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Vegan Tomato Gazpacho

5 Natural Ways to Increase Vitamin D

Tempeh Meatballs & Spaghetti

Manjulas All-Time Favorite Appetizers










sour vegetarian recipes

Vegan Green Smoothie with Chia Seeds

January 11 2021 VegKitchen 

Vegan Green Smoothie with Chia Seeds Everybody loves a great vegan green smoothie. They’re full of things like antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals, and of course, they taste amazing. And that’s before we talk about add-ins, whether they’re for flavor or for an extra boost of nutrients. Chia seeds are my favorite thing to add to a green smoothie. And for good reason! Chia Seeds Chia seeds are an excellent add-in for smoothies. They pack a protein punch, they’re full of antioxidants and are an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids. Chia seeds also contain vitamins A, B1 (Thiamin), B2 (Riboflavin), C (ascorbic acid), E, choline, and Folate (folic acid). Chia also contains vitamins B3, B5, B6, B15, B17, D, K, inositol, and PABA. The main Minerals are Boron, calcium, copper, iodine, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorous, potassium, silicon, sodium, strontium, sulfur, and zinc. It also has amylose and plenty of electrolytes. And they also contain 18 of the 22 amino acids, including all nine essential amino acids. You can literally never have too much chia. This recipe and photo below are from Chia: The Complete Guide to the Ultimate Superfood*by Wayne Coates, PhD. Used with permission. This article was first published on October 5, 2001. It has since […] The post Vegan Green Smoothie with Chia Seeds appeared first on VegKitchen.

rasam vada recipe | rasam vadai recipe | rasa vadai recipe

January 7 2021 hebbar's kitchen 

rasam vada recipe | rasam vadai recipe | rasa vadai reciperasam vada recipe | rasam vadai recipe | rasa vadai recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. south indian cuisine is ultra-popular for its range of breakfast recipes it has to offer. these are generally clean and healthy meals with an abundance of carbs in it. but then there are other types and variants of breakfast cum snack with deep frying as its main source of cooking. one such popular and tasty snack combo recipe is rasam vadai recipe known for a strange combination of vada and spicy rasam. The post rasam vada recipe | rasam vadai recipe | rasa vadai recipe appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

cream cheese spread recipe | veggie cream cheese | herb cream cheese

January 4 2021 hebbar's kitchen 

cream cheese spread recipe | veggie cream cheese | herb cream cheesecream cheese spread recipe | veggie cream cheese | herb cream cheese with step by step photo and video recipe. dips and sauces are very common in the indian cuisine and are made for most of the savoury snacks. these generally include the spicy and tangy tomato sauce or fruit-based sweet and sour jams for most of the bread varieties. but then there is another popular dip or spread made with milk which is known as cream cheese loaded with mixed herbs known for its creaminess. The post cream cheese spread recipe | veggie cream cheese | herb cream cheese appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Apple Banana Pakora, Bhajia, Fritters

December 30 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Apple Banana Pakora, Bhajia, Fritters (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Apple Banana Pakora Apple and Banana Pakoras! Pakoras are an all-time favorite snack amongst everyone. Pakoras are made in so many ways using a variety of vegetables and lentils. Apple and Banana Pakoras were suggested by my friend Rajni from India. It sounds different because I never tried these pakoras. I decided to give it a try. I know she enjoys sweet and spicy combinations of flavors. These pakoras are crispy from the outside and soft from the inside. These Pakoras are also vegan and gluten-free. Give it a try and share your experience. Hope you will enjoy it. This recipe will serve 4. Course Appetizer Cuisine Indian Prep Time 5 minutes Cook Time 15 minutes Total Time 20 minutes Servings 4 people Ingredients6 Apple slices cut into rounds 1/­­4 inch thick 6 banana slices, cut into the long way banana should not be very ripe 1/­­2 cup gram flour besan 2 Tbsp rice flour 1 Tbsp corn starch also can use arrow root powder 1/­­2 tsp salt adjust to taste 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds jeera 1/­­4 tsp black pepper 1/­­2 tsp mango powder amchoor 1 Tbsp sugar 2 Tbsp cilantro finely chopped, hara dhania 1 Tbsp green chili finely chopped InstructionsI am using firm apples. I have sliced the apples in rounds about 1/­­4 inch thick. Use firm bananas that are slightly less ripe. Do not use fully ripe bananas. I am using 1banana. I sliced the banana in 6 pieces the long way To make the batter, add all the dry ingredients together besan, rice flour, cornstarch, salt, cumin seeds, black pepper, mango powder, and sugar. Mix all the ingredients well. Add the water slowly to make a smooth batter. Consistency of pancake mix. I used about 1/­­2 cup of water. Now add the green chilies and cilantro, mix it well. Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium-high heat. The frying pan should have about 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put one drop of batter in the oil. The batter should come up but not change color right away. Dip the apples and bananas slices into the batter one at a time, making sure it is covered by the batter completely. Then, slowly drop in the slices into the frying pan. Fry the pakoras in small batches, not overlapping. The pakoras will take about 3-4 minutes to cook. Turn them occasionally. Fry the pakoras until both sides are golden brown. If the oil is too hot, the pakoras will brown too fast and not get crispy. The crispy, delicious pakoras are now ready to serve. NotesThey taste delicious with tamarind sweet and sour chutney. I already have this chutney recipe on my blog. You would also like to see the recipes for Apple Jalebi, Apple Bread Rolls, Aloo Puri, Tomato soup. The post Apple Banana Pakora, Bhajia, Fritters appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Holiday Cookbook Giveaway #3

December 15 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Holiday Cookbook Giveaway #3 I’m happy to announce the third winner of my Holiday Cookbook Giveaway.  As a reminder, three winners have been chosen (one in the last three weeks) to win copies of four of my recent cookbooks: The Plant-Based Slow Cooker The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook Vegan Mac & Cheese One-Dish Vegan The third and final winner has been chosen using the Random Number Generator on Random.org and the winner is: Connie Faivre. To claim your cookbooks, Connie, please send me an email or DM me on Messenger and let me know where to send your cookbooks! If I dont hear from you by next week, another winner will be chosen. I wan to that everyone who participated in my giveaway.  Thank you for your support and for your kind words. I wish the very best to all of you this holiday season and in the coming year. The post Holiday Cookbook Giveaway #3 appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Cookbook Giveaway Winner #2

December 8 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Cookbook Giveaway Winner #2 It’s time to announce the second winner of my Holiday Cookbook Giveaway.  As a reminder, three winners are being chosen (one each week) to win copies of four of my recent cookbooks: The Plant-Based Slow Cooker, The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook, Vegan Mac & Cheese, and One-Dish Vegan. The second winner has been chosen using the Random Number Generator on Random.org and the winner is: Sandra Lee Childs . To claim your cookbooks, Sandra, please send me an email or DM me on Messenger and let me know where to send your cookbooks! If I dont hear from you by next week, another winner will be chosen (along with a winner for the third and final giveaway). Everyone else, thanks for entering and if you didnt win this time, you’ll have another chance to win next Tuesday.  And keep those new entries coming in (on the original Holiday Cookbook Giveaway post from November 27). The post Cookbook Giveaway Winner #2 appeared first on Robin Robertson.

The Ultimate Wellness Gift Guide for Everyone on Your List

December 1 2020 Vegetarian Times 

The Ultimate Wellness Gift Guide for Everyone on Your ListTis the season to update your naughty or nice lists and start holiday shopping. With health and wellness remaining center stage amidst a new surge of COVID-19 cases, everyone could use an extra dose of TLC throughout the holidays and into the new year. Weve curated a collection of 25 wellness gifts at a variety of price points that are sure to fill your lucky recipients with the warm fuzzies this season is all about. Broglie Box Curated Wellbeing Kits Help a loved one on your list keep his or her anxiety or stress in check with a BroglieBox. Co-founder Julia Broglie was inspired to create the company after experiencing her own mental health challenges as a young adult and losing her older brother, Justin, to suicide. She offers a wide variety of boxes -- such as Grief Relief, Stress Less and Focus Kit -- but were partial to the Alleviate Anxiety Deluxe Box, which comes with therapy dough, a massage rollerball, mindfulness cards, a workout band, hydration reminder, journal, medication reminders and a magazine full of articles from mental health experts. BroglieBox, $40 Nap Bar Better Sleep Box Good things come to those who nap, including reduced sleep deprivation and increased productivity. Houston residents adore pay-by-the-snooze facility Nap Bar, and you can now give the same luxurious napping experience to anyone on your nice list, no matter where they live. Nap Bars Better Sleep Box features everything you need for the perfect napping environment: an aromatic soy-based candle, a vegan aromatherapy pillow mist, a blackout sleep mask, and a downloadable theta brain wave audio file. Nap Bar Better Sleep Box, $69 Dazzle Dry Mini Kit Its not as easy to get a mani/­­pedi these days, so why not gift a quick-drying, non-toxic, humane, and long-lasting manicure system that brings gorgeous nails right to your recipients house? Developed by bio-organic chemist Dr. Vivian Valenty and backed by over 30 years of research, Dazzle Dry is a unique line of naturally advanced, high-performance nail care. Its award-winning four-step nail system is vegan, never tested on animals, and dries in just five minutes without UV light. DazzleDry, $75 Landia Skincare Mens Care Starter Set No doubt, theres a man in your life who could really use his own skincare products, and the Mens Care Starter Set from Landia Skincare is the perfect choice. The whole vegan skincare line is toxin-free, and made in Oregon from organic local ingredients that are responsibly sourced. This set includes a shave cream, face cream, and beard and hair oil in two scents -- and, best of all, it comes luxuriously packaged in a wooden box complete with a wooden button. Built Marketplace, $20 Lord Jameson Dog Treats Whether your pup celebrates Christmas or Hanukkah, Lord Jamesons got you covered. Choose from Holiday Cobbler (crisp green apples and oats), Gingerbread (peanut butter and oats), or Hanukkah Gelt (blueberries) -- the entire collection is vegan, cruelty-free, plant-based, allergy-friendly, and made without any preservatives, artificial colors, flavors, or GMO ingredients. Lord Jameson, $12.99 The Dry Challenge Book If 2021 is the year someone in your life has vowed to cut back on their alcohol consumption, help support their healthy lifestyle choice with a copy of, The Dry Challenge: How to Lose the Booze for Dry January, Sober October, and Any Other Alcohol-Free Month. The Dry Challenge is ideal for anyone who wants to complete a dry-month challenge, giving up all forms of alcohol for 31 days -- it walks you step-by-step through one drink-free month, from sharing the news with friends and family to getting back on track if you slip up and have a drink (or two). Amazon.com, $14.99 Puritize Home Sanitizing System Sanitize everything was 2020s slogan, and all signs are pointing to 2021 requiring the same vigilance with hygiene. Help protect your loved ones with a Puritize Home system, an ultraviolet light home sanitizing system that kills more than 99.9% of germs, bacteria and viruses -- in just 10 minutes. Put your cell phones, masks, glasses, keys, remote controls, headphones, toothbrushes, and electronic devices in and wait for it to work its magic. Puritize, $199.99 Vellabox Candle Subscription Do you know what really sets the mood this holiday season? Heavenly scented small-batch candles-- especially ones that are made by American artisans, are vegan and cruelty-free, use 100% natural wax with cotton wicks, and are phthalate- and paraben-free. Vellabox ticks all those boxes, with an expertly curated candle subscription box. With three sizes to choose from, your recipient will receive a candle and surprise gift each month all year long. Vellabox; starting at $10/­­month FINEX Cast Iron Skillet Set Theres no more prized culinary tool than a cast iron skillet -- you can pretty much cook anything in it, it lasts literally forever, and it even fortifies food with iron. FINEX is designed by a small team of Portland-based craftspeople who are grounded in the belief that cooking should be genuine. The Holiday Starter Set comes with a 10-inch skillet and lid (the most versatile pan youll ever own) perfect for cooking holiday meals, and a custom three-piece care kit to ensure the cookware is preserved and performs perfectly for generations to come. Finex, $229.00 Blissd Happiness Planner They say it takes 30 days to break a bad habit or create a healthy one. But what if it takes just a bit longer? Blissd will give you 100 days of goal setting, self-reflection and inspirational quotes all wrapped up in its beautiful Happiness Planner. This planner uses the power of positive thinking, mindfulness, gratitude, and self-development to help you discover and create a life in alignment with who you truly are. Bliss’d, $29.00 Saltworks Gourmet Salt Gift Set Dont get salty this season; give salty! Any foodie will love the curated selection of six signature salt fusions from SaltWorks -- including Black Truffle Sea Salt, Wild Porcini Mushroom, Vintage Merlot, Espresso Brava, Lime Fresca and Spanish Rosemary. Its housed in a limited-edition recipe box, along with six different recipes. The bold flavors absolutely come through, since SaltWorks uses a proprietary process to bind natural ingredients to each sea salt crystal. Saltworks, $49.95 Green Chef Meal Delivery Know someone doing keto? Paleo? Living a plant-powered lifestyle? No matter their dietary preference, Green Chef delivers. Literally. All of the premium ingredients you need to cook a delicious meal for two or four comes pre-measured and prepped -- all you have to do is follow the step-by-step instructions to enjoy a gourmet meal. These days, skipping the grocery store is the best gift of all. Green Chef, starting at $11.99 per serving Mala Collective Mala Bead Necklace Long-time meditators and those wishing to start their practice will appreciate receiving mala beads from Mala Collective this holiday season. Whats a mala? A string of 108 beads (an auspicious number in Buddhism) used as a tool to help count mantras. It also acts as a tactile guide as you sit in silence in a meditation practice. Each necklace is made from different gemstones (each steeped in its own symbolism) and Rudraksha seeds (which provide inner calm and peace), and is hand-knotted and blessed in Bali. Mala Collective, $96.00 Mission Farms CBD Goat Milk Soaps Sure, soap can clean, but the right soap can also heal. Thats why Mission Farms crafts soaps made from more than 25% fresh goat milk (goats milk naturally contains specific enzymes to reduce dry skin and psoriasis, such as alpha-hydroxy acid and MCT oils), coconut oil, and olive oil -- and infuses it with full-spectrum CBD and other essential oils. The goats milk comes from a farm outside of Bend, Oregon, and theres a formulation for any need: Deepen Your Sleep (lavender blossom), Ease Your Comfort (spearmint eucalyptus), Cam Your Stress (honey grapefruit) and Enhance Your Well-Being (oatmeal and honey). Mission Farms CBD, $20.00 Dr. PAWPAW Skincare Balms Is it a lip balm? Color for your cheeks? Eyeshadow? The answer is yes! Dr.PAWPAWs Hello Gorgeous Gift Set is whatever you need it to be, including the perfect stocking stuffer. This set of vegan-approved, cruelty-free, ethically sourced multipurpose natural skincare balms jazz up and nourish lips, skin and hair. They harness the power of pawpaw or papaya and contain vitamins A, C, and E, plus iron, potassium and magnesium. Ulta, $12.99 Apollo Neuro Wearable Wellness Device Since stress is at an all-time high, it makes sense to fight it with technology never seen before. A team of physicians and neuroscientists at Apollo Neuro recently developed a wearable wellness device that uses gentle vibrations (low-frequency, inaudible sound waves you can feel but not hear) to help your body recover from stress. Apollos scientifically proven technology improves heart rate variability -- a key biometric of stress -- so you can feel more calm, balanced, and perform at your best. Apollo, $349.00 NAMAR Sustainable Cutlery Set Single-use plastic is ruining the environment, so why not give a gift that will help the future of our planet? This sustainable stocking stuffer is ideal for coworkers who bring their lunch to work, frequent travelers, picnickers, or anyone leery of germs on restaurant silverware. Made from 100% wheat straw, yet gluten-free, NAMAR is biodegradable, reusable and easy to clean -- and it doesnt get soggy in soups or salads. The set includes a fork, spoon and set of chopsticks placed inside a travel-friendly wheat straw case. Namar, $12.00 White Elm Vegan Leather Tote Bag For the woman who always has her hands full, give the perfect vegan carry-all: a White Elm Aquila vegan leather tote bag. Not only does it feel like high-quality leather, but the well-thought-out design is also a favorite among traveling mothers, nurses, teachers and working professionals. It was created by a busy mom who wanted to stay organized and look good, so the super spacious bag features an adjustable shoulder strap, carry handles, three exterior pockets, five interior pockets, and a secure zip closure. White Elm, $129.00 Slumber CBN Sleep Aid Youre probably familiar with CBD, but CBN is another compound found in the cannabis plant thats primarily used as a natural sleep aid. For anyone on your list whos struggling with getting enough shut-eye, CBN may be the most priceless gift of all. This THC-free formula is made in Colorado and derived from organically grown hemp, plus its vegan and GMO-free. Slumber, $44.95 Sanabul Womens Boxing Gloves Theres no such thing as punching like a girl, but that doesnt mean she needs to wear mens boxing gloves while doing so. Sanabuls Womens Easter Egg Boxing Gloves feature a narrower silhouette that contours the female hand for a comfortable fit. And dont let the feminine array of colors (mint, coral, ice blue, and lavender) fool you -- these gloves are made for performance and durability. Amazon, $49.99 AncestryHealth Genetics and Health Kit Wouldnt it be helpful to have a little crystal ball that provides insights into your risk for commonly inherited health conditions? Well, it exists -- but in the form of a DNA kit, not a crystal ball. Simply use the AncestryHealth kit to provide a saliva sample, and your recipient will learn his or her risk for some commonly inherited conditions (such as breast cancer). By knowing this risk, users are able to work with their healthcare provider to get the screenings they need for early detection and chart a healthier path forward. Plus, AncestryHealth also includes all of the features of AncestryDNA, which allows one to discover their origins and connect to living relatives. Amazon, $119.00 OLIKA Hydrating Hand Sanitizer Clip Ons Help your loved ones maintain clean hands on the go with OLIKA hydrating hand sanitizers. These thoughtful vegan and gluten-free stocking stuffers are refillable, recyclable and come in six essential oil-based fragrances (such as mint citrus and cucumber basil). Plus, theres aloe vera in the formula to help keep frequently sanitized hands moisturized. Clip one to your purse and another to your childs backpack. Olika, $29.99 Martha Stewart CBD Holiday Sampler Sick of the CBD gummies that taste like unsophisticated kids candy? Kick things up a notch for the CBD-lover on your list with Martha Stewarts new 15-flavor CBD gummy sampler. With this special gummy sampler gift box, I was inspired by flavors from my garden, said Stewart. So, she included raspberry, rhubarb, passionfruit, Persian lime, black raspberry, strawberry, grapefruit, calamondin, green apple, black currant, blood orange, kumquat, quince, Meyer lemon and huckleberry in this 60-count box with 10mg CBD per gummy. Shop Canopy, $64.99 Moodygirl Chocolate Bars Its easy to rationalize eating dark chocolate -- its full of antioxidants, heart-healthy flavanols, and even a little brain-stimulating caffeine. But what about a chocolate bar that boosts your mood, too? Moodygirl chocolate bars contain vitamins and adaptogens designed to help women through PMS symptoms, low libido and stress relief. Plus, they are organic, vegan, gluten-free and free of refined sugars. These are the most delicious and guilt-free stocking stuffers around. Moodygirl, $9.99 Hurom Easy Clean Slow Juicer Juicing is a great way to pack more fruits and vegetables into each day, but cleaning up can be such a chore. Enter the Hurom Easy Clean Slow Juicer, which eliminates the mess thanks to a larger pulp outlet and elongated strainer grooves that rinse clean -- no scrubbing required. Its slow squeeze technology mimics the motion of squeezing fruit by hand, and youll be left with bone-dry pulp. Bonus: it can also make smoothies, nut milk and ice cream. Hurom, $499.00 The post The Ultimate Wellness Gift Guide for Everyone on Your List appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Holiday Cookbook Giveaway

November 27 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Holiday Cookbook Giveaway Its time for my first annual Holiday Cookbook Giveaway! I will be giving away a set of four of my recent titles to three lucky winners during the next three weeks. Each book bundle will include a copy of: Vegan Mac & Cheese The Plant-Based Slow Cooker One-Dish Vegan The Plant-Protein Revolution Cookbook The first winner will be announced on Tuesday, December 1st; the second winner will be announced on Tuesday, December 8th; and the third winner will be chosen on Tuesday, December 15th. The winners will be chosen at random. Whether you add the books to your personal cookbook collection, or give them away as gifts, this giveaway is my way of saying thank you and Happy Holidays from me to you. To enter this giveaway, simply leave a comment at the end of this post.  For example: What are you grateful for? What makes you smile?  Why do you want to win these books? What’s your favorite vegetable? TELL ME SOMETHING GOOD! Enter now! Leave your comment at the end of this post and check back on the next three Tuesdays to see if youve won a cookbook bundle! The post Holiday Cookbook Giveaway appeared first on Robin Robertson.

tamarind candy recipe | imli candy | imli ki goli | imli toffee

November 20 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

tamarind candy recipe | imli candy | imli ki goli | imli toffeetamarind candy recipe | imli candy | imli ki goli | imli toffee with step by step photo and video recipe. candy or toffee recipes are primarily a combination of sweet or creamy taste in flavour. however, there are some tangy or sour taste candies too which are majorly made using citrus and tropical fruit. but it can also be made with other ingredients and tamarind is one such popular choice and can be mixed with dates and spice to make a lip-smacking toffee recipe. The post tamarind candy recipe | imli candy | imli ki goli | imli toffee appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

protein powder recipe | protein shake recipes | homemade weight loss protein powder

November 18 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

protein powder recipe | protein shake recipes | homemade weight loss protein powderprotein powder recipe | protein shake recipes | homemade weight loss protein powder with step by step photo and video recipe. weight loss recipes are one of the trending and a must recipe for most of us. most of these are generally a protein-based recipe and skipping carbs in our daily diet. however, these protein sources are chemical compounds and ignore natural source assuming it is impossible to prepare at home. this post is to negate that belief and shows how to make all-purpose homemade weight loss protein powder. The post protein powder recipe | protein shake recipes | homemade weight loss protein powder appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

The Sticky Debate About Honey

November 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

If theres one hot-button issue among vegans, its honey. While some vegans will eat it and use it, others wont, which can cause some heated debates among this group. So why not just get right to the point: Is honey vegan? The basic buzz on honey Honey bees collect nectar from flowering plants, which they regurgitate into honeycomb cells. With a little fanning from their wings to remove excess moisture, the end result is honey. The amazing fact? Making one pound of honey requires 556 worker bees, and the average worker bee will only make one-twelfth of a teaspoon of honey in its lifetime, according to the Ontario Beekeepers Association. Because honey is so high in sugar, it then becomes an energy source for the bees, helping fuel the roughly 12,000 beats their wings take every minute. Of course, bees have been making honey ever since their existence, and its said theyve been around for about 30 million years. How long humans have been eating honey isnt entirely clear, but honey has certainly found its way into the human food system, showing up on breakfast tables, getting baked into breads and muffins, and being mixed into granolas. Honeys also a popular medicinal cure. The case against honey being vegan The first argument against honey not being vegan (though it certainly is vegetarian) is the obvious one: Honey comes from an animal, and vegans eschew any animal-based products. Animals arent ours to use, steal from or manipulate as we see fit, says Amber Canavan, senior campaigner and spokesperson for PETA in Portland, Ore. And while you might not equate bees with farmed animals like chickens, pigs and cows, there is cruelty in the raising of bees. Theyre killed and harmed in the process, Canavan says. She points to commercially bred honey bees who are kept crammed in file-cabinet type hives. When hives are ready for harvesting, its nearly impossible to open the hive and get honey out without crushing numerous bees who are trying to protect the hive, she adds. Now move to queen bees, who are often treated like female cows in the dairy industry, being artificially inseminated by force, Canavan says. Beekeepers might even clip the wings of queen bees so they cant escape and move the hive. And speaking of moving, bees are often trucked around the country, especially in the commercial industry, to pollinate plants in a given destination. Because honey bees arent native to this country, moving them around like this could introduce issues for local pollinators, she adds. Related: How to Choose Sugar Substitutes Finally, taking honey from the bees may threaten the bees health, according to The Vegan Society. Not only is their honey supply then decreased, many commercial beekeepers will take the honey off and feed them high-fructose corn syrup, which isnt good for their health, says Paul Cronshaw, co-founder and director of operations for the Santa Barbara Beekeepers Association in California, vegan and hive keeper whose hives are cruelty- and chemical-free. Putting honey on the table In spite of the above arguments, there are vegans who do consume and use honey, Cronshaw being one of them. My philosophy is that the bees are using honey as a survival food in a house that Im providing, and I take only a minimal amount for rent, he says, adding that this was the first year hes taken from them in years because of the now-ended drought in California. As a result, the bees produced more honey this year and were able to pay more rent. Whats his rationale for using honey? I use honey for medicine and other reasons, he says. Those reasons include helping with sore throat, improving oral health, and aiding with wound healing. Case in point: He was bitten on the hand by a dog recently and used Manuka honey to heal while honey helped him survive a foot injury on a nine-day backpacking trip in the Sierras a few years ago. And while nobodys advocating supporting commercial beekeepers, supporting local ones can help the bee population survive. Numerous studies, after all, point to the collapse of bees who help pollinate numerous food crops. Although honey bees arent in danger of extinction, they are in decline, albeit a big slower because humans are their shepherds or keepers, he adds. If you do decide to use honey, Cronshaw recommends connecting with local beekeepers to find out how they practice beekeeping. Most local beekeepers arent trucking their hives around the country, arent using harmful fillers after taking the bees honey and are working hard not to kill bees. You can raise bees without killing them, he says. The good news is that you dont have to eat or use honey if you dont want to. There are so many alternatives on the market now, Canavan says. Not only can you choose from things like maple syrup, stevia, blackstrap molasses and agave syrup, theres even vegan honey. You can also help local pollinators by planting plants they like and creating a pollinator-friendly yard.   The post The Sticky Debate About Honey appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Alternative Meats: A Convenience or a Curse?

November 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Have you started swinging through the drive-thru more frequently since fast-food chains decided to hop on board with plant-based burger options? Sure, Burger Kings Impossible Whopper and Carls Jr.s meatless Beyond Meat burger may seem like enticing options after a long day -- heck, even Ikea is rumored to be working on a meatless version of its famous Swedish meatballs. And of course, its an encouraging sign that a plant-based lifestyle is becoming more mainstream, especially when its accepted in restaurants known for their beefy offerings. But could racking up too many fast-food visits mean youre sacrificing some of the positive health benefits associated with a plant-based diet for the sake of convenience? Meat alternatives are taking center stage because more and more people are recognizing that taking meat off our menus is an imperative if we are to preserve the planets life support systems for future generations, says Brenda Davis, R.D., a world-renowned expert in plant-based nutrition and coauthor of Nourish: The Definitive Plant-Based Nutrition Guide for Families. Aside from being better for the planet, her coauthor, Reshma Shah, M.D., a plant-based pediatrician, notes the many health attributes with this lifestyle. Plant-based diets have been associated with longevity, a decreased risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, certain cancers, and a healthy gut, she explains. Studies suggest the people eating a plant-based diet have a lower risk of being overweight or obese. Additionally, plant-based diets have been shown to be an effective strategy for treating many of the chronic diseases that make up the leading causes of death in the United States and throughout the world. 5 Pros of Alternative Meats First, lets explore the benefits of adding alternative meats to your diet: - Easy protein source. Some people may benefit from these concentrated, and very bioavailable protein sources. For athletes who struggle meeting protein needs, these foods can rapidly boost protein intake, says Davis. Also, for seniors who have higher protein needs, and lower calorie intakes, it can be tough to meet recommended intakes. Meat alternatives can help boost protein intakes in a way that is simple and palatable for seniors. - A non-threatening way to transition to eating less meat. New to the world of plant-based eating? Or simply trying to replace a few meat-based dishes each week? Plant-based meat alternatives can offer convenience for busy families, provide an alternative in social situations, and make the transition to a plant-based diet more enjoyable and sustainable in the long run, says Dr. Shah. You may find that you rely on these foods more at the beginning of your plant-based journey. As many people become more comfortable cooking and enjoying a variety of whole, plant foods, they may end up eating these foods less often. - Cleaner fuel. Plant-based meats are lower in persistent organic pollutants that are most concentrated in products at the top of the food chain, such as meat, fish and dairy products, says Davis. Also, plant-based meats cannot form heterocyclic amines, which are carcinogenic compounds formed when meat, poultry or fish are cooked at high temperatures. - Lesser inflammatory response. Plant-based meats are much lower in endotoxins (also known as lipopolysaccharides) than ground meats, which Davis says are associated with chronic inflammation and several disease states. - Reduced risk of food poisoning. Plant-based meat alternatives don’t carry the risk of foodborne disease from bacterial contamination in the same way that animal-based foods do, says Dr. Shah. Related: Tofu: The Unsung Hero of Coronavirus-Related Meat Shortages 5 Cons of Alternative Meats There are some downsides to alternative meat consumption, too: - Processed food is still processed food. While it might be tempting to skip purchasing whole ingredients and making your meals from scratch, the tradeoffs may not be worth it. Most plant-based meat alternatives tend to be higher in calories, fat, sodium, and additives compared to whole plant foods -- like beans and rice, says Dr. Shah. While plant-based meat alternatives are higher in fiber -- animal foods contain no fiber-- and are devoid of cholesterol, they certainly would not be considered a health food when compared to a homemade burger made of black beans, quinoa, and veggies. - Budget-buster. Currently, meat alternatives are rather expensive, sometimes even more expensive than meat. As the demand increases, this may change. - Quality depends on the brand. Meat alternatives vary in their quality, but are generally fairly highly processed foods, says Davis. Some are made from extracted plant proteins, fats, seasonings and preservatives, while others are made from black beans and quinoa. Consumers who want minimally processed foods need to read the label. - Allergens abound. Are you sensitive to gluten, soy or nuts? Meat alternatives are often based on ingredients that are associated with common allergens, so be sure to read labels carefully to avoid a reaction. - Nutrient deficient options. Davis says that meat alternatives are not always fortified with vitamin B12 or zinc, both of which are relatively high in meat. Make sure youre getting enough of these nutrients via the rest of your diet or through supplements. Related: 8 Must-Try Alternative Milks How to Shop for Alternative Meats A simple ingredient list with recognizable foods is always a good place to start. Next, Dr. Shah says to consider the amount of fat (especially saturated fat), sodium, and other additives. One particular additive that has gained scrutiny is the addition of heme iron in certain plant-based meat alternatives, she says. Heme-iron is added to enhance the meaty flavor and appearance of these foods -- but its thought to be pro-inflammatory, cause increased body iron stores, and provide an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. How Often Should You Consumer Alternative Meats? As with most things in life, moderation is key. Eating plant-based meat alternatives from time to time can certainly be a part of a healthy diet, but relying on them on a regular basis -- especially if they are taking the place of whole, plant foods -- would not be considered health-promoting, concludes Dr. Shah. Its also important to note that the consumption frequency may depend on your overall state of health. What is safe and appropriate for one individual may be quite different for another, explains Davis. If you struggle with hypertension or cardiovascular disease, you will want to minimize intake of the high sodium, high-fat meat alternatives. The post Alternative Meats: A Convenience or a Curse? appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Chana Dal Sweet and Sour Paratha

October 31 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Chana Dal Sweet and Sour Paratha (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Chana Dal Sweet and Sour Paratha Chana Dal Sweet and Sour Parathas is a delicious and unique blend of many flavors. These Parathas are spicy, sweet, and sour. The combination of all these flavors is simply delicious. The nuttiness of the coconut and sweetness of sugar, cardamom, and fennel seeds add to the flavor. My mother was very fond of sweet and sour flavors. She first asked me to make these Parathas and requested me to make the filling, telling me exactly what she wanted in the filling. I followed her instructions exactly including what spices to put in. To my surprise, the recipe came out perfect and it was exactly the flavor combination she was looking for. I made this recipe for her several times and she really enjoyed it. It felt so good to see my mom smile. She will have these Parathas with Aloo Tamatar, or just with a hot cup of Chai. I take great pride when making these recipes for you all. I like to make sure that when you try my recipes out, they meet your expectation! I decided to make these Parathas after 30 years. I have no idea why I waited this long. This is a wonderful flavorful breakfast dish, or you can serve with the main meal. Hope you enjoy them! Recipe will serve 4. Prep Time 10 minutes Cook Time 20 minutes Servings 4 people IngredientsFor Dough 3/­­4 cup whole wheat flour atta 1/­­4 cup All Purpose flour plain flour or maida 1/­­4 tsp salt 2 Tbsp oil 1/­­3 cup lukewarm water use as needed Filling 1/­­2 cup chana dal 1 Tbsp oil 1/­­8 tsp asafetida 1/­­2 tsp salt 1/­­8 tsp cardamom powder 2 Tbsp coconut powder 2 1/­­2 Tbsp sugar 2 tsp mango powder amchoor 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder lal mirch 1 tsp fennel seed powder saunf Also, Need2 Tbsp of dry flour for rolling Parathas 3 Tbsp oil to cook the parathas InstructionsDoughIn a bowl, mix whole-wheat flour, all-purpose flour, salt and oil, mix it well rubbing with fingers; add water slowly to make soft dough. The dough should not be stick to your fingers. Cover the dough and set it aside. Let it rest at least ten minutes. FillingWash and cook dal in two cups of water, in Instant pot or pressure cooker for 25 minutes. Dal should be soft but not mushy. I am using instant pot. Heat the oil over low medium heat in a pan add dal, and all the spices for filling fennel, red chili, mango powder, coconut powder, asafoetida, and salt, Note: if dal has extra water drains most of the water. Stir continuously, and keep pressing dal, until water from dal has evaporated. Note: dal should be moist, not be powdery. Turn off the heat. Let the filling cool to room temperature. To make ParathasTake the dough and knead it for a minute. Divide the dough and filling in 10 equal parts. Dough balls and filling should be the same size. Take one part of the dough and with your fingers flatten the edges and make into 3-inch circle. Leaving the center a little thicker than the edges. Place a filling in the center. Pull the edges of the dough to wrap it around the peas filling. Repeat to make all balls. Let the filled balls settle three to four minutes. Note: It helps to spread the filling evenly. Meanwhile heat a heavy skillet on medium-high heat until moderately hot. To test, sprinkle water on the skillet. If the water sizzles right away, the skillet is ready. Press the filled ball lightly on dry whole wheat flour from both sides. Using a rolling pin, roll lightly to make five-inch circles, keeping the sealed side of the balls on top. If the dough sticks to the rolling pin or rolling surface, lightly dust the parathas with dry flour. Place the paratha on the skillet. When the paratha starts to change color and begins to puff up, flip it over. You will notice some golden-brown spots. After a few seconds, drizzle one teaspoon of oil over the paratha. Flip the paratha again and lightly press the puffed areas with a spatula. Flip again and press with a spatula making sure the paratha is golden-brown from both sides. Repeat for the remaining parathas. Parathas are best served hot and crispy. NotesYou will have leftover filling; you can refrigerate for up to a week or freeze for 2-3 months. Cooking time 20 minutes, this does not include boiling Chana Dal. The post Chana Dal Sweet and Sour Paratha appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

My Thoughts for Air Fryer

October 7 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

After giving it much thought, I finally decided to get an air fryer. I checked out many of them and eventually decided to get the Air Fryer Convection Toaster Oven: it includes a toaster, oven, and air fryer all in one. Another reason I decided to buy this one is to save kitchen countertop space. I replaced the toaster oven with this air fryer. So far, I am enjoying it. As a toaster oven, it does a better job than any toaster or toaster oven I have used. I am very happy with the oven feature: it is big enough to bake a cake, small batches of cookies, and a medium size pizza. I dont do much baking, but I have started baking more because the air fryer is easy to use and needs less time to bake it preheats in 2-3 minutes easily. It is also easy to clean. When using it as an air fryer (the reason I purchased this new gadget), it so far has not produced very satisfactory results except in grilling vegetables, tofu, paneer, and roasting nuts. I also use this to dry roast poha (flat rice) and makhana (fox nuts) half the way and then finish roasting in a frying pan, which saves some time but more importantly because for both things you need constant stirring which becomes too much for my shoulder. I do make both items very often. I have tried making French fries, pakora, samosa, katchori, and salteen crackers. If you eat these items as soon as they come out from the air fryer, they taste just okay, in my opinion. Also, using the air fryer did not save any time and the items lost the flavor. One of my friends suggested she liked heating the frozen snacks like samosas, katchories. I decided to try this; I got frozen samosa and katchories from the grocery store, and yes they came out good when I heated them. The question is why I needed the Air Fryer for that since I could have done the same in the toaster oven or in a conventional oven.  I am looking for help and suggestions. If you have any vegetarian recipe you were happy with, I will try and do the recipe.  I will like you to share your suggestions. Thanks! The post My Thoughts for Air Fryer appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Slow Cooker Lasagna

December 22 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Slow Cooker Lasagna The slow cooker is my go-to cooking method for lasagna.  Because it’s made with dried lasagna noodles (no need to pre-boil), assembly is a cinch. Plus, you can assemble it well in advance and refrigerate until needed.  Then, just set it and forget it! I’m posting this easy version just in time for the holidays.  It’s a great idea for Christmas dinner because you can relax and enjoy the day while it cooks, without worrying about it burning or spilling over in the oven. For another version, with more vegetables, try the Lasagna Primavera recipe in The Plant-Based Slow Cooker.  But if you want a more basic lasagna, this one’s for you.  You can leave out the spinach if you prefer, but I like the added greens.  (Plus red and green is so Christmas-y!)You can use your own homemade tomato sauce or storebought marinara sauce in a jar (you may need to use a jar and a half to make it sauce enough). Lasagna in a Slow Cooker For best results, use a large oval slow cooker. You may need to break the noodles to conform them to the shape of the slow cooker. To make gluten-free, use gluten-free lasagna noodles. I use regular dry lasagna noodles - no need to pre-boil. The added water is absorbed by the dry noodles and softens them as it cooks. SERVES 6 SLOW COOKER SIZE: 5- TO 6-QUART COOK TIME: 4 TO 5 HOURS GLUTEN-FREE OPTION   12 ounces soft tofu, drained 1 pound firm tofu, drained 1 (10-ounce) package frozen chopped spinach, thawed and squeezed dry 1?3 cup nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon onion powder 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon dried basil 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 teaspoon sea salt 1/­­2 teaspoon ground black pepper 4 to 5 cups of your favorite tomato sauce for pasta (or a large jar of marinara sauce) 1/­­2 cup water 1/­­3 cup dry red wine (optional) 1 package vegan mozzarella shreds (such as Violife or Daiya) 8 ounces uncooked lasagna noodles (about 9 noodles)   - Crumble all of the tofu into a large bowl. Add the spinach, nutritional yeast, onion powder, garlic powder, basil, oregano, salt and pepper. Mix well, then taste to make sure the mixture has enough salt and pepper. - Spread a layer of marinara sauce into the bottom of the slow cooker. Stir in the water and wine (if using). (The extra liquid will be absorbed by the dried noodles as they cook). Arrange a layer of the noodles over the sauce, breaking pieces to fit, as needed. - Top the noodles with about one-third of the tofu mixture, followed by a sprinkling of the mozzarella, and another layer of noodles. Spread a layer of marinara sauce over the noodles. Repeat the layering two more times, ending with a layer of marinara sauce topped with the remaining mozzarella. Put the lid on the slow cooker and cook on High for 4 hours or until the noodles are tender. - Remove the lid, turn off the cooker, and let the lasagna stand for about 15 minutes before serving.   The post Slow Cooker Lasagna appeared first on Robin Robertson.

How to Get Enough Calcium on a Vegan Diet

December 8 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Calcium is critical for strong bones, and other vital functions in your body--and its harder to get on a vegan diet. The good news: with a little planning, you can meet all your daily calcium needs with whole, unprocessed foods. Plus, research suggests calcium absorption from plant sources is comparable to that from cow’s milk, nutrients found in plants benefit bones, and a carefully selected vegan diet doesn’t increase osteoporosis risk. And plant foods are rich in other nutrients like magnesium, vitamin K, copper, zinc, protein, fiber, antioxidants and other nutrients, all of which play an important role in preventing osteoporosis. You dont have to drink milk; keep bones strong with these 12 plant-based foods: 1. Collard greens One cup cooked = 266 mg Daily value: 27% Milk calcium equivalent: about 3/­­4 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: magnesium, vitamin K, fiber, vitamin C, beta-carotene and other antioxidants. 2. Tofu One-half cup = 250 to 400 mg Daily value: 25-40% Milk calcium equivalent: 3/­­4 to 1 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: protein, magnesium, copper, zinc. Note: firm and extra-firm varieties, made with calcium sulfate, have the highest calcium content. 3. Spinach One cup cooked = 245 mg Daily value: 24% Milk calcium equivalent: about 3/­­4 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: magnesium, vitamin K, vitamin C, beta-carotene and other antioxidants. Related: The Well-Stocked Vegan Pantry 4. Chia seeds Two tablespoons = 177 mg Daily value: 18% Milk calcium equivalent: about 1/­­2 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: magnesium, copper, zinc, fiber, omega-3 fatty acids. 5. Bok choy One cup cooked = 158 mg Daily value: 15% Milk calcium equivalent: about 1/­­2 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: magnesium, vitamin K, fiber, vitamin C and other antioxidants. Note: Because it’s a cruciferous vegetable, bok choy is also rich in cancer-preventive compounds. 6. White beans One cup cooked = 131 mg Daily value: 13% Milk calcium equivalent: about 1/­­3 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: magnesium, zinc, copper, fiber, protein Related: Nutrition Face-Off: Raw vs. Cooked Spinach 7. Tahini Two tablespoons = 126 mg Daily value: 13% Milk calcium equivalent: about 1/­­3 cup* Biggest benefits: magnesium, zinc, copper, fiber. Note: look for raw, unsalted varieties, with no added oil 8. Navy beans One cup cooked = 126 mg Daily value: 13% Milk calcium equivalent: about 1/­­3 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: magnesium, zinc, copper, fiber, protein 9. Amaranth One cup cooked = 116 mg Daily value: 12% Milk calcium equivalent: about 1/­­3 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: magnesium, zinc, copper, fiber, protein Related: 5 Habits of the Healthiest Vegans 10. Edamame One cup cooked = 98 mg Daily value: 10% Milk calcium equivalent: about 1/­­4 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: protein, magnesium, copper, zinc 11. Almond butter One ounce (about 22 nuts) = 86 mg Daily value: 8% Milk calcium equivalent: about 1/­­4 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: magnesium, protein, copper. Note: Look for raw, unsalted varieties, with no added oil. 12. Blackstrap molasses Two tablespoons = 82 mg Daily value: 8% Milk calcium equivalent: about 1/­­4 cup* Other bone-building nutrients: magnesium, copper, zinc. Note: Because it’s high in sugar, use blackstrap molasses as a substitute for other sweeteners, to avoid overdoing your daily sugar grams. * Based on the calcium content of 352 mg in one cup 2% milk The post How to Get Enough Calcium on a Vegan Diet appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

How a Plant-Based Diet Can Affect Your Mood

December 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

When most people hear the phrase, You are what you eat, they think about it in terms of body size or physical medical issues -- such as being overweight or underweight or having Type 2 diabetes. But research shows your food choices also affect your mental health, mood, and temperament. Eating a healthy diet containing fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds --with the addition of fortified foods and supplements when indicated -- can support mental well-being, says Reshma Shah, M.D., a plant-based pediatrician and coauthor of Nourish: The Definitive Plant-Based Nutrition Guide for Families. Phytonutrients, which have a protective effect, and fiber, which is responsible for the health of our gut microbiome, are exclusive to plants and have been associated with improved mental health outcomes. Mental Health Benefits of a Plant-Based Diet Theres no shortage of research being done on the mood-boosting and mental health effects associated with the consumption of fruits, vegetables, and other plant-based fuel. These include: - Anxiety and stress. The arachidonic acid, found only in animal products like eggs and chicken, sets off multiple chemical reactions in the body that eventually lead to an increase in inflammation, says Dr. Kasey Nichols, NMD, licensed physician and member of the Arizona Naturopathic Medical Association (AzNMA). When this inflammation reaches the brain, it subsequently can cause feelings of anxiety and stress, as well as depression. People who avoid foods with arachidonic acid typically report a more positive mood and improved mental health. One survey-based study found decreased rates of stress and anxiety in those eating a vegan vs. omnivorous diet, and that vegetarians had reported better mood than non-vegetarians. - Depression. Research suggests eating more plant-based foods can improve quality of life, mood and reduce symptoms of depression. A study published in the British Journal of Psychiatry analyzed the dietary patterns and risk of depression in 3,486 participants over a five-year period. Individuals eating whole foods reported fewer symptoms of depression compared to those who ate mostly processed foods. - ADHD. Although diet isn’t the driving cause or cure for ADHD, Dr. Nichols says some research has shown that switching to a plant-based diet could help with its symptoms. One study showed that preschoolers who chose processed dietary patterns were significantly and positively correlated with ADHD symptoms, while those who chose vegetarian dietary patterns were negatively correlated with ADHD symptoms. Cognition. Some research has shown that eating more plant foods can prevent a cognitive decline later in life, says Dr. Nichols. One study found that those who consistently ate more plant-based foods were 18-33% less likely to develop cognitive impairment than those who didn’t. - Focus. Looking to improve productivity in the workplace? One study showed that employees who ate plant-based foods reported improved job performance and missed fewer workdays. Related: 8 Ways to Improve Your Gut Health & Mood 2 Things to Watch on a Plant-Based Diet While eschewing animal products is a healthy lifestyle choice, it requires a thorough understanding of how to create balanced and complete meals. There are a couple areas youll need to pay special attention to, to ensure youre reaping all of the healthy benefits: - Nutrient deficiency. If done improperly, a plant-based diet could lack important nutritional needs that can negatively affect mental health. A deficiency in nutrients found in animal products -- like choline, vitamin B-12, folate, omega-3 fatty acids and amino acids -- have been linked to depression, poor mood regulation, poor metabolism, low energy, as well as memory and attention span difficulties. Plant-based eaters in developed countries need to be the most concerned about lacking brain-healthy nutrients like DHA, vitamin B12, vitamin K2, zinc, iron, riboflavin, and vitamin D3, says Dr. Nichols. It is usually common knowledge that vegan diets need to be supplemented with B12, but many people are under the impression that colorful fruits and vegetables are excellent sources of most other vital nutrients. Dietary supplements are a great way counter any deficiency. - Caloric deficiency. Switching to a plant-based diet may end up resulting in a significant reduction in calories. Many find that they lose a few pounds, but if the reduction becomes too extreme and lacks key nutrients and carbohydrates, you may become more irritable, or hangry, and easily distracted, says Dr. Nichols. If youre losing too much weight, add some more healthy fats (such as coconut oil and avocados) into your diet. Related: Plant-Powered Brain Health Boost Your Mood with These Plant-Based Must-Haves Its easy to fall into a rut during meal prep and planning -- many people are creatures of habit who gravitate toward the same menu week after week. But if your go-to meals arent well-rounded, this could leave you lacking in essential nutrients. In order to ensure youre getting the full spectrum of nutrition your body and mind need to thrive, make sure youre including the following: - Omega 3s. Omega 3 fatty acids have been implicated in improved mental health outcomes, says Dr. Shah. Plant-based diets generally limit or exclude fish, which is a major source of omega 3 fatty acids, so they may be low in this key nutrient. Instead, youll find your omega 3s in foods such as chia seeds, hemp seeds, flax seed, and walnuts. - Tryptophan. The brain uses the amino acid tryptophan to produce serotonin, the feel-good neurotransmitter. Its found in chicken, eggs, cheese and fish, but plant-based sources of tryptophan include leafy greens, sunflower seeds, watercress, soybeans, pumpkin seeds, mushrooms, broccoli and peas. - B vitamins. Known to boost mood by increasing such neurotransmitters as serotonin, dopamine, and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), B vitamins may be the key to boosting your spirits, too. Choose from beans, legumes and lentils, fortified cereals and sunflower seeds. The effects of going plant-based vary from person to person, so it’s best to consult your doctor first to make sure it’s the right move for you, says Dr. Nichols.   The post How a Plant-Based Diet Can Affect Your Mood appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Holiday Cookbook Giveaway: Winner #1

December 1 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Holiday Cookbook Giveaway: Winner #1Thank you to all who entered my Holiday Cookbook Giveaway.  Reading all of your comments has been a source of joy and inspiration. The first winner has been chosen using the Random Number Generator on Random.org and it tells me that our first winner is: Lydia Claire . To claim your cookbooks, Lydia Claire, please send me an email or DM me on Messenger and let me know where to send your cookbooks! If I don’t hear from you by next week, another winner will be chosen (along with a winner for the second giveaway). If you didn’t win this time, no worries — you will have two more chances to win on the next two Tuesdays.  Keep those entries coming in (on the original Holiday Cookbook Giveaway post from November 27).   The post Holiday Cookbook Giveaway: Winner #1 appeared first on Robin Robertson.

5 Vegetarian Swaps to Boost Nutrition in Sweet Treats

November 23 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Choose Whole Grains Theres a reason the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend to make at least 50% of your grains whole: theyre packed with essential vitamins and minerals that keep your body running at its peak! When gearing up to bake that family favorite sugar cookie or bread loaf, consider swapping half of the all-purpose flour for a whole-wheat flour until you can make the full switch (this Healthy Chocolate Chunk Pumpkin Loaf is a great recipe to start with!) Traditionally, when you start small like this its an easy way to slowly get your pallet to adjust to the change while boosting the fiber of the entire slice (or cookie) too! If youre gluten-free, consider using a recipe that calls for gluten-free oat flour or almond flour (like these Healthy Pumpkin Muffins) so you also reap the benefits of the fiber. Amp Up Those Omegas with Walnuts Pumpkin, pecan, or apple pie calling your name this season? Consider swapping out that white flour and butter crust for a delicious (and nutritious) walnut-based crust. Walnuts pack 2.5 grams of the plant-based version of the omega-3 fatty acid known as alpha-linoleic acid (ALA), in addition to 4 grams of protein and 2 grams of fiber in a one-ounce portion. While many name brands have begun selling their own walnut crusts in the baking section at your local market, they often contain flour and butter in small amounts to help hold the crust together. Not a deal-breaker if youre tight on time, but defeats the purpose of the swap if youre trying to keep this treat gluten-free and vegan. Consider making your own (check out a simple recipe idea here) by pulsing walnuts with a date paste or syrup in your food processor, then shaping into a pie crust and freezing until ready to bake. Related: 7 Tips for Shaking Sugar Think natural When It Comes to Sugar Its no secret most people eat WAY more added sugar than recommended (for reference, on average Americans eat about 17 teaspoons of added sugar a day when the recommendation is closer to 12 teaspoons or below for a 2000 calorie diet!) And friends, beware, coconut sugar, maple syrup, honey, and good ole cane sugar are ALL just different types of added sugars (one isnt better than the other.) To help satisfy that sweet tooth, consider using the natural sugars found in sweet fruits and vegetables, like apples, dates, and sweet potatoes, in your baked goods. Depending on the type of recipe youre making, you should be able to reduce the added sugar by at least a third when you sub in unsweetened applesauce (like these Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bars do!) Note you will also need to modify the fat amount (like the oil or butter used) so the texture continues to be the same. Boost Fiber with Beans Chocolate is abundant this season and for good reason: its delicious and its packed with flavonoids. But what if you took that decadent chocolate and brought it up a notch to boost the fiber and create a decadent dark chocolate dip to serve alongside graham crackers, gingerbread, or fresh fruit? Youd be the hostess with the most-ess for sure! Begin by pureeing a cup of beans alongside melted dark chocolate or dark cocoa powder, dates for natural sweetness, and your favorite nut or seed butter of choice. Blend until its a smooth, hummus-like consistency and enjoy! (Use this Sweet Hummus Recipe as your guide.) Power Up with Protein Cream pies and bundt cakes are certainly popular around the holiday season, but that doesnt mean you cant do over the dairy! Swapping in a portion of reduced-fat Greek or skyr yogurt for sour cream helps to boost the protein while minimizing the saturated fat of your treat. If youre still not a big fan of Greek yogurt, then ease into it by starting small with the swap, with roughly a third used in place of the sour cream. In no time youll be adjusted and making the full swap, pinky promise! (Try this Butterscotch Cheesecake Pie for a nice addition to your menu this year!) The post 5 Vegetarian Swaps to Boost Nutrition in Sweet Treats appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet

November 19 2020 Vegetarian Times 

With the new year just weeks away, the media is honing in on the top nutrition trends we can expect to see in 2021, and to no surprise increasing plant-protein remains at the top. Whether youre eating more plant-based for sustainability, health, or just because, rest assured there are a variety of whole food options you can choose from to meet your protein needs. But, before you head straight into the freezer department at your local grocer to pick up the latest faux meat product, lets take a look at 10 whole food sources of plant-based protein you may just want to toss into your cart instead! Reader beware, you may end up saving a few bucks once you realize how convenient and affordable many of these options are. Lentils Just one cup of cooked lentils provides nearly 18 grams of plant-protein and 16 grams of fiber for just 225 calories. Lentils also contain many important nutrients, like iron, potassium, zinc and choline (a nutrient that 90% of Americans arent getting enough of!) Plus, theyre budget-friendly with a 16-ounce bag of dried lentils coming in at just $2.99.  Registered Dietitian Kim Rose of www.kimrosedietitian.com recommends making a pot of seasoned lentils on the weekends. Divide them into individual 1 cup servings, and then add them to different meals throughout the week!  Youll find me turning lentils into meatballs, or for a really quick fix, adding a little bar-b-que sauce to them to make tasty, vegan sloppy joes. Hummus This plant-based spread can be made from a variety of beans and legumes, not just the traditional garbanzo bean you may think! Depending on the bean used, the protein content will vary slightly, but a standard 1/­­4 cup serving (or about 70 grams by weight) has roughly 6 grams of protein for just 180 calories. Plus, it often packs heart-healthy unsaturated fatty acids that help keep you fuller for longer too! Brynn McDowell, Registered Dietitian and cookbook author of The Mediterranean Diet Made Easy recommends using hummus in place of mayo on sandwiches or spreading it on bagels or toast! She suggests thinning it out and using it as a creamy salad dressing to add more plant-based protein to meals. Pistachios Pistachios are a good source of plant-based protein with a 1-ounce serving of the nut (shelled) providing 6 grams of it! Plus, they pack dietary fiber, potassium, and antioxidants that help keep your body in tip-top shape. While the shelled variety tends to be a tad pricier, you can still pick up a 10-ounce in-shell bag for about $5.49 at most markets. Lauren Manaker, Registered Dietitian, and author of Fueling Male Fertility, recommends to use shelled pistachios as a salad topped in place of grilled chicken or shrimp. The plant-based protein boost that also gives you fiber and healthy fats for staying power. You can also toss pistachios in trail mixes and in oatmeal as a topping for added nutrition and crunch! Related: Healthy Late-Night Snacks Chickpeas One of the most common forms of plant-based protein on the market is the good ole chickpea (aka, the garbanzo bean!) With nearly 7.5 grams of protein, 6.5 grams of fiber, and 3.7 mg of iron in just 1/­­2 cup serving of cooked chickpeas, its a great way to increase the total nutrient density of your diet. The best part: a pound of chickpeas (dried) often comes in at less than $3.00! NYC-based Registered Dietitian, Natalie Rizzo, MS, RD, is a big fan of adding chickpeas to both meals and snacks! From grain bowls to veggie burgers, or roasted as a protein-filled snack, chickpeas offer a convenient and affordable plant-based protein to nearly every diet. Edamame (Soybeans) Edamame is the immature form of the soybean that is often eaten from the shell (or shelled) alongside traditional Asian dishes. Regardless of the form of soybean you eat, they can easily be incorporated into a balanced diet with two servings being a reasonable goal for adults. A half-cup of shelled edamame packs nearly 9.5 grams of plant-based protein and 4 grams of fiber, as well as iron, potassium, folate, and choline! Sarah Koszyk, Sports Nutritionist and author of 25 Anti-Aging Smoothies for Revitalizing, Glowing Skin, recommends pureeing edamame in a hummus, dip, or pesto. Spread the edamame purees on a sandwich or wrap, add it to a burrito, or toss it with a salad, pasta, or rice dish. If youre looking to venture into the other forms of soybeans (like tofu), Registered Dietitian Sylvia Klinger of Hispanic Food Communications suggests blending silken tofu with oil, spices and herbs makes for a delicious high protein dressing, or adding a soy-based curd to pancakes to boost the protein there as well! Tempeh Tempeh is a fermented product made from soybeans in addition to some whole grains, seasonings and other flavorings. A 4-ounce serving of this soy-based protein packs nearly 20 grams of protein, in addition to a host of nutrition benefits. For starters, tempeh is filled with nutrients like manganese, magnesium, phosphorus and B vitamins in addition to its role as a probiotic. Jenna Braddock, Florida based at MakeHealthyEasy.com recommends spending a little bit of time prepping it to make the perfect dish! Braddock suggests crumbling the tempeh, then marinating it and finishing with a sear in a hot pan to add instant protein to salads, wraps, bowls and tacos. Pill Nuts Pronounced peel-y, this nut is native to the pili tree often found in Northern Australia and the Philippines. While lower in protein comparatively speaking per serving size (a 1/­­4 cup serving provides 3 grams in comparison to some of the other nuts), it packs a nutritional punch in that it contains essential amino acids the human body needs. This nut is harder to find at local markets, and you will need to likely shop online and be willing to spend about $16.99 for a one-pound bag. Maya Feller, nationally recognized nutrition expert and author of The Southern Comfort Food Diabetes Cookbook, recommends enjoying this mildly flavored nut in yogurt form (yes, brands are now popping up incorporating this nut into their yogurts!) smothered over a stack of pancakes or in their raw form as a crunchy snack. Hemp Seeds Three tablespoons of hulled hemp seeds provide nearly 10 grams of plant-based protein to your meal for just 170 calories. Plus, theyre full of iron and unsaturated fats while offering a great nut-free alternative for crunch. While a bit more pricey than other seeds (a 12-ounce bag is roughly $12.99), theyre an easy addition to boost plant-protein on simple foods. Plant-based sports dietitian, Kelly Jones of kellyjonesnutrition.com recommends adding them to oatmeal, sprinkling them onto pancakes, using as a topper for soups and salads, and incorporating into homemade energy bites! Lupini Beans Lupini beans are a staple of the Mediterranean diet and making a name for themselves in the US due to their high protein content. In just a 1/­­2 cup cooked serving of the bean it packs nearly 13 grams of plant-based protein. But, where it packs in protein it lacks in fiber, with that same 1/­­2 cup serving providing only 2 grams. Found traditionally in the jarred food section of the market, there are a few ways you can cook with them! Amy Gorin, a plant-based registered dietitian and owner of Plant-Based Eats recommends draining and rinsing the beans as you would do with any other canned beans. Then, use them in your favorite dishes, like her delicious plant-based lupini salad! Quinoa One of the only whole grains that is a complete source of protein (containing all 9 essential amino acids), this is an excellent (and affordable) gluten-free, plant-based protein addition to nearly any diet! One cup of cooked quinoa contains nearly 8 grams of protein for just 220 calories (plus nearly 5 grams of fiber.) Quinoa also contains many important B vitamins as well as potassium and antioxidants. Registered Dietitian Tamara Hoffman of Unbeetable Nutrition and Wellness recommends adding quinoa to your taco Tuesday menus with a spicy Mexican seasoning or sauteing it into your stir-fry dishes with a soy sauce. The post 10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Label Lingo: Plant-Based Diet vs. Vegan Diet

November 6 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Plant-based products have never been hotter. From grocery store aisles to restaurant menus, the term plant-based is everywhere these days. Meanwhile, vegan has become so mainstream that it seems like every day, you hear about another celebrity or athlete going vegan. So does plant-based mean vegan and vice versa? Its hard enough reading labels on food products let alone figuring out the difference between these terms, especially when you throw whole food in front of plant-based. While they do have things in common, there are differences between these labels. Experts untangle them below. Related: 5 Plant-Based Subscription Meal Kits Guaranteed to Make Your Taste Buds Happy Plant-Based Versus Vegan As the name implies, plant-based dieters are focused on increasing the amount of plant-based food sources in their meals. This means more fruits, vegetables, legumes, tubers, nuts, seeds, legumes and grains. Although a person on a plant-based diet may still consume foods with animal products and/­­or byproducts, the ratio of plant-based sources increases while foods from animal and seafood sources are minimized, says Dan Nguyen, R.D.N., registered dietitian and nutritionist at HelloFresh. Of course, the based part of plant-based can be confusing, namely because it has wide-ranging meanings. For some, it could indicate that theyre eating 51 percent of their diet from plants while others might be closer to 90 or 95 percent. They can both be called plant-based eaters, but only if youre eating 100 percent plants can you say that youre a whole-food, plant-based eater, says Susan Levin, M.S., R.D., C.S.S.D., director of nutrition education for the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. Vegan, on the other hand, means that this person eats zero animal products. That translates into no meat, poultry, dairy, seafood, or any animal byproducts. Yet vegan extends beyond the diet, as it also affects what people wear and what purchases they make. According to the Vegan Society, vegan is defined as a philosophy and way of living which seeks to exclude--as far as is possible and practicable--all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose; and by extension, promotes the development and use of animal-free alternatives for the benefit of animals, humans and the environment. In dietary terms, it denotes the practice of dispensing with all products derived wholly or partly from animals. Related: Tofu: The Unsung Hero of Coronavirus-Related Meat Shortages Why Plant-Based and Vegan Labels Arent a Health Halo Eating more plants is the key to better health and even longer life, according to numerous studies. Plants are a powerhouse of fiber, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and phytonutrients, Nguyen says. By eating more plants and fewer animals, youll get more of these valuable nutrients. As a result, you might experience lower blood sugar, LDL (or bad) cholesterol, and blood pressure, to name a few beneficial side effects. Plus, eating fewer animal foods and seafood will help decrease your carbon footprint, which is a win for the planet. Yet dont get duped into thinking that foods labeled plant-based or vegan are automatically healthy. The surprise? Many of these foods are still highly processed. Foods marketed as plant-based may not necessarily be healthy or contain many whole plant foods, Nguyen says. These foods can be high in fat, sugar and/­­or sodium and could still make you sick, putting you at greater risk for chronic conditions like heart disease and diabetes. Thats true even if youre a junk food vegan who primarily eats processed vegan food. Just taking animal products out of your diet doesnt guarantee that youll be healthier, as you may not be getting the fiber and nutrients you need, Levin says. Related: Less Meat, Less Problems How to eat healthy, no matter whether youre plant-based or vegan While going plant-based, more so vegan because youre eliminating all animal products, is an admirable first step, it shouldnt be your end step if youre prioritizing health, Levin says. Instead, think about moving as close as you can to a 100 percent whole-food diet. To get there, Levin suggests reading food labels and keying in on fiber. Fiber is often a good indicator of how processed the product is, she says. If you dont see much fiber in a food, chances are its on the low end of the healthy food scale. Then check the added sugar and the ingredient list in general. If you see ingredients you dont know how to pronounce, you should probably avoid putting that food in your cart, Levin says. The post Label Lingo: Plant-Based Diet vs. Vegan Diet appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Got Anxiety? Create a Soothing Sleep Routine

November 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

If youre like a lot of people right now, anxiety may be causing you to toss and turn throughout the night. But sleep is essential to our health--without it were at increased risk of infections, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and obesity. And getting a good nights rest can improve mood and emotional balance according to Matthew Walker, PhD, director of the Center for Human Sleep Science and author of Why We Sleep (Scribner, 2017). Maybe we cant make every night worry-free, but with the following suggestions for creating a soothing going-to-bed routine, we can improve our chances of getting those much-needed hours of sleep. Keep your bedroom cool, dark, and comfortable Screens--your iPad, laptop, television, phone--all emit light that has been shown to disrupt sleep. Make your bedroom a no-gadget zone and block out street light with shades. Even a hint of dim light...has been shown to delay the release of nighttime melatonin in humans, writes Walker, referring to the hormone that alerts our bodies to darkness, signaling that its time to sleep. For optimal rest, your mattress and pillow should be comfortable, and your bedroom temperature should be cool, according to Your Guide to Healthy Sleep published by the National Institutes of Health. Create a transition time I dont work or do anything on the computer past 8 p.m., says Kim Acosta, a working mother of two who, in spite of a complex schedule of family and work responsibilities has found ways to ensure a full nights rest. She has an evening routine of sitting with her 13-year-old son while they each read their own books before going to sleep--a relaxing time for both of them. Instead of working or cleaning the house right up to the minute you hit the pillow, give yourself time to unwind and relax at the end of the day. Create a transition to sleep with activities such as taking a warm bath, playing music, writing in a journal, or doing yoga stretches. Related: 11 Ways to Reduce Stress and Anxiety Dont let exercise or dinner ruin sleep Getting exercise earlier in the day promotes good sleep, but if you work out just before going to bed, your body may be too revved up for restful sleep, according to Your Guide to Healthy Sleep. The same goes for eating--if you eat a big meal right before bed, indigestion might keep you up. Time these activities for early in the evening or at least two to three hours before bedtime. Put off your worries When I start to worry about the next day, I dont try to problem-solve in the moment, says Acosta. I tell myself youre equal to the task which seems to calm me. I think its my way of giving myself permission to not worry about whatever is bothering me at the moment and remember that it will all be fine tomorrow when I will deal with it. Follow her lead and try putting your worries on a mental shelf until tomorrow. Meditate The science is loud and clear: meditation and sleep make splendid bedfellows, writes Ariana Huffington in her bestselling book, The Sleep Revolution-Transforming Your Life, One Night at a Time (Harmony Books, 2017). Huffington, who suffered from sleep deprivation for years, learned that making a mental gratitude list helped calm her mind at night, and that meditating eased stress. Need guidance? Check out apps such as Headspace, Cal, Noisli or Slumber, which offer guided meditations, soothing music, storytelling and nature sounds that can help you drift into peaceful, health-giving sleep. We independently source all of the products that we feature on vegetariantimes.com. If you buy from the links on our site, we may receive an affiliate commission, which in turn supports our work. The post Got Anxiety? Create a Soothing Sleep Routine appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Holidays

November 1 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Holidays We are so excited to tell you about our new holiday ebook! It’s a collection of our favorite, festive, plant-based recipes, developed with the intention of bringing color and joy to your holiday table. As always, the focus is on flavor-packed, whole food ingredients and inspiring, seasonal produce. This project was so incredibly fun to work on. Dreaming up a celebratory table of vibrant, plant-forward dishes, and bringing it to life is just a really gratifying thing to do. Coming together around a table of good food is one of the undeniable pleasures of life, and we hope that these recipes will become yours as you celebrate with your loved ones. We are also launching the holiday ebook bundle, which includes the holiday ebook along with our desserts ebook for $4 off the total price. You can check out a few sneak peek photos from the ebook, plus the full recipe index below. Buy the Holiday Ebook /­­ Buy the Holiday Ebook Bundle ($4 Off) Recipe Index *all recipes are vegan, all but 4 recipes are gluten-free - Sour Cream and Shallot Dip - Stuffed Mushrooms with Smoky Quinoa and Cashew Parm - Smashed Potato Latke Bites - Beet Caviar - Butternut Squash, Farro and White Bean Salad - Holiday Slaw with Tahini-Orange Dressing - Miso-Roasted Cauliflower and Grapes with Green Caper Sauce - Leek and Potato Soup with Brussels Sprout Chips - Maple-Mustard Brussels Sprouts - Mashed Potatoes with Mushroom White Bean Gravy - Herb and Walnut Stuffing/­­Dressing - Sweet Potato and Caramelized Onion Casserole - Creamy Butternut Squash and Apple Soup with Fried Shallots - Cranberry and Pear Sauce - Leeks in Vinaigrette - Cardamom Rice - Lentil Loaf with Balsamic Glaze - Coconut-Braised Red Cabbage - Orange and Sage Tempeh - Red Onion Tart with Tofu Ricotta - Quinoa and Vegetable Pot Pie with Gluten-Free Crust - Chocolate Fudge - Seeded Pumpkin Bread with Apple Butter - Rosemary Almonds - Gingerbread Banana Granola Buy the Holiday Ebook /­­ Buy the Holiday Ebook Bundle ($4 Off) The post New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Holidays appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

The Plant-Based Slow Cooker

October 27 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

The Plant-Based Slow Cooker The Plant-Based Slow Cooker is my latest book and it comes out just in time for slow cooker season. There’s something cozy about the wonderful fragrance of food simmering in a slow cooker on a cold winter day. (Of course, if you’re like me, you use your slow cookers all year long.) If you’re a fan of my earlier book, Fresh from the Vegan Slow Cooker, then you’ll love this new edition, revised and updated with new information and tips and featuring 225 recipes — including many all-new ones such as: - Thai Coconut Soup - Oyster Mushroom Bouillabaisse - Seitan Spezzatino - Spice-Rubbed Whole Cauliflower - Jackfruit and Black Bean Chili - Portobello Pot Roast - Ful Medames - Indian Eggplant Curry - Korean Bugogi-Inspired Jackfruit - Artichoke-Spinach Lasagna   - Chocolate Oatmeal with Raspberries and Rose Petals - Carrot Cake Oatmeal Due out on November 10, you can pre-order The Plant-Based Slow Cooker on Amazon or wherever you buy your books. The post The Plant-Based Slow Cooker appeared first on Robin Robertson.

VT Tried It: Justin’s Peanut Butter

October 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

As a vegetarian living an active lifestyle, Justin was on a mission to create something better. Given that nut butter was a staple in his diet, plain old peanut butter just wasnt cutting it. He dreamt up his own flavors and an assortment of experimental nut butters began to fill his cabinets. After weeks of hungry roommates stealing his tasty creations, Justin decided to write his name on the jar.  Justin’s uses organic ingredients, Rainforest Alliance certified cocoa, sustainably sourced palm oil, recyclable packaging, and made with windpower. Justins Maple Almond Butter: The denser texture and subtle maple flavor pairs well with something juicy like an apple for a healthy and satisfying snack that doesnt leave you hungry later. It didnt take much to be nicely filling.   Justins Honey Peanut Butter: This spreads well, and would pair well with crackers or with celery as a healthier alternative. Nicely sweet but honey taste is still subtle. We paired this with apple slices, which was very satisfying even for colleagues who dont like apples (yes, they are an odd bunch!). These travel pouches are great for the hiking trail, or office snack drawer, and would be a great snack while watching kids sports g Justin’s offers recipes to cook with your favorite nut butters ->  The post VT Tried It: Justin’s Peanut Butter appeared first on Vegetarian Times.


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