soy sauce - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!










soy sauce vegetarian recipes

Roasted Chestnut Soup

December 25 2017 Meatless Monday 

Chestnuts are roasted sweet and balanced with apple cider vinegar and soy sauce in this simple soup. Red bell pepper slices and green onions top this winter warmer for a festive veggie crunch, making it perfect for your next holiday gathering. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings. Serves 4 - 1 1/­­2 pounds whole chestnuts - 1 tablespoons olive oil - 1 large red onion, diced - 4 cups low sodium vegetable broth - 1 cup lowfat Greek yogurt - 1 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce - 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar - a few dashes hot sauce - salt and pepper, to taste - 1 red bell pepper, sliced - 2 green onions, sliced Place the chestnuts in a bowl and cover with hot water. Soak for 1 hour. Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Make an X on the flat side of each chestnut and place them, onto a baking sheet, cut side up. Transfer the baking sheet to the oven, roast for about 30 minutes and set aside to cool. When chestnuts are cool enough to handle, scoop their flesh out with a spoon. Dice the chestnut flesh. Place the olive oil into a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add the onion and cook for about 4-6 minutes, or until softened. Add the vegetable broth, 4 cups of water and the diced flesh of the chestnuts. Bring to a boil and reduce the heat to medium-low. Simmer for 30-40 minutes, or until the bits of chestnuts are very soft. Remove the stockpot from heat and stir in the Greek yogurt, soy sauce, apple cider vinegar and hot sauce to taste. Transfer the chestnut veggie stock mixture to a blender in batches. Puree until smooth. Strain through a sieve and transfer to a medium bowl. Taste for seasoning and adjust if desired. Divide the soup into 4 bowls, top with festive red bell pepper and green onion slices and enjoy! The post Roasted Chestnut Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Spicy Bok Choy with Noodles and Peanuts

December 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

Wilted bok choy and peanuts fill a flavorful, savory broth alongside chewy noodles for a hearty one-dish meal. Look for fresh rice noodles in the pasta or Asian food section of most grocery stores. This recipe comes to us from Sharon Palmer, The Plant-Powered Dietitian. Serves 4 - 1 teaspoon sesame oil - 1 tablespoon peanut oil - 1 red onion, sliced - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 1 tablespoon peanut butter - 3 tablespoons soy ginger dressing - 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce - 2 tablespoons orange juice - red pepper flakes, to taste - 1 (12 ounces) package fresh rice noodles - 6 (6-ounce) heads baby bok choy - 1/­­4 cup peanuts Place the oils in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the onion and garlic and sauté for about 5 minutes, or until the vegetables soften and become fragrant. Add the peanut butter, dressing, soy sauce, orange juice, red pepper flakes and 1-1/­­2 cups water to the skillet. Stir until bubbly and smooth. Cover and cook while you prepare the noodles. Bring a medium pot of water to a boil over medium-high heat and cook the rice noodles according to package directions. Drain and rinse with water. Transfer the cooked noodles to the skillet and stir to combine. Add the bok choy and peanuts to the pan and let cook for 1 minute, or until the bok choy is slightly wilted. Enjoy! The post Spicy Bok Choy with Noodles and Peanuts appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Chilli Paneer (Indo-Chinese Dish)

November 3 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Chilli Paneer Chilli Paneer is a popular Indo-Chinese dish. Chilli Paneer makes a spicy flavorful starter especially for many of my friends who enjoy the spicy food. Chilli Paneer can also be served as a side dish. This is absolutely delicious and easy to make. - 6 oz paneer (cut into bite sized pieces) - 1 cup bell pepper (sliced, capsicum, Shimla mirch, I am using yellow and green bell pepper for color) For Batter - 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour (plain flour, maida) - 2 Tbsp corn starch or arrow root powder - 1/­­2 tsp salt For Sauce - 2 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable oil) - 1 Tbsp ginger (shredded, adrak) - 1 Tbsp green chili (chopped) - 1 tsp chili flakes - 2 Tbsp soy sauce - 1 Tbsp vinegar - 1 Tbsp tomato paste - 1-1/­­2 tsp corn starch or arrow root powder - 1/­­2 cup water -  I am using store bought paneer, texture is not very soft to give the paneer softer texture soak the paneer for at least 10 minutes in hot water with few drops of lemon juice. -  To make batter mix flour, corn starch, and salt in a bowl. Add the water slowly to make a smooth batter (batter should be consistency of pancake batter or dosa batter). -  Heat at least 1/­­2 inch of oil in a frying pan over medium high heat. Oil should be moderately hot. -  Dip the paneer into the batter, making sure it is completely covered by the batter. Then drop the paneer pieces slowly into oil in the frying pan. (do not overlap them) -  Fry the paneer in small batches. Fry them turning occasionally, until they are very light golden brown. Take them out over paper towel. -  Do same with bell pepper. -  For sauce heat the oil in sauce pan over medium heat; add ginger, and green chili stir for about one minutes. Add all the ingredients for sauce except corn starch, (soy sauce, vinegar, chili flakes, and tomato paste), Stir for 1 minutes. mix water and corn starch and add to the sauce. Cook for another two minutes, sauce should be thick consistency. Sauce gets thicker as it sits. -  Add paneer, and bell pepper into sauce and serve hot. The post Chilli Paneer (Indo-Chinese Dish) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Veggie Spring Rolls Fried Rice – 1 Pot 30 Mins

October 16 2017 Vegan Richa 

Veggie Spring Rolls Fried Rice – 1 Pot 30 Mins1 Pot, 30 Minute Veggie Spring Rolls Fried Rice! Fridge clean up fried rice with cabbage, carrots, bell pepper,  with rice or other cooked grains for a quick weeknight meal. Vegan Gluten-free Nut-free Recipe. Deep fried Veggie Spring Rolls deconstructed! and tossed into rice to make a 1 pot meal. All the veggie fun and no assembly or frying. Add some toasted wonton wrappers as garnish to this fridge clean up meal for a fun weeknight dinner! Veggies like thinly sliced cabbage, carrots and peppers are cooked lightly. Some soy sauce, ginger and garlic powder and black pepper adds flavor. You can use this veggie mixture to fill up spring roll or wonton wrappers and bake as well. Or fold in cooked rice or grains of choice to make veggie fried rice and serve as is or as a side with some sweet and sour or kung pao dishes. Delicious!  While you are here, do catch a feature about my second book on Huffington post here, talking about it on Main Street vegan here and a wonderful question answer session at VeganMofo here.  Get a copy here. Back to this 1 Pot simple meal! Continue reading: Veggie Spring Rolls Fried Rice – 1 Pot 30 MinsThe post Veggie Spring Rolls Fried Rice – 1 Pot 30 Mins appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Seitan Satays with Ginger-Peanut Sauce

August 15 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Seitan Satays with Ginger-Peanut SauceSeitan is sturdy enough to thread easily onto skewers to make these tasty Seitan Satays with Ginger-Peanut Sauce. Traditionally served as an appetizer, it can also be served as a main dish.   Seitan Satays with Ginger-Peanut Sauce - 1 pound seitan, cut into 1/­­4-inch slices - 1/­­2 cup water - 4 tablespoons soy sauce - 3 teaspoons natural sugar - 1 garlic clove, minced - 1 cup vegetable broth - 1/­­3 cup peanut butter - 2 teaspoons minced fresh ginger - 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice - 1/­­4 teaspoon cayenne - Orange slices - Thread the seitan slices onto bamboo or metal skewers, pushing down firmly. Blend the water, 3 tablespoons of the soy sauce, 2 teaspoons of the sugar, and the garlic in a shallow baking dish. Add the skewered seitan and marinate for an hour, turning once. - While the seitan is marinating, combine the broth, peanut butter, ginger, lime juice, remaining 1 tablespoon of soy sauce, remaining 1 teaspoon of sugar, and the cayenne in a blender or food processor, and blend until smooth. Transfer the mixture to a saucepan and simmer until thick enough to coat a spoon, stirring constantly, about 10 minutes. - Preheat the broiler or grill. Cook the satays until hot and browned, about 3 minutes per side. Arrange the satays on a platter and garnish with orange slices. Pour the sauce into individual dipping bowls to serve. From Hot Vegan by Robin Robertson. (C)2014 Robin Robertson. Used by permission from Andrews McMeel Publishing.   The post Seitan Satays with Ginger-Peanut Sauce appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Bánh M? Tostadas

July 11 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Bánh M? Tostadas East meets West in this tasty fusion combo. Tostada means toasted in Spanish and is the name of a Mexican dish in which a toasted tortilla is the base for other ingredients that top it. Bánh m? is a popular Vietnamese sandwich that features crisp pickled vegetables, fragrant cilantro, chiles, and zesty hoisin and sriracha sauces. In this iteration, bánh m? ingredients find themselves on toasted tortillas instead of in a baguette to make Bánh M? Tostadas. Corn tortillas are usually used for tostadas, although wheat tortillas may be used if you prefer. Bánh M? Tostadas - 1 large carrot, shredded - 1/­­2 English cucumber, peeled, seeded, and chopped - 2 cups finely shredded cabbage - 1 cup fresh cilantro leaves - 1 to 2 tablespoons chopped pickled jalape?o chiles ((optional)) - 1 teaspoon dark (toasted) sesame oil - 1 tablespoon neutral vegetable oil - 2 garlic cloves, minced - 1/­­4 cup minced scallions - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger - 1 (8-ounce) package baked tofu, cut into thin strips - 3 tablespoons soy sauce - 3 tablespoons hoisin sauce - 2 tablespoons rice vinegar - 1 to 2 teaspoons sriracha sauce - 1 teaspoon sugar Tostada shells: - 4 to 6 corn or flour tortillas - 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil Toppings: - In a large bowl, combine the carrot, cucumber, cabbage, cilantro, and jalape?os, if using. Drizzle on the sesame oil and toss gently to combine. Set aside. - Heat the vegetable oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic, scallions, and ginger and cook for 1 minute. Add the tofu and 1 tablespoon of the soy sauce and mix well to coat the tofu. Set aside to cool. - In a small bowl, combine the remaining 2 tablespoons soy sauce, the hoisin, vinegar, sriracha, and sugar, stirring well to blend. Tostada shells: - Preheat the oven to 400°F. Arrange the tortillas in a single layer on two baking sheets. Brush both sides of each tortilla with oil. Bake for 5 minutes on one side, then flip the tortillas over and bake for 2 to 3 minutes longer, until crispy. Watch carefully so they dont burn. To assemble: - Evenly divide the tofu among the tostada shells. Top each with some of the vegetable mixture, then the sauce. Serve immediately. Excerpted from 100 BEST VEGAN RECIPES, (C) 2016 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by Lucy Schaeffer. The post Bánh M? Tostadas appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Ginger Roasted Leeks & Asparagus

June 12 2017 Meatless Monday 

Leeks are sliced paper thin and marinated with lemon juice, soy sauce and freshly grated ginger. Roasted asparagus makes the perfect canvas for the salty sour leeks in a side dish which celebrates springs bounty. This recipe comes to us from JL goes Vegan. Serves 4 - 1 bunch asparagus - 1 leek - juice of 1/­­2 a lemon - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 tablespoon coconut aminos* - or - 1 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce - 1 teaspoon ginger, grated *Coconut aminos is a soy sauce substitute with 65% less sodium. Found in health food stores. Low sodium soy sauce can be substituted if coconut aminos are unavailable. Snap the bottom ends off of each asparagus spear. Slice the leek in slices as thin as possible with a madoline or a knife. Rinse the leek slices thoroughly. Toss the asparagus and thinly sliced leeks in a shallow dish with the lemon juice, olive oil, grated ginger and the coconut aminos or soy sauce. Let marinate for 20 minutes. Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Roast the asparagus and leeks in their marinade for 8-10 minutes, or until the asparagus is cooked to preference. Divide into 4 portions and enjoy on the side. The post Ginger Roasted Leeks & Asparagus appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Fried Brown Rice with Vegetables

May 22 2017 Meatless Monday 

Fried rice gets a bad reputation for being to greasy, carb-y and lacking in veggies, but when you make your own quick version at home, it can become a healthy, veggie-loaded meatless meal! This recipe was developed by Alexandra Shytsman of The New Baguette and is featured in her free Weeknight Cooking E-book. Serves 4-6 - 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon coconut oil OR cold-pressed organic canola oil - 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil - 2 medium garlic cloves, minced - 1 tablespoon minced ginger - Pinch of hot red pepper flakes - 1 medium yellow onion, cut into small dice - 1 large carrot, peeled and cut into small dice - 1 bell pepper, cut into small dice - 1 cup frozen edamame OR peas - 3 cups cooked brown rice, cold from the fridge* - 3 tablespoons soy sauce, divided - 1 egg - 2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds - 2 scallions, chopped Heat coconut and sesame oils in a wok or large non-stick skillet over high heat. Add garlic, ginger and pepper flakes, and cook for 1 minute. Add onion, carrot and pepper and cook until vegetables are just starting to brown, about 3 minutes, tossing occasionally. Mix in edamame or peas and cook for another minute. Add rice and stir to incorporate evenly. Cook until rice is heated through and starting to brown, 2-3 minutes, stirring occasionally. In a small bowl, beat the egg with 1 tablespoon soy sauce. Push the rice mixture to one side of the skillet and pour beaten egg onto opposite side. Stir the egg continuously until it is scrambled. Season rice mixture with remaining 2 tablespoons soy sauce, and toss everything in the skillet together to combine evenly. Garnish with sesame seeds and scallions. *To cook perfectly fluffy brown rice, bring 2 cups of water to a boil in a small pot, and season with 1/­­4 teaspoon salt. Turn heat down to low, add 1 cup of rice, cover tightly with a lid, and simmer until all water is absorbed, 15-20 minutes – do not stir rice while cooking. Turn heat off and let rice stand covered for another 10 minutes to steam. Fluff with a fork before serving/­­using. The post Fried Brown Rice with Vegetables appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Nasi Goreng

March 23 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Nasi Goreng I couldn’t even tell you how many times I had Nasi Goreng while I was in Malaysia. It was definitely often. Like, really often. Not only is this traditional vegetable fried rice dish usually totally delicious, it’s also usually easy to find and (with little to no effort) a great vegan option. Pretty much everywhere I went in the five weeks in Malaysia, this dish was on the menu or easy to order at almost any restaurant. Especially out of the big cities and in the countryside - and particularly on the islands and beaches - this is a vegan/­­vegetarian stand-by that is never hard to find. (By the way, based on my travels, this is true for most of Southeast Asia, including Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar… but the dish is found under other names and with local flavors.) This becomes an almost daily meal, if vegan options are limited. On Pulau Pangkor, there were two food places (more shacks than restaurants) that served fantastic Nasi Goreng and vegetable fried rice. And in Borneo, staying in the Permai rainforest, the local restaurant and the nearby food court had vegetable fried rice, or Nasi Goreng. There were also many breakfast or lunch buffets at hotels and restaurants that had rice dishes like this. Contrarily, when in Penang and Kuala Lumpur I was usually so blown away by other vegan choices that I didn’t eat Nasi Goreng as often. Nasi Goreng’s flavors and textures forge powerful memories for anyone who’s been to Malaysia or Indonesia - or even just a Malaysian or Indonesian restaurant - whether vegan, vegetarian, or neither. Just as with so many classic recipes - from region to region and family to family this dish is made a million different ways. This is mine… inspired by so many excellent meals on my adventures. When I created this recipe for the Malaysia cookbook, I made sure to hit all the best, unique flavors in a good Nasi Goreng: Fresh galangal root (or ginger), lime juice, spicy chili, and a thin, tangy sauce provided by the mix of Shoyu soy sauce, vinegar, and citrus zest. I also round out the savory flavors with some sweetness. Traditionally in Malaysia, this dish would be served with just a bit of chopped vegetables (and way more rice). For my recipe, I’ve got a lot of the good stuff, included the crumbled tofu - which, by the way, replaces scrambled egg - sometimes found in traditional Nasi Goreng. By the way, I have many similar recipes inspired by other travels and other countries and cuisines - including: Cambodian Fried Rice, Mexican Magic Rice, and Vegetable Fried Rice from my World, Mexico, and Sri Lanka vegan cookbooks. After you’ve tried my Nasi Goreng, check out the other recipes and decide which country’s classic fried rice is your favorite. Nasi Goreng traditional vegetable fried rice recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA available in English & German serves 2 to 3 /­­ time 40 min + - 3.5 oz (100 g) firm tofu - 1 cup (190 g) broken jasmine rice or short grain brown rice - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - 1 2/­­3 cup (400 ml) water - 1 cup (100 g) chinese cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli or bok choy finely chopped - 1 medium (90 g) carrot finely chopped or sliced - 2-3 Tbs oil - 1 tsp sesame oil optional - 3 (50 g) spring onions chopped, separated into white ends and greens - 1 or 2 cloves garlic finely chopped - 1 large red chili finely chopped optional - 1/­­2 in. (1 cm) fresh galangal or ginger finely chopped - 1 tsp coriander ground - 1/­­2 tsp black pepper ground - 2 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu) - 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice or 2 tsp rice vinegar - 1 tsp lime zest or lemon zest optional - 1 tsp sugar or agave syrup - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - lime slices for garnish - Cut tofu in slabs, wrap in clean kitchen towel. Weight with heavy cutting boards to press out excess moisture. Let sit 20 min. Unwrap tofu and crumble into a bowl. - Wash and drain rice thoroughly. - Bring water to boil in a small pot. Add rice and salt. Stir. Return to boil. Reduce heat to low and cover. Simmer 12 to 20 min as needed. After water is absorbed, remove from heat. Fluff rice with a fork. Cover and let sit and cool, ideally an hour or more. - Heat oil in a large wok or frying pan on medium high. Add chopped spring onion ends, garlic, chili (if using), galangal (or ginger), ground coriander, and black pepper. Fry, stirring constantly, until lightly browned, 2-3 min. - Add chopped carrots. Fry, stirring constantly, 2-3 min. Add crumbled tofu. Mix well. Fry, stirring regularly, until tofu begins to turn golden brown, 3-5 min. Add chopped cabbage (or other vegetables). Fry, stirring constantly, until vegetables start to soften, 4-5 min. - Whisk soy sauce, lime (or lemon) juice, zest, sugar (or agave syrup), and sea salt in a small bowl. - Add cooked rice to frying vegetables. Mix well. Add soy sauce mix and spring onions greens. Combine well. Fry, stirring constantly until liquid has been absorbed and rice and vegetables are moderately browned, 5-7 min. Remove from heat. Cover until ready to serve. - Serve with lime slices. vegan recipe for Nasi Goreng from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA The post Nasi Goreng appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Penang Laksa

March 13 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Penang Laksa Incredibly, I’d been in Malaysia for almost two weeks before I got to try Laksa, the legendary noodle soup. Even before the trip, I’d read about the intensely loved, powerful and fiery, somewhat-sour soup in food blogs and food guides to Malaysia. I’d checked out plenty of recipes and seen lots of super tasty photos. Once I got to Malaysia, whenever I asked locals what dishes I had to try, I heard again and again: Laksa! Okay, great, but where? And the answer was: Penang! Penang was hands-down my favorite place to eat on the Malaysia trip. (Singapore was a fairly close second. Penang was just more artsy, soulful, and real). I collected maps with locations of the best street food in Georgetown (Penang) and scoured the web and my travel guides for addresses of must-try vegetarian restaurants. On my second day in town, I had lunch at the vegan restaurant Sushi Kitchen, and met the chef/­­owner, who made a list for me of Must-See places and dishes. That night I went to Luk Yea Yan, a vegetarian Chinese restaurant known for fantastic flavors and inexpensive eats. I ordered up the Laksa soup. Three minutes later my oversized bowl of hot, steaming, bright red soup arrived - with countless ingredients and toppings piled up to the rim. There were at least three kinds of noodles, tofu cubes, soya and seitan chunks, numerous vegetables, about four kinds of fresh herbs - and balanced on top: a soup spoon with a thick, red curry paste on it. I’d read about this… Traditionally Laksa is usually served with a generous spoonful of rempeh - spicy red curry paste for you to stir in to the hot red broth yourself. I knew what to do. I did it. A half dozen flavors immediately exploded in my mouth: tamarind, chili, lime, pineapple, cilantro, mint. This was followed by a second wave of flavors: an army of vegetables, tofu, and seitan slices. I slurped down the noodles and paddled pieces of everything with my chopsticks into my hungry jaws. I had to take a break a few times to catch my breath and cool the spice alarm with generous draws on my lemon iced tea. When I was done, my forehead was light with perspiration and my lips and tongue were tingling and alive. There was never a doubt whatsoever that I would include a vegan recipe for Penang Laksa in my new Malaysia cookbook. Several weeks later (after having tried vegan Laksa soup at least three other times in Malaysia) I was back in my kitchen in Germany and set to work. It took a few attempts to master the recipe, each try better than the last. And then I had it: my own epic Laksa recipe! Since then, I’ve made it probably ten more times, including for several dinner parties large and small, and plenty of times for lunch. It’s best on cold, cloudy days to fire up your mood and open you up! But I’ve also made it lots of other times, even in the summer, well… just because it’s so awesome and is always a dish guests talk about long after the meal. Penang Laksa classic Malaysian noodle soup recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA serves 2 to 3 /­­ time 45 min - 5 oz (150 g) seitan sliced - 3.5 oz (100 g) smoked tofu sliced - 1/­­3 cup (45 g) pineapple chopped - 1 Tbs vegetable oil  - 1 Tbs soy sauce or Vegan Fish Sauce - 7 oz (200 g) udon noodles (cooked) - 2 1/­­2 cups (600 ml) water  - 2/­­3 cup (150 ml) coconut milk  - 1 kefir lime leaf or 1 tsp lime zest  - fresh mint leaves chopped - fresh coriander leaves chopped - fresh thai basil leaves chopped - bean sprouts for garnish laksa spice paste: - 4 candlenuts or 2 Tbs cashews soaked 20 min in hot water, drained - 1 stalk lemongrass chopped - 1/­­2-1 large red chili chopped - 2 cloves garlic chopped - 1 shallot chopped - 3/­­4 in (2 cm) fresh galangal or ginger chopped - 1/­­2 tsp paprika ground (more as desired, for red color) - 1/­­2 tsp fennel seed ground - 1/­­2 tsp coriander ground - 2 tsp coconut sugar or agave syrup  - 3/­­4 tsp sea salt  - 1 tsp tamarind paste (seedless) - 2 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice  - 2 Tbs vegetable oil  - If using dried Udon: Cook, rinse, and drain 3.5 oz (100 g) noodles according to package instructions. - Blend spice paste ingredients in a small food processor until smooth. - Heat 1 Tbs oil a large pot or wok on medium high heat. Add sliced seitan and smoked tofu. Fry, turning regularly until edges are browned and crispy, 3-5 min. - Stir in chopped pineapple. Continue to stir-fry, 2-3 min. Add soy sauce (or Vegan Fish Sauce). Fry 2-3 min. Transfer to a plate or bowl. - Return pot or wok to medium high heat. Fry blended spice paste until it darkens and oil starts to separate, stirring constantly, 3-5 min. - Gradually stir in water, coconut milk and kefir lime leaf (or lime zest). Bring to simmer. Add cooked udon noodles. Return to simmer. Cook until noodles have slightly softened, 3-5 min. - Stir in fried seitan, tofu, and pineapple. Turn off heat. Cover until ready to serve. - Portion soup and noodles into bowls. Garnish with chopped herbs and bean sprouts. Serve. Panang Laksa vegan recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA (available as printed cookbook & ebook - in English & German) The post Penang Laksa appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Noodles with Peanut Sauce

March 6 2017 Meatless Monday 

In just 15 minutes, you can have a nourishing vegan meal on the table that is flavorful and packed with veggies. This recipe comes to us from Kristie Middleton and appears in her new book MeatLess: Transform the Way You Eat and Live - One Meal at a Time. Serves 4-6 - 1 cup crunchy peanut butter - 4 tablespoons soy sauce or tamari - 2 teaspoons agave or other sweetener - 1 teaspoon hot pepper sauce like Sriracha, or more or less to taste - 2 cloves garlic - 1 to 1-1/­­2 cups water - 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil - 4 carrots, chopped into coins - 2 cups broccoli florets - 2 cups frozen edamame - Crushed peanuts or sesame seeds to garnish, optional - 1 16-ounce package of your favorite noodles, cooked according to package - instructions (spaghetti, angel hair, soba, and udon all work well) Add all sauce ingredients to a blender or food processor, or use an immersion blender to combine well. If you like a thick sauce, use less water. Set aside. Steam carrots, broccoli, and edamame for 4 minutes or until the broccoli is bright green. Toss the vegetables with the noodles and pour the peanut sauce over it. Serve sprinkled with crushed peanuts or sesame seeds. The post Noodles with Peanut Sauce appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Garlicky Korean Mac and Cheese with Gochujang

February 18 2017 Vegan Richa 

Garlicky Korean Mac and Cheese with GochujangSpicy Garlicky Korean Mac and Cheese with Gochujang. Use sriracha for variation. Vegan Recipe. Gluten-free with gluten-free pasta  There can’t be too many mac and cheese recipes right. This version has some gochujang (Korean condiment that is spicy, fermented and pungent). Gochujang makes an amazing glaze for tofu.  It also makes a great addition to a creamy sharp flavored mac and cheese. Add as much gochujang as you like, or use Asian Chile Sauce or Sriracha instead. Serve this mac with roasted veggies that are glazed in gochujang + soy sauce+ sugar or over some broccoli or with a lentil loaf with a sriracha maple glaze. I like this with a sprinkle of vegan parm and generous black pepper. A toasty breadcrumb topping with a mix of toasted bread crumbs, a clove of garlic minced and herbs of choice, works amazing as well.  Continue reading: Garlicky Korean Mac and Cheese with GochujangThe post Garlicky Korean Mac and Cheese with Gochujang appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Porcini Risotto with Beetroot Balls

December 22 2016 Veganpassion 

Porcini Risotto with Beetroot Balls We're always splitting up the preperation for our christmas dinner. I'm sending the menu ideas to my family first and everyone decides what they would like to eat and what they could imagine to prepare. Mostly it ends with the men sitting on the couch and the women cooking a wunderful menu. But we're working on that. At least they have the will to do something and after the dinner all plates are empty *proud* As an entree for this years phony menu I have chosen a porcini risotto. It's very easy to make alongside. You can draft one of the men to help you stir while you can organize the rest of your menu. With oven baked carrots, beetroot balls and a wonderful sauce your christmas dinner is going to be amazing. Have lots of fun with cooking! Makes 4 portions. For the porcini risotto: 1 onion 2 tbsp. olive oil 300 g risotto rice 2 tbsp. dried porcini or 250 g fresh porcini 1,2 l vegetable broth salt, pepper, nutmeg 1 tbsp. yeast flakes 1 tbsp. almond butter Cut the onion into cubes and sweat them in olive oil, then add risotto rice. Add mushrooms and 200 ml vegetable broth and let it cook while stiring. Flavour it. As soon as the rice absorbed the vegetable broth add some more liquid until the rice is covered. Stiring makes the rice creamy so don't waste your arm power. After 30-40 minutes when all the liquid is gone an the rice is done, add yeast flakes and almond butter. Taste everything. For the beetroot balls: 250 g fresh beetroot 200 g tofu 2-3 tbsp. olive oil 1 onion 2 tbsp. soy curd 3 tbsp. breadcrumbs, whole spelt salt, pepper, nutmeg, sage 1 tbsp. yeast flakes olive oil for the taste Grate beetroot. Crumble tofu and roast it in a pan with lots of olive oil. Cut onions into cubes and add them to the pan. Roast the mixture until it gets brown. Then flavour it and add beetroot. Roast everything a little bit unil the flavours evolve. In a mixing bowl mix together the beetroot mixture, soy curd, breadcrumbs and yeast flakes. Form the mixture into 12 balls and bake them in the pan with some olive oil. For the oven baked carrots: 500 g multicolored carrots 3 tbsp. olive oil 2 tbsp. maple sirup salt, pepper Quater the carrots lengthways and put it on a baking sheet with baking paper. Sprinkle with olive oil and maple sirup. Roast them in the oven at 190°C (374°F) upper-/­­lower heat 15-20 minutes. For the gourmet sauce: 1 big onion 1 carrot 2-3 tbsp. olive oil 2 tbsp. tomato paste salt, pepper, nutmeg, paprika 1 tbsp. starch 1 tbsp. soy sauce 500 ml vegetable broth Cut onion and carrot into very fine cubes. Sweat in olive oil until they get brown and aromatic. Then add tomate paste and let it caramelize a little bit. Flavour it. Stir in the starch and the soy sauce and mix until everything is smooth. Add more and more vegetable sauce and let it boil down. Serve risotto with dark sauce, oven baked carrots and beetroot balls. Feast until santa comes.

Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower

November 2 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower This post was created in partnership with San-J. Happy November! It’s so hard to believe that the year is almost over. November in the U.S. means Thanksgiving, and for the rest of the world, those December and January holidays are not so far off as well. We are here to give you some ideas to consider for those festive family dinners, friendsgivings and potlucks, with an emphasis on vegetables, fruit and whole food ingredients. The holidays can be a little tough if you are trying to stay on track with eating well or even simply keeping away from meat/­­dairy/­­gluten. If you aren’t participating in one or more of those categories, chances are, you might feel excluded at a holiday table. And even if you are totally fine with eating those veg-centered sides only, others might find it offensive or feel as though they are not being good hosts, etc. The point is, there is usually a main event to a holiday table, and although to me it’s always been the pie, to most it’s the bird, or another grand platter of some sort of meat. There is a ceremony to getting that platter on the table – it takes time and care to pick out and prepare, which creates anticipation and excitement. Here, I applied that kind of thinking to cauliflower, a whole cauliflower, prepared in a way that feels ritualistic, celebratory and fun, and delicious enough to be a holiday table centerpiece. This cauliflower is slowly stewed whole in a rich, tomato-based sauce with greens, carrots, onions, mushrooms, spices and autumn herbs. Tamari, balsamic and prunes help create body, depth and complexity in flavor. In the end, the cauliflower comes out incredibly tender and cuts like butter – ‘carving’ it is quite a pleasure. It’s incredibly good served over anything starchy, which should be easy since many holiday tables will likely include some sort of potato/­­root mash in their setting. The cauliflower is pictured here served with a delicious celeriac and parsnip mash with crispy sage, which makes for a perfect accompaniment. We will be posting the recipe for the mash this coming weekend, so make sure to stop by for that, it’s a real winner. Tamari, the gluten free soy sauce, is such a staple ingredient in my kitchen, that I feel at a loss whenever I run out. It’s a basic requirement in many Japanese and Asian-inspired dishes, but I use it in all kinds of meals, way beyond Japanese. It’s an essential flavor builder in this cauliflower, for example. I find tamari to be especially great for vegan and vegetarian cooking – it helps immensely with developing flavor depth and complexity when added to vegetables, and of course, it’s an amazing addition to sauces. When it comes to tamari brands, San-J is a classic that’s been around for eight generations, and the brand you will likely see when you search for gluten-free soy sauce in your store. The difference between San-J tamari and regular soy sauce is that tamari contains no wheat, just organic fermented soybeans, while soy sauce usually has 40%-60% wheat. The higher concentration of soybeans in tamari also contributes to its richer flavor and smoother texture. San-J tamari contains no artificial preservatives or additives, the soybeans are non-GMO, and are brewed for up to six months according to traditional Japanese techniques. It really is the best, and I’m so happy to have partnered with San-J on this festive recipe. Enjoy :) Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower   Print Serves: 1 cauliflower head Ingredients 5 prunes - roughly chopped 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - sliced 2 medium carrots - diced about 6 cups roughly chopped collard greens about 3 tablespoons tamari - divided 1 lb crimini mushrooms - quartered 5 garlic cloves - sliced 1 chili pepper - seeded and chopped 3-4 sprigs thyme - chopped about 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary handful sage leaves - chopped freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon tomato paste two 28 oz boxes/­­cans of crushed tomatoes 1 large cauliflower head - outer leaves trimmed Instructions Drizzle prunes with balsamic vinegar in a small bowl and set aside. Warm coconut oil in a large pot over medium high heat. Add onion, carrots, collard greens and a splash of tamari and sauté for 10 minutes, until onion is translucent and collard greens are wilted. Add mushrooms and sauté for about 8 minutes, until all their liquid is evaporated. Add garlic, chili, thyme, rosemary, sage and black pepper and saute for 2-3 minutes. Add prunes together with balsamic vinegar, followed by 2 tablespoons tamari and tomato paste and stir around until the liquid evaporates, about 1 minute. Add crushed tomatoes, stir to combine and bring to a near boil. Carefully drop cauliflower into the sauce and spoon plenty of sauce on top of the cauliflower to coat it completely. Stir some of the vegetables out from under the cauliflower to ensure that its covered with the sauce as much as possible. The top of the cauliflower may peek out a little and thats ok. Bring the sauce back to a boil, adjust the heat to a slow simmer, cover and cook for 40-50 minutes, until the cauliflower is completely cooked and soft throughout. Scoop the simmering sauce over the cauliflower every now and then while its cooking. Remove the cauliflower from the pot, slice and serve it warm with plenty of sauce, over vegetable mash or any grains of choice. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Black Bean Chocolate and Fig Cookies Banana Toffee Tart Butternut Squash Spaghetti with Creamy Almond Butter Sauce Lemongrass Mango Curry with Toasted Pumpkin Seeds .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Rice Paper Rolls

September 18 2017 Meatless Monday 

These Vietnamese treats are filled with vermicelli, Chinese cabbage and bean sprouts and seasoned with lime, mint, chili and cilantro. A shallot miso dipping sauce provides the perfect balance to these light rice paper rolls with unexpectedly intense flavors. This recipe comes to us from Trudy of veggie.num.num. Serves 6 For the dipping sauce: - 1 tablespoon water - 2 tablespoons sweet chilli sauce** - 1 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce** -  1/­­2 shallot, finely diced -  1/­­2 tablespoon fresh mint, finely chopped -  1/­­2 tablespoon cilantro, finely chopped - 1 teaspoon miso paste** To complete the rice paper rolls: - 4 ounces vermicelli, cooked according to instructions - 1 cup Chinese cabbage, shredded -  1/­­2 cup bean sprouts - 1 bell pepper, thinly sliced -  1/­­2 cup fresh mint leaves, finely chopped -  1/­­2 cup cilantro, finely chopped - 1 fresh red chili - Juice of 1 lime - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce** - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons sweet chili sauce** - 15-20 rice paper sheets** *Found in Asian markets or the ethnic food or sauce sections of most grocery stores. To make the dipping sauce: In a medium bowl whisk together the water, chili sauce and soy sauce. Whisk in the shallot, mint, cilantro and miso paste until thoroughly combined. To complete the rice paper rolls: After the vermicelli noodles are cooked, drain and rinse well. Roughly chop the cooked noodles. In a large bowl combine the chopped noodles, cabbage, sprouts, bell pepper, mint, cilantro and chili. Dress the veggie filling with the lime juice, soy sauce and sweet chili sauce. Toss until well mixed. Soak one individual rice paper sheet in a large bowl of water for 15-30 seconds, or until just soft. Pat dry on a clean towel. Place 2 tablespoons of filling inside the soaked rice paper roll. Fold in the edges and then roll them up firmly. The edges should seal neatly when pressed together with your fingers. Repeat the rice paper roll soaking and filling process individually until all the rice paper sheets are used up. Serve the rice paper rolls with dipping sauce on the side. The post Rice Paper Rolls appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegetable Hakka Noodles – 1 Pot Indo Chinese Noodles

July 12 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegetable Hakka Noodles – 1 Pot Indo Chinese NoodlesEasy 1 Pot Vegetable Hakka Noodles. Indo Chinese Hakka Noodles with peppers, onions, cabbage, carrots and a simple sauce. Vegan Nutfree Recipe. Can be gluten-free.  Indo Chinese food is a big category of its own in Indian cuisine. There are several dishes that make up the cuisine. The dishes are known for being heavily influenced by chinese dishes and then they are amped up with things like garlic, ginger, green chile, spices and more. These Hakka Noodles are a staple side that goes well with any of the Indo Chinese veggie mains like Manchurian(book 1), or a Chilli Tofu paneer.  To make this into a meal, add some baked tofu or some vegan meat subs marinated in soy sauce + minced ginger+ garlic. I like to make these with peppers, onion, cabbage and any other veggies that I have, and some greens. These noodles are super easy, 1 Pot, peppery and a great light weeknight meal. Continue reading: Vegetable Hakka Noodles – 1 Pot Indo Chinese NoodlesThe post Vegetable Hakka Noodles – 1 Pot Indo Chinese Noodles appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Pulled Jackfruit BBQ Sandwiches

July 3 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Pulled Jackfruit BBQ Sandwiches Not only does jackfruit lend itself well to shredding for that pulled effect, but its also great at soaking up the zesty barbecue sauce, making it an ideal candidate for these hearty sandwiches. Look for canned water-packed jackfruit in Asian markets or well-stocked supermarkets (be sure not to get the kind packed in syrup). If jackfruit is unavailable, substitute your choice of chopped seitan, steamed crumbled tempeh, or chopped or shredded mushrooms (portobellos or oyster mushrooms are especially good here). Pulled Jackfruit BBQ Sandwiches - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 yellow onion, minced - 1 (16-ounce) can water-packed jackfruit, drained and shredded or thinly sliced - 1 tablespoon tamari soy sauce -  1/­­4 teaspoon smoked paprika - Salt and ground black pepper - 1 1/­­2 cups barbecue sauce, store-bought or homemade (recipe follows) - 4 sandwich rolls, split and toasted - Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the jackfruit and cook until softened, about 10 minutes. Stir in the soy sauce and season with the paprika and salt and pepper to taste. Add as much of the barbecue sauce as desired, stirring to mix well. Use a fork (or two) to break up the jackfruit. If hard pieces remain, remove them to a cutting board and finely chop, then return them to the skillet. Cook for about 10 minutes to heat through and blend the flavors. Pile the jackfruit mixture onto the toasted sandwich rolls. Serve hot. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.   Barbecue Sauce - 1 tablespoon grapeseed or sunflower oil - 1 yellow onion, minced - 3 garlic cloves, minced - 1 (28-ounce) can tomato sauce or puree - 1 canned chipotle chile in adobo sauce, minced - 1/­­2 cup pure maple syrup or dark brown sugar - 1/­­4 cup water - 1/­­4 cup cider vinegar - 1/­­4 cup tamari - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground black pepper - 1/­­2 teaspoon liquid smoke - Heat the oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook for 5 minutes, until the vegetables soften. Add the tomato sauce, chipotle, maple syrup, water, vinegar, tamari, salt, and pepper, stirring to mix well. Simmer for 20 minutes, or until the sauce reduces to the desired consistency. Near the end of the cooking time, stir in the liquid smoke, then taste and adjust the seasonings, adding more salt, maple syrup, or vinegar if needed to balance the flavors. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. The post Pulled Jackfruit BBQ Sandwiches appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Grilled Mushroom Caesar Salad

May 30 2017 Vegan Dad 

Grilled Mushroom Caesar Salad This is a recipe I developed over two years ago that never saw the light of day. With BBQ season now upon us I thought would dust it off. There is perhaps nothing I love more that a marinated, grilled oyster mushroom. And certainly e veryone will think youre a fun guy when you make this traditional side salad as the main meal--all done on the barbecue! INGREDIENTS Dressing: ?      1/­­2 cup (125 mL) soy milk (more as needed) ?      1/­­2 cup (125 mL) vegan mayonnaise ?      2 tsp (10 mL) freshly squeezed lemon juice ?      2 small cloves garlic, minced ?      1 tbsp minced capers ?      1/­­2 tsp each light soy sauce, brown sugar ?      1/­­4 tsp each apple cider vinegar, mustard powder, onion powder ?      1 tsp miso ?      pinch ground ginger ?      salt and pepper to taste Salad: ?      2 small hearts of romaine lettuce ?      1/­­4 cup (60 mL) freshly squeezed lemon juice ?      2 tbsp (30 mL) olive oil ?      seasoned salt ?      16 large shitake mushrooms, stems removed ?      3/­­4 lb (375 g) oyster mushrooms, stems on ?      1/­­2 cup (125 mL) croutons METHOD Oil grill and preheat barbecue to med-high  Dressing:  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together dressing ingredients. Season to taste with salt and pepper and thin with more soy milk to get desired consistency.  Salad:  1. Slice romaine in half lengthwise, leaving core intact.  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together lemon juice, oil, salt and cayenne. Lightly brush over cut side of romaine. Set romaine aside on a tray.  3. Place mushrooms (cut oyster mushrooms into smaller pieces if needed) in remaining lemon juice mixture in a baking tray. Toss to coat. Season with seasoned salt. Let marinate for 15 mins  4. Place romaine cut-side down on grill. Place mushrooms on grill. Barbecue romaine for about 3 mins on the oiled side, and mushrooms, about 3-5 mins per side.  5. Set each romaine half on a plate. Divide shitake mushrooms evenly among the plates. Remove stems from oyster mushrooms and divide among the plates. Scatter with croutons. Drizzle with dressing. Serve.

Rainbow Pad Thai

March 23 2017 Meatless Monday 

The theme of the 2017 Careers through Culinary Arts Program (C-CAP) Meatless Monday Recipe Contest was Oodles of Noodles and it challenged teen chefs to create innovative, meatless noodle recipes. This recipe is the Virginia regional winner and comes from Cashé Clark of Virginia Beach Technical and Career Center. Serves 6 - For the Pad Thai: - 8 oz pad Thai noodles - 2 medium-sized carrots, spiralized - 1 zucchini, spiralized - 1 red pepper, julienned -  1/­­2 yellow onion, julienned -  1/­­2 cup red cabbage, thinly sliced -  1/­­2 cup fresh bean sprouts - 1 tablespoon sesame oil - 1 tablespoon vegetable oil - 2 large eggs beaten -  1/­­2 cup peanuts, shelled, unsalted, and dry roasted -  1/­­4 cup fresh basil, chopped - 2 limes(optional), wedged into 4 pieces - For the Sauce: - 6 tablespoons vegan fish sauce (recipe below) - 6 tablespoons light brown sugar -  1/­­4 cup white vinegar - 2 tablespoons soy sauce - 2 tablespoons sambal oelek (chili paste) - For the Vegan Fish Sauce: -  1/­­2 cup shredded wakame seaweed - 2 cups water - 2 large cloves garlic, crushed but not peeled - 1 teaspoon black peppercorn - 1/­­3 cup mushroom soy sauce - 1 teaspoon red miso paste To Prepare the Pad Thai Place uncooked noodles into a large bowl of cold water to soak for 15 minutes or until tender. Put all ingredients for the sauce in bowl and stir until all ingredients are combined. Combine carrots, zucchini, red peppers, yellow onion, red cabbage, and bean sprouts in a large bowl and set aside. Heat sesame oil over medium high heat in a large wok, add vegetables and stir fry for five minutes or until tender crisp. Transfer vegetables into a large bowl and set aside. Drain the noodles. Set aside. Add vegetable oil to wok, add reserved noodles to hot wok and stir fry quickly, for a minute or two using tongs to toss. Add the sauce and stir fry for two minutes, or until the sauce begins to thicken and stick to the noodles. Push the noodles aside in the wok. Pour the eggs into the wok on the cleared side and let sit for about 30 seconds. Toss well with the tongs. The egg mixture will stick to the noodles and everything will start getting sticky Add in the vegetables, toss together and remove from heat. Stir in peanuts and herbs. Serve immediately with lime; if desired. To Prepare the Vegan Fish Sauce Combine wakame, garlic, peppercorns, and water in a medium sauce pot and bring to a boil. Lower heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Strain and return the liquid back to the pot. Add soy sauce, bring back to a boil and cook until mixture is reduced and almost unbearably salty. Remove from heat and stir in miso. The post Rainbow Pad Thai appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Nasi Lemak

March 15 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Nasi Lemak In the five weeks that I spent exploring Malaysia, Singapore, and Borneo there were a few dishes that I just had to try whenever I had the chance. Nasi Lemak is a national favorite - and one of my favorites, too! The name technically means “fatty rice” but “creamy rice” sounds a least a little bit better. Traditionally, as with this recipe, Nasi Lemak is rice cooked in creamy, coconut milk - often along with fresh herbs and spices such as pandan (which you can replace with bay leaves if that’s what you’ve got.) The bright yellow hue comes from turmeric. Though it’s a breakfast dish, it can be eaten at any time of the day, and many variations cross firmly into Savory Culinary Territory. I eat this all times of the day: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Snack, whatever! I tried Nasi Lemak in lots of places: Kuala Lampur, Penang, Malacca, and Singapore. Inspired by those dishes and their accompaniments - and my own imagination, I’ve created a complete meal set: Coconut Pandan Rice served with stir-fried Lemongrass Ginger Tofu, crunchy, charred Spicy Nuts, and a delicious sweet-chili sauce known as Sambal Belacan. These are actually four different recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA which I’ve put together in this one post. You can of course substitute or simplify the dishes for a less involved meal set designed how you like it. Nasi Lemak is equally awesome even when it’s just served with the fresh cucumber, lime slices, and nuts. I love going all out and doing the Lemongrass Tofu cubes, too. Also, I find the hot, spicy Samabal Belecan completes the dish fantastically. How to eat it? Mix it up and eat it with your hands! Serve this meal set up on a banana leaf, wash your hands, mix everything together, and dive in… wild and forkless. (By the way, frozen banana leaves are often available at your local Asian import grocery shop. Just thaw them, rinse them, and eat off of them.) If you prefer a more modern approach: Make it all, arrange it perfectly on plates, eat it with a fork and spoon. It’s up to you! Nasi Lemak Malaysian Coconut Pandan Rice with Lemongrass Ginger Tofu, Spicy Nuts & Sambal Belacan recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA serves 3 to 4 /­­ time 60 min Coconut Pandan Rice: - 2 cups (375 g) broken jasmine rice or basmati rice - 1 2/­­3 cup (400 ml) water - 1 2/­­3 cup (400 ml) coconut milk - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric ground - 2 pandan leaves or bay leaves - fried onions for garnish - 1/­­2 small cucumber sliced - lime slices for garnish - Rinse and drain rice thoroughly. - Bring water and coconut milk to low boil in a medium pot with good lid. Stir in rice, salt, turmeric, and pandan (or bay leaves). Return to simmer. Cover and steam until most liquid is absorbed, 12-15 min. Remove from heat. Stir a few times. Cover and let sit 10 min. Remove and discard leaves before serving. - Garnish with fried onions, cucumber, and lime slices. Lemongrass Ginger Tofu: - 14 oz (400 g) firm tofu cut in cubes or strips - 1 1/­­2 cups (200 g) pineapple chopped - 1 Tbs oil - 2 shallots finely chopped - 2 cloves garlic finely chopped - 2 stalks lemongrass finely chopped - 3/­­4 in (2 cm) fresh ginger finely chopped - 1 tsp coriander ground - 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice - 1 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu) - 1/­­4 tsp sea salt - fresh coriander or parsley leaves chopped, for garnish - Cut tofu in slabs and wrap in clean kitchen towel. Weight with a heavy cutting board and press out extra moisture, 15-20 min. Unwrap and cut in cubes or strips. - Heat oil in a large frying pan or wok on medium high heat. Add chopped shallots, garlic, lemongrass, ginger, and ground coriander. Fry, stirring constantly, until shallots being to soften and brown, 2-3 min. - Add tofu cubes. Mix well. Fry, stirring regularly, until tofu cubes are golden brown and crispy on the edges, 5-8 min. - Add chopped pineapple, lime (or lemon) juice, soy sauce, and salt. Fry, stirring regularly, another 5-10 min. Remove from heat. Spicy Nuts: - 1/­­2 cup (50 g) peanuts - 1/­­2 cup (50 g) cashews - 1/­­2 tsp chili powder or paprika ground - 2 tsp coconut sugar - 1/­­4 tsp sea salt - Heat a medium frying pan on medium heat. Dry roast peanuts and cashews, stirring regularly, until light golden brown and dark spots begin to appear, 4-7 min. Do not burn. - Add chili powder (or paprika), sugar and salt. Mix well. Continue to cook another 2-3 min, stirring constantly, until sugar has melted and nuts are well coated. Remove from heat. Allow to cool. Sambal Belacan: - 2-3 Tbs vegetable oil - 5 large (90 g) red chilies chopped - 2 cloves garlic chopped - 1 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu) - 1 Tbs rice vinegar - 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice - 1 Tbs coconut sugar - 1/­­4 tsp sea salt - Blend all ingredients in a small food processor or blender until smooth, adding more oil (or some water) as needed. - Heat a small frying pan on medium heat. Add blended spice paste to pan and fry, stirring regularly, until sauce darkens, thickens, and oil separates, 8-12 min. vegan recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA (available as printed cookbook & ebook in English & German) The post Nasi Lemak appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl

March 10 2017 My New Roots 

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Poke seems to be everywhere these days, from fine restaurant menus, to fast-casual and even food trucks. Chefs are coming up with clever combos and creative reinterpretations - even fish-free versions for the veg set. I knew had to take a stab at it. Or at least a poke. Sorry. For those of you hearing about poke for the first time, this fresh and tasty dish (pronounced POH-kay), hails from Hawaii. In its most unadulterated form, poke is raw fish, originally combined with sea salt, candlenut and seaweed. It evolved over the years as ingredient availability increased, and the salt was replaced with soy sauce, the seaweed with spring onion, the candlenut with sesame and so on. Once it hit mainland America a few years ago, poke mania ensued and the dish evolved to become more of a meal - not just a snack. Now it is often served atop rice and garnished with all manner of innovative ingredients. Fully-focused poke restaurants have established themselves in major cities across North America. Many of these eateries allow their patrons to customize their bowls with veggies, sea weed, pickles, beans, nuts, and alt-grains, tapping into the to the fact that fast, fresh, healthy meals are becoming mainstream. Which totally rocks. I had most of the elements for my own poke-inspired version in my head...except for the fish (the most important part?). I racked my brain to come up with something that looked just like tuna or salmon, but didnt want to use fruit, like watermelon or papaya, since I didnt want the dish to be sweet. It wasnt until I was trying to fall asleep one night, that it came to me...chiogga beets! Chiogga, or candy-striped beets are gorgeously two-toned when they are raw. Sliced thin horizontally, they reveal rings of deep pink pigment and creamy white, resembling something that your grandmother keeps on her coffee table in a crystal dish. But for anyone who has ever roasted these stunning creatures will know that the magic doesnt last; the magenta bleeds into the white during cooking, resulting in an almost homogenous pale pink, with slight variegation. WHICH LOOKS EXACTLY LIKE TUNA. I almost couldnt sleep. Too excited. The next day I gathered up all the things Id like in a poke bowl: short grain brown rice (not long grain - an important distinction), spring onion for bite, carrot for crunch, edamame for pop and protein, and avo for creaminess. I took this last one a step farther and blended it with lemon and wasabi for the most boss sauce ever. This alone would be delish on most things...please try it. And for the fishy component, I thought back to the raw vegan tuna I made for my first cookbook, and how effective adding a sprinkle of nori was to boost that fresh-from-the-sea flavour. This is not a deal breaker for the overall dish, but it definitely made it taste complete. If you cant find nori flakes, just crunch up a couple sheets of the stuff that youd use to make sushi. Easy fix! I like to use wasabi powder in the avo cream since the pre-made stuff in a tube is questionable. Have you ever read the ingredient list on one of those packages? It can be scary stuff. In a pinch, use it, but tracking down the powder is worth it from a nutrition standpoint, and also a flavour one. The real stuff tastes infinitely better! What a shocker. Wasabi is Japanese horseradish, and like its western counterpart, it belongs to the Brassica family, like cabbage, broccoli and mustard. The root is dried and then pulverized, which gives us the powder that we can blend with water to create wasabi paste. It is a difficult crop to grow, which explains the high price for the genuine product. Most wasabi powders dont contain any wasabi at all, but are instead a mix of mustard powder and regular horseradish mixed with green food dye. A high-quality wasabi powder should be organic and contain only horseradish and wasabi. The colour should be pale green - not disco neon. Most health food stores carry wasabi powder. This is a good brand. Everything unfolded just as Id hoped it would. The beets came out perfectly pink with those thin white stripes that look just like fat striation. The marinade that I tossed them around in was acidic and ginger-y and just plain yum. Building the meal up with the rice, the beans, the veggies, a dollop of cream, a sprinkle of nori and roasted sesame, was ever so satisfying and fun. This healthy, fresh meal is calling you. No need to poke about, just make it. Again, sorry.     Print recipe     Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Serves 3-4 Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 200g short grain brown rice, soaked overnight if possible 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 2 cups /­­ 250g edamame beans, fresh or frozen 2 tsp. cold-pressed olive oil a couple pinches flaky sea salt Beets & Marinade 3 medium Chiogga (candy striped) beets 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1 tsp. finely grated ginger pinch fine sea salt Avocado Wasabi Cream 2 medium ripe avocados 2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1-2 tsp. wasabi powder, to taste pinch fine sea, to taste 2 spring onions, sliced lengthwise into ribbons 2 medium carrots, julienned 2 Tbsp. sesame seeds 3 Tbsp. nori flakes Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Wrap beets in aluminum foil and place on a baking sheet in the oven. Roast until tender, about 45 minutes (to check doneness, peel back the foil of one beet and insert the tip of a sharp knife. If there is little resistance, its ready). Peel back foil from each beet and let cool slightly. 2. While the beets are roasting, make the rice. Drain and rinse well. Place in a pot with 2 cups /­­ 500ml of fresh water and salt. Cover, bring to a boil and reduce to simmer. Cook until tender (add more during cooking if necessary), about 45 minutes. 3. While the rice is cooking, make the Avocado Wasabi Cream. Scoop out the flesh from both avocados and add to a food processor. Blend on high, then add the lemon juice, wasabi powder and salt. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. 4. In a medium bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil, ginger and salt. Slip the skins off the cooled beets. Cut the beets into cubes and toss in the marinade. Let sit for at least 20 minutes. 5. While the beets are marinating, bring a medium pot of water to the boil. Add a few pinches of salt and the edamame. Simmer for a couple minutes until bright green and tender (do not overcook!). Drain and rinse under cold water to halt cooking. Toss with a little olive oil and sprinkle with flaky salt. 6. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast sesame seeds, stirring often until fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside. 7. Julienne the carrots. 8. To assemble, divide the rice among the bowls. Add the marinated beets, edamame, carrots and a dollop of Avocado Wasabi Cream. Sprinkle with nori flakes, the toasted sesame seeds and top with the spring onions. Enjoy! I’m on my last few days of the North American tour now. Honestly, it’s been just magical and I am so grateful to all of you who came out to show some love and connect with the healthy community around them! I have just one more event left, and if you’re in LA, please come to The Springs tomorrow! I’ll be giving a lecture on Improving Immunity, Digestion and Detoxification, serving a delicious lunch, and launching a recipe collaboration with their chef! Hope to see you there. All love and smiles, Sarah B Show me your bowls on Instagram! #mnrpokebowl The post Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl appeared first on My New Roots.

Peanut Noodles

February 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

This flavorful peanut noodle dish is not only packed with plant protein, but veggies and enticing aromatic herbs, too. This recipe comes to us from our friends at Pondicheri and is featured as a Meatless Monday special in the restaurant’s New York and Houston locations. Serves 4 - 4 cups /­­ 225 g Chinese thin rice noodles - 3 Tbsp sesame oil - 3-4 cloves garlic, chopped - 2 small carrots, julienned - 1 red bell pepper, thinly sliced - 1 stalk celery, thinly sliced on the bias - 1 small red onion, thinly sliced - 2 in /­­ 5 cm piece ginger, julienned - 2 tsp black pepper - 2 tsp salt - 4 Tbsp Shaoxing cooking wine or rice wine vinegar - Zest & juice from 1 orange - 2 Tbsp ketchup manis [Indonesian soy sauce] - 1 tsp Sichuan peppercorns, ground - 2 Tbsp sambhal olek [Indonesian chili sauce] - 2 Tbsp peanut butter - 2 cups /­­ 135 g spinach leaves, sliced - 1 cup /­­ 340 g purple cabbage, sliced - 2 Tbsp chopped cilantro - 2 Tbsp toasted & chopped peanuts Pour boiling water over the noodles & let them soak for 3-4 minutes. Drain & set aside. In a large wok or sauté pan, heat up the sesame oil & add the garlic. Almost immediately, add the julienned carrots & cook for 4-5 minutes, frequently stirring. Add the red bell peppers & cook for another minute. Turn up the heat & cook, stirring on high for 2-3 minutes. Add the celery, red onions, ginger, black pepper & salt. Cook for just under another minute & add the cooking wine, orange juice with zest, ketchup manis, peppercorns, sambhal olek & peanut butter. Continue cooking at high heat for 2-3 or until the sauce around the vegetables is bubbly. Add the noodles, spinach, cabbage, cilantro & peanuts. Toss to mix, turn the heat off & serve immediately. The post Peanut Noodles appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Red Cabbage with Orange & Apple

January 9 2017 Meatless Monday 

Red cabbage is chopped into ribbons and tossed with red wine vinegar, honey, coriander, soy sauce and chili powder for a sweet-sour-spicy flavor. Green apples soak up this delectable sauce, before this fruit veggie medley is topped with freshly grated ginger. Try this dish on the side in place of coleslaw. This recipe comes to us from Jenné of Sweet Potato Soul. Serves 4 - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1/­­2 head red cabbage, washed & cut into ribbons - salt, to taste - 1/­­2 onion - 1 clove garlic, minced - 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar - 1 teaspoon honey - 1 bay leaf - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground coriander - 1 teaspoon low sodium tamari or soy sauce - 1 teaspoon red chili powder - 1/­­2 cup fresh squeezed orange juice with pulp - 1 Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored and cubed - 1 teaspoon fresh ginger, grated - fresh black pepper - orange slices*, for garnish Place the olive oil in a large, deep pot over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and sauté for 4-6 minutes, or until the onion begins to soften. Add the red cabbage ribbons, sprinkle with a little salt, stir and cover. Cook the cabbage for about 2 minutes, or until the cabbage begins to soften. Uncover the pot and coat the cabbage with the vinegar, honey, bay leaf, coriander, tamari or soy sauce and chili powder. Stir thoroughly, turn down heat to medium-low and cover again and cook 4-6 minutes. Uncover and pour in the orange juice, orange pulp and apple cubes. Cook about 10 minutes more, or until the cabbage has reached desired tenderness. Taste for seasoning and adjust to preference. Serve hot or warm, sprinkled with freshly grated ginger and black pepper. Garnish with sliced oranges, if using, and enjoy! The post Red Cabbage with Orange & Apple appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Idli Manchurian

November 4 2016 Manjula's kitchen 

Idli Manchurian (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Manchurian is a popular Indo Chinese dish, and made several different ways. Idli Manchurian is a super delicious appetizer or main dish. I prepare this dish when I have leftover idlies. Idli Manchurian satisfies your savory and spicy cravings! This recipe will serve 3. Preparation time 10 minutes Cooking time 20 minutes Ingredients: - 4 idlies, I am using left over idlies, I do have the recipe for idli - About 2 cups sliced yellow and green bell pepper, use any color bell pepper -  1/­­4 teaspoon salt - 2 tablespoons oil for stir-frying, idlies and bell pepper For Sauce - 6 whole red chilies - 2 tablespoons oil (canola or vegetable oil) - 2 tablespoons soy sauce - 1 tablespoon vinegar - 1 tablespoon ginger paste or finely grated ginger (adrak) - 1 tablespoon tomato paste -  1/­­2 teaspoon sugar - 2 teaspoons corn starch or arrow root powder - 1 cup water Preparation - Boil the red chilies in about 1/­­2 cup of water until they are tender. Let them cool off. In a blender blend all the sauce ingredients together oil, soy sauce, vinegar, ginger, tomato paste, sugar, and corn starch if needed add more water. - Boil the sauce over medium heat. Sauce should be pouring consistency. Set aside. - Cut the idlies into bite size pieces, I have cut the idlies in 6 pieces. Heat the oil in frying pan over medium high heat. Add idlies and sprinkle the salt. Stir-fry for 2-3 minutes until idlies are lightly golden brown, take them out and set aside. - In the same pan stir fry bell pepper 2-3 minutes, do not overcook the bell pepper, they taste better when they are still crisp. Add the stir-fry idlies to bell peppers. Pour the sauce and stir gently making sure idlies are coated well. Turn off the heat. Idli Manchurian is ready. Take them out in a serving bowl. Manchurian makes a delicious lunch box meal. Also, try Gobi Manchurian, Masala Idli, Rava Idli The post Idli Manchurian appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Mushroom Fried Rice

September 26 2016 Meatless Monday 

Turn this classic takeout dish into a satisfying, home-cooked Monday night meal. This fried rice features three (three!) different types of mushrooms and is packed with even more veggies, not grease and salt. This recipe comes to us from Stefanie of Sarcastic Cooking. Serves 4-6 - 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil - 4 ounces shitake mushrooms, stems removed and chopped - 6 ounces portabella mushrooms, stemmed and chopped - 4 ounces button mushrooms, chopped - 1/­­3 cup diced yellow onion - 2 carrots, peeled and grated - 2 teaspoons chili garlic sauce - 1 tablespoons low sodium soy sauce - 3-4 cups cooked white/­­brown rice, cooked according to instructions on packaging - 2 large eggs - 4 green onions, chopped - salt and pepper to taste Add olive oil to a large skillet or wok. Allow the oil to heat up for a minute or two over a medium flame. Add all the mushrooms. Stir to evenly coat in oil. Sautee mushrooms for 10 minutes until golden and crispy on the edges. Add the onion and carrot. Sautee an additional three to five minutes until onions become translucent. Remove the vegetables from the pan. Add to a plate and keep off to the side for later. Reduce the heat to low. Add the two eggs to a small mixing bowl and beat. Add in a little pinch of salt and pepper. Pour the eggs into the hot pan and scramble. Cook until firm. Remove egg and add it to the plate with the veggies off to the side. Add chili garlic sauce and soy sauce to the pan, whisk to combine. Mix in the rice. Add in the cooked egg and mushrooms. Stir to make sure the flavors are evenly distributed. Lastly, mix in the green onions, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve with additional soy sauce and hot sauce. The post Mushroom Fried Rice appeared first on Meatless Monday.


You will enjoy these as well ...

Found an error?
Help to fix it! Tell it us!



Our sites missing something? Suggest new content or features!



Have you any comments?
Send it us!