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Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus

April 7 2017 My New Roots 

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus The first job I landed after moving to Copenhagen, was working as a chef in a little cafe. After a few weeks of consistently not burning lasagna and under seasoning everything, I was asked if I was interested in cooking on a few episodes on a local, public TV station. The producers suggested I choose a few dishes that I love, and filmed me in a friends kitchen, since mine was too small. My husband gently warned me beforehand that Danes dont respond well to overly-enthusiastic, hyperbolic Americans, so I faked it and was awkwardly not myself as I spoke lukewarmly about whole grains and beans, fermented things and dark leafy greens. The first recipe I made on the show was sprouted hummus, and although the recipe turned out well, I felt like a fraud. Because above all things, sprouts were, and still are, my true love. The show was on at 2 or 3 in the morning, and because I didnt have a television, I never actually saw it on air. Instead, I watched it on my computer on a borrowed CD, long after it had been on TV. Much to my dismay, the producers titled the show Cooking with Sareh, which still baffles me considering the fact that my name is spelled the exact same way in Danish. The program was poorly edited, badly lit, awkward in every sense, and in my attempts to come off as cool and nonchalant, I seemed utterly bored as I fondled chickpea sprouts - something that otherwise would get me pretty riled up. On the whole, this experience was totally mortifying, except for one small, redeeming factor. I was suddenly being recognized at work in the café, and on the bike paths of Christiania: hey sprout girl! theyd call at me. Its you! I didnt make your hummus, but your show is great, sprout girl, theyd say. If there was any consolation, this was it. I was Sprout Girl. So in case you missed my break out performance on Cooking with Sareh, and my reined-in, lackluster pitch about sprouts, here it is again. Because I am Sprout Girl forever and always. Sprouting is like any other kitchen endeavour: it seems pretty daunting until you actually do it, then youre left wondering what took you so long to try – a real facepalm moment. With simple equipment that you most likely have in your cupboard, and seeds that you already have in your pantry, its a fun and empowering practice that brings you one step closer to your food. Sprouts are so nutritious because they are life potential, ignited. When we soak a seed, we end its dormancy, and awaken the nutrition inside it needed to grow a plant which will in turn make more seeds and more plants. When we eat a sprout, we eat this potential! Pound for pound, sprouts have the largest amount of nutrients of any food. Did you get that? This is a big deal! And its all because sprouting increases vitamin content significantly, especially vitamin A, Bs, C and E, along with boosting calcium, iron, selenium, and zinc. The quality of protein and carbohydrates improves, as the sprouting process begins to break down the complex proteins and starches into amino acids, peptides, and simple carbohydrates needed by the seed to grow. At the same time, anti-nutrients such as phytic acid, protease and amylase inhibitors are neutralized. This makes a sprout very easy to digest with highly absorbable nutrients. Who is responsible for this influx of awesomeness? Its enzymes! Enzymes are compounds found in raw plants that are needed for nearly every biochemical process that takes place in our body, and something many of our modern diets are lacking. Sprouts are virtually loaded with them. There are up to 100 times more enzymes in sprouts than uncooked fruits and veggies! Enzymes are also what sets living food apart from raw food. Yes, raw foods still offer us enzymes, but eating a food that is alive guantees more enzymes, and in fact more nutrients altogether. As soon as a food is picked, it begins losing its nutrients. Imagine how much vitamin C is left in that orange, which has traveled hundreds, if not thousands of kilometers to get to your plate, and spent weeks, if not months in a storage facility before being dropped off at your local grocer. Sprouts are the remedy to this, pulsating with life and life-giving nutrients, and pretty much the freshest food you can eat outside of a garden. Sprouts are also incredibly low in calories, yet deliciously filling due to their high fiber and water content. A fantastic food to binge on, especially if youre trying to elbow out some of the other stuff from your diet. I love the versatility of sprouts, not only are there so many varieties, but they can be used in so many ways. Like this hummus for example! You can also go classic and top your sandwiches with sprouts, or fold them into grain salads, puree them into soups and even smoothies. I also love freshening up cooked dishes, like stir-fries, curries and pizzas with sprouts. Their crunch and earthy brightness are a welcoming balance to heavier, richer meals. If youre on a budget, sprouts are a sweet deal. Because the amount of food you sprout triples or quadruples in size, youll end up with way more to eat than you started with for the same price. Its kind of magical. Whats more, is that properly stored sprouts can last over a month, and some varieties up to 70 days. If youre prone to tossing away spoiled produce, sprouts will save you money, big time. Sprouting can take place anywhere you have access to fresh, clean water twice a day. Ive sprouted on road trips, beach holidays, visiting the in-laws...all over the place! And the groovy thing about taking your show on the road is that you can convince other people to get sprouting too. And sprouts are not just great for our health, but also the planet. Consider the fact that youre growing a garden right in your kitchen, using your own energy to make the magic happen. Its hyper-local food at its best! No chemicals or pesticides during the growing process, or fossil fuels for transportation. Could sprouts be the perfect food?! The answer is yes. But I may be a little biased. I am the Sprout Girl, after all. If you are concerned about mold or bacteria contamination, please understand that commercially-grown sprouts are propagated in an ideal environment for pathogens to proliferate. Just one more reason to grow your own sprouts at home where you can be sure of proper hygiene and care. Make sure that your jar or sprouting container is thoroughly clean, that youre rinsing your sprouts with cool water twice daily, and that your sprouts have plenty of airflow. After I drain my sprouts, I make sure that the seeds /­­ sprouts arent blocking the entire opening of the jar (see photo). If you follow these tips, you shouldnt have any problems. Scoring Seeds You can sprout just about anything, but the cheapest and easiest things are found in the bulk bin of your health food store! Lentils, beans, chickpeas, rice, buckwheat, wheat are all widely available and inexpensive. Its imperative that you choose organically-grown ingredients, as conventionally grown seeds are often irradiated, making them difficult, or even impossible to germinate. You can also purchase seeds online, especially the more specialty ones, like alfalfa, radish, onion, broccoli etc. Finding Equipment There are plenty of sprouting apparatuses that you can buy, but if youre just starting out, use a jar! I bet you already have one. – 1 sterilized, large-mouth, quart-sized glass jar with an airtight lid – small piece of cheesecloth – rubber band – a bowl or dish rack How to Sprout There are countless resources on this topic online, and even whole books written about sprouting, so I am presenting you with a very simple, yet rather foolproof technique. If you want to learn more (which I encourage you to do!) here’s a great place to learn about different methods, applications, as well as help and advice: Sprout People     Print recipe     Simple Sprouting Day 1 1. Prep (night) Take a quick glance at the seeds as you put them into the sterilized soaking container. Remove any stones, cracked /­­ damaged seeds, and rinse well. 2. Soak (night) A general rule is covering the seeds with 2-3 times the amount of water (e.g. 1 cup seeds : 2-3 cups water). Use pure, filtered, unchlorinated water. Skim off any seeds that are floating. Let sit for 8-12 hours. Day 2 1. Drain (morning) Put a piece of cheesecloth over the mouth of the jar and secure it with a rubber band. Drain the seeds letting all the water run out. 2. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 3. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 3 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 4 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) 3. Enjoy (night) Your sprouts are ready! The tail should be at least the length of the seed itself (if it is not quite there yet, continue with the rinsing and draining process until it is. Some seeds take a couple more days). If youre not going to eat all the sprouts right away, make sure you let the sprouts drain for at least 8 hours after their last rinse before you put them in the fridge. Never store wet sprouts, as they will spoil quickly. Store sprouts in the sprouting jar with an airtight lid for one month, or more.     Print recipe     Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus Makes 4 cups Ingredients: 2 cloves garlic 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml tahini 1/­­2 tsp. fine salt, to taste 2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (optional) zest of 1 lemon 4 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 4 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 4 cups /­­ 500g sprouted chickpeas (start with 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 300g dried chickpeas) Directions: 1. Pulse the garlic in the food processor until minced. Add all other ingredients, except for the sprouted chickpea and blend until you have a paste. Add the chickpeas and blend on high until as smooth as possible. Season to taste and adjust more salt /­­ spice if desired. To achieve an even smoother consistency, scoop hummus into a high-speed blender and blend on high for an additional 10-15 seconds. Serve immediately and store leftovers in an airtight container for up to five days. I hope that this process seems simple enough for you to try. I promise that once you start sprouting, you won’t be able to stop! It’s so easy, fun, and connecting – not to mention delicious. Good luck and happy sprouting, dear friends! xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Copenhagen! I am thrilled to announce my first two cookbook events in CPH this Spring. The first will be an intimate talk and demonstration at SLOW Copenhagen, and the second will be a magical, celebratory dinner in collaboration with the local, organic grocer and kitchen, Kost. Click on the images for more info and tickets! Can’t wait to see you there.    The post It’s Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

VegKitchen’s Ashkenazic Passover Favorites

March 19 2015 VegKitchen 

VegKitchen’s Ashkenazic Passover FavoritesVegKitchen’s vegan Passover Seder recipes and menus (great for vegetarians too) focus on the fresh produce of early spring. Here’s a full menu for Ashkenazic (Eastern European)-style recipes, from matzo ball soup to dessert. If you want even more choices, go to our Vegan Passover Seder Recipes and Menus. That’s where you’ll find tips for putting together a plant-based Passover Plate, as well. First up, and central to the celebration, Spring Vegetable Soup with Vegan Matzo Balls. Passover Mock Chopped Liver (made with cashews and mushrooms) can be served on matzo along with the soup, or before the meal as an appetizer. Eastern European-style Haroset (sometimes spelled charoset) is a sweet condiment served as part of the Passover Seder served with matzo. Its made essentially of apples, walnuts, and wine. Spinach, Leek, and Potato Matzo Gratin is a casserole main dish that’s mild and flavorful. Other vegan main-dish options: Eggplant Matzo Mina (similar, but more Sephardic inspired) and Passover Quinoa Pilaf. Serve any of the main dish options with a colorful salad of spring veggies. You can wing it, of course, but if you’re looking for an idea, try this refreshing Orange and Cucumber Salad with Spring Greens. Consider adding another holiday favorite to the plate if you want a slightly sweet touch. Passover Carrot-Apple Pudding is a holiday favorite. Another option is Sautéed Carrots with Almonds, which is more Sephardic-inspired. You might be too full for dessert, but there’s always room for a light fruit finale like Apple and Pear Fruit Compote. Serve with store-bought or homemade Chocolate Matzo Brittle. Happy Passover, happy spring, and enjoy!

What Do I Do With … Matzo?

April 14 2014 Vegetarian Times 

What Do I Do With … Matzo?    April (and sometimes March) ushers in the Passover holiday in the Jewish tradition. In simple terms, this holiday is a spiritual remembrance of the Israelites flight from Egypt after 400 years of slavery. The Passover seder is the traditional meal shared with family and friends on the first two nights of the weeklong celebration, and while the meal contains six key components, the most important ritual food just might be matzo. Matzo (sometimes spelled matzoh or matzah) is a thin, cracker-like bread made simply from flour and water. Its a key Passover component because it represents the Jews hasty retreat from Egypt, which left no time for bread to rise. In some homes, theres a tradition of breaking the matzo in two and hiding one half for the children to hunt for. Other families skip the games and stick to eating, but creative cooks in households around the world have come up with new twists on the matzo tradition, like matzo latkes. Another intriguing recipe from the VT vaults is Dark Chocolate and Pistachio Matzo Bark, which features the humble bread enrobed in dark chocolate and sprinkled with nuts. Thats my kind of celebration. You can also use matzo meal and matzo ball mix as you would breadcrumbs and even as a binder in baked goods. For a lovely vegan matzo ball soup recipe, check out the tasty excerpt from Mayim Bialik’s new cookbook, Mayim’s Vegan Table, in the April/­­May 2014 issue of Vegetarian Times.   Do you have a favorite Matzo recipe for Passover? Is it sweet or savory? Tell us all about it!     —— Aurelia dAndreas passion for travel is deeply intertwined with her love of food. Whether in Perth, Prague, or Phnom Penh, she always gravitates toward local markets in search of edible treasures, and takes pleasure in re-creating tasty travel memories at home in her tiny Parisian kitchen.


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