spring onions - vegetarian recipes

spring onions vegetarian recipes

Recipe: Mediterranean-Style Rotini with Toasted Garlic Panko

October 8 2018 Oh My Veggies 

When I saw the recipe for Fusilli with Caramelized Spring Onions and White Wine sitting in my “Recipes to Make” folder (an actual folder, mind you, not one on the computer–I am old school like that), I thought I’d add it to my meal plan because I had everything on hand for it except the onions. When I went to write up my meal plan post, I noticed that the recipe had pretty mediocre reviews online, with readers commenting that the dish was bland and flavorless. Oh, what to do! I had already done my shopping for the week, so it was too late to make something else. Instead, I decided to change the recipe–I added everything I could find in the pantry to give this pasta dish a big boost in flavor. I could have gone the easy route and doused this with massive amounts of cheese, but I opted to add ingredients that pack a lot of flavor into a small amount of calories and fat, making this Mediterranean-Style Rotini recipe both delicious and healthy.

Spring Picnic Bread

April 16 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Spring Picnic Bread Picnic season is finally upon us and we have been kicking it off with two new favorite things. The first one is a bike and the other is a bread. We have been dreaming of a Danish cargo bike for years and years, and last month we finally splurged on this one. It’s the perfect vehicle for us because we can fit all three kids in it with seatbelts and all. It’s ideal to bring home heavy grocery bags with. And it’s environmentally friendly. All practicalities aside, it is also so much fun to ride around with and we are roaming from playground to picnic spots without a hitch. Just packing a few blankets, a big smoothie, a rhubarb compote and this beauty of a bread. We created this recipe for all type of picnic situations. We wanted something spring-y and savory that tasted awesome and could manage a bumpy bike ride. It’s basically like a savory muffin that we bake in a sheet pan. It serves many, is easy to make, super moist and flavorful and you can make lots of variations on it (although I love the look of thinly shaved asparagus on top). Needless to say, this is also ideal for a brunch or or other weekend gatherings. Just like a foccacia, the bread acts as a base and you can play around with all kind of toppings. Here are a few variations: o Swap some of the potatoes in the bread with grated carrots, parsnip or swede. o A teaspoon of mustard in the batter adds some complexity to the flavor. o Any fresh herbs can be mixed into the batter. o Olives or capers could be good on top. Spinach could also be used instead of asparagus. o You can use a dairy free yogurt instead of buttermilk and leave out the feta cheese if you prefer it dairy free. o We havent tried a vegan version but replacing the eggs with chia eggs (1 egg = 1 tablespoons chia seed + 3 tablespoons water) has worked for us on similar recipes. Asparagus & Potato Picnic Bread Serves 12 Dry Ingredients 100 g /­­ 1 cup oat flour (or the same amount rolled oats, blitzed into flour in a food processor) 100 g /­­ 3/­­4 cup rice flour (or buckwheat flour or spelt flour) 1 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 1 tsp sea salt flakes Wet Ingredients 3 free-range eggs 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup olive oil or coconut oil, at room temperature 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup cultured buttermilk (or yogurt or plant-based yogurt) 1-2 spring onions 3-4 potatoes (2 cups /­­ 250 g grated) 1 handful fresh parsley, finely chopped 100 g feta cheese Topping 3 raw asparagus 1/­­3 cup pumpkin seeds 2 tsp quality olive oil 2 tsp honey a handful chive Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 350°F bake mode and grease a 30 x 22 cm /­­ 12 x 9 inch tray or line it with parchment paper. Add all the dry ingredients to a large mixing bowl and stir until combined. Make a well in the centre and set aside while preparing the wet ingredients. Whisk eggs in a separate bowl, then add oil and buttermilk. Finely chop the onion. Peel the potatoes, grate them coarsely and add them to the wet mixture along with the onion and parsley. Crumble in half of the feta cheese. Give it a good stir and then pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the flours. Use a wooden spoon or spatula to combine the batter and then pour it onto the tray. Use a peeler to shave the asparagus into thin ribbons and spread them out over the batter. Crumble the remaining feta cheese on top. Combine pumpkin seeds, oil and honey and sprinkle them on top as well, along with the chive. Bake for approximately 40 minutes or until golden and a skewer inserted in the centre of the cake comes out clean. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly in the tin before transferring to a wire wrack to cool completely. Store the cake at room temperature in an airtight container and it will keep for a few days. Great to bring on a picnic and serve with a tangy rhubarb compote or chutney. Enjoy!

Roasted Veggie Grain Platter

March 27 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Veggie Grain Platter Hi, David here. I’ll get to the recipe soon but first I just wanted to share a little scene from last night. Isac was watching a baking program for kids and as I was tucking him in, he thoroughly explained the whole process of making croissants to me. You have so much butter in croissants, dad. Like, a lot. You put it on the dough and fold it over the butter like this. And you hit it with the rolling pin like this, bam bam bam. When it comes to numbers and letters, he can be a little clueless, but the fact that our three year-old had memorized all the details in croissant baking from just watching it once on tv, made me all happy and proud. I’m not saying that mastering a croissant is more important than math, but teaching our kids how to cook has been one of the things I’ve really looked forward to as a dad. And he is really into it. The little kids stove has long been his favorite toy both at home and in kindergarten an he often serves imaginary pancakes to all his friends. I’ve promised him that we will make croissants together tonight so I’m off to prep a dough right after this (making the rye croissants from Green Kitchen Travels). I’ll report back with how it goes. Today’s recipe doesn’t have anything to do with croissants but Isac does play a little part as kitchen helper in the video below. So, the recipe. There is one obvious reason why grain bowls have become so popular in the last couple of years. Their looks. If you don’t know what a grain bowl is, it’s basically a mix of roasted and raw vegetables on a bed of grains and herbs arranged in a bowl. The mix of vegetables often make these bowls super colorful and therefore also very popular on instagram. Grain bowls are however more then just pretty. They are hearty and provide a variety of textures and flavors. They are also very easy to adapt to what you have at home and what’s in season. We often make grain bowls for lunch, with any cooked grain, millet or quinoa as the bed, adding leftover vegetables from the fridge on top. In this recipe, we have taken the grain bowl concept and turned it into a platter. It’s topped with roasted and fresh spring vegetables, feta cheese, egg halves and hazelnuts. It’s a beautiful dish and a great one to make for Easter dinner. If you want to take the Easter concept even further, you could add roasted asparagus as well. We use an organic five-grain mix (emmer wheat, barley, gamut, brown rice and oat groats) from Zeta as the grain base but if you can’t find something similar, go with your favorite grain. Grains thrive with flavor friends, so we have paired these with a quick salsa made from marinated bell peppers, olives, capers, herbs and lemon. And stirred in a bit of feta cheese and toasted hazelnuts as well. It’s all there, flavours, looks and textures. Roasted Veggie Grain Platter with Bell Pepper Salsa Serves 4 To make this vegan, you can simply skip the eggs and feta cheese. 1 x 250 g bag Zeta 5-grain mix (or grains of choice) Roasted vegetables: 1 bunch carrots 3 purple spring onions or 2 red onions 2 small zucchini 1 tbsp olive oil sea salt Bell pepper & olive salsa: 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup grilled marinated bell pepper 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup Lecchino olives 3 tbsp capers 5-6 stalks fresh parsley and mint 1/­­2 lemon, juice 4 tbsp olive oil Topping: 2-3 medium soft boiled eggs 150 g feta cheese 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup hazelnuts, toasted and chopped 2 handfuls mache lettuce 6 heirloom cherry tomatoes, halved 1 bunch radishes Preheat the oven at 200°C /­­ 400°F and cover a baking tray with baking paper. Peal or clean the carrots and trim off the outer layer of the onion. Cut the onion lengthwise and the zucchini in bite-size pieces. Place the vegetables on the tray. Drizzle with oil and salt and roast for 15-20 minutes. Cook the grains in a large bowl of salted water according to the instructions on the package and drain in a sieve once they are ready. Make the salsa by chopping all the ingredients finely. Place in a bowl, squeeze over lemon juice and drizzle with oil. Fold the salsa into the grains, reserving some of it for serving. Crumble 2/­­3 of the feta cheese into the grains and half of the hazelnuts. Toss so everything is mixed. Pour the grains onto a platter, top with the roasted vegetables, lettuce, tomatoes, radishes, egg halves, feta cheese and hazelnuts. Drizzle with olive oil and serve with the remaining salsa and some sourdough bread on the side. Disclosure: We were compensated by Zeta for creating this recipe and video using some of their products. All words are our own. 

Green Potato Salad

July 4 2017 Veganpassion 

Green Potato Salad The last weeks I've been traveling for the PLANT BASED INSTITUTE between Munich and Berlin. I don't get to enjoy my balcony that often. On my first free evening I took the chance to have a wonderful BBQ with my friends enjoying the weather. Everyone cooks the dish they want and we really don't want to miss a traditional german potato salad. I like it most with some greens in it. The recipe is from my new book VEGIONAL What do you like most for a BBQ evening? If you like, comment below and maybe the next recipe will be your wish! Makes 4-6 portions. Preparation time: 40 minutes For the remoulade: 100 ml soy milk (you will need soy milk because of it's lecithin) 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar 1/­­2 tsp. mustard salt, black pepper 1 onion 2 small pickles 1 bunch of fresh herbs of your choice (chives, parsley, tarragon, chervil) For the salad: 4,4 lbs waxy potatoes  10 oz frozen green peas 1 small zucchini 5,2 oz smoked tofu 3 spring onions 2 pickles homemade remoulade 3 tbsp. white wine sugar smoked salt, black pepper Mix soy drink and vinegar in a blender until the soy drink builds flakes. Blend at medium speed and add oil until you reached favoured consistency. Flavor with mustard, salt and pepper. While blending the mixture is a little warm and it will get thicker when it cools off. Cut onion and pickles into small cubes, chop the herbs and stir all in.  Cook potatoes in salted water for about 20 minutes. Then drain potatoes and let them cool off. Cut beans into pieces and leave to cook with the peas in some salted water. Darin afterwards. Peel the potatoes (or not) and cut them in slices. Put them in a salad bowl. Cut small cubes of zucchini and smoked tofu, slice spring onions and add to the potatoes. Also add beans and peas. Chop pickles and stir with remoulade and vinegar. Add the dressing to the salad and mix everything. If you like add smoked salt and pepper. 

Odds and Ends Homemade Spice Mix

April 25 2017 Vegie Head 

I’ve wanted to make my own spice mix for a long time – using more than just dried spices. I have been growing my own organic vegies and herbs for over a year now in my two Healthy Patches, and had an abundance of celery, chillies, oregano, rosemary and spring onions… and nothing to... The post Odds and Ends Homemade Spice Mix appeared first on Vegie Head.

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl

March 10 2017 My New Roots 

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Poke seems to be everywhere these days, from fine restaurant menus, to fast-casual and even food trucks. Chefs are coming up with clever combos and creative reinterpretations - even fish-free versions for the veg set. I knew had to take a stab at it. Or at least a poke. Sorry. For those of you hearing about poke for the first time, this fresh and tasty dish (pronounced POH-kay), hails from Hawaii. In its most unadulterated form, poke is raw fish, originally combined with sea salt, candlenut and seaweed. It evolved over the years as ingredient availability increased, and the salt was replaced with soy sauce, the seaweed with spring onion, the candlenut with sesame and so on. Once it hit mainland America a few years ago, poke mania ensued and the dish evolved to become more of a meal - not just a snack. Now it is often served atop rice and garnished with all manner of innovative ingredients. Fully-focused poke restaurants have established themselves in major cities across North America. Many of these eateries allow their patrons to customize their bowls with veggies, sea weed, pickles, beans, nuts, and alt-grains, tapping into the to the fact that fast, fresh, healthy meals are becoming mainstream. Which totally rocks. I had most of the elements for my own poke-inspired version in my head...except for the fish (the most important part?). I racked my brain to come up with something that looked just like tuna or salmon, but didnt want to use fruit, like watermelon or papaya, since I didnt want the dish to be sweet. It wasnt until I was trying to fall asleep one night, that it came to me...chiogga beets! Chiogga, or candy-striped beets are gorgeously two-toned when they are raw. Sliced thin horizontally, they reveal rings of deep pink pigment and creamy white, resembling something that your grandmother keeps on her coffee table in a crystal dish. But for anyone who has ever roasted these stunning creatures will know that the magic doesnt last; the magenta bleeds into the white during cooking, resulting in an almost homogenous pale pink, with slight variegation. WHICH LOOKS EXACTLY LIKE TUNA. I almost couldnt sleep. Too excited. The next day I gathered up all the things Id like in a poke bowl: short grain brown rice (not long grain - an important distinction), spring onion for bite, carrot for crunch, edamame for pop and protein, and avo for creaminess. I took this last one a step farther and blended it with lemon and wasabi for the most boss sauce ever. This alone would be delish on most things...please try it. And for the fishy component, I thought back to the raw vegan tuna I made for my first cookbook, and how effective adding a sprinkle of nori was to boost that fresh-from-the-sea flavour. This is not a deal breaker for the overall dish, but it definitely made it taste complete. If you cant find nori flakes, just crunch up a couple sheets of the stuff that youd use to make sushi. Easy fix! I like to use wasabi powder in the avo cream since the pre-made stuff in a tube is questionable. Have you ever read the ingredient list on one of those packages? It can be scary stuff. In a pinch, use it, but tracking down the powder is worth it from a nutrition standpoint, and also a flavour one. The real stuff tastes infinitely better! What a shocker. Wasabi is Japanese horseradish, and like its western counterpart, it belongs to the Brassica family, like cabbage, broccoli and mustard. The root is dried and then pulverized, which gives us the powder that we can blend with water to create wasabi paste. It is a difficult crop to grow, which explains the high price for the genuine product. Most wasabi powders dont contain any wasabi at all, but are instead a mix of mustard powder and regular horseradish mixed with green food dye. A high-quality wasabi powder should be organic and contain only horseradish and wasabi. The colour should be pale green - not disco neon. Most health food stores carry wasabi powder. This is a good brand. Everything unfolded just as Id hoped it would. The beets came out perfectly pink with those thin white stripes that look just like fat striation. The marinade that I tossed them around in was acidic and ginger-y and just plain yum. Building the meal up with the rice, the beans, the veggies, a dollop of cream, a sprinkle of nori and roasted sesame, was ever so satisfying and fun. This healthy, fresh meal is calling you. No need to poke about, just make it. Again, sorry.     Print recipe     Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Serves 3-4 Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 200g short grain brown rice, soaked overnight if possible 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 2 cups /­­ 250g edamame beans, fresh or frozen 2 tsp. cold-pressed olive oil a couple pinches flaky sea salt Beets & Marinade 3 medium Chiogga (candy striped) beets 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1 tsp. finely grated ginger pinch fine sea salt Avocado Wasabi Cream 2 medium ripe avocados 2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1-2 tsp. wasabi powder, to taste pinch fine sea, to taste 2 spring onions, sliced lengthwise into ribbons 2 medium carrots, julienned 2 Tbsp. sesame seeds 3 Tbsp. nori flakes Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Wrap beets in aluminum foil and place on a baking sheet in the oven. Roast until tender, about 45 minutes (to check doneness, peel back the foil of one beet and insert the tip of a sharp knife. If there is little resistance, its ready). Peel back foil from each beet and let cool slightly. 2. While the beets are roasting, make the rice. Drain and rinse well. Place in a pot with 2 cups /­­ 500ml of fresh water and salt. Cover, bring to a boil and reduce to simmer. Cook until tender (add more during cooking if necessary), about 45 minutes. 3. While the rice is cooking, make the Avocado Wasabi Cream. Scoop out the flesh from both avocados and add to a food processor. Blend on high, then add the lemon juice, wasabi powder and salt. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. 4. In a medium bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil, ginger and salt. Slip the skins off the cooled beets. Cut the beets into cubes and toss in the marinade. Let sit for at least 20 minutes. 5. While the beets are marinating, bring a medium pot of water to the boil. Add a few pinches of salt and the edamame. Simmer for a couple minutes until bright green and tender (do not overcook!). Drain and rinse under cold water to halt cooking. Toss with a little olive oil and sprinkle with flaky salt. 6. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast sesame seeds, stirring often until fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside. 7. Julienne the carrots. 8. To assemble, divide the rice among the bowls. Add the marinated beets, edamame, carrots and a dollop of Avocado Wasabi Cream. Sprinkle with nori flakes, the toasted sesame seeds and top with the spring onions. Enjoy! I’m on my last few days of the North American tour now. Honestly, it’s been just magical and I am so grateful to all of you who came out to show some love and connect with the healthy community around them! I have just one more event left, and if you’re in LA, please come to The Springs tomorrow! I’ll be giving a lecture on Improving Immunity, Digestion and Detoxification, serving a delicious lunch, and launching a recipe collaboration with their chef! Hope to see you there. All love and smiles, Sarah B Show me your bowls on Instagram! #mnrpokebowl The post Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl appeared first on My New Roots.

Herby Picnic Potato Salad

September 1 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Herby Picnic Potato Salad A couple of weeks ago we had a little picnic for our baby boy with family and a few close friends. It was kind of a combined (very delayed) Welcome-to-the-World-Isac and Happy-First-Birthday celebration and it turned out to be a real gem of a day. It has basically been raining in Sweden all summer, but this day was filled with sunshine, good food, laughter and lots of chubby babies. Despite having written two cookbooks, we actually rarely cook for our friends. Instead we prefer going the picnic route, having everyone bringing something to share. It just makes it a lot easier to plan these kind of things instead of having to do everything yourself. It also makes for a more fun and spontaneous event. We did actually end up cooking quite a lot anyway for this picnic. We made a few picnic pies, two monster versions of our Blueberry Cake (not shattered this time) and an adapted version of the potato salad from Sara Fortes latest book Bowl+Spoon. We got to read her book manuscript before it was published as we were asked to write a little quote for the back. Here is what we wrote: We love that Saras recipes are always focused on real ingredients, simple to prepare, and undoubtedly delicious. The bowl theme is brilliant and exactly how we prefer to eat our everyday meals. Apart from a few other favourites in the book, we have been making different versions of Saras potato salad at least five times this summer. Its incredibly flavourful with lots of fresh herbs and capers, and also has a tangy zing from white wine vinegar. The original recipe calls for hard-boiled eggs and its an excellent combo, but we have also been playing with other (vegan) sources of protein. One time we tried beluga lentils and here we are using chickpeas. We added kale and apple to make it less of a side dish and more of a complete meal. As the name implies, this is great to pack on a picnic but it is also a good indoor meal. And when your kids are tired of having potato salad for the fifth time, you can fry the leftovers in a pan into a quick and flavourful hash. Herby Picnic Potato Salad with Kale, Apple & Chickpeas Serves 6 Recipe adapted from Bowl+Spoon by Sara & Hugh Forte. We usually make an extra large (almost double) batch of the vinaigrette because it’s so good. If your white wine vinegar is very sweet, you can add some lemon juice for extra zing. 2 pounds/­­1 kg small new potatoes Coarse Herb Vinaigrette 3 tbsp pickled capers 2 spring onions or green onions 2 cups loosely packed herbs (a mix of chives, parsley, basil and top greens from the celery) 2 tbsp white wine vinegar or apple cider vinegar 1/­­3 cup cold pressed oil sea salt and black pepper, to taste 2 apples, diced 3 celery stalks (save the top greens for the vinaigrette), finely diced 2 leaves kale, chard or spinach, chopped 1 can (14 oz/­­400 g) cooked chickpeas, rinsed Put the potatoes in a large pot, cover them with water and bring the water to a boil. Boil for 12-15 minutes until they are cooked through but not falling apart - just until you can easily pierce a sharp knife through the center. Drain and set aside to cool. In a food processor, blitz capers and their brine, onions, basil, parsley, chives, celery greens, vinegar, lemon juice, oil, salt and pepper until you get a coarse vinaigrette. Quarter the potatoes and collect them in a larger mixing bowl. Pour the vinaigrette over the just-cooled potatoes and gently toss to coat. It will look like a lot of dressing, but the potatoes soak it up as they sit. Stir celery, apples, kale and chickpeas into the potatoes. Taste for salt and pepper. Serve at room temperature.

Ramen Revisited + How to make Dashi

March 31 2015 My New Roots 

Ramen Revisited + How to make Dashi My parents made my lunch every day that I was in school from the time I was barely old enough to hold a brown paper bag, right up until my last days of high school. It was always exactly the same format, with slight variations: sandwich, juice box, granola bar, piece of fruit. Pretty standard fare for most of my peer group if I remember correctly, and I never complained about it. That is until the day I peered over my bologna-on-a-bun to see Alexis at the popular kids table in the junior high cafeteria slurping over what looked like a rather foreign and intriguing styrofoam cup of something hot and tasty. Oh, thats Mr. Noodles, my best friend Julie said, and went on to explain that all you had to do was pour boiling water into the cup and wait a few minutes before eating the noodle soup-like meal. I looked down at my cold, relatively flavourless, pedestrian food and felt left out. Not only was I totally un-cool, but suddenly my lunch was too. Could life get any worse?! I ran home and told my mom about the cup noodles and begged her to buy some at the store, promising her that this could not only save her time, but most importantly, my lunchroom reputation. Dont you want me to be popular?!, I wailed. Convinced this was my ticket to the promised land of spin-the-bottle and weekend shopping mall hang-outs, I persuaded her to invest the fifty cents on a couple trials and see what all the fuss was about. When she came home I had the kettle boiled and ready to get down to business. Folding back the paper lid, I spotted a magical little package of flavoured powder inside, which I read was meant to be emptied into the cup before adding the water. A couple shriveled, token peas fell out amongst the dust and my mom looked pleased to see green. The boiling water was added, I closed the lid again and waited - the longest four minutes of my life thus far. But oh, what ceremony! What rapture! The timer on my ironman wristwatch beeped, I stirred the cup, and dug in. It was salty. Very salty. Thats about all I can recall. The noodles, semi-cooked and crispy in parts were underwhelming and bland, while the broth, if I can all it that, was shockingly saline. But none of that mattered. I would have eaten cow dung if it meant sitting next to Alexis. I finally had the answer to the question of cafeteria coolness. Needless to say, eating ramen did not initiate me into the popular crowd, nor did it inspire a great love of this ubiquitous, cheap eat canonized by hung-over college kids everywhere. Until very recently this had been my only experience with ramen. But when yet another ramen recipe request landed in my inbox, I knew it was time to revisit this famous dish. It needs to be said that instant ramen is a far cry from its traditional roots of noodles in broth, which when prepared properly with care and intention, can be utterly delicious. I suppose its like most things that go from revered, regional dish to the freezer section of the gas stations grocery aisle, or worse. Shouldnt these things receive a different name or label in respect to the original recipe? Its somewhat maddening, but I surrender to the fact that there is only so much I can change in this world. The backbone of all ramen is the broth, or dashi. Dashi is a clear stock that is traditionally made using kombu, Japanese sea kelp, and katsoubushi or bonito, dried fish. Other dashi bases can include shiitake mushrooms, and because my recipes are plant based, Ill be showing you how to make this variety and the kombu one today. Once you have this base, you can spike your dashi with shallots, garlic, ginger, miso, etc. but today were keeping things simple and I leave the fun and improvisation to your ramen-hungry minds. Toppings vary widely, but vegetarian ingredients can include noodles (obviously), mushrooms, strips of nori or other tasty sea veggies, greens, spring onions, shredded cabbage, kimchi, garlic, and the ever-so-popular soft-boiled egg. If you are vegan, simply leave this ingredient out – it’s the only animal product in the recipe and still delicious without it. The one thing I love about ramen is its versatility and infinitely customizable combinations to suit every season, taste, and budget. On Salt, Sodium and Finding a Balance The big bad deal with packaged ramen and its accompanying powdered broth or flavour packet is the incredibly high sodium content, some brands containing an entire days worth in just one serving! On the flip side, making your own dashi allows you to control the sodium level and provide you with balanced saltiness for overall wellbeing. Sodium is not only important to us, our survival depends on it. Its role in the human body is to work in conjunction with potassium to maintain cellular fluid levels, acid/­­alkaline balance, and keep the nerves and muscles functioning properly. Sodium plays a role in hydrochloric acid production in the stomach, and is used during the transport of amino acids from the gut to the blood. Because sodium is needed to maintain blood fluid volume, excessive sodium can result in increased blood volume and elevated blood pressure, especially if the kidneys are compromised in any way and unable to clear it efficiently. Hypertension and premenstrual problems are more frequent in people who have a high salt intake, especially when there is a relatively low level of potassium in the diet to counteract it. Virtually all whole unprocessed plant foods contain more potassium than sodium. Grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables, especially leafy greens, offer ten to several hundred times more potassium, and yet the average American is said to be deficient in potassium. Although there is no standard ratio of sodium to potassium to recommend, eating a balanced, whole foods diet (surprise!) is the best way to achieve equilibrium. So how much sodium should be eating in a day? First it needs to be established that sodium and salt are two different things. The salt we consume is in fact a combination of two ions, sodium and chloride, in percentages of roughly 40% and 60%. Most nutrition experts agree that sodium intake on a daily basis should not exceed 2 grams per day. This amount is equal to 5 grams of salt, or 1 teaspoon. Yup. Thats it. Put into those terms, its easy to see how one could overdo it...by lunch hour. To avoid excess sodium intake, limit processed foods. As I mentioned above, a little recon revealed that some instant ramen brands cover the daily sodium base in just one serving. Yikes! Sodium lurks in some very unexpected places, so be savvy and read labels. To be extra cautious avoid high-salt foods such as commercially-prepared pickles, olives, and saurkraut, canned and instant soups, processed cheese, condiments like ketchup, barbeque sauce, gravy, alfredo sauce, salad dressings, mayonnaise, soy sauce, snacks foods like chips, salted peanuts and pretzels, crackers, and boxed breakfast cereal. Remember, cooking for yourself is the only way to know exactly what you are getting in your food. There are a few things that need to be mentioned about this recipe. First, you need to start the process the night before (or the morning of) by simply soaking the dashi ingredients in water and set in the fridge. This is how you make the broth. You can hurry the process by cooking the ingredients in hot water if youre in a rush, but the results are better if you follow this slower method (plus, your fridge does all the work). I will also say that traditional dashi is delicate and mild-flavoured, unlike the instant dashi that is saltier and stronger due to the addition of artificial, chemical flavour enhancers. When you try the dashi for the first time, try not to compare it to the ramen broth youve had in the past - this is the real deal. Appreciate its clean, pure taste and it subtlety, and add tamari or miso only as needed to enhance the natural flavour. Second, you can make and enjoy the dashi bases separately if you like, or combine the two for a more complex flavour. I really like the combination of the kombu and shiitake dashi together. They both contain good amounts of umami, so united they deliver a deep, multifaceted taste experience without the meat. Third, get organic ingredients if you can. Sea vegetables and mushrooms are both like little sponges in their respective environments so finding the cleanest and highest quality you can is a good idea. Finally, purchase the most high-vibe ramen noodles you can find. The other reason I was inspired to write this recipe and post was because of all the incredibly awesome ramen Ive seen at the health food store. Made with whole grains, some of them even gluten-free, I couldnt say no! Now, you could make your own noodles if you like (this is an art I greatly admire) but in the interest of saving a smidgen of time, buy yourself some noodles and get to the ramen even faster.     Print recipe     Ramen Revisited + How to make Dashi Serves 4 (each dashi recipe below serves 2) Dashi 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water : 60g dried shiitake mushrooms (do not use fresh) 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water : 20g kombu Directions: For the kombu dashi, place .7oz /­­ 20g of kombu in 4 cups /­­ 1 liter of water overnight in the fridge. In the morning, discard the kombu, strain the remaining liquid and warm it in a pot on the stove until just barely simmering. Serve. For the shiitake dashi, remove any dirt or debris from the dried mushrooms and place in 4 cups /­­ 1 liter of water. It is important to submerge the mushrooms, so place something on top of them, such as a smaller glass lid, and set them in the fridge overnight. In the morning, remove the mushrooms, squeezing out as much liquid from them as you can. Set the mushrooms aside, strain the remaining liquid and warm it in a pot on the stove until just barely simmering. Serve. Ramen 3-4 bunches baby bok choy, quickly stir-fried in a little shallot and garlic 2 carrots, julienned 2 spring onions, sliced 2 soft-boiled or medium eggs (to suit your taste) (optional) 1 pack whole grain ramen noodles (gluten-free, if desired) To serve dried or fresh chilies tamari or miso, to taste (use discretion!) Directions: 1. Prepare all the ingredients: stir-fry the bok choy or other greens, julienne the carrots, slice the spring onions, slice the rehydrated shiitake mushrooms, soft boil the eggs. 2. Bring a pot of water to the boil. Add the noodles and cook according to the package instructions. 3. While the noodles are cooking, ladle the broth into the bowls. Add the hot noodles and all other ingredients. Take a moment to arrange the food in a pleasing way, sit, and enjoy.   *   *   *   *   *   * Hey everyone! Mybook comes out today!!! I am so ridiculously excited to see this day arrive and the book arrive in your homes and kitchens. The reviews have been so positive so far and for that, I thank you. Please note that although most stores in North America that are carrying the book should have it in stock today, some may take a few days to longer. If you want to purchase the book online, there are many retailers listed here. I would like to take this time to acknowledge the couple of misprints in the book. During the editing process the following mistakes were made: on page 21, the ghee recipe is labeled vegan. On page 241-242 buckwheat and spelt switched places so that buckwheat is in the gluten-containing section of the grains chapter, while spelt is in the gluten-free section. In other news, my Vancouver tour dates and events have been confirmed! Here is where and when you can find me in Van city (this will be my first time there, can you believe it?!). Click the links for more details and ticket information. April 15: Burdock and Co. Collaborative Dinner + Book Signing April 16: Whole Foods Cambie Cooking Demo + Book Signing April 17: Interview + Afternoon Tea with CBCs Sheryl MacKay Barbara Jos Books to Cooks Dinner Event + Book Signing Looking forward to seeing you all there! Also, check out my most recent interview over at the gorgeous site, The Coveteur.

Spring Vegetable Stir Fry w/ Chilli Ginger Chia Jam

October 24 2014 Veggie num num 

This is a recipe thats been sitting in the back of my head and on my to do list for ages! With a trip to the local markets over the weekend I was spurred into action and armed with a basket of crunchy and colourful goodies, I knew it was time to throw a vegetable stir fry together. Its basically a super simple vegetable stir fry recipe thats made a little more awesome by the addition of a homemade chilli, ginger chia jam. I used chia seeds to make a jam with far less sugar than your typical store brought sweet chilli sauce and Im so happy with how it all came together! I could seriously eat bowl after bowl of this healthy, invigorating vegetable stir fry. Packed with a rainbow of vegetables and lots of fresh ginger this simple stir fry is a truly nourishing dinner. Use your favourite in season veg and if you like your chilli sauce hot, add a few birds-eye chillies to give it an extra kick. I served this healthy vegetarian recipe with soba noodles because basically, I love any excuse to eat soba. You could serve it with brown rice, ramen noodles or really any rice or noodle variety you prefer. The Chilli, Ginger Chia Jam should keep well in a jar in your fridge for a few weeks or more. The recipe makes enough for three or four stir-fries or try serving it as you would sweet chilli sauce in any of your favourite dishes. CHILLI GINGER CHIA JAM Preparation time: 35minutes /­­/­­ Makes around 2 cups || note: add 2 or 3 birds -eye chillies if you like it hot! || - 200g (7 oz) long red chillies - good thumb sized piece of fresh ginger - 2 garlic cloves, peeled - 1/­­3 cup coconut sugar (or raw brown sugar) - 2 cups apple cider vinegar (or rice wine vinegar) - 3 tbs chia seeds - 1 1/­­2 tbs miso paste Top and roughly slice the chillies. Roughly chop the ginger. Thrown the chillies, ginger and peeled garlic cloves into a food processor and pulse until finely diced. Set aside. In a medium sized heavy based saucepan heat the sugar and vinegar over a low heat for a few minutes until the sugar is completely dissolved. Add the chilli, ginger and garlic mixture, plus the chia seeds and increase the heat to around medium, bringing everything to a gentle simmer. Simmer, gently, uncover for around 20 minutes until the jam is thick. Add the miso paste and stir through until dissolved. Simmer for around 3 more minutes and then transfer while still hot to a sterilized jar. The Chilli, Ginger Chia Jam should keep well for a few weeks or more in your fridge. {adapted from a recipe found on SBS Food} SPRING VEGETABLE STIR FRY w CHILLI GINGER CHIA JAM + SOBA Preparation time: 25minutes (+ preparation time for the chilli jam) /­­/­­ Serves 4 || note: you can omit the fresh ginger here if you dont love it like crazy like I do. Use any seasonal veg you like and switch out the sweet basil for Thai basil if you prefer. Peanuts or cashew would be good too, instead of the almonds and you could use your favourite rice or noodles in place of the soba. || - small thumb sized piece of ginger - 150g (5oz) spring carrots - 150g (5 oz) yellow string beans - 4 small radishes (approx. 50g/­­2oz) - 1 small red capsicum/­­bell pepper (approx.150g/­­5 oz) - 70g (2 1/­­2 oz) snow peas - 3 spring onions - 1 tbs cold pressed coconut oil -  3/­­4 cup of Chilli, Ginger Chia Jam (as prepared above) - 1 tbs miso paste - 1 tbs tamari (more or less to taste) - good handful of sweet basil + extra to serve -  1/­­4 cup flaked almonds - 180g (6 oz) soba noodles, prepared to packet instructions Slice the piece of ginger into thin strips. Set aside. Scrub the carrots and slice them in half lengthways. Top and tail the yellow beans, thinly slice the radishes and slice the capsicum into strips. Set aside in a separate bowl. Top the snow peas and slice in half, diagonally. Using the white part only, slice the spring onions diagonally also. Set aside in a separate bowl. In a small saucepan or frying pan dry roast the flaked almonds until lightly brown and crisp, set aside. Heat the coconut oil in a wok or good-sized frying pan. When hot add the ginger and toss over a medium/­­high heat for a minute before adding the prepared carrots, yellow beans, radishes and capsicum. Toss vigorously for around 3-4 minutes. Add the chilli, ginger jam, miso and tamari to taste, toss to combine well before adding the prepared snow peas and spring onions. Toss for just a minute then remove from the heat and toss through the torn basil leaves. Check seasoning and adjust with tamari if needed. Pile the stir-fried veg onto a serving platter, scatter over the toasted flaked almonds and extra torn basil leaves before serving immediately accompanied with the prepared soba noodles. Alternatively you can toss your noodles through the stir fry before serving. The post Spring Vegetable Stir Fry w/­­ Chilli Ginger Chia Jam appeared first on Veggie num num.

Early Summer Abundance Bowl

July 6 2014 My New Roots 

Early Summer Abundance Bowl Keep it simple. Use what you have. Make it work. Ive been staring at these three ideas for the past few hours. In between breastfeeding my baby, laundry, trying to make food for myself, emails, brushing my teeth and changing a couple diapers, Ive been back and forth to my computer unsuccessfully getting any further with this post. Then I read it again and realized that the advice that I was trying to give all of you out there was precisely what I needed to hear myself. My days are so different than they used to be. Instead of being able to play in the kitchen from dawn until way past dusk, Im playing with my sweet baby. Instead of making food for all of you to recreate Im making food for us. Unremarkable, perhaps, but there is a turning inwards, a quiet and simplicity that Im cultivating, or at least trying to. It isnt glamorous and most of it isnt worth blogging, but its real life. And I am very grateful for it. Needless to say, meals have been simple and Abundance Bowls have been abundant. Ive been cooking grains and beans in bulk to use for later, then tossing whatever fresh veggies I have on hand into the mix. If I can bend time and squeak out five or ten minutes worth of creativity, a sauce happens, or maybe a quick pickled condiment. All of a sudden, a pretty boss bowl of tasty, healthy food sits before me and I feel like the luckiest person in the world, living in true abundance. That is what the Abundance Bowl is all about. Keeping it simple. Using what you have. Making it work. And I guess feeling that kind of overwhelming gratitude doesnt hurt either. Here we are in the first breaths of true summer. My little family and I are back in Canada for the next little while and it feels amazing to be home. The sun is bright and the river is crisp, gardens everywhere are bursting with fresh food. The Early Summer Abundance bowl celebrates all of it, along with the feeling of luckiness that always pervades my thinking this time of year, as we begin to reap the benefits of the season. I chose freekeh in this edition, a roasted, immature wheat that tastes deep and rich and is the perfect counterpoint to sweet, young beetroots, earthy radishes and vibrant sprouts. The grain is harvested while still young and soft, then roasted or sun-dried. The health bonus of harvesting immature wheat is that it retains more of its nutrients and proteins than its fully-grown counterparts. It even claims to have fewer carbohydrates than regular wheat because its young. It surprisingly has more dietary fiber content than brown rice, plus more calcium, iron, and potassium content. You can find freekeh at Middle Eastern grocery stores and increasingly at natural and gourmet food shops. Sometimes it is referred to and sold as Green Wheat. If you have never tried freekeh before, get ready to freak out. Its seriously amazing stuff! It cooks up like any other grain, keeps very well in the fridge and can be enjoyed hot or cold. I love it in salads, especially with lots of garlic, olive oil and lemon to balance the smoky flavour. As I was after a sort of Middle Eastern flavour profile, I chose to make a harissa-spiked chutney with spring onion and dates, which is altogether scrumptious. Leftovers of this are excellent smeared on toast with poached eggs for breakfast, accompanying roast veggies or in an avocado sandwich. The colour isnt very sexy, but the flavour is oh-my-goodness delicious. And to really take this Abundance Bowl to the next level, I may have put a little seared halloumi cheese in there. Maybe. Oh I totally did.     Print recipe     Early Summer Abundance Bowl Serves 3-4 Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 175g freekeh 1 tsp. sea salt 1/­­2 block Halloumi cheese (about 125g /­­ 4.5oz) 2 medium yellow beets (red beets will work too) 1 small bunch radishes a few handfuls of fresh sprouts (I used sprouted black lentil) juice of 1/­­2 lemon handful fresh mint leaves cold-pressed olive oil for garnish 1 batch Spring Onion Harissa Chutney (recipe below) Directions: 1. Place the freekeh into a saucepan and cover with water. Swirl water and rub the grains together vigorously to wash them. Drain and repeat until the water is clear. Add 2 cups water and a couple pinches sea salt. Bring to a boil, cover, and simmer until the water is completely absorbed (about 15 minutes for cracked grain and 45 minutes for whole grain). Remove from heat and drizzle with a little olive oil, stir to combine. Set aside. 2. While the freekeh is cooking, prepare the vegetables. Peel the beets and slice very thinly with a mandoline or your excellent knife skills. Place in a bowl with a drizzle of olive oil, lemon juice, and a few pinches of salt. Roughly chop mint and fold to combine. Slice radishes. 3. Slice the halloumi and place on a grill pan or dry skillet over high heat. Cook until golden on the underside, then flip. 4. To assemble, place about 1/­­4 of the cooked freekeh in each of the bowls. Add a few slices of grilled halloumi, a handful of sliced beets, a couple radishes, a large handful of sprouts, and a generous dollop of the Spring Onion Harissa Chutney. Serve immediately and enjoy. Spring Onion Harissa Chutney Makes about 2 cups Ingredients: 2 large bunches /­­ 400g /­­ scant 1 lb. spring onion (equals roughly 6 cups chopped) knob of coconut oil or ghee pinch of sea salt 1/­­2 -1 Tbsp. harissa paste (depending on how hot you like it) 1-2 large dates, preferably Medjool, pitted 3 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 3 Tbsp. lemon juice Directions: 1. Wash and roughly chop spring onions, including the green tops. Melt a knob of coconut oil or ghee in a skillet over medium heat. Add spring onions and a pinch of salt. Stir to coat and cook until the onions are softened and sweet, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat. 2. In a food processor, roughly chop pitted dates. Add the spring onions, harissa, olive oil and lemon juice. Blend on high until the mixture is creamy, but still a little chunky. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. Store leftovers in a tightly sealed glass container in the fridge for up to five days. As for those of you asking about the Potluck Picnic in Toronto, I have made the difficult decision to skip it this year. There are so many things going on in my life (all positive!) but in the name of keeping things simple and quiet, I am honoring the commitment I made to myself to focus my energy on my family at this time. I so much appreciate your enthusiasm, and also your understanding. And of course I look forward to resuming the event next summer! Show me your Abundance Bowls on Instagram: #earlysummerabundancebowl

Dijon Grilled Asparagus and Onions

May 29 2017 Meatless Monday 

Spring onions are grilled with asparagus spears for a smoky sweet flavor as well as a stunning presentation. Sliced shallots, white wine vinegar and Dijon mustard provide a savory contrast to season these delectable vegetables. This recipe comes to us from Kristina of Formerchef.com. Serves 8 For the Dijon vinaigrette: - 1/­­2 shallot, thinly sliced - 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar - 3 tablespoons olive oil - 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard - salt and pepper, to taste For the grilled asparagus and onions: - 1 pound asparagus spears, trimmed - 1 pound spring onions*, halved lengthwise - 1 tablespoon olive oil *Spring onions are sweet onion bulbs attached to greens found in farmers markets and the produce section of grocery stores in Spring and Summer.   To make the Dijon vinaigrette: Whisk the sliced shallot, vinegar, olive oil and Dijon mustard together in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper to taste. To complete the Dijon Grilled Asparagus & Onions: Preheat a grill to medium-high. Toss the trimmed asparagus and halved onions in a large bowl with the tablespoon of olive oil, taking care to ensure all ingredients are evenly coated. Place the asparagus spears and spring onions onto the heated grill, taking care to place the green portion of the spring onions on a cooler part of the grill. Grill, rotating every 2 minutes or so for about 6 minutes, or until the asparagus are tender. Plate the asparagus and onions on a large platter. Drizzle with the Dijon Vinaigrette, divide into 8 portions and enjoy! The post Dijon Grilled Asparagus and Onions appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Nasi Goreng

March 23 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Nasi Goreng I couldn’t even tell you how many times I had Nasi Goreng while I was in Malaysia. It was definitely often. Like, really often. Not only is this traditional vegetable fried rice dish usually totally delicious, it’s also usually easy to find and (with little to no effort) a great vegan option. Pretty much everywhere I went in the five weeks in Malaysia, this dish was on the menu or easy to order at almost any restaurant. Especially out of the big cities and in the countryside - and particularly on the islands and beaches - this is a vegan/­­vegetarian stand-by that is never hard to find. (By the way, based on my travels, this is true for most of Southeast Asia, including Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar… but the dish is found under other names and with local flavors.) This becomes an almost daily meal, if vegan options are limited. On Pulau Pangkor, there were two food places (more shacks than restaurants) that served fantastic Nasi Goreng and vegetable fried rice. And in Borneo, staying in the Permai rainforest, the local restaurant and the nearby food court had vegetable fried rice, or Nasi Goreng. There were also many breakfast or lunch buffets at hotels and restaurants that had rice dishes like this. Contrarily, when in Penang and Kuala Lumpur I was usually so blown away by other vegan choices that I didn’t eat Nasi Goreng as often. Nasi Goreng’s flavors and textures forge powerful memories for anyone who’s been to Malaysia or Indonesia - or even just a Malaysian or Indonesian restaurant - whether vegan, vegetarian, or neither. Just as with so many classic recipes - from region to region and family to family this dish is made a million different ways. This is mine… inspired by so many excellent meals on my adventures. When I created this recipe for the Malaysia cookbook, I made sure to hit all the best, unique flavors in a good Nasi Goreng: Fresh galangal root (or ginger), lime juice, spicy chili, and a thin, tangy sauce provided by the mix of Shoyu soy sauce, vinegar, and citrus zest. I also round out the savory flavors with some sweetness. Traditionally in Malaysia, this dish would be served with just a bit of chopped vegetables (and way more rice). For my recipe, I’ve got a lot of the good stuff, included the crumbled tofu - which, by the way, replaces scrambled egg - sometimes found in traditional Nasi Goreng. By the way, I have many similar recipes inspired by other travels and other countries and cuisines - including: Cambodian Fried Rice, Mexican Magic Rice, and Vegetable Fried Rice from my World, Mexico, and Sri Lanka vegan cookbooks. After you’ve tried my Nasi Goreng, check out the other recipes and decide which country’s classic fried rice is your favorite. Nasi Goreng traditional vegetable fried rice recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA available in English & German serves 2 to 3 /­­ time 40 min + - 3.5 oz (100 g) firm tofu - 1 cup (190 g) broken jasmine rice or short grain brown rice - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - 1 2/­­3 cup (400 ml) water - 1 cup (100 g) chinese cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli or bok choy finely chopped - 1 medium (90 g) carrot finely chopped or sliced - 2-3 Tbs oil - 1 tsp sesame oil optional - 3 (50 g) spring onions chopped, separated into white ends and greens - 1 or 2 cloves garlic finely chopped - 1 large red chili finely chopped optional - 1/­­2 in. (1 cm) fresh galangal or ginger finely chopped - 1 tsp coriander ground - 1/­­2 tsp black pepper ground - 2 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu) - 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice or 2 tsp rice vinegar - 1 tsp lime zest or lemon zest optional - 1 tsp sugar or agave syrup - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - lime slices for garnish - Cut tofu in slabs, wrap in clean kitchen towel. Weight with heavy cutting boards to press out excess moisture. Let sit 20 min. Unwrap tofu and crumble into a bowl. - Wash and drain rice thoroughly. - Bring water to boil in a small pot. Add rice and salt. Stir. Return to boil. Reduce heat to low and cover. Simmer 12 to 20 min as needed. After water is absorbed, remove from heat. Fluff rice with a fork. Cover and let sit and cool, ideally an hour or more. - Heat oil in a large wok or frying pan on medium high. Add chopped spring onion ends, garlic, chili (if using), galangal (or ginger), ground coriander, and black pepper. Fry, stirring constantly, until lightly browned, 2-3 min. - Add chopped carrots. Fry, stirring constantly, 2-3 min. Add crumbled tofu. Mix well. Fry, stirring regularly, until tofu begins to turn golden brown, 3-5 min. Add chopped cabbage (or other vegetables). Fry, stirring constantly, until vegetables start to soften, 4-5 min. - Whisk soy sauce, lime (or lemon) juice, zest, sugar (or agave syrup), and sea salt in a small bowl. - Add cooked rice to frying vegetables. Mix well. Add soy sauce mix and spring onions greens. Combine well. Fry, stirring constantly until liquid has been absorbed and rice and vegetables are moderately browned, 5-7 min. Remove from heat. Cover until ready to serve. - Serve with lime slices. vegan recipe for Nasi Goreng from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA The post Nasi Goreng appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Vegetable Roti

May 12 2016 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Vegetable Roti If you ever talk to anyone who’s been to Sri Lanka… and especially if you talk to someone from Sri Lanka, just mention Vegetable Roti and you’ll see their face light up. It’s practically impossible not to have tried them, and it’s even less likely to not love them! They are made and enjoyed pretty much everywhere in Sri Lanka, from North to South and East to West, coast to countryside to hill country. It’s also one of those classics, that despite their popularity, you just almost never find outside of the homeland. Unless you make them yourself… or have someone make them! Most of the few, good Sri Lankan and South Indian restaurants that I’ve found in Europe and North America don’t have stuffed roti quite like the original. One exception is in the delicious and awesome Tamil and Sri Lankan neighborhood in Paris, near the La Chapelle metro stop. That’s actually probably where I first had them, and got to try Sri Lankan food for the first time, many years ago. Since it’s so hard to find Vegetable Roti outside of Sri Lanka, and I (unfortunately) can’t just teleport myself to the island paradise whenever I want to, I was determined to make a convincing, authentic recipe. And when making my Sri Lanka vegan cookbook (with recipes inspired by the 10 weeks I spent exploring the island) there was no question about it. I knew I had to include a Veg Roti recipe! After watching roti being made at least 50 different times by street vendors and in restaurant kitchens, taking lots of notes, studying the technique, making my own recipe wasn’t that difficult. To be honest, making roti dough takes some practice and experimentation. It’s important to let it sit for at least an hour in a moderately warm place. And I always start with less water and very gradually add more. Learning how to get just the right texture and springiness for the dough is like with any bread-making. I refined this recipe over several weeks, had it tested by a dozen friends before publishing it in the cookbook, and continue to use it whenever I want to make vegetable roti: at home, for dinner parties, cooking classes, as a picnic snack, etc. Vegetable Roti are Sri Lankan “Short Eats” What’s a Short Eat? Simply put, snacks and appetizers and street food. There is a rich culture in the Sri Lankan tradition of grabbing a few snacks from the street vendors, hole-in-the-wall snack shops, neighborhood take-out bakery, and mobile bakery tuk-tuks. In addition to the classic roti, Short Eats also include all the many fried rolls, vada, baked snacks, bread and much more. Short Eats are typically enjoyed between meals or as a small meal - on the way to work, on the bus, on the train, at the office, wherever and kind of whenever. They’re everywhere and make a quick breakfast. Or small lunch. Or a mini-dinner, before - or even in place of - a big dinner. The bakery tuk-tuks drive around in the morning and evening - often with their trademark ice cream truck melodies playing funny variations of Für Elise. Yes, really. It’s awesome, and for the rest of your life you’ll start drooling when you hear Beethoven. Vegetable Roti stuffed with potatoes, carrots & leeks recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – SRI LANKA makes 4 to 6 /­­ time 45 min + roti dough: - 1 1/­­2 cups (200 g) flour (all-purpose /­­ type 550) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­2 cup (120 ml) water - 2 Tbs vegetable oil - Combine flour and salt in a large mixing bowl. Add water and 1 Tbs oil. Mix with fork and knead with hands until smooth and elastic, 3-5 min. If batter sticks to hands, knead in more flour. If too dry, add slightly more water. - Add another 1 Tbs oil and knead another 5 min. - Separate into 4 to 6 pieces. Knead and form into balls. Lightly coat balls with oil and place on plate, cover with plastic wrap. Allow to sit in a warm (not hot) place for 1 hour. vegetable filling: - 2/­­3 cup (80 g) leeks or spring onions or 1 medium onion finely chopped - 1 medium (80 g) carrot peeled, grated or finely chopped - 1 large (140 g) potato peeled, grated or finely chopped - 1 Tbs vegetable oil - 1/­­2 tsp black mustard seeds - 1/­­2 tsp coriander ground - 1/­­2 tsp black pepper ground - 1/­­2 tsp chili powder or paprika ground - 5-6 curry leaves and/­­or 1/­­2 tsp curry powder - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - 3-4 Tbs water (more as needed) - Heat oil in a large pot or pan on medium heat. Add mustard seeds. When they start to pop (20-30 sec), add ground coriander, black pepper, chili powder (or paprika), and curry leaves and/­­or curry powder. - Add leeks (or onions), grated carrot and potato, turmeric, salt. Cook partially covered, gradually adding water, stirring and mashing regularly, until vegetables are soft, 7-10 min. Remove from heat. - Uncover dough. Briefly knead a ball. On a greased surface, press flat and roll out or continually flip and stretch to form a long, wide strip. Wrapper should be almost 3 times as long as it is wide and about 1/­­8 in (3 mm) thick. Knead some oil into each dough ball if too firm and not stretching easily. - Spoon about 3 Tbs filling onto one end. Fold over repeatedly in triangles until sealed. Transfer to lightly greased plate and continue for others. - Heat a large, heavy frying pan on medium high heat. Place filled triangles on pan and press down lightly. Fry on both sides, until brown spots appear, 3-5 min each side. Arrange standing up on edges, pressing down lightly and leaning together to brown edges, 2-3 min each end. - Continue for all rotis. Serve with chili sauce, chutney, or eat plain. Making Sri Lanka Streetfood superstars: Vegetable Roti! homemade dough, spicy potato filling. I ate these almost every day during my 10 weeks in Sri Lanka. Recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke -- SRI LANKA #vegancookbook #srilanka #vegetableroti #streetfood #whatveganseat #lotusartichoke A video posted by Justin P. Moore (@lotusartichoke) on Sep 7, 2015 at 7:35am PDT The post Vegetable Roti appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Asparagus, Fennel & Spinach Soup + Topping!

April 22 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Asparagus, Fennel & Spinach Soup + Topping! In our house, soup is rarely served without some kind of topping. It’s almost like a yin and yang thing, we start talking about soup and the conversation directly leads on to toppings. I guess it’s a pretty natural thing since we eat a lot of soup and prefer it to be a more complete meal, instead of just a starter. The toppings does not only add a different texture and flavor to the soup, but also some more stomach filling proteins. To be honest, many times I think we spend more time working on the toppings then on the actual soup. It’s the same principle as we have with oatmeal toppings. Here are a few of our favorite soup + topping combinations from earlier blog posts: Sweet potato and red lentil soup with aubergine and kale topping, Carrot and tomato soup with corn ceviche topping, Spinach and kale soup with tahini dressed chickpea topping. We found a huge bunch of over-priced asparagus in the market the other day and for some reason decided that it was a good idea to spend our last money this month on asparagus instead of a new set of clothes for Isac. So we walked home and made soup. We went for a smooth and quite mildly flavored soup and allowed the toppings to have more punch in flavor and texture. We only chose green-ish ingredients for the topping. Yup, there we go again, choosing ingredients by color. But it actually turned out fantastic. It’s got a lot of crunch from the pumpkin seeds, flavor from parsley and the asparagus tips, richness from the lentils and sting from the chili. I ate the leftovers without the soup straight from the fridge. Now I”ve spent most of this post talking about the topping, but the soup is pretty good too. Quick, simple, delicious and with a clear taste of spring. If you don’t have any fennel at home, you could add a few potatoes instead, or other green spring vegetables. We also made a quick cashew cream to go with the soup. We often just add a few dollops yogurt into our soup but cashew cream is a nice and rich vegan alternative. If you just remember to pre-soak the cashew nuts, the cream is done in no-time. As a side note, I just tried adding some cashew cream on top of my latest smoothie and it wasn’t bad at all. So, go make your vegetable market guy happy and buy a bunch of asparagus. Make soup, whip up a cashew cream. And for goodness sake, don’t forget about the topping! Asparagus, Fennel & Spinach Soup Serves 4 We keep a jar of toasted pumpkin seeds in our kitchen and almost always have some cooked lentils ready in our fridge. It’s a good advice as it makes it a lot easier to create small quick meals. 1 pound /­­ 450 g green asparagus 2 tbsp coconut oil or butter 6 thin spring onions or 1 yellow onion 2 cloves garlic 1 small fennel bulb (or 1/­­2 large) 1 large handful spinach 2 cups water or vegetable stock 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar or lemon salt & black pepper Lentil & Pepita Topping The reserved raw tips from the asparagus 1 cup cooked puy lentils (1/­­2 cup uncooked, boiled in water for 18 minutes) 1/­­2 cup dry-toasted and salted pumpkin seeds /­­ pepitas 1 large bunch flat leaf parsley 1/­­2 green chili, finely chopped (optional) 1 tbsp olive oil Cashew Cream 1/­­2 cup cashew nuts 1/­­2 cup filtered water 1 tbsp lemon juice 1/­­2 tsp sea salt Trim the tough end off the asparagus. Cut in diagonal pieces, 1/­­2 inch /­­ 1 cm thick. Save the asparagus tips for the topping. Heat oil in a large saucepan. Finely chop onion, garlic and fennel and add to the the pan and sauté for about 5 minutes or until soft. Add the asparagus, stir around and let fry on low/­­medium heat for a minute, then add spinach, water/­­stock, apple cider vinegar, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and let simmer for 10 minutes. Meanwhile prepare the topping. Carefully pour the soup into a blender or use a hand blender to mix until smooth. Taste the soup, add more water or salt if needed. Preparing the topping: Finely chop the asparagus tips and the parsley and place in a bowl together with the boiled lentils and the toasted pumpkin seeds. Add chili if your prefer it a little spicy. Pour over some olive oil and stir around so it’s all mixed well. Preparing the cashew cream: Cover the cashew nuts in water and let soak for at least 3 hours. Drain and rinse and place in a blender. Add the filtered water, lemon juice and salt and mix until completely smooth. Taste and add more salt or lemon if needed.

Carrot Fritters

December 29 2014 Meatless Monday 

Sweet carrots and spring onions are seasoned with savory cumin, coriander and garlic in these tasty fritters. These carrot patties are delicious when served alongside a crunchy veggie salad for contrast. This recipe comes to us from Jennifer of Delicieux. Serves 4 - 6 large carrots, peeled and grated - 6 spring onions, finely chopped - 1 teaspoon ground cumin - 1 teaspoon ground coriander - 1/­­2 cup fresh cilantro - 1 garlic clove, minced - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­2 cup flour - 2 eggs, beaten - 2 tablespoons canola oil Cover a baking sheet with newspaper. Preheat an oven to 200 degrees and place the newspaper covered baking sheet into the oven. Place the grated carrots, chopped spring onions, ground cumin, ground coriander, cilantro, salt and minced garlic together in a large bowl. Mix to combine, taking care to ensure all ingredients are evenly combined. Add the beaten eggs and flour to the bowl and mix until just combined. Place the canola oil in a large frying pan over high heat. Add full tablespoons of the carrot spring onion mixture to the pan, flattening them with your spatula to create a disc shape. Cook on each side for about 2 minutes, or until golden. Transfer the cooked carrot fritters to the newspaper lined baking sheet in the oven so they stay warm while you make the remaining carrot fritters. Divide the carrot fritters into 4 servings and enjoy! The post Carrot Fritters appeared first on Meatless Monday.

No Noodle Pad Thai

September 21 2014 Golubka Kitchen 

No Noodle Pad Thai I’m so excited to talk about the new creation of our long-time (virtual) friends, David and Luise, the team behind Green Kitchen Stories. I’ve been anticipating their second cookbook, Green Kitchen Travels, with much enthusiasm after admiring their work for many years. Once it arrived at my doorstep, I didn’t put it down until I saw the whole thing, studying every stunning image many times over. The book is filled with vibrant vegetarian and vegan dishes, many of which I was tempted to make right away. What makes it special is that every recipe is inspired by the authors’ travels around the world, often based on authentic dishes with a fresh, veggie-based twist. The creative and easy-going GKS style is evident on every page. It was very tough for me to decide on a dish for this post. I was quite torn between the Crispy Aubergine Bites, Lentil and Strawberry Tacos, Sicilian Caponata, Vietnamese Pho, Vegan Moussaka, Indian Cardamom Laddu, Portuguese Sopa de Legumes and Lemongrass Brussels Sprout Curry. Finally, my never-ending love for Pad Thai took over, and this No Noodle Pad Thai recipe did not disappoint. The flavors here are warming, yet very fresh and crisp, with julienned daikon and carrots replacing noodles. Now I’m off to shop for ingredients for the Caponata, before it’s too late in the season for tomatoes and eggplants. The good news is that Green Kitchen Travels is available for pre-order right here! Thank you David and Luise for another beautiful cookbook. No Noodle Pad Thai 1 daikon radish or zucchini 4 medium carrots – peeled 4 cups mung bean sprouts 4 spring onions (scallions) – finely chopped (I used chives here) 1 package firm tofu – cut in cubes 1 handfull cilantro leaves (I used basil because I had beautiful basil on hand) 2 tablespoons black or tan sesame seeds – toasted, plus extra for garnish 4 slices of lime – to serve Sauce 1/­­2 cup (4 oz/­­125 g) peanut butter (I used almond butter) 4 tablespoons lime juice 2 tablespoons honey 2 tablespoons tamari or soy sauce 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger 1 pinch ground cayenne pepper 1. Create the noodles from the daikon and carrots using a julienne peeler, mandoline, spiralizer or potato peeler. Place the ‘noodles’  into a bowl, then add in the mung bean sprouts, onions, tofu, herbs and sesame seeds. Mix well. 2. Stir together all the sauce ingredients in a separate bowl, add more water if needed. Adjust the seasoning. 3. Pour the sauce over the vegetables and toss to combine thoroughly, using your hands. Garnish with more herbs, sesame seeds and a slice of lime. Note: If making ahead, store the salad and sauce refrigerated in two separate containers.

Dijon Grilled Asparagus & Onions

June 2 2014 Meatless Monday 

Spring onions are grilled with asparagus spears for a smoky sweet flavor as well as a stunning presentation. Sliced shallots, white wine vinegar and Dijon mustard provide a savory contrast to season these delectable vegetables. This recipe comes to us from Kristina of Formerchef.com. Serves 8 For the Dijon vinaigrette: - 1/­­2 shallot, thinly sliced - 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar - 3 tablespoons olive oil - 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard - salt and pepper, to taste For the grilled asparagus and onions: - 1 pound asparagus spears, trimmed - 1 pound spring onions*, halved lengthwise - 1 tablespoon olive oil *Spring onions are sweet onion bulbs attached to greens found in farmers markets and the produce section of grocery stores in Spring and Summer.   To make the Dijon vinaigrette: Whisk the sliced shallot, vinegar, olive oil and Dijon mustard together in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper to taste. To complete the Dijon Grilled Asparagus & Onions: Preheat a grill to medium-high. Toss the trimmed asparagus and halved onions in a large bowl with the tablespoon of olive oil, taking care to ensure all ingredients are evenly coated. Place the asparagus spears and spring onions onto the heated grill, taking care to place the green portion of the spring onions on a cooler part of the grill. Grill, rotating every 2 minutes or so for about 6 minutes, or until the asparagus are tender. Plate the asparagus and onions on a large platter. Drizzle with the Dijon Vinaigrette, divide into 8 portions and enjoy! The post Dijon Grilled Asparagus & Onions appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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