soy milk - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!










soy milk vegetarian recipes

Sweet Potato Challah

December 17 2017 Vegan Dad 

Sweet Potato Challah Ive been meaning to post this recipe for ages. Sweet potato is my new favourite way to replace eggs in enriched bread dough recipes. It makes the final loaf nice and soft, and adds colour to the dough that     mimics the many egg yolks of non-vegan challah. This is a version of Peter Reinharts recipe from Artisan Breads Everyday, but I use a blender to incorporate the potato into the liquid ingredients. You can let the dough rise in the fridge, then shape and bake the next day as he calls for, but I usually just do everything in the same day because I dont have the time or the fridge space to follow his method. The recipe produces reliable results every time. Trust me: I make at least two recipes a week so the kids have buns for school lunches. Makes 2 loaves, or 16 buns INGREDIENTS All measurements are weight, not volume - 17oz warm water - 2.5 oz oil - 4 oz cooked sweet potato (see note* way below) - 3 oz sugar - 14 g instant yeast - 19 g salt - 2 lb 3 oz bread flour - soy milk for brushing METHOD 1. Place water, oil, sweet potato, sugar, yeast, and salt in a blender. Blend until smooth. 2. Add liquid to flour in a large bowl and bring into a dough. Knead until smooth.  3. Shape into a ball and let rise, covered, in a large oiled bowl until doubled in size.  4. From here, YouTube is your friend. Determine how many braids you want in your loaf (the pic above is a 6 braid) and find a video for how to braid it. Remember that the recipe makes two loaves. 5. Place braided loaves on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper (ideally both loaves on one big sheet). Brush with soy milk. 6. Leave to rise, uncovered, in a warm place until almost doubled in size (about 1 hour). Keep brushing with soy milk every 15 mins or so, to keep the dough from drying out and to build up layers of soy milk (this will give the loaf that glossy finish when baked).  7. While dough is rising, preheat oven to 350.  8. Bake for 20 mins, then rotate the pan and bake for another 15-20 mins, until the loaves are evenly browned and sound hollow when thumped on the bottom. A convection oven really helps get an evenly browned loaf.  A NOTE ON BUNS This is also my go to recipe for buns--it makes 16 buns that I do as a 4x 4 batch bake on a large sheet pan. Brush them with soy milk like the loaves, but bake at 400 for 15-17 mins, rotating the pan half way through. Or, space them apart, slash the tops before baking, and sprinkle with sesame seeds after the last brushing with soy milk (as pictured below). Or do hot dog/­­sausage buns.  *Note: I prick the skin of a sweet potato a few times with a fork, then cook it in the microwave on the potato setting. Its fast and makes for a sweet potato that is not too wet. 

Crispy Fried Cauliflower Wingz

December 5 2017 Vegan Dad 

Crispy Fried Cauliflower Wingz This recipe is perfect for your upcoming holiday party! Or tuck it away until the Super Bowl. An indulgence, to be sure, but you deserve it. Ive been meaning to work up a recipe like this since the cauliflower wings craze hit the interwebs a while ago, but I never got around to it. These are crispy and flavourful, and remain so even when they are no longer hot. The boys doused theirs in Buffalo hot sauce, while the rest of us stuck to a sweet BBQ sauce. Delicious!  INGREDIENTS - 1 large head of cauliflower, cut into florets Brine - 2 cups cold water - 1 tsp garlic powder - 2 tsp onion powder - 2 tsp smoked or seasoned salt - 2 tsp paprika - 1 tsp poultry spice Batter - 2 cups all purpose flour - 1 cup panko crumbs - 1/­­2 cup chickpea flour - 1/­­2 cup tapioca flour/­­starch - 1 tbsp each: onion powder, garlic powder, paprika, Italian seasoning - 1 tsp white pepper - 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar - 3 cups plain soy milk (more if needed) METHOD 1. The day before: mix together the brine ingredients (I use a blender). Pour into a large freezer bag, then add the cauliflower florets. If your cauliflower is very large, you can make a 1.5 recipe of the brine.  2. Remove as much air a possible so the brine is making maximum contact with the brine. Refrigerate for at least 12 hours, rotating the bag as needed for even brining.  3. The Day of: drain cauliflower in a colander. Heat oil in a deep fryer to 350 degrees. 4. While cauliflower is draining, whisk together the dry ingredients for the batter (i.e. flour to white pepper).  5. Dredge the cauliflower in the flour mixture in batches until coated. Shake off all excess and place on a baking sheet. 6. In a separate bowl, whisk together vinegar and soy milk. Add enough of the soy mixture to the remaining flour mixture to make a thickish batter. Add more soy milk if needed. 7. Add some pieces of cauliflower to the batter. Turn to coat. Leave the cauliflower in the batter for a few minutes to allow the batter to soak into the dredging flour. 8. Shake off excess batter and transfer to a cooking tray or plate.  9. Fry in oil, 3-4 minutes per side, until deep golden brown. Make sure your oil is not too hot or the outside will burn before the cauliflower is cooked. 10. Drain on paper towels and serve while still hot. NOTE 1: while one batch is frying, add another to the batter so it can soak. Repeat. NOTE 2: add more soy milk to the batter, if needed. The dredging flour will thicken the batter a bit, so just thin it down again. 

Cherry Chocolate Banana Shake

October 23 2017 Meatless Monday 

Chocolate and cherries are a classic combination, but when better to execute it than on Meatless Monday morning? This ice cool breakfast shake is a surefire way to wake up feeling refreshed. This recipe comes to us from Lisa of Barefoot in Her Kitchen. Serves 3 -  1/­­2 cup ice - 1 banana, peeled - 10 cherries, pitted - 1 heaping tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder - 1 teaspoon agave nectar* -  1/­­2 cup rice or soy milk - or -  1/­­2 cup nonfat milk - 1 1/­­2 cup ice cold water - 1 teaspoon chocolate flavored whey protein** * Agave (ah-Gah-vay) nectar is similar in taste & texture to honey but has a lower impact on blood sugar when compared other sweeteners. Agave can be found in the health food or specialty food aisle of most grocery stores. **optional. Found in health food stores. If you are not using the chocolate whey protein, double the cocoa powder and agave nectar in the smoothies.   Place the ice in a tall blender or pitcher if youre using a hand mixer. Add the banana, cherries, cocoa, agave nectar, milk, water and whey protein if using. If you are not using the whey protein, double the amount of cocoa and agave. If youre using a blender, pulse briefly until the mixture is somewhat crushed, but not pureed. If youre using a hand mixer, pulse the mixer in an up and down motion until the ice is smashed and the fruit begins to soften and blend, but the mixture is not liquefied. After mixture is blended, cover the cup or pitcher and shake distribute the ice and fruit evenly. Serves immediately and enjoy. The post Cherry Chocolate Banana Shake appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Naan Buns

August 26 2017 Vegan Dad 

Naan Buns When we were in Quebec City last week vegan food for the entire family was pretty hard to come by. We ended up eating at a burger place that had some vegan options: tofu on a bun, or something they called LIndien. It was more like a large falafel on a bun, but the kids were more or less pleased with it. The idea is a good one, so I made my own version when I got home (caveat: I did not actually eat the original burger because fried food and me dont get along. Thanks, Crohns!). First up, the naan bun. Next, the burger. INGREDIENTS Makes one dozen buns - 2 cups warm soy milk - 1 tbsp sugar - 1 tbsp lemon juice - 1 tbsp yeast - 775g/­­1lb 11oz all purpose flour - 3/­­4 tsp salt - 1 tsp baking soda - 1 tsp baking powder - 3 tbsp oil METHOD 1. Whisk sugar and lemon juice into the soy milk. Whisk in yeast and set aside to fully dissolve and get frothy. 2. Whisk together flour, salt, baking soda and baking powder. 3. Add oil and yeast mixture to the flour and bring together into a dough. Knead for about 5 mins, or until smooth. Shape into a ball and placed in an oiled bowl, covered, to rise for an hour. 4. Divide the dough into 12 pieces and shape into boules. Press each boule into a flat, puck shape with your finger tips. Place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper (or two, depending on the size of your oven and baking stone). Mist buns with oil, then cover. Place another baking sheet on top of the buns (this will let them rise but keep the puck shape) and let rise for about 45 mins, or until almost doubled in size. 5. While bread is rising, place a baking stone on the middle shelf of the oven and preheat to 450 degrees. 6. The buns work best if you bake them directly on the hot stone. I slide the parchment off the pan and on to the stone, but you could just put the pan right on the stone. In any event, brush the buns with water (top with poppy seeds if you want), and place in the oven. Reduce heat to 400 degrees. 7. Buns right on the stone will bake in 8-9 minutes. Buns on the sheet wont be far behind. Bake until buns are a deep golden brown and sound hollow when thumped on the bottom. 8. Cool on wire racks and enjoy!

Grilled Mushroom Caesar Salad

May 30 2017 Vegan Dad 

Grilled Mushroom Caesar Salad This is a recipe I developed over two years ago that never saw the light of day. With BBQ season now upon us I thought would dust it off. There is perhaps nothing I love more that a marinated, grilled oyster mushroom. And certainly e veryone will think youre a fun guy when you make this traditional side salad as the main meal--all done on the barbecue! INGREDIENTS Dressing: ?      1/­­2 cup (125 mL) soy milk (more as needed) ?      1/­­2 cup (125 mL) vegan mayonnaise ?      2 tsp (10 mL) freshly squeezed lemon juice ?      2 small cloves garlic, minced ?      1 tbsp minced capers ?      1/­­2 tsp each light soy sauce, brown sugar ?      1/­­4 tsp each apple cider vinegar, mustard powder, onion powder ?      1 tsp miso ?      pinch ground ginger ?      salt and pepper to taste Salad: ?      2 small hearts of romaine lettuce ?      1/­­4 cup (60 mL) freshly squeezed lemon juice ?      2 tbsp (30 mL) olive oil ?      seasoned salt ?      16 large shitake mushrooms, stems removed ?      3/­­4 lb (375 g) oyster mushrooms, stems on ?      1/­­2 cup (125 mL) croutons METHOD Oil grill and preheat barbecue to med-high  Dressing:  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together dressing ingredients. Season to taste with salt and pepper and thin with more soy milk to get desired consistency.  Salad:  1. Slice romaine in half lengthwise, leaving core intact.  2. In a medium bowl, whisk together lemon juice, oil, salt and cayenne. Lightly brush over cut side of romaine. Set romaine aside on a tray.  3. Place mushrooms (cut oyster mushrooms into smaller pieces if needed) in remaining lemon juice mixture in a baking tray. Toss to coat. Season with seasoned salt. Let marinate for 15 mins  4. Place romaine cut-side down on grill. Place mushrooms on grill. Barbecue romaine for about 3 mins on the oiled side, and mushrooms, about 3-5 mins per side.  5. Set each romaine half on a plate. Divide shitake mushrooms evenly among the plates. Remove stems from oyster mushrooms and divide among the plates. Scatter with croutons. Drizzle with dressing. Serve.

Easy Vegan Eggnog Recipe

December 23 2016 Vegan Richa 

Easy Vegan Eggnog RecipeEasy Vegan Eggnog Recipe with eggy chickpea flour custard , almond milk, nutmeg, cloves and cinnamon. Homemade Nog. Make Golden Eggnog with Turmeric or add Cardamom for Chai spice. Vegan Holiday Drink Recipe Vegan Nog is easy to find these days with so many brands coming out with vegan options. If you want to make some from scratch, this is an amazing version for you. Add spices to preference, add liquor or not and make this holiday drink. Honestly, I don’t think I ever actually liked eggnog in my pregan days. Those days feel so far away that I cannot remember why I didn’t like eggnog. But this vegan version has me hooked. This Vegan Eggnog is all creamy and foamy with no eggs. Chickpea flour (or use regular flour) is cooked up into a thick custard, that is blended into non dairy milk and spices. I like this chilled when using almond milk since some almond milk brands dont do well with boiling. For a hot version use soy milk or other non dairy milk. Fold in some whipped aquafaba for more foamy texture.  If you make this, do leave me a comment here on the post or tag me on Instagram. Continue reading: Easy Vegan Eggnog RecipeThe post Easy Vegan Eggnog Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Pumpkin Tarts

October 19 2016 Vegan Dad 

Pumpkin Tarts This is the last of my pumpkin recipes for this fall. Its too late for Canadian Thanksgiving, but these could be a hit at your very own American Thanksgiving. The filling has lots of pumpkin flavour but has a lighter texture than usual pumpkin pie filling. The filling does not have to be baked so these tarts come together relatively quickly.  INGREDIENTS Makes 24 tarts - 24 frozen tart shells, baked - 1/­­3 cup unsalted chickpea aquafaba - 1/­­8 tsp xanthan gum - 3 tbsp sugar - 1/­­4 cup raw cashews - 1 cup plain soy milk - 1/­­3 cup sugar - 1 cup cooked pumpkin (see note below*) - 1/­­2 tsp cinnamon - 1/­­2 tsp ginger - 1/­­4 tsp nutmeg - large pinch allspice - pinch of salt - 1 tsp vanilla - 2 tbsp corn starch - 1/­­4 tsp agar powder - whipped topping METHOD 1. Bake the tart shells per the instructions on the package. Cool. 2. Soak cashews in boiled water for 15 mins. Drain. 3. While cashews are soaking, add aquafaba and xanthan gum to a mixer bowl. Fix the mixer with a balloon whisk and whisk on med-hi speed until foamy. Add sugar 1 tbsp at a time, and blend until soft peaks form. 4. Put the soaked cashews and the remaining ingredients (but not the aquafaba mixture) in a blender. Blend until very smooth. 5. Pour the blender contents into a saucepan and cook on the stove or medium heat, stirring constantly. When bubbling, cook for two minutes. 6. Let mixture cool for 2 mins, stirring regularly to prevent a scum from forming. Fold in the aquafaba mixture completely. 7. Spoon mixture into the cooled tart shells (save any leftovers in the fridge and call it pumpkin custard). When they reach room temperature, transfer to the fridge to fully cool. I think these taste best the next day. 8. When ready to serve, top with the whipped cream of your choice (I use the recipe from Homemade Vegan Pantry, but you could use a commercial topping as well).

Apple Pineapple Empanadas

June 1 2016 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Apple Pineapple Empanadas When I was living in the small town of Lo de Marcos, on the Pacific Coast of Mexico, we’d often take day trips to Sayulita. Sayulita, like San Pancho and Lo de Marcos, used to be just a sleepy fishing village. All three towns are just up the coast from Puerto Vallerta - which has been in the tourist guidebooks for quite some time. In the 1960s and 1970s, PV was built up for tourism (kind of like planned tourism destinations Acapulco and Cancun). It was also around this time that surfers “discovered” Sayulita, which remained pretty much a secret for a while. Over the next few decades, tourism and expat enclaves grew and migrated along the Nayarit coast, creating what it is now: cities, towns, and villages coming to terms with all of the holiday traffic and escape artists. In addition to surfing, Sayulita is popular for weddings and honeymoons, yoga retreats, artistic and culinary workshop getaways, souvenir and craft shopping, and of course: respite from the louder and brasher cities. For me, Sayulita will always be about empanadas. Going to Sayulita always meant going to my favorite little hole-in-the-wall empanada take-out bakery. We’d leave Lo de Marcos in the morning on the local bus, ride about half an hour south, down the coast along jungle and oceanview roads. The bus stand was a good, hot, 10 to 15 minute walk to the “downtown”. As we approached the main town square, my mouth would already be watering, anxious to see what kind of empanadas were there. You see, this is part of why we tried to leave early and arrive before lunch. By mid afternoon, the bakery would always sell out of at least one of my favorites: Empanadas de Manzana (with apple filling) and Empanadas Espinaca y Papas (spinach & potato filling). This place only made and sold empanadas, and nothing else. You’d just walk up to the counter, see what was listed on the chalkboard, and then place your order. The baked pastries never got a chance to cool off. Usually they rarely spent a few minutes on the counter in their baskets before they’d be bought, carried away, and devoured. I’d buy a bunch of whatever vegan empanadas they had, and then bring them back to the park for a family picnic. The rest of the day was usually spent sipping coconut water or fresh juice, watching surfers (and absolute beginner surfer lessons taking place on the beach), strolling around, and then, once we got hungry again, enjoying an excellent meal at La Esperanza, or our favorite taquería (whose name I’ve long since forgotten) just off the main street. This photo of me with my surfboard in Lo de Marcos has nothing to do with Empanadas. Unless perhaps I ate empanadas that morning in Sayulita. Which is entirely possible. Back in Germany, I got to work perfecting my Empanada recipe Sure they’re great with just apple, but adding fresh pineapple is mind-blowing. I love the tropical touch, which is a really powerful, nostalgic reminder of the my months spent living next to the beach in Mexico. I suggest using a good, buttery vegan margarine. Don’t use cheap stuff, and try to find something that is recommended for baking. Cheaper margarines have too much water in them, and you’ll miss out on the rich, creamy flavor for your dough. In Germany I use Alsan, and in the U.S.A. Earth Balance makes some good stuff that will work for baking. (If you’ve got other suggestions for readers, please leave a comment below!) Also, keep an eye on your goodies in the oven! If you overbake them, you’ll be disappointed by the texture. Since I’m really not that great of a baker, I actually take the empanadas out of the oven a minute or two before I think they’re done. A bit soft and chewy is always better than hard and dry! Keep fresh, hot empanadas covered or wrapped with a damp dishtowel so they don’t dry out, too. Oh, and always be careful with the first bite - I don’t even know how many times I’ve burned my tongue on blazing hot empanada filling! Enjoy! Apple Pineapple Empanadas Empanadas de Manzana y Pi?a recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MEXICO! makes 8 to 10 /­­ time 45 min + dough: - 3 cups (375 g) flour (all-purpose /­­ Type 550) - 1 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - 1 Tbs sugar - 1/­­4 tsp baking powder - 8 Tbs (110 g) margarine - 3/­­4 cup (180 ml) cold water - 2 Tbs soy milk or rice milk for glaze optional - Combine flour, salt, sugar, baking powder in large mixing bowl. - Cut margarine into thinly sliced pieces and add to bowl. Using hands, knead margarine into flour mix. - Gradually add in cold water, continue kneading a few minutes until dough is rubbery and smooth. If needed use slightly more flour or water. - Pull and form into 8-10 equal sized balls and return to bowl. Cover and let sit 20 min. apple & pineapple filling: - 2 medium apples peeled, finely chopped - 1 cup (140 g) pineapple finely chopped - 1/­­2 tsp cinnamon ground - 1 Tbs sugar - Combine chopped apples and pineapple with cinnamon and sugar in large bowl. Mix well. - Pour 2 Tbs soy milk (or water) into cup or small bowl. - Preheat oven to 400 F /­­ 200 C /­­ level 6. - On floured surface, roll out a dough ball with rolling pin (or bottle) to 1/­­4 in (1 cm) thickness. Using a medium bowl or saucer as a guide, cut circle with knife. Roll up and save trim. - Put 2 Tbs filling onto a dough circle. Dip finger in soy milk (or water) and trace around outer edge to help seal. Fold over in half and press edges firmly with a fork to seal. - Brush top with soy (or rice) milk, if desired, for glaze. Carefully transfer to baking tray. Repeat for all empanadas. - Bake until golden brown and edges start to crisp and darken, about 20-25 min. - Allow to cool 5 min before serving: Filling is very hot! Variations: Other fillings: Experiment with strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, chopped pears, walnuts, hazelnuts, banana, chocolate… or whatever else you come up with! recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MEXICO! The post Apple Pineapple Empanadas appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Lemon Meringue Pie

May 4 2016 Vegan Dad 

Lemon Meringue Pie I know I am late to the aquafaba/­­vegan meringue party, but better late than never I suppose. The issue was that I was never able to get the aquafaba to beat into stiff peaks and so I stopped experimenting months ago. Even after endless whisking on high in the KitchenAid, very soft peaks was the best I could get. And then I recently happened upon recipes that use xanthan gum. Problem solved! Perfect peaks every time (and I wonder if you could cut it down to 1/­­4 tsp for this recipe). Lemon Meringue Pie is one of Vegan Moms favourites (and we have not eaten it for over 10 years) so I was happy to be able to take her down culinary memory lane. The filling is tangy and sweet, and firm without being rubbery. The meringue is some serious vegan magic. The filling calls for both corn starch (white) and corn flour (yellow). This may cause some confusion because what the Brits call corn flour, Americans/­­Canadians call corn starch. This recipe makes one big 10 pie or, as I found out tonight in preparing for a departmental party, 42 tarts. INGREDIENTS - 1 10 pre-baked pie crust Filling - 1/­­4 cup corn starch - 1/­­4 cup corn flour - generous 1/­­2 tsp agar powder - 2 cups + 3 tbsp (17.5 oz) white sugar - 1 3/­­4 cup + 2 tbsp (15 oz) water - 2/­­3 cup fresh lemon juice - 1 cup soy milk Meringue - 3/­­4 cup salt free chickpea aquafaba - 1/­­2 tsp xanthan gum - 1 tbsp lemon juice - 7.5 tbsp (5 oz) superfine white sugar METHOD Bake your shell per whatever recipe you are using. It is best if the crust is slightly underdone since you will be baking the assembled pie. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 1. Whisk the corn starch, corn flour, agar, and sugar together in a saucepan. Whisk in water and lemon juice, then whisk in soy milk. 2. Bring to bubbling over medium high, stirring constantly. When bubbling, reduce heat to med-lo and cook for two minutes, stirring constantly. 3. Immediately pour the filling into the prepared pie crust and set aside to start cooling. The filling will be a bit runny, but it will set in the fridge. 4. Make the meringue: whisk the xanthan gum into the aquafaba, then place in a stand mixer and whisk on high with a balloon whisk until stiff peak form. 5. Whisk in the 1 tbsp of lemon juice, then whisk in the sugar a bit at a time, scraping down the sides of the bowl regularly. 6. When the sugar is incorporated and the meringue is no longer gritty, gently spread the meringue over the pie filling. The filling will be wobbly, so be gentle (or pipe the meringue on). 7. Bake at 350 for 12 to 15 minutes, until meringue is lightly browned (or browned to your liking). I like to use convection for this step. 8. Let the pie cool for an hour, then transfer to the fridge. When pie is cool, put in a container in the fridge and completely cool (about 4 hours or up to overnight). If you are in a rush, place the cooled pie on ice packs in the fridge.

Yogurt

March 2 2016 Vegan Dad 

This recipe is a mashup of the two yogurt recipes Miyoko Schinner has given us in Artisan Vegan Cheese and Homemade Vegan Pantry. I like the thickness of the soy yogurt recipe, but I prefer the taste of almond milk so this recipe is the best of both worlds. A purely soy yogurt will set beautifully on its own without the aid of the cornstarch or agar, but I find it to be rather temperamental. If the yogurt gets too hot it will separate. Here, the starch and agar help set the almond milk whilst keeping the final product homogeneous. Perfectly thick yogurt every time. NOTE 1: this recipe makes a lot (but with four kids it does not last long). Half the recipe if needed, but also note that it will keep in the fridge for about 2 weeks. NOTE 2: Start this recipe by using a commercially available yogurt as your starter (you can use a dried yogurt culture, but usually they contain skim milk powder). For the next time you make yogurt, save 6 tbsp of yogurt from this recipe. The first batch might taste a little weird (depending on the quality of the yogurt you bought--they are all pretty horrible around here) but by your second batch and beyond you wont taste it anymore. INGREDIENTS Makes about 6.5 cups - 1 cup raw whole cashews, soaked for a few hours - 2 cups almond milk - 4 cups soy milk - 2 tbsp cornstarch - 1/­­2 tsp agar powder - 6 tbsp yogurt with live cultures METHOD 1. Blend the soaked cashews with the 2 cups of the almond milk. If you have a super blender like a Vitamix, you dont need to soak the cashews. Blend until smooth. 2. Whisk the cornstarch and agar into the 4 cups of soy milk in a saucepan. Add the cashew mixture and place over medium heat. 3. Heat the mixture, stirring constantly, until slightly thickened and glossy. You wont need to bring it to a boil (about 180 F), but it will be hot and steaming. You will notice the mixture getting glossier and sticking to the bottom of the pot a bit as you stir. Its going to take a good 15 minutes. 4. Remove from heat and let cool to 110 degrees Fahrenheit. Stir occasionally to prevent a skin from forming. When mixture is cooled, whisk in yogurt. 5. Pour boiling water into a large container with a lid to sterilize. Pour out water before adding yogurt. I use a massive 6 cup mason jar. 6. Pour yogurt into sterilized container and put on the lid. The trick now is to keep the jar warm (at around 110 degrees F) for the next 8-15 hours. I wrap my mason jars in a bunch of towels and leave it  near the heater. In the summer, I leave it out in the sun. The longer you leave the yogurt, the more it will set and the tangier it will get.

Savoury Stuffing Rolls

November 24 2015 Vegan Dad 

Savoury Stuffing Rolls What?! A new post?! As I explained on ye olde Vegan Dad Facebook page, I have been battling Crohns this entire year and that has very much dampened my enthusiasm for cooking and eating. I think I am finally getting it under control, so heres hoping! I have also spent the last three weeks on strike which was the inspiration for these buns. On the picket line we have been blessed by endless treats from supporters. I thought it would be nice to have a handheld savoury snack instead and these fit the bill. They are reminiscent of stuffing, hence the name. You could easily add some cranberries in with the apple, or raisins. Use this as a starting point and go nuts (maybe even add nuts?). Could be great for Thanksgiving or Christmas dinner. INGREDIENTS Makes 24 rolls - 1 recipe everyday whole wheat bread (make with all white bread flour, if desired, as I did) - 2 potatoes and 1 carrot, small dice (about 2 cups total) - olive oil - sea salt - 4 garlic cloves - 1 leek, white and light green part, halved and thinly sliced - olive oil - 1 cooking apple, peeled, small dice - 1/­­4 tsp sage - 1/­­2 tsp thyme - 1/­­2 tsp marjoram - 1/­­4 tsp cinnamon - freshly ground pepper - soy milk for brushing METHOD 1. Make the dough per the recipe link above. While the starter is rising, preheat the oven to 400 degrees. 2. Toss the diced potato and carrot in a splash or two of olive oil and season lightly with sea salt. Transfer to a cookie sheet lined with baking parchment and bake for 20 mins, turning the veggies after ten to ensure and even roast. 3. Wrap the unpeeled garlic cloves in a piece of aluminum foil and roast along with the veggies for 20 mins. 4. Set veggies and garlic aside to cool. 5. Heat a splash of olive oil in a small frying pan over med-lo heat and saute leeks until softened (about 5-7 mins). Add apple and cook for a minute more. Skin and chop up roasted garlic and mix through. Remove from heat. 6. Continue making the dough but add the herbs in to the dry ingredients. Add the veggies and diced apple/­­leek mixture in during the final two minutes of kneading. I like to start this in the stand mixer with the dough hook, but finish on a lightly floured counter to make sure nothing gets too smushed up. Add more flour is the dough is too wet. It should be slightly tacky but not sticky. 7. Transfer dough to a oiled bowl and let rise for an hour, or until doubled. 8. Line a large cookie sheet with parchment paper (or two smaller trays). Divide dough into 24 equal pieces and shape into rolls (a little tricky with all the veggies and apple, but be patient). Place on tray (in six rows of four), mist with oil, and cover with plastic wrap to let rise. 9. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. 10. When rolls have almost doubled and are touching one another, brush tops with plain soy milk and bake for 15 minutes, rotating tray half way through for an even bake. Cool but enjoy while still warm.

Vegan Pumpkin Spice Brownies (and why I run. . . with Frankie)

October 2 2015 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Pumpkin Spice Brownies (and why I run. . . with Frankie) The pumpkin craving kicked in and I began a search for what I'd bake. Not that there isn't a billion options with regard to pumpkin. I have pumpkin recipes galore within the hundreds of cookbooks scattered around this house to last me the full month of October and then some. Thumbing through the stacks yesterday, I was sure of one thing, the cinnamon and ginger were coming off the spice racks. Finally.  I have old recipes cut from magazines stuffed in files as well. Add an internet search on top and I became a "frenzied overwhelmed baker"!  I finally settled on my direction and ingredients.  I would go "brownie" with my pumpkin.  Basically, I took bread recipes apart, pared down the flour and liquid ingredients, omitted the eggs (of course), amped up the spice factors and had DH pleading 'I hope you wrote this recipe down'.  I will tell you from snacking on these this morning after a night in the fridge that the flavor and moistness factor went triple on them. They are really good right after you've baked them and then cooled, and taken with tea right before bed. They're insanely delicious the NEXT day. So just keep 'em in the pan covered with some foil and have some with your coffee in the mornings. OMG. My favorite baking pan is an old 8" x 8" cake pan that belonged to my mother. It has years of baking on it and I credit this with having much to do with success of my baking anything in this relic.  Fall is the time when along with baking, my reading obsession kicks in.  Right now, "Purity" by Jonathan Franzen and "Olive Kitteridge" by Elizabeth Strout are in the queue.  Both are fantastic.  I am a huge Franzen fan. He grew up in St. Louis. I did not.  So I find him fascinating for that reason alone.  Okay, many other reasons for my admiration, but mostly he's brilliant. Olive Kitteridge came to me by way of my fascination with Francis McDormand and the Emmy's last month. I happened to catch a few brief moments of the awards show but enough of it to land me in the middle of the awards handed out to "Olive Kitteridge" and Frances McDormand for Lead Actress. I watched in complete admiration her accepting this award in her very black dress and very natural appearance and admired her even more. I began streaming the mini-series the next night.  And. I. Loved. It.  I would have to say it is one of the top five films I've watched in the last ten years. Simply loved it. Right after finishing the series, I got the book. I don't want to spoil this for anyone by saying this, but if you watch the series, you will not be any less pleased with how the book reads.  I am typically not a movie-then-book person, rather I am a book-then-skip-the-movie person.  The book is wonderful. Where was I when all of this Olive Kitteridge was happening?  (Well we don't have cable for one. But still. No excuse.)  I've also been able to run more now that the horrible nightmare of plantar fasciitis has taken a break.  So Frankie and I head out for a few miles together a couple of times a week. I had an incident this week on my run through a St. Louis County Park that left me a little shocked and a bit shaken. If you'd rather skip the story--and get the recipe, that's fine. The recipe is below.  I totally understand, but given this whole thing sort of left me a bit paralyzed, I have to write about it.  Call it my therapy. I love running. It's my meditation. It's my strength. It's where I go to just be. As a runner, I don't typically like to run alone. I know it sounds crazy, but for one, running alone as a man is different than running alone as a woman. The vulnerability of the running woman is what I'm mostly talking about here. In my youth, the thoughts of crazy whacked out men out there really didn't phase me much. I always figured I'd "out run" anyone who tried to catch me. No body ever has. But still. As I've aged (and now in my fifties!), I find running alone (even through my neighborhood) a bit of a scary proposition, though it shouldn't be and I should be able to run anywhere just as most men are able to run "anywhere". . . alone.  *What we like to call "Male Privilege" allows that men can run alone with less fear than women.  This is why I take my dog and I wear on my wrist pepper spray. This is the reality of my running philosophy.  And it's a good thing.  Running through a local park in the middle of the week this week, I happened along a man standing in the middle of the trail, pants down. What I glimpsed of him as I came over the crest was enough for me to cringe and pull Frankie closer to me and sort of stop. I wasn't close enough to the opening of the trail to turn back. And we were far enough away from the perv that my pausing sent enough of a signal that I was not unaware of what I had just witnessed. We scared this imbecile enough that he almost fell backwards down the hill trying to manage his dog--yes, he had a small terrified dog, and pull his shorts back up. I was completely incensed. Furious. Scared. Worried. Focused on getting by him and not having an "encounter". I've got a good gut read on people and when I read something as scary I will project this fear outward. In this instance I projected disgust and then fear. And a lot of WTF?! What was happening here was someone who has a problem had come to the park to deal with his "issues" in a most inappropriate way.  A public park that should be safe, respected and beautiful was sullied by someone who needs help.  I wasn't facing anything like a major deep woods, off trail oh-my-god I have to hike to the open space four miles back to my car, I was only into the trail by about a quarter mile. Anyone could have happened upon this idiot. Here's the thing about this moment. Most people are harmless. Most men I've come across are respectful and polite--and most of the time, if you were to come across me on my run, I keep my head down, sunglasses on and give a quick look up to let you know I've seen you. Frankie along side. For those instances when I have an icky gut feel, I will turn around after passing to make sure the person has moved on. I've never been that trusting of people. I think it's a safe and far smarter way to get by in this world. This philosophy has carried me along this far in my running life and served me well. And my response to an incident like this is: see, I'm right.     I know I gave a very clear signal to this individual that he'd better not ever do this again, with Frankie barking up a storm as we ran by him--mostly out of protecting because I believe she sensed fear emanating from me, she went into protection mode. For me, I was in recovery mode trying to calm my heart and keep my feet moving until we reached an open space. Frankly, if I had to describe him, I don't think I could other than I remembered the dog, that poor little terrified dog he tugged along. Thankfully once Frankie and I came out at the other end of the trail we were at the lake and there were several folks with whom I took a quiet respite. I simply needed to get back to my car now. Still in shock and disbelief.  Sharing the story with Dr. Thyme that evening over the phone, he was stunned. And worried. And sickened, furious. Hearing a story like this reminds him of how vulnerable I can be sometimes when he's away. However, I refuse to be holed up in my house because of a whack job. I just won't. But I can see how something like this might prevent someone from venturing out.  But if we don't. . .then they win.  I could go on and on on the subject of this crazy moment I had in the park and why our system of mental health is broken in this country and how we don't do enough to protect innocent people. The news lately is filled with stories of sick people hurting innocent bystanders. The incident I had has scarred me a bit. I am not immune to the ugliness of the world. Neither am I a Pollyanna who goes about just happy-go-lucky, people are great! Hardly. But really, we need to do a better job of it. Really. People are complicated. Not that I won't run again in this park. But it's a reminder, ladies: Be vigilant. Be aware. But run on . . . with your dog, or pepper spray. Vegan Pumpkin Spice Brownies *makes one 8"x 8" pan  1/­­2 cup spelt flour 1/­­2 cup unbleached all purpose flour 3 teaspoons ground cinnamon 1/­­2 teaspoon ground ginger 1/­­4 teaspoon ground cloves 1/­­4 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/­­2 teaspoon salt  2 teaspoons ground golden flaxseed mixed with 3 tablespoons water 2/­­3 cup brown sugar 1 1/­­4 cup canned pumpkin 1/­­2 cup soy milk 1/­­4 cup olive oil 2 teaspoons vanilla extract *powdered sugar for dusting over  Preheat oven to 350 and lightly spray and 8 x 8 inch baking pan. Add all dry ingredients and spices to a medium mixing bowl and sift together. Set aside. In a small bowl, add the flaxseed and water and and mix together, set this aside to thicken. In another bowl, add the brown sugar, pumpkin, soy milk, olive oil and vanilla extract, mix well. Add the entire bowl of wet ingredients to the dry, the with a spoon, mix well--just until the dry ingredients are moist. Pour mixture into pan and smooth over with back of spoon. Bake for 25-30 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in middle comes out clean. Remove from oven, allow to cool completely. Dust with powdered sugar. Cover the pan with foil and store in fridge for three days. Enjoy!

Grand Budapest Hotel & Courtesan au Chocolat

September 7 2015 seitan is my motor 

Grand Budapest Hotel & Courtesan au ChocolatSince this blog is about food, I rarely get to talk about other things I like. But today’s Vegan MoFo promt is the perfect occasion to change that. I like books and films a lot and I like it even more when films are about books and writers. The Grand Budapest Hotel is a film about writers. Sort of. It’s also a  film about the author Stefan Zweig, whose works have inspired Anderson’s movie. (Also sort of. If you haven’t seen this movie, go watch it, it’s hard to describe. I promise it’s going to be fun!) In addition the director credits several old films, like Grand Hotel. Grand Hotel by the way is based on the fabulous Novel Menschen im Hotel ( Grand Hotel) by  Vicky Baum. There are other novels that could act as the model for this movie, like Hotel Savoy by Joseph Roth.  I have read Zweig’s The World of Yesterday but not the other works Anderson mentions. When I first saw Grand Budapest Hotel I was absolutely amazed by the fictional world Anderson had created. In the movie everything was torn apart and put back together in a way I have never seen before. The setting is a hotel in the fictional Central European country Zubrowka. The town around this hotel has similarities to Eastern European spa towns. Most of the the material was shot in Görlitz though, a small and beautifully renovated town right at the Polish border. It’s not far from Dresden where I live and it has become a popular US-movie location. Dresden also plays a little part in the Grand Budapest Hotel, I recognised a couple of streets and museum halls. In one of the most fascinating scenes in the movie a couple of characters chase each other through such a hall. Then they leave though a door and we find them back in Görlitz or somewhere else, but definitely not behind the museum in Dresden. Admittedly, this movie is not a documentary. And Anderson makes no secret of the fact that “the places [he] had envisioned just didn’t really exist anywhere“. He says he’s interested in the invention, he’s not trying to be realistic. He definitely has accomplished that. I recognised many buildings but couldn’t follow the characters’ paths because they were invented. I recognised the time period Anderson was covering but his interpretation was completely different both from the fictional and non-fictional works I have read about this period before. As I said, he put everything together again in a completely new way, even the tiniest details. The German location names used are funny and absurd and the spelling of many things is only superficially German (or French). I don’t know that much about Wes Anderson but his socialisation outside of Europe seems visible in all these details. (Or maybe he did it on purpose.) For example, there’s a bakery in this movie called Mendl’s. In German this would be Mendl or Mendls Bäckerei. No apostrophe, I would say. At least not back at that time. Then again I might be wrong. I am siding with Konrad Duden here, who published Germany’s most influential dictionary. Thomas Mann on the other hand used apostrophes with genitive cases. So we’re probably lucky he wrote great novels instead of designing and printiong bakery signs. Anyway, Mendl’s supplies everyone with a pastry called courtesan au chocolate, which is again a mix of English and French words. Those courtesans au chocolate are a colourful and elaborate version of the French pastry Religieuse. For the movie this version was invented in a bakery in Görlitz and the recipe is online. The funny thing is that they used a dairy shop in Dresden, Pfunds Molkerei,  as setting for the pastry shop. I’ve only been there once in my pre-vegan days, not to buy cheese, just because it’s an outstanding location and a tourist magnet. I only lasted ten seconds though because it was smelly as hell in there. So I cannot really imagine it turned into a bakery, even if it’s only for a few scenes. Those poor actors. Beautiful pastries smelling like aged cheese. Whatever, let’s finally get to today’s topic: “Make something inspired by a book or film.” I did not only veganise the original recipe, I changed the whole thing. Because  my recipe is how I has imagined the courtesans before learning about the recipe. It’s my version of the story! Note: For the food colouring I tried to go with natural dyes, but I think artificial ones would have been better. My colours came with a taste and I didn’t like both the matcha and the blueberry plus soda versions that much. So if you have access to artificial vegan food dyes, I recommend to use them. P.S.  We’re on the last day of our vacation and I am writing this recipe on the road. The recipe plugin isn’t working that great on our tablet. Sorry if the ingredient list looks a bit confusing. I’ll fix that as soon as we’re home. Print Grand Budapest Hotel & Courtesan au Chocolat IngredientsFor the doughnuts 240 g (2 cups) all-purpose flour 1 1/­­2 teaspoons instant yeast 120 ml (1/­­2 cup) soy milk 50 g (1/­­4 cup) sugar 2 tablespoons oil 1 pinch salt 1.5 to 2 litres of oil, suitable for frying For the ganache 2 tablespoons sugar 1/­­2 tablespoon cornstarch 60 ml (1/­­4 cup) soy milk 160 g chopped dark chocolate For the glaze 150 g (1 1/­­2 cups) powdered sugar, divided vegan red food colouring (I used 1 teaspoon. Adjust according to your package directions.) 1-3 teaspoons water 1 teaspoon matcha powder 2-3 teaspoons lime juice 2-3 teaspoons blueberry juice (from cooked blueberries) 1 pinch baking soda For the icing 55 g (1/­­2 cup) refined coconut oil or shortening, softened 50 g (1/­­2 cup) powdered sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract InstructionsTo make the doughnuts, combine flour and yeast in a bowl. Add milk, sugar, oil, and salt to a small pan and heat until luke warm. Add to the flour mixture and knead for about 7-10 minutes, or until your dough is firm and doesnt stick. Cover the dough and let it rest until doubled in size, about 60-90 minutes. Roll the dough into 4 equally sized pieces and use differently sized cookie cutters to cut each piece into 3 differently sized disks. Note: This is what I did. Its easier just to roll each piece of dough into 3 differently sized balls. Use leftovers to make 4 additional small balls, about the size of a grape. Let the disks or balls rest (covered) until doubled in size. Heat the oil in a pot. If you choose a smaller pot, youll need less oil. Just make sure that the doughnuts will be able to float and not stick to either the bottom of the pot or to each other. Use a candy thermometer. The oil should be around 160°C to 175°C, and definitly not hotter than 180°C. Fry the doughnuts for 1 or 2 minutes, or until crispy and browned. Transfer to some pieces of kitchen paper towels to drain off excess oil. To prepare the ganache, mix sugar and cornstarch and set aside. Place soy milk and chopped chocolate in a small pot. Heat carefully until the chocolate has melted. Make sure the chocolate doesnt burn and stir. Remove from heat and add sugar mixture. Whisk until silky. To fill the doughnuts, use a pastry bag with a long and small pastry tip. Use the tip to poke a hole into the big and medium sized doughnuts and then pipe some of the ganache into them. This takes a little experience but after a couple of doughnuts you should get the hang of it. To make the red glaze combine 50 g (1/­­2 cup) of powdered sugar with red food colouring and 1-3 teaspoons of water, depending on the amount of food colouring you used. The glaze should be silky and not too runny. Dip the small doughnuts into the glaze and let them dry on a cookie rack. To make the green glaze, combine 50 g (1/­­2 cup) of powdered sugar with matcha powder and lemon juice. Dip the medium sized doughnuts into the glaze and let dry. To make the purple glaze, combine 50 g (1/­­2 cup) of powdered sugar with baking soda and blueberry juice. Dip the large doughnuts into the glaze and let dry. The glaze will change its colour after a while and turn purple/­­blue purple. Dip the grape sized dough balls into leftover ganache and let dry. To make the frosting, place coconut oil and powdered sugar in a small food processor. Whip until smooth, add vanilla and whip again. To assemble, piple some frosting onto the large doughnuts and top with a medium sized one. Top the medium sized doughnuts with frosting and add a small one. Place the grape sized dough ball on top. Now try to eat this! 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­09/­­grand-budapest-hotel-courtesan-au-chocolat/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com      

Homemade unsweetened soy yogurt

August 8 2015 Fatfree Vegan Recipes  

Homemade unsweetened soy yogurt More details and complete nutritional information can be found at lovelowfat.com/­­homemade-soy-yogurt-recipe/­­. Did you know that many yogurts out on the market are just as bad for you as a Twinkie? Not only is dairy being revealed as linked to numerous health issues, but the sugar content in many store bought yogurts is mind blowing. You might think a Twinkie is tooth-ache sweet with 19 grams of sugar. Well many of the popular brands of yogurt have up to 29 grams of sugar per serving! With the American Heart Association recommending no more than 30 grams of sugar per day for women, we might be better off with the Twinkie! Although we are not recommending that either. The options out in the world for plain, unsweetened soy yogurt are slim. And if you can find it, its usually pretty expensive. Luckily its easy to make at home. Ive been making my own soy yogurt for years and someone recently asked us to post our homemade soy yogurt recipe. So here it is! Ingredients: 4 cups plain, unsweetened soy milk 1 heaping tablespoon of soy yogurt for starter (sweetened is fine, just be sure it has live active cultures) Optional: fruit and/­­or sweetener of choice You will also need a yogurt maker, or anything that will keep the yogurt at a steady temp of between 110-115 degrees F (such as a heating pad or blanket, or a digital crockpot). I find a yogurt maker to be the easiest method, and you can find them pretty inexpensively. Instructions: 1. At medium temperature, heat the soy milk in a 2 quart sauce pan until it comes to a boil. Keep an eye on it! It expands a lot as soon as it reaches its boiling point, and can boil over pretty quickly. 2. Remove from heat and let cool to about 110 degrees. Meanwhile, preheat yogurt maker by turning it on. As the milk is cooling, you might see a skin form on the surface. I find that removing it helps it to cool a little more quickly, plus I prefer it not to get mixed in to the recipe. Its easy to remove with a spoon. 3. Once cooled to the proper temp, pour into your yogurt making container or bowl. 4. Gently stir in yogurt starter, cover and let sit in your yogurt maker for anywhere from 8 to 12 hours, depending on how tart you prefer it. The longer it sits, the more tart your soy yogurt recipe will be. 5. Let chill for a few hours and its ready to use! The texture should be creamy and somewhat firm, as yogurt is. The recipe makes about a quart of soy yogurt. Before you eat it all up, however, save a heaping tablespoon for your next batch of homemade soy yogurt so you dont have to buy another starter. With that, you can keep it going infinitely as long as you continue to regularly make yogurt. What not to do: There are a number of reasons that could cause your homemade soy yogurt not to firm up: - milk other than unsweetened plain soy milk was used - milk did not boil all the way or was somehow contaminated in cooling process - soy milk was not at the proper temp when starter was added - yogurt starter did not have active cultures - setting temperature was too cool - yogurt was not let to set long enough But its very simple to avoid these pitfalls as long as you follow the recipe as directed. And once you make your own homemade soy yogurt, you may find yourself never buying overly sweetened, overpriced mass produced yogurt again! (C) ayalnaor for Fatfree Vegan Recipes, 2015. | Permalink | 3 comments | Add to del.icio.us Post tags:

Green Potato Salad

July 4 2017 Veganpassion 

Green Potato Salad The last weeks I've been traveling for the PLANT BASED INSTITUTE between Munich and Berlin. I don't get to enjoy my balcony that often. On my first free evening I took the chance to have a wonderful BBQ with my friends enjoying the weather. Everyone cooks the dish they want and we really don't want to miss a traditional german potato salad. I like it most with some greens in it. The recipe is from my new book VEGIONAL What do you like most for a BBQ evening? If you like, comment below and maybe the next recipe will be your wish! Makes 4-6 portions. Preparation time: 40 minutes For the remoulade: 100 ml soy milk (you will need soy milk because of it's lecithin) 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar 1/­­2 tsp. mustard salt, black pepper 1 onion 2 small pickles 1 bunch of fresh herbs of your choice (chives, parsley, tarragon, chervil) For the salad: 4,4 lbs waxy potatoes  10 oz frozen green peas 1 small zucchini 5,2 oz smoked tofu 3 spring onions 2 pickles homemade remoulade 3 tbsp. white wine sugar smoked salt, black pepper Mix soy drink and vinegar in a blender until the soy drink builds flakes. Blend at medium speed and add oil until you reached favoured consistency. Flavor with mustard, salt and pepper. While blending the mixture is a little warm and it will get thicker when it cools off. Cut onion and pickles into small cubes, chop the herbs and stir all in.  Cook potatoes in salted water for about 20 minutes. Then drain potatoes and let them cool off. Cut beans into pieces and leave to cook with the peas in some salted water. Darin afterwards. Peel the potatoes (or not) and cut them in slices. Put them in a salad bowl. Cut small cubes of zucchini and smoked tofu, slice spring onions and add to the potatoes. Also add beans and peas. Chop pickles and stir with remoulade and vinegar. Add the dressing to the salad and mix everything. If you like add smoked salt and pepper. 

1:15 Buns

January 20 2017 Vegan Dad 

1:15 Buns Welcome to the new year! If your 2017 is going to be anything like my 2016, then you will need this recipe to get some rich bunly goodness into your meals post haste. They are a little more stodgy than a regular bun, but, hey, you can make these in one hour and 15 minutes and they taste better than anything from the grocery store. The key is to have a nice warm place to help the dough rise quickly. The baking soda also gives them a better oven rise. Makes 6 buns INGREDIENTS - 15 oz bread flour - 1 tsp baking powder - 1 tsp salt - 3 tbsp sugar - 1 tbsp instant yeast - 1/­­2 tsp apple cider vinegar - 4 oz warm soy milk - 5 oz warm water - 1.5 oz oil - warm soy milk for brushing - sesame seeds METHOD 0:00 - 10:00: Whisk together flour, baking powder, salt, sugar, and yeast. Whisk apple cider vinegar into the soy milk, then whisk in water. Add to flour along with the oil. Bring into a dough and knead until smooth. Shape into a ball. 10:00 - 30:00: Place dough in an oiled bowl, cover, and let rise in a warm place. 30:00 - 35:00: Shape dough into 6 boules. Place onto a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Flatten into more of a puck-like shape. Brush with warm soy milk. 35:00 - 50:00: Let buns rise in a warm place, brushing with soy milk one more time half way through  the rise. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. 50:00 - 60:00: slash buns about 1/­­3 of the way through with a sharp knife. Brush once more with soy milk and sprinkle with sesame seeds. Finish the rise. The final buns wont have as much rise as a regular dough but dont worry, they have a good oven rise. 1:00:00 - 1:15:00: Bake the buns for 7.5 minutes, then rotate pan and bake for another 7.5 minutes. Cool and serve.

Garbanzo Bread (or buns)

October 21 2016 Vegan Dad 

Garbanzo Bread (or buns) I developed this recipe to get rid of the many cans of beans I had sitting in my fridge, drained of their precious aquafaba. The beans up the protein content of the bread and enrich the dough, giving it a wonderfully soft texture and more delicate crumb. Although the sponge does smell rather beany, the chickpeas are indistinguishable in the final loaf. I always make a double recipe (in two separate bowls) and bake four loaves, or two loaves and a dozen buns. (And I apologize for my idiosyncratic measurements. Thats just how I roll.)  INGREDIENTS Makes 2 loaves or 12 buns Sponge - 1lb 1oz flour (see note below*) - heaping tbsp instant yeast - 1/­­2 can unsalted chickpeas + warm water to make 20oz Dough - all the sponge - 11oz flour - 1/­­3 cup packed brown sugar - 3oz oil - 2 1/­­4 tsp salt METHOD 1. Make the Sponge: Whisk together flour and yeast. Place your blender container on your scale, add the chickpeas, then the water to make 20oz. Blend until very smooth. Add to the flour and mix with a wooden spoon until blended. It will take a little elbow grease. Cover and let sit for an hour. 2. Make the Dough: add the remaining ingredients to the sponge and bring into a dough. Knead for 5-7 mins, or until smooth. 3. Let rise in a lightly oiled bowl for an hour, or until doubled in size.  4. Punch dough down. If Making Bread: divide into two, shape into loaves, and let rise in 1.5 lb loaf pans. Bake at 350 for 38-40 mins. If Making Buns: divide into 12 pieces and shape into boules. Flatten into pucks and let rise on a large baking sheet (or two) lined with parchment paper. Brush with soy milk and bake at 400 degrees for 15-17 minutes.  *NOTE: You can use hard baking flour, all purpose flour, or a mix of the two. All purpose flour gives the bread a country loaf feel and is perfect for hamburger and hotdog buns (and makes a great loaf too). When I use hard flour, I usually slash the tops of the loaves (and the hamburger buns) before baking (as you can see in the picture).  You can also use whole wheat flour but may have to add more water to the final dough. 

Pumpkin Brioche Cinnamon Rolls

October 15 2016 Vegan Dad 

Pumpkin Brioche Cinnamon Rolls This recipe is a bit fussy but I thought I would post it anyway. The idea was to create a cheaper and easier brioche using margarine (instead of Earth Balance which I think has a weird taste, or homemade vegan butter). The problem is that margarine does not firm up in the fridge the way butter does, so the final dough is tricky to work with. Also, you need to keep the ingredients cold so the margarine does not melt. The xanthan gum gives the dough some structure, and flouring the dough before rolling helps as well. Dont worry if the rolls look a bit sloppy before they prove, as you can see from the pic it will all work out in the end. If this sounds like too much trouble, just use vegan butter and forget the xanthan gum.  INGREDIENTS Sponge - 2.25 oz bread flour - 2 tsp instant yeast - 4 oz lukewarm soy milk Dough - 8 oz  very cold  margarine - 6 oz cooked pumpkin, cold (see note below*) - 4 oz cold soy milk - 16 oz bread flour - 2 tbsp sugar - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 tsp xanthan gum (optional) Filling - 2 tbsp cooked pumpkin, cold - 1 tbsp margarine - 1/­­2 cup brown sugar - 2 tsp cinnamon - 1 tsp ground ginger - 1/­­4 tsp nutmeg - 1/­­8 tsp allspice Icing - 2 tbsp soy milk (more if needed) - 1 1/­­2 c icing sugar METHOD Sponge 1. Mix together sponge ingredients until four is well hydrated. Cover and let sit for 45 mins. Dough 1. Measure out the margarine and place it in the freezer.  2. Add  pumpkin, soy milk, flour, salt to the sponge and bring together into a dough with the paddle attachment. Let the dough sit for 5 mins.  3. Using the paddle attachment on a mixer, add in 1/­­4 of the butter at a time, waiting until the previous amount has been fully incorporated before adding more. The final dough will be smooth, satiny, and very soft. 4. Switch to the dough hook and knead in the xanthan gum. The dough should gather in a ball around the hook. 5. Transfer dough to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.  6. On baking day: Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. Roll/­­pat the dough on a well-floured surface into a 18 x 14 rectangle. Flour the top of the dough if needed.  7. Whisk pumpkin and margarine together. Mix in sugar and spice. Spread on to the dough, leaving a 1 space on the long side.  8. Roll up along the ling edge, ending at the 1 space. Cut into 12 1.5 pieces, tuck the piece of dough with filling on it to the bottom and place on the baking sheet.  9. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise a room temperature for about 2 hours, or until about doubled in size.  10. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Bake for 15-18 mins, until golden. 11. Make the icing. Mix together soy milk and icing sugar. It should be thick but able to be drizzled off the end of a spoon. Add more soy milk as needed.  12. Let cool for 10 mins on the baking sheet, then drizzle the icing over the rolls. Let fully cool before eating.  *NOTE: Microwaving is the way to go here. Cut the pumpkin in half and scoop out the seeds. Place cut side down on a plate and microwave until flesh if soft and coming away from the skin. Allow to cool in the fridge before using, and keep the leftovers in a sealed container for other recipes. 

Light Asparagus Soup

May 9 2016 Meatless Monday 

Rather than heavy cream, this recipe pairs plain yogurt and soy milk with spring’s finest asparagus to create a light, seasonal soup that’s rounded out with onion, shallots, garlic and chili flakes. This recipe comes to us from Tawnie of Kroll’s Korner. Serves 4 - 2 bunches of asparagus - 1 shallot, chopped - 1 white onion, chopped - 2 cloves garlic, diced - 2 1/­­2 cups vegetable broth - 1 Tbsp. butter - 2 Tbsp. flour - 1 cup soy milk - 1 5.3oz. container of plain yogurt - 1 tsp. fresh lemon juice - 1 tsp. red pepper chili flakes - 1/­­4 cup grated Parmesan cheese - salt and pepper – 1 tsp. of each Wash asparagus and cut an inch or two off from the bottom of them. Place the asparagus, shallot, garlic and onion in a saucepan with 1 cup vegetable broth. Bring this to a boil and then reduce to a simmer until the asparagus is tender. Remove a few asparagus tips to garnish the soup when you serve. Place the rest of the veggies in a blender and blend until smooth. Melt butter in the same saucepan the asparagus cooked in and mix in flour, salt and pepper and whisk for 30 seconds. (Don’t let flour burn!) Stir in remaining vegetable broth and bring to a boil. Take the pureed veggies and soy milk and stir into the saucepan. Next, whisk in the siggi’s yogurt, lemon juice and red pepper chili flakes. Bring to a boil again, serve hot with fresh Parmesan on top and garnish with asparagus tips. The post Light Asparagus Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Is Soy the Center of All Vegetarian Diets?

March 30 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Is Soy the Center of All Vegetarian Diets?We asked our friends at the Natural Gourmet Institute to help debunk vegetarian diet myths - and one is that following a plant-based diet means you’ll be eating nothing but tofu. Vegetarian Times has partnered with the renowned New York-based culinary school to create a comprehensive new online course, Foundations of Plant-Based Nutrition. Whether youre a new vegetarian, an avid cook wanting to expand your skills, or contemplating a career in the food industry, you will find this course helpful. Sign up to receive discounts and information about this awesome course. Myth: Soy is the Center of All Vegetarian Diets   There are still people out there who (incorrectly) assume that tofu is a cornerstone of a vegetarian diet. Even plant-based stock images frequently still have hunks of unseasoned, flavorless tofu when describing a vegetarian meal. While many vegetarians and vegans do enjoy tofu from time to time, it is hardly considered a mandatory menu item. Soy products like tofu, tempeh and soy milk are great sources of plant-based protein and happen to be considered complete proteins meaning that soy contains all of the essential amino acids. If you enjoy the taste of soy, then lightly processed or unprocessed soy products like tofu, tempeh and edamame can be healthful additions to your diet. However, if you avoid soy for any reason, fear not, because there is a whole world of plant-based protein options out there. A persistent misconception about vegetarian diets is that consuming enough protein is challenging. However, nearly all whole foods contain some protein; processed products are stripped of much of their protein, fiber and some nutrients so its best to stick to whole foods whenever possible. Nuts, seeds, beans and legumes, eggs and dairy contribute great amounts of protein but whole vegetables, too, contain this macronutrient. Consuming enough protein on a vegetarian diet, with or without soy, is quite easy as long as a variety of foods are eaten throughout the day. To learn more about meeting protein needs on a plant-based diet, join us for our online course, Foundations of Plant-Based Nutrition. Kayleen St. John is the Director of Nutrition at NYCs Natural Gourmet Institute. Kayleen has a Masters degree in clinical nutrition from NYU and is a registered dietitian. Her research examines the relationship between diet and inflammatory conditions. Kayleen is an avid runner and believes smart nutrition contributes to optimal athletic performance. Our new course, Foundations of Plant Based Nutrition, led by Kayleen, covers essential plant-centric professional cooking techniques, health-focused topics including allergens and inflammation, and how to separate nutrition fact and fiction in a vegan and veg diet.

Swedish Pancake Cake

February 9 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Swedish Pancake Cake I started counting how many pancake recipes we have posted since we started the blog and it’s surprisingly few. At least if you divide that number with the number of times we have made pancakes since we started the blog, which is embarrassingly many. We like pancakes in our family and I think we need to blog more about it. We have pancakes for breakfast, lunch or dinner at least once a week. So with a few hours left on Shrove Tuesday aka Pancake Tuesday, we wanted to throw in a little collection with some of our favourite pancake recipes from the past years - both sweet and savoury. We are also sharing the ultimate way to eat pancakes, in the form of a cake! If not for tonight, it’s an unbeatable breakfast (or dessert) for your loved ones on Valentine’s Day. The recipe is from our first book, The Green Kitchen, which btw is coming out on Portuguese this Spring (the 11th language it is being translated to, crazy!). We love American style pancakes that are stacked up high and topped with a drizzle of syrup and fruit. These Flour-free Banana, Blueberry & Coconut Pancakes are made simply with egg, banana, blueberries and desiccated coconut and they are much lighter than common American pancakes. The recipe is from The Green Kitchen but can also be found on Cooked.com. All our book recipes are actually available on the Cooked website, it’s a subscription based site but they have a 30-day free trial. Spinach Crepes with Chickpea, Apple & Tahini Filling. We have been making green pancakes for years and it’s simply achieved by mixing pancake batter in a blender with the addition of spinach (or beetroot). We serve these with a savoury filling for dinner but they also taste great on their own. Click here for the full recipe. And here is a video with us making them. Masala Dosa filled with Sweet Potato & Peas, Mango & Raisin Chutney and Raita. We loved eating dosa for breakfast in India and all the different fillings add so much flavour with both sweet and savoury tones. The dosa batter is made without eggs so these are perfect for vegans. This recipe is from Green Kitchen Travels and is available on Cooked.com. Coconut & Quinoa Pancakes with Clementine Marmalade. These vegan pancakes are from Amy Chaplin’s brilliant book that we blogged about last year. Here is the recipe. Buckwheat cr?pes with passion and mango syrup. Our version of French dessert cr?pes are topped with an addictive Mango & Passionfruit Syrup and a dollop of mascarpone. The recipe is from Green Kitchen Travels and can also be found on Cooked.com. Summer Berry Pancake Cake I have made different versions of this cake since I was a child, and I never get tired of it. I think it is so beautiful with all those stacks of pancakes, and the berries and cream squishing out from the sides. Traditionally you put jam between the layers, but we stick to fresh fruit, nut butter and date syrup. The pancakes should be very thin, so we always use a non-stick frying pan when we make these. You can prepare the pancakes one day in advance and assemble the cake just before serving. If fresh berries aren’t in season, you can use frozen instead./­­David Pancake Batter 200 g /­­ 1 3/­­4 cup buckwheat flour 3 large eggs (or 4 medium) 500 ml /­­ 2 cups soy milk or milk of your choice 1 tbsp butter, plus extra for frying pinch sea salt Layers 3 ripe bananas, sliced thin 225 g /­­ 1 1/­­2 cup raspberries, mashed with a fork 225 g /­­ 1 1/­­2 cup blackberries, mashed with a fork 125 g nut butter 120 ml raw date syrup (soft dates mixed with a splash of water in a blender) 500 ml /­­ 2 cups thick cream, chilled Topping 150 g /­­ 1 cup raspberries 125 g /­­ 1 cup blackberries 2 tbsp pistachio nuts, chopped To make the batter, add all the ingredients, plus 250 ml /­­ 1 cup  water to a large mixing bowl and whisk vigorously until you have a smooth batter. Make sure that there are no lumps of flour left. Refrigerate for 20 minutes. Give it a good whisk after you have removed it from the fridge, as the flour tends to sink to the bottom. Heat a 20 cm /­­ 8, preferably non-stick, frying pan on medium-high heat. When the pan is hot, add a few drops of oil and about 75 ml of the batter. Tilt the pan until the batter is evenly distributed. Fry for 45-60 seconds on each side, until the pancakes are golden and can be flipped easily with a spatula. Fry all of the pancakes - the batter should make about 15 - and place on baking paper to cool off. You can layer with baking paper between the pancakes to stop them sticking together. To assemble, pour the cold cream into a large chilled bowl. Use an electric hand mixer or a whisk to whip it until soft peaks form. Set aside. Put the cold first pancake on a cake stand. Spread a layer of thin slices of banana evenly over the top. Add another pancake and top it with about a third of the mashed raspberries. Then continue with next pancake and a third of the mashed blackberries. Continue with another pancake and carefully spread a thin layer of nut butter and date syrup on it. Add another pancake and spread with a layer of whipped cream. Then start all over with the banana layer. Continue until all the pancakes are covered. Top with whipped cream, fresh fruit and finely chopped pistachios. All photos from our first book by Johanna Frenkel.

Maple Date Pumpkin Porridge

October 19 2015 Meatless Monday 

Hot cereal is simmered with cinnamon, dates and maple syrup for a sweet spiced breakfast thatll take you back to childhood. Pumpkins earthiness is a great match for the porridge grain farina in this stick-to-your-ribs dish thats sure to keep you full until lunch. This recipe comes to us from Kathy of Happy. Healthy. Life. Serves 2 - 1 1/­­2 cups of water - 1/­­2 cup soy milk - or - 1/­­2 cup nonfat milk - 1/­­3 cup uncooked farina based porridge - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon - 3 tablespoons maple syrup - 1/­­4 cup dates, chopped - 1/­­3 cup canned pumpkin* - or - 1/­­3 cup roasted pumpkin puree* - 1 teaspoon nondairy buttery spread, for garnish - or - 1 teaspoon butter, for garnish - additional soy milk, for garnish - dash of cinnamon, for garnish - 2 tablespoons dates, chopped for garnish - 2 tablespoons pecans**, chopped for garnish *please note that canned pumpkin is not the same as canned pumpkin pie filling, which should not be substituted. To make your own pumpkin puree, cut a pumpkin in half, scoop out the seeds and roast, cut side down, in a 400 degree oven for 50-60 minutes, or until pumpkin flesh is soft when poked as a fork. For the smoothest consistency, puree the roasted pumpkin pulp in a food processor or blender. **optional   Bring the water and milk to a boil in a large pot over medium-high heat. Add the salt and porridge, stirring constantly. Bring to a strong boil and reduce heat to medium. Continue stirring constantly and cook according to package directions, or until the porridge thickens. Stir in the cinnamon, dates and maple syrup. If you desire a thinner cereal add in additional milk. Thicker, add in more cereal. When the porridge has cooked into a thick, hydrated consistency resembling thick applesauce, turn the heat down to low. Stir in the pumpkin puree over low heat. You can either stir it in completely or you can leave it swirled gently into the porridge. Turn off the heat and spoon equal amounts of porridge into 2 bowls. Add 1/­­2 teaspoon butter per bowl, a dash of cinnamon and a splash of milk on top. Add a few leftover chopped dates and pecans, if using, as garnish and enjoy. The post Maple Date Pumpkin Porridge appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Tempeh, Tofu, Seitan, and Jackfruit: What They’re Made of and How to Enjoy Them

September 14 2015 Meatless Monday 

Tempeh, Tofu, Seitan, and Jackfruit: What They’re Made of and How to Enjoy ThemChances are youve seen some delicious recipes that call for some interesting ingredients that might be a bit unusual. Foods like tempeh, tofu, seitan, and jackfruit, are rapidly taking the spotlight in dishes that are perfect for Meatless Monday meals. These foods add the texture and protein we often crave without using any meat at all - but what are they made of, and whats the difference between them? Tempeh Tempeh is growing in popularity in the US, and has begun showing up on restaurant menus and grocery store shelves. Originally from Indonesia, tempeh is made of soy that has been fermented with natural cultures. The fermentation process turns the raw soy into a fairly firm cake-like consistency. Tempeh is known for providing over 18 grams of protein per serving, and easily-digestible B12 vitamins. The food as an innate nutty flavor, but takes on the taste of spices an marinades well (just like its cousin, tofu). Bell Pepper Tempeh Fajitas, Meatless Monday Tofu Tofu is one of the most popular meat substitutes, and is an essential ingredients in East Asian and Southeast Asian cuisine. Tofu is made by coagulating fresh soy milk (made from raw or sprouted soy beans) until curds form, pressing the curds to release the remaining liquid, and cooling the resulting blocks of curd. Differences in how the tofu is pressed account for the differences in texture between silken/­­soft tofu and regular/­­firm tofu. Tofu is known for its ability to soak up flavors of spices and marinades, and is popular in healthy recipes as a robust source of protein and minerals that is entirely cholesterol free. Honey Glazed Tofu and Plum Summer Rolls, Robin Asbell Seitan Seitan (pronounced say-tan) is made of protein-rich wheat gluten, and boasts an impressively meat-like texture. Because of this texture and its ability to pick up flavors in cooking, seitan is frequently used in restaurants as meat substitutes like faux-duck. Seitan can be purchased seasoned and prepared, and is made by combining vital wheat gluten with water and any desired spices. Seitan is known for its texture, but it is also a prominent source of protein with up to 36 grams of protein per serving (more than tofu or tempeh) and has a high concentration of carbohydrates per serving. Seitan Cheeseburger Pizza, Upton’s Naturals Jackfruit Jackfruit is a tree fruit indigenous to tropical regions, and has recently been making waves in western meatless cooking. The flesh of the fruit is highly versatile and is perfectly healthy to consume raw or cooked in a recipe to mimic or replace meat. Jackfruits are high in protein and potassium, and are a rare example of fruits that are high in essential B-complex vitamins including B-6 (pyridoxine), niacin, riboflavin, and folic acid. BBQ Jackfruit Sandwiches with Avocado Slaw, Minimalist Baker To learn more about tasty ways to make Meatless Monday meals, join our Twitter chat with Upton’s Naturals tonight at 9pm. The post Tempeh, Tofu, Seitan, and Jackfruit: What They’re Made of and How to Enjoy Them appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Travel and Restaurant Survival Tips for Your Plant-Based Diet

August 20 2015 VegKitchen 

Travel and Restaurant Survival Tips for Your Plant-Based DietExcerpted from The Plant-Based Journey: A Step-by-Step Guide for Transitioning to a Healthy Lifestyle and Achieving Your Ideal Weight* by Lani Muelrath (BenBella Books (C) Sept. 2015, reprinted by permission). See the pre-order promotion for this book, and enjoy bonuses!  The workplace and travel both bring up the question of restaurant dining. Restaurant menus, it seems, are designed to thwart your best-laid plans for healthy eating. Oil, butter, and cheese are slammed into everything imaginable to increase food seduction, pushing you to keep eating. Is it any wonder Julia Childs cookbooks are such big sellers? Put gobs of butter in anything and it will taste good. When it comes to restaurant menus, here are a few simple strategies for navigating the options. How to Put a Restaurant Plate Together Restaurants listed as vegetarian, vegan, or natural foods may be friendly houses of food for your journey--but then again, perhaps not. Vegetarian implies no meat products; vegan items are devoid of all animal products. Vegetarian and vegan, however, do not necessarily mean healthy. They dont tell you anything about how the food is prepared, how much fat or sugar is added to the fare, or--in the case of vegetarian--even if dairy products or eggs are used. That doesnt mean these restaurant venues arent workable; it just means that you will need to be specific about exactly what you want when ordering. The best strategy is to do an internet search on the restaurants menu--and even make a phone call in advance to inquire about options. Detect which items on the menu might be most plant-eater friendly. Most restaurants have a dinner salad on the menu. When ordering your salad, clearly underscore what you do want: lettuce, tomatoes, carrots, cucumber--any and all raw vegetables. Next, politely be specific about what you do not want on your salad--cheese, eggs, bacon, meat chunks, anchovies--Ive been surprised by every one of these on one occasion or another. Dont be afraid to use the words allergy or doctor if it will help. Mention no croutons as well--they are usually fried in oil and often cheese saturated. Finally, ask for dressing on the side. You can also say no dressing and ask for a shaker of vinegar, which many restaurants serve with salads. You want the waiter or waitress to be your friend, and as you are asking them to go out of their way a bit for you, being gracious is a smart move. More and more often, veggie burgers are being featured as sandwich or entrée menu choices. Ask that yours be baked and not fried, and ask for ketchup and mustard instead of mayo or butter on the bun. If there is a vegetarian sandwich listed, simply ask that yours be served without mayo, cheese, or butter. If not, you can probably order a custom sandwich. In addition to salads and veggie burgers, your best restaurant bet might be in the sides section of the menu, where you will often find baked potatoes and other vegetables. If you dont see it listed, ask about the vegetable of the day, often served with the restaurant entrées as part of the main menu--frequently asparagus, green beans, or broccoli. You can ask that your serving be steamed and prepared without frying or oily dressing. If you say low fat, all bets are off as to how butter-drenched your plate will arrive, so be specific. Fruit salads are usually either in the sides or listed somewhere else on the menu; clarify to serve without yogurt or cheese. Breakfast is usually easy because oatmeal is almost always on the menu. Ive started to have increasing good luck with asking for soy milk or almond milk on the side, too. Our recent stop at a Mexican eatery is an example of getting good choices at restaurants. On the face of it, the menu looked like a dietary disaster. But I know I can pull together something pretty good at most Mexican restaurants--as long as they have a batch of beans cooked sans lard. I had phoned ahead about the beans, so I knew that they had two pots of beans in the kitchen: one of them plain boiled pintos. When we arrived, I knew exactly what to do. I ordered a big bowl of the boiled beans, a stack of soft, fresh corn tortillas, garden salad without dressing, extra bowls of salsa (for dressing and for my tacos), and some lime or lemon wedges. When it all arrived, I created multiple tacos by piling the beans, greens, and chunky house salsa on the corn tortillas. Combined with the greens and tomato on the salad, I crafted a hearty lunch. If the only in-house beans had been cooked in a pot of lard, I would have simply passed on beans in my tacos and done just fine with the fresh corn tortillas, tomatoes, green salad, and house salsa. Big Chain Bites When it comes to the fast-food chains, a little creativity can get you some eats in a pinch. The problem is all the mystery ingredients. Careful scrutiny usually uncovers dairy products, eggs, or oils on the lists of what, on the face of it, may appear to be plant-friendly fare--such as beans and veggie burgers. Ingredients seem to also be in a constant state of flux. You cant always trust that the servers are in the know when it comes to ingredients, so its worth checking with management or headquarters online if you want to get the facts. The best resource I have found on fast-food restaurant menus is listed at Urban Tastebuds, which has ferreted out and listed Forty-Eight Vegan Chain Restaurant Menus--the closest thing to plant-based currently available. See the list at www.urbantastebuds.com/­­43-vegan-chain-restaurant-menus -every-vegan-needs-know. The list starts with Atlanta Bread Company and runs all the way through Wendys. Each listing is linked to a page elaborating upon which items can be ordered without animal products. Keep in mind that it doesnt add the processed food filter, so items may include oils and other processed products. Fast-food meals are best left as last-resort options. Still, its nice to know where you might be able to find emergency fare. Planes, Trains, and Automobiles What about the challenges posed by airplane and other long-distance travel? The tips regarding workplace readiness may be all you need. Yet travel involving greater distances and extended chunks of time presents its own set of challenges. This year my husband and I took five trips involving international travel. Add to that the dozen or so excursions made in country for speaking engagements, and were talking about lots of hours logged on planes, in airports, and even a boat or two. The same pack-and-plan system works for all of them. Scout the Location in Advance The first thing I do for airplane travel is some reconnaissance regarding food options at the destination. First stop is the internet, where Ill search the hotel or rental location for nearby plant-food-friendly options, such as a produce market, a natural foods store, or a familiar chain--places where Ive found a good meal in the past, and where I know I can replenish my travel food stash. I then search the area for restaurants under the categories of vegetarian, vegan, or natural foods. A search at www.happycow.net can often turn up several appropriate vendors for eats in urban areas. Outbound Its easy to prepare and pack food when you are heading out on plane travel. Heres an example of how I do it. With an international junket coming up in a few days from this writing--in addition to the in-transit needs of spare clothing and a toothbrush--Ill pack in my carry-on the following: four hummus sandwiches, two peanut butter sandwiches, four apples, cold baked potatoes, peeled carrots, sugar snap peas, and a couple of baggies of rolled oats along with some dried fruit, nuts, and seeds. All of these easily pass at airline security--Ive never had a question asked yet. This food cache translates to two substantial meals for both my husband and me. The hummus sandwiches are eaten first due to their perishable nature. The carrots and snap peas will serve as filling and fibrous portable fare--instant salad, just not in the usual bowl. The peanut butter sandwiches pass the durability test and Ive served them good as new-- though slightly reshaped depending on the rigors of travel--up to forty-eight hours later. The apples last indefinitely. So do the nuts and seeds. Potatoes are best eaten within a few hours, depending on the heat to which your luggage is exposed, but Im always impressed by the way these hold up. The rolled oats can be emptied into a cup, covered with water, and after a few minutes of soaking, ready to eat. If your fruit stockpile has run out, you can find apples, bananas, and other fruit at most airports, even in the coffee shops. Another option for carry-on is soups-in-a-cup that simply require hot water. Let them sit, and in five minutes you can have split pea or black bean soup. Inbound Returning from a destination creates a slightly different situation because you dont have the luxury of being able to stock up from home. If youve been staying with friends or family, a house rental, or a hotel with a fridge, you can pack fruit and durable sandwiches for the return trip. Rolled oats, dried fruit, and nuts packed as part of your outbound preparations can hitch up with airport salads and fruit for sustenance. *This post contains affiliate links. If the product is purchased by linking through this review, VegKitchen receives a modest commission, which helps maintain our site and helps it to continue growing!

Vegan Chocolate Cake Mix from The Homemade Vegan Pantry. Book Review + Giveaway!

July 31 2015 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Chocolate Cake Mix from The Homemade Vegan Pantry. Book Review + Giveaway! The The Homemade Vegan Pantry: The Art of Making Your Own Staples by Miyoko Schinner is the book you need to start cooking vegan staples at home. All of building blocks as home made soy milk, your own tofu and tempeh, baking mixes, pan cake mixes, mac and cheese mix, glorious butterless butter (palm oil free). Dressings and sauces such as eggless mayo, brown sugar mustard, ketchup, teriyaki sauce, vegan oyster sauce, vegan fish sauce, ranch, no-oil caesar and many more. Basic pizza, rolls, biscuits, pastas, gluten-free polenta crackers, cake mix. The book also uses some of these in recipes for soups, pasta, cakes, brownies, cookies. There are vegan subs for unribs, unchicken, and obviously amazing cheeses like oil-free cheddar and mozzarella, almond feta and many many more.   Chapters include Condiments (sauces, dressings, jam), dairy and egg-free goodness (cheese, yogurt, milks), all you need is soup (broth, stock, soups), the meat of the argument (tofu, yuba, yuba bacon, unfish, unchicken, unribs, neatballs), magic and pasta (marinara, vodka sauce, mac n cheese mix), the grains of truth (pancake mix, pizza dough, dinner rolls, pastry dough, granola) sweet endings (cake mixes, buttercream, ice cream) The publisher is giving away a copy of the book to one of the blog readers (US only). Please see the end of the post to enter.  Continue reading: Vegan Chocolate Cake Mix from The Homemade Vegan Pantry. Book Review + Giveaway!The post Vegan Chocolate Cake Mix from The Homemade Vegan Pantry. Book Review + Giveaway! appeared first on Vegan Richa.


You will enjoy these as well ...

Found an error?
Help to fix it! Tell it us!



Our sites missing something? Suggest new content or features!



Have you any comments?
Send it us!