilted in the store – that means they don’t transport them correctly. Also the leaves should be firm to the touch, this includes kale, mustard greens, bok choy- you name it. They shouldn’t have any yellow or brown spots, that means they’re getting old and have been around the block! Q: How do you recommend storing kale and other leafy greens? A: In a bag with paper towel to keep greens from getting wet spots and spoiling. Excess moisture in the bag causes greens to spoil faster. Q: Can you freeze fresh greens? A: You can buy frozen greens, but if you try to freeze fresh one you have to blanch them and they may loose nutrients. Q: Is it healthier to make my own green juice or buy one? Sometimes it makes my stomach hurt. A: Make it, but better yet, make a smoothie so you get all the fiber, too! Q: How do mustard greens compare to kale nutrition-wise? A: Kale is king, it’s higher in vitamin and mineral content compared to all the greens. However you still want to mix and match it with other greens since it superfood has a unique nutritional profile Q: If I mix and match mustard greens with kale, is the cooking time the same? A: No. mustard greens cook faster so cook your kale 2-3 minutes before adding other delicate greens like mustard and spinach. Q: How are Asian mustard greens different from the “Southern” kind (as I think of them)? A: Asian [mustard greens] usually have a little more “kick” or a hint of spice. I like to combine them with stronger flavorings like ginger, soy sauce, and hot sauce while with Southern greens like collards, I serve them with herbs, cheese, lemon or nuts Q: Is the cooking time the same for collards and mustard greens? A: Collards take a little longer, but I don’t do them the Southern way. They cook them for 45 minutes so the Vitamin C is defintely destroyed. I thinly slice them, saute them [for] about 6 to 8 minutes. Q: Is there a better way to prep mustard greens – like soaking? I find them bitter sometimes. A: I don’t recommend soaking, but yes, mustard greens are really strong tasting, so I mix them with other greens and fat items, like nuts and seeds (and eggs if you eat them) to mellow them! Q: Have there been any studies in the past year on kale and its health properties? Any new research or discoveries? A: There are a bunch of studies out there, especially when it comes to cancer prevention. Kale is the #1 food besides turmeric, but you can combine the two.  

Vegan Father’s Day Recipes! Gluten-free Soy-free Options

June 19 2015 Vegan Richa 

My Dad is like most Dads, very hard working and does not know the meaning of vacation. He visits every few years for a month and before the plan is finalized, he always makes sure he will have something to do. He made a super sturdy King Size Bed Frame for us in his 2013 visit. Go figure. This was his vacation   It is next to impossible to get him to sit through a 3 hour Hindi movie. I sometimes wonder if he even likes going to the beach. Its fun watching hubbs and Dad together. Hubbs loves spending time on the beach or a park, just sit and think and watch, and Dad sits there and it seems like he is liking it, but 15 minutes later he starts to look impatient.:) This Vegan Father’s Day Recipes round up is dedicated to him. He might try some of these recipes, but the way to his heart and stomach is simple Indian food filled with vegetables and dals Happy Father’s Day Dad!  Continue reading: Vegan Father’s Day Recipes! Gluten-free Soy-free OptionsThe post Vegan Father’s Day Recipes! Gluten-free Soy-free Options appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Warm Summer Fruit Salad

June 14 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Warm Summer Fruit Salad If my 15 year younger self would see me know. I am sitting here writing a text that is trying to sell the idea of a warm fruit salad. Young David would have told me  that I was an idiot: “Why heat fruit when you can have it chilled?!” You see, young David hated warm fruit. And I mean. Truly. Hated.  Back then, I could binge eat platters of fresh fruit, but cook or bake it and I wouldn’t touch it. Even apple pie, the one dish that every normal person loves, made my stomach turn upside down. I sometimes allowed myself to eat the part of the crust that hadn’t been touched by the fruit, but my tongue cringed from the bare thought of warm apple in my mouth. And now I’m all of a sudden very excited about this fruit salad that has taken a quick detour through the oven. What happened? I would love to say that this recipe was the game changer. But truth be told, I think I just slowly learned to appreciate warm fruit, recipe by recipe. Anyway, apart from the fact that I used to hate warm fruit and now swear by this dessert. Apart from the fact that this recipe is dead-simple. Apart from the fact that it includes some of the best bounty of the season and tastes like summer in your mouth. Yes, apart from all that, this fruit salad is also covered in grated dark chocolate (that melts!), coconut flakes and salted almonds (that pairs oh so well with dark chocolate). And if you are still not  convinced to try it out, we created this little video as a final selling point:  This is originally a Swedish dessert called Gino served with strawberries, kiwis and bananas with white chocolate on top. Our version is quite different, but t he choice of fruit and measurements are really just suggestions here, add or subtract fruit to your liking. Peaches or pineapple would also be good baked. Or raspberries? We use fruit in season here, but baking fruit is also a great way to increase the flavours during the winter season. Luise and I haven’t entirely agreed on the baking time. Personally I think the fruit only should be heated quickly, so it’s still quite firm. Just 5-6 minutes or enough time for the chocolate to melt. Luise however prefers the fruit to be more baked and a bit softer so the juices and flavours come together more. That’s about 10-12 minutes. But we’ll leave that decision to you (in the photos and video it’s baked after Luise’s preference). Warm Summer Fruit Salad Serves 4 1 cup almonds + 1 tbsp boiled water mixed with 1 tsp salt (or store-bought salted almonds) 3 kiwi fruits 3 apricots 2 bananas, peel 10 strawberries 10 cherries, pitted 2 plums, remove stones 1 lime, juice 1 oz /­­ 30 g dark chocolate (70% or darker) 1/­­3 cup dried unsweetened coconut flakes Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Prepare the almonds by placing them in a mixing bowl, pour the hot salted water over the almonds and combine until all almonds are covered. Place the almonds in a baking tray and roast in the oven for 10-15 minutes or until slightly golden and crunchy. Set aside. Prepare the fruit by cutting them into bitesize pieces. Place the fruit in a baking dish and add the lime juice, toss to mix. Chop the almonds and sprinkle over the fruit salad. Grate the chocolate, it should almost cover the fruit salad. Sprinkle with coconut flakes and place the dish in the oven. Bake for 5-10 minutes, until the chocolate has melted and the fruit is warm and juicy (not mushy). Serve in bowls with plain yogurt or a dollop of ice cream.

Golden Sauerkraut – Wild Fermentation

May 4 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Golden Sauerkraut – Wild Fermentation Before we start this post, we wanted to introduce a new little feature here on the blog. We call it Homemade Whole Food Staples. Unknowingly, we actually already started it a few weeks ago, with our post about homemade nut butter. A lot of you told us that this was the first time you’ve made nut butter at home, so we realised that this could be a good opportunity for us (and you) to learn more about classic methods, recipes and pantry staples that are popular in whole food kitchens. It’s nothing wrong to cut some corners and buy jars and cans of staples from the store, but if you want to save some money, learn what really is in those jars and get a better hum about the kitchen basics, you might find this new feature interesting. Our hope is that we can show how recipes that many find too intimidating to try at home, really isn’t complicated at all. We are discussing sharing how to make your own vegetable stock, the ultimate pomodoro passata, mastering a sourdough and how to make homemade coconut yogurt. But we are also really interested to hear what you want us to try/­­share. Leave us a comment and let us know if there is something specific that you are curious to learn more about. Today we are talking fermented vegetables. It’s one of the healthiest thing you can eat but the whole idea of food that needs 3 weeks before its ready, scares most people from even trying to prepare it. Right? But please folks, stay with us on this one. Not only are fermented/­­cultured vegetables on most top-lists of trendy food 2015, but a large spoonful of homemade Sauerkraut is also TRULY delicious on top of a salad or inside a sandwich. Furthermore, the natural occurring probiotics in fermented food are great for your stomach and body. The whole 3-weeks-to-prepare-issue is more like 20 minutes of active work and then 3 weeks of waiting. Best of all, we are going to show you the most natural way of doing it, without any starters at all. It’s called wild fermentation, only 2 ingredients are needed and the method has been around for hundreds of years. But you can also add a bunch of different flavourings to it, like caraway seeds, ginger, garlic, beetroot, chilli, fennel or turmeric. Does this project still sound impossible? Here in Scandinavia, we have quite the tradition of pickling, preserving and fermenting. But weirdly enough, Luise’s and my interest for fermented vegetables actually sparked during our recent trip to Australia. Almost all the cafes we frequented had at least one salad or bowl that was topped with fermented vegetables or sauerkraut. And the health food stores there have whole isles with different brands of organic raw fermented/­­cultured vegetables. It didn’t take long until we were hooked. The flavours were just so fresh and the acidity added a real kick to whatever we paired it with. And in a strike of unbelievable luck, we met Vivianne on our potluck picnic in Sydney, she is one of the founders of Raw Sisterhood, a Bondi based company that makes incredibly tasty fermented vegetables, raw crackers and raw granola. She promised to teach us some of their secrets and now we get to share one of their recipes here. We made the first batch together in her house and we have continued making it now when we are home. They call this version Golden Goodness and it’s basically wild fermented cabbage and carrots flavoured with turmeric and garlic Before we get on to the recipe, we wanted to let Brenda and Viv from Raw Sisterhood explain the magic behind Wild Fermentation and healthy bacterias: Why wild fermentation: Wild fermentation is a natural process in which we provide the perfect environment for nature to do its thing, so no starter is needed.  All fresh fruits and vegetables contain enzymes and bacteria (lacto bacilli) which allows them to break down (ripen). As fruits and veggies ripen they go through an enzymatic process, essentially they digest themselves.  When foods go off or rot, they have been exposed to oxygen. In a wild ferment, we allow the vegetables to digest themselves, in an oxygen free environment.  The lacto bacilli in the vegetables, eats the naturally occurring sugars and then produces lactic acid and more lacto bacilli....and the cycle continues.  Why eat healthy bacteria: Lactic acids can kill many strains of parasite and many other pathogens in the body purifying the intestines. Fermented veggies increase the healthy flora in the intestinal tract by creating the type of environment for them to flourish in. Increases nutrient values in the vegetables especially vitamin C. The high fiber content in cultured vegetables help to clean the digestive system, removing undigested food and unwanted toxins. Fermented foods also facilitate the break down and assimilation of proteins. Golden Sauerkraut - Wild Fermented Cabbage, Carrot & Turmeric Makes about 2 huge jars. You can easily half this recipe if you prefer. Be sure to sterilise your jars before your start. 2 green cabbages (3 kg) Save some of the outer layers of the cabbage for packaging on the top 800 g /­­ 7 cups carrots (6 medium size carrots) or beetroot 15 g /­­ 1,5 tbsp grated ginger 15 g /­­ 1,5 tbsp minced garlic 15 g /­­ 1 tbsp fresh grated turmeric (optional) 30 g /­­ 3 tbsp ground turmeric 5 g /­­ 1 tbsp caraway seeds 5 g /­­ 1 tbsp fennel seeds 2 tbsp /­­ 30 g himalayan sea salt (optional, you can do it without salt, but it speeds up the process) Wash the cabbage and scrub the carrots, then finely slice the cabbage and grate the carrots. Or use a food processor with a fine slicer attachment for the cabbage and rough grating attachment for the carrots. Place all ingredients in large mixing bowl. Use your hands (you might want to wear rubber gloves to prevent your hands to get stained by the turmeric) to mix and massage until it starts to get soft and juicy. The vegetables should release quite a lot of juice, if not, just add some more salt. Use a spoon or a tong to spoon the mixture into 2 large clean jars. Pack it really tight to leave out all air, keep packing until the jar is full of veggies and the veggies are covered in juice (important). Leave some space at the top to place a whole folded cabbage leave on top, this is to prevent any oxidation. Close with an air-tight lid. During the fermentation process the veggies will expand and the liquid will try to come out, we put our jars in a bowl or a plastic bag for any juice that might drip from the sides. Leave the jars to ferment in room temperature for 2-4 weeks (depending on room temperature), 3 weeks is usually perfect. When ready, it should be softly textured but not mushy and have a fresh, spicy and acidic flavour. Discard the cabbage leave at the top and store the jars in the fridge. We usually divide the fermented vegetables in smaller jars and hand out to friends and family or keep it in the fridge. Tip: o If your veggies are stinky and leaky, then place the jars in a bowl and place everything in a plastic bag and close it. Then place in a cupboard and drain the water after about 3 days. o If the top is discolored or has a bit mould, dont be alarmed just remove it and wipe around or just change the jars. o Use organic vegetables for fermenting and dont wash or scrub to much, it can destroy the natural enzymes on the vegetables.

Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri

October 20 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri Sana on the left Sana Javeri Kadri is the founder of Diaspora Co., a radically different spice collective dedicated to equity, sustainable agriculture, and decolonization. We’ve been fortunate to try Diaspora’s heirloom, organic, single-origin turmeric powder, and let’s just say it’s going to be very hard to go back to enjoying any other powdered turmeric ever again. Sana lives between Mumbai and Oakland, California. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I crave routine and am most productive when Im following a routine. However, Im unable to do deep thinking work or larger creative work in the middle of a hectic routine, so I like to keep at least one day of the week wide open for creative projects and giving myself the time and space I need to create something important. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I have been trying really hard to wake up, spend as little time on my phone as possible and then make myself a nourishing drink and most importantly, make myself some breakfast. One of my worst habits is to wake up, get on my phone, start responding to emails and then quickly get changed for work and dive straight into a full workday without taking any time to nourish myself or check in with my body. It means that by 1pm Im starving, cranky and already tired for the day. The life changing power of breakfast is something Im still learning… -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My girlfriend and I try not to spend too much time on our phones before bed, or looking at a screen. She recently introduced a 20 mins of reading before bed practice that were trying to stick to, its my favorite way to wind down and Im committing to not responding to work emails at 10:45pm, even if its 11:15am in Mumbai and my team there is just getting fired up. Work in progress. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  My therapist guides me into mindfulness during our sessions every week because I often come in feeling stressed, frantic and a bit fragile. Shes always able to help me get back in touch with my body and begin to feel grounded again. At her urging, I handle all my stressful work calls or emails sitting outside in the sunshine, ideally with my bare feet in the ground. This practice of grounding has been particularly helpful to me in the past few months of managing a stressful season. I also recently downloaded the Headspace app, and just the five minutes everyday of meditation has made a huge difference to me. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – In Oakland – Bread srsly gluten free sourdough, crispy fried egg cooked in ghee topped with smoked paprika, turmeric and salt, sliced avocado or smoky pinto beans or sliced tomatoes or any veggie leftovers I can wrangle from the fridge, maybe a slice of bacon if Im wanting some extra fat. In Mumbai – a loaded crispy veggie dosa. Either way, I love hot and savory breakfast. The cold and sweet breakfast tradition isnt common in India so, cereal and granola with milk culture is something I find very odd about the United States. Lunch – Leftovers express. My girlfriend and I both work long hours, so our saving grace is prepping large meals a couple times a week and then subsisting on leftovers. Gluten-free pasta with canned early girls (I can 80 lb every summer so that we never have to buy store bought tomato sauce) with every vegetable in the fridge/­­our imperfect produce box and ground beef is a family classic. Rosie is always joking that my stomach doubles when it comes to pasta and shrinks for everything else. Shes not wrong. Snack – My favorite snack is stovetop popcorn. Growing up in Mumbai we never had a microwave, it was my parents most loathed kitchen appliance. So now Im following that tradition of never owning a microwave. My favorite stovetop popcorn is popped in ghee and then topped with nutritional yeast, turmeric, and salt. Its perfect. Dinner - My perfect dinner is khichdi (spiced rice and lentils cooked in ghee and heavy on the ginger, turmeric and cumin), thick full fat yogurt, masala okra, a little bit of pickle (Brooklyn Delhi achaars are divine) and a side of spicy amaranth battered fish. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I used to do caffeine, in a delicious ghee, turmeric, cardamom and coconut sugar concoction, but over time Ive stopped being able to handle it. It started to make my stomach hurt and made me anxious. So I now drink either matcha with rice milk and date syrup, or hot chocolate with hemp oil, coconut sugar and adaptogens if Im needing the extra nourishment. Some days, if Ive slept enough and rested enough, I do better on just water and breakfast, no extra boost needed. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? I had a notorious sweet tooth all the way until my early twenties – I couldnt be trusted with bars of chocolate and was known to sneak spoonfuls of cake first thing in the morning. However the older Ive gotten (Im still technically in the early twenties), sweets just give me a sugar crash and make me feel sluggish. As an avid lover of food, Id rather eat plenty of things that make me feel fantastic, than the things that make me feel terrible. Both Rosie and I have been surprised and how quickly our respective sweet tooths have disappeared since we started living together, and how easily weve been able to cut out sugar from our life once we could verbalize how terrible it made us feel. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I swear by cannabis tinctures. Im not big on cannabis in other ways, but I find cannabis to be the only way to really deal with chronic pain. Ive also started using Super Good Hemps Turmeric Full Spectrum Hemp Oil in my morning drinks, and I find that it has similar effects. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I used to weight lift and do Crossfit pretty intensely, but had a really awful injury in 2016. Since then, Ive really had to reframe my definition of exercise. Now, I consider it an extension of my healing process. Intense exercise just isnt possible for me in the same way, so I stick to swimming as often as I can (usually a couple times a week), doing Nike Training body weight workouts at home, and talking our dog for a long walk every evening. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I love exercise and do best when Im outside and moving my body. Rosie and I try to take our pup Lilly out for a hike at least once a week, and we notice how much more present are with each other and our work when weve exercised.  That being said, Im also an incredibly competitive person, so reframing exercise to no longer be an intensely competitive thing has been very hard for me. I find it difficult to work up the enthusiasm to go on a leisurely swim, without a team to train with, or a competition to work towards. Switching off my producing strategy is my biggest challenge. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Both! It took me a long time to love my face, acknowledge that it was beautiful despite not looking like everything I saw on magazines and on billboards. But that acceptance and love for my external beauty definitely came from tending to, and growing confidence in my inner beauty. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I grew up using raw honey as a face cleanser, handmade ayurvedic soaps for my body, and a mom who never used makeup. So that has informed a lot of my skincare today. My skincare guru is 300% Abena, the founder of Hanahana Beauty, I use her shea butter exfoliating body bar and swear by it, and I use Abenas recipe for a rose water, tea tree oil and jojoba oil soaked cotton pad as a cleanser morning and night, and it has been a complete game changer for getting my glow back. Ive also been using Curology, which is a custom dermatologist service, that is super affordable and came highly recommended by friends. They prescribed me their night cream, which has really taken care of my breakouts and blackheads. Im not usually big on using chemicals on my skin but have found Curology to be a minimalist option that really works. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Cutting out sugar and gluten entirely is the most obvious one – I break out as soon as I am eating sugar, so its first to go. I also use a turmeric, honey, hemp oil and cornmeal face mask every couple weeks that always makes me feel radiant. My dentist has noticed and commented on the huge difference in my teeth that shes seen since I stopped drinking coffee – theyre whiter than ever before and need much less cleaning, which for me is reason enough to skip the coffee. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Abenas DIY rose water, jojoba oil and tea tree oil cotton pads! I used to be a ardent fan of Thayers Rose Witch Hazel Toner but in my experience with skincare – once you go DIY, its impossible to go back :) That being said – I will admit to being a Glossier believer, I didnt use makeup until I discovered Glossier concealer and highlighter. Its so easy and lazy but it works so wonderfully. Stress, Etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Taking our pup out for a long walk by the water is a really grounding activity for me. I have no idea how I managed my stress before she moved in with us. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Honestly Im a spokesperson for not really managing my stress well. My partner often comes home to a fuming, off the hook Sana and it takes significant chatting, massaging and cuddling to work me out of the state that I can get into if Im very stressed.  Im an extrovert and a peoples person so being around people that I love is my best coping mechanism. That being said – I have to be careful not to emotionally dump onto my loved ones, just because theyre willing to be there for me. Ive definitely been guilty of that in the past. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? The first one is to make sure I get a really good nights sleep, and make sure Im not drinking alcohol, eating dairy or any processed food. Usually, managing my sleep and diet is the easiest way to kick a cold before it hits. If the cold cant be stopped, I usually start by accepting that my bodys way of asking for rest is by getting sick, and its important to just honor that and completely rest. Then – turmeric, ginger, honey tea all day long.  -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Ive been trying really hard to take weekends off, and any weekend that I succeed at that- the balance feels so much better. Honestly, as a young business owner, the hustle is so glamorized and romanticized. Youre told that now is your time to grind, and to get further in your career. Whilst this is true, Id also argue that now is the time to establish healthy boundaries and habits in your life so you learn how to maximize your productivity and your potential. Any day that I work a 16 hour day (which is too often), I know that I am not focusing on the bigger picture, and am actually sacrificing my long term goals as a business owner. Remembering that, and focusing on working more effectively, rather than working more, has been a huge step towards achieving healthier work life balance. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Therapy. Every week, no matter what. That perspective and process is something Im deeply committed to. Therapy rarely feels easy, but it is always in service of myself and my larger goals, so its the easiest way to feel on track. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Eating based on how it makes me feel, not how it sounds or tastes. As soon as I focused on how it made me feel, my taste buds changed, I lost weight, my skin issues cleared and I became a very healthy person, with remarkable ease. I know how obnoxious that sounds, Im sorry. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I fly home to India. I know this is incredibly privileged, and a bit excessive, but shuffling back and forth between two continents constantly gives me a broader perspective, and somehow – the psychology of taking an international flight is an incredibly cathartic and productive experience for me. I almost always come back from my trips to India with fresh eyes, new vision and a bigger picture. Thats true for all travel, in my opinion. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. The fundamental line of Crossfit – eat meat and vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch and no sugar. has influenced my self nourishment beyond any book or movie. I may not be a competitive Crossfit athlete any more but eating to nourish my body is so much more fulfilling than eating to nourish my cravings. Knowledge --  What was your path to starting Diaspora Co.? You can read a lot more about that here, but long story short – Ive been working in the food industry since I moved to the United States in 2012 and I quickly noticed that whilst the farm to table movement felt at its zenith in the Bay Area, it only applied to certain things. Spices and imported foods were somehow excluded from those quality standards. The idea for a new kind of import export company formed in November 2016, and in February 2017 I quit my job and embarked on seven months of research visiting farms, research institutions and markets across India. Diaspora Co. was formally launched as a direct trade sustainable food company with our first offering of turmeric in August 2017. Its been a total rollercoaster since then. --  Can you tell us about the kind of turmeric you sell and how it differs from most turmeric one can buy at a store today? Im biased, but Im also overly honest so I dont think it would be an exaggeration to say that we sell the worlds best turmeric. Historically, there hasnt ever been a quality standard for how to define the highest quality, beyond arguments and branding largely based in exoticism and the colonizer/­­savior mindset. It is the freshest, as in it was harvested in 2018 and is milled every 3 months, versus powders that can be up to five years old and still on a grocery store shelf, stale as ever. It is the most potent variety of turmeric out there, with a tested 4.7% curcumin content. It is a fragrant and exceptional heirloom rhizome variety that compares to other turmeric powders out there as an heirloom summer tomato would to a grocery store store tomato grown for storage not flavor. Finally, it is organically farmed in a spice agriculture landscape where pesticide overuse and residue is notorious. Phew! --  Can you tell us about your decision to pay your turmeric producer really well and about owning the fact that your product costs more because of this? I think part of our work is that what the industry considers paying our producer really well, we consider basic human dignity of paying a living wage and for the price of sustainability, flavor and honest work. If we didnt pay our partner farmers the prices that we do, they wouldnt have the power or the incentive to produce at the standard that they do. To me, this big word decolonizing really just means how are you going to empower the people around you who have historically been stripped of their power? Paying our farmers well is actually the easiest embodiment of our decolonizing mission. As for owning our higher prices – we simply couldnt exist without charging what we do. And ultimately, were dedicating to riding the fine line between being affordable to the home cook and being a leader of sustainability and supply chains and therefore being regarded as a luxury product. I have to believe that we can do both. Turmeric latte blends or turmeric centered businesses that dont want to pay our prices or wholesale from us because theyd like to continue to exploit their sources and maintain their ridiculously high margins, Im in this for the long game and their reckoning will come. It always does. Apologies if I sound cold and jaded, business is vicious and Ive had to steel parts of myself to tolerate it all. --  What are some of your favorite ways to use Diaspora Co. turmeric? Honestly, turmeric was so woven into the fabric of my childhood that it was invisible to me. We cooked with it, made beauty treatments with it, and we used it to mark life and death. So even now, my favorite way to use turmeric is still in simple Indian vegetable dishes – lightly cooked okra tossed in cumin, turmeric and salt is the definition of comfort for me, or a coconut milk turmeric chicken broth with squash and long beans. Comforting, vegetable heavy home cooking is how I innately know how to use turmeric. Lattes just arent for me. --  We love your photos! How did you become a photographer? When I was 14 and going through a really tough phase at school (bullying, puberty, the patriarchy et all), my parents taught me how to use their DSLR. Ive used photography as the lens through which I make sense of and connect with the world ever since. When my academic pursuits turned to food and agriculture in college, my lens turned to it too. In so many ways, I recognize that I was never particularly talented or the best or the brightest, I was always just a really solid worker, and entirely self motivated, and that meant that once I started photographing, I just never stopped, and now here we are. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Ive found that balancing my role as a business owner with my role as a photographer is what gives me the most joy professionally. So I have a couple exciting photo shoots planned for the coming months that will be a welcome respite to the chaos of holiday e-commerce. That, and I havent seen my girlfriend and pup in almost a month since Ive been in India and I miss them terribly, so very excited to come home to my two favorite living beings. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Were so lucky to live in Oakland, where eating out is an incredible experience, especially at a time where women chefs are absolutely excelling in their field. So eating delicious meals by our favorite local women chefs is my favorite treat – Cosecha Cafe (Mexican), Nyum Bai (Cambodian), Champa Garden (Laotian) and 20th Century Cafe (Eastern European) to name a few.  -- A book to feed the soul:  I just finished reading Yvon Chounards Let My People Go Surfing and its been so deeply inspiring to me. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Akwaeke Emezi, they are my favorite writer, a member of this third culture/­­diaspora/­­immigrant excellence interweb community and has navigated their self care so beautifully and visibly through the years. Id love to learn more from them. Photos by Sana Javeri Kadri, Sophie Peoples, Assad Keval /­­/­­ This post contains Amazon Affiliate Links You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Ashley Neese Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Amanda Forcella Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Cinnamon Crunch Cereal and Hemp Milk

August 14 2017 My New Roots 

Cinnamon Crunch Cereal and Hemp Milk It is easier to change a man’s religion than to change his diet. – Margaret Mead Yup. Pretty much. This entire shift began when I had a particularly gnarly couple of months with manic mood swings that rivaled my adolescence, acne flare-ups, bloating, low energy, night sweats, and all-round malaise. Knowing what I know, I looked at my diet first to see what could be adjusted. Everything was organic, whole, plant-based and totally healthy by most peoples standards. But it just wasnt working anymore. I knew something had to give. Delving in deeper, a typical day for me was a whole-grain porridge in the morning, topped with all kinds of seasonal fruit, homemade granola etc. Lunch was a couple slices of organic sourdough rye bread from the local bakery, with homemade hummus, avocado, sprouts etc. Dinner was often a mixed bowl, the base of which was brown rice, quinoa, millet or buckwheat covered in a rainbow of vegetables, homemade pickles, superfood-loaded sauce, and fresh herbs. I wasnt eating sugar, drinking coffee, I was keeping up with my exercise and sleeping well. So what was the problem? In this case, I had a feeling it was a big ol grain overload. The idea of cutting back on my morning oats, bread, and grain bowls was literally devastating to me. I cried. On multiple occasions, just talking about giving up muffins made me weep, and I felt like there was just no way I could make even more changes, or think about my diet even more than I already did. I have had two serious experiences with orthorexia in my life. For those of you who dont know what orthorexia is, it is defined as an obsession with healthy eating. It is considered an eating disorder, and one that is becoming more prevalent in Western culture as healthy eating becomes increasingly trendy. The first bout happened the year I moved out of the house to study at university. While many of my friends were bingeing on junk food and beer, I swung in the opposite direction entirely and took advantage of the incredible meal program that was offered at school, and fueled myself with enormous salads, delicious sandwiches and wraps, veggie-heavy soups and stews, and protein-rich smoothies. I also signed up for the free fitness classes at the university gym, got hooked on kickboxing, step aerobics, boot camp drills, and the weight literally fell off me. I lost about 25 pounds that year, and for the first time in my life I felt like I was in control of the way I looked. The sudden attention from guys – which I had never had before – further stoked the fires for my desire to be even thinner, even though my initial motivation to eat this way stemmed from a desire to be healthy. As my attitude towards food morphed from friend to enemy, I flirted with a full-on eating disorder at this point, playing games with myself to see how long I could go without eating, how many exercise classes I could fit in between classes and study groups, how long I could make my bean salad from lunch last (too long!). Eventually my energy levels dropped to the point where I had a very hard time getting out of bed in the morning and I couldnt concentrate well in school. I realized that I had taken things too far and started eating in a more balanced way again. I put the experience behind me without giving it too much thought. The second time this resurfaced was, ironically, while studying holistic nutrition. While I was learning all about foods and how my body worked, I became almost afraid to eat, toxifying my body, or poisoning it with sugar, gluten, dairy and the rest. I became obsessed with detoxing and subsisted only on clean foods; mostly vegetables. I was stressed, my hair started falling out, my acne came back and my energy hit an all-time low. Despite my obvious physical misery, I somehow felt validated since I wasnt putting anything bad in my body. Eating as healthy as possible became obsessive for me and my classmates, and wed all proudly bring our lunches to school, subtly scrutinizing each others Tupperware contents. Again, food had lost its pleasure, its joy, and had become something that I saw as more of an enemy than a friend. And that really scared me. After graduating, I finally got a grip, and once again slowly re-established a healthy relationship to what I was eating. It is for these reasons that food is such a tender subject for me, and changing my diet dangerous territory. I spent so many years struggling to achieve a positive connection with food, and when I finally got there and it felt like such a relief. The prospect of having to go back to that place of thinking about food more than I already did felt unsafe for me, and slipping back into an obsessive place felt like an inevitability. Meanwhile, the negative self-talk voices were loud and overpowering, telling me how I was fat, flabby, weak, old - things that I KNEW werent true. But thats the sad thing about internal monologues, they dont need to make sense to play like broken records in our minds all day every day. Its enough to drive a person insane. The cruel voices coupled with my extreme fear of reverting back to my old thought patterns and eating habits absolutely terrified me. I felt like I had hit a wall of hopelessness. And all I wanted to do to feel better was to eat a piece of eff-ing bread. The reason I suspected the grain thing was because of the unique relationship that blood sugar has to our hormones. If were consuming carbohydrates at a faster rate than our bodies are utilizing them for energy, that extra glucose gets stored in the fat cells of the liver, which decreases its ability to breakdown excess estrogen, and allowing it to hang around in our systems longer than it should. This excess circulating estrogen causes a whole host of symptoms, including, you guessed it: mood swings, bloating, sluggish metabolism, tender breasts, fatigue, foggy thinking, PMS, and many more less-than-desirable issues. Now, these things can be exacerbated by stress (shocker), inadequate fat and protein intake, and environmental factors, all of which I was likely suffering from. I set out by making a plan, since I know how hard it is to make positive changes without preparation. Instead of focusing on the all the things I wanted to reduce or eliminate, I focused on the foods I could have, foods higher in fat and protein, since I knew that those things would naturally elbow out the things I would normally fall back on (Im looking at you, banana bread). I made a list that I could refer to when I was grocery shopping for ingredients. I cooked and froze things. I stocked the fridge and pantry. I was ready. Within the first few days I already noticed a difference: my energy was incredibly stable, my emotions were in check, the bloating in my stomach dissipated, and I just felt good. As the days rolled on my compulsive urges to down half a dozen muffins subsided, and it was like I could clearly see that what I had actually been battling was blood sugar issues - not just too many grains or carbohydrates. It became clear that I had been taking my bod on a wild rollercoaster of high and low blood sugar for years, which had in turn been tossing my hormones around like a pair of sneakers in a washing machine. Stabilizing blood sugar is the first step in managing your endocrines system ability to do its job properly. I realized that if I was going to eat grains (or any carbohydrate-heavy food), I had to eat them in smaller amounts, balance them out thoughtfully with enough fat and protein, and make sure that I was actually using that energy instead of letting it sit around in my body. So far, things have been going incredibly well, and I am so darn proud of myself for not only identifying the issue, but actually doing something about it. We are fluid beings with needs that evolve and change over time. Our diets need to reflect that, which is why its imperative to listen to our bodies and be advocates for our own health. No one knows your body better than you, and once you quiet all the noise out there telling you how to eat in black-and-white terms, youll be able to hear yourself, without judgement, and choose the way of eating that is just right for you, right now. It may be different tomorrow, and that is okay too. In sharing this all with you, I am trying to set an example, because you too have this intuition that is telling you just what you need to eat and do right now. Its actually fun to be connected to yourself, your unique rhythms and needs. Learning about how you operate and designing a plan that caters to your exceptional self means that you can celebrate, instead of berate your body the whole month through, and experience pleasure in every stage of our cycle. I promise. This is undoubtedly a huge topic, and one that I plan on chipping away at over the next few blog posts. Some things I want to reiterate here are, that I do not believe that grains or carbohydrates are bad. No natural food group should be vilified, just as no macronutrient should be either. If youre thinking about giving up carbs, Id advise you not to. Glucose, the sugar found in carbohydrates is your brains primary fuel source, and when consumed responsibly, carbs will help you on your wellness journey, not hinder you. I still stand behind each and every one of the recipes that I have created for this blog, the app, and both of my cookbooks, and I believe that they are appropriate for many people to enjoy. However at this stage of my life, some of the recipes do not serve my needs any longer, and Ive had to make small changes to them, or put them on the shelf for another time. Im okay with that. Whew! Now for some notes on the recipe. The base recipe for my Cinnamon Toast Crunch-inspired cereal is grain-free, but it does rely on almond flour, which can be expensive. If you can tolerate pseudo-grains, feel free to top up the base with buckwheat flour. This will bulk up the cereal considerably so youll have more for less money. This cereal is r-i-c-h. You really only need a small amount to fuel you in the morning - not like the bottomless bowls of that were used to consuming in the morning without every really feeling satisfied, ya know what I mean? And paired with a luscious liquid like my Super Creamy Hemp Milk will keep you full for even longer, help stabilize your blood sugar, not to mention flood your bod with the delicate nutrients and powerful enzymes that store-bought, plant-based milk is missing. This recipe is dead simple and pretty much like cream – I shouldnt even call it milk, since its so rich and thick. And since were thinking outside the cereal box here, dont stop at breakfast...this milk is amazing in coffee and tea, in raw treats and baked goods, soup, smoothies, ice cream and popsicles. Youre gonna love it! I made the cereal the first time with just almond flour and a full half-cup of applesauce. It was definitely delicious, but I loved it just as much when I cut this amount in half. If you dont want all the sweetness, use just 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml of applesauce instead of the full amount. If youre using buckwheat flour, you will need the full amount of the applesauces moisture to bind it all together. I havent tried a version without the coconut sugar, so if youre not into that stuff feel free to play with the recipe on your own.     Print recipe     Grain-free /­­ Gluten-free Cinnamon Crunch Cereal Makes 5-7 servings Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup ground flax seeds /­­ 50g 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 150g blanched almond flour 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35g coconut sugar 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml - 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml applesauce ( 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml if using buckwheat flour) 1 Tbsp. coconut oil, melted optional: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g buckwheat flour Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 325°F/­­160°C. 2. Combine the ground flax seeds, almond flour, cinnamon, salt, and sugar in a large mixing bowl. Stir well. Then add the desired amount of applesauce and coconut oil, and stir to fully incorporate (you made need to use your hands if it gets too dry). Gather dough into a rough ball. 3. Place dough ball on a sheet of baking paper with another sheet on top. Using a rolling pin, roll the dough as evenly as possible, about 2mm thickness (not quite paper thin). If youre using buckwheat flour, youll need to separate the dough into two batches to achieve this. Remove top sheet of baking paper, and using a paring knife, score the dough into small squares of your desired size (mine were about 1.5cm /­­ .5 square). 4. Place in the oven to bake for about approximately 25 minutes until turning golden around the edges, then turn the oven off and let the cereal sit in there until cool (this will help dry it out and make them extra crisp). 5. Once the cereal is completely cool, break up the pieces into squares and place in an airtight glass container. Store for up to one month at room temperature. Super Creamy Hemp Milk Makes 1 liter /­­ 1 quart Ingredients: scant 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water 3/­­4 cup hulled hemp seeds /­­ hemp hearts Totally optional add-ins: sweetener (stevia, dates, honey, maple syrup...) vanilla sea salt raw cacao powder Directions: 1. Place all ingredients in the blender and blend on high until smooth (this make take a couple minutes). 2. Pour directly into a sterilized bottle and store in the fridge for up to 5 days. Initially, I was really afraid to come out about any of this stuff - the changes my diet is undergoing, the orthorexia, the internal voices! But I know in my gut that if Im going through it, someone else out there is too. And the reason I wanted to start My New Roots in the first place was to create a safe space for everyone to share and support each other on our health journeys, so I have to be as transparent and honest as I feel I can be to set that example. I want to say a huge heartfelt thank-you to all of you who have stood by me all of these years and continue to do so. It feels pretty amazing to have you, and to be getting better all together. In light and gratitude, Sarah B.   ***** Also… There’s one spot left for the upcoming retreat in Ibiza, click here to join me for a week of total inspiration and rejuvenation! The post Cinnamon Crunch Cereal and Hemp Milk appeared first on My New Roots.

Honey Miso Latte

July 28 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Honey Miso Latte Let’s talk about air travel for a bit. I never, ever eat airplane food anymore. After years of partaking in complementary in-flight meals and dealing with the resulting, brutal stomach aches, I realized that it’s the always-questionable food that was making me feel unwell, not so much the elevation as I initially suspected. The first time I brought my own, home-cooked meal onto an overseas flight was a revelation – I felt none of the usual discomfort after eating and could actually get some sleep. Since then, I take all kinds of steps to prepare for air travel, especially long, international flights and find the extra effort to be very much worth it. First off, a few days before flying, I make an extra effort to stay hydrated and to eat at least a few very nutritious and balanced meals. Along with buying a huge water bottle after security, I bring a few sleepy-time tea bags with me on the flight, then ask the flight attendant for hot water and steep a strong, relaxing cup of tea, which helps me go to sleep, since I usually need help. A good sleep mask is always good for blocking out the neighbor’s screen light, too. For food, I like to bring a spinach, strawberry and basil salad, which sounds complicated but is really the best. Since I usually travel during the summer, all three of those ingredients are at peak season and taste amazing on their own, so no dressing is needed and the salad is leak-proof, almost weightless and very manageable. I feel nourished and light after that salad and don’t crave much more. For snacks, I will make some kind of sprouted seed bars and pack a few strips of untoasted nori, along with some dark chocolate. And I find that having an apple helps freshen up after an airplane nap. It’s amazing to see the bewilderment on the flight attendants’ and seat neighbors’ faces when they realize I’ve brought my own food and even teabags – it’s just not a common practice at all. But with the huge difference it makes, I don’t see why not! Since I’ve learnt that eating miso might be helpful when it comes to countering the radiation we are exposed to on any given flight, I’ve been trying to incorporate it into my pre-flight meals, whenever I can remember. Aside from the obvious miso soup, I’ve been making this miso latte, warm in the winter and iced in the summer, before heading out the door for the airport. It’s very quick and has that whole delicious balance of sweet, salty and umami flavors going for it. There is also an immunity boost from turmeric, honey and ginger to help you fight off the myriad germs swirling around that flying can you will be spending some time in :) If you have any in-flight health tips, I would love to hear them! Always looking for more. Enjoy! P.S. We are on Snapchat under golubkakitchen, follow along for behind-the-scenes GK. Honey Miso Latte   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients 2 cups almond milk 1-inch piece ginger - sliced (optional) 2-3 teaspoons sweet miso paste 2 teaspoons raw honey ⅛ teaspoon turmeric (optional) black pepper - if using turmeric, for optimal absorption Instructions warm version If using ginger, simmer it in the milk for 10 minutes, then strain. If not using ginger, warm the milk on its own. Combine warmed milk with the rest of the ingredients in a blender and serve hot, sprinkled with more turmeric and black pepper, if desired. iced version If using ginger, simmer it in the milk for 10 minutes and let cool. If not using ginger combine cold milk with the rest of the ingredients in a blender and serve over ice, sprinkled with more turmeric and black pepper, if desired. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Quinoa Collard Wraps from the Sprouted Kitchen Cookbook Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream Sunday Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso Caramel and Chocolate - Ice Cream Sund... Gingery Rutabaga and Pear Handpies .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Honey Miso Latte appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Homemade Chamomile Tea with Fresh Flowers from The Garden

May 29 2016 Vegan Thyme 

Homemade Chamomile Tea with Fresh Flowers from The Garden The flowers of the chamomile plant resemble a carpet of mini-daisies blanketing a small, sunny corner of my vegetable patch.  They're lovely, actually. Hardy, too. Tonight I made my first batch of chamomile/­­mint tea.  By the way, mint is the other "easiest herb in the world to grow"--you simply cannot kill it.  Trust me.  So back to chamomile: I snipped a small bouquet of the white and yellow flowers and placed them in my coffee mug with a few sprigs of mint leaves. I poured warm water over and set the timer for about five minutes.  I strained the liquid into another mug, and like magic, we had homemade chamomile tea. Your tea will taste nothing like the dried bags of herbal chamomile tea you may have tried.  The fresh-flower variety of tea is very herb-y. A bit of a lemony taste, too. It's delicious.  Chamomile tea is said to be good for helping ease stomach upset and to help with sleep. The best chamomile herb to buy is one of German origin matricaria retutica, or so I've read.  I basically used common sense and bought the herb from the nursery with the tag that said, Excellent for Making Tea!  Side-by-side growing mint with green beans. I KNOW!  But it works.  Make sure you strain the tea. Once you do, you'll have this lovely pale greenish-yellow brew.  Comfort in a cup. In other news. This is Frankie. She's a giant. We just adore her and her sissy tolerates her. 

Low Budget Vegan In Mongolia

January 14 2016 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Traveling as a vegan in Mongolia is not recommended for weak stomachs. I thought mine could handle it, but it didnt. Although I was always very well prepared, I had a […] The post Low Budget Vegan In Mongolia appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

4 Ways to Prevent Holiday Weight Gain

December 7 2015 Vegetarian Times 

4 Ways to Prevent Holiday Weight Gain We asked healthy cooking expert and Skinny Chef, Jennifer Iserloh to share her best tips for keeping extra pounds off for the holiday season. The author of 50 Shades of Kale and trained chef is also the instructor for our Gentle Cleanse course. The online course is a 1-2-3 plan: a 7-day detox, 3-week meal plans, and guidelines for making lifelong decisions. Sign up today to start feeling and looking better today.   Dreading putting on a few holiday pounds? Well dont let the worry of weight gain put a damper on your holiday cheer. There are plenty of tips and little tweaks to allow you to celebrate the season without sacrificing your well being. You can nosh, sip, and brew this holiday!  Just do it the smart and healing way by following these tips to help lessen temptation for the bad stuff while you still enjoy good eats with family and friends. Nosh Winter Detox Foods Many winter foods that you know and love are detox powerhouses, like sage, broccoli, cauliflower and pickled foods, like olives. Include them in your holiday meals in a festive way.  Toss cooked broccoli or cauliflower with sage and chopped olives cooked for 1 minute in warm olive oil.  Or sprinkle greens with lemon zest, chopped rosemary, and toasted walnuts. Spice Up Drinks Chiles are chock full of antioxidants and are super low in calories.  Adding hot peppers to your drinks and foods can burn off up to 50 extra calories during a meal. Even if youre not a spicy fan, you can start with just a little pinch of cayenne in your drinks and smoothies to get a chili-licious boost. Hydrate for Health Do you know that cravings for sweets can actually be your bodys cry for water? With the bustle and rushing of the holiday season many people forget to drink water. Sipping water before you reach for a snack can actually lesson the cravings you have throughout the day -even for fatty or salted foods. Warm Up When stress is high and you just need a little TLC, try sipping a hot beverage instead of noshing on a holiday treat.  I carry tea bags in my purse to be prepared, then just add hot water!  Sipping hot teas can actually reduce anxiety this study shows. If youre sensitive to caffeine I recommend, redbush tea. It is is naturally caffeine free and contains stomach soothing compounds  - perfect for this season of over-indulgence! Want to be more proactive in your avoidance of holiday weight gain--and feel better in the bargain? Join me on The Gentle Cleanse program. The three-day, seven-day, and 21-day programs fit all your needs for eating well (and even shedding a few pounds) throughout the holidays and beyond.

Should Fruit Only be Eaten on its Own ?

October 12 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Should Fruit Only be Eaten on its Own ? Packed with fiber, vitamins, and disease-thwarting antioxidants, fruit is undeniably important to overall health. Yet, some health advocates believe that to fully reap the benefits of fruit, you should eat it with no other foods. But dont stop adding berries to your morning oatmeal just yet. Food combining, a nutritional philosophy known as trophology, holds that fruit is best eaten separate from other foods, because when fast-digesting fruit is consumed along with food containing starches and proteins, its digestion is hindered, leading apples, grapes, and their ilk to ferment in your gut, which contributes to a range of digestive woes (such as bloating, indigestion, and gas). On the flip side, when fruits are eaten on their lonesome--at least an hour before or after a meal--your body can more easily access their nutritional bounty, leading to improved energy and weight loss. True? Yes, different foods do digest at different speeds, according to Sharon Palmer, RDN, author of Plant-Powered for Life, but there is a dearth of scientific evidence to support the practice of segregating fruit from other edibles. A healthy digestive tract has all the necessary enzymes needed to properly digest fruit and release its nutrients in a timely fashion, Palmer says, whether or not other starches, proteins, or fats are present. In other words, the human digestive tract is efficient at digesting mixed meals. Whats more, she says, gas is produced by bacteria working on food in the colon--not the stomach. So even if fruit is lingering in your stomach, it has little relevance to gas production. As for the purported weight loss benefits of carefully matching your food intake, an International Journal of Obesity study found no evidence that a food-combining diet was any more effective at bringing about a slimmer waistline than a typical balanced diet. Our Favorite Fruit Combos When it comes to good nutrition, science shows that these combos provide an extra boost. Blueberries + Yogurt Antioxidants in blueberries and the vitamin D found in the cultured dairy appear to team up to bolster immune health. For an immune-friendly snack, top plain Greek yogurt with blueberries and chopped nuts. Orange + Beans Citrus fruits, such as oranges, are rich in vitamin C, which helps increase absorption of the plant-based iron found in beans. Try black bean tacos topped with an orange salsa. Strawberries + Dark Chocolate Antioxidants in these foods react synergistically with one another, creating an antioxidant punch not available when consumed separately. Stir chopped strawberries and dark chocolate into hot oatmeal. The Reality If you find eating fruit solo is better for your digestion, there is no harm in continuing to do so. Ultimately, the more pressing question for a healthful diet is how much fruit you eat rather than when you eat it. Aim for at least 2 cups daily. Canada-based Investigative Nutritionist Matthew Kadey, RD, sets us straight on misleading nutrition claims.

10 Supermarket Foods and Drinks That Aren’t Always Veg

June 22 2015 Vegetarian Times 

10 Supermarket Foods and Drinks That Aren’t Always Veg Grocery shopping can be intimidating for new vegetarians: off-limits ingredients abound, and questionable products seem to lurk in every aisle. Is there lard in those beans? Anchovies in that dressing? When in doubt, use this handy cheat sheet to identify the most common supermarket foods and drinks that might not pass the veg test--and learn how to replace them with suitable substitutions. 1. Alcohol You wont find an ingredients list on most bottles, but isinglass (fish bladders), gelatin (animal skin, bones, tendons, and ligaments), and crab shells are just a few of the fining agents sometimes used to clarify alcohol. Check out barnivore.com to see if your favorite wine, beer, or booze was made with veg-friendly fining agents. 2. Caesar Dressing Anchovies give this popular salad dressing its signature salty kick. We love Follow Your Hearts creamy fish-free alternative, which gets plenty of zing from veg Worcestershire sauce and a hint of mustard. Great for vegans, its made without Parmesan cheese and egg yolks, two other standard Caesar ingredients. 3. Cheese Parmesan, Romano, and other old-school-style cheeses typically contain animal rennet--a cheesemaking ingredient extracted from the stomachs of calves, kids (goats), or lambs thats often simply labeled enzymes. Read VT‘s shopping guide, and stick with cheeses that state theyre made with microbial or vegetable rennet, or no rennet at all. (Psst: BelGioioso makes a vegetarian Parmesan wedge.) 4. French Onion Soup Beef stock may be providing the rich base for this comfort-food classic, so check the fine print on any supermarket can. Ordering it at a restaurant? It might also contain Parmesan and Gruyere cheeses made with animal rennet. Ask your server. 5. Gummy Treats Along with gummy vitamins and Starburst candies, conventional gummy bears and worms get their chewy texture from gelatin. Come Halloween, offer trick-or-treaters gummy treats that use fruit pectin instead--we promise they won’t be able to taste the difference. 6. Jell-O This jiggly childhood dessert is almost synonymous with gelatin. Find veg equivalents in the baking aisle of natural foods stores, or make your own using a thickening agent such as arrowroot powder or agar powder, derived from algae. 7. Kimchi A Korean staple believed to aid digestion, this spicy concoction of pickled veggies is traditionally fermented with fish sauce or dried shrimp. Look for jars that skip the seafood, such as Mother-in-Laws Vegan Napa Cabbage Kimchi. Use kimchi to add heat to veggie burgers, eggs, rice, and tacos. 8. Marshmallows Sorry, smores lovers: your favorite fluffy pillows contain gelatin. That goes for marshmallow-y treats such as Peeps and Rice Krispies Treats too. Have your campfire fun with vegan marshmallows made by Dandies or Sweet & Sara; vegetarians can also grab Marshmallow Fluff, which is gelatin-free (but contains dried egg whites). 9. Refried Beans Look out for lard in cans of refried beans, especially traditional versions. Some Mexican restaurants may also use animal fat in their bean and tortilla recipes, so be sure to ask. Luckily, its easy to find vegetarian refried beans cooked in oil. Amys Kitchen and Pacific Foods make a few VT favorites. 10. Worcestershire Sauce You can find a laundry list of ingredients--including anchovies--in this umami-rich condiment added to burgers, barbecue sauces, Bloody Mary cocktails, and more. For equally pungent, veg Worcestershire, try Annies Naturals or The Wizards, or swap in soy sauce. Shop Smart Restocking your kitchen? Follow these pro tips for veg-savvy grocery shopping: Inspect the label Read all ingredients carefully to avoid mix-ups. The same brand may have a veg and a non-veg option of the same type of food, notes Lindsay Nixon, author of The Happy Herbivore Guide to Plant-Based Living. Go natural Change up your supermarket routine. Nixon suggests visiting health food stores for a wider variety of veg-friendly goodies. (And if youre lucky enough to live near an exclusively vegetarian market, hop to it.) Make it yourself Vegetarian versions of sauces can be expensive, says Nixon. A homemade version is a fraction of the cost! Get easy recipes for veg kimchi, Caesar dressing, French onion soup, and more in VT‘s extensive recipe database.

Warm Summer Fruit Salad + Video

June 14 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Warm Summer Fruit Salad + Video If my 15 year younger self would see me know. I am sitting here writing a text that praises a warm fruit salad. Young David would have told me  that I was an idiot: “Why heat fruit when you can have it cold?!” You see, young David wasn’t very fond of warm fruit. At all.  Back then, I could binge eat bowls of fresh fruit, but cook or bake it and I wouldn’t touch it. Even apple pie, the one dish that every normal person loves, made my stomach turn upside down. I sometimes allowed myself to eat the part of the crust that hadn’t been touched by the fruit, but my tongue cringed from the bare thought of warm apple in my mouth. And now I’m all of a sudden ridiculously excited about this fruit salad that has taken a quick tour through a hot oven. What happened? I would love to say that this recipe was the game changer. But truth be told, I think I just slowly learned to appreciate warm fruit, recipe by recipe. Apart from the fact that I used to hate warm fruit and now swear by this dessert. Apart from the fact that this recipe is dead-simple and can be prepared in no-time. And apart from the fact that it includes some of the best bounty of the season and you will get all these summer-bonanza-feelings just by preparing it. Yes, apart from all that, this fruit salad is also covered in grated dark chocolate (that melts!), coconut flakes and salted almonds (that pairs oh so well with dark chocolate). Young David might not approve, but old David thinks this is pretty darn good and would like you all to give it a try. If you are still not  convinced, we created this video for our youtube channel as a final selling point:  The original Swedish version of this dessert is called Gino. It’s baked strawberries, kiwis and bananas with white chocolate on top. Our version is quite different, but t he choice of fruit and measurements are really just suggestions here, add or subtract fruit to your liking. Peaches or pineapple would also be good baked. Or raspberries. We have used fruit in season, but baking fruit is also a great way to increase the flavours during the winter season. Luise and I haven’t entirely agreed on the baking time. Personally I think the fruit only should be heated quickly, so it’s still quite firm. Just 5-6 minutes or enough time for the chocolate to melt. Luise however prefers the fruit to be more baked and a bit softer so the juices and flavours come together more. That’s about 10-12 minutes. But we’ll leave that decision to you (in the photos and video it’s baked after Luise’s preference). Warm Summer Fruit Salad with Dark Chocolate & Salted Almonds Serves 4 1 cup almonds + 1 tbsp boiled water mixed with 1 tsp salt (or store-bought salted almonds) 3 kiwi fruits 3 apricots 2 bananas, peel 10 strawberries 10 cherries, pitted 2 plums, remove stones 1 lime, juice 1 oz /­­ 30 g dark chocolate (70% or darker) 1/­­3 cup dried unsweetened coconut flakes Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Prepare the almonds by placing them in a mixing bowl, pour the hot salted water over the almonds and combine until all almonds are covered. Place the almonds in a baking tray and roast in the oven for 10-15 minutes or until slightly golden and crunchy. Set aside. Prepare the fruit by cutting them into bitesize pieces. Place the fruit in a baking dish and add the lime juice, toss to mix. Chop the almonds and sprinkle over the fruit salad. Grate the chocolate until it covers the fruit. Sprinkle with coconut flakes and place the dish in the oven. Bake for 5-10 minutes, until the chocolate has melted and the fruit is warm and juicy (not mushy). Serve in bowls with a dollop thick plain yogurt or ice cream.

Movie on a Mission: Inside the Garbage of the World

May 4 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Movie on a Mission: Inside the Garbage of the WorldPhoto: Carillo Films When you learn that an average American discards 4.5 pounds per day of trash, you realize we are the problem because we are not aware of where our trash is going and what it does to the environment and ultimately to our health, says Philippe Carillo, co-director and co-producer--with his wife, Maxine--of the documentary Inside the Garbage of the World. The film aims to correct this lack of awareness by showing the scourge of plastic pollution. Here, Philippe passionately responds to questions the film prompts. How would designating plastic as hazardous waste--which the film advocates--be a game changer? When plastic will finally be considered hazardous material, then plastic manufactures will be forced to come up with a safe material for human consumption and for the environment. We should have a totally independent organization, a pro-consumer organization, which should do all the testing of any product before it goes to market. But today that is far from the case. Big corporations have way too much power, and they are not ethical in regards to public safety. Californias ban on plastic bags, set to start this summer, is on hold since an industry-backed referendum qualified for the November 2016 ballot. What would you say to the states voters? I challenge anybody who is voting to overturn the ban to go to the beach every morning like I do and clean it of plastic. Believe me, they will start to understand. Have them ask scientists about the dangers of plastic, learning what it does little by little to their health, and to the fish and marine mammals who are dying all over the world because their stomachs are full of plastic bags. Ask them to visit one of the first beaches where plastic has concentrated, such as Kamilo Beach in Hawaii, and see if they can apprehend the future and how we are killing ourselves. We cannot leave our future in the hands of greedy organizations. Our future depends on us. Where would you suggest people start to get involved? In any vote that may occur in your vicinity, vote for your future and the future of your children. Also, vote with your pocketbook. That is your great power. You are the one who chooses what grocery stores sell. Remove plastic from your life, even if its step by step: Bring along your own fabric bags when you shop. Stop buying water in plastic bottles; there are alternatives such as glass bottles, or carry your own water container if you have a good water filter at home. Use your own mug when you buy coffee; buy bamboo or camping utensils to avoid using plastic utensils; use your own stainless steel container for takeout food. After a while you will see a change. We are the change! What about you? How are you reducing single-use plastic in your life?

4 Reasons Why You Should Start Juicing

April 24 2015 VegKitchen 

4 Reasons Why You Should Start JuicingContributed by Garrick Dee Tan. When it comes to staying healthy and fit, a lot of health experts like dieticians and doctors would say that you should eat a lot of fruit and vegetables. How much? It varies. For instance if youre a 35 year old male who does not exercise a lot, you should eat at least 2 cups of fruit and 3 cups of vegetables. This handy tool from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will calculate how much you should eat depending on your age, sex and physical activity level. What counts as a cup? According to the CDC a whole small apple can be considered as a cup, a large banana is considered a cup, half a cup of sweet potato + half a cup of green beans is considered a cup. Heres the full chart. Eating all that vegetables and fruit really fills up your stomach which is great because itll leave less room for junk food but the digestive system gets overwhelmed. One option that will help health conscious folks like you and I consume more fruits and vegetables is juicing, and Ill share with you 4 reasons why you should consider incorporating this practice into your diet. - Allows you to consume more fruits and vegetables Like what I said earlier in this article depending on your age, sex and physical activity level you need to consumer 5 to 6 cups fruits and vegetables. Juicing helps you consume more because the process separates liquid from pulp. Whats left is a liquid brimming with live enzymes and nutrients get absorbed by the body without having to be digested by the gut. This in a way helps rest the digestive system. - Helps treat certain types of ailments like diabetes Diabetes is an epidemic that affects over 30 million Americans with over 1.5 million new cases per year. One of the best natural remedies used with success by a number of people to control diabetes is bitter melon. This (you guessed it) bitter fruit contains four ingredients that is known to help the bodys capability to absorb and process sugar. These four ingredients are vicine, polypeptide-P, charantin and lectin. It is so potent that doctors and health practitioners have warned against combining this with diabetic medication because it could cause hypoglycemia or a condition where the blood sugar falls to dangerously low levels. Dosages vary but the maximum you can safety take is around 2 bitter melons per day. If youve tasted bitter melon, it is very bitter and I doubt no matter how good the chef is you wont be able to eat a whole piece. An alternative is to juice bitter melon. This removes all the pulp and what you get is a concentrated drink that has helped thousands of people reverse type-2 diabetes. If pure bitter gourd is too bitter for your taste you can try adding these ingredients. Important note: If youre under medication, consult with a physician first before incorporating this into your diet because like what Ive said combining this with diabetic medication can cause hypoglycemia. And when you do take this regularly monitor blood glucose levels - if it falls within normal levels ask your doctor if you can discontinue medication. - Helps you lose weight No, Im not talking about a juice fast where youll eat nothing but juice. Im talking utilizing juicing into your diet in order to reduce hunger pangs. While a juice fast can work for the short term and Ive read a lot of success stories, the truth is it isnt sustainable for an extended period and can be dangerous if you do it the wrong way. What Im suggesting here is a solution where you dont need to starve yourself. The solution involves drinking fresh juice before a meal or in-between meals in order to curb the hunger pangs that normally would occur if we dont eat snacks in between meals. Health experts agree that eating smaller portions is the key in losing weight and keeping it off but if what you are eating in between meals is rich in fructose then this method can also work against you, which is why drinking juice or a smoothie /­­ juice combo is a better option. Not only will your body get the nutrients it craves for thus reducing appetite, it also lessens the carb and sugar intake. This will result in weight loss minus the nutrient deprivation. If you dont believe me, try some of these recipes before any meal and see if it helps in reducing hunger pangs. Some of these recipes have ingredients that help in weight loss like Avocado and Grapefruit. - Improves digestion A health digestive system is important to our overall health, in fact a third of our immune system is found in the digestive tract and research confirms this. Juicing helps indirectly by providing you with a healthier alternative to store bought juices. Fruits like lemon also help with the digestive system by lubricating the digestive system and softening the stool. Drinking a cup of warm lemon water in the morning will help improve in fact will help digestive health by stimulating the liver to produce bile which is a fluid needed to flush out waste from the gut. Another ingredient you can add to your juices to improve digestion is ginger. Eating a thumb of ginger is just plain impossible but juicing it is not and adding it adds a nice spicy contrast. Next week, Ill cover the most common mistakes a lot of people make when juicing. One of them is a key contributor in people gaining weight so please stand by for that. - For more juicing tips, visit Juicing with G.


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