spring - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Sabudana falooda recipe | sago royal falooda | sabudana dessert | sago drink

Ginger Watermelon Italian Ice

Anise-Flavored Eggplant Stir-Fry

Parotta recipe | kerala paratha recipe | malabar paratha recipe










spring vegetarian recipes

Tie-Dye Purple Cauliflower Alfredo

July 17 2020 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Tie-Dye Purple Cauliflower Alfredo Serves 6 The world is a nightmare, dinner doesnt have to be. What if pasta could be a fantasy dreamworld where our alfredo was tie-dye purple? But this alfredo is not just pretty, its so, so tasty! Purple cauliflower is braised just until tender, keeping its color somewhat intact and bringing a deep, cruciferous flavor, plus lots of creaminess, to the sauce.  Note, I said it keeps its color somewhat intact. I had to throw in a non-conventional ingredient to make the lavender pop a bit. Dont hate…its frozen blueberries! But you really cant taste them and you know you have some laying around for the apocalypse.  So youll be left with a pretty lavender sauce to coat your noodles in. But it doesnt stop there! Take a lemon and squirt it over the plate, then watch your lavender deepem into fuschia and magenta streaks, splotches and ribbons of color. You are the greatest artist of your generation. Make sure to do this tableside and get a video of it.  OK, now get yourself on an app, order some purple cauli and whip this up! Its good wholesome entertainment for the whole fam (or your cats) and a relaxing escape that will make you think of a better possible future. Right? Recipes Notes ~ Some serving ideas: grilled or breaded tofu, tofu balls (recipes for all of those exist on this site, I’m just too world weary to link to them), toasted pine nuts, springs of fresh basil, your favorite fake chick’n. ~ Bottled lemon juice will work, but fresh will taste better! ~ If you dont have purple cauli this wont work out but it will still be a tasty cauliflower recipe.  ~ For best results, trim the white parts of the cauliflower away as much as possible so that you are left with mostly purple floret. ~ Dont use too dark a veg broth. The lighter you go, the less muted your sauce will be. ~ If you dont have a high speed blender, do not despair. Just soak the cashews for at least 2 hours (preferably overnight) and proceed with your regular old blender. You can also boil them for 20 minutes if you are super short on time and didnt plan ahead. Ingredients 2 tablespoons refined coconut oil 1 cup sliced shallot 6 cloves garlic, minced 3 cups vegetable broth 1 head purple cauliflower in small florets (about 6 cups) 3/­­4 cups whole unroasted cashews 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice (plus extra for squeezing) 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast 10 frozen blueberries 3/­­4 teaspoons salt 1 pound fettuccine, cooked according to package directions in salted water Directions 1 – Boil salted water for pasta and get that whole thing going. By the time youre done making the sauce sauce the pasta should be drained and ready.  2 – Preheat a large pan over medium heat. Sauté shallot in coconut oil with a pinch of salt for 5 to 7 minutes. Add the garlic to the pan and spoon a little dab of oil on it. Mix in with the shallots and cook another 2 minutes.  3 – Add the broth, cover pan and bring to a boil. Place the cauliflower in the pan in as much of a single layer as possible. Cover and steam about 4 minutes. Mix cauliflower in the liquid, cover and steam another 4 minutes. It should be fork tender. Remove a few florets to place on the individual pasta plates later, if you like. 4 – In the meantime, place the cashews, lemon juice, nutritional yeast, blueberries and salt in a high speed blender (see note if you don’t have a highspeed blender). When the cauliflower is done, transfer it to the blender. Let sit for 10 minutes or so just to stop steaming. At that point, blend until smooth, scraping down the sides 5 – When pasta is ready, drain and pour the sauce over it. Reserve a little bit for dolloping over the plates of pasta. Taste pasta for salt. The saltiness with vary depending on your salted water and the saltiness of the broth. 6 – Place pasta in bowls, spoon additional sauce over noodles. Now take a seeded lemon and squirt it all over the pasta. Voila! Tie dye alfedo.

Chocolate-Kissed Peanut Butter Pie

July 14 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Chocolate-Kissed Peanut Butter Pie The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook comes out in just four weeks. Let’s celebrate with something sweet from the book! The Chocolate-Kissed Peanut Butter Pie is everything you could want in a dessert and more.  The “more” being PROTEIN, of course! Each small serving of this decadent confection contains 12 grams of plant protein. This peanut butter pie is complemented by chocolate because: chocolate. The addition of almond flour and tofu (plus the peanuts and peanut butter, of course) provide a wealth of protein to this decadent treat. If you prefer a firm fudgy texture, keep the pie in the freezer; for a softer, creamier texture, keep it in the refrigerator. While the book concentrates mostly on the savory side of plant protein, this recipe shows that there are some sweet treats in store as well.  Best of all, the recipes are all plant foods — no protein powders are called for in any of the recipes. Have you pre-ordered your copy of The Plant-Protein Revolution Cookbook yet? Do it now and get bonus recipes. If you pre-order before August 11, 2020, my publisher will send you additional bonus recipes that you can start using right away! Just send your proof of purchase to the following e-mail address: plantproteinrev@quarto.com and theyll send you the bonus recipes. Now about that pie…. Chocolate-Kissed Peanut Butter Pie This recipe is from The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook by Robin Robertson (c) 2020, The Harvard Common Press. Photo by Jackie Sobon. Crust - 11/­­2 cups (129 g) almond flour - 1/­­4 cup (22 g) unsweetened cocoa powder - 1/­­4 cup (80 g) pure maple syrup - 1 tablespoon (14 g) refined coconut oil, plus more as needed, melted Filling - 1 cup (175 g) vegan semi-sweet chocolate chips, melted - 1 (12-ounce [340 g]) package firm silken tofu, drained - 1 cup (260 g) creamy natural peanut butter - 1/­­3 cup (106 g) pure maple syrup - 1 tablespoon (5 g) unsweetened cocoa powder - 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract Drizzle - 1/­­2 cup (88 g) vegan dark chocolate chips - 1/­­2 teaspoon refined coconut oil - 1/­­4 cup (36 g) crushed unsalted dry-roasted peanuts - Line a 9-inch (23 cm) springform pan with parchment paper. - To make the crust, in a food processor, combine the flour, cocoa powder, maple syrup, and coconut oil. Blend until crumbly and well mixed. If the mixture doesnt hold together when pinched between your fingers, add up to 1 tablespoon (15 ml) additional coconut oil. Use your fingers to press the mixture evenly into the bottom and about halfway up the sides of the pan. Place the pan in the freezer while you make the filling. - To make the filling, combine all the filling ingredients in a food processor and blend until completely smooth. Pour the filling into the prepared crust and refrigerate or freeze for 4 hours, or until firm. - To make the drizzle, in a microwave-safe bowl, combine the chocolate chips and coconut oil. Microwave for 30 seconds, then stir. If not completely melted, microwave again for 10 seconds at a time until melted. Drizzle the melted chocolate over the top of the pie and sprinkle with the crushed peanuts. Store in the refrigerator for up to 3 days or in the freezer for up to 1 month. Variation: Try swapping out the peanut butter and peanuts for almond butter and crushed almonds. The post Chocolate-Kissed Peanut Butter Pie appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Creamy Vegan Lemon Pasta with Asparagus

June 10 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Creamy Vegan Lemon Pasta with Asparagus Coming to you with this creamy, lemony pasta that’s under 10 ingredients and presents a really delicious way to eat a lot of asparagus. I have to admit that asparagus is not my favorite vegetable, but I still eat tons of it in the spring because the mission here is to learn to love and take full advantage of all vegetables in season. I do find asparagus to be truly enjoyable in this pasta – it’s hard not to when it’s framed by carbs and a rich, creamy sauce. This dish comes together pretty quickly. We whip up a simple lemony cashew sauce in the blender and blanch the asparagus together with the pasta, then mix it all together and serve. The brightness and acidity of the lemon punctuates the richness of the sauce and gives the whole thing a sunny feel. Hope you’ll give it a try! Creamy Vegan Lemon Pasta with Asparagus   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients ½ cup raw cashews sea salt 1 clove garlic - roughly chopped zest and juice from 1 large lemon 2 teaspoons nutritional yeast freshly ground black pepper pinch red pepper flakes (optional) 12 oz spaghetti or other pasta of choice about 13 oz asparagus - tough ends snapped, cut into 2-inch pieces basil or parsley - for garnishing (optional) Instructions Soak the cashews in hot water for at least 15 minutes. Set a large pot of well-salted water to boil. In an upright blender, combine the drained cashews with ¾ cup water, garlic, lemon zest (reserve some for garnishing), lemon juice, nutritional yeast, pepper, red pepper flakes if using, and a generous pinch of salt. Blend until very smooth. Taste for salt and adjust if needed, the sauce should be fairly salty. Cook the pasta in the prepared pot until al dente, according to the time on the package. Add the asparagus to the pot at the last 3 minutes of cooking the pasta, to blanch. Reserve 1½ cups of the starchy pasta water before draining the pasta. Drain the asparagus and pasta and return both to the pot. Pour the cashew sauce over the pasta, along with a generous splash of the reserved pasta water, mix well to combine. Add more pasta water as needed, until you have a nice saucy consistency. Serve right away, garnished with the reserved lemon zest and herbs, if using. 3.5.3226 The post Creamy Vegan Lemon Pasta with Asparagus appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Spring Berry Salad with Lemon Verbena Vinaigrette

June 1 2020 Oh My Veggies 

This light salad recipe is made with fresh spring berries and a lemon verbena vinaigrette. It’s the perfect way to use lemon verbena from the garden! All I Want is Salad We got back from Georgia on Monday night and I’m now ready for my next vacation. I think after you travel, you’re supposed to feel well-rested and satisfied, but traveling only makes me want to travel more. I spent most of the car ride home Googling hotels in Hawaii and the cost of airfare to the Florida Keys. So I guess I haven’t had my fill of travel this summer. But I did leave Georgia with my fill of fabulous desserts, courtesy of my Aunt Darlene. (You’re watching her on The American Baking Competition, right?!) She made mini-cheesecakes and gorgeous stenciled cookies and brownies topped with gold leaf for my cousin’s wedding. Oh, and there was cake too, of course. And then the next day, we got to eat the rejects--more cookies, more brownies, and orange blossom macarons. So! Much! Food! Bingeing on sweets is always the best motivation for getting back on track with my diet. When we were leaving Savannah, I told Chris that all I wanted […]

Bean, Pesto, and Quinoa Cakes with Roasted Tomatoes

May 15 2020 Oh My Veggies 

I got the idea for this Bean, Pesto, and Quinoa Cakes with Roasted Tomatoes recipe in a roundabout way. Now that I have basil growing in the garden again, I’m on a quest to use up my frozen pesto because I’ll be able to make it fresh whenever I want to. If making a big batch of pesto and freezing it for fall and winter marks the end of summer for me, then frantically trying to use up that pesto is a sure sign of spring. It happens every year, like clockwork. It’s a good thing this recipe took a few tries to get right--I think I used half of my pesto supply perfecting it. The first time I made it, I only used cannelini beans. It was not good. I’ve realized that I only like cannelini beans as a component of a dish, not as the main ingredient. White bean cakes with just white beans, pesto, panko, and egg were definitely meh. So then I used half the beans and more ingredients each subsequent trial. Cheese! Why not? A zucchini? Of course! And then quinoa. Sometimes less is more, but sometimes more is more. And this is a more […]

Lemon-Dill White Bean & Potato Soup

May 13 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Lemon-Dill White Bean & Potato Soup Coming to you with a recipe that feels simultaneously springy and warming. Spring here in the Northeast has been on the chillier side, and smoothies and big, raw salad lunches feel pretty far away. We’re still eating lots of soups/­­stews, and not hesitating to turn on the oven to roast vegetables. We’re also going through a BIG dill obsession in our household. It’s just such a unique herb, perfect at brightening up whatever dish it touches. We’ve been having tons of it in the form of lemony herb oil, served with creamy white beans, and also in potato salads. This soup is a compilation of all those flavor favorites in one bowl of coziness. All the ingredients in this soup are pretty straightforward. We start building flavor with a standard trio of onion (or leeks), celery, and carrots, followed by some spices, garlic and salt. We cook the white beans and potatoes in broth, until the potatoes are tender, and then blend half the soup for a creamy but slightly chunky texture. We finish it off with lots of fresh lemon juice and zest, and tons of dill. So simple and satisfying! Hope you and yours are well :) Lemon-Dill White Bean & Potato Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients olive oil or avocado oil 1 yellow onion - diced finely, or 2 sliced leeks (white parts only) 1 medium carrot - diced finely 2 stalks celery - diced finely sea salt 4 garlic cloves - minced freshly ground black pepper ½-1 teaspoon red pepper flakes, plus more for garnishing 1½ teaspoons ground coriander 4 medium yellow potatoes or new potatoes (about 1lb) - cut into ½ chunks 2 cups cooked white beans (or 1 15 oz can) 6 cups vegetable broth 1 tablespoon white/­­mild miso a few large handfuls baby spinach (optional) zest from 2 lemons scant ¼ cup lemon juice (from about 2 medium lemons), plus more for garnishing 1 small bunch dill (about ⅓ cup packed) - stemmed and chopped, plus more for garnishing Instructions Warm a soup pot over medium heat and add a generous pour of oil once the pot is hot. Add the onion/­­leeks, carrot, celery, and a pinch of salt. Sauté over medium-low heat for about 15 minutes, or until the onion is translucent and the other vegetables are soft. Add the garlic, black pepper and red pepper flakes to taste, and coriander. Cook for about another 30 seconds, until the garlic is fragrant. Add the potatoes and another generous pinch of salt, mix to coat the potatoes. Add the beans and vegetable broth, mix, cover, and bring to a simmer. Simmer, covered, for 20 minutes, or until the potatoes are just tender. Transfer about half the soup to an upright blender, along with the miso, and blend until just smooth. You can also do this with an immersion blender, leaving some of the soup chunky. Return the blended soup to the pot. Mix and taste for salt/­­pepper, adjust if needed. Turn off the heat, wilt in the spinach, if using, and mix in the lemon zest, juice, and dill. Serve the soup warm, garnished with lemon wedges, more dill, and red pepper flakes. Notes - Dill stems are really easy to strip with a quick motion like you would do when stemming kale. This saves a lot of time! - The flavor and acidity of fresh lemon juice dissipates quite quickly, so I recommend serving any leftovers with more squeezes of lemon juice in each bowl. 3.5.3226 The post Lemon-Dill White Bean & Potato Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Versatile Fennel Salad

May 6 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Versatile Fennel Salad The first warm spring days always have me craving fresh, raw, crunchy produce that I tend to overlook when it’s cold outside. Fennel is probably my number one vegetable in that category, so we’ve been having a lot of fennel salads, which got me thinking about fennel’s practicality. It tends to be sturdier and last longer than delicate salad greens, so even if you don’t have greens, you can still make a bomb salad with a bulb of fennel. This version is incredibly delicious and so much greater than the sum of its parts, plus it can be customized endlessly. The bulk of this salad is made up of melt-in-your-mouth wisps of fennel (achieved easily with a mandoline) and white beans (making for a beautiful, monochrome plate). There is a ‘cheesy,’ peppery cashew dust that gets stirred throughout and sprinkled on top of the salad, bringing some subtle umami and fattiness that usually comes in the form of grated cheese. The dressing is simple – zesty and garlicky, made with ingredients you likely have in your pantry. To customize, you can use other kinds of beans, or add in delicate greens like arugula or herbs, and/­­or citrus segments. Rustic, homemade croutons would also be really good in this salad. You can experiment endlessly. Hope you’ll give it a try! Versatile Fennel Salad   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients 1 clove garlic - grated or minced 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar pinch red pepper flakes zest of 1 lemon juice of half a lemon 1 tablespoon olive oil sea salt scant ¼ cup cashews ½ teaspoon nutritional yeast freshly ground black pepper 1 large fennel bulb (or 2 small) - stems cut off, fronds reserved ½ cup cooked white beans Instructions Combine the garlic, vinegar, red pepper flakes, lemon zest, and lemon juice in the bottom of a salad bowl, whisk to combine. Stream in the olive oil while whisking, until emulsified. Add a generous pinch of salt to taste and adjust if needed. Set aside. Grind the cashews in a mortar and pestle until mostly fine. Add the nutritional yeast, a generous amount of both black pepper and salt right to the mortar bowl, and mix to combine. Place the fennel on a mandoline stem side down, root facing up (see photo) and slice very thinly right into the bowl with the dressing. Cut the fennel in half through the root if it doesnt fit on your mandoline and proceed to slicing. Avoid the tough core by rotating the fennel when slicing, at the end. Add the white beans, reserved fennel fronds, and about half of the cashew dust to the bowl, and mix to combine. Serve right away, finished with more cashew dust. Notes To customize this recipe, you can use other kinds of beans, or add in delicate greens like arugula or herbs, and/­­or citrus segments. Rustic, homemade croutons would also be really good here. 3.5.3226 The post Versatile Fennel Salad appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Thai Asparagus Treat

May 4 2020 VegKitchen 

Thai Asparagus Treat Tender asparagus is a welcome sign of spring, and Thai seasonings--including lemongrass, if you can find some--provide a wonderful way to enjoy them. Peel the lower part of the stalks before slicing if the skin is thick and tough. Photos by Evan Atlas. The post Thai Asparagus Treat appeared first on VegKitchen.

Mixed Mushroom Rice

April 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

Those who like mushrooms usually stay with one kind but here the three types of mushrooms make this an exceptional recipe. This dish was created by Chef Nishant Chaube, influenced by a similar Chinese recipe. Recipe and photo from Phaidon’s The Indian Vegetarian Cookbook, by Pushpesh Pant. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 6 cups (50 fl oz/­­1.5 liters) mushroom stock/­­vegetable stock - 2 cups (14 oz/­­400 g) long-grain rice - 2 cups (5 oz/­­150 g) shiitake mushrooms, sliced -  1/­­3 cup (1 oz/­­25 g) oyster or button mushrooms, sliced -  1/­­4 cup ( 1/­­4 oz/­­10 g) dried morels -  1/­­4 cup (2 fl oz/­­60 ml) sesame oil - 1 cup (3 oz/­­80 g) shallots or scallions (spring onions), sliced - 4 tablespoons peeled and chopped fresh root ginger - salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste   Directions: In a large pan, bring 4 cups (1 3/­­4 pints/­­1 liter) of mushroom/­­vegetable stock to the boil, seasoning with salt to taste, add the rice and cook for 20-25 minutes, until al dente. Drain and set aside. Heat the remaining stock in a separate large pan, add the shiitake, oyster (or button) mushrooms, and morels and cook for about 7-8 minutes over medium heat, simmering until the stock has reduced to a thick, sauce-like consistency. Meanwhile, heat the sesame oil in a skillet (frying pan) and fry the shallots or scallions (spring onions) and ginger over medium heat for 2 minutes, then add to the mushroom sauce. Stir the rice into the sauce, mix well, cover, and simmer over medium-low heat for 5-7 minutes, season and remove from the heat. The post Mixed Mushroom Rice appeared first on Meatless Monday.

The Inexpensive Pantry Staple That Makes Everything Taste Better

March 23 2020 Meatless Monday 

The Inexpensive Pantry Staple That Makes Everything Taste BetterPeanut butter is everything: savory and sweet, fatty and salty, crunchy and creamy. Its uses are truly endless, serving as the basis of stews, sauces, chilis, chutneys, and, of course, desserts. Peanuts, also known as goobers, ground nuts, or monkey nuts, are nutritionally dense, rich in both healthy fats and plant-based protein. Peanuts and peanut butter have long shelf lives, are inexpensive, and can add a tasty new dimension to any number of recipes. Sure, you can eat peanuts by the handful (or spoonful), but then youd be missing out on the peanuts wildly diverse culinary applications. This Monday, branch out and do some experimenting by making any one of these novel peanut recipes. Overnight Apple Peanut Butter Oatmeal A dollop of peanut butter transforms a bowl of oatmeal from meh to mmmmm. This oatmeal is packed with protein and fiber, making it a perfect was to start your morning. For the Overnight Apple Peanut Butter Oatmeal, click here. Peanut Butter Chili with Pinto Beans The secret to this smooth, salty, dreamy chili is a cup of creamy peanut butter. Try it and taste the magic for yourself. For the Peanut Butter Chili with Pinto Beans recipe, click here. Peanut Butter and Jelly Pancakes The best of breakfast collides with a lunch box staple. A great meal for kids, adults, and adults who act like kids. For the Peanut Butter and Jelly Pancakes recipe, click here. Peanut Noodles Packed with plant protein, this flavorful noodle dish incorporates unique Southeast Asian ingredients like sambhal olek (Indoenisan chile sauce) and Sichuan peppercorns. Give it a try if you want to put your taste buds on an adventure. For the Peanut Noodles recipe, click here. Spicy Peanut Chutney Top soups, pastas, stews, or sandwiches with this delightful blend of roasted peanuts, garlic, sesame seeds, coconut, and chile flake. Its the perfect blend of sweet, nutty, and spicy. For the Spicy Peanut Chutney recipe, click here. Sweet Potato Peanut Stew Creamy and decadent, you can whip up this West African stew in under 30 minutes. This recipe is based on one from Iba Thiam, chef and owner of Cazamance restaurant in Austin, Texas, and it is one of the recipes in Oldways A Taste of African Heritage cooking program. For the Sweet Potato Peanut Stew recipe, click here. Thai Spring Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce Light and refreshing, serve these Thai spring rolls as an appetizer or in place of a salad. The peanut dipping sauce adds a tangy punch of flavor. For the Thai Spring Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce, click here. Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post The Inexpensive Pantry Staple That Makes Everything Taste Better appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Holi, Holi, Holi!

March 3 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Holi, Holi, Holi!The flowers are blooming, and spring is upon us! That means that one of my favorite holidays is fast approaching…yes Holi!  I love the spirit of Holi with its fun, festive and colorful spirit. I especially enjoy playing with my grandchildren during this time.  It keeps me young even though time is passing by quickly. Spending time with my grandchildren during this festive time really brings back a lot of fun memories from my childhood.  My parents loved celebrating holidays and making it very special for us.  It always makes me feel happy thinking of those times.  Of course, these wonderful holidays allow me to spend more time in my favorite place at home – the kitchen!  These holidays and celebrations are not complete without delicious food. As a young child, I can vividly remember the whole neighborhood filled with delicious aromas in preparation for Holi.  My mother would make a variety of finger foods because it was easy to share with friends and neighbors. This year Holi falls on March 9th and 10th.   In India, Holi is a time where people of all different backgrounds come together and celebrate.  A bonfire is typically prepared the night before Holi. The next day family, friends, and neighbors play together with specially prepared colored powders. These powders are called “gulal” and colored water is playfully splashed on each other as well.   Of course, this is my grandchildrens’ favorite holiday to celebrate! In preparation for Holi, here are some of my favorite snacks to prepare:  Gujhias Crispy Shakarpara Nariyal Ka Ladoo Nimki Nimki (Salted Fried Crackers) Khasta Kachori Khasta Kachori Kesar Peda Kesar Peda Here’s to wishing everyone a wonderful Holi this year! The post Holi, Holi, Holi! appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Dates and Nuts Bar

January 26 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Dates and Nuts Bar (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Dates and Nuts Energy Bar, Healthy Bar, All-Natural Nutritional Bar 2020 is the start of a new decade and like most people Im sure you have thought about eating clean and healthy. My next recipe is for any new year resolutions and is called Dates and Nuts Bar. This healthy gluten-free energy bar is also vegan and sugar-free. The bars have a great nutty texture that tastes so delicious. This yummy treat is so satisfying for any sweet cravings! Because we all live busy lives, these bars make great snacks because they are so easy to take on the go. You can even give them to your kids as an after -school snack. Because dates are so sweet, they provide the perfect natural alternative to added sugars. They are sure to be a hit with friends who are avoiding sugar but still crave something sweet. Try these bars as a healthy alternative to cookies and other sweet treats. You will feel amazing. Course Snack Keyword All Natural, Almonds, Badam Burfi, Besan ki barfi, Candy, Cocoa Powder, Coconut, coconut Ladoo, Cooking Video, Dates Bar, Delightful, Diabetic, Flax Seed Burfi, Flax Seeds, Gluten Free, Gourmet food, Home Made, Jain Food, Kids Friendly, Lunch Box, Natural Alternative, Nutritional Bar, Nutty, Quick And Easy, Sattvic Food, Snack, Sugar Free, Swaminarayan, Sweet, vegan, Walnuts Prep Time 10 minutes Cook Time 10 minutes Total Time 20 minutes Servings 16 pieces Ingredients1 1/­­2 cup pitted dates cut into small pieces 2 Tbsp cocoa powder 1/­­3 cup coconut powder 1/­­3 cup flax seed meal 1/­­8 tsp sea salt 1/­­2 cup roasted Walnuts roughly chopped 1/­­2 cup roasted Almond roughly chopped 1/­­2 cup roasted Cashews roughly chopped 2 tsp sesame seeds 2 tsp pumpkin seeds InstructionsSoften the chopped dates in microwave for 30 seconds, doing this makes dates soft and easy to work. Blend the dates in the food processor until they become to the paste, this should take about 15 seconds. Add flex seed meal, and cocoa powder and salt to the food processor and blend it until all the ingredients incorporated. This should take about 15 second. Add the roasted and chopped nuts walnuts, almonds, and cashew nuts. Blended it until all the ingredients incorporated, but nuts should be still chunky this should take about 20 seconds of blending. Remove the mix from food processor, and make it into 2 balls, roll it into about 1/­­4-inch-thick, sprinkle the sesame seeds and pumpkin seeds to the rolled bar and lightly press the seeds, so they stay into the bars. Cut them into your desire shape. I decided to cut them in bars. NotesThese are some more healthy choice you would like to know Quinoa salad, Stuffed karela, Lentil Vegetable soup, Mango panna cotta The post Dates and Nuts Bar appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Super Easy No-Knead Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread

January 10 2020 Oh My Veggies 

This is not a post meant to shame you into making your own whole wheat sandwich bread. Because I am not one of those bloggers. You know, the kind that make you feel like a terrible human being because you’re not making your own almond milk from almonds you grew yourself, maintaining your own bee hives in your backyard, trekking into the woods to harvest wild morel mushrooms every spring? Yeah, that’s not me. I mean, if you want to be an urban beekeeper, that’s totally cool. But I’m way too lazy for that sort of thing. Plus, bees make me nervous. They sting, yo. So please know that I’m not posting this because I think you should be making all your bread yourself. This was just a fun project that I wanted to do for a while and I thought I’d share it. If you read a lot of food blogs, perhaps you’ve seen me commenting on other people’s bread posts taking about how baking with yeast scares me. (So if you’re keeping track, I’m scared of bees and yeast. Someday I’ll tell you about how I’m scared of fishing poles. Someday…) My last attempt to use yeast was […]

Unique Holiday Gift Guide for the Gourmets and Food Lovers on Your List

December 2 2019 Meatless Monday 

Unique Holiday Gift Guide for the Gourmets and Food Lovers on Your ListThe holiday season is here, so the team at Meatless Monday has assembled a snazzy gourmet gift-guide that includes everything you need to make plant-based eating -- or any type of eating for that matter -- easier, healthier, and more tantalizing to the taste buds. Whether youve been naughty or nice, weve got something for everybody: A self-sustaining indoor herb garden for your apartment-bound offspring, a molecular gastronomy starter pack for your Chopped-obsessed sister-in-law, and, of course, a hazard-proof mandoline for mom. But no matter the tool, cooking gadget, or condiment, all of the gifts listed below will make someones Meatless Monday a whole lot more delicious. Indoor Smart Herb Garden Tell us if this sounds familiar: Your recipe calls for 2 tablespoons of fresh basil, but the quantities sold in the grocery store would last you a month. Thankfully your thoughtful friend purchased you this easy-to-use, self-sustaining smart herb garden. It works just like a capsule coffee machine: Insert the biodegradable smart-soil capsule, add water to the tank (good for up to 3 week), and plug it in! Bring on the basil. For the Indoor Smart Herb Garden, click here.   Hot Sauce Flavors from Around the World The ideal gift for any hot-sauce junkie, this set of hot sauce flavors from around the world will add some searing flavor to any plant-based meal. Add some BAM! to your seitan and experiment with some spicy sauces from Costa Rica, New Orleans, Argentina, and 27 other states and countries. For the Hot Sauce Flavors from Around the World, click here. Embossed Rolling Pin Theres nothing more comforting than the aroma of freshly baked cookies. Let your baked goods look as good as they smell with one of these ornately embossed rolling pins; theyll transform any sheet of cookie dough or pie crust into an edible art piece. For the Embossed Rolling Pins, click here.  Food Dehydrator A must-have for any individual looking to easily incorporate more plant-based foods into their diet, a food dehydrator can turn any fresh fruit or vegetable into the perfect plant-based snack. Use it to dry herbs or make your own fruit leather or mushroom jerky. For the Food Dehydrator, click here. Hazard-Proof Mandoline Slicer and Spiralizer Its sharp blade and high potential for kitchen mishaps has earned the mandoline a villainous reputation, but its still a very useful kitchen tool that can quickly transform any number of fruits and vegetables into perfectly bake-able, fry-able, salad-able slices. This hazard proof mandoline is foolproof, safe, and comes with its own handy spiralizer, perfect for turning oblong shaped vegetables into flowing strands of carb-free noodles. For the Hazard Proof Mandoline Slicer and Spiralizer, click here. Super-Cute Kids Cookware Introducing children to the magic of cooking is one of the most valuable lessons you can bestow upon them. An appreciation for gastronomy starts in the kitchen, and theres no easier way to get the young ones cooking than with a set of super-cute kids cookware, which features an adorable set of vegetable-themed spoons, measuring cups, and whisks. For the Super-Cute Kids Cookware, click here. Molecular Gastronomy Starter Pack  Bring out your inner Top Chef with this incredibly cool molecular gastronomy starter pack. Use food-friendly additives to create jells, powders, beads, and caviars that will have your guests marveling at your gastronomic chops. For the Molecular Gastronomy Starter Pack, click here.    Fermentation Kit (Jars Not Included) The list of health benefits associated with fermented vegetables (kimchi, sauerkraut, pickles) is lengthy, but these foods can be a little pricey when purchased from the supermarket. A fun and cost-effective way to bring more fermented foods into your diet is to make them yourself. This fermentation kit comes with all the tools you need to pickle, culture, and preserve all of your favorite veggies. For the Fermentation Kit, click here. DIY Mochi Kit Mochi is the dessert that melts in your mouth, not in your hands. Everyone -- and I mean everyone -- has fallen head-over-heels in love with this Japanese frozen dessert. This DIY mochi kit is perfect for plant-based food lovers because it allows you to swap in any one of your favorite non-dairy ice creams. For the DIY Mochi Kit, click here.   Foodie Baby Gear We know that your baby niece, cousin, or newborn couldnt be any cuter, but what if they were wearing a little dim-sum or tater-tot onesie? This collection of adorable baby gear comes complete with all the food puns that any food-loving parent could ever dream of. For the Foodie Baby Gear, click here. Tofu Press Water is the element that prevents your perfect cubes of tofu from absorbing flavor and crisping up in the sauté pan. So just say no to soggy tofu! Exorcise those dampening demons in 15 minutes with this EZ Tofu Press: Simply set the press on a dish to catch water, place tofu on press base, turn both knobs for resistance, and continue to tighten the knobs every few minutes until your desired texture is achieved. For the Tofu Press, click here.   Meatless Monday Family Cookbook The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook, by Jenn Sebestyen, emphasizes the limitless potential of plant-based cooking. The recipes are nutritious, easy-to-prepare, and mimic the look, taste, and texture of comfort-food favorites (youve got to check out the lentil Bolognese, butternut-squash mac and cheese, and meaty mushroom stew). Its an awesome gift for anyone looking to expand their repertoire of plant-based recipes. For the Meatless Monday Family Cookbook, click here.   For more Meatless Monday inspiration, tips, and recipes, click here The post Unique Holiday Gift Guide for the Gourmets and Food Lovers on Your List appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Lemon & Poppy Seed Vegan Baked Oatmeal – Healthy

May 17 2020 Vegan Richa 

Lemon & Poppy Seed Vegan Baked Oatmeal – HealthyFor a Healthy Baked Oatmeal Recipe that tastes like a lemon and poppy seed muffin, look no further than this gluten-free and vegan Lemon Poppy Seed Oatmeal. Jump to Recipe This Healthy Vegan Baked Oatmeal is a comforting and cozy start to the day – and guess what? It tastes like a Lemon and Poppy Seed Muffin. The type of muffin that reminds us of road trips, picnics, bake sales, and all kinds of light-hearted springtime fun, or is that just me? I used to be all about that bowl of steaming porridge oats in the morning….. lol nope that was not me, I never liked oats! Until I discovered the beauty of baked oatmeal. Since I started making baked oatmeal, Ive fallen in love with the cakey texture and I LOVE  how you can make a big casserole dish in advance and portion it out for a healthy vegan breakfast all week long. Plus you get to play around with so many fun and seasonal flavor options.  Have you tried my PB&J Baked Oatmeal, my Pumpkin Baked Oatmeal or Banana Bread Baked Oatmeal. Bookmark them, oatmeal lovers, and thank me later. Anyways, this is a one-casserole recipe and it is super simple to make – even on a weekday, though I like to prepare it on Sundays to take the edge off Monday mornings! It takes just minutes to put together. Then bake, slice, and serve warm or cold! Continue reading: Lemon & Poppy Seed Vegan Baked Oatmeal – HealthyThe post Lemon & Poppy Seed Vegan Baked Oatmeal – Healthy appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Pesto Quinoa & White Bean Cakes with Roasted Tomatoes

May 15 2020 Oh My Veggies 

Now that I have basil growing in the garden again, I’m on a quest to use up my frozen pesto because I’ll be able to make it fresh whenever I want to. If making a big batch of pesto and freezing it for fall and winter marks the end of summer for me, then frantically trying to use up that pesto is a sure sign of spring. It happens every year, like clockwork. It’s a good thing this recipe took a few tries to get right--I think I used half of my pesto supply perfecting it. The first time I made it, I only used cannelini beans. It was not good. I’ve realized that I only like cannelini beans as a component of a dish, not as the main ingredient. White bean cakes with just white beans, pesto, panko, and egg were definitely meh. So then I used half the beans and more ingredients each subsequent trial. Cheese! Why not? A zucchini? Of course! And then quinoa. Sometimes less is more, but sometimes more is more. And this is a more is more recipe. But even with more, it’s still not a lot. If you make this, don’t skip the […]

Happy Mothers Day

May 10 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Happy Mothers DayMy mother and I... Like many of you, during this time at home, I have been trying to get through some organization and general Spring cleaning. It’s really amazing just how much we accumulate through the years. It got me thinking...do we really “need” all these items, or is it just more “stuff”? I wondered if maybe it was time to simplify our lives. I went through closets and closets full of items, opening up suitcase after suitcase filled with a variety of long-forgotten memories. I stumbled upon a suitcase full of old saris and I just couldn’t bear to discard any one of them. It’s because each and every sari has a special story behind it. I am hoping that one of these days I can sit down with my granddaughters and tell them all the stories behind the saris. Who knows maybe they will want to keep some of the saris and wear them? I just hope they do and when they grow up they will remember why the sari was so special to Dadi (grandmother). I know that I still use one of my mothers shawls to this day, despite the fact that it has some tears and is not in the best condition. It doesn’t matter to me because for me, it is somewhat of a security blanket and something to hold onto as a comforting memory of my mother. Of course, going through my belongings comes with memories of my childhood, especially memories of my mother. My mother was one of a kind and just filled with wisdom. Her perspective towards life was very positive. She managed this outlook even though her health was not good. When she was resting, I would sit close to her. She would hold my hand and talk. I could feel her warmth as she softly spoke to me. She was gentle, caring, and giving. Oftentimes, I was left puzzled at some of our conversations because they were deep conversations that were hard for me to understand at my young age. However, now when I think back to those conversations, I understand that she was trying to pass on her values in addition to what things I should let go and give importance to. While she had many health issues, one thing that stood out is that she never complained about feeling unwell. I was the oldest child and often felt I should help her take care of my younger siblings, especially given her health problems. Maybe this was all in my head because, despite her health issues, she was the most positive person and always had a smile on her face. One would never guess she was enduring health issues. My mother was the type of person to always help someone out. She would see someone feeling unwell and immediately bring them home and take care of them. She did this no matter who the person was. I remember feeling confused as to why she bothered helping people she didn’t even know. When I asked her this question, she would simply calmly ask me to bring that person a glass of water. I knew to not question her further. This was simply my mom’s character. She was full of life, always laughing and giggling. She felt it was extremely important to be involved with her childrens lives in every way. My friends loved to hang out with her and felt so comfortable around her. In the back of their minds, I knew they all wanted their moms to be like her. I must have been nine or ten when I decided I would help my mother in cooking and learn the proper way to cook. Her hands had magic. She made simple food but her food always looked and smelled delicious. Even at that time she enjoyed serving food with style and flair. I still remember so many family and friends eagerly await her dinner invitations. When I asked my mother why her food tasted so good, her answer was simple. She smiled and said her first advice was to serve food with a smile. Next, she said always use fresh ingredients and only use spices are to enhance the flavors of the food, and not cover it up. She also emphasized that cooking with love and care were also important ingredients in a dish because they added to the flavors of the dish. Back then, I didn’t understand her answer. How could cooking with love and care be important in a dish? But now I know exactly what she meant. Even today, sometimes when I am tired, I just want to cook something quickly and get out of the kitchen. But then my mother’s words would ring in my ears. She would always say you should never cook if you are tired, irritated, or simply not in the mood. She used to say it would affect the taste of the food. I did not understand what she meant and used to think her food tasted good because she just had great cooking skills and techniques. However, with age and having fed my family for 50 plus years, I realize there was wisdom in my mother’s words. Now when I feed my friends, family, and loved ones, I can see that my mother’s advice was spot on! So, during this time, why not make your family feel loved and cook special dishes for them? I know that I have enjoyed doing so! Stay safe and healthy! The post Happy Mother’s Day appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Vegan Thai Asparagus Stir-Fry

May 4 2020 VegKitchen 

Vegan Thai Asparagus Stir-Fry Tender asparagus is a welcome sign of spring, and Thai seasonings--including lemongrass, if you can find some--provide a wonderful way to enjoy them. Celebrate spring by making this recipe for Thai-seasoned asparagus. This healthy stir-fry is vegan, so it’s a snack or appetizer that everyone can enjoy! The post Vegan Thai Asparagus Stir-Fry appeared first on VegKitchen.

Brothy Beans & Greens Lunch

April 29 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Brothy Beans & Greens Lunch I pretty much always know what I’m having for lunch, especially right now, with this chilly spring weather and infrequent grocery trips. Greens and beans! This meal never gets boring because I change up a lot of things: the kinds of greens and beans I use, how I cook them, what other components I include or leave out, etc. It’s a hearty, nutritious, warming lunch that comes together quickly and doesn’t weigh me down for the rest of the day. I also love that it’s a no-brainer on busy days. Although there’s no exact recipe for this, I thought I’d explain my method here, and maybe you’ll try and love it as much as I do. One of my New Year food resolutions was to cook a pot of beans every week and it’s been the best thing following through with it. Basically I cook the beans with plenty of water and aromatics, so that at the end I don’t just have a pot of delicious beans but also a flavorful broth. At lunch time, I reheat a portion of the brothy beans and quickly cook up some greens with garlic, olive oil, and pepper. I serve the greens on top of the brothy beans simply as is, or with any other toppings I feel like/­­have on hand, and that’s it. This lunch is also delicious served with a slice of sourdough, which I’ve been baking weekly. I use the Tartine country bread recipe, and it has been the most exciting learning experience I’ve had in a while. Brothy Beans & Greens Lunch   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 cups dried beans of choice sea salt olive oil aromatics of choice (see below) greens of choice - stemmed, torn or sliced if necessary garlic freshly ground black pepper/­­red pepper flakes aromatic options for the bean broth smashed garlic cloves halved onion/­­other broth vegetables or their scraps like celery, carrots, leeks, etc. hot peppers herbs (fresh or dried) lemon zest bay leaves whole peppercorns/­­other spices topping ideas freshly ground black pepper red pepper flakes fresh herbs fermented vegetables like sauerkraut/­­kimchi toasted seeds/­­nuts avocado splash of olive oil hot sauce or harissa Instructions Prepare the brothy beans. Put the beans in a large bowl and cover with plenty of water. Let soak overnight or up to 24 hours. Drain and rinse very well. Add the beans to a soup pot, along with a generous amount of salt, a splash of olive oil, and any aromatics of choice. Cover with plenty of water, so that the beans are covered by at least 2. Cover the pot and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a gentle simmer and cook, covered, for 30 minutes to an hour, or until the beans are tender and creamy. Let cool. Discard any large pieces of aromatics (I usually leave in the garlic and peppercorns). Distribute the beans among jars together with their broth and keep refrigerated until ready to use. To make the greens and beans lunch, start heating up a portion of the beans and their broth in a small pot over medium-low heat. Heat a saute pan over medium heat for cooking the greens. Wash the greens youll be using and do not dry (if your greens are already pre-washed and dried, add a splash of water to the pan in the next step for steaming). Put the greens in the heated pan, cover, and let steam over low heat for 5-7 minutes, or until the greens are beginning to soften and are bright green in color. Remove the lid from the pan and grate a whole clove of garlic right into the pan on a microplane (or add minced). Season the greens with salt, freshly ground black pepper and/­­or red pepper flakes, and add a splash of olive oil. Stir the greens to coat, and continue cooking until they are soft enough to your liking. Transfer the beans and broth youve been heating up to a bowl, followed by the cooked greens. Add any toppings of choice and enjoy! You can also serve the beans over any grain of choice or with bread for an even more substantial meal. 3.5.3226 The post Brothy Beans & Greens Lunch appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

The Spring Supper Salad

April 23 2020 My New Roots 

The Spring Supper Salad Greetings, friends! For fun I am resurrecting one of the blog posts I wrote back in 2010 – a warm butter bean salad bowl, garlic-roasted carrots and wild rice. Why I am re-publishing a decade-old recipe? Well, for one I thought that there are a bunch of new followers around here who have never even seen this delight (hello, by the way)! Second, most of you who have been here since the beginning may have forgotten about it. Third, its the ideal pantry staple recipe. And lastly, because its very, very delicious. Creamy butter beans, golden garlic-y carrots coins, chewy wild rice, crisp and bright pickled onions, silky kale, and refreshing dill, all coming together with a lick-your-lips mustardy dressing that is divine on just about everything – this salad and beyond. I’ve also re-named it the Spring Supper Salad because it’s the perfect seasonal transition meal (yea baby, it’s definitely a meal) incorporating both winter and spring produce and flavours, as we make our way into the light of the upswing! Hooray! This recipe brings back so many memories for me. It was around this time that I had been working in restaurants in Copenhagen for about 3 years. I loved my job, and could hardly believe that someone actually paid me to spend all day in a hot, cramped kitchen, cooking a dozen new dishes every day without a menu or recipes – definitely still in the honeymoon phase. I felt confident in the food I was making, applying my deep understanding of nutrition to recipe development, and I used every day to push myself creatively, keenly aware of how fast I was learning and growing. I was certainly in the vortex, and it was a very exciting time of my life.  I started my shift around 8 am, and the majority of my dishes needed to be ready at 12 noon when we opened the doors for lunch. This is a relatively short window of time to pump out 200 servings of anything, but after some years, I developed short cuts that would deliver a lot of flavour in a hurry. One of these short cuts, was garlic oil – the first thing I would make after tying my apron strings, that would act as a marinade, a roasting medium, and a base for soups, stews, dressings and sauces for the entire day. In fact, I dont think that there were many dishes coming off of my station that didnt have garlic in them back then (such an easy way to make things taste good!). This oil sat on my bench and it got tossed into all the things, and all the people kept coming back for more.  One thing I loved using the garlic oil on, was winter veggies. I could toss them in said liquid gold, crank up the oven, and in half an hour, Id have a blistered, glistening pile of roasted rainbow roots to serve, only needing a squeeze of lemon juice and a smattering of fresh herbs to make it presentable. Who wouldnt want to dive into that?! Plus, it was cheap. Like most restaurants, we were always looking at the bottom line and how we could make even the most humble foods taste exquisite. Garlic oil was the ticket.  At the restaurant, my signature move was combining veggies, grains, and beans in exciting ways (which was very novel at the time!) so this dish emerged from a commercial ovens worth of garlic-roasted carrots needing a home. With some tender and creamy butter beans coming off the stove, and some day-old, steamed wild rice calling out to me from the fridge, this combination came together very organically, taking the varied textures, colours, and flavours into consideration.  The secret to this dish is the consistency of the garlic in the oil. Different from mincing garlic and adding it to oil, here you must must must grate it or blend it up together so it becomes almost paste-like. This way, the garlic goes everywhere the oil does, and evenly caramelizes into the most divine, delectable gold, thats mellow and sweet and roast-y. You will not hate it. Stop! Fiber time. Fiber is probably the least sexy and alluring of all the nutrients we hear about. Its all about Protein! Fat! And if you hear about carbohydrates, its probably something ignorant and unfair (I really hate jerks picking on macronutrients, back off!). Fiber seems pretty boring and something only your grandmother cares about, so why do you need to?   One reason that plant-rich diets are so health-sustaining, is not only due to their high fiber content, but their potential for fiber diversity. In the past, fiber has been broken down into two main categories: soluble and insoluble. Whats new and exciting in this field of research, is that we can see that fiber can be broken down into several more categories (viscous, non-viscous, non-starch polysaccharides, resistant starches etc.) each one bringing forth the potential for diversified food sources for our gut bacteria. In short, the greater the diversity of plants we eat, the greater the diversity of our microbiome.  Why does this matter? Because our gut is the foundation for our overall health. If weve got a wide range of troops on the front lines of our immune system, the better our chances are for not just surviving, but thriving. The fiber we eat also feeds our good bacteria, and specific types of fiber feed specific types of bacteria. Enjoy eating the widest variety of plants you can, to ensure that youre supporting the widest variety of good guys in your digestive system. They will repay you in spades Im tellin ya!  The foods with the highest amounts of fiber are beans and lentils, vegetables, fruits, grains, and nuts and seeds (remember that there is no fiber in animal-based foods). Different proportions of soluble, insoluble fiber, as well as viscous /­­ non-viscous fiber, and fermentable fiber can be found in all of these food groups, it is highly recommended that you eat from each of them. And instead of focusing on grams (the minimum daily recommended intake is a measly 25g, not that were talking about that…), we need to focus on diversity. Enjoy as many plant-based foods as you can, and experience the terrain of your body slowly begin to change. Everything comes back to the gut, and not just what you are eating, but what your gut-bacteria are eating too. With this dish, youll be feeding those good guys with fiber from six different plants! Talk about a solid mix. Beans, whole grains, 3 different veggies, plus herbs, add up to serious fiber diversity. Good, good, good fiberations! The fun thing about revisiting this recipe, was seeing if there was anything I would change this time around. I have learned so much and grown incredibly as a cook in the past ten years, so I was surprised that I didnt have many tweaks to make. The only two things I felt this salad needed was a dark leafy green and a pickle – classic Sarah B moves at this point! Since we still dont have any spring greens happening yet, I decided kale was the winner, and obviously it needed to be massaged! I turned the red onions in the original recipe into a quick pickle, as this is another indispensable kitchen technique that Ive learned since posting the first time around. This salad-meal has everything you need and crave from a single bowl: its super flavourful and filling, with all of the textures in the mix to satisfy your noshing desires. The elements can all be made separately, even on separate days, if it seems like too many things to cook at once for a single dish. If you go the rollover route, boil the beans and rice a day or so before (and make extra while youre at it, because meal prep is for winners), and pickle the onions up to a week ahead. The kale can be prepped /­­ massaged a day or so in advance, but the carrots should be roasted right before serving.  If you dont have butter beans, any white bean would work (navy, cannellini, Great Northern, or baby lima beans are some varieties) and if you want to switch up the grain, any kind of rice would work – even millet or quinoa would be delicious! Instead of carrots, use any root veg you have kicking around your crisper: beets, sweet potato, turnip, or winter squash would taste great in the garlic oil. And if dill isnt the herb of your dreams, try substituting it with flat-leaf parsley, cilantro, basil, or tarragon.      Print recipe     Butter Bean, Wild Rice, and Garlic-Roasted Carrot Salad Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup wild rice 1 cup dried butter beans 4-5 medium carrots 4 cloves garlic 2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 bunch fresh dill sea salt freshly ground black pepper a handful of quick-pickled red onion (recipe follows) 1 batch massaged kale (recipe follows) Dressing: 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard 1 Tbsp. maple syrup 2 Tbsp. raw apple cider vinegar 3 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil pinch of sea salt Directions: 1. Soak beans for 8 hours or overnight. Drain, rinse well and cover with fresh water. Add a teaspoon of sea salt. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cook until beans are soft - about 45 minutes. 2. While the beans are cooking, rinse the wild rice well, drain, and put in a pot. Cover rice with 1.5 cups fresh water, add a couple pinches of sea salt, bring to a boil, and reduce to simmer. Cook until rice is chewy-tender - about 45 minutes. You will know the rice is done when the grains open up to reveal their purple-gray inner portion. 3. Preheat the oven to 400F. While the rice is cooking, wash the carrots and slice them on the diagonal into coins, place on a baking sheet. Grate the garlic with a microplane and combine it with the oil. Pour over carrots and toss to coat. Sprinkle with salt. Place in the oven and roast, turning them a few times over the course of 15-20 minutes. The carrots should be cooked but not mushy - al dente! 4. Make the dressing by combining all ingredients together, shake well. 5. Now all the elements come together: Drain and rinse beans in cool water to stop the cooking process. Pour dressing over warm beans and toss. Let sit for 5 minutes or so. Drain the rice if any water remains, cool slightly. Mix with beans. Toss in the carrots, scraping the pan to add garlic oil to the remainder of the ingredients. Throw in the massaged kale, as many pickled onions as you fancy, and an explosion of dill. Cracked black pepper too, if it’s calling to you. 6. Serve immediately and enjoy. Quick-Pickled Red Onion Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml raw apple cider vinegar 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water 2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 medium red onion, thinly sliced Directions: 1. Combine the vinegar, water, salt, and maple syrup in a large jar. Stir to dissolve the salt and syrup. Add the onions to the jar and put them in the fridge. Enjoy after at least 30 minutes, keeps for up to two weeks.  Massaged Kale Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 90g shredded curly or dino kale Juice of 1/­­2 lemon 2 tsp. extra virgin olive oil 2 pinches of fine sea salt, plus more as needed Directions: 1. In a large bowl, combine the shredded kale, lemon juice, olive oil, and salt. Using your hands, rub and squeeze the kale together as if you are giving it a massage, until the kale leaves are dark green and tender, about 2 minutes. Enjoy immediately in the salad, or store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for up to five days.  I really hope you enjoy this delicious and satisfying meal soon. These days are asking so much of us, and I continue to come back to the kitchen for grounding, clarity, and connection. There are no answers, just presence. And in that presence I find myself over a cutting board, being grateful for just what is front of me, slicing a carrot, then another, saying thank you for simple things. Love to you all. Stay well and safe out there. xo, Sarah B The post The Spring Supper Salad appeared first on My New Roots.

Vegan Chocolate Chunk Blondies (somehow I must've known it would come to this)

March 12 2020 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Chocolate Chunk Blondies (somehow I must've known it would come to this) I threw these blondies together as I prepped a big batch of black bean burgers to freeze for later. (Yes, I am food prepping.) Probably made over a dozen batches of these cookies over the past few months. As usual, I took a break from sugary carb-craving in February. Things are much different now. Even though the grass is beginning to green up and my daffodils are blooming, the urge to bake and soothe my soul with comfort foods normally reserved for dark, winter months has returned with a vengeance.  (As a news-obsessed individual, I'm sure you can guess why.) My cookbooks lining the kitchen walls are more precious to me than ever right now. I've collected hundreds over the decades. I drop into flea markets looking for Pyrex and instead find myself with a two-dollar cookbook I'd wanted years ago. One more for the collection. Call me crazy, but in my Marie Kondo cleaning frenzy last spring--very few cookbooks left this house. Very. Few. One of my old stand-by cookbooks, an Alice Medrich classic, stands the test of time.   Published in 2010, my dog-eared, taped-page and post-it noted guides indicate the cookbook's utility.  Here's my vegan version blondie--and don't bake these in an 8" square pan. Use instead a rectangle if you can. Mine is 10 x 6" pan I purchased for eight bucks at the grocery store. Once you add the batter to the pan, you may look at it and think: this cannot be right--there's barely enough batter to cover the bottom of the pan. Trust the recipe, they bake up beautifully. And after a night in the fridge, even better.  Vegan Blondies (adapted) 3/­­4 cup unbleached AP flour 1/­­4 cup whole wheat flour 1/­­2 t. baking powder 1/­­4 t. fine sea salt 1 stick vegan butter 3/­­4 cup light brown sugar 1 t. vanilla extract 2 T. ground flax, plus 3 T. water, 1 t. olive oil (vegan egg) 2/­­3 cup walnuts or pecans 1/­­2 cup chocolate chunks Preheat oven to 350. Line pan with parchment paper, lightly spray. Mix dry ingredients together, set aside. Place small saucepan over low heat, add butter and sugar and stir until butter melts and sugar is mostly dissolved. Remove from heat. Add vanilla extract and flax egg. Mix well. Add dry ingredients to butter mixture. Mix just until flour is mostly incorporated. Add half nuts and half chocolate. Spread batter in pan, then sprinkle remaining nuts and chocolate over. Bake for about 20 minutes or just until the sides begin to turn golden. Let cool completely, then cut into squares and store in fridge. With all the bleak AF stuff out in the world lately, my own version of self-care includes a nice vitamin rich juice first thing in the morning. I've had my juicer for a dozen or so years now. It's come in very handy lately (even though it sat literally unused for about eight of these). If you think, "Hey, nice blondie recipe, but then juicing...how's that work?" Um, resistance is futile. I will always have chocolate in my life in one form or another. This is my favorite juicing recipe: 1 beet 1 carrot 1 celery stick 1 knob ginger 1 granny smith apple juice of half a lemon When I can, I make enough for two small pints (one before I eat oatmeal for breakfast, another to drink later in the day--you know, around three in the afternoon when I'd rather scarf down a whole package of M&Ms). I've been a believer in juicing for ages...has it helped? I have no damned idea. It makes me feel good. So yes. It "helps". Also been intermittent fasting. So basically the day goes like this: Eat between nine and five. Stop.  Went to my local WM on Tuesday, just as a precaution, trying to get my hands on bleach cleaner. Wow. I happened to turn the corner and spotted an out of place single bottle left. I was like: "Thank you retail-eagle-eye for helping me spot the thing that wasn't like the other things."

Leek Pea Medley over Rye Toast

January 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

Leeks are sautéed with fresh peas and lemon juice and then tossed with steamed fava beans, artichoke hearts and fresh baby spinach. This salute to spring veggies is made decadent when goat cheese and fresh mint are thrown in, all served atop a slice of toasted rye bread. This recipe comes to us from Trudy of veggie.num.num. Serves 4 - 2 1/­­2 cups fava beans - 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - 2 small leeks, finely diced - 2 1/­­2 cups peas - zest & juice 1/­­2 lemon - 3.5 ounces baby spinach - 1 10 ounce can artichoke hearts, quartered - 3.5 ounces goat cheese*, crumbled - 6 slices rye bread, toasted - fresh mint, for garnish *Optional Steam or boil the fava beans for 3-4 minutes, or until just tender. Rinse under cold water and peel when cooled. Place 2 of the tablespoons of olive oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Add the leeks and fry over a medium heat for 3-4 minutes, or until soft. Add the fava beans and toss, coating in oil. Add the peas and continue to cook over a medium heat for 3-4 minutes, or until the peas are just tender. Add the lemon zest, artichoke hearts and baby spinach. Toss until well mixed and thoroughly heated through. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the crumbled goat cheese and toss to combine. Whisk the lemon juice with the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil together in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper and set aside. Serve 1/­­4 of the fava beans and peas on top each piece of toasted rye bread. Drizzle with the lemon juice and olive oil mixture and finish with a few fresh mint leaves. The post Leek Pea Medley over Rye Toast appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Top 20 Meatless Monday Recipes of All Time

January 13 2020 Meatless Monday 

Top 20 Meatless Monday Recipes of All TimeYes, you read that correctly. To celebrate the start of 2020, weve made a list of our 20 most popular recipes of all time. This collection represents YOUR favorite Meatless Monday meals, and its a must-read for anyone looking to incorporate more plant-based cooking into their daily diet. From Thai spring rolls and shawarma tofu to Vietnamese mango salad and Mediterranean vegetable noodle soup, weve got something for everyone. Best of all, these recipes are all super simple to make, with many of them taking less than 30 minutes to prepare. Here are our top 20 Meatless Monday recipes of all time: 20) Black Bean Meatless Balls and Zucchini Noodles For the Black Bean Meatless Balls and Zucchini Noodles, click here. 19) Vietnamese Mango Salad For the Vietnamese Mango Salad, click here. 18) Shawarma Tofu For the Shawarma Tofu, click here. 17) Farro and White Bean Veggie Burgers For the Farro and White Bean Veggie Burgers, click here. 16) Banana Date Smoothie For the Banana Date Smoothie, click here. 15) Freebirds Beyond Meat Crumbles For Freebirds Beyond Meat Crumbles, click here. 14) Easy Veggie Lo Mein For the Easy Veggie Lo Mein, click here. 13) Mediterranean Vegetable Noodle Soup For the Mediterranean Vegetable Noodle Soup, click here. 12) Grilled Avocado with Salsa For the Grilled Avocado with Salsa, click here. 11) Vanilla Almond Milk Oatmeal For the Vanilla Almond Milk Oatmeal, click here. 10) Grilled Vegetable Tacos For the Grilled Vegetable Tacos, click here. 9) The Meatball Shops Veggie Balls For the Meatball Shops Veggie Balls, click here. 8) Vegetable Pancit For the Vegetable Pancit, click here. 7) Zucchini Tomato Curry For the Zucchini Tomato Curry, click here. 6) Lemon Mint Quinoa Salad For the Lemon Mint Quinoa Salad, click here. 5) Casamiento (Black Beans and Rice) For the Casamiento (Black Beans and Rice), click here. 4) Italian White Beans and Kale For the Italian White Beans and Kale, click here. 3) Kale Potato and Carrot Curry For the Kale Potato and Carrot Curry, click here. 2) Thai Spring Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce For the Thai Spring Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce, click here. 1) Jamaican Jerk Tofu For the Jamaican Jerk Tofu, click here.   If you decide to make one of these delicious recipes, let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post Top 20 Meatless Monday Recipes of All Time appeared first on Meatless Monday.

spring onion paratha recipe | hare pyaz ka paratha | green onion paratha

December 17 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

spring onion paratha recipe | hare pyaz ka paratha | green onion parathaspring onion paratha recipe | hare pyaz ka paratha | green onion paratha with step by step photo and video recipe. paratha or flat bread recipes are very common across all indian regions. it is generally made and served with a hint of raita and pickle for lunch and dinner, but also can be served as a snack. one such multipurpose snack paratha recipe is spring onion paratha recipe, known for its simplicity and flavour. The post spring onion paratha recipe | hare pyaz ka paratha | green onion paratha appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegetable Kathi Roll - Frankie

November 18 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Vegetable Kathi Roll - Frankie (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Vegetable Kathi roll Vegetable Kathi Rolls are a popular Mumbai street food. Vegetable Kathi rolls are the perfect meal for any time. These are also a great vegan treat. This recipe is super easy to put together and it makes for the perfect lunchbox or tiffin meal. Also, this is my version of Spring Roll. Course Appetizer Cuisine Indian Keyword Appetizers, Healthy, Homemade, Jain Food, Lunch Box Meal, No Garlic, No Onion, Picnic Food, Sattvik, Satvik, Snack, Spring Roll, Street Food, vegan, Vegetable Roll, Vegetarian Prep Time 15 minutes Cook Time 15 minutes Servings 2 people IngredientsFor Kathi roll2 uncooked tortilla 2 tsp oil to cook the tortillas About 20 spinach leaves cut into 2-3 pieces 1/­­2 cup red bell pepper thinly sliced and remove the seeds 1 cup cabbage thinly sliced 1/­­4 cup carrots shredded 1/­­2 cup cucumber thinly sliced 2 Tbsp cilantro leaves finely chopped Peanut Sauce 1/­­4 cup peanut butter 2 Tbsp soy sauce 1 Tbsp ginger juice 1 Tbsp sugar 2 Tbsp lime juice 1 Tbsp sesame oil optional 3 whole red chilies InstructionsSauceRemove the seeds from red chili and soak in 2 tablespoons of hot water for few minutes. Blend all the ingredients together except peanut butter, soy sauce, ginger juice, sugar, lime juice, and sesame oil. After spices are blended to paste add peanut butter and blend enough to mix t well. Note: dont over blend peanut butter will leave the oil. Check if the salt is needed, soy sauce is quite salty. Kathi RollHeat the skillet over medium high, lightly oil the skillet, place the tortilla over skillet for about half a minute, it will change in the color lightly and puff different places. Flip the tortilla over, and lightly brush the oil, flip it again and lightly brush the tortilla. tortilla should have light golden color on both sides. Remove the tortilla from the skillet, make both tortilla same way. And set it aside. You can cook the tortillas in advance. Assembling the FrankieTake one tortilla and put it over a flat surface. Spread about 2 tablespoons of peanut sauce over tortilla, leaving 1/­­2 inch around. Center of the tortilla spread the vegetables moderately, spinach, carrot, bell pepper, cucumber, cabbage, and cilantro. Roll them tightly like burrito. Use extra peanut sauce as a dip. NotesSuggestions Instead of tortilla you may use left over Roti, Paratha. Serve Peanut Sauce as a dipping sauce with vegetable salad, French fries or with variety of bread. You may also enjoy Idli Manchurian, Veggie Hash Browns The post Vegetable Kathi Roll - Frankie appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.


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