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LOVE Soup with Pistachio Dukkah

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sour vegetarian recipes

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool

February 9 2019 My New Roots 

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool   When we committed to going to the ocean, I immediately felt the thrilling sensation that washes over me when I stand at the intersection of land meeting water. I smelled brine and dampness. I saw certain patterns and colours; light sand against dark water, wet stones, seaweed, driftwood, and feathers. This was the second recipe I created for the dreamy on-location photoshoot with Christiann Koepke back in October (you can see the first one here). The inspiration for this dish came first in fact, fast and furiously. Just thinking about the seaside brought this recipe to me in a wave of total inspiration. I wanted the ingredients to reflect the elements in this environment, and for the final result to be a visual meeting of land and sea. Now Im not super into “fake meat”, but there is something undeniably satisfying about tricking someone into thinking a vegetable is flesh. Tee hee. Plus, Rene Redzepi does it all the time, so maybe it puts me in the cool cooking club too? Yes? Anyway, I knew something on the plate had to look like seafood, and I had my sights set on scallops. In my first cookbook, I made “scallops” out of leeks, and wanted to try something different, so going through the rolodex of tube-shaped white veggies in my mind, I fell upon king oyster mushroom stems. Naturally. Browned in ghee and well-seasoned, I knew that these morsels would look exactly like mollusks, and taste deceptively meaty. A pool of herbaceous, vibrant green pesto, would be the land, and the perfect resting place for my mushroom medallions. I combined flat-leaf parsley and spinach to create a bright yet balanced sauce that complimented - rather than overwhelmed - the rest of the dish. But with all this creaminess, I knew that I also needed to include something for textural contrast, so toasted hazelnuts became the beach stones, along with fried capers, which added a bite of seaside brine. This dish is surprisingly easy to make, and it is the prefect main to serve for family and friends that you want to spoil a little. It looks impressive, but its a cinch to get on the table without gluing you to the stove. The pesto can be made a week in advance (although the fresher, the better), so that the only thing you need to do before serving is cook the mushroom and capers, and warm the pesto a little. I love cooking the capers and mushrooms in ghee (recipe here) because its just so darn delicious, but the pesto is vegan and if you want the entire meal to be so, simply swap out the ghee for expeller-pressed coconut oil, which is refined for high heat cooking and has no tropical aroma. Beta-glucan Goodness Edible mushrooms are both medical and nutritional dynamos. Collectively, they not only provide us with plant-based protein, vitamin D, and a whole host of minerals, but most excitingly a group of polysaccharides called beta-glucans. These complex, hemicellulose sugar molecules enhance the functioning of the immune system by activating immune cell response and stimulating the production of white blood cells. These compounds also effectively mobilize immune stem cells in your bone marrow, and exhibit anti-tumor properties, so theyre often used supplementally in cancer treatment protocols. Beta-glucans help to lower cholesterol, as this type of fiber forms a viscous gel during digestion, which grabs a hold of excess dietary cholesterol, prevents absorption by moving it through your digestive tract, and eliminates it. Through your poop! This same gel also slows down your digestion, which in turn stabilizes blood sugar, and minimizes the release of insulin. King oyster mushrooms are of course a good source of beta-glucans, but you can get them in other places too: barley, oats, sorghum, mushrooms like shiitake, reishi and maitake, as well as seaweed, algae, and dates.   I wouldn’t put king oyster mushrooms in the “specialty” category of fungi, but I also know that theyre not available at every grocery store, so if you cant find them, substitute with any other kind of mushroom you like and forgo the whole scallop charade. The dish will still turn out delicious, I promise. If you want to change up the herb in the pesto, try basil instead of flat-leaf parsley. Cilantro could also be delicious, but potentially overwhelming, so use more spinach in that case. And instead of hazelnuts in the pesto and garnish, try almonds, pecans or walnuts. Yummm. I like to serve this with a big hunk of crusty bread on the side to mop up any leftover pesto in the bowl. It also helps to have some good olive oil and flaky salt around for this situation, just sayin. If youd prefer the grain route, steamed brown rice, quinoa, or millet could be a decent accompaniment too. And if you want to go completely grain-free, roasted sweet potato, winter squash, or pumpkin would be totally lovely.     Print recipe     King Oyster Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 lb. /­­ 500g king oyster mushrooms (choose ones with fat stems) a generous amount of ghee (or expeller-pressed coconut oil) fine + flaky salt 1 jar brined capers (about 1/­­3 cup /­­ 55g) a handful of toasted hazelnuts, roughly chopped, for garnish 1 batch Parsley-Spinach Pesto (recipe follows) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish a few leaves of parsley, for garnish Directions: 1. Remove any dirt or debris from the mushrooms with your hands, or small soft brush. (do not use water!). Slice the stems into enough rounds so that each person has 5 or 6. Keep the caps for another dish. 2. Drain the capers and pat them dry with a clean tea towel or paper towel. Heat about a tablespoon of ghee (or coconut oil) in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the capers and fry until split and crisp - about 2-3 minutes. Remove from pan and set aside. 3. Add more ghee (or coconut oil) to the same skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add the sliced mushroom stems, a sprinkle of flaky salt, and cook on one side until golden, about 5-7 minutes. Then flip and cook on the other side until golden. Work in batches or use separate skillets - if you crowd the mushrooms they will steam each other and get soggy. That is not what were after! 4. While youre cooking the mushrooms, place the pesto in a small saucepan, add a touch of water to thin, if desired, and warm over low-medium heat. Do not boil! 5. To serve, place about 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml of the warm pesto in the bottom of a dish, spreading it out to make an indent in the center. Place 5 or 6 mushroom stems in the pesto, then top with the fried capers and toasted hazelnuts. Drizzle with olive oil and a few grinds of black pepper. Garnish with parsley and serve immediately. Parsley-Spinach Pesto Makes about 2 1/­­4 cups Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 150g hazelnuts 1 fat clove garlic 2 cups /­­ 35g flat-leaf parsley, lightly packed (tender stems only) 2 cups /­­ 65g baby spinach, lightly packed zest of 1 organic lemon 1/­­3 cup/­­ 80ml freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 2 lemons) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml cold-pressed olive oil 1/­­2 cup /­­ 35g nutritional yeast 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water, more if needed Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place hazelnuts on baking sheet. Toast in oven for 12-15 minutes or until fragrant and lightly toasted. Remove and set aside. Once cool, remove skins by rubbing the hazelnuts together in your hands. Set aside. 2. Remove any tough stems from the parsley. Roughly chop the leaves and tender stems (this prevents the parsley from bruising in the food processor). 3. Place garlic in the food processor and pulse to mince. Add the hazelnuts, parsley, spinach, lemon zest and juice, olive oil, nutritional yeast, and salt. Pulse for 30 seconds, then add the water and pulse again until its thick, but spreadable. Remove lid and scrape. Repeat until reaches desired consistency (I like mine a little chunky, but its up to you!). Store leftovers in an airtight glass container in the fridge for up to one week. We’re home from Bali now, settling back into life in the cold Canadian winter. It feels good to be here, especially after a satisfying few weeks in the sunshine, hosting two glorious retreats. Now it’s time to ground and focus on the year ahead. I’m very excited for 2019 – so many exciting things to share with you, just on the horizon. I hope you’re all well out there, and enjoying a vibrant start to the new year. Sending love and gratitude out to you all, always. xo, Sarah B The post Mushroom “Scallops” in a Warm Pesto Pool appeared first on My New Roots.

Ring in the Chinese New Year with these 7 Meatless Recipes

February 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

Ring in the Chinese New Year with these 7 Meatless RecipesHappy Year of the Pig to everyone who celebrates the Chinese New Year around the world. We invite you to include Meatless Monday dishes in your celebratory feast and wish you good fortune and great prosperity for the coming year. According to myth, the Jade Emperor called a meeting of all the animals in the zodiac. On the way, the pig stopped to eat but then fell asleep- thats why the pig is the last sign in the 12-year cycle. A Pig Year is considered favorable and brings good luck and wealth. This vibrant annual celebration takes place not only in Mainland China and South East Asia, but also in areas with significant Chinese populations such as the U.S., the U.K., and Australia. In addition to setting off firecrackers and honoring your ancestors, eating is a big part of the celebrations. Historically eaten by Chinese royalty, wonton soup is a perfect hot starter. Dumplings are a favorite and can be easily made with vegetables. A pretty jicama-stuffed bao surrounded by steamy dough is the perfect New Years treat. And for dessert, good fortune fruit can be served, such as oranges and tangerines. Celebrate the Year of the Pig with a Meatless Monday feast! Homemade Dumplings/­­Potstickers This recipe , including how to video , comes to us from Madeline Lu. Check out her food and travel blog  for culinary and wanderlust inspiration. Vegetable Congee This recipe comes to us from Tina Jui of The Worktop . Find the original Vegetable Congee Recipe  and additional photos on The Worktop. Wonton Soup This recipe  comes from Ashley at Eat Figs, Not Pigs . Check out her blog  for more delicious recipes. Jicama Bao This recipe comes to us from WoonHeng . Follow her on Instagram  for more great plant-based recipes. Pan-Fried Vegetarian Dumplings/­­Potstickers Try this incredible two-tone veggie dumpling recipe  from Red House Spice . Her blog is a great resource for dumpling making techniques and tips. Fried Brown Rice with Vegetables This recipe was developed by Alexandra Shytsman of The New Baguette  and is featured in her free Weeknight Cooking E-book . Easy Veggie Lo Mein This recipe comes to us from Karen of The Tasty Bite . Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, look for us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post Ring in the Chinese New Year with these 7 Meatless Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Spicy Tomato Queso Dip

February 1 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Spicy Tomato Queso Dip Just in time for the Super Bowl, here is one of my all-time favorite dips: Spicy Tomato Queso Dip (photo by Melissa Chapman) from Fresh from the Vegan Slow Cooker. I usually make this in a smaller (1 to 2 quart) slow cooker, but its an easy recipe to double or triple for a crowd and make it in a 3 to 4 quart slow cooker. In addition to being a great dip, its also great in nachos, a vegan Philly Cheesesteak, burritos, and even as the cheese sauce in mac and cheese. Spicy Tomato Queso Dip This is a quick and delicious dip that assembles easily. It also lends itself to variations such as the addition of crumbled vegan chorizo or cooked black beans. This recipe is from Fresh from the Vegan Slow Cooker by Robin Robertson (C) 2012. Slow cooker size: 1 1/­­2 quart Cooking Time: 2 hours on Low One 14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes with green chilies, drained 1/­­2 cup nutritional yeast 3 tablespoons oat flour 1 teaspoon prepared yellow mustard 1 teaspoon onion powder 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cumin 1/­­2 teaspoon chili powder 1/­­2 teaspoon salt 1 cup nondairy milk 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice Puree the tomatoes in a blender or food processor until smooth. Add the remaining ingredients, except the nondairy milk and lemon juice, and blend until smooth. Transfer the mixture to a lightly oiled 1 1/­­2 quart slow cooker. Stir in the nondairy milk until well incorporated. Cover and set the cooker on Low and cook, stirring occasionally, for 2 hours, or until the mixture is thick and hot. If the mixture isnt thickening after 2 hours, turn it up to High, remove the lid, and cook uncovered for 20 to 30 minutes longer. When ready to serve, spoon about 1/­­3 cup of the queso into a small bowl, stir in the lemon juice, then stir back into the slow cooker. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Makes about 2 cups The post Spicy Tomato Queso Dip appeared first on Robin Robertson.

rajma recipe | rajma masala | rajma curry | punjabi rajma recipe

January 29 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

rajma recipe | rajma masala | rajma curry | punjabi rajma reciperajma recipe | rajma masala | rajma curry | punjabi rajma recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. there are many ways to make the popular rajma masala. but the punjabi version of rajma curry is super popular and has been embraced by other regional cuisines. further, it is also appreciated because of the abundant supply of protein which makes it a complete meal when served with rice which is a source of carbohydrates. The post rajma recipe | rajma masala | rajma curry | punjabi rajma recipe appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera

January 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera Cortney Herrera is the artisan distiller and founder of the holistic skincare company Wildcare, located in the Pacific Northwest. We’ve been crushing hard on Cortney’s creations, like her expertly distilled hydrosols and face masks full of the most unique, glow-promoting ingredients, and we’re so excited to share this wisdom-packed interview. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Structure of certain things like eating & sleeping times has always made me feel the most supported. I am a triple virgo so by nature I crave a solid routine around the everyday basics. With that said, its freeing to just rehash it all and recreate a functional flow if I feel like Im too caught up in our pattern. Now that I have a baby (hes 1!) as much as I want things to be regimented for us all to thrive,  its necessary to play with flexibility for the unexpected too, so Ive shifted a bit more towards that direction. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. We sleep with our curtains open so that each morning we wake up to natural light. We just moved back to Oregon from sunny CA, so this is especially crucial for me here in the Pacific Northwest to feel more stable during the darker winter months. Our baby almost always wakes us up around 7am and usually starts babbling, so well take him out of his crib and have a little cuddle time. If hes not out on a job, my husband Alex will get him ready for the day and then Ill make us a morning beverage (usually tea with mushroom powder and coconut manna, and honey) and either one of us will cook a simple breakfast for the family (tortilla with an egg, handful of parsley or cilantro and a fermented veggie). We both work from home so we each hop on our computers shortly after while switching off with who is playing with baby Oso. One thing I am firm on is giving myself a facial massage for 5-10 minutes after I wash up. My skin loves it, but more importantly its a nice form of meditation to have that little moment of space to zen out a bit. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I opt for a magnesium bath, face mask (I like our creamy Soft Focus Mask at night), sometimes a chocolate and always a cup of tea – lately its a blend of lemon balm, chamomile, oatstraw and raspberry leaf. If time gets the best of me, Ill have a mug of hot water with magnesium powder to relax before bed. Im also really big on lists (virgo) so I usually write a new one before bed every night for all different things like shopping lists, distillation lists, who I need to email back more urgently, recipes I want to make.... everything thats been floating around in my mind that day so Im more freed up before bed. I watch a little Netflix and laugh, and then get in bed around 11. I like the Headspace app as a guided 5-10 minute meditation to center my breathing when I lay down. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Outdoor explorations! We aim to weave one day trip into each week, usually within an hour of home, and drive to a mountain, forest, or river to breathe clean air & explore without much of a plan or direction in mind. Having this free-flowing space contrary to our routines during the week creates lots of room for spontaneity…and sometimes we hit a dead-end, but thats all part of the fun of experimenting and not having a plan! Balance is key. If we dont have time to physically drive to a big open landscape that weekend because of work, well take walks in the neighborhood or a smaller visit to a nearby park (there are parks everywhere in Portland!). I like to be present and check in with myself as I move…how does the sun or mist feel on my skin, what scents are in the air, what does this leaf feel like in my hand.... All of these little check-ins help me feel more grounded and connected. Sustenance -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I stopped drinking coffee and caffeinated tea about 8 or so years ago to curb my anxiety – its helped tremendously! My favorite go-to drinks for energy & focus are roasted dandelion tea, fresh juice we make at home (the greener, the better), or chocolate milk with walnut milk and raw cacao! For the most part good quality chocolate has always mellowed me out actually – I think its the magnesium. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? I like to opt for something that will satisfy a sweet tooth without the crash or sugar spike like incorporating dates, honey or maple with healthy fats that sustain my energy. Lately Ive been making these very simple almond butter cookies. The recipe is: 1 cup almond butter (any nut butter will do!), 1 egg, 1/­­2 Tbs of virgin coconut oil, a couple spoons of coconut sugar, a pinch of himalayan salt and any spices that appeal (cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla bean etc). Roll into balls, smoosh with a fork and bake for 10 minutes! -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? My sister Ash (Black Sage Botanicals) makes delicious oxymels – vinegar based tinctures with infused organic and foraged herbs and honey. Im in love with her Tulsi Oxymel made with rose and pomegranate vinegar. It feels heart-opening and nurturing! Im pretty regimented on taking Vitamin D, a DHA fish oil, and iron with nettles along with various flower essences dependent on what my emotional state is calling for. Water is the main tool for me I need to remember, all day every day!!!!! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I aim to get out at least a couple times a week on an adventure and walk, usually finding a new forest to explore here in the northwest. Its been the single best thing for me in releasing any anxiety or stress from the week. I also am just getting back into yoga, focusing on the balance between movement + stillness. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I see beauty in nourishing and embracing every facet of our unique selves so much that the joy and loving energy we hold for our own bodies and spirit inherently radiates to those around us. I think when we allow ourselves to really connect with others, be vulnerable, be authentic, be blissful, be curious, beauty is an energy thats more magnetic than visually stimulating. I find a lot of rocks beautiful because I take time to notice their expressive nature. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? My approach is all about balance supported by nature and ancient rituals. Cold-pressed oils, raw honey, herb infusions, powdered herbs....focusing on the balance between humans and the natural world – how we care for botanicals and how they may care for us. I like to look at skincare the same way I look at the food I eat; when I feel happy about the ingredients I apply on my skin, my skin feels happy too. Its all about respecting and caring for ingredients so we create more harmony as we utilize them. My favorite tools are oil + water, in the form of our face oil and hydrosols. It may sound counterintuitive for those two to go hand in hand yet its what our skin is essentially made of and vital for nourished skin + optimal function. After cleansing, Ill mist a hydrosol (during winter I choose Empress Cypress or Rosemary Bay) and follow with SunRoot Solar Serum. Ill take about 5-10 minutes for a facial massage and then follow with another generous mist of Hydrosol. My skin glows!! -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water mainly. Eating lots of healthy fats like coconut oil/­­manna, ghee, avocado. The fish oil and vitamin d every day along with eating a lot of fermented foods and drinking the roasted dandelion tea I mentioned earlier (hormone balancing = skin balancing). The more we can do to support the gut and liver especially, the happier our skin is! I love incorporating raw honey and bee pollen in my rituals. Our Bee Rosy Mask actually has ground bee pollen in it and makes my skin feel like a spring flower. As for my hair, I like to use our skin soother Rosemary Bay Hydrosol to keep my scalp healthy. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? As a mama & business owner, there is always stress – good stress and real earth-shaking stress. The beauty/­­wellness business is pretty idealized – its HARD work and creating boundaries to minimize stress and prioritize your own personal wellness can be easily misplaced. Some things that usually help me release are talking it out with my sisters, breathing deep with a tall glass of water, embracing quietness, saying no when I need to, saying yes when I want to, putting my hands in dirt to work in the garden, and going on a walk. The past year I also started writing more regularly. Oddly enough a lot of it started flowing on my instagram which has led me to a beautiful community of friends that Ill message with on and off. On some more wild days, my husband and I will just run to the living room, turn up the music and just go crazy dancing for 10 minutes and then go back to work. This often helps the most with little stressors, especially seeing baby Oso laughing at us. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I make elderberry syrup every winter and take a spoon everyday when Im run down. Magnesium baths, herbal steams, foot soaks, rest, water, raw honey, and garlic. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Something that always helps me is doing something for myself first thing in the morning, so I dont end up too busy and putting it off later. That usually takes shape as a face massage. At the end of the day when Im laying in bed, I almost always do a self-check in and think of one nice thing I did for myself that day. If I forgot to physically do something, Ill say a few affirmations to myself. Im also quite excited to be starting therapy again and EMDR this month. I honestly am really eager to get back into it and work through some heavy triggers and blockages. I think thats one of the nicest things I could do for myself right now. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Allowing myself space to slow down & connect. Wildcare has been buzzing since conception. We were featured in Vogue the first month we opened, and from there it just became an everyday hustle to stay caught up – a challenge Im incredibly grateful for. Last year I had my first baby, and he arrived to our surprise 2 months early via an emergency cesarean. He remained in the NICU for a month while my husband and I went home as baby and I each had to separately heal. I felt broken, and at first, I jumped right back into work as soon as I had more movement to distract from much of the emotional pain I had experienced. A few months later when he was home, business was great but there was this moment I knew I needed to stop everything, reflect and be present with what I was feeling and with our baby. I closed the shop for a few weeks, and decided to stop taking on new retail partners for pretty much the remainder of 2018. Being transparent and open with those around me – even our customers about what I was going through, has been the biggest change Ive made. Slowing down, bridging that connection of my voice + products, being present and prioritizing the same amount of care for myself that I give others has allowed me to feel more honest with myself. Still a huge work in progress yet this practice continues to reveal a community of supporters that wouldnt have been there unless I was vulnerable. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I feel like inspiration finds me within the energy of the landscapes I’m immersed in. Right now its walking on the soft mossy forest floor in Oregon, hypnotized by rushing rivers and gazing up at towering Fir trees and dancing leaves. I really trust in the natural relationship of quiet down time vs the times Im energized with new ideas, and think its important to allow things to reveal themselves naturally as a connection is made. These visuals, scent memories, and feelings from nature always wind their way into my dreams even years later and lead me to formulas and product names so its best for me to just to go with the flow. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a distiller and starting Wildcare? My sisters and I grew up strongly influenced with our moms skin care rituals who worked as a makeup artist for film & tv, amongst other things. As kids, we would concoct foot soaks using pine needles and flowers we would collect on afternoon walks, and hair masks with eggs and mayonnaise! These DIY projects have always stayed with me. My formal schooling was both in Culinary and Herbal disciplines – a foundation that propelled my special focus on care – internal & external. There was an afternoon in particular where I had focused all my energy on exploring a better remedy to comfort my eczema flare-ups. When I noticed all the Rosemary that was growing in our yard near a little Bay tree I intuitively crafted my first Wildcare product, The Skin Soother Rosemary + Bay Hydrosol using a makeshift distillation system out of kitchen pots & pans. I remember I actually cried at the moment I saw the first hydrosol emerge…I really felt lucky to be in the presence of such an ancient form of alchemy. After obsessively spraying this camphorous green-smelling mist for a few weeks & seeing my skins improved health, this artful practice of distilling was something I fully got behind. I spent a year doing playful and careful experimentations, making hydrosols for family and friends. There was one night I even dreamt about filling a table full of tiny amber bottles with aromatic liquid and then a month or so later, I sprung up from a dream and shouted Wildcare! to my husband. Wildcare was born shortly after that in the end of 2015. -- At Wildcare, you make your own hydrosols and advocate their healing properties. Can you tell us a little bit about what they are and why they are so effective? Hydrosols are the subtly aromatic waters from distilled plant material. A copper still is placed over fire, holding spring water (we hand-collect from a local Oregon spring!) & fresh plant material. Inside the still, steam rises & passes through the plant in the form of vapor, carrying vital nutrients, plant acids & suspended particles of the plants essential oils. As the vapor cools, it condenses back into a liquid state and emerges in the form of aromatic water (now a Hydrosol) along with its essential oil counterpart. Our distillations have about an 8 hour duration depending on the plant utilized, a very slow & thoughtful process that requires a focused presence from the distiller. The majority of the essential oil will rise to the top, leaving the Hydrosol with about 0.1% micro-particles of essential oil, making it a very gentle mist without the same safety concerns that essential oils carry. When you purchase a pure Hydrosol, note that it will read as 100% distillate or floral water – without the addition of other ingredients or essential oils. More on the distillation process here. -- What are some of your best-sellers? 100% SunRoot Solar Serum, but more on that below! Our best selling Hydrosols of the season have been the skin soother Rosemary Bay, awakening Palo Santo, and Empress Cypress (a personal favorite!). From our face and body line, Soft Focus Mask has been flying off the shelves. Its a gentle and creamy clay based mask with brightening pearl powder, soothing organic coconut milk, and pineapple extract to even out lackluster skin. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? SunRoot Solar Serum is a product Ive worked on for 2+ years and was just released! After working so long on this formula, its been the most rewarding experience to see so many glowing reviews pour in. Im overwhelmed in the best possible way. It features a 4-week infusion of organic artichoke leaf in this incredibly beautiful Jojoba oil that Im sourcing directly from a farmer here in the US. He is self-taught and does all his cold-pressing by hand! Artichoke leaf is a powerhouse in healing sun damage, scarring and repairing tissue. Its combined with warming turmeric root, and juicy fruit oils like Sea buckthorn, Rose hip and Raspberry Seed. To extend even more beauty and peace of mind, its a 90+% certified organic formula! I am also in the middle of a complete rebrand, designed by artist Morgan Ritter (my younger sister!), with SunRoot as the first look of Wildcares new visual identity. The bottles are entirely covered with my actual tiny handwriting thats been screen-printed, echoing my commitment to being a maker – literally being a conduit, like water. Its a bold gesture to avoid a standardized typeface and is unlike what is commonly seen in the market, as we intend for this design to be a personal, embodied approach to commerce. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Its been a challenge as a nurturer however Ive been practicing treating myself more, creating stronger boundaries around my own personal time so that I can give more too. My affirmations since going through what I did last year have been The nurturer deserves to be nourished. I am deserving of nourishment. I am deserving of my own care. Simple pleasures like tinkering around in the kitchen and baking something experimental, even a chiropractic care visit from my favorite Luna Wellness practitioner, Megan makes me feel extra supported. Every so often Ive been treating myself to a facial from any one of a few dear friends here in Portland too. Allowing myself this space has been crucial to be able to lovingly care for child and have peace of mind. -- Standout book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art: Book - Aromatic Medicine by Patrice de Bonneval & Cathy Skipper Song/­­Album -Papa Celestin ragtime music, bought it at Mississippi Records :-) Movie - Stargate (I just saw Hackers for the 1st time and that was cool, ha ha ha) Piece of Art - STOOL WITH WHEELS (ALL THE WORLD’S PAIN, YET THERE ARE MOVEMENTS) by Morgan Ritter from her show The Cat House Settlements -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Dena Nakhle Birch – She is my friend/­­angel/­­naturopathic doctor based out of Santa Barbara, CA. A brilliant healer with one of the biggest hearts I know. Erica Chidi Cohen – her friendship and book Nurture was incredibly supportive to me after my birthing experience. Neva Osterloh – the sweetest woman offering loving forms of care through her Portland skincare studio. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Gabrielle Russomagno Self-Care Interview Series: Rocio Graves Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Meet honeygrow’s CEO and Their New, Seasonal Plant-Based Dishes for Meatless Monday…and Every Day of the Week

January 7 2019 Meatless Monday 

Meet honeygrow’s CEO and Their New, Seasonal Plant-Based Dishes for Meatless Monday…and Every Day of the Weekhoneygrow , the trendsetting DIY eatery with feel-good vibes and locally sourced ingredients, is joining the global Meatless Monday movement. And they just launched two savory and seasonal meatless dishes that you definitely need to try-and fall in love with. We did! Look for these new featured meatless items at honeygrow:   Soulfull Oats Salad (S.O.S.) - is a seasonal winter salad with organic baby arugula, roasted shaved local Brussels sprouts, roasted sweet potato spirals, dried cherries, ricotta salata, house-made multi-seed crackers (made with Soulfull Oats *), with a pomegranate vinaigrette. *A special note - for every S.O.S salad sold, honeygrow and The Soulfull Project will donate a portion of sales to local food banks in the US.     Vegan AF - is a winter stir-fry with sweet potato and zucchini spirals, house-made vegan chorizo, roasted spicy tofu (non-GMO), mushrooms, kale, red onions, bell peppers, cilantro, spiced agave cashews, and a smoked paprika-tomato sauce.     Meatless Monday checked in with honeygrow CEO and founder, Justin Rosenberg, to learn more about the healthy options at all 29 locations of his super busy and popular restaurant concept.     1. What was the impetus for including plant-based dishes on your menu and working with Meatless Monday? honeygrow was created with plant-based options in mind--I was vigorously vegan when I conceived of the brand. Finding meatless options for lunch every day at my desk job was a constant struggle. Working with Meatless Monday is a perfect fit since our menu is designed to be completely customizable. 2. Why is it important to you to offer customers a wide selection of customizable plant-based options? As someone who is seeking plant-based options, particularly when Im on the go, choices are key. We want to be able to provide plant-based options and we know that people want to be creative with their food. With our style of service + range of options, anyone can come in and customize any dish to their preferences. 3. What is your favorite honeygrow dish to eat on Meatless Monday? Right now, its the Vegan AF--its our first stir-fry that features sweet potato and zucchini spirals, house-made vegan chorizo, roasted spicy tofu (non-GMO), mushrooms, kale, red onions, bell peppers, cilantro, spiced agave cashews, and a smoked paprika-tomato sauce. Its hearty, a tad spicy, and ridiculously good. On January 4th, Meatless Monday hosted a Facebook Live event from a honeygrow location in Brooklyn. Find out more here .   Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. If youre as inspired by honeygrow as we are, wed love to talk to you about promoting and implementing Meatless Monday in your restaurant, hospital, K-12 school, college or university. Contact us here online  or find us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post Meet honeygrow’s CEO and Their New, Seasonal Plant-Based Dishes for Meatless Monday…and Every Day of the Week appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Breakfast Sweet Potato

December 24 2018 Meatless Monday 

Have leftover roasted sweet potatoes from your holiday meal? Turn them into breakfast! Pairing them with peanut butter and chia seeds adds healthy sources of fat to help keep you full. This recipe comes to us from Tawnie Kroll, RDN of Krolls Korner.   Serves 1   - 1 sweet potato - 1 medium banana, sliced - 1-2 Tbsp. creamy peanut butter - 1/­­2 Tbsp. chia seeds - 1/­­4 tsp. ground cinnamon   Wash and dry your sweet potato. Poke holes in it with a fork and wrap it in a paper towel and cook in the microwave until you can stick a fork all the way through and it feels done (soft). About 8-10 minutes in the microwave. Carefully cut the sweet potato in half and place banana slices on the sweet potato. Then drizzle the peanut butter on top, followed by the chia seeds and ground cinnamon. The post Breakfast Sweet Potato appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Black Bean Nachos

December 10 2018 Meatless Monday 

Nachos get a healthy plant-based boost with nutritious black beans, which are sauteed with Tabasco sauce for a little heat and honey for a little sweet. This crowd-pleasing recipe comes together in no time and can be customized with your favorite toppings. This recipe comes to us from Golden Blossom Honey. Serves 6 - 1/­­2 medium onion, chopped - 1 clove garlic, minced - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 (15 ounce can) black beans, drained and rinsed - 2 dashes Tabasco sauce - 1 tablespoon honey - 3 medium tomatoes, chopped - 1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced - 2 scallions, chopped - 1 (8 1/­­2 ounce) bag tortilla chips - 4 ounces sharp cheddar cheese, grated - 4 ounces Monterey Jack cheese, grated - 1 avocado, peeled and sliced - 3 tablespoons fresh cilantro, chopped - sour cream - salt and pepper to taste   Preheat oven to 475°.   Saute onion and garlic for 5 minutes in olive oil over medium heat. Reduce heat. Add black beans and Tabasco sauce. Stir in honey. Cook for 10 minutes, stirring often. In a medium bowl, mix together tomatoes, jalapeno pepper, and scallions. Place tortilla chips evenly on baking sheet. Place black bean mixture over chips, followed by tomato mixture and grated cheeses. Bake for about 5 minutes, until cheese melts. Top with avocado slices, cilantro and sour cream. The post Black Bean Nachos appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Come Along! Join Meatless Monday and Slow Food for Terra Madre Day on December 10th

December 3 2018 Meatless Monday 

Come Along! Join Meatless Monday and Slow Food for Terra Madre Day on December 10thWere partnering with Slow Food to celebrate their annual Terra Madre Day with a Meatless Monday meal. Take part in an international day of celebration by cooking up a plant-based dish and sharing it on Meatless Monday with family, friends, and colleagues. Every year, on December 10th, Slow Food - a global nonprofit committed to food that is good, clean, and fair for all - celebrates Terra Madre Day (Italian for mother earth). The theme this year is Food for Change, to illustrate how everyday food choices can make an impact on climate change and the planet. The celebration falls on a Meatless Monday, so naturally, we joined forces to double the impact for the climate. Why? Cutting out meat one day a week is good for the planet because it lessens the demand to raise livestock, which requires an extraordinary amount of resources and takes a devastating toll on the environment.   How to Join in the Meatless Monday Celebrations on Terra Madre Day: 1. Plan to cook a Meatless Monday meal on December 10th. Consider cooking with ingredients like protein-rich and delicious beans and legumes . 2. Share your recipe here . 3. During your Meatless Monday meal, share your photos on social media with the hashtags #MeatlessMonday and #FoodForChange   -For Chefs : Feature this dish in your restaurant on Meatless Monday and the rest of the week. Consider donating 50% or more of the sales to Slow Food USA. -For Meatless Monday Ambassadors and Slow Food Chapters: Host a #FoodForChange potluck or meal for your family, friends, and colleagues. On December 10th, make a difference in your community with Meatless Monday and Slow Food for Terra Madre Day. Join two distinguished worldwide movements that are committed to making change for personal health and the health of the planet. To get inspired, enjoy a short video celebrating Meatless Monday and Slow Food with chefs from Africa to Japan.     Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram!   Are you interested in getting Meatless Monday started in your restaurant or community? Become a Meatless Monday Ambassador! We have all the resources and tools you need. Get started here . You can also get in touch with us at info@meatlessmonday.com. The post Come Along! Join Meatless Monday and Slow Food for Terra Madre Day on December 10th appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Tricked-Out Tofurky

November 23 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Tricked-Out Tofurky This year, we will have Thanksgiving dinner on Saturday with friends, but I couldn’t let the actual day go by without doing at least some cooking — and we LOVE Thanksgiving leftovers! I happened to pick up a Tofurky roast on sale, but I always end up making a separate baking dish of my own stuffing.  This time, I decided to transform the humble Tofurky into a holiday roast to be reckoned with by opening it up, stuffing it with A LOT of stuffing, and wrapping the whole thing in yuba (bean curd skin), before roasting it to perfection. The actual process happened in a swirl of creativity, so I didn’t stop to take step-by-step photos.  I’ll explain what I did: TRICKED-OUT TOFURKY Ingredients: 1 recipe of your favorite stuffing, made ahead and refrigerated 1 Tofurky Roast 1 or 2 sheets of frozen yuba (bean curd skin), available in Asian markets, thawed and at room temperature Method: 1. Make your favorite stuffing ahead of time and refrigerate in a bowl until needed. 2. Cut the ends off the Tofurky and discard the plastic wrapper.  Cut about a 1-inch thick slice off the bottom of the Tofurky and place the roast, cut side up, on your cutting board. Cut that 1-inch slice lengthwise into 2 1/­­2-inch slices and set them aside. 3. Carefully make a cut long-way through the center of the roast stopping just short of cutting all the way through. (The roast should stay in once piece, if possible.  Removing the stuffing and adding it to your bowl of stuffing. Cut a few diagonal slits in each side of the inside of the Tofurky, essentially to open it up to be nearly flat. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. 4. If your yuba is stiff, place it (folded) in a large mixing bowl with about 1 cup of warm vegetable broth.  Let it soak until softened.  Carefully open up the yuba sheets and arrange them in the bowl to line it. (You can leave the broth in the bowl.) 5. Place the cut Tofurky in the bowl on top of the yuba, cut-side up,  Transfer the stuffing into the bowl on top of the Tofurky, pressing to shape it into an oval. Press the sides of the Tofurky into the stuffing to make a nice oval roast shape.  Place the 2 reserved 1/­­2-inch Tofurky slices on top of the stuffing, pressing them in to make a firm roast. 6. Gather the yuba up and around the sides of the roast so that the roast is entirely wrapped in yuba. Place a sheet of parchment paper on top of the roast and invert a rimmed baking sheet on top.  Carefully flip the bowl and baking sheet so that the roast is now on the baking sheet.  Remove the bowl. 7. Rub the outside of the roast lightly with oil or spray it lightly with cooking oil spray. Cover with foil and bake for 1 hour.  Uncover and bake for about 20 minutes longer or until the yuba is nicely browned. Transfer the roast to a serving platter (it’s easy to do with the parchment paper — you can then slide out the parchment paper and discard.  If your platter is large enough, surround it with roasted veggies.  Cut the roast with a serrated knife and serve with gravy.   We really loved the results.  I served the roast with roasted butternut squash, Brussels sprouts, and pecans; twice-baked stuffed potatoes; and cranberry sauce. Assembling the roastwas much easier to do than it sounds, and way more delicious with all the added stuffing and crispy yuba skin.  Plus you can serve way more people this way. Win-win, any way you look at it (especially for the turkeys).     The post Tricked-Out Tofurky appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Japanese Vegetable Curry

November 13 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Japanese Vegetable CurryMilder and thicker than other curries and slightly sweet, Japanese curries are typically thickened with a roux. This Japanese Vegetable Curry from One-Dish Vegan cuts the fat and adds flavor by pureeing some of the vegetables in the curry to thicken it. This is also good made with fresh or frozen shelled edamame instead of the tofu and snow peas instead of the green peas. S&B brand curry powder works best in this dish. Japanese Vegetable Curry Milder and thicker than other curries and slightly sweet, Japanese curries are typically thickened with a roux. This version cuts the fat and adds flavor by pureeing some of the vegetables in the curry to thicken it. This is also good made with fresh or frozen shelled edamame instead of the tofu and snow peas instead of the green peas. S&B brand curry powder works best in this dish. - 2 teaspoons olive oil or 1/­­4 cup (60 ml) water - 1 large yellow onion, chopped - 2 carrots, peeled and cut into 1/­­4 -inch (6 mm) thick slices - 1 1/­­2 to 2 tablespoons (9 to 13 g) yellow curry powder - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons (24 g) tomato paste - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) wheat-free tamari - 1 to 2 teaspoons agave nectar -  1/­­4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, optional - 1/­­3 cup (82 g) applesauce - 3 cups (700 ml) vegetable broth - 1 large rurusset potato, peeled and cut into 1-inch (2.5 cm) dice - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 1 tablespoon (16 g) mellow miso paste - 8 ounces (225 g) extra-firm tofu, well drained, blotted dry, and diced -  3/­­4 cup (113 g) fresh or (98 g) thawed frozen peas - Heat the olive oil or water in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the carrots and then stir in the curry powder, tomato paste, tamari, agave, cayenne (if using), applesauce, and broth and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and add the potato and salt and pepper to taste. Simmer until the vegetables are tender, about 30 minutes. - Transfer about 2 cups (455 g) of the mixture to a high-speed blender or food processor. Add the miso paste and puree until smooth. Stir the vegetable puree back into the curry along with the tofu and peas and simmer for 5 minutes longer. Taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. - Serve hot. From One-Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2018 Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc. Used with permission.   The post Japanese Vegetable Curry appeared first on Robin Robertson.

One-Pot Sicilian Couscous

November 6 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

One-Pot Sicilian CouscousIsraeli (pearl) couscous is larger than regular couscous, giving it more flavor and texture. It is especially delicious in this One-Pot Sicilian Couscous dish from One-Dish Vegan made with chickpeas, olives, and an assortment of vegetables. One-Pot Sicilian Couscous Israeli (pearl) couscous is larger than regular couscous, giving it more flavor and texture. It is especially delicious in this Sicilian-spiced dish made with chickpeas, olives, and an assortment of vegetables. - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil or 1/­­4 cup (60 ml) water - 1 onion, finely chopped - 1 carrot, thinly sliced - 1 red bell pepper, chopped - 3 garlic cloves, minced - 4 plum tomatoes, chopped or 1 can (14 ounces, or 400 g) of diced tomatoes, undrained - 1 teaspoon dried basil -  1/­­2 teaspoon ground saffron or turmeric -  1/­­4 teaspoon ground paprika - 1 1/­­2 cups (246 g) cooked chickpeas or 1 can (15.5 ounces, or 440 g) of chickpeas, rinsed and drained - 1 1/­­4 cup (219 g) uncooked Israeli (pearl) couscous - 2 cups (475 ml) vegetable broth -  1/­­4 teaspoon red pepper flakes - Salt - 1 jar (12 ounces, or 340 g ) of marinated artichoke hearts, drained and chopped -  1/­­2 cup (85 g) Kalamata olives, halved and pitted - 2 tablespoons (28 ml) fresh lemon juice - Freshly ground black pepper - 2 tablespoons minced fresh (8 g) parsley or (5 g) basil - Heat the olive oil or water in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the onion, carrot, bell pepper, and garlic. Cook, stirring, for 5 minutes to soften the vegetables. Stir in the tomatoes, dried basil, saffron, and paprika. Stir in the chickpeas, couscous, broth, and red pepper flakes. Season with salt to taste. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer, cover, and cook for 10 minutes. - Remove from the heat and let stand, covered, for 10 minutes longer or until all the liquid has been absorbed. Add the artichoke hearts, olives, and lemon juice and season with black pepper just before serving. Fluff the couscous with a fork. Sprinkle with parsley and serve hot. From One-Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2018 Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc. Used with permission. The post One-Pot Sicilian Couscous appeared first on Robin Robertson.

The Climate Crisis Is Urgent. Meatless Monday Can Be Part of the Solution

November 5 2018 Meatless Monday 

The Climate Crisis Is Urgent. Meatless Monday Can Be Part of the SolutionTake action to fight climate change by going Meatless Monday.   Recent published reports have described a greater urgency to reduce climate change, citing that crisis levels could be reached as early as 2040. o The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) generated worldwide attention by emphasizing the need for more immediate and far-reaching behavior changes than previously thought. It also identifies the role of food production and consumption in the current environmental crisis. o A second study in the publication Nature mirrors this identification of food as a major contributor to climate change and environmental harm. These reports point to livestock production as a major contributor to global warming, creating more greenhouse gases than all of the planes, trains, and automobiles in the world. For consumers looking for a way to take action against climate change by reducing meat consumption, Meatless Monday is a simple first step. Making a commitment to swap out meat for plant-based foods every Monday can lead toward more sustained changes to diet over time. The Center for a Livable Future at Johns Hopkins University shares their perspective on these recent reports  and also provides resources to guide consumers to better understand the relationship between food choices and climate change: “The Connections between Diet, People and Planet ” and “Global Meatless Monday -- for the Environment. ” To help improve this understanding, Meatless Monday has designed unique creative materials that give people a simple way to discuss and share the benefits of changing our diets. The Meatless Monday movement has support from chefs, celebrities, schools, restaurants, and organizations in more than 40 countries. The post The Climate Crisis Is Urgent. Meatless Monday Can Be Part of the Solution appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Coconut Curry Noodles and Butternut Squash

October 30 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Coconut Curry Noodles and Butternut SquashButternut squash adds a touch of sweetness to the coconut-curry sauce in this Coconut Curry Noodles recipe from One-Dish Vegan. Mix and match vegetables or make it as spicy as you like--begin with as much or as little cayenne as you like and then garnish with sriracha or sambal oelek for more heat.   Coconut Curry Noodles and Butternut Squash Butternut squash adds a touch of sweetness to the coconut-curry sauce. Mix and match vegetables or make it as spicy as you like--begin with as much or as little cayenne as you like and then garnish with sriracha or sambal oelek for more heat. - 2 teaspoons neutral vegetable oil - 3 shallots (chopped) - 1 tablespoon (8 g) grated fresh ginger - 3 tablespoons (45 ml) wheat-free tamari - 1 tablespoon (6 g) yellow curry powder - 2 teaspoons ground coriander -  1/­­4 teaspoon cayenne, or to taste - 2 teaspoons sugar - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 2 cups (475 ml) vegetable broth - 1 small butternut squash, peeled and cut into 1/­­2 -inch (1.3 cm) dice (about 3 cups) - 8 ounces (225 g) dried rice noodles - 2 cups (140 g) chopped bok choy or other leafy greens - 1 can (14 ounces, or 395 ml) of unsweetened coconut milk -  1/­­2 cup (8 g) chopped fresh cilantro - 2 scallions, chopped - Lime wedges, to serve - Sriracha or sambal oelek, to serve (optional) - Heat the vegetable oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the shallot and ginger and cook, stirring, for 1 minute to soften. Stir in the tamari, curry powder, coriander, cayenne, sugar, and salt and pepper to taste. - Stir in the broth and then add the squash. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer. Cover and cook for 20 minutes or until the squash is tender. Add the bok choy and simmer for another 10 minutes. - While the vegetables are cooking, soak the rice noodles in a bowl of hot water and set aside. When the noodles are soft, drain them and add them to the vegetables. - Stir in the coconut milk and heat until hot--but do not boil. Taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. - Serve in large bowls and garnish with cilantro and scallions. Serve with lime wedges and sriracha (if using). From One-Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2018 Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc. Used with permission. The post Coconut Curry Noodles and Butternut Squash appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Healthier You Series: All-Star Nutritionist Bonnie Taub-Dix Sheds Light on Good Heart Health Practices You Can Use

January 28 2019 Meatless Monday 

Healthier You Series: All-Star Nutritionist Bonnie Taub-Dix Sheds Light on Good Heart Health Practices You Can UseStart smart eating habits on Mondays for a happier and healthier you! February is just around the corner and its American Heart Month . Take a moment on Monday to focus on behaviors that may help you live a longer and healthier life. This is the third article in this months Healthier You Series. Weve discussed making good dietary choices for kidney health and type 2 diabetes . This week, we look at heart health. The American Heart Association recommends making simple changes to your diet to improve heart health, such as limiting red meat. Meatless Monday is an easy and enjoyable way to make smart food choices for your heart . Consuming less red and processed meat and more plant-based foods like whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes can benefit cardio-health. Bonnie Taub-Dix is a nutrition consultant, author, and Meatless Monday advocate. We asked her to share some heart-friendly advice. 1. Meatless Monday encourages people to cut out meat one day a week for their health and to try a great variety of plant-based foods. Are there specific plant-based foods that are most beneficial for heart health? Plant-based protein is a hot, trendy topic but these are foods that have been around for centuries, providing fiber and an array of nutrients. Plant proteins like beans, nuts, and seeds are just a few examples of how we can cut back on meat while boosting the value of our diets. Oatmeal is a steamy bowl of goodness for breakfast swirled with almond butter and bananas or as a savory side mixed with a variety of seasonings and spices. Oats and almonds are rich in fiber to help lower cholesterol levels. Beans, the most underrated superfoods, are also rich in soluble fiber to help keep you feeling fuller longer while controlling cholesterol levels. Theyre also a great source of plant-based protein.   2. Are there particular foods to avoid? What about processed foods? Many people say they try to avoid processed food, as if its a kind of poison. Its a well-intentioned goal, but even pre-chopped fruit or vegetables are processed foods! Certain processed foods make our lives more convenient, safer-and in many ways, even more nutritious. The good news is certain processed foods are healthier than some foods found in their natural state, such as: o Plain yogurt, with added cultures, retains the protein and calcium naturally found in dairy products, and it also includes added good bacteria to help boost our gut function and immune systems. o Canned tomatoes contain more lycopene--a powerful antioxidant that reduces inflammation--than fresh tomatoes do, especially when they are eaten simultaneously with a small amount of oil to enhance absorption. Dont judge a food by the front of the package. Flip that bag or box over to read whats really inside!   3. Should people with a family history of heart disease be much more careful than those who dont have a history? What can someone with a family history do to help prevent heart disease? If you knew you could have stopped that balsamic vinegar from splattering on your favorite white sweater, would you have done something to prevent it from happening? Unless youre clairvoyant, its not very easy to prevent something you cant predict. When it comes to your body--whether its potential damage from high blood sugar, blood pressure, or cholesterol levels--this is the time to take charge of your health. You can fight against your family histories by taking a closer look at what youre putting on your plate, moving more , and finding effective ways to manage stress .   4. Whats your go-to food for heart health on Meatless Monday? Id have to say my Spicy Dark Chocolate Chili Bowl ! What I love about this recipe is that you dont really have to follow it exactly -- you can swap out for your favorite ingredients. This recipe contains beans and avocado, as well as a variety of anti-inflammatory spices. Bonnie recently published Read It Before You Eat It – Taking You from Label to Table . You can find more about Bonnie at Better Than Dieting and on Instagram. For an extra bonus, check out heart-friendly Meatless Monday recipes, from pancakes to burgers, in our free comfort food e-cookbook . Use Mondays to make positive change in your life that will do you a world of good. Meatless Monday is a global movement followed by millions who choose not to eat meat one day a week for their health and the health of the planet. Help spread the word about the many benefits of Meatless Monday, such as how reducing meat consumption may improve your heart health. Download our shareable free graphics here . Follow  us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Healthier You Series: All-Star Nutritionist Bonnie Taub-Dix Sheds Light on Good Heart Health Practices You Can Use appeared first on Meatless Monday.

NYC Health + Hospitals Launches Meatless Monday

January 17 2019 Meatless Monday 

The goal is to encourage healthy lifestyles and reduce disease risk. NYC Health + Hospitals, the largest public healthcare system in the country, will now be offering a Meatless Monday chefs choice option to inpatients at all 11 acute care hospitals. Hospital dietitians will counsel patients on the benefits of a plant-based diet as theyre making their meal choices for the day. Eric Adams, Brooklyn Borough President joined Mitchel Katz, President and Chief Executive Officer of NYC Health + Hospitals to announce the program at a press conference where they talked about the importance of plant-based nutrition in healing patients and promoting overall well-being. See the press release here and video highlights of the event below.     Brooklyn Borough President, Eric L. Adams, an ardent advocate for plant-based diets, commended Dr. Katz for his leadership and called on all hospitals to take the Meatless Monday pledge saying that hospitals have a unique opportunity to influence patients and families in rethinking the nutritional quality of their meals, and Meatless Mondays now has a role in that conversation. Dr. Katz spoke about the hospitals commitment to supporting patients in adopting healthy behaviors: We want to empower our patients to live their healthiest lives by introducing them to healthier foods that they may choose once theyre discharged. The Meatless Mondays initiative is consistent with this mission and fits with our new Plant-Based Lifestyle Medicine Program at NYC Health + Hospitals Bellevue, developed to provide intensive support for outpatients who wish to adopt healthy lifestyle changes. William A. Brown, Chief Executive Officer of NYC Health + Hospitals/­­Coney Island, added, The Meatless Monday initiative is one small but powerful step we can take to help our patients make healthier decisions and improve their outcomes. Commenting on the ability of the Meatless Monday program to encourage healthy behavioral changes, Whitney Ahneman, MS, RDN, CDN, CDE, Clinical Nutrition Manager at NYC Health + Hospitals/­­Coney Island shared, For many patients, making changes to their diets and breaking long-standing habits can seem overwhelming; however, Meatless Monday offers the ability for our patients to adopt small changes that can make a big difference over time in reversing or preventing certain chronic conditions. Meatless Monday Offers Expertise to Hospitals and Organizations Hospitals wishing to implement Meatless Monday programs can consult with our team, which includes experts from the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future.  Free resources include: o Research on the health and environmental benefits of choosing plant-based foods instead of meat o Implementation guides for starting Meatless Monday in hospital cafeterias o Creative materials that can be used to promote Meatless Monday on site or through digital and social media o Downloadable cookbooks and weekly newsletters with Meatless Monday recipes For additional information on the impact of food choices on chronic health problems and climate change, see resources from Meatless Mondays scientific advisor, The Center for a Livable Future at Johns Hopkins University: The Connections between Diet, People and Planet >> Questions? Contact us now for additional information or to learn how to implement a program at your hospital. The post NYC Health + Hospitals Launches Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

bitter gourd curry recipe | karela sabzi | kakarakaya curry

December 26 2018 hebbar's kitchen 

bitter gourd curry recipe | karela sabzi | kakarakaya currybitter gourd curry recipe | karela sabzi | kakarakaya curry with step by step photo and video recipe. indian curries are very essentials for many indians and are made on day to day basis. there are myriad types of it made with different ingredients and for different purposes. one such simple and easy curry recipe is bitter gourd curry which is known for its sweet, sour and spicy taste combinations. The post bitter gourd curry recipe | karela sabzi | kakarakaya curry appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegan Shakshuka

December 20 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Shakshuka If youre looking for something different to wake up your taste buds, this vegan shakshuka may be just the ticket. Tofu replaces poached eggs in this spicy dish that originated in Tunisia. It’s great for brunch or a light supper.  I like to serve it with a side of oven-fried potatoes and a salad. Chopped cooked artichoke hearts are a good addition to the zesty sauce and are a good foil for the spicy heat. If you prefer less heat, you can reduce the amount of harissa, red pepper flakes, and/­­or jalapeno.  Serve with warm crusty Italian bread or pita bread. This is one of the 25 all-new recipes featured in One-Dish Vegan (Revised and Expanded edition).   Vegan Shakshuka Makes 4 servings   12 ounces firm tofu, drained 1/­­4 teaspoon turmeric 1/­­4 teaspoon Indian black salt (kala namak), optional Salt and ground black pepper 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 red onion, chopped 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 red bell pepper, chopped 1 jalape?o chile, seeded and minced 1 tablespoon smoked paprika 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cumin 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast 2 teaspoons harissa paste or 1/­­2 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon sugar 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 (28-ounce) can diced tomatoes, undrained 1 teaspoon Za’atar spices or 1/­­2 teaspoon dried oregano Chopped parsley or cilantro, as garnish Crusty Italian bread or warm pita bread, to serve 1/­­2 cup vegan unsweetened yogurt   Cut the block of tofu into four 1/­­2-inch thick slices, and then use a cookie cutter to cut the slices into 4-inch rounds.  Save the tofu scraps to use in a scramble or other recipe. Rub kala namak (if using) on the surface of the the tofu rounds. Rub the turmeric in a 1 1/­­2 -inch circle in the center of each tofu round. Season with salt and pepper and set aside. Heat the olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and cook for 5 minutes to soften. Add the garlic, bell pepper, and chile and cook until tender, 5 minutes. Stir in the smoked paprika, cumin, tomato paste, harissa, sugar, tomato paste, and diced tomatoes. Cook, stirring, until slightly saucy, about 4 minutes, mashing any large pieces of tomato. Reduce the heat to low, season with salt and pepper to taste, and simmer for 10 minutes. Arrange the tofu rounds on top of the sauce, pressing down so just the centers show and the rest of the tofu is submerged in the sauce. Simmer for 10 minutes longer to thicken the sauce and heat the tofu. To serve, sprinkle Za’atar spices and garnish with fresh parsley.  Serve with toasted crusty bread or baguette or pita bread and yogurt, if using.   The post Vegan Shakshuka appeared first on Robin Robertson.

gujarati dal recipe | gujarati tuvar dal | gujarati toor dal

December 6 2018 hebbar's kitchen 

gujarati dal recipe | gujarati tuvar dal | gujarati toor dalgujarati dal recipe | gujarati tuvar dal | gujarati toor dal with step by step photo and video recipe. dal recipe has always been a staple curry for most of indian households. there are myriad ways and varieties of it which is made according to the demographics and taste buds of the local region. one such easy and simple dal lentil soup recipe is known as gujarati dal recipe which is sweet and sour in taste. The post gujarati dal recipe | gujarati tuvar dal | gujarati toor dal appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Fried Eggs on Kale bed

November 28 2018 Oh My Veggies 

Contrary to popular belief, spinach is not a particularly significant source of iron. The myth around its high iron content was born from a study in which a decimal point had been moved by mistake. However, spinach does contain many important nutrients--especially antioxidants and bioflavonoids that help stop carcinogenic substances and processes. Spinach is, for example, rich in carotenoids, plant pigments that are responsible for its dark green color. Spinach is a good source of antioxidants essential for our skin and our health, whether raw, cooked, canned, or frozen.  

Weekday Cauliflower Dal

November 15 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Weekday Cauliflower DalWe had a little vote on instagram the other day, asking which recipe we should post on here next. I was absolutely convinced that these Peanut Butter & Jam Chocolate Cups would be the winner. But there was instead a surprisingly large majority asking for a cauliflower dal. I suppose most of you just want to cozy up with warm food that hugs the belly right now. And that is exactly what this is. A belly hugger and a particularly simple recipe that doesn’t require any fresh herbs or unusual ingredients. Just a handful of pantry staples and a little trick for a flavor packed topping. We’ll teach you more about the recipe and the topping in a bit. But before we do that, we wanted to show you this video that we made. It is part of a new mini series that we are doing on on youtube where we travel around Sweden to source local ingredients and cook with friends. In this episode we took the train to the west coast to pick apples with Linda Lomelino and then she bakes a classic Swedish Apple Cake. Fun times! Luise was quite nervous about releasing this because she speaks in front of the camera more than she has done before, so please give her a little extra love. We have two more episodes coming before this year ends. Back to the dal. If you are not familiar with the name, it is essentially an Indian Lentil Soup. We have been sharing a few different dal recipes on here and in our books and this is a mix of them all. It is not our fanciest version but instead something that you can make on any given weekday. A dal is one of those recipes that you learn once and then know and cook for the rest of your life. I promise. I have been making varieties of this soup since I moved to my first apartment and learned how to cook. All ingredients are easy to find and can basically go into the sauce pan at the same time. If there is one thing that you should give a little extra attention, it is to use a good curry spice blend. The use of spices can vary in curries, we particularly love a version that includes ground fenugreek. But you can use any curry mix that you like. If you have some mustard seeds, coriander seeds and/­­or cardamom seeds in your spice cabinet, you can grind them into your curry blend to boost it with extra flavor. Because freshly grounds seeds/­­spices always taste more. The trick When we were on Sri Lanka a couple of years ago, we learned a dal trick from a local woman. After having cooked lentils and spices into a pretty good dal, she put another pan on high heat, added ghee and more spices to it and, when super fragrant, she stirred them into the soup. Adding those warm spices and butter last minute just boosted the soup and made it insanely flavorful. For this recipe we use a similar method for garlic and mustard seeds that we then wilt down spinach into. You can stir down the spinach into the dal, but we instead serve it as a topping (because our kids prefer it without the spinach). We normally add toasted pumpkin seeds on top as well but didn’t have any at home this time. Weekday Cauliflower Dal  Serves 4 Notes: You can either serve the soup chunky or mix it smooth with a hand blender. Our favorite way is to just give it a super quick whizz with the blender to make it a little creamier and yet keeping texture from the cauliflower and potatoes. If you want it a little sweeter and creamier, you can replace 400 ml /­­ 14 oz of the water/­­stock with a tin of coconut milk. We don’t add chili to it because of our kids but that can obviously also go in along with the curry. 3 tbsp coconut oil or butter/­­ghee 1 onion 2 cloves garlic 1 tbsp ground curry spice blend 1/­­2 tbsp mixed mustard seeds, coriander seeds and cardamom seeds (or just add 1/­­2 tbsp extra ground curry) 1 large chunk (5 cm /­­ 2 inches) fresh ginger 1 cauliflower (approx 500 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb) 3 potatoes, coarsely diced 200 g /­­ 1 cup red lentils 2 soft dates, pitted and mashed 1 litre /­­ 4 cups water or vegetable stock 1 tsp apple cider vinegar   Garlicky spinach 2 tbsp coconut oil 2 tsp mustard seeds 2 garlic cloves, finely sliced 2-3 handfuls spinach   Tomato salad 10 cherry tomatoes 2 tsp olive oil 1 tsp apple cider vinegar salt & pepper Make the Cauliflower Dal: Heat coconut oil, onion and garlic in a large saucepan on low/­­medium heat. Add the curry, grind the extra spices in a mortar and add those as well (or just add more curry). Stir constantly with a wooden spoon until it smells fragrant, but be careful so the spices do not burn. If it feels too dry add a spoonful, or more, of water. Break the cauliflower into florets and chop the stem finely. Peel the potatoes and dice them into 1 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch bits. Add both to the sauce pan along with the lentils and dates. Stir and sauté for about a minute before adding water or stock. Let simmer for 30 minutes or until the lentils are starting to dissolve and the cauliflower florets are tender. Stir carefully (if you want the cauliflower florets to stay intact) a few times. Add apple cider vinegar and salt to taste. Give the soup 2-3 pulses with a hand blender (if you like, see note above). Serve in bowls with a dollop of yogurt (coconut yogurt or regular yogurt) and top with garlicky spinach and tomato salad. Make the Garlicky Spinach: Heat coconut oil in a skillet. Sauté mustard seeds and garlic on low/­­medium heat until golden and fragrant. Add spinach and turn off the heat. Stir until wilted. Ready for serving. Make the Tomato Salad: Cut the tomatoes in halves and place in a bowl. Add olive oil, vinegar salt and pepper and toss to combine. Serve on top of the dal for a fresh zing of flavor.

Lentil Pâté

November 10 2018 VegKitchen 

Mystify your family by serving this delicious veggie pâté with lentils. A delicious source of protein for breakfast or dinner, serve them on bread or crackers with a touch of mustard--satisfaction guaranteed! Save Print Lentil Pâté Serves: 2 cups   Ingredients 1 tablespoon of olive oil 1 onion, chopped 2 clove garlic, minced 2 tablespoons of nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon of tamari 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/­­2 teaspoon ground clove 1/­­4 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1 cup dried green lentils, rinsed salt and pepper, to taste 3 cups of vegetable broth chopped fresh parsley, to taste Instructions In a saucepan over medium heat, heat oil and add onion and garlic. Sauté for about 4 minutes or until onion is tender. Add yeast, tamari, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and lentils. Season to taste, mix well, and cook for about 5 minutes. Add the vegetable broth. Bring to a boil, reduce to low heat, and simmer uncovered for about 25 minutes or until the lentils are tender. Stir regularly while cooking. In a food processor or hand blender, reduce the mixture to a smooth, even purée. Transfer the mixture to an airtight container and allow to cool in the refrigerator for 1 hour. When ready […] The article Lentil Pâté appeared first on VegKitchen.

Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale and Lentils

November 6 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale and Lentils More than just a sandwich, this is better described as a warm and wintery mushroom and kale salad on top of a slice of freshly baked sourdough bread and it is every ounce as heavenly as it sounds. But before we talk more, let’s watch a movie. We have been taking an involuntary break from making our youtube videos as we have been finishing up our next book, but we are back with a bunch of new videos now. We are starting off with this sandwich this week and have a few more in the upcoming weeks. If you’ve been following my stories on instagram, you might have noticed that we’ve been picking up a new (but old) love for baking rye sourdough bread. It’s been years since we baked bread more regularly and I remember giving up the last time after having killed our third starter. Apparently (luckily), we are better at keeping children alive than sourdough starters and plants. Anyway, I felt a streak of boldness and got back on it again a few weeks back. Instead of making our own starter, we asked if we could buy a rye starter from a sourdough bakery close to us. They handed us a paper cup with a wobbly and bubbly starter and we went home and started baking. It’s been alive for a month now and whenever we are not baking, we simply let it sleep in the fridge. Many sourdough breads are complicated stories involving a checklist with tasks. This is a simpler method where we bake the bread in a crockpot to help it develop a thick crust and soft centre. Its a version of the classic No-Knead Bread but with sourdough bread and the addition of rye flour to give it more tang. The dough is more moist than traditional bread doughs and needs longer proofing time so it develops its tangy sourdough flavor. We use 30/­­70 per cent rye/­­wheat ratio. We have been experimenting with various ratios but find that this is optimal for a bread that can rise well and still provide a lot of rye character. We have been using the bread for lunch sandwiches and this mushroom sandwich is our very favorite at the moment. It’s very very simple, you just fry mushrooms in a pan with a bit of garlic, fold down kale and cooked lentils and add a little vinegar to balance the flavors. We serve it with a herby vegan spread between the bread and the topping that we make from Zeta BreOliv, capers and parsley. BreOliv is a spreadable olive oil that can be used instead of butter. It is made from just olive oil, shea oil, water and salt. This recipe is sponsored by Zeta and you can find the recipe in Swedish on their site. And the English version below. Sourdough Sandwich with Mushroom, Kale & Lentils Makes 4 slices BreOliv Herb Spread 4 tbsp Zeta BreOliv 1 tbsp capers 1 small bunch parsley Mushroom Topping 2 tbsp Olive Oil 300 g /­­ 11 ounces (3 cups) mixed mushrooms 1 clove garlic 1 tbsp white wine vinegar 2 large kale leaves, stalk discarded 1 cup /­­ 100 g cooked lentils salt & black pepper To serve 4 slices sourdough bread (see recipe below) - Make the herb spread by chopping capers and parsley and stirring it together with Zeta BreOliv In a bowl. - Clean and divide the mushrooms into large bits. Peel and crush the garlic. - Heat a large skillet with olive oil. - Add mushroom and garlic and let sizzle for a few minutes. Then add white wine vinegar. - Chop the kale and rinse the lentils and stir them into the pan. Let saute until the kale has softened. - Taste and season with salt and pepper. - Cut a few slices bread and add a layer of the herb spread. Top with the mushroom and kale mixture and a grind of black pepper. Rye Sourdough Makes 1 loaf Before we make this bread we feed the starter a few hours ahead so it’s alive and kicking. 100 ml (1/­­3 cup) rye sourdough starter 400 ml (1 1/­­2 cup) water 1 1 /­­2 tsp salt 330 g (2 1/­­3 cups) organic all purpose flour 170 g (1 1/­­2 cup)  organic rye flour 6-8 green olives - Stir together sourdough, water and salt in a large bowl, and the two flours in a separate bowl. - Chop the olives coarsely. - Fold the olives and the flour mixture into the sourdough liquid and use a wooden spoon to stir it into a sticky dough. Sprinkle over more flour if needed. You can also dip your hands in flour and use them if you prefer. The dough is ready when it can be shaped to a ball that is smooth on the outside and sticky on the inside. - Cover the bowl with plastic and leave in room temperature for 12 hours (can be more or less depending on how warm your room is. - It should have expanded at this point and be very sticky and bubbly. Fold it out on a floured table. Sprinkle extra flour on top and pull and fold the dough around itself a few times. It will be pretty sticky. - Flour a proofing basket or bowl and transfer the dough to it with the folds and ends facing upwards and the smoother (dont worry if its not super smooth) facing down. - Leave to proof for two more hours. - Set the oven to 250°C/­­500°F and place a Dutch oven with lid in the oven. - Use oven mittens to remove the hot Dutch oven. Sprinkle the bottom with flour and carefully flip out the dough into it. - Put the lid back on, place in the oven and let back for 30 minutes. Remove the lid, lower the temp to 230°C/­­450°F and let bake for 20 more minutes. - The bread is ready when it has a neice crust and a hollow sound when tapped on. - Let cool wrapped in a cloth before you slice it and it will stay moister. This post is sponsored by Zeta. All words and opinions are our own.

Aam Ki Launji, Sweet And Sour Mango Chutney

November 4 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Aam Ki Launji, Sweet And Sour Mango Chutney (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Aam Ki Launji, Sweet and Sour Mango Chutney Aam Ki Launji is packed full of flavors, creating a wonderful combination of sweet, spicy, and sour. This can be used as a side dish or as a condiment. My favorite way to serve Aam Ki Launji is with stuffed parathas. This is a quick and easy recipe that adds a lot to your palette! - 2-1/­­2 cup raw cooking mango (cut into byte size pieces, I used 1 mango) - 2 Tbsp oil - 3 dry red chilies (cut into pieces) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 1/­­4 tsp nigella seeds (kalonji) - 1/­­4 tsp fenugreek seeds (methi dana) - 1 tsp fennel seed (saunf) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­4 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder - 1 tsp salt - 3 Tbsp sugar (use as needed) - 1/­­4 cup water -  Heat the oil in a heavy bottom pan, over low heat. When oil is just warm add all the ingredients except sugar, red chilies and asafetida, fennel seeds, nigella seeds, fenugreek seeds, coriander powder, red chili, turmeric, sugar and salt sauté for few seconds. - Add the mango cubes, mix well add about 1/­­4 cup of water mix it well cover the pan. And let it cook on a medium heat for 7-8 minutes, while stirring occasionally. - After mangoes are cooked they are soft and tender add sugar and turn off the heat and cover the pan for few minutes. - Once Aam Ki Launji is cooled, you can refrigerate. For up to a week. Notes For this recipe, raw cooking mango works the best. These mangoes are now available year around in most Indian grocery stores. You may find that sometimes the mangoes have already started ripening and the color is not white when you slice inside, but it will still work. You can also use mangoes that are not ripe enough and too sour to eat for this recipe. If you think that the mango still needs some sourness, add in mango powder. The post Aam Ki Launji, Sweet And Sour Mango Chutney appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Find Your FoodPrint and Make Sustainable Decisions about Food

October 29 2018 Meatless Monday 

Find Your FoodPrint and Make Sustainable Decisions about FoodWe can all do our part to help fight climate change. The food we eat is actually a major contributor to global warming, and Meatless Monday is a simple, effective, and enjoyable way to achieve a more sustainable diet. To help you make the most informed choices about your food, were happy to tell you about FoodPrint.org, a new website that offers tips and resources for lowering your foodprint: all the processes that are required to get your food to your plate, and the impact these processes have on the environment, animals, and people. The site is full of information about how to shop, cook and eat more sustainably. And if youd like to dig deeper, it also has tons of information on industrial food production -- from its climate impacts to animal welfare to public health implications -- and the benefits of more sustainable practices. Find your foodprint and find out how you can eat and shop more sustainably by taking their quiz. Help us spread the word about the benefits of Meatless Monday for the health of the planet. Share our Meatless Monday social media graphics on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! The post Find Your FoodPrint and Make Sustainable Decisions about Food appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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