soy - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!










soy vegetarian recipes

Rice Pudding with Berries

January 8 2018 Meatless Monday 

The Chinese often begin their day with a congee, or rice porridge. This breakfast rice, sweetened up with cinnamon and berries, is a great way to use up leftover rice. You can use any type of rice. Serves 4     - 2 cups brown rice, precooked - 1-1/­­2 teaspoons cinnamon - 1/­­2 cup almonds, slivered - 3 cups soymilk - 1/­­2 cup mixed berries Mix all ingredients and simmer until thick, stirring constantly. Serve hot or cold and garnish with berries. The post Rice Pudding with Berries appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Chickpeas in Coconut Onion Sauce – Manglorean Chana Gassi

January 6 2018 Vegan Richa 

Chickpeas in Coconut Onion Sauce – Manglorean Chana GassiChana Gassi /­­Ghassi – Mangalorean Coconut Onion sauce with Chickpeas. Simplified adaptation of Regional Indian Curry from Coastal Karnataka. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Nut-free Recipe I remember trying a version of Kori Gassi which is a popular chicken curry from Mangalorean cuisine (coastal region in Karnataka state) way back when. The Sauce is made with a few ingredients but packs an amazing complex flavor. This coconut onion sauce can be used with veggies and tofu as well. I use chickpeas with it and served it with tomato rice. Dried chickpeas that are soaked for a few hours and pressure cooked in a pressure cooker/­­Instant Pot. You can also make it in a saucepan, see recipe notes. The sauce cooks and caramelizes under pressure with the chickpeas, it it does not need to be pre-roasted. If however you are using cooked chickpeas or veggies, cook the sauce until the onion doesn’t smell raw, then add the veggies/­­chickpeas and simmer. Just when you thought we cant have more chickpea curries :). There are many sauces and curries across regional Indian cuisines that use various ingredients and spices very different from each other and often paired with meats, paneer or legumes. The different flavors, textures, spices all work equally beautifully with the different beans and pulses, seitan/­­chikin subs, and tofu. Its all about the sauce. Lets make this Mangalorean Chana Ghassi! Continue reading: Chickpeas in Coconut Onion Sauce – Manglorean Chana GassiThe post Chickpeas in Coconut Onion Sauce – Manglorean Chana Gassi appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Spiced Sprouted Lentils, Cajun Roasted Sweet Potato Bowl

January 3 2018 Vegan Richa 

Spiced Sprouted Lentils, Cajun Roasted Sweet Potato BowlSpiced Sprouted Lentils, Cajun Roasted Sweet Potato Bowl with Veggies, Greens and Tahini Garlic Dressing. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe. Use cooked lentils, beans or chickpeas for variation. Happy New Year Everyone! Starting up the year with this amazing Sprouted lentil bowl. Lentils are sprouted, then lightly spiced, greens are wilted with garlic, Veggies roasted with Cajun spice and served in a bowl with a dressing of choice.  Use sprouted mung beans or other sprouted chickpeas/­­beans for variation. I also love this with sprouted brown chickpeas. Cook it a bit longer to reduce the raw flavor and serve up in the bowl. Sprouted Lentils and Beans makes the nutrients more bio-available, improves the quality of the protein and also makes them more digestible for some. You can also use cooked lentils or chickpeas instead for a quicker meal. Lets get Sprouting. Continue reading: Spiced Sprouted Lentils, Cajun Roasted Sweet Potato BowlThe post Spiced Sprouted Lentils, Cajun Roasted Sweet Potato Bowl appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes

January 1 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes Lauren Haynes is a folk herbalist, medicine maker, plant enthusiast, and the founder of Wooden Spoon Herbs, a small apothecary line based in the Appalachian mountains. Take a look at Lauren’s shop offerings, and you’ll be immersed in a world of plant-powered tinctures, salves, oxymels, and teas, each one more magical than the other. In this interview, Lauren tells us about self-care as a form of self-respect, kindness as a form of beauty, her favorite plants for stress, beauty, and colds (and more!), the importance of sourcing her ingredients locally and working with what’s available, as well as exercise, sustenance, inspiration, procrastination, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Oh, open and free, absolutely. Since I work from home, things end up being pretty routine: tea, emails, breakfast. But if I have my way I love to see how the day unfolds uninhibited. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. Most mornings start with a hot tea or something creamy with raw milk and occasionally marshmallows. I check and return emails first thing, then Ill meditate and make some breakfast and get to work. On lazier mornings well go into the small town nearby and eat eggs benedict and read the paper. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My new favorite nighttime tool is the Flux app for my computer. It gradually turns your screen from blue light to orange with the arc of the day, so the blue light doesnt deter melatonin production come bedtime. Other than that, just reading a great book until my eyes get tired. Living out in the county where its dark and quiet helps me sleep soundly every night. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – smoked salmon omelette with sauteéd greens Lunch – egg salad sandwich with a bowl of good soup Snack – fruit or hummus or a little chocolate Dinner – soul food: pinto beans, cornbread, a baked sweet potato and collard greens, topped with hot sauce and ferments and a slice of blue cheese -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink tea most mornings. Sometimes matcha or Earl Grey, or sometimes just ginger and lemon balm, to ground and calm myself before a hectic day. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Um... yes, check. I have a major sweet tooth and Lilys stevia-sweetened chocolate bars save my life. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Right now my regimen includes fish oil, Mothers Best beef liver pills, a tincture of medicinal mushrooms, and evening primrose oil. I also love using lymphatic herbs steeped in vinegar throughout the year. Every spring I steep whatever edible herbs are coming up naturally in raw apple cider vinegar: plantain, violet leaf, dead nettle, dandelion greens, chickweed and cleavers. That lasts me all year and keeps me feeling vital, just a spoonful a day. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I try to exercise but if I have a full schedule its the first thing I cut out. I live on a tract of wilderness, so walking a few miles a day is super easy and I do that interspersed with yoga when Im feeling too tired to get outside. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? A little bit of both! Its definitely hard to make the time for it since I work from home and just go, go, go. I definitely find walking in the woods pleasurable, so that keeps me motivated to exercise. I cant even imagine going to a gym... Maybe someday. Exercise is something Im starting to get excited about. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? True beauty is when someone makes you feel like your soul is illuminated by the way that they treat you. Thats what is beautiful to me. If I want external beauty, Ill just scroll Instagram for a bit, you know? But true kindness is actual beauty. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Laidback is how I would describe my skincare routine. See also: erratic. I use a rosewater and witch hazel toner daily (Poppy & Someday), followed by a blend of rosehip and carrot seed oil (Zizia Botanicals). Sometimes I use a gentle rose quartz scrub on my face (Aquarian Soul), followed by oil cleansing, but usually Im pretty lowkey. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Yes! Nettle and alfalfa infusions, and also evening primrose oil internally. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Drink tons of water, sleep as much as you can, and wear red lipstick. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Consistent routines are hard for me, but I am constantly checking in to make sure I dont get overwhelmed by stress, even if that means five minutes of yoga in the middle of the day. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I really love regular acupuncture treatments and massage, as well as daily meditation and moxibustion. Calming teas that ease tension, like ginger and chamomile. Also just goofing off as much as I can get away with. You cant be silly and stressed at the same time. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? My first line of defense is a few dropperfuls of fire cider. I make one called Sunshine Cider with turmeric and rosehips, but my friend Gretchen made me some with habanero peppers and that always helps me stay on the right side of health. Fire cider, a shot of elderberry syrup and then some red root tincture, an amazing lymphatic herb that relieves a sore throat. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely bleed together, as I work from home and run my business with my partner. I try to take the weekends off and get out of the house daily to break up the work mode, even if its just a drive to the post office. Luckily, I love my work because its a huge part of my life. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Honestly, mindfulness is key. Just checking in with myself constantly to see how Im feeling, why Im feeling that way and what I need. I just take little tea or chocolate breaks or go put some sun on my face or make a nourishing meal. A hot shower if Im feeling cold. Self massage if Im feeling anxious. Shutting the computer if Im getting tired. And making time for the little things that make me happy, like reading a book. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Cleaning up my diet was key for me in resolving a lot of health issues. In college I was just eating garbage and drinking alcohol and doing all the teenage things. Once I realized that youre literally what you eat, and started treating my body with respect, a lot shifted for me. I really feel like that small change helped align me with the path Im on now, which is 100% what Im supposed to be doing. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Im usually brimming with ideas and running myself ragged trying to make them all happen, so if I struggle with anything its occasional procrastination. Usually this looks like doing the easier things on my to-do list before the hard-hitting work chores, which isnt such a bad thing. I just kind of let myself have some slower times, because I work really hard. I may sip tea and pull tarot cards and then eventually get a burst of energy. Or sometimes I do nothing for like two full days. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. So, so many. I love The Gift of Healing Herbs by Robin Rose Bennett and Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz, as well as so many books from the 70s by obscure hippies and natural living advocates. Living on the Earth by Alicia Bay Laurel, for example. Knowledge -- What was your path to studying herbology and founding Wooden Spoon Herbs? I came to herbs when looking for a path to self-sufficiency. I romanticized living off the land, providing all that I would need for myself through my connection to the earth. And thats basically how it happened. I got all the books I could find about herbalism, read them, and started making herbal remedies. I started selling them slowly and it just kind of took off. Then I got to put my business hat on and thats been such a rewarding challenge. -- Can you talk a little bit about your decision to work only with herbs native to your home region of Appalachia? Theres so much to say about this. When I started opening my eyes to the bounty that surrounded me, it struck me as absurd to order herbs from suppliers that sourced from the far corners of the earth, when we had so many of the same herbs that could be sourced from the bioregion of Appalachia. For example, why am I going to order nettle that comes from Croatia when my friend has an acre of it on her farm? And no offense to Croatia or the herbalists that use those sources, but it just wasnt for me. I saw the opportunity to create a righteous supply chain and source from local farmers and forage my materials. To this day I still source directly from small organic farms around the country. Appalachias medicinal herbs are legendary: ginseng, goldenseal, bloodroot. People from all over the world use these herbs exclusively. And many of the herbs used in Traditional Chinese Medicine grow in Appalachia, because when the continents were Pangea parts of what is now China and parts of Appalachia were the same land. The geography of these regions is still very similar, and that is really special. So I wanted to learn about these plants for myself, because they are my neighbors and we share the same space. Not to mention that my family has been on this land for at least five generations, probably more. Its my most recent ancestral tradition, and I think its really important to learn about the traditions of your own ancestors so that youre not co-opting someone elses. Our pasts are precious. Finally, I believe in slow, local medicine for the same reasons I believe in slow, local foods – because theyre more potent and they taste better. -- What are some of your best-selling products and what herbs is your customer most excited about at the moment? My bestsellers are the Anxiety Ally, Brain Tonic, Moontime Magic and Migraine Melter tinctures. Elderberry Sumac Syrup is always a hit, as well as the Golden Cocoa (adaptogenic golden milk meets hot chocolate). I also have some new, more esoteric offerings based on the elements, and the Spirit one has been selling really well. I think my customers are just always after herbs that ground and expand the spirit, which is super beautiful. That and herbs for stress, always. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment?  Podcasts! All the podcasts: Medicine Stories, Thats So Retrograde, So You Wanna Be A Witch, Being Boss. That and the color cobalt blue. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love seeking out hot springs, getting massages and acupuncture, going to the movies with my partner and eating at good restaurants. In the summer, swimming in the river behind my house and lying in the sun. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Caravan by Stephen Gaskin Song/­­Album – Tried So Hard by Gene Clark Piece of art – the entire Motherpeace tarot deck -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? My favorite mohair cardigan, a striped shirt, high-waisted leggings and denim, Poppy & Somedays Gypsy Rose Toner, whatever books Im reading, a notebook and Uniball pen, magazines, calming tinctures, bagged tea, thermos, Ricardo Medina botines, charcoal toothbrush -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Jess Fuery, Beatrice Valenzuela, Shiva Rose, the founders of Cap Beauty, Ashley Neese, Connie Matisse of East Fork Pottery, jeweler Annika Kaplan, Erica Chidi Cohen, Rachel Craven, Beth Kirby of Local Milk, Rachel Budde of Fat and the Moon, Kristen Dilley of Nightingale Acupuncture, and, naturally, Ilana Glazer Photos by Beth Kirby and Lauren Haynes You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Spaghetti Squash Pasta with Sun-dried Tomato, Garlic & Basil

December 29 2017 Vegan Richa 

Spaghetti Squash Pasta with Sun-dried Tomato, Garlic & BasilSpaghetti Squash Pasta with Sun-dried Tomato, Garlic & Basil. Light Dinner with no Grains. Add some spiced chickpeas, roasted nuts or baked tofu for variation. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe I had 3 small spaghetti squashes lying around the other day and I decided to jump onto the spaghetti squash pasta wagon to see what this squash is about.  It is an interesting Squash that when roasted and scooped looks like noodles/­­spaghetti and can be use used in place of those.  It is neutral flavored (less sweet) than many of the winter squashes and works well in savory dishes. To this squash, I added a simple saute of garlic, basil, sun dried tomato, olive oil, salt and pepper and crumbles up almond cheese or vegan parm.  Simple, pleasing, light and delicious! Continue reading: Spaghetti Squash Pasta with Sun-dried Tomato, Garlic & BasilThe post Spaghetti Squash Pasta with Sun-dried Tomato, Garlic & Basil appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Everything Bagel Vegan Cheese Ball – 10 Minute – No soaking, straining

December 22 2017 Vegan Richa 

Everything Bagel Vegan Cheese Ball – 10 Minute – No soaking, strainingEverything bagel Seasoning Vegan Cheese Ball. No soaking, blending, straining needed! 10 minute vegan cheese ball. Gluten-free. Can be soy-free Cheesy Balls and dips are always popular at potlucks and events. But most recipes need a blender or processor, lots of wait time, straining and handling. You dont need to do any of that with this cheese ball. It takes just 5 minutes to put together, 35 mins to bake and its ready to serve! Put the almond flour, spices, flavor ingredients in a bowl, mix well to combine, knead for a minute to combine and bring together, done! Roll it in everything bagel seasoning or other spices or seeds /­­crushed nuts, and bake at low heat. Cool and serve with veggies and crackers. Easy as that. Perfect to start up the Holiday Dinner. Happy Holidays Everyone!Continue reading: Everything Bagel Vegan Cheese Ball – 10 Minute – No soaking, strainingThe post Everything Bagel Vegan Cheese Ball – 10 Minute – No soaking, straining appeared first on Vegan Richa.

10 Healthy Vegan Christmas Dessert Recipes

December 21 2017 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

10 Healthy Vegan Christmas Dessert Recipes It’s been one of those months. December flew by, and the chaos of getting ready for Christmas sped it along. And then there were the “fun” end of year challenges–medical checkups and minor procedures, a wrecked car (E’s but she wasn’t hurt), and last minute plane tickets to get her home for the holidays. Oy. So my dreams of having a new recipe for you in time for Christmas evaporated. Instead, I decided to remind you of some of my family’s favorite holiday desserts.(...) Read the rest of 10 Healthy Vegan Christmas Dessert Recipes (219 words) (C) svoisin for FatFree Vegan Kitchen, 2017. | Permalink | 9 comments Post tags: Holidays The post 10 Healthy Vegan Christmas Dessert Recipes appeared first on FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

Vegan Gluten free Christmas Cake – Fruit Cake

December 18 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Gluten free Christmas Cake – Fruit CakeVegan Gluten free Christmas Cake Fruit Cake full of nuts, dried fruits, candied ginger. Soft, Flavorful and great for gifting. Vegan Soyfree Recipe.  I am not sure why fruit cakes have a bad rap. They used to be a treat we would wait for around Christmas. Soft, Sweet, full of fun stuff for us kids I guess. Maybe we just lucked out with a fabulous bakery. I make versions of my Spelt spiced fruit cake if not baking a load of cookies every year. This version is adapted from spelt flour version. I use almond flour and rice flour to keep it gluten-free. The cake keeps well refrigerated for a few weeks if you use liquor or a week with orange juice. Serve as is or with a bourbon/­­rum glaze! Add nuts or seeds that you like, some dates, apricots, cherries. I also added some roasted sunflower seeds and chia seeds, so the cake is also great to snack on. Continue reading: Vegan Gluten free Christmas Cake – Fruit CakeThe post Vegan Gluten free Christmas Cake – Fruit Cake appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Potato Sweet Potato Latkes – Fritters

December 13 2017 Vegan Richa 

Potato Sweet Potato Latkes – FrittersEasy Vegan Latkes. Potato & Sweet Potato Latkes. Panfried crispy latke fritters for Hanukkah. Vegan Gluten-free soy-free Nut-free Recipe. 7 Ingredients. The year is slipping by. Just a few weeks to go before we hit 2018. Its been one hectic year so far. Book work, Chewie being sick (he is doing much better now, almost his normal demanding and barky self). And I have been playing catch up with posts on the blog.  Lets get to these simple latkes before the season passes us by. Potatoes, onions and sweet potatoes are shredded and mixed with starch, salt and pepper, then pan fried until crisp. You can also deep fry these latkes. The key is time and patience. Burnt potato does not taste good. Golden is bliss. Make thin latka and let them cook through. Serve with applesauce, vegan sour cream or other toppings of choice. Continuing with December deals and giveaways! See below.Continue reading: Potato Sweet Potato Latkes – FrittersThe post Potato Sweet Potato Latkes – Fritters appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Watch: Ireland Vegan Scene At Dublin Vegfest 2017

December 11 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

HappyCow’s Ken Spector traveled to Dublin, Ireland, checked out the vegan scene, and attended and spoke at Dublin Vegfest in Dublin, Ireland on September 23+24, 2017. Ken interviewed two Irish vegans who discussed highlights from the event and provided exclusive insider vegan tips. Vegan celebrities such as strongman Patrik Baboumian attended and spoke at the event. Below is our video containing interviews and highlights: For more information see: http:/­­/­­dublinvegfest.com Watch our video here: Veg Restaurants featured in video: Soya Vegan Butcher in Dublin, Ireland https:/­­/­­www.happycow.net/­­reviews/­­sova-vegan-butcher-dublin-53343 Veganity in Dublin, Ireland https:/­­/­­www.happycow.net/­­reviews/­­veginity-restaurant-dublin-98189 143 V in Cork, Ireland https:/­­/­­www.happycow.net/­­reviews/­­143v-cork-92211 My Goodness in Cork, Ireland https:/­­/­­www.happycow.net/­­reviews/­­my-goodness-cork-105957 Special Thanks to the event coordinator, Pears Hussey, and to the two women Ken interviewed in the video, Dearbhla Mitchell and Tamasin MacCarthy Morrogh. The post Watch: Ireland Vegan Scene At Dublin Vegfest 2017 appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Vegan Pumpkin Cheesecake Soy-free GF option

December 7 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Pumpkin Cheesecake Soy-free GF optionVegan Pumpkin Cheesecake with graham cracker style crust. Easy Creamy Pumpkin Cheesecake to please everyone. Gluten-free with gluten free crust. Soy-free Recipe. I made this cheesecake over Thanksgiving and I think I have found my favorite holiday dessert. It is creamy, lightly tangy, pumpkiny, spicy and all things holiday, fall and dessert. Its lighter, creamier and spicier than a pumpkin pie and oh so good. This has just the right amount of pumpkin and the cheesecake flavor balance which I like much more.  Its a simple recipe. Blend the pumpkin with soaked cashews, non dairy yogurt sweetener and pumpkin pie spice. Bake to set, then chill  until ready to serve. Serve with whipped coconut cream, or vanilla ice cream or califlornia cabin (its a fabulous flavor from local Seattle vegan ice cream shop frankie and Jos). Make this cheesecake for a party or for yourself as you might not want to share! Continue reading: Vegan Pumpkin Cheesecake Soy-free GF optionThe post Vegan Pumpkin Cheesecake Soy-free GF option appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Crispy Fried Cauliflower Wingz

December 5 2017 Vegan Dad 

Crispy Fried Cauliflower Wingz This recipe is perfect for your upcoming holiday party! Or tuck it away until the Super Bowl. An indulgence, to be sure, but you deserve it. Ive been meaning to work up a recipe like this since the cauliflower wings craze hit the interwebs a while ago, but I never got around to it. These are crispy and flavourful, and remain so even when they are no longer hot. The boys doused theirs in Buffalo hot sauce, while the rest of us stuck to a sweet BBQ sauce. Delicious!  INGREDIENTS - 1 large head of cauliflower, cut into florets Brine - 2 cups cold water - 1 tsp garlic powder - 2 tsp onion powder - 2 tsp smoked or seasoned salt - 2 tsp paprika - 1 tsp poultry spice Batter - 2 cups all purpose flour - 1 cup panko crumbs - 1/­­2 cup chickpea flour - 1/­­2 cup tapioca flour/­­starch - 1 tbsp each: onion powder, garlic powder, paprika, Italian seasoning - 1 tsp white pepper - 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar - 3 cups plain soy milk (more if needed) METHOD 1. The day before: mix together the brine ingredients (I use a blender). Pour into a large freezer bag, then add the cauliflower florets. If your cauliflower is very large, you can make a 1.5 recipe of the brine.  2. Remove as much air a possible so the brine is making maximum contact with the brine. Refrigerate for at least 12 hours, rotating the bag as needed for even brining.  3. The Day of: drain cauliflower in a colander. Heat oil in a deep fryer to 350 degrees. 4. While cauliflower is draining, whisk together the dry ingredients for the batter (i.e. flour to white pepper).  5. Dredge the cauliflower in the flour mixture in batches until coated. Shake off all excess and place on a baking sheet. 6. In a separate bowl, whisk together vinegar and soy milk. Add enough of the soy mixture to the remaining flour mixture to make a thickish batter. Add more soy milk if needed. 7. Add some pieces of cauliflower to the batter. Turn to coat. Leave the cauliflower in the batter for a few minutes to allow the batter to soak into the dredging flour. 8. Shake off excess batter and transfer to a cooking tray or plate.  9. Fry in oil, 3-4 minutes per side, until deep golden brown. Make sure your oil is not too hot or the outside will burn before the cauliflower is cooked. 10. Drain on paper towels and serve while still hot. NOTE 1: while one batch is frying, add another to the batter so it can soak. Repeat. NOTE 2: add more soy milk to the batter, if needed. The dredging flour will thicken the batter a bit, so just thin it down again. 

Too-Easy Chocolate-Peanut Butter Fudge

November 28 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Too-Easy Chocolate-Peanut Butter FudgeThis Chocolate-Peanut Butter Fudge is too easy not to make on a regular basis! It firms up quickly, so be sure to get it into the pan right away. For a soy-free fudge, use a soy-free vegan butter. Too-Easy Chocolate-Peanut Butter Fudge This fudge is too easy not to make on a regular basis! - 8 ounces semisweet vegan chocolate. coarsely chopped, or vegan chocolate chips - 1 cup peanut butter - 1/­­2 cup vegan butter - 1 cup confectioners sugar - 1 teaspoon vanilla extract - Lightly grease an 8-inch square baking pan. - Place the chocolate, peanut butter, and butter in a heatproof bowl and set it over a saucepan of simmering water, stirring until the chocolate melts and the mixture is smooth. - Turn off the heat. Whisk in the sugar and vanilla until smooth and well blended. - Scrape the mixture into the prepared pan and cool until firm. Cut into 1 1/­­2-inch squares. Keep refrigerated. From The Nut Butter Cookbook by Robin Robertson. (C)2014 Robin Robertson. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Lori Maffei.   The post Too-Easy Chocolate-Peanut Butter Fudge appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegan Chocolate Pecan Pie – Glutenfree option

November 20 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Chocolate Pecan Pie – Glutenfree optionVegan Chocolate Pecan Pie with Dates and Chai spice. All the pecan pie with chocolate. Derby Pie. Glutenfree with gf crust. Vegan Pecan Pie. Soyfree Recipe.  So! Lets get to posts just before the break in all that holiday mood, planning and travels. This Quick Pecan Pie with chocolate chips, loads of pecans, and dates instead of the sugar works out really well for a decadent deseert. Serve with whipped coconut cream (so many whipped coconut toppings in the market this season!), or vanilla ice cream and some vegan caramel.  Pecans get toasted, then tossed with some cinnamon, Dates get blended with non dairy milk, pumpkin pie spice, vanilla and some flour to make the base which is a mix of custard and cookie when baked. Pecans, chocolate chips are mixed in and baked until set. Chill if needed. Make ahead and enjoy it the whole week!Continue reading: Vegan Chocolate Pecan Pie – Glutenfree optionThe post Vegan Chocolate Pecan Pie – Glutenfree option appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Irish Cream Cheesecake

December 30 2017 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

Vegan Irish Cream Cheesecake When my family and I left town last week to spend Christmas with our two families, the last thing I expected was to come home with a new recipe to share. Id signed off on Facebook for the holidays and didnt even bring a camera with me. My plan was to make only tried and tested recipes for Christmas Day (and as few of them possible--I was on vacation, darnit!), but when we couldnt find vegan eggnog in any store, Vegan Eggnog Cheesecake had to become Vegan Irish Cream Cheesecake.(...) Read the rest of Vegan Irish Cream Cheesecake (842 words) (C) svoisin for FatFree Vegan Kitchen, 2017. | Permalink | 8 comments Post tags: Higher-fat, Holidays The post Vegan Irish Cream Cheesecake appeared first on FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

Roasted Chestnut Soup

December 25 2017 Meatless Monday 

Chestnuts are roasted sweet and balanced with apple cider vinegar and soy sauce in this simple soup. Red bell pepper slices and green onions top this winter warmer for a festive veggie crunch, making it perfect for your next holiday gathering. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings. Serves 4 - 1 1/­­2 pounds whole chestnuts - 1 tablespoons olive oil - 1 large red onion, diced - 4 cups low sodium vegetable broth - 1 cup lowfat Greek yogurt - 1 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce - 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar - a few dashes hot sauce - salt and pepper, to taste - 1 red bell pepper, sliced - 2 green onions, sliced Place the chestnuts in a bowl and cover with hot water. Soak for 1 hour. Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Make an X on the flat side of each chestnut and place them, onto a baking sheet, cut side up. Transfer the baking sheet to the oven, roast for about 30 minutes and set aside to cool. When chestnuts are cool enough to handle, scoop their flesh out with a spoon. Dice the chestnut flesh. Place the olive oil into a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add the onion and cook for about 4-6 minutes, or until softened. Add the vegetable broth, 4 cups of water and the diced flesh of the chestnuts. Bring to a boil and reduce the heat to medium-low. Simmer for 30-40 minutes, or until the bits of chestnuts are very soft. Remove the stockpot from heat and stir in the Greek yogurt, soy sauce, apple cider vinegar and hot sauce to taste. Transfer the chestnut veggie stock mixture to a blender in batches. Puree until smooth. Strain through a sieve and transfer to a medium bowl. Taste for seasoning and adjust if desired. Divide the soup into 4 bowls, top with festive red bell pepper and green onion slices and enjoy! The post Roasted Chestnut Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Everything Bagel Vegan Cheese Ball – 10 Minute

December 22 2017 Vegan Richa 

Everything Bagel Vegan Cheese Ball – 10 MinuteEverything bagel Seasoning Vegan Cheese Ball. No soaking, blending, straining needed! 10 minute vegan cheese ball. Gluten-free. Can be soy-free Cheesy Balls and dips are always popular at potlucks and events. But most recipes need a blender or processor, lots of wait time, straining and handling. You dont need to do any of that with this cheese ball. It takes just 5 minutes to put together, 35 mins to bake and its ready to serve! Put the almond flour, spices, flavor ingredients in a bowl, mix well to combine, knead for a minute to combine and bring together, done! Roll it in everything bagel seasoning or other spices or seeds /­­crushed nuts, and bake at low heat. Cool and serve with veggies and crackers. Easy as that. Perfect to start up the Holiday Dinner. Happy Holidays Everyone!Continue reading: Everything Bagel Vegan Cheese Ball – 10 MinuteThe post Everything Bagel Vegan Cheese Ball – 10 Minute appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Khichdi in a Jar – Mixed Vegetable Kitchari Mix for Instant Pot or Saucepan

December 20 2017 Vegan Richa 

Khichdi in a Jar – Mixed Vegetable Kitchari Mix for Instant Pot or SaucepanKhichdi in a Jar – Mixed Vegetable Kitchari Mix for Instant Pot or Saucepan. Easy Lentil Rice Soup with Veggies.  Gift the jar full of lentils,, rice and spices. Empty into a pot with veggies of choice. Easy Weekday Dinner.  Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Nut-free Recipe. Tis the time to wrap up some fun gifts and this one is a must. When I made this jar, I thought, hey its khichdi, it is a super simple recipe. People can possibly just throw it all together at home within minute. But when its right there in the jar, it is as simple as putting it in the instant pot (pressure cooker) or saucepan with water and just a short wait to a fabulous meal. Khichdi or Kitchari is soup or dal and rice preparation that usually is very lightly spiced and served as light meal when you are sick or just to give the tummy a break.  The basic version is slightly bland with just 1 or 2 spices and kept so to be a light meal. You can add different spices, some vegetables, tomato etc to make it a hearty meal. The basic version is in my first book, green moong and brown rice version on the blog.  This bottled up kitchari makes a great gift. You will want to make and eat lots of kitchari after the big holiday meals and the jar makes it a 5 minute job. Empty contents in an Instant pot which you may have received as a gift or saucepan, add whatever veggies you like or not, add water and done! Serve as is or with some chutneys or papadum/­­crackers. Continue reading: Khichdi in a Jar – Mixed Vegetable Kitchari Mix for Instant Pot or SaucepanThe post Khichdi in a Jar – Mixed Vegetable Kitchari Mix for Instant Pot or Saucepan appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Sweet Potato Challah

December 17 2017 Vegan Dad 

Sweet Potato Challah Ive been meaning to post this recipe for ages. Sweet potato is my new favourite way to replace eggs in enriched bread dough recipes. It makes the final loaf nice and soft, and adds colour to the dough that     mimics the many egg yolks of non-vegan challah. This is a version of Peter Reinharts recipe from Artisan Breads Everyday, but I use a blender to incorporate the potato into the liquid ingredients. You can let the dough rise in the fridge, then shape and bake the next day as he calls for, but I usually just do everything in the same day because I dont have the time or the fridge space to follow his method. The recipe produces reliable results every time. Trust me: I make at least two recipes a week so the kids have buns for school lunches. Makes 2 loaves, or 16 buns INGREDIENTS All measurements are weight, not volume - 17oz warm water - 2.5 oz oil - 4 oz cooked sweet potato (see note* way below) - 3 oz sugar - 14 g instant yeast - 19 g salt - 2 lb 3 oz bread flour - soy milk for brushing METHOD 1. Place water, oil, sweet potato, sugar, yeast, and salt in a blender. Blend until smooth. 2. Add liquid to flour in a large bowl and bring into a dough. Knead until smooth.  3. Shape into a ball and let rise, covered, in a large oiled bowl until doubled in size.  4. From here, YouTube is your friend. Determine how many braids you want in your loaf (the pic above is a 6 braid) and find a video for how to braid it. Remember that the recipe makes two loaves. 5. Place braided loaves on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper (ideally both loaves on one big sheet). Brush with soy milk. 6. Leave to rise, uncovered, in a warm place until almost doubled in size (about 1 hour). Keep brushing with soy milk every 15 mins or so, to keep the dough from drying out and to build up layers of soy milk (this will give the loaf that glossy finish when baked).  7. While dough is rising, preheat oven to 350.  8. Bake for 20 mins, then rotate the pan and bake for another 15-20 mins, until the loaves are evenly browned and sound hollow when thumped on the bottom. A convection oven really helps get an evenly browned loaf.  A NOTE ON BUNS This is also my go to recipe for buns--it makes 16 buns that I do as a 4x 4 batch bake on a large sheet pan. Brush them with soy milk like the loaves, but bake at 400 for 15-17 mins, rotating the pan half way through. Or, space them apart, slash the tops before baking, and sprinkle with sesame seeds after the last brushing with soy milk (as pictured below). Or do hot dog/­­sausage buns.  *Note: I prick the skin of a sweet potato a few times with a fork, then cook it in the microwave on the potato setting. Its fast and makes for a sweet potato that is not too wet. 

Kitchen Creativity

December 12 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Kitchen Creativity In a break from my usual recipe posts, I’d like to share an excerpt from Karen Page’s new book entitled Kitchen Creativity. Beyond a cookbook, Kitchen Creativity is a guide to inventive cooking (without recipes!) that will inspire you to think, improvise, and cook like the world’s best chefs. Great cooking is as much about intuition and imagination as it is about flavor and technique. Kitchen Creativity gives insights into these creative processes from more than 100 top restaurant kitchens, including the Bazaar, Blue Hill, Daniel, and Dirt Candy. Based on four years of research and dozens of in-depth interviews, Kitchen Creativity illuminates the methods of culinary invention. Part I reveals how to learn foundational skills, including how to appreciate, taste, and season classic dishes before reinventing the classics from a new perspective. Part II’s A-to-Z entries are an invaluable culinary idea generator, with exercises to prompt new recipe ideas and combinations. While not a cookbook, nor a vegan book, for that matter (although vegan chefs and ingredients are very well represented), Kitchen Creativity has a lot to offer for cooks looking to broaden their creativity in the kitchen.  The following is an excerpt from Kitchen Creativity on one of my favorite topics, umami… “Umami” from Kitchen Creativity by Karen Page The taste of umami is imparted by glutamate, a type of amino acid discovered in 1908 by Dr. Kikunae Ikeda of Tokyo Imperial University. In studying kombu (kelp), Ikeda managed to isolate glutamate as its own compound, giving it the name of umami, which translates as savoriness. Thus, 5,000 years after the discovery of salt, and 4,000 years after the discovery of sugar, and 3,500 years after the discovery of sour (vinegar), umami is a relatively new taste concept. Japanese cooks had been using umami-rich ingredients intuitively for centuries, long before their scientific properties were discovered to enhance flavor. While we first mentioned umami in our 1996 book Culinary Artistry, it did not begin to gain more widespread acceptance until after 2000 when glutamate receptors were discovered on the tongue. The main sources of umami are those deriving from 1) the amino acid glutamate (found in, e.g., kelp); and those deriving from 2) so-called nucleotides--such as a) adenylate (aka AMP, which is found primarily in fish and shellfish), b) guanylate (aka GMP, which is found primarily in plants and fungi, e.g., shiitake mushrooms, esp. dried), and c) inosinate (aka IMP, which is found primarily in meat and fish, e.g., bonito flakes). The big umami magic happens when one or more nucleotides are combined with glutamate, as there is a synergistic affect--resulting in umami with as much as eight times the potency. Umami Dynamics Umami can enhance a bland dishs appeal with mouth-filling savoriness. Umami can also enhance a dishs perceived sweetness, while tempering its perceived bitterness. If you find yourself with too much of a good thing when it comes to umami, try balancing with salty, sweet, bitter, acidic, or piquant ingredients. Umami is a taste that tends to linger on the palate--something referred to as a long finish in the wine world. Because it contributes to the qualities of deliciousness and satiation, umami is especially prized as a taste in dishes and menus. Note: Certain herbs and spices can also emphasize a dishs savory aspects, such as bay leaf, cumin, oregano, paprika, sage, and thyme. Using Umami Chefs praise black garlic (aka fermented garlic) for its ability to add depth and earthiness to dishes ranging from vegetables to meats. If you doubt umamis importance as one of the five primary tastes, consider the fact that leading chefs like Michael Anthony, Eric Ripert, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten believe dashi to be a key component of their cooking. Some chefs use it to replace liquids in countless preparations, from brines to broths to salad dressings. Chefs have rising enthusiasm for all manner of fermented ingredients (e.g., fermented soybeans, kimchi, miso, pickles, sauerkraut), which bring umami to dishes including vegetables. The corn smut known as huitlacoche is prized as a Mexican delicacy, not only by chefs cooking in the vernacular like Rick Bayless, but also mainstream chefs who find themselves using it in quesadillas, soups, and tacos. Sean Brock declares is insanely delicious and luxurious, like black truffles. Kombu (aka kelp, the sea vegetable) is prized for its umami by Yoshihiro Narisawa. Brad Farmerie is fanatical about miso, which allows him to achieve a rich mouthfeel without butter or cream. Miso is an integral part of Farmeries roasted chile caramel Brussels sprouts, which involve caramelizing sugar (sweet) before adding chiles (hot), cilantro stems (bitter), lime juice (sour), fish sauce (salt/­­umami), and miso (richness). He adds miso to sweet potatoes + brown butter + rosemary to create another dish hes not able to take off the menu. Other chefs will add misos (e.g., white) to salad dressings or soups for an umami boost. From his time in Japan, Michael Anthony picked up a love of sea weeds and pickles. Thomas Henkelmann describes rich, flavorful stocks as essential for cooking in every season. Umeboshi paste is prized by chefs, including Isa Chandra Moskowitz of Omahas and Brooklyns Modern Love, for its umami quality. Moskowitz adds it to her Caesar salad dressing for its anchovy flavor. Even native Brits like Mark Levy fall prey to the charms of white truffles, which he prizes for their mysterious aroma and short availability. Excerpted from Kitchen Creativity: Unlocking Culinary Genius--with Wisdom, Inspiration, and Ideas from the Worlds Most Creative Chefs by Karen Page (Little, Brown, October 31, 2017). Save Save Save Save The post Kitchen Creativity appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegetable Korma – Creamy Indian Korma Recipe No Onion Garlic

December 10 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegetable Korma – Creamy Indian Korma Recipe No Onion GarlicVegetable Korma – Veggies in Spiced Ginger Chile Sauce. Creamy Indian Korma Recipe made without Onion and garlic. Vegan Indian Gluten-free Soy-free  Can be made nut-free. No Onion No Garlic Recipe. Instant pot option Weekends always have me craving Indian food, so here is this quick Korma Sauce with vegetables of choice.  There are several different types of kormas. Some are decadent, some light. Some use lots of whole spices, some use just a few and some use coconut. This korma sauce is a simple sauce made with whole spices, ginger and chili and then thickened with cashews. The sauce does not use onion and garlic as is used is many korma sauces. Some regional cuisines in India do not include certain root veggies like onion and garlic, or allium. This delicious and easy sauce has a similar flavor punch of my restaurant style Navratan korma sauce (from my first book), but simpler and without any onion and garlic. Use whichever whole spices you have and Use other nuts or coconut as sub for cashews. Lets get to this delicious Clean up the fridge Veggie Korma. Also in other news, get both my books on Kindle Matchbook DEAL, ebook version 88% off for only 2.99 on amazon US, when you get the print copy. If you already bought the print copy at any time past or present (for yourself or for gifting), you get this deal too! Head to the book page and it will automatically show you the deal if you have a print copy order in your account. Take the ebook with you on kindle, computer or your phone!Continue reading: Vegetable Korma – Creamy Indian Korma Recipe No Onion GarlicThe post Vegetable Korma – Creamy Indian Korma Recipe No Onion Garlic appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Chocolate Macadamia Truffles with Coconut

December 5 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Chocolate Macadamia Truffles with Coconut When you love chocolate, macadamia nuts, and coconut, theres only one thing to do - make these decadently delicious truffles. Chocolate Macadamia Truffles with Coconut are great for holiday gift giving, and they’re a terrific addition to dessert trays at parties, too! Chocolate Macadamia Truffles with Coconut When you love chocolate, macadamia nuts, and coconut, ?theres only one thing to do - make these decadently delicious truffles. - 1 1/­­3 cups shredded unsweetened coconut - 1/­­3 cup semisweet vegan chocolate chips - 1/­­3 cup macadamia butter - 3 tablespoons coconut milk - 2/­­3 cup confectioners sugar - Finely chop the coconut by pulsing it in a food processor. Set aside. - Place the chocolate in a heatproof bowl and set it over a small saucepan of simmering water until the chocolate melts. (Alternatively, melt the chocolate chips by placing them in a small microwaveable bowl and microwave on high for about 1 1/­­2 minutes, or just until the chocolate is completely melted.) Add the macadamia butter and coconut milk and blend until smooth and creamy. - Place the chocolate mixture, sugar, and 1/­­3 cup of the reserved coconut into a food processor and process until well combined. - Shape the mixture into 1-inch balls and roll them in the remaining 1 cup coconut, pressing so the coconut adheres to the truffles. Place the truffles on a platter or a baking sheet. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use. From The Nut Butter Cookbook by Robin Robertson. (C)2014 Robin Robertson. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Lori Maffei. The post Vegan Chocolate Macadamia Truffles with Coconut appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Spicy Bok Choy with Noodles and Peanuts

December 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

Wilted bok choy and peanuts fill a flavorful, savory broth alongside chewy noodles for a hearty one-dish meal. Look for fresh rice noodles in the pasta or Asian food section of most grocery stores. This recipe comes to us from Sharon Palmer, The Plant-Powered Dietitian. Serves 4 - 1 teaspoon sesame oil - 1 tablespoon peanut oil - 1 red onion, sliced - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 1 tablespoon peanut butter - 3 tablespoons soy ginger dressing - 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce - 2 tablespoons orange juice - red pepper flakes, to taste - 1 (12 ounces) package fresh rice noodles - 6 (6-ounce) heads baby bok choy - 1/­­4 cup peanuts Place the oils in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the onion and garlic and sauté for about 5 minutes, or until the vegetables soften and become fragrant. Add the peanut butter, dressing, soy sauce, orange juice, red pepper flakes and 1-1/­­2 cups water to the skillet. Stir until bubbly and smooth. Cover and cook while you prepare the noodles. Bring a medium pot of water to a boil over medium-high heat and cook the rice noodles according to package directions. Drain and rinse with water. Transfer the cooked noodles to the skillet and stir to combine. Add the bok choy and peanuts to the pan and let cook for 1 minute, or until the bok choy is slightly wilted. Enjoy! The post Spicy Bok Choy with Noodles and Peanuts appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Instant Pot Eggplant Sweet Potato Lentil Curry

November 25 2017 Vegan Richa 

Instant Pot Eggplant Sweet Potato Lentil CurryInstant Pot Eggplant Sweet Potato Lentil Curry. Mung Beans, lentils, spices, sweet potato and eggplant make a filling curry or soup. Use other veggies of choice. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Nut-free Recipe. Make it in a saucepan or InstantPot Pressure Cooker. Easily made oil-free. This 1 Pot Sweet Potato Eggplant and Lentil Curry is easy, flavorful and comes together quickly. I make variations of this often with brown or green lentils, green mung beans, a combination of the two, different veggies and spices. The combination of earthy lentils, hearty mung beans and veggies like eggplant and sweet potato makes for an amazing meal.   Serve this hearty warming bowl as a soup or as dal with rice or grains or flatbread. Make it with various spice blends as garam masala or berbere or baharat (from my book  (get both now with holiday deals and super low prices!). See video below for the curry with brown lentils and mung beans. Continue reading: Instant Pot Eggplant Sweet Potato Lentil CurryThe post Instant Pot Eggplant Sweet Potato Lentil Curry appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Fill Your Plate with Meatless Sides for Thanksgiving

November 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

Fill Your Plate with Meatless Sides for ThanksgivingEven if youre not going meat-free for Thanksgiving, you can still keep your sides plant-based! Meatless Monday has several recipes for delicious side dishes that are rich with veggies and flavor. If youre tired of the sides you serve every year, put a new, vegetarian spin on some old classics! There are so many great meatless dishes that you can feel free to fill your plate with sides and skip the turkey. Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts Mushroom Pie Squash and Sunchoke Mac and Cheese Savory Soy-sage Stuffing Arugula Fig Almond Salad   Make sure to tune into Facebook today at 12:00 noon EST to watch Goyas Chef Fernando Desa make Quinoa and Brown Rice Stuffing and Coquito Coconut Eggnog in preparation for the Thanksgiving holiday! We’ll be streaming at https:/­­/­­www.facebook.com/­­GoyaFoods/­­. The post Fill Your Plate with Meatless Sides for Thanksgiving appeared first on Meatless Monday.


You will enjoy these as well ...

Found an error?
Help to fix it! Tell it us!



Our sites missing something? Suggest new content or features!



Have you any comments?
Send it us!