starch - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Thanksgiving Nut Roast

Easy as Chocolate Pie

Vegan Banoffee Pie with Date Caramel Sauce

Spicy Potato Curry










starch vegetarian recipes

Vegan Pumpkin French Toast

November 8 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Pumpkin French ToastVegan Pumpkin French Toast with Pumpkin Cornbread, pumpkin pie spices and Caramelized Apples! Breakfast for fall. Vegan Soy-free Recipe. Can be gluten-free with gluten-free cornbread I had another batch of pumpkin cornbread but no soup to finish it up with. Oh well, we could have finished it up as is (its so good!), but I decided to make pumpkin french toasts with it.  The Pumpkin french toast batter has generous amount of pumpkin puree and pumpkin pie spices mixed with a bit of starch and non dairy milk. The bread is soaked for a few seconds then pan fried. I love this batter with my pumpkin cinnamon swirl Sandwich bread. The combination with the pumpkin cornbread is even more delicious. Cornbread doesnt get soggy. It has pumpkin and spices already which get amplified with the pumpkin + spices in the batter. And is topped with spiced apples. Fall spices everywhere! Try not to eat these right off the skillet.  I served these with apples cooked with coconut sugar, mainly because the photos with just butter weren’t looking as fun :). These french toasts are very delicious as is! Continue reading: Vegan Pumpkin French ToastThe post Vegan Pumpkin French Toast appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Chilli Paneer (Indo-Chinese Dish)

November 3 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Chilli Paneer Chilli Paneer is a popular Indo-Chinese dish. Chilli Paneer makes a spicy flavorful starter especially for many of my friends who enjoy the spicy food. Chilli Paneer can also be served as a side dish. This is absolutely delicious and easy to make. - 6 oz paneer (cut into bite sized pieces) - 1 cup bell pepper (sliced, capsicum, Shimla mirch, I am using yellow and green bell pepper for color) For Batter - 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour (plain flour, maida) - 2 Tbsp corn starch or arrow root powder - 1/­­2 tsp salt For Sauce - 2 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable oil) - 1 Tbsp ginger (shredded, adrak) - 1 Tbsp green chili (chopped) - 1 tsp chili flakes - 2 Tbsp soy sauce - 1 Tbsp vinegar - 1 Tbsp tomato paste - 1-1/­­2 tsp corn starch or arrow root powder - 1/­­2 cup water -  I am using store bought paneer, texture is not very soft to give the paneer softer texture soak the paneer for at least 10 minutes in hot water with few drops of lemon juice. -  To make batter mix flour, corn starch, and salt in a bowl. Add the water slowly to make a smooth batter (batter should be consistency of pancake batter or dosa batter). -  Heat at least 1/­­2 inch of oil in a frying pan over medium high heat. Oil should be moderately hot. -  Dip the paneer into the batter, making sure it is completely covered by the batter. Then drop the paneer pieces slowly into oil in the frying pan. (do not overlap them) -  Fry the paneer in small batches. Fry them turning occasionally, until they are very light golden brown. Take them out over paper towel. -  Do same with bell pepper. -  For sauce heat the oil in sauce pan over medium heat; add ginger, and green chili stir for about one minutes. Add all the ingredients for sauce except corn starch, (soy sauce, vinegar, chili flakes, and tomato paste), Stir for 1 minutes. mix water and corn starch and add to the sauce. Cook for another two minutes, sauce should be thick consistency. Sauce gets thicker as it sits. -  Add paneer, and bell pepper into sauce and serve hot. The post Chilli Paneer (Indo-Chinese Dish) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Big Bang Tofu

October 10 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Big Bang Tofu The quick and easy sauce in this recipe is made with just three ingredients, but it provides a big bang of flavor as a coating for the lightly fried tofu. When making the sauce, mix in the sriracha a little at a time and taste as go, to be sure turns out at the heat level you prefer. I like to serve this Big Bang Tofu over rice or quinoa with sautéed greens on the side. The sauce also makes a great dip for roasted cauliflower florets.   Big Bang Tofu - 1/­­3 cup Asian sweet chili sauce - 1/­­3 cup vegan mayonnaise ((I like Just Mayo)) - 1 to 2 tablespoons sriracha sauce - 14 to 16 ounces extra-firm tofu, drained and pressed - 2 tablespoons cornstarch - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 1 tablespoon safflower oil or other neutral oil - In a small bowl, combine the chili sauce, mayonnaise, and sriracha. Mix well until thoroughly blended. Set aside. - Cut the tofu into 1/­­2-inch dice and place in a bowl. Sprinkle with the cornstarch and salt and pepper to taste and toss to coat the tofu. - Heat the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the tofu and stir-fry until golden brown, about 8 minutes. Toss the tofu with the reserved sauce and serve hot. Recipe from MORE Quick-Fix Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2014, Andrews McMeel Publishing. The post Big Bang Tofu appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Giardiniera Mac and Cheese

September 26 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Giardiniera Mac and Cheese Italian pickled mixed vegetables, called giardiniera, can be quite tart, so its best to drain and rinse before using. You can make this mac and cheese without the gardiniera or with the addition of cooked vegetables, frozen, thawed green peas, or marinated artichoke hearts. You can also make this ahead and then cover and pop it in the oven to reheat.   Giardiniera Mac and Cheese - 8 to 12 ounces fiore pasta or other bite-sized pasta shape - 2 1/­­2 cups giardiniera vegetables, drained and coarsely chopped - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1/­­3 cup panko crumbs - 1 1/­­2 cups unsweetened almond milk - 1/­­3 cup raw cashew pieces, soaked and drained - 2 tablespoons cornstarch or tapioca flour - 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast flakes - 1 tablespoon mellow white miso - 1 heaped tablespoon tomato paste - 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar or lemon juice - 3/­­4 teaspoon mustard powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika - 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder - 1 small clove minced garlic - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground turmeric - 1 teaspoon salt, or to taste - Cook the pasta in a pot of boiling salted water until it is al dente. About 3 minutes before the pasta is done cooking, stir in the giardiniera. Drain and leave in the strainer. - Heat the oil in a small skillet over medium-high heat. Add the panko crumbs, stirring to coat with the oil. Cook, stirring for a few minutes until the crumbs are toasted. Remove from the heat and set aside. - In a blender, combine all of the remaining ingredients and blend until smooth and creamy. Pour the sauce into the pot in which the pasta was cooked and cook stirring, over medium-high heat, until the sauce is hot, bubbly, and thickened, about 4 minutes. Add the pasta and vegetables to the sauce, stirring gently to combine and heat through. Transfer to a casserole dish and sprinkle with the reserved panko. Serve hot. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. The post Giardiniera Mac and Cheese appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Super-Easy Pulled Jackfruit Sandwiches

July 27 2017 VegKitchen 

Super-Easy Pulled Jackfruit Sandwiches There are plenty of pulled jackfruit sandwich recipes around the web, but this miracle food is so amazing that we just had to have one of our own. This super-easy pulled jackfruit sandwich recipe relies on flavorful BBQ sauce to envelop the starchy fruit. In its unripe state it has that kind of stringy texture […] The post Super-Easy Pulled Jackfruit Sandwiches appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Gluten-free Lemon Donuts. Grain-free Baked Vegan Doughnuts

July 16 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Gluten-free Lemon Donuts. Grain-free Baked Vegan DoughnutsVegan Gluten-free Lemon Donuts Recipe. 1 Bowl or Blender. These baked gluten free doughnuts are amazingly soft and moist. They are Grain-free, Easy, Zesty. Use lemon or lime. Baked Vegan Doughnuts. Glutenfree Grainfree Soyfree Yeast-free Paleo Can be nutfree. I keep trying gluten-free baking on and off. Some recipes that I try from cookbooks turn out ok to a mess. Doughnuts are a difficult baking task esp if made gluten-free, as they are supposed to be soft, moist, airy and a bit chewy. These baked doughnuts come very close. And the best part is that they use a few ingredients(flour lemon, leavening, flavor), no xanthan gum, no rice flour, no oats, no grain!  I looked again to my Indian roots to make these doughnuts. Chickpea flour/­­besan makes a great dhokla, which is a steamed savory cake. It uses just 1 ingredient, chickpea flour and spices and some leavening and boom, you have a soft, moist cakey bread. I used a similar batter, added a bit of starch to hold the shape better, and some almond flour for texture and volume. You can easily make these without the almond flour. Just add more flour.  These doughnuts come out better with besan. Chickpea flour makes a stronger flavor and slightly less moist version. Yes they are not the same flour. Besan is flour of skinless brown chickpeas or chana dal and chickpea flour in the US is generally white chickpea /­­garbanzo bean flour. Besan is available online on amazon or in Indian stores(its very cheap in Indian stores). If you use chickpea flour, add more zest and dont store the donught longer than a few hours. The chickpea flour flavor gets more prominent. Lets get to these lemony bites! Continue reading: Vegan Gluten-free Lemon Donuts. Grain-free Baked Vegan DoughnutsThe post Vegan Gluten-free Lemon Donuts. Grain-free Baked Vegan Doughnuts appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Oh My Vegan Blueberry Pie with Perfect Double Crust Dough (and eight paws!)

July 1 2017 Vegan Thyme 

Oh My Vegan Blueberry Pie with Perfect Double Crust Dough (and eight paws!) In baking, like everything else in life, weather, moods and trips to the store dictate whether pie is in order. I'm that person who sees pies in grocery store cases and thinks: what a shame, why don't people bake their own pies anymore? Then crave pie all the way home. It's been humid and unbearable one day, dry and breezy the next so far this summer with very little rain.  Hot days of summer or not--I was baking a pie this week.  I don't know why I've always felt baking a pie is an all day affair. It never is. Pie memories I have are of a pastry cutter and my mother with a large bowl of flour and clumps of butter rolling about in pieces, seeping through the thin wires of the cutter, and of me asking for raw bits of dough to nibble on while she continues to roll through the process of butter, dough, shortening. Then her with a large wooden rolling pin (the same one I still use today), shaping a circle out onto the kitchen counter with a few flings of flour tossed over and under the dough before being carefully flattened into the vintage Corning Ware blue cornflower pie plate (the exact same pie plate I use to today). Then she'd take gobs of whatever fresh fruit was available at the store for filling and copious amounts of sugar. Peach pies more often than not, but for me--berries always in summer. It never seemed to be a big deal for her to just magically throw together a pie.  The pies were always scrumptious.  There are a few schools of thought out there as to whether pie crust is a butter only affair or a shortening AND butter affair. I am of the latter in terms of preference. Nothing fancy. Use whatever design you'd like to vent the pie during baking. Giving into my craving for pie the entire pie process comes together and bakes in about an hour and a half. The "half hour" set aside for mandatory cooling period for the dough. Eating of said pie commences after a good hour or two of cooling with a dallop of vegan vanilla ice cream: a la mode. Or saved for the next morning. . . for breakfast. (The best way to eat pie if you ask me.)   This is actually my second berry pie I've baked in two days.  And aside from pies: here's the newest member of the family.  This is our last addition to the family what with all the aging we have left in front of us . . we are now two dogs, two humans and four hearts. She is a little under weight and has much growing to go. She is super smart. Her sister loves her, but is a bit too big to have "full access" for play time (because her paw literally covers the little one's head entirely). Supervised play only for the time being.  She fell asleep on the exam table at her first vet appointment while getting her booster shots.  Awww.  The first day we ALL met her! Smallest. Sweetest. Big Sissy loves her, too.  Now. Yup. It's a whole new world around here. Vegan Blueberry Pie Perfect Double Crust Pie Dough 2 1/­­2 cups all purpose flour (10 1/­­2 ounces by weight) 7 T. cold vegan butter  1/­­4 cup cold vegetable shortening 1 teaspoon fine sea salt 8 T. ice cold water In a large bowl, sift together the flour and salt. Then cube the ice cold butter and shortening and using a pastry blender, work the dough until the butter and shortening are in small pieces--some larger pieces are okay--actually are fine! Then begin adding the water one tablespoon at a time, tossing the dough around with a spoon to incorporate the water. Begin to work the dough into a ball carefully with your hand--but don't "over handle" the dough--you want to be able to form a ball. Then divide the ball in half. Flatten each half into a disc, then wrap in plastic and place in fridge for 30-45 minutes.  Meanwhile, make the filling: 6-7 cups frozen blueberries (*I only had four cups of blueberries on hand, so added frozen black and red raspberries to offset the amount--it works out fine--but I did buy more blueberries for next time) 1/­­4 t. ground cinnamon 2 T. corn starch 2 T. all purpose flour 1/­­2 cup sugar juice of whole lemon Preheat oven to 425. Prepare a 9" pie plate for baking. Toss all filling ingredients together in a bowl. Roll out pie dough on well-floured surface to a 10" in diameter circle--or wide enough to cover the base of the pie plate with a bit of overhang. Place dough in pie plate, pressing it in to fit bottom and come up the sides. *You don't want the crust too thin--about a 1/­­4" works well. Add the filling. Repeat with other half of dough and then place on top of filling. Fold the dough around the edges under and using your finger and thumb, pinch the crust closed. For the top of the pie, use whatever "venting" system you'd like. I just used a knife and cut out my own decorations, well. . . triangles.  Bake for 20 minutes at 425. Then turn oven down to 350 and bake for an additional 40 minutes or until crust begins to brown.  Allow to pie to cool for at least an hour before slicing. Store in fridge. 

Vegan Breakfast Nachos

June 13 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Breakfast Nachos These Breakfast Nachos are a favorite “anytime” meal at our house, and they can make an extra-special brunch on Father’s Day.  I plan to make this for Jon on Sunday to thank him for being such a great dad to all of our kitties.  Lucky for him, the cats won’t be helping me in the kitchen! I hope you and your family enjoy this as much as we do! Breakfast Nachos Nachos for breakfast is a fun way to start the day. Make the queso sauce in advance and the nachos will come together quickly. - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 small yellow onion, minced - 2 garlic cloves, minced - 3 scallions, chopped - 12 ounces extra-firm tofu, drained and diced - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cumin - 1/­­4 teaspoon turmeric - 1 1/­­2 cups cooked or 1 (15-ounce) can black beans, drained and rinsed - 1 large tomato, diced - 1 jalapeno, seeded and minced -  1/­­4 cup chopped cilantro, plus more for garnish (optional) - 1 ripe avocado, peeled, pitted, and diced - 1 recipe Smoky Queso Sauce (below), kept warm - 1 (13-ounce) bag restaurant-style tortilla chips -  Heat the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion and cook for 3 minutes, then add the garlic and scallions and cook 2 minutes longer. Add the tofu and salt, and cook, stirring, for 5 minutes. Stir in the nutritional yeast, cumin, and turmeric. Taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. Stir in the beans, cover, and keep warm. -  In a medium bowl, combine the tomato, jalapeno, cilantro, and lime juice. Season with salt to taste and mix well. Gently stir in the avocado. -  To assemble, spoon a thin layer of the sauce on the bottom of a large plate. Place half of the chips on top of the sauce. Spoon half of the sauce on top of the chips, followed by half of the tofu and beans, and then half of the salsa. Top with the remaining chips and repeat with the remaining ingredients. Serve immediately, garnished with additional cilantro, if using. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by William and Susan Brinson.   Smokey Queso Sauce This easy-cheesy sauce is great for nachos or folded into cooked pasta for a zesty mac and cheese. If chopped pimientos are unavailable, you can substitute 3 tablespoons chopped roasted red bell pepper. - 1 (2-ounce) jar chopped pimientos, drained - 1 teaspoon canned chipotle chiles in adobo sauce - 1/­­2 cup nutritional yeast - 3 tablespoons cornstarch - 1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika - 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder - 1 teaspoon salt - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice - 2 teaspoons rice vinegar - 1 1/­­2 cups plain unsweetened almond milk or water -  Combine all the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Transfer to a saucepan and cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until thickened, about 5 minutes. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Use as desired. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. The post Vegan Breakfast Nachos appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Stovetop Peach-Blueberry Crumble

May 30 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Stovetop Peach-Blueberry Crumble With summer on the horizon, fresh fruit desserts are back on the menu.  I especially love the combination of peaches and blueberries.  One of my favorite ways to serve them is with this easy crumble that is best served warm with a scoop of vegan vanilla ice cream. Similar to a fruit crisp, this Peach-Blueberry Crumble is made in a skillet on a stovetop instead of in the oven. The basis of the crumble topping is healthful, toothsome oatmeal. Yum. Stovetop Peach-Blueberry Crumble (Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC.) Ingredients - 1 1/­­2 pounds firm, ripe peaches (5 to 6 peaches) - 1 tablespoon lemon juice - 1/­­2 cup granulated sugar - 2 tablespoons cornstarch - 1 cup fresh or frozen blueberries - 1 cup old-fashioned or quick-cooking oats - 1/­­2 cup light brown sugar - 1/­­4 teaspoon salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cinnamon - 1/­­2 cup cold vegan butter (Earth Balance), diced Preparation Halve and cut the peaches, then cut them into thin slices and place in a large bowl. Add the lemon juice, sugar, and cornstarch and toss well to combine. Gently fold in the blueberries. Transfer the fruit mixture to a 10-inch skillet (cast iron is preferable) and set aside. In a food processor, combine the oats, brown sugar, cinnamon, and salt and pulse to combine and break down the oats somewhat. Add the butter and pulse until the pieces of butter are the size of peas. Sprinkle the topping mixture evenly over the fruit. Cover and cook over medium heat until hot and bubbly, about 12 minutes. Turn off heat, remove the lid, and let stand for another 5 minutes to cool slightly. Serve warm or at room temperature.   The post Stovetop Peach-Blueberry Crumble appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Green Pea Falafel Bowl

April 26 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Pea Falafel Bowl One of the first recipes we posted on the blog was baked herb & pistachio falafels. That was back in the days when we didn’t have three monsters tearing down the house. When I still had an old-fashioned job. And when baking a falafel instead of deep-frying it felt like a fresh new idea. Elsa once asked me if grandma’s older sister was alive when the dinosaurs lived on earth. I told her no (while simultaneously typing a message with a ton of dinosaur emojis to my mom). That is roughly how long ago that falafel recipe feels like. Dinosaur age. So much has happened since then. I still think it’s a good recipe and today’s falafel recipe has much of the same qualities. They are simple, baked, packed with fresh herbs and hold together excellently. If you don’t serve it with the mint yogurt, it is also vegan. We subbed the pistachios with some pumpkin seeds/­­pepitas this time and replaced half of the chickpeas with green peas to make them more suited for spring. It also gives them a slightly sweet tone and less dry than your average falafel (which is one of our favorite features with this recipe). We serve them in a bowl with roasted carrots, cinnamon spiked quinoa, beetroot hummus and a splash of mint yogurt instead of wrapping them up in lettuce or bread. We think of it as a spring-y Moroccan falafel bowl. I won’t claim that this is a dead-simple recipe (as it involves cooking, mixing and baking), but I at least find it comforting that the carrots, beetroot and falafels all are baked simultaneously in the oven. Before we jump to the recipe, we wanted to share the updated schedule for our little Green Kitchen At Home US book tour. And also this short video about the book that we did the other day. As we mentioned in our last post, we are coming to the US next week for some press activities. Both Luise and I will be in New York and then I’ll continue on my own to SF and LA. We are only doing a few public events and are very much hoping to see some of you there. New York > 1 May Our cooking class at Sur La Table is sold out but we will have a mingle, book signing and Q&A at CAP Beauty on 1 May, 7 pm. Entrance is free, you get to try some tasters from the book and we’ll both be there to chat. All you need to do is RSVP here.  San Francisco & Los Angeles > 3-5 May I’ll be at Credo Beauty in San Francisco on 3 May, 2-4 pm, signing books and chatting with you all about food, photography, kids and whatnot. I will also be doing the same in their Los Angeles store on 4 May, 5-7 pm. Free entrance, just RSVP to both events here. I’ll also be teaching a hands-on cooking class at Sur La Table in Los Angeles. There are still a few tickets available - so go get them here! For those of you who’s been asking, we will also be coming to London in June and Amsterdam after the summer. Enough about that. Let’s start cooking! Recipe notes o Falafel purists use soaked chickpeas instead of cooked. Cooked is however much quicker and works just fine. We also find that it’s easier on our digestion. o You don’t have to roast the beetroot for the hummus but can simply grate raw beetroot before mixing it. But since we’re using the oven anyway for the other parts of the bowl, we roast them to give the hummus a rounder flavor. Green Pea Falafel Bowl Serves 4 Falafels 1 cup /­­ 150 g green peas, fresh or frozen (thawed) 1 cup /­­ 150 g cooked chickpeas 2 small shallots, peeled and coarsely chopped 1-2 cloves garlic, peeled 2 tbsp buckwheat flour or potato starch 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 3 stalks fresh mint, leaves picked 3 stalks parsley, stems discarded 1 tbsp lemon juice 1 tsp ground cumin 1 tsp flaky sea salt 1-2 tbsp olive oil Beetroot Hummus 200 g raw beetroots 1 cup /­­ 150 g cooked white beans  3 tbsp light tahini (sesame paste) 4 tbsp lemon juice 3 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil 1 tsp ground cumin 1 clove garlic, peeled 1 tsp flaky sea salt Cinnamon Quinoa 1 cup uncooked Quinoa pinch flaky sea salt 1/­­2 tsp ground cinnamon 1 small handfull raisins (we used green raisins with a smoky flavor) To serve 4 carrots, peeled and cut into thick sticks (bake together with the beetroot) 2 avocados, sliced 4 handfuls mache lettuce 1/­­2 cucumber, sliced 12 radishes, sliced 1 cup plain yogurt a bunch fresh mint leaves, chopped a handful toasted almonds, chopped sesame seeds Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F fan mode (this is because we’re doing two plates simultaneously). Add all falafel ingredients (except the oil) to a food processor and pulse until mixed but not pureed. With moist hands, shape 16 mini falafel patties (roughly 1 generous tablespoon per falafel). Pour a little olive oil into the palm of your hand and then place each falafel in it, smoothing out the falafel and at the same time coating it in oil. Refill with oil for every fourth falafel. Place them on a baking tray covered with baking paper. Bake in the oven for 20 minutes, turning them after half the time. Peel the beets and cut in quarters. Place on a baking tray together with the prepared carrots (from the To serve list) and place in the oven (this can be done simultaneously as the falafel tray) for about 20 minutes or until baked through and soft. Let cool slightly and then place the beets (set the the carrots aside for serving) in a food processor (or bowl if using a stick blender) with the rest of the ingredients and mix for at least 2 minutes until very smooth. Taste and adjust the flavors to you liking. Prepare the quinoa while the vegetables are in the oven: Place rinsed quinoa in a saucepan, add 2 cups water, salt and cinnamon and bring to a boil. Lower the heat immediately and simmer for about 12-15 minutes. Stir in raisins and set aside. Stir together yogurt and a handful chopped mint leaves, set aside. Arrange all serving ingredients in bowls and top with beetroot hummus, quinoa and pea falafels. Sprinkle with almonds, sesame seeds and mint. Enjoy! PS! If you have already received our new book through online orders, we’d be super grateful if you could leave a short review of it on Amazon. Thank you! 

Monday Menu: Sesame-Ginger Tofu Broccoli Stir-Fry

April 17 2017 VegKitchen 

Monday Menu: Sesame-Ginger Tofu Broccoli Stir-Fry I could live on Asian-style stir-fries and noodle dishes. Theyre so versatile and simple to make, perfect for busy weeknights. Case in point, Sesame-Ginger Tofu Broccoli Stir-Fry. Its inspired by General Tsos Tofu, but dispenses with the cornstarch-battered, deep-fried tofu.This version, with pan-sautéed tofu, plenty of broccoli, and a savory, sweet, and spicy sauce even […] The post Monday Menu: Sesame-Ginger Tofu Broccoli Stir-Fry appeared first on VegKitchen.

Carrot Cake (vegan & gluten free)

April 6 2017 Veganpassion 

Carrot Cake (vegan & gluten free) Spring is spoiling us and I'm enjoying it to the fullest. Soon we'll be searching egg alternatives between the grasses because it's easter time *yaaay!!!* As a spring treat I created a carrot cake. Gluten free and without any refined sugars it's full of flavours: from buckwheat, to hazelnuts, carrot, bananas and caramelized coconut sugar! What a celebration :-) The cake consists of a biscuit and a coconut cream and it's prepared very quick. If you don't like coconut you can use vegan whip cream if you like and garnish it with hazelnuts. Makes one cake with 18 cm diameter. For the biscuit: 1/­­3 cup + 1 tbsp. rice whole grain flour 1/­­3 cup buckwheat flour 1/­­4 cup hazelnuts, grounded 1 tbsp. starch 4 tbsp. coconut sugar 1 pinch xanthan or tapioca starch 1 tsp. bicarb each 1 pinch cinnamon and vanilla 1 banana 1 small carrot 2 tbsp. + 2 tsp. plant based baking oil 1/­­2 cup dairy free milk 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar 2 tbsp. maple sirup Preheat oven to 338°F (170°C) air circulation. In a mixing bowl, mix together rice whole grain flour, buckwheat flour, hazelnuts, starch, coconut sugar, xanthan and bicarb. Add vanilla and cinnamon. Mash the banana with a fork and grate the carrot. Add banana, carrot with oil, dairy free milk, vinegar and maple sirup to the flour mixture and mix until the dough is smooth. Mix with a egg beater but not to long so the dough stays fluffy. Grease a springform and fill in the dough. Bake at 338°F air circulation for 25-30 minutes. Take the form out of the oven and let it cool off. For the coconut cream: 2 cans of coconut milk (refrigerated for at least 8! hours) or 3/­­4 cup + 1 tbsp. whip cream 2-4 tbsp. maple sirup 1 pack stabilizer for whipping cream coconnut chips. hazelnuts daisys Take the coconut milk out of the refrigerator and take the fatty cream from the top. You can use to coconut water to create some delicious Currys. Take the stabilizer for whip cream and cream it with a mixer. Fold in the maple sirup. Take the biscuit out of the springform carefully and cut it in two small flan cases. Use the lower one and put it on a cooling rack and spread 2-3 tbsp cream ob it. Put the second flan case on top and spread the rest of the cream on it and around it. Garnish the cake with coconut chips, hazelnuts and daisys. The cake can be stored in the fridge for 3-4 days. Have lots of fun with baking and enjoy!

Sorghum Beet Risotto

March 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sorghum Beet Risotto Ive been seeing a lot of why not just make it with rice reactions to alternative grain risotto recipes. I have a few reasons. Trying to get a variety of potentially more nutritious grains into my meals is one. Making a risotto-like dish with any grain makes it taste delicious and a little more special than just a bed for the more dominant stuff on your plate. Its also a creative challenge, and I welcome those when they occur in the kitchen. The flavor will always be a bit more new and unexpected than traditional risotto, but the creamy grain dish format will keep it in cozy territory, which is nice. Of course, no grain will quite replace starchy Arborio rice, which is what usually gives risotto that wonderfully creamy consistency. I like to incorporate blended roasted root vegetables, beans or coconut milk to achieve that sought-after texture. In this risotto, I went with coconut milk, which integrates seamlessly with the flavors of the beets, ginger, garlic and chili. Though the spicy, sweet and earthy flavors in this dish are a bit far from the classic, its absolutely delicious in its own right, and kind of perfect for this transitional time of year. Ive tried sorghum in salads and bowls in the past, but always found it to be a bit too chewy for my liking. That toothsome texture works perfectly in risotto, though, so I was very happy to rediscover this nutritious, gluten-free grain with this dish that I developed for Nuts.com. There are some weekend links below, have a great Sunday! Chani Nicolas – been loving her weekly horoscopes Jesse Kamm, Living Off the Grid – that house! Slicing Pretty Avocados – can’t stop doing this now Georgia OKeeffe: Living Modern – this exhibition sounds amazing, love that they are making an emphasis on her clothing. Tea Blends for Healthy Skin, Digestion and Energy Za’atar Swirl Bread – so beautiful and sounds delicious Follow this link to see the recipe for the Sorghum Beet Risotto :) You might also like... Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Clementine Fudge Cake Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sorghum Beet Risotto appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Boston Cream Pie Pudding

January 20 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Boston Cream Pie PuddingVegan Boston Cream Pie Pudding Parfaits. Creamy Almond flavored pudding layered with smooth chocolate. Serve as pudding cups or add other layers of vanilla wafers or vanilla sponge cake to make Parfaits. Vegan Soy-free Recipe. Can be made nut-free.  I loved the Boston Cream Pie Cake From Violet Sweet Shoppe when the shop was in Seattle. All the varieties of cakes and pies, consistent and delicious are harder to find now in this big city of Seattle, since they closed. So when I want some of that Boston cream pie, I make this pudding parfait.  Creamy, almondy, Chocolatey. Add a layer of vegan sponge cake for the pie cake version. Less work, and satisfies that sweet tooth.  Make the pudding with starch, almond extract and cashew milk. Melt some chocolate with some non dairy milk. Layer, garnish and serve. Quick and easy surprise for valentines day. Add some beet juice to the vanilla almond pudding for color. Top with granola or whipped coconut cream. Continue reading: Vegan Boston Cream Pie PuddingThe post Vegan Boston Cream Pie Pudding appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Blueberry Crumble Cheesecake

August 18 2017 Veganpassion 

Blueberry Crumble Cheesecake Berry season is a wonderful season! My neighbor always hands me a bowl of his fresh garden berries and I get to enjoy them. In his garden 5 minutes feel like a whole week of vacation and I'm always very thankful if I get the chance to plant some onions or pick some cherries. I wish I had my own garden but with all the traveling right now it's not possible. To thank my neighbor I give him the result of his idea giving berries to me. This time it was a blueberry crumble cheesecake. Perfect for the season and very enjoyable. The almond flour in the cheese cream for it's creamy consistency. Just try it! Makes one cake 9,4 inch diameter. For the dough: 1 3/­­4 whole spelt flour 1/­­2 cup raw cane sugar 1 stick + 1 tbsp. vegan butter 2-3 tbsp. dairy-free milk + some fat for the form For the filling: 28 oz soy curd 1/­­2 cup starch 1/­­2 tsp. vanilla, grounded 1/­­2 cup raw cane sugar 4 heaped tbsp. almond flour 1 good pinch kala manak salt 1 pinch cinnamon 1 pinch saffron threads 1/­­3 cup almond flakes 4.2 oz blueberries 2 small apples In a mixing bowl mix together flour, sugar, butter, salt and dairy-free milk with a fork. If the tough gets crumbly you can knead the dough with your hands. Use a springform and grease it with butter. Then push 2/­­3 of the thin dough into the form. Form a 1,5 inch high edge. For the filling mix 4 tbsp. of curd, starch, vanilla, raw cane sugar, almond flour, kala manak and saffron. Then stir in the rest of the curd. Spread 3/­­4 of the cheese cream on the dough. Peel apples if needed and cut them into fine slices. Then spread them on the cream. Mix the blueberries with the rest of the cream and spread them on the apples. Use the rest of the dough and the almonds as crumbles. Bake at 356°F (180°C) top/­­bottom heat for 50-60 minutes. Let cake completely cool off. Enjoy with family and friends!

Heart of Palm and Artichoke Cakes

July 25 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Heart of Palm and Artichoke Cakes These delectable Heart of Palm and Artichoke Cakes are crisp on the outside and moist and flaky on the inside with a flavor that is remarkably similar to traditional crab cakes thanks to Old Bay seasoning and a dash of nori flakes. This recipe makes six to eight cakes (depending on how big you like them) that can be enjoyed as a main dish, in sandwiches (theyre even good cold!), or as a component in Seitan Oscar.   Heart Of Palm And Artichoke Cakes - 1 tablespoon olive oil, plus more for frying -  1/­­2 cup minced onion -  1/­­4 cup minced celery - 2 teaspoons minced garlic - 1 (14-ounce) jar hearts of palm, well drained, patted dry, and roughly chopped - 1 (6-ounce) jar marinated artichoke hearts, well drained, patted dry, and roughly chopped - 2 teaspoons Old Bay seasoning - 1 tablespoon cornstarch - 1 teaspoon nori or dulse flakes -  1/­­4 cup vegan mayo -  3/­­4 cup panko bread crumbs - Lemon wedges, for serving -  Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion and celery and cook until softened, 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute longer. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool.  -  In a large bowl, combine the hearts of palm, artichoke hearts, Old Bay seasoning, cornstarch, nori flakes, and mayo. Add the cooled onion mixture and 1/­­4 cup of the panko, and mix well. Divide the mixture into 6 to 8 portions and shape into small patties. -  Place the remaining 1/­­2 cup panko in a shallow bowl. Coat the patties with the bread crumbs and refrigerate or freeze for 20 minutes or longer. -  Heat a thin layer of oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat until hot and shimmering. Carefully place the patties in the skillet and cook until golden brown on each side, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Transfer the cooked patties to a plate. Serve hot with lemon wedges. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by William and Susan Brinson. The post Heart of Palm and Artichoke Cakes appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight

July 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight This post was created in partnership with Whole Earth Sweetener Co. Turkish delight is one of those old-school sweets that was always around during my childhood in the Soviet Union, which is surprising because treats were scarce and mainly homemade. There was a tiny store a short walk away from our home, where they carried neat, white paper boxes, lined with tissue and filled with delicate pink, sugar-dusted Turkish Delight squares. We called the treat rahat lokum (just another commonly used name for Turkish Delight). I spent my childhood convinced that it was fairy food, and cherished every pleasantly jelly-like, aromatic bite from the magical paper box. I’ve since completely forgotten about rahat lokum, dismissing it as an outdated sweet of my semi-hungry childhood, until I was in Moscow a few months ago. There is a high-vibe sweets brand sold in some grocery stores in Russia, which makes chocolate, wafers and such, with surprisingly wholesome ingredients, cool herbal add-ins, and a pleasantly low amount of non-refined sugar. I always make a point of hunting down some of their stuff to bring back home. This time around, I discovered a new product of theirs, which was a healthier, green tea-flavored Turkish Delight. It was delicious and disappeared in no time once my family got a taste of it back in Florida. I quickly got the urge to figure out my own recipe, as I often do with these types of obsessions. Thankfully, I’m no stranger to the thickening and gelatinizing properties of arrowroot (starch from a tropical tuber) and agar-agar (sea vegetable). Both make for the perfect, allergy-friendly and healthful alternative to cornstarch, which is traditional to Turkish Delight recipes. After some consideration, I decided to color my delight with hibiscus tea, as a tribute to the pink treats of my childhood, and because I’m generally obsessed with hibiscus and its million health benefits. For an extra aromatic finish, I added some orange blossom water instead of the more commonly used rose water, which truly takes this treat to the next level. When coated in arrowroot powder, this Turkish Delight looks surprisingly professional, as though it was store-bought. The cool thing is that in reality it’s pretty easy to make at home, just take a look at the video above to see the whole process. For sweetener in this recipe, I used an organic blend of stevia and honey from Whole Earth. I’ve had a pretty turbulent relationship with stevia over the years. I’ve always wanted to get into it as a sugar substitute, knowing that it’s totally natural, free of calories, and a zero on the glycemic index, but I just cannot get used to its potent, powerful flavor (when extracted it’s something like 200 times sweeter than sugar!). Any time I add pure stevia extract to anything, it’s all I can taste, and that flavor lingers in my mouth for hours in an unpleasant way. Thankfully, Whole Earth Sweetener Co. figured out that when mixed with other, more traditional sweeteners, stevia is barely distinguishable, and they offer a few carefully considered stevia blends. The neat thing is that because of stevia’s potency, you only need half of the amount of their sweetener in any given recipe. In other words, this Turkish Delight recipe only calls for 1/­­4 cup of the honey and stevia blend, while you would need twice the amount (1/­­2 cup) of pure honey or maple syrup to achieve the same sweetness without the stevia. After trying the Whole Earth stevia-honey blend, as well as their stevia-raw sugar blend, I’m totally on board. I love being able to use less sugar in my sweet recipes, and I’m hoping that these products can help me ease into a love affair with pure stevia, some day :) I’m curious to hear about your guys’ experience with stevia. Do you use it? Did it take you some time to get used to it? Any tips and stories are much appreciated! Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight   Print Serves: about 48 pieces Ingredients 3½ cups purified water 2 tablespoons dried hibiscus flowers ⅔ cup plus ¼ cup arrowroot powder, divided ¼ cup stevia-honey blend or ⅓ - ½ cup pure honey or maple syrup 4½ tablespoons agar agar powder (not flakes) 1¼ teaspoon orange blossom water or rose water Instructions Combine the water with the hibiscus in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, cover and let the tea steep for 30 minutes. Prepare an 8 x 8-inch square, rimmed dish by lining it up with parchment paper. Set aside. Strain the hibiscus tea. Mix ½ cup of the tea with ⅔ cup of the arrowroot powder in a medium bowl. The mixture will be quite thick and difficult to mix at first. Set aside. Pour the rest of the hibiscus tea into the same saucepan used for brewing the tea. Add the sweetener and the agar agar powder, whisk to combine and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and simmer for 5 minutes, whisking periodically. At the end of the 5 minutes, give the prepared arrowroot mixture a good stir and slowly pour it into the saucepan with the agar mixture, stirring vigorously. The mixture will be very thick and stretchy. Remove from heat and add in the orange blossom water, whisking to combine. Immediately spoon the mixture into the prepared dish, evening it out as much as you can. Place the dish into the refrigerator for 1-2 hours, until the mixture is completely set. Once set, lift the delight square out of the dish onto a cutting board, using the extending ends of the parchment paper. Slice into around 48 cubes and roll them in the remaining ¼ cup arrowroot powder to coat. Store refrigerated in an airtight container. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles Almost Savory Raw Chocolate Raw Honey Maca Pancakes, a Weekend Breakfast Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

potato smiley recipe | mccain smiles recipe | potato smiles recipe

June 25 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

potato smiley recipe | mccain smiles recipe | potato smiles recipepotato smiley recipe | mccain smiles recipe | potato smiles recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. the recipe is loosely based on mccain potato smiles which is prepared from potato and potato starch. however in this recipe corn starch and boiled-mashed potatoes are used for the same result. it is an ideal snack for evening tea or masala chai and can also be served as biscuits. Continue reading potato smiley recipe | mccain smiles recipe | potato smiles recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Crunchy Vegan Asian Salad With Baked Tofu & Garlic Soy Dressing

June 3 2017 Vegan Richa 

Crunchy Vegan Asian Salad With Baked Tofu & Garlic Soy DressingCrunchy Vegan Asian Salad With Baked Tofu & Garlic Soy Maple Dressing. Vegan Asian Salad. Marinated and Baked Tofu over Crunchy Greens, Peppers, Cucumber and carrots. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe This salad is perfect for the warm weather. Serve it with warm just baked tofu, or cold prebaked Tofu, plenty of crunchy juicy vegetables and this versatile garlic soy dressing.  This Baked Tofu is easy and a great topper for Salads. Press, Marinate, bake and done. For crispier result, toss the marinated tofu in cornstarch or other starch and bake. The dressing which is the same as the marinade, intensifies the baked tofu flavor and compliments juicy and crunchy veggies really well. Make a big bowl of this Salad for the next Summer Potluck or picnic.  Or make wraps with the Baked Tofu, Veggies and finely chopped greens tossed in the dressing!  Simple everyday ingredients and so much flavor. Whats your favorite everyday Quick Summer Salad?Continue reading: Crunchy Vegan Asian Salad With Baked Tofu & Garlic Soy DressingThe post Crunchy Vegan Asian Salad With Baked Tofu & Garlic Soy Dressing appeared first on Vegan Richa.

12 Comforting & Easy Vegan Casseroles

May 26 2017 VegKitchen 

12 Comforting & Easy Vegan Casseroles Vegan casseroles are always comforting, and it’s nice to know that they’re also good for you, not starchy and heavy like the old-fashioned kind. Choose from these vegan casserole recipes whenever you need a hearty dose of comfort food without the guilt! Creamy Pasta and Butternut Squash Casserole (at top) will remind you of macaroni and cheese. […] The post 12 Comforting & Easy Vegan Casseroles appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Menu: Sesame-Ginger Tofu Broccoli Stir-Fry

April 17 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Menu: Sesame-Ginger Tofu Broccoli Stir-Fry I could live on Asian-style stir-fries and noodle dishes. Theyre so versatile and simple to make, perfect for busy weeknights. Case in point, Sesame-Ginger Tofu Broccoli Stir-Fry. Its inspired by General Tsos Tofu, but dispenses with the cornstarch-battered, deep-fried tofu.This version, with pan-sautéed tofu, plenty of broccoli, and a savory, sweet, and spicy sauce even […] The post Vegan Menu: Sesame-Ginger Tofu Broccoli Stir-Fry appeared first on VegKitchen.

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus

April 7 2017 My New Roots 

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus The first job I landed after moving to Copenhagen, was working as a chef in a little cafe. After a few weeks of consistently not burning lasagna and under seasoning everything, I was asked if I was interested in cooking on a few episodes on a local, public TV station. The producers suggested I choose a few dishes that I love, and filmed me in a friends kitchen, since mine was too small. My husband gently warned me beforehand that Danes dont respond well to overly-enthusiastic, hyperbolic Americans, so I faked it and was awkwardly not myself as I spoke lukewarmly about whole grains and beans, fermented things and dark leafy greens. The first recipe I made on the show was sprouted hummus, and although the recipe turned out well, I felt like a fraud. Because above all things, sprouts were, and still are, my true love. The show was on at 2 or 3 in the morning, and because I didnt have a television, I never actually saw it on air. Instead, I watched it on my computer on a borrowed CD, long after it had been on TV. Much to my dismay, the producers titled the show Cooking with Sareh, which still baffles me considering the fact that my name is spelled the exact same way in Danish. The program was poorly edited, badly lit, awkward in every sense, and in my attempts to come off as cool and nonchalant, I seemed utterly bored as I fondled chickpea sprouts - something that otherwise would get me pretty riled up. On the whole, this experience was totally mortifying, except for one small, redeeming factor. I was suddenly being recognized at work in the café, and on the bike paths of Christiania: hey sprout girl! theyd call at me. Its you! I didnt make your hummus, but your show is great, sprout girl, theyd say. If there was any consolation, this was it. I was Sprout Girl. So in case you missed my break out performance on Cooking with Sareh, and my reined-in, lackluster pitch about sprouts, here it is again. Because I am Sprout Girl forever and always. Sprouting is like any other kitchen endeavour: it seems pretty daunting until you actually do it, then youre left wondering what took you so long to try – a real facepalm moment. With simple equipment that you most likely have in your cupboard, and seeds that you already have in your pantry, its a fun and empowering practice that brings you one step closer to your food. Sprouts are so nutritious because they are life potential, ignited. When we soak a seed, we end its dormancy, and awaken the nutrition inside it needed to grow a plant which will in turn make more seeds and more plants. When we eat a sprout, we eat this potential! Pound for pound, sprouts have the largest amount of nutrients of any food. Did you get that? This is a big deal! And its all because sprouting increases vitamin content significantly, especially vitamin A, Bs, C and E, along with boosting calcium, iron, selenium, and zinc. The quality of protein and carbohydrates improves, as the sprouting process begins to break down the complex proteins and starches into amino acids, peptides, and simple carbohydrates needed by the seed to grow. At the same time, anti-nutrients such as phytic acid, protease and amylase inhibitors are neutralized. This makes a sprout very easy to digest with highly absorbable nutrients. Who is responsible for this influx of awesomeness? Its enzymes! Enzymes are compounds found in raw plants that are needed for nearly every biochemical process that takes place in our body, and something many of our modern diets are lacking. Sprouts are virtually loaded with them. There are up to 100 times more enzymes in sprouts than uncooked fruits and veggies! Enzymes are also what sets living food apart from raw food. Yes, raw foods still offer us enzymes, but eating a food that is alive guantees more enzymes, and in fact more nutrients altogether. As soon as a food is picked, it begins losing its nutrients. Imagine how much vitamin C is left in that orange, which has traveled hundreds, if not thousands of kilometers to get to your plate, and spent weeks, if not months in a storage facility before being dropped off at your local grocer. Sprouts are the remedy to this, pulsating with life and life-giving nutrients, and pretty much the freshest food you can eat outside of a garden. Sprouts are also incredibly low in calories, yet deliciously filling due to their high fiber and water content. A fantastic food to binge on, especially if youre trying to elbow out some of the other stuff from your diet. I love the versatility of sprouts, not only are there so many varieties, but they can be used in so many ways. Like this hummus for example! You can also go classic and top your sandwiches with sprouts, or fold them into grain salads, puree them into soups and even smoothies. I also love freshening up cooked dishes, like stir-fries, curries and pizzas with sprouts. Their crunch and earthy brightness are a welcoming balance to heavier, richer meals. If youre on a budget, sprouts are a sweet deal. Because the amount of food you sprout triples or quadruples in size, youll end up with way more to eat than you started with for the same price. Its kind of magical. Whats more, is that properly stored sprouts can last over a month, and some varieties up to 70 days. If youre prone to tossing away spoiled produce, sprouts will save you money, big time. Sprouting can take place anywhere you have access to fresh, clean water twice a day. Ive sprouted on road trips, beach holidays, visiting the in-laws...all over the place! And the groovy thing about taking your show on the road is that you can convince other people to get sprouting too. And sprouts are not just great for our health, but also the planet. Consider the fact that youre growing a garden right in your kitchen, using your own energy to make the magic happen. Its hyper-local food at its best! No chemicals or pesticides during the growing process, or fossil fuels for transportation. Could sprouts be the perfect food?! The answer is yes. But I may be a little biased. I am the Sprout Girl, after all. If you are concerned about mold or bacteria contamination, please understand that commercially-grown sprouts are propagated in an ideal environment for pathogens to proliferate. Just one more reason to grow your own sprouts at home where you can be sure of proper hygiene and care. Make sure that your jar or sprouting container is thoroughly clean, that youre rinsing your sprouts with cool water twice daily, and that your sprouts have plenty of airflow. After I drain my sprouts, I make sure that the seeds /­­ sprouts arent blocking the entire opening of the jar (see photo). If you follow these tips, you shouldnt have any problems. Scoring Seeds You can sprout just about anything, but the cheapest and easiest things are found in the bulk bin of your health food store! Lentils, beans, chickpeas, rice, buckwheat, wheat are all widely available and inexpensive. Its imperative that you choose organically-grown ingredients, as conventionally grown seeds are often irradiated, making them difficult, or even impossible to germinate. You can also purchase seeds online, especially the more specialty ones, like alfalfa, radish, onion, broccoli etc. Finding Equipment There are plenty of sprouting apparatuses that you can buy, but if youre just starting out, use a jar! I bet you already have one. – 1 sterilized, large-mouth, quart-sized glass jar with an airtight lid – small piece of cheesecloth – rubber band – a bowl or dish rack How to Sprout There are countless resources on this topic online, and even whole books written about sprouting, so I am presenting you with a very simple, yet rather foolproof technique. If you want to learn more (which I encourage you to do!) here’s a great place to learn about different methods, applications, as well as help and advice: Sprout People     Print recipe     Simple Sprouting Day 1 1. Prep (night) Take a quick glance at the seeds as you put them into the sterilized soaking container. Remove any stones, cracked /­­ damaged seeds, and rinse well. 2. Soak (night) A general rule is covering the seeds with 2-3 times the amount of water (e.g. 1 cup seeds : 2-3 cups water). Use pure, filtered, unchlorinated water. Skim off any seeds that are floating. Let sit for 8-12 hours. Day 2 1. Drain (morning) Put a piece of cheesecloth over the mouth of the jar and secure it with a rubber band. Drain the seeds letting all the water run out. 2. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 3. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 3 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 4 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) 3. Enjoy (night) Your sprouts are ready! The tail should be at least the length of the seed itself (if it is not quite there yet, continue with the rinsing and draining process until it is. Some seeds take a couple more days). If youre not going to eat all the sprouts right away, make sure you let the sprouts drain for at least 8 hours after their last rinse before you put them in the fridge. Never store wet sprouts, as they will spoil quickly. Store sprouts in the sprouting jar with an airtight lid for one month, or more.     Print recipe     Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus Makes 4 cups Ingredients: 2 cloves garlic 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml tahini 1/­­2 tsp. fine salt, to taste 2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (optional) zest of 1 lemon 4 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 4 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 4 cups /­­ 500g sprouted chickpeas (start with 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 300g dried chickpeas) Directions: 1. Pulse the garlic in the food processor until minced. Add all other ingredients, except for the sprouted chickpea and blend until you have a paste. Add the chickpeas and blend on high until as smooth as possible. Season to taste and adjust more salt /­­ spice if desired. To achieve an even smoother consistency, scoop hummus into a high-speed blender and blend on high for an additional 10-15 seconds. Serve immediately and store leftovers in an airtight container for up to five days. I hope that this process seems simple enough for you to try. I promise that once you start sprouting, you won’t be able to stop! It’s so easy, fun, and connecting – not to mention delicious. Good luck and happy sprouting, dear friends! xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Copenhagen! I am thrilled to announce my first two cookbook events in CPH this Spring. The first will be an intimate talk and demonstration at SLOW Copenhagen, and the second will be a magical, celebratory dinner in collaboration with the local, organic grocer and kitchen, Kost. Click on the images for more info and tickets! Can’t wait to see you there.    The post It’s Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

Apam Balik

March 18 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Apam Balik It was my first day in Kuala Lumpur… I’d just arrived and was at the start of a 5 week culinary adventure to get a taste of Malaysia, Singapore, and Borneo. The sun shone bright and the sky was that deep, satisfying shade of blue. I was on a short morning walk from the Winsin Hotel on the edge of downtown Chinatown, heading towards the Indian neighborhood. Just outside the subway station on a particularly more urban street corner was a line of shiny, silver food trucks. My eye was caught immediately by one in particular: A woman was spilling roasted, candied peanuts and then corn kernels from a can onto a golden, round, thin pancake. She folded it over - making sort of a sweet taco - and placed it on a rack on the chrome counter of her street food cart. She caught me watching and smiled. “Hey Mister! You try Apam Balik!” Well, what could I say? I got closer and watched her make another two crepes. First, she stirred a simple batter of mostly rice flour and coconut milk and poured and spread the crepe on the sizzling griddle. Moments later, she pried up an edge, slid her spatula tracing under the circle, and flipped it over. I watched her again top the thin, crunchy crepes with peanuts and corn before folding them in half and setting them on the rack just in front of me. Just then, a colorfully dressed Indian woman parted from a few family members and approached the cart from my side. She reached out an anxious hand in a dance-like gesture, rattling rows of wrist bangles, and scooped two of the Apim Balik pancakes from the rack. She rattled off a few sentences in Malay to the seller, they exchanged some money, and both giggled briefly. The Indian woman turned to me and extended one of the crepes until it was right in my face. She said to me in melodic Indian English: “This one for you. Apam Balik. Peanut Pancake!” It was in my grasp and between my teeth before I knew it. The crepe was crunchy on the outside but then soft and chewy, quickly giving way to the delightful combination of sweet and salty flavors from the roasted peanuts, punctuated by bursts of fresh corn juiciness. It was perfect. I devoured the rest of it. Weeks later, back in Berlin, I set about to re-create the deliciousness. For the vegan recipe in my MALAYSIA cookbook, I made a simple, sure-fire formula for making Apim Balik at home in the kitchen. I didn’t have to veganize anything. It’s a pretty much straight-up thin pancake batter based on rice flour, coconut milk and sugar, lending a crunchy thin crepe. For the filling, I simplified it going with just candied peanuts. My variations (below) include optionally topping it with a sweet syrup and going authentic street food style with sweet corn kernels. Apam Balik crispy, crunchy peanut-filled pancakes recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA makes 4 to 6 /­­ time 30 min + - 3/­­4 cup (100 g) peanuts crumbled or very coarsely ground - 2 Tbs sugar - 1/­­4 tsp sea salt - 1/­­2 cup (60 g) flour (all purpose /­­ type 550) - 1/­­2 cup (50 g) rice flour - 1/­­4 cup (45 g) sugar - 1 Tbs corn starch - 1 tsp baking powder - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - 1 cup (240 ml) coconut milk - 2 Tbs water - agave syrup or coconut (palm) syrup optional - vegetable oil for frying pan - Crumble or coarsely grind peanuts and dry roast in a pan on medium heat until golden brown and dark spots appear, 4-5 min. Add sugar and salt. Mix well. Stirring constantly, roast until sugar melts and mix starts to stick together, 1-2 min. Remove from heat. - Combine flour, rice flour, sugar, corn starch, baking powder, and salt in a large mixing bowl. Whisk in coconut milk and water gradually. Mix until mostly smooth, but do not over mix. Cover and let batter sit 20-30 min. - Heat frying pan on medium high heat. Put a few drops of oil on pan and rub it around with a paper towel. Do this before each pancake. When a drop of water sizzles and dances on surface, pan is ready. - Pour about 1/­­4 to 1/­­3 cup (60-80 ml) batter in the center of the hot pan. Tilt and turn the pan to form a large, thin, circular pancake. - After bubbles appear on surface and underside is golden brown (about 2-3 min), use a spatula to carefully peel up the edges around the pancake and then flip it over. Cook the other side for 1-2 min, then flip it back over. Put 2-3 Tbs of the sugary peanuts on the pancake and roll up or fold over. Transfer to a plate. Repeat with other pancakes. - Serve plain, or drizzle pancakes with agave syrup or coconut syrup. Variations: Creamy: Use peanut butter instead of roasted, crumbled peanuts. Bananas: Add sliced banana to filling. Traditional: Add 1-2 Tbs sweet corn kernels to each pancake filling. vegan recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA available in English & German   The post Apam Balik appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

10 Warm Salads for Winter

February 7 2017 VegKitchen 

10 Warm Salads for Winter Eating produce all year round -- both cooked and raw -- is one of the healthiest habits on earth. Salads take care of the latter, but theyre not exactly crave-worthy in the winter when most of us would rather have warm foods like soups and stews (or starchy comfort foods). Something that works like a charm to make cool weather salads more enticing is adding something warm or even piping hot to them.The post 10 Warm Salads for Winter appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Vegan Pizza Dip with Vegan Mozzarella Cream & Herbed Mushrooms

January 16 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Pizza Dip with Vegan Mozzarella Cream & Herbed MushroomsVegan Pizza Dip. Easy Pizza Dip with sauteed mushrooms, olives, pizza sauce and from scratch vegan mozzarella cream sauce. Gluten-free Recipe. Can be soy-free. SuperBowl is just around the corner. Sadly Seahawks wont be there this year and Russell will be missed.  I whipped up this Pizza dip in the half time of the last game. At the end of the video, Chewie was barking away because of the high energy of the last quarter. He knows when his daddy is worked up. We ate half of the dip with the warmed up mini wheat pita breads and later used the rest to make pizza grilled sandwiches! Dip between 2 slices, with some other veggies and greens thrown in, grill and serve.  There are layers of Pizza sauce, sauteed herbed mushrooms and onions, vegan mozzarella style cream sauce, layered with some tomato slices, olives and finished with fresh basil and pepper flakes. The cream sauce has starches that thicken and do their starchy thing during the baking. When the dip is hot out of the oven, there is a cheesy stringy texture and flavor all mixed up with the pizza sauce and mushrooms and olives. All the mess that a pizza dip should be. Continue reading: Vegan Pizza Dip with Vegan Mozzarella Cream & Herbed MushroomsThe post Vegan Pizza Dip with Vegan Mozzarella Cream & Herbed Mushrooms appeared first on Vegan Richa.


You will enjoy these as well ...

Found an error?
Help to fix it! Tell it us!



Our sites missing something? Suggest new content or features!



Have you any comments?
Send it us!