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30 Easy Vegan Recipes for Quarantine Using Pantry Staples

Avocado Paratha

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Singapore Mei Fun

April 1 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Singapore Mei FunQuarantine cooking can be fun — as in mei fun!  Mei fun noodles are very thin Chinese rice noodles (also called rice vermicelli). It is a popular street food in Singapore. Basic mei fun can be somewhat bland, usually stir-fried with shiitake mushrooms, soy sauce, and a few other ingredients, with additional condiments served on the side. Singapore mei fun, on the other hand, is distinctive for its addition of curry powder. It usually features a number of vegetables, and some type of protein food — my version calls for tofu, but you can substitute seitan, tempeh, or soy curls. If rice vermicelli noodles are unavailable, you can make this with angel hair pasta instead (cooked al dente before adding to the skillet). Also feel free to change up the vegetables used (zucchini instead of broccoli, or green peas instead of snow peas, for example). The seasoning can also be adjusted to your taste, add more red pepper flakes (or a drizzle of Sriracha) for more heat, or use more or less curry powder. Here is the recipe for Singapore Mei Fun.  Since I.m limiting my trips to the supermarket, I was out of bell pepper, snow peas, broccoli, and cilantro, so I just used cabbage, carrots, and frozen green peas - and it was still super-delicious.  Use what you got!  This is what my quarantine version looked like last night: This recipe is from my most beautiful cookbook, Vegan Without Borders.  If you don’t have this book, now is a great time to get it — it’s like taking a culinary tour around the world, right in your own home! Singapore Mei Fun - 8 ounces rice vermicelli (mei fun noodles) - 4 teaspoons vegetable oil, divided - 8 ounces extra-firm tofu, drained, pressed, and cut into 1/­­2-inch dice - 1/­­4 cup soy sauce, divided - 1 to 2 tablespoons good-quality Madras curry powder (I used 2 tablespoons  S&B curry powder blended with water) - 1 medium-size yellow onion, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced - 1 red bell pepper, seeded and cut into thin matchstick strips (or shredded cabbage) - 1 carrot, coarsely shredded - 2 ounces snow peas, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces (or frozen green pea) - 1 teaspoon sugar - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 to 1/­­2 teaspoon red pepper flakes (omit if you dont want it spicy) - 1 cup vegetable broth - 2 cups small broccoli florets, lightly steamed (or steamed green beans cut into 1-inch pieces) - 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro (optional) Soak the rice noodles according to the package directions until softened. Drain well and set aside. Heat 2 teaspoons of the oil in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the tofu and stir-fry until nicely browned, adding 2 tablespoons of the soy sauce and a sprinkling of curry powder while cooking. Remove from the skillet and set aside on a plate. Reheat the skillet with the remaining 2 teaspoons of oil. Add the onion, bell pepper, carrot, and snow peas, and stir-fry 2 to 3 minutes to soften. Stir in the remaining curry powder and stir-fry 10 seconds, or until fragrant. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons of soy sauce, along with the sugar, salt, and red pepper flakes, stirring to mix well. Stir in the broth and bring to a boil over high heat. Add the drained rice noodles and return to a boil, stirring to coat the noodles in the sauce. Add the steamed broccoli and reserved tofu, and cook, stirring, 1 to 2 minutes, or until the liquid has been absorbed by the noodles. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Serve hot sprinkled with cilantro. Serves 4 Recipe is from Vegan Without Borders (c) 2014 by Robin Robertson The post Singapore Mei Fun appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go Bad

March 30 2020 Meatless Monday 

Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go BadEvery food item will eventually go bad, but there are many food staples that offer a terrific value, can be prepared in big batches, and have an incredibly long shelf-life. Some of these ingredients can serve as the centerpiece of a meal, like potatoes, beans, and pasta, while others act as supporting actors, providing quick bursts of flavor to ordinary dishes. Best of all, many of these foods are completely plant-based and rich in many of the essential vitamins and minerals necessary for a healthy body. Our list of plant-based ingredients all have a shelf life of over two months (when stored properly) and are relatively inexpensive. But most importantly, these pantry staples give you the opportunity to get in the kitchen and experiment with flavors and ingredients that you may have overlooked in the past. And Meatless Mondays are always a great opportunity to start a new healthy ritual. Beans Often sold for less than a dollar a can, beans are the ultimate plant-based protein. With so many different types to choose from -- kidney, black, pinto, cannellini, pigeon peas, butter beans -- the recipe possibilities are endless. Make a stew, vegetable chili , bean salad, or these black bean meatless balls with zucchini noodles . Diced Tomatoes (canned) Take a simple stew, stir-fry, or sauce to the next level with a can of diced tomatoes. At only a buck a can, diced tomatoes will become your new secret weapon in the kitchen. Try adding them to this boldly-seasoned spicy chickpea ragout. Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Toss them into a blender, soup pot or sauté pan to add some nutrients and heft to your mid-week meals. When stored properly, frozen fruits and vegetables will last years (but please dont make them wait that long). Some frozen vegetables -- spinach, collards, broccoli rabe -- should be thawed and drained before cooking, while others like broccoli, peas, and peppers can be thrown into a hot pan as-is and easily transformed into a garlic-ginger fried rice. Granola A bag of granola wont run you much more than $4.00, depending on the brand, but it will impart an invaluable crunch to yogurt and oatmeal. Many manufacturers sell granola with a shelf life of up to six months, but it should be good to eat it even past that point (although it might not retain its full crunch). Lentils (dry) At $1.50 per pound, a bag of dried lentils is one of the best bargains in the grocery store. Besides an almost indefinite shelf life, the lentil contains a laundry-list of essential minerals like iron, folate, and manganese, is packed with protein, and is a great source of fiber. If youve never before cooked with dried lentils, start with a simple stew or this easy French lentil salad with cherry tomatoes. Onions When stored in the refrigerator, onions can last for up to two months (sometimes longer). Theyre pretty cheap, too, costing only around $1.00 – $1.50 per pound. Sear on the stove top for a smoky, charred flavor or cook them low-and-slow to unlock their natural, caramel-like sweetness and sprinkle them over this sweet potato caramelized onion stew. Oatmeal Think of oatmeal as a blank canvas. Costing less than a quarter per serving, let your imagination run wild when it comes to cooking breakfast. Mix in everything from peanut butter, jam, nuts, seeds, or even savory spices. Dried oatmeal can last longer than a year when properly stored. Use oatmeal in this vanilla almond milk oatmeal or try using it to make dessert, like this apple cranberry oatmeal bread. Pasta Costing only $1.00 per box, your pantry should be loaded with pasta, but we recommend going beyond the standard semolina/­­durum wheat flour varieties and experiment with pastas made from whole grains, vegetables, lentils, and chickpeas. Try some unique flavor combinations to keep things interesting, like this recipe for green tea pesto pasta . Peanut Butter Whether you like it creamy or crunchy, peanut is the ideal pantry staple . A serving of peanut butter is packed with protein and healthy fats, both of which will keep you feeling nice and satiated. Peanut butter has a shelf life of more than a year (unopened), and many brands of sell for less than $2.00 a jar. Polenta (corn meal) Polenta is made by mixing cornmeal (dried, ground corn) with either water or milk. Inexpensive and versatile, polenta can serve as the foundation of any number of meals, pairing especially well with tomato sauce, like in this recipe for Italian white beans with kale and polenta.  Potatoes These starchy staples dont last forever, but when stored in a cool dark space they can last for between 2 - 3 months. At around .50 cents per pound, the potato is an excellent source of fiber, nutrients, and calories; they can add creaminess to soups or serve as a vessel for a delicious stuffed potatoes primavera . Rice Whether its white, brown, or wild, rice costs less than a quarter per serving. Rice can serve as an accompanying carbohydrate or act as the main meal. For a new take on everyones favorite grain, try this vegetarian biryani or meatless brown rice jambalaya . Salsa Jarred salsa is an excellent (and convenient) alternative to fresh varieties. Add a tablespoon to anything bean burritos and taco bowls to spicy puttanesca pasta and gallo pinto ; mash some together with a ripe avocado and youve got a quick-and-easy guacamole. Soy Sauce Drizzle soy sauce into your stir fry, salad, sautéed vegetable, or tomato sauce for a boost of salty umami flavor. You can also use it liberally in this yummy Asian noodle bowl with spicy almond sauce . Soy sauce can cost as little as $2.00 a bottle and can last nearly two years after opening when stored in the refrigerator. Sweet Potatoes The sweet potato is natures candy; slice it down the middle and heat in the microwave for five minutes and out comes tasting reminiscent of a sugary soufflé. If you want to try making a dish that requires a little more technique, cook up this spicy and aromatic sweet potato chana or a coconut milk sweet potato white bean soup . Vegetable Broth/­­ Bouillon A box of vegetable broth is a staple of any kitchen, but you can expand your soup selection by adding some chickn bouillon cubes to your pantry. Add some beans, frozen vegetables, and seasonings and you have a clean and simple dinner for around $1.00 per serving, or add some flour, nut-milk, and noodles for a creamy vegetable noodle soup . Curious about what other plant-based ingredients you should be storing in your pantry? Check out our list of 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients . The post Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go Bad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Quarantine Quesadillas and Stay-At-Home Menu Plan

March 28 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Quarantine Quesadillas and Stay-At-Home Menu Plan I hope you’re prepared for cooking during quarantine.  I know I am.  But I owe my preparedness in the path of hurricanes for many years.  Hurricane preparedness was so much a part of our lives, that we actually wrote a book about it!  And now, that the same kind of preparedness is helpful during these strange days of self-isolation. Even though we’re allowed to venture out for groceries, I prefer to keep my interactions with the outside world to a minimum.  That’s why we made one trip to the store last week and shopped for enough food to last a month. The canned and dried beans and pasta was the easy part. I also stocked the freezer with an extra supply of frozen spinach, collards, broccoli, and other green veggies because I knew the fresh, more delicate produce would be the first things we needed to use up. I then loaded up the fridge with plant milk, tofu, and lots of fresh produce. I planned menus that used the most delicate product first, so now, over a week since shopping, we’re nearly out of fresh greens — I have enough lettuce for about three more salads. But we still have a lot of other hardy veggies like cabbage, carrots, celery, winter squash, and of course, white and sweet potatoes.  I bought a lot of fruit that I’m keeping refrigerated to last longer, pulling out only what we’ll use in a day each morning. Here is a list of what I plan to cook in the weeks ahead using what I have on hand: Stay-at-home Menu Plan - Chili Mac & salad - Tacos - Pizza & salad - Hakka noodle stir-fry - Lentil soup - Stuffed kabocha squash - Shepherds Pie - Ramen bowls - Vegetable fried rice - Tofu tetrazzini with green beans - Saag with tofu and basmati rice - Enchiladas - Pasta Fagiole - Tofu scramble - 15-bean soup - Seitan Pot Roast with Cabbage, Carrots & Potatoes - Artichoke Mac UnCheese - Three bean pasta salad - Veggie Dogs w/­­sauerkraut - Chickpea salad wraps - Singapore mei fun - Hoppin John If you have a copy of my book Cook the Pantry or Vegan Unplugged, you’ll find lots of useful tips and recipes using pantry ingredients.  I’ll be sharing some of those recipes in the weeks ahead.  For now, I’ll leave you with the recipe from Cook the Pantry for Spinach and White Bean Quesadillas or as they are now known, Quarantine Quesadillas.  Stay safe! Spinach and White Bean Quesadillas aka “Quarantine Quesadillas” Frozen spinach and canned white beans combine with garlic and spices to make a delectable filling for these hearty quesadillas.  No cheese needed.  Serve with your favorite salsa. - 1 tablespoon olive oil (or 2 tablespoons water to water-saute) - 2 or 3 garlic cloves, pressed or minced - 10 ounces frozen chopped spinach, thawed and squeezed dry - Salt and ground black pepper - 1 (15.5-ounce) can white beans, drained and rinsed - 1 tablespoon lemon juice - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground coriander - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cumin - Large flour tortillas Heat the oil in a saucepan over medium heat.  Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, 30 seconds.  Add the spinach and season with salt and pepper to taste.  Add the beans, lemon juice, coriander, and cumin.  Cook, stirring, until the spinach is cooked and the flavors are blended, about 5 minutes.  Mash the beans well while cooking. Set aside. Place a large tortillas on a flat work surface. Spread a thin layer of the spinach mixture evenly over half of the tortilla. Fold the remaining half of the tortilla over the half with the filling and press gently to enclose and spread the filling close to the edges. Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Place the quesadilla in the hot skillet.  Flatten with a spatula and cook until lightly browned on the bottom, about 3 minutes. Flip the quesadillas and cook until the other side is golden brown.  Cut into wedges. Repeat with more tortillas and filling as desired. Serve hot with salsa. This recipe is from Cook the Pantry by Robin Robertson (C) 2015, published by Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Annie Oliverio. The post Quarantine Quesadillas and Stay-At-Home Menu Plan appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Plant-Based Pantry Meals We’ve Been Cooking, Pt. 1

March 25 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Pantry Meals We’ve Been Cooking, Pt. 1 I’ve been posting regular pantry cooking stories on our Instagram, and I thought I’d have those recipes live here in written form as well. We’ve been minimizing our grocery shopping as much as possible, mostly depending on pantry staples and some longer lasting produce for our meals. This is not your regular, well-photographed post since all the photos are just quick cellphone snapshots I took at dinner time, but hopefully you won’t mind. The recipes are also very off-the-cuff and based on what we had in the pantry, so please feel free to adjust them according to what you have on hand. That’s really what these dishes are all about! The theme here is canned tomatoes, since they are pantry royalty and can bring big flavor to all kinds of dishes, with very little effort. There are two tomato-based stews, a lush tomato pasta, a tempeh sausage recipe, and a little banana bread treat at the end. I hope to do more of these posts very soon as I continue exploring this theme. Let us know if you have any requests or need help with any particular ingredient/­­dish, etc. Sending big love as always. Few things are as easy and satisfying as a simple marinara pasta, which can be easily made with canned tomatoes. The extra garlic and extra cooking time makes this version especially lush. You can watch me make it here. Lush Marinara Pasta   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients olive oil 1 yellow onion - diced sea salt 5 cloves of garlic - thinly sliced 1 28 oz can whole peeled tomatoes - crushed up with your hands pinch of red pepper flakes - to taste a few sprigs of fresh basil, plus more for garnish 2 teaspoons sugar (only if needed) about 10 oz pasta of choice Instructions Heat a medium pot over medium heat. Add a generous pour of olive oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and saute for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic and saute for another 30 seconds or until fragrant. Add the tomatoes, red pepper flakes, basil sprigs, and more salt if your tomatoes are unsalted. Bring the mixture to a gentle simmer and simmer, stirring frequently, for 45 minutes to 1 hour, until the sauce is thickened and glossy. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. If your sauce tastes too acidic, add the sugar. Transfer about half or more of the sauce to a separate container to use later, leaving the rest in the pot. Meanwhile, boil a pot of water and cook pasta according to the instructions on the package. Save about 1 cup of the starchy pasta water. Drain your pasta and add it to the pot with the reserved sauce. Start mixing, adding small splashes of the starchy pasta water, until the sauce is well-incorporated and sticking to the pasta. Garnish with more basil and enjoy. Notes You can use leftover pasta sauce in any of the dishes in this post that call for tomatoes. 3.5.3226   Pappa al Pomodoro is a Tuscan bread and tomato soup, and it’s the coziest thing ever, plus a great way to use up stale bread. We filled this one out with white beans and kale for a more one-stop meal. You can watch me make it here. Pappa al Pomodoro with White Beans and Kale   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients 4 thick slices of crusty bread, preferably stale 2-3 slices of garlic olive oil ½ large yellow onion - diced sea salt ½-1 teaspoon dried marjoram or oregano (optional) pinch of red pepper flakes - to taste 14.5 oz can diced fire-roasted tomatoes 1½ teaspoon coconut sugar 1 15 oz can or 1½ cups cooked white beans vegetable broth 2 large handfuls of kale - chopped Instructions If your bread isnt stale, toast it. Generously rub each piece of bread with the garlic on both sides. Slice or break the bread up into smaller pieces. Mince any left-over garlic. Heat a large pot over medium heat and add a pour of olive oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt, and saute for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic, marjoram/­­oregano, if using, and red pepper flakes, and stir around for another 30 seconds. Add the tomatoes, coconut sugar, white beans, more salt to taste, and enough vegetable broth to achieve a chunky stew consistency. Bring to a simmer. Once simmering, stir in the kale. Let simmer with the lid askew for about 15 minutes. Taste for salt and spice and adjust if needed. Distribute the garlicky bread between bowls. Pour the stew over. Garnish with a drizzle of olive oil and/­­or any herbs of choice. Notes You can use any kind of canned tomatoes or even tomato sauce for this recipe, just adjust the salt and cooking times accordingly. 3.5.3226   This is not a traditional Chana Masala by any means, but it uses a similar principle of chickpeas stewed with tomatoes and spices. I think that roasted cauliflower goes really well with this dish, and the (super easy!) chutney brings a much-needed pop of green. You can watch me make this dish here. Chana Masala with Roasted Cauliflower and Cilantro Chutney   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients for the chana masala 1 head cauliflower - cut into florets avocado oil or other oil of choice sea salt black pepper 1 yellow onion - diced 1-inch piece of ginger - grated or minced 4 cloves of garlic - grater or minced 1 teaspoon curry powder, or to taste 1½ 15 oz cans or about 2¼ cups cooked chickpeas 1-1½ cups tomato sauce or other canned tomatoes purified water juice from ½ lemon for the cilantro chutney 1 bunch cilantro with stems - roughly chopped 1 serrano pepper - seeded if you prefer less spice 1 teaspoon coconut sugar sea salt juice from ½ lemon Instructions to make the chana masala Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a lined baking tray. Place the cauliflower on the tray, drizzle it with some oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast for 30 minutes, stirring halfway, or until the cauliflower is cooked through and caramelized in parts. Heat a pot over medium heat and add a pour of oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt, and saute for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the ginger, garlic, curry powder, and some black pepper, and saute for 1 more minute, until fragrant. Add the chickpeas, stir to coat, and let the chickpeas toast in the spices for 3-5 minutes. Add the tomato sauce and enough water to thin everything out to a chunky stew consistency. Add more salt if needed (this will depend on whether your chickpeas and tomatoes were salted). Bring to a simmer and let simmer for about 15 minutes, or until the cauliflower is finished roasting. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Turn off the heat and stir in the lemon juice. Serve with the roasted cauliflower and cilantro chutney (recipe follows). to make the cilantro chutney Combine the cilantro, serrano, sugar, salt to taste, and lemon juice in a high speed blender. Blend until smooth. You shouldnt need water, but add small splashes of water if your blender has a difficult time getting going. Notes If you made our freezer bouillon, you can use about 5-6 teaspoons of the fiery freezer bouillon in place of the onions, ginger, and garlic in this recipe. 3.5.3226   This is a riff on the Italian classic of sausage and peppers, except that the ‘sausage’ is made by cooking tempeh with all kinds of herbs and spices, which makes it incredibly flavorful. Feel very free to adjust the spices according to what you have on hand, you kind of can’t go wrong here! You can watch me make this dish here. Tempeh Sausage, Peppers, and Onions   Print Serves: 4-5 Ingredients avocado oil or other oil of choice 1 yellow onion - sliced sea salt 2 red and/­­or orange bell peppers - cored and sliced splash of beer (optional) 2 8 oz packages of tempeh - crumbled tamari - to taste maple syrup - to taste 2 cloves garlic - minced 1 tablespoon minced fresh sage (or use dried sage) 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 teaspoon coconut sugar ½ teaspoon garlic powder ½ teaspoon onion powder ½ teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon dried thyme ¼ teaspoon chili powder pinch of red pepper flakes pinch of smoked salt (totally optional) Instructions Heat a large pan over medium heat and add a pour of oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and saute for 1-2 minutes to give the onions a head start. Add the peppers and another pinch of salt, and saute for about 5 minutes, until starting to soften. Add a splash of beer, if using, and let it cook off for 1-2 minutes. Turn the heat down to medium-low, cover the pan, and let the onions and peppers stew for 20 minutes, or until soft and melted. If your pan gets too dry, add a splash of water. Meanwhile, put the crumbled tempeh in a bowl and drizzle some tamari and maple syrup over it. Mix to coat and let sit. Gather all your spices for the tempeh sausage by measuring them out into one bowl: garlic, sage, tomato paste, coconut sugar, garlic powder, onion powder, smoked paprika, dried thyme, chili powder, red pepper flakes, and smoked salt, if using. Once the onions and peppers are done cooking, remove them from the pan and set aside for now. Add more oil to the pan. Add the tempeh and stir to coat it in the oil. Press the tempeh into the pan in one even layer and let brown undisturbed for about 3 minutes. Stir the tempeh, press it into the pan again, and keep cooking until mostly golden brown. Stir in the prepared spice mix and cook the tempeh for another 2-3 minutes, until fragrant. Taste for salt and spices and adjust if needed. Add the onions and peppers back in, stir to incorporate, and let everything warm through together. Enjoy the sausage as is or on sandwiches, over rice, etc. 3.5.3226   In our last post, I talked about my sourdough starter and how I’ve been experimenting with recipes that use up sourdough discard from feeding the starter. So far I’ve made cookies and this banana bread, which turned out delicious, but didn’t really taste like sourdough. It’s a great way to save some flour in any case, if you have a starter. You can watch me make it here. Vegan Sourdough Banana Bread   Print Adapted from The Baking Fairy - this is a great recipe to use if you dont have sourdough! Serves: 1 standard loaf Ingredients 5 very ripe bananas - peeled, divided ½ cup sourdough discard/­­starter ¼ cup refined coconut oil - melted or soft ¼ cup non-dairy milk 2 teaspoons vanilla extract ½ cup plus 1 tablespoon coconut sugar, plus more for sprinkling generous pinch of sea salt 1½ cups all purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking soda Instructions Preheat the oven to 350° F (175° C). Prepare an oiled and parchment-lined loaf pan. Mash 4 of the bananas in a large bowl. Add the sourdough discard, coconut oil, milk, and vanilla. Use a fork to mix until smooth. Add the sugar, salt, flour, and baking soda. Mix to just incorporate. Transfer the batter to the prepared loaf pan. Slice the remaining banana in half lengthwise and use it to decorate the top of the loaf. Sprinkle more coconut sugar over the banana and top of the loaf. Bake for 50 minutes. Cover with a piece of domed parchment paper and continue baking for another 10 minutes, or until golden on top and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Let cool for at least 20 minutes in the loaf pan, then transfer to a cooling rack and let cool for another 20 minutes. Slice and enjoy. 3.5.3226   Other pantry-friendly recipes we’re cooking this week: - Cozy Pantry Stew - Next Level Lemon Miso Potatoes - Fall-Apart Caramelized Cabbage The post Plant-Based Pantry Meals We’ve Been Cooking, Pt. 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Sourdough Chocolate Chip Cookies

March 22 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Sourdough Chocolate Chip Cookies I’ve been thinking about making a sourdough starter and baking bread ever since I finally got a Dutch oven this summer. Spending all our time at home recently opened up space for all kinds of long-term kitchen projects. I finally mixed up a 100% rye, 100% hydration starter last week and it’s been so fun to see it develop. Keeping my hands busy with rewarding cooking tasks has been so helpful in terms of getting out of my head lately. Cooking has always been a source of solace around here, but I never realized how much I depend on it as meditation. Highly recommend! The seemingly counterintuitive thing about keeping up a sourdough starter is that you have to discard a good amount of it when you ‘feed’ it, which for me is twice a day. Without getting rid of some starter at every feeding, you’ll quickly build up way too much of it, which in turn will require way too much flour to feed it. But there does come a point, about a week in or so, when your starter is mature and the stuff you’re discarding can totally be used for baking. That’s where sourdough discard recipes come in. There are lots of them on the internet, and you can make anything from pancakes (we have a recipe for that here) to waffles, banana bread to English muffins. The other day, I wanted to use up my discard that I’d been saving in the fridge, but I was also really craving chocolate chip cookies, so I went for it and made these. Once my starter got going, I saved my discard in a covered container in the fridge instead of composting it and about 5 days in, I had enough to make these cookies. The 100% rye 100% hydration starter recipe that I’ve been following is here (it’s super detailed), but I think that you could use any starter discard for these cookies. The flavor of the cookies will vary depending on the flour you use for your starter and how sour it is. My rye flour starter brought a lovely earthiness and depth to the flavor of the cookies. In terms of sourness, my discard was pretty young and barely sour, so there was just a hint of sourness that read more like complexity than straightforward sourdough flavor. Vegan Sourdough Chocolate Chip Cookies   Print Serves: makes about 12 4-inch cookies Ingredients ½ cup refined coconut oil - solid or semi-solid ¼ cup + 2 tablespoons coconut sugar ½ cup sourdough starter/­­sourdough discard (I used this method) 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1¼ cup all purpose flour generous pinch of sea salt, plus more for sprinkling on top ½ teaspoon baking powder ½ cup dark dairy-free chocolate chips Instructions Preheat the oven to 360°. Prepare a parchment-covered baking sheet. In a mixing bowl, combine the coconut oil and sugar, and mix with a fork until evenly incorporated. Add the sourdough discard and vanilla, and mix well. Add the flour, salt, and baking powder, and mix until you have a unified cookie dough. Fold in the chocolate chips. Using an ice cream scoop or a spoon, scoop out even portions of the dough and place on the prepared baking sheet. Flatten the dough with the palm of your hand and shape it into round cookies (these cookies will not expand on their own in the oven). Bake for 15-17 minutes, until the cookies are golden and the surface is somewhat dry to the touch. Start checking at 10-12 minutes. Sprinkle with more salt if desired. Let cool for 20-30 minutes, preferably on a cooling rack. Enjoy! Notes These cookies are on the more subtly sweet side, depending more on the sweetness of the chocolate chips. If you like your cookies sweeter, increase the amount of sugar to ½ cup. 3.5.3226 The post Vegan Sourdough Chocolate Chip Cookies appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Mad Mocha Marbled Mousse Pie

March 16 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Mad Mocha Marbled Mousse Pie Chocolate mousse pie has long been a stalwart of vegan desserts, but leave it to Laura Theodore (PBS’s Jazzy Vegetarian) to jazz up this favorite with a few new (and delicious!) twists that are right in the recipe title: in this recipe chocolate teams up with coffee giving it a wonderful mocha flavor.  And then, it gets all fancy with a beautiful marbled effect, making it off-the-charts gorgeous.  Another thing to love about this pie is a crust made with dates, nuts, and coconut to add even more flavor and texture. You can find this recipe and more in Lauras latest book, Vegan for Everyone.  In addition to many all-new recipes, the book features updated versions of 60 fan-favorite recipes from her earlier books.  Check it out, but first, check out this pie.....   Mad Mocha Marbled Mousse Pie MAKES 10 SERVINGS This pie is gorgeous to look at, delicious to eat and a delight to serve! Your family and guests will think you slaved for hours creating the fancy marbled effect, but its actually super easy to do! You will please chocolate and coffee lovers alike with this impressive sweet indulgence! CRUST 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to coat pan 11 Medjool dates, pitted and chopped 2/­­3 cup chopped pecans 1/­­2 cup chopped walnuts 1/­­2 cup unsweetened shredded dried coconut FILLING 1 block (14 to 15 ounces) extra-firm regular tofu, drained and crumbled 5 1/­­2 tablespoons vegan cane sugar 1/­­2 cup cold, strong brewed coffee 1 1/­­2 cups vegan dark chocolate chips (55% to 70% cacao) 1/­­2 cup unsweetened or sweetened nondairy milk Generously coat a 9-inch round pie pan with olive oil. Put all of the crust ingredients in a high-performance blending appliance and process into a dough, stopping the machine and scraping the bowl several times. The dough will be very sticky. Transfer the dough to the oiled pan and press it into the bottom and up the sides of the pan (see note). Put the pie pan in the freezer for 6 to 8 minutes, and then transfer to the refrigerator while you prepare the filling. To make the filling, put the tofu, sugar and coffee into a blender and process until very smooth. Transfer 1/­­3 cup of the tofu/­­coffee mixture to a small bowl and reserve. Add the chocolate chips to the top of the remaining tofu mixture (that is still in the blender container). Put the nondairy milk into a small saucepan and bring it to a simmer over medium-low heat. Immediately pour the simmering nondairy milk over the chocolate chip mixture and process for 30 seconds to 1 minute, or until it becomes completely smooth. Pour the chocolate filling into the chilled crust (it will mound up slightly, above the crust). Immediately drop 5 to 6 spoonfuls of the reserved tofu/­­coffee mixture onto the top of the pie. Then, using a wooden skewer or the tip of a knife, gently swirl the tofu/­­coffee mixture into the top of the pie in a pleasing, marbleized pattern. Refrigerate for at least 3 hours (or overnight), until completely set. Slice and serve! Chefs note: If you are cooking gluten free, make certain to purchase certified gluten-free tofu, available in most supermarkets. Chefs note: If desired, create a decorative edge to the crust. Using the tines of a fork, press gently down around the entire outer edge of the crust to form evenly spaced lines.   Photo Credit: Laura Theodore Recipe from Vegan For Everyone by Laura Theodore Published by Scribe Publishing Company, (C)2020. Reprinted by permission. The post Mad Mocha Marbled Mousse Pie appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward Eating

March 10 2020 Meatless Monday 

Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward EatingThe recent COVID-19 outbreak has caused concern across the world, and many people are taking measures to make sure they do not fall sick. Besides washing your hands and staying home if youre sick, theres a lot you can do from a nutrition standpoint to boost your immune system  – eat more vegetables and fruits, legumes and whole grains .  Vegetables and fruits especially, have nutrients and special natural compounds called phytochemicals that serve as antioxidants to neutralize damage to cells and fight nasty pathogens like COVID-19, the flu and the common cold. Will they prevent you from getting sick? Maybe not. But a healthy diet can help strengthen your immune system to help fight the virus and recover quickly. Below are some nutrients found in plant-based foods that are vital for a strong and robust immune system: Vitamin C An antioxidant that increases production of white blood cells, is key to fighting infections. Citrus fruits, papaya, dark green and yellow vegetables, red bell pepper, strawberries, tomatoes and watermelons are great sources of Vitamin C. Try this recipe.  Vitamin E An antioxidant that protects your cells from free radical damages, enhances the immune system to fight off bacteria and viruses. Foods high in vitamin E are sunflower seeds, nuts and green vegetables. Try this recipe. Vitamin A Functions mainly by keeping the skin, vision, and tissues of the mouth, stomach, intestine, and respiratory system healthy. Its anti-inflammatory properties enhance the immune system. Good sources of vitamin A are sweet potatoes, spinach, pumpkins, carrots, peppers, cantaloupes. Try this recipe. Zinc An important mineral that helps in wound healing, functions in the development of immune cells, which is needed for the immune system to work properly. Food sources of zinc are legumes, whole grains, nuts and seeds. Try this recipe.  Dietary protein Plays a major role in the bodys immune response. They activate cells that help fight off infections in the body. Good plant sources of dietary protein are: legumes, beans, peas, soy, and nuts. Try this recipe.    Overall, if pondering about which vegetable or fruit to eat, think of colors – purple, blue, red, yellow and orange, because it usually means they are packed with antioxidants that are great for your health and immune system.     Resources: 1. Zinc in Human Health: Effect of Zinc on Immune Cells. https:/­­/­­www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/­­pmc/­­articles/­­PMC2277319/­­ . Accessed March 5, 2020 2. Health Professional Fact Sheet. NIH, Office of Dietary Supplement. https:/­­/­­ods.od.nih.gov/­­factsheets/­­VitaminA-HealthProfessional/­­ . Accessed March 5, 2020 3. Li P, Yin YL, Li D, Kim SW, Wu G. Amino Acid and Immune Function. Br J  Nutr, 2007 Aug:98(2):237-52.  4. Protect your Health with Immune-Boosting Nutrition. https:/­­/­­www.eatright.org/­­health/­­wellness/­­preventing-illness/­­protect-your-health-with-immune-boosting-nutrition . Accessed March 5, 2020 The post Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward Eating appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pile on the Protein with These 10 Plant-Based Foods

March 1 2020 Meatless Monday 

Pile on the Protein with These 10 Plant-Based FoodsFats and carbohydrates have faced their fair share of scrutiny over the decades, but protein has managed to coast through years of fad diets and conflicting-nutritional recommendations unscathed. Protein is essential for healthy body functions, responsible for growing and repairing muscle tissue, aiding in digestion and energy production, and helping bolster your immune system. With a lengthy list of benefits, its no surprise that getting enough protein is a dietary priority. Thankfully, theres an abundance of this crucial macronutrient in a variety of plant-based foods and ingredients. This Monday, kick-start a healthy week with delicious high-protein, plant-based foods.   Almonds A handful of almonds is a satiating snack that will keep a grumbling tummy at bay, but the tree nut is also a good source of protein. A quarter cup of almonds contains 6 grams of protein and plenty of fiber. Eat them on their own or incorporate them into your own custom snack mix . Black Beans Easy to prepare, cheap to buy, versatile, and nutritionally dense, the black bean is the ultimate pantry staple for people looking to incorporate more plant-based protein into their diet. Cooked black beans contain 8 grams of protein per half cup. Purchase them canned, or, if ambitious, dried, and transform them into plant-based burgers, taco fillings , soups, or meat balls . Chickpeas Cooked chickpeas are the main ingredient in hummus and boast nearly 15 grams of protein per cup. And remember, when using canned chickpeas, save the liquid -- also known as aquafaba -- for a terrific, plant-based egg white replacement. Edamame Popular in Japan and other areas of East Asia, edamame is as close you can get to a perfect food : One cup of cooked edamame contains 8 grams of fiber, 17 grams of protein, and is only 189 calories. Farro One of the lesser known ancient grains, farro needs to be on your radar . A quarter cup of uncooked farro contains 6 grams of protein. Its toothsome texture adds a pleasant chew to grain bowls and salads. Kidney Beans These hefty beans are dense, nourishing, and nutrient-packed. One cup of cooked kidney beans contains roughly 13 grams of protein (as well as 13 grams of fiber). Lentils With tons of fiber and almost no saturated fat, look to use lentils as the foundation of multiple meals throughout the week. A cup of cooked lentils contains 18 grams of protein and more than half your recommended daily value of fiber. Peanuts A staple of almost every pantry, the peanut (and peanut butter) is a tremendous source of plant-based protein and health fats. With nearly 10 grams of protein per quarter cup, the peanut is a great snack to take to the office or incorporated into this sweet and spicy Sweet Potato Peanut Stew.   Quinoa The trendiest of grains (well, its technically a seed), quinoa is a splendid source of protein that can serve as the foundation of any meatless meal . A cup of cooked quinoa boasts around 8 grams of protein. Tofu There are imitators and then there are originators. Tofu -- made from soy beans -- is sold in a variety of textures and forms, but no matter the type, youre guaranteed to get a solid dose of plant-based protein, with a half-cup offering around 10 grams. Our recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu (the most popular recipe on our website) will make you a lifelong tofu loyalist.   Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Pile on the Protein with These 10 Plant-Based Foods appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday Menu

February 24 2020 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday MenuThis week, in honor of Mardi Gras, were celebrating Healthy-Fat Tuesday with a list of foods and ingredients rich in healthy fats. Fats are complex and often misunderstood nutrients. Despite their often-misleading name, fats play an important role in healthy balanced diets and their consumption doesnt necessarily lead to weight gain. Saturated and unsaturated are the two major categories of dietary fats. Saturated fats are typically solid at room temperature and are predominately found in red and processed meats, whole milk and whole-milk dairy products, cheese, and baked goods. Although fine in moderation, the USDA Dietary Guidelines recommend limiting saturated fat to under 10 percent of your daily caloric intake. Unsaturated fats come from vegetables, nuts, seeds, and fish, and are labeled as good fats because their consumption is associated with lower rates of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Try incorporating these foods and ingredients into your weekly Meatless Monday menu. Avocado With 77 percent of calories from fat, this pretty green fruit is actually one of the fattiest plant foods on Earth. Avocado is rich in oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid associated with reduced inflammation. Easily add some to your diet with this recipe for Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast. Canola Oil Derived from the rapeseed, canola oil has a similar nutritional profile to olive oil but contains a slightly lower percentage of saturated fat. Its one of the most versatile cooking oils, which makes it excellent for frying and medium-heat cooking. It can also be used as the base for salad dressings, sauces, and marinades. Flaxseeds Flaxseeds are high in fiber and protein, but theyre also one of the richest sources of plant-based omega-3 fatty acids -- polyunsaturated fats that are associated with benefits for heart health. Hemp Seeds While technically categorized as a nut, the hemp seed is nutrient-dense and a terrific source of both omega-6 and omega-3 essential fatty acids. Try adding a scoop to smoothies, muffins, or chia pudding. Olive Oil Although it contains small levels of saturated fat, olive oil is predominately composed of a monounsaturated fat called oleic acid. Studies link oleic acid to lower levels of inflammation, but the health benefits of olive oil range from a reduced risk of stroke and heart disease to weight loss. Peanuts An easy and accessible snack, a little pouch of peanuts can instantly cure your hunger pangs. Peanuts are so satiating because of their high-fat content. Classified as an oilseed rather than a nut, the peanut is nearly 50 percent fat, most of which is mono- and polyunsaturated. Try adding some to this hot and spicy Peanut Noodle. Tahini Made from pulverized sesame seeds, tahini -- along with chickpeas -- is one of the main ingredients in hummus. Sesame seeds are made up of 80 percent mono- and polyunsaturated fats, which research shows can help lower cholesterol levels. Tahini makes the perfect dressing for roasted vegetables or this Curry Carrot Salad. Walnuts Like most nuts, walnuts contain good fats, but they are also an important vegetarian source of omega-3 fatty acids. Research shows that omega-3 plays a critical role in reducing oxidative stress in the brain and can even help with the development and function of the central nervous system. Eat them roasted or blend them up with lentils to make the perfect plant-based meatball.   Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday Menu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

bendekai gojju recipe | bendekai kayirasa | bendekayi gojju – karnataka style

February 20 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

bendekai gojju recipe | bendekai kayirasa | bendekayi gojju – karnataka stylebendekai gojju recipe | bendekai kayirasa | bendekayi gojju - karnataka style with step by step photo and video recipe. kayirasa is one of the popular semi thick sauce based gravy from the south indian state of karnataka. the recipe is known for it combination of taste. it has a combination of sweetness, spiciness, sourness and savoriness which makes it an ideal taste enhancer. it can be made with different vegetables and bendekai gojju recipe or okra kayirasa is one such option. The post bendekai gojju recipe | bendekai kayirasa | bendekayi gojju – karnataka style appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Recipe | Whole Wheat Chocolate Cherry Muffins

February 10 2020 Oh My Veggies 

When I was little, I had a thing for chocolate-covered cherries. I’m not really sure how it started--no one in my family likes chocolate cherries, so I don’t know where I first had them. But man, did I love them. While my brothers would get Sour Patch Kids or Razzles (remember Razzles?!) from the candy store, I’d go to the fancypants chocolate counter and get two or three chocolate cherries. Now that I’m older, I can’t stand those chocolate cherry cordials. They are waaaay too sweet for my tastes. But I still love that combination of chocolate and cherries--just not all the added sugar. Since I’m on a bit of a muffin kick lately, I thought I’d try making chocolate cherry muffins. I’ve had half a bag of dried cherries sitting in the pantry since October, so it was time to use them up! And I had all of the other ingredients on hand too, so these muffins were just meant to be. Unfortunately, I’m still learning when it comes to baking, and I burnt them. They weren’t so burnt that they were inedible, but they did end up being a little bit dry, especially on the bottom. I’ve adjusted […]

Eat Your Way to a Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

February 3 2020 Meatless Monday 

Eat Your Way to a Reduced Risk of Heart DiseaseHeart disease (also referred to as cardiovascular disease) is a term that covers an array of health conditions affecting the heart such as coronary artery disease, heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias), and congenital heart defects. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for both men and women, with half of all Americans (47%) qualifying for at least one of the three key risk factors (high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking cigarettes). For more information about the relationship between diet and heart disease, check out our Meatless Monday heart-health guide . The good news is that you can manage two of these risk factors -- high blood pressure and high cholesterol --by making a few simple adjustments to your daily diet, without missing out on flavor. In honor of American Heart Month, weve put together a list of tips to help you eat your way to a reduced risk of heart disease. Eat More Fruits and Vegetables Fruits and vegetables contain the nutrients your body needs to function properly and ward off disease. Many fruits and vegetables, regardless of how theyre prepared (sans the deep fryer), are low in calories and contain vitamins, minerals, and fiber that help prevent heart disease. Focus on the Right Fats The American Heart Association emphasizes the importance of eating the right type of fats and oils. Saturated fats from animal products, trans fats, and hydrogenated vegetable oils should be replaced with healthy fats like olive oil and canola oil. Go with Whole Grains Whole grains provide the body with fiber and other nutrients that regulate blood pressure and promote heart health. Improve your diet by swapping out white rice, bread, and pasta for brown rice and whole-wheat varieties of your favorite carbohydrates. Maintain a Healthy Weight Excess weight and a large waist size have been found to raise the risk of developing heart disease. Reaching a healthy weight doesnt require an extreme diet, but rather a commitment to weekly exercise and an eating plan rooted in fruits, vegetables, legumes, and other minimally processed foods. Limit Consumption of Red and Processed Meats Processed meats contain high amounts of additives, chemicals, and sodium. These foods, which include deli meats, hot dogs, sausages, and bacon, should only be consumed in moderation. Think Mediterranean Studies show that a Mediterranean-style diet which includes a balanced proportion of fruits, vegetables, legumes, healthy oils, and monosaturated and polyunsaturated fats, reduced incidences of major cardiovascular disease. Avoid Too Much Sugar and Processed Carbohydrates Foods of minimum nutritional value like sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drinks, white breads, pastas, and other heavily processed carbohydrates are major sources of excess calories and can lead to weight gain and insulin resistance. Control Portion Size Moderation is key to any healthy diet. Reducing serving sizes grants you the flexibility to eat a wider variety of foods you enjoy. For more information on meat reduction and heart health: Reduce your risk of heart disease by starting healthy habits on Monday Check out the Meatless Monday Recipe Gallery for healthy, tasty recipes Join the community and share photos of your own plant-based creations by using the hashtag #MeatlessMonday and tag @MeatlessMonday. The post Eat Your Way to a Reduced Risk of Heart Disease appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Creamy Wild Mushroom Rice Soup

January 24 2020 Oh My Veggies 

And Soup Week continues! It also ends with this delicious creamy mushroom rice soup. I guess since I only post 2-3 recipes each week, theme weeks are not very epic around here, huh? Theme months would be way too much I think, but maybe I’ll start doing theme fortnights in the future. (Yes, I said fortnight. I’m fancy like that.) Having grown up in the midwest, I can tell you this: Midwesterners like their food creamy. We love cheesy casseroles, anything made with canned soup, and all kinds of concoctions made with sour cream, mayo, and/­­or cheese sauce (usually and, not or). Being sick last week, I was craving comfort food and to me, comfort food is creamy food. So I set out to make a vegetarian version of the classic Creamy Wild Rice & Chicken Soup. And then, because it’s the New Year and I’m trying to watch what I eat, I set out to make a lighter version. Behold, Creamy Wild Mushroom Rice Soup. The biggest obstacle was figuring out what to replace the chicken with. I’m always hesitant to cook with seitan on my blog because I don’t know if that’s readily available everywhere. And tofu in […]

hot and sour soup recipe | hot n sour soup | hot sour soup recipe

January 17 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

hot and sour soup recipe | hot n sour soup | hot sour soup recipehot and sour soup recipe | hot n sour soup | hot sour soup recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. indo chinese is known for its spicy and flavoured taste which is catered for indian taste buds. it is a mixture of full of flavours with bitterness, spice, sour and savoury in it. it does offer the same taste in its soup variations too and hot and sour soup recipe is one such simple and quick filling recipe. The post hot and sour soup recipe | hot n sour soup | hot sour soup recipe appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Sewing Face Masks for Healthcare Workers

March 22 2020 Vegan Thyme 

Sewing Face Masks for Healthcare Workers I am making face masks. I used this tutorial. In the last 24 hours many more face mask tutorials have begun to pop up with a simple Google search. Please note: the CDC has issued a statement regarding the homemade masks here. I feel helpless, I want to help. So do others. Our very own Missouri Star Quilt Company, Jenny Doan, shared a video face mask tutorial here.  We are all going through the same unimaginable crisis at once. Our healthcare workers are going to be on the front lines of the brunt of what is to come. I have neighbors and family members who work in healthcare and are now bracing for what is to come. It is terrifying. I am so grateful for each and every one of these brave souls. I am sending them love and appreciation.  During the days, I spend time at my sewing machine, though I've got the concentration of a hummingbird right now. I've stumbled through knitting and crochet projects in fits and starts. I still manage to get dinner on the table. I did a bit of baking and will share a recipe or two here shortly.  In the evenings we both try to carve out a little time of zen TV watching--no news! I sit with a project in my lap, hands busy with each stitch.   From Brene Brown: "Try to be scared without being scarry."

tamarind rasam recipe | puli rasam recipe | chintapandu charu

March 18 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

tamarind rasam recipe | puli rasam recipe | chintapandu charutamarind rasam recipe | puli rasam recipe | chintapandu charu with step by step photo and video recipe. rasam recipes are one of the staple food of many south indian households. it is generally made with combination of lentil, tamarind, spice mix and tomatoes. however some there are some simple recipes too which can be made with one of these ingredients. one such rasam recipe is tamarind rasam recipe or puli rasam recipe known for its sour and spicy taste. The post tamarind rasam recipe | puli rasam recipe | chintapandu charu appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

vendakkai mor kulambu recipe | vendakkai mor kuzhambu | okra yogurt gravy

March 11 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

vendakkai mor kulambu recipe | vendakkai mor kuzhambu | okra yogurt gravyvendakkai mor kulambu recipe | vendakkai mor kuzhambu | okra yogurt gravy with step by step photo and video recipe. kulambu a popular south indian creamy sambar recipe known for its sour and spice taste it has to offer. it is typically served and made with leftover curd or yogurt, which are generally sour in taste. one such simple and easy kulambu variation is vendakkai mor kulambu recipe, which has the additional crispiness from the fried okra. The post vendakkai mor kulambu recipe | vendakkai mor kuzhambu | okra yogurt gravy appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

In Case of Quarantine: Cook the Pantry

March 10 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

In Case of Quarantine: Cook the Pantry With a possible pandemic on the horizon, I’ve stocked up on toilet paper and hand sanitizer — just in case.  But I’ve also stocked up on enough food supplies to get us through the next couple of months, in case of quarantine. I’ve been using the tips and recipes in my book, Cook the Pantry, to dictate my grocery list and keep my pantry full if the situation worsens.  The quick and easy recipes in Cook the Pantry use mostly items from your pantry and freezer (along with some optional fresh produce, if you have it on hand). One of my favorite recipes from the book is the Artichoke Muffaleta Po Boys.  It’s the best of two popular New Orleans culinary icons joining forces to create the ultimate sandwich made with artichokes and a piquant olive relish. Here’s the recipe: Artichoke Muffaleta Po Boys Makes 2 servings Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. - 3 scallions, chopped - 1 garlic clove, crushed - 1/­­3 cup pickled vegetables, well-drained - 1/­­3 cup pimiento-stuffed green olives, well-drained - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 (14-ounce) can artichoke hearts, well-drained and halved - 1/­­2 teaspoon Cajun spice blend - 3 tablespoons Creole mustard - 3 tablespoons vegan mayonnaise - 2 small sub rolls - 1 cup shredded lettuce - 1 large tomato, thinly sliced - Pickled sliced jalape?os - Tabasco or other hot sauce, to serve 1. In a food processor, combine the scallion and garlic and process until finely minced. Add the pickled vegetables, olives, and pulse to make a relish. Set aside. 2. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the artichoke hearts, season with the spice blend, and cook until nicely browned, about 5 minutes per side. 3. To assemble the sandwiches, spread the mayonnaise and mustard on the inside top and bottom of the bread. Spread the lettuce onto the bottom of each sandwich, followed by tomato slices. Top with the relish mixture, a few slices of jalape?os, and the artichokes. Serve at once with Tabasco. In case you don’t already own Cook the Pantry, below is a list of the 100 recipes in the book. Check it out — you don’t need to be quarantined to enjoy these easy and delicious recipes. Cook the Pantry: Vegan Pantry-to-Plate Recipes in 20 minutes or Less Soup, Stew, Chili Tortilla Soup Chipotle Corn Chowder White Beans and Greens Soup Hot and Sour Noodle Soup Black Bean Soup with a Whisper of Sherry Shiitake Happens Mushroom Soup Pretty Good Gumbo Minestrone Soup Curry-Spiced Pumpkin Bisque Creamy Peanut Soup Pantry Plus Gazpacho Vegetable Bricolage Everyones Favorite Black Bean Chili Red Bean Chili Moroccan-Spiced Vegetable Stew Chana Masala Bowls Salad Savvy Five-Minute Couscous Salad Amazing Technicolor Chickpea Salad Moroccan Couscous Salad Tabbouleh Salad Pantry Pasta Salad Hearts of Palm Ceviche Composed Marinated Vegetable Salad Pinto, Corn, and Red Pepper Salad Threes a Crowd Bean Salad White Bean Niçoise Salad Taco Salad with Corn and Black Bean Salsa Southwest Salmagundi Asian Noodle Salad with Peanut Dressing Zucchini Pasta Salad Suddenly Sushi Salad Asian Noodle Slaw Avocado Goddess Salad Three-Tomato Pasta Salad Sesame Soba Salad Sandwiches, Burgers, and Pizza Crab-Free Sandwiches Bean and Spinach Burritos Artichoke Muffaleta Po Boys BBQ Jack Sandwiches Homestyle Hash Burgers Black Bean and Walnut Burgers Samosadillas Artichoke Tartines Black Bean and Spinach Quesadillas Chunky Chickpea Sandwiches Texas Caviar Wraps Artichoke-Spinach Pizza Pizza Nicoise Black and White Pizza BBQ Chickpea Pizza Cheeseburger Pizza Jalapeno-Hummus Pizza Pinto Bean Nacho Pie Stovetop Suppers Hoppin John and Collards Paella from the Pantry Cheesy Grits and Greens with Smoky Mushrooms Polenta Fiesta Quick Quinoa Pilaf Asian-Style Vegetable Pancakes with Dipping Sauce Dinnertime Scramble Tofu and Broccoli Stir-Fry Layered Tortilla Skillet Lemongrass Jasmine Rice Greek Freekeh and Spinach with White Beans Pantry Bulgur Pilaf Tuscan Chickpea Fritatta Red Beans and Quinoa with Chipotle Queso Chickpea-Artichoke Cakes with Dill Aioli Black Bean Picadillo Jerk Tempeh with Coconut Quinoa Top Shelf Couscous Pilaf Pantry Pasta Plus Giardiniera Mac and Cheese Capellini with Palm-Heart Scampi Sauce Penne and Broccoli with Red Bell Pepper-Walnut Sauce Kitchen-Sink Capellini Ramen Fagiole Pasta Marinara Puttanesca in a Pinch Rotini with Creamy Pumpkin Sauce Penne with White Beans and Olivada Speedy Lasagna Rice Noodles with Spicy Peanut Sauce Spaghetti Lo-Mein Artichoke-Cannelini Pasta Manchurian Black Bean Noodles Sweet Treats Rawklava Easy as Chocolate Pie Peanutty Energy Balls Almond-Cranberry Haystacks Coconut Lime Drops No-Bake Oatmeal Cookies Bananas Foster Dessert Nachos No-Fuss Chocolate Fondue Stovetop Peach-Blueberry Crumble Ginger-Walnut Rum Balls Chocolate-Almond Truffles Pecan Pie Squares Mangos with Pistachios and Cranberries Fudgy Brownie Mug Pastry-Wrapped Chocolate and Walnut-Stuffed Dates The post In Case of Quarantine: Cook the Pantry appeared first on Robin Robertson.

gajar mooli ka achar recipe | carrot radish pickle | mooli gajar ka mix achar

February 25 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

gajar mooli ka achar recipe | carrot radish pickle | mooli gajar ka mix achargajar mooli ka achar recipe | carrot radish pickle | mooli gajar ka mix achar with step by step photo and video recipe. pickle or achar recipe is very common across india and are made with different types vegetables. the most common veggies used are mangoes and limes which has abundant source of sourness and flavour in it. yet it can be made with other locally available vegetables and gajar mooli ka achar is one such combination from the north indian cuisine. The post gajar mooli ka achar recipe | carrot radish pickle | mooli gajar ka mix achar appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Recipe | Meyer Lemon & Basil Sorbet

February 21 2020 Oh My Veggies 

As a consumer, my weakness is novelty. Instead of growing red tomatoes, I grow purple ones; instead of listening to No Doubt in junior high, I was obsessed with Pavement. I’ve always been slightly contrarian by nature and I think my appreciation for all things new and different stems from that. When it comes to citrus fruit, this time of year is pretty good for novelty. I’m not much of a citrus eater the rest of the year, but winter is different. There’s Satsumas and Minneolas and Blood Oranges and they’re all readily available and affordable. And unlike regular oranges and tangerines, I like these kinds of citrus. When I saw Meyer lemons at the grocery store, I knew I wanted to try making a sorbet with them. Their deep yellow rind was so bright and cheerful and it made the regular lemons a few bins away look so boring and blah. The darker rind comes from the fact that Meyer lemons originated by crossing lemons with oranges. Although the appeal of Meyer lemons is that they’re sweeter and less acidic than regular lemons, I’ve found that they’re still a little too sour for my tastes. So yes, there’s lots […]

Sweet and Sour Guava Curry

February 13 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Sweet and Sour Guava Curry (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Amrood Ki khati Methi Sabji (Sweet and Sour Guava Curry) Guavas, or "amrood" in Hindi, are simply delicious and probably one of my favorite fruits! This year I have an abundance of guavas growing in my backyard. I like to sprinkle chaat masala on guavas. The spiciness really brings out its flavor. Since I have so many delicious guavas, I decided it was time for me to make Guava Sweet and Sour Curry (Amrood Ki khati Methi Sabji). In case you are not familiar, this is a popular North Indian dish which I believe tastes best with fresh hot puris or parathas. This was a staple sabji when I was a child growing up in India, provided guavas were in season. My brother especially enjoyed this dish. He simply relished this sabji and could enjoy eating it every day. However, there was catch – he would only eat this dish with puris! Rotis or parathas simply did not do this dish justice! My brother would pretend to read a book while eating so no one would disturb him so he could truly enjoy eating in peace! Whenever I make this recipe, I remember our sweet, innocent childhood memories. Guava Sweet and Sour Curry has the best flavors – spicy, sweet and sour – all in one dish! This recipe will serve 2. Course Main Course Cuisine Indian Keyword Amrood, cooking shows, Gourmet food, Guava Fruit, Home Cooking, Home Made, Indian food, Jain Food, Kadoo Ki Subji, Khatta Meetha, Main Dish, Mandir Food, No Garlic, No lahsun, No Onion, No Pyaj, North Indian Recipes, Recipe videos, Satvik Food, Spicy, Swaminarayan, Tropical Fruit, Vegetarian, Veshno Cooking Prep Time 5 minutes Cook Time 15 minutes Total Time 20 minutes Servings 2 people Ingredients2 cups guavas amrood, cut into bite size pieces 2 Tbsp oil 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds jeera 1/­­4 tsp fenugreek seeds mathi dana 1/­­8 tsp asafetida hing 2 tsp coriander powder dhania 1 tsp fennel seed powder saunf 1/­­4 tsp turmeric haldi 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder 1/­­2 tsp salt 1 Tbsp ginger adrak, thinly sliced 1/­­2 tsp mango powder amchor 1 tsp lemon juice 2 Tbsp sugar adjust to the taste 2 Tbsp chopped cilantro hara dhania InstructionsHeat the oil in a saucepan. Oil should be moderately hot. Test the heat by adding one cumin seed to the oil. If the cumin seed cracks right away, the oil is ready. Add the cumin seeds, asafetida, fenugreek seeds, fennel seeds powder, coriander powder, turmeric, and red chili powder stir for few seconds. Add ginger and guava mix it well add 1 cup of water and cover the pan. Lower the heat and cover the pan cook for about 5-8 minutes until guavas are tender. Add mango powder, lemon juice and sugar stir and add cilantro. Turn off the heat and cover the pan for few minutes. Amrood Ki khati Methi Sabji is ready to serve. NotesIf Guava seeds are hard then remove them, adjust the sugar to taste depends how sweet are guava. The post Sweet and Sour Guava Curry appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Pithla (Besan Curry)

February 9 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Pithla (Besan Curry) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Pithla (Besan Curry) Pithla is a variation of Kadhi. Kadhi is made in many ways. In North India, Kadhi is made like a thick soup with pakoras dumplings. Another popular variation is Gujarati Kadhi, which is sweet and sour and made watery with a soup-like consistency. When first time I had gujrati Kadhi, I thought it was yogurt hot and spicy drink, and enjoyed very much, still my perception has not changed. Pithla, however, is thick in consistency. Sometimes I call this is Besan Ki Sabji. This is a quick and easy recipe to make. Pithla is made with few ingredients. It's also gluten-free and vegan. Traditionally Pithla is served garnished with hot ghee (clarified butter). Pithla is a complete and satisfying meal. I always thought that Pithla was a dish from the state of Bihar. Whenever we visited our grandparents in Bihar, we would make sure to enjoy this dish. However, I've heard from friends that Pithla is also a popular dish from the state of Maharashtra. Regardless of where this dish originates from, it is one of my favorites! My mom was from Bihar and my dad was from North India. We always lived in North India. My mom's cooking was a mix of traditional Bihari and North Indian food. For me, North Indian cooking tends to be more spicy while Bihari dishes are more simple. My mom tried to adopt elements from both Bihar and North India in her dishes. Her unique blending of the foods from these very different parts of India kept her and my dad both happy. I have fond memories of enjoying Pithla. Even today, when I visit my sisters in India, they will make sure they make the dishes we used to enjoy with our mom. Of course, Pithla was one of many dishes we enjoyed! We would gather around for lunch and reminisce about our old memories while enjoying delicious Pithla served with rice. It truly is comfort food at its best! This recipe will serve 2. Course Main Course Cuisine Indian Keyword Besan Kadhi, Bihari Kadhi, Cooking Video, Curry Recipe, Gatte Ke Kadhi, Gluten Free, Gujrati Kadhi, Homemade, Jain Food, Maharashtrian Dish, Main Dish, Mandir Food, No Garlic, No Onion, Panjabi Kadhi, Quick And Easy, Satvik Food, Swaminarayan, vegan, Veshno Cooking Prep Time 5 minutes Cook Time 10 minutes Total Time 15 minutes Servings 2 people Ingredients1 cup besan Bengal gram flour 2 Tbsp oil 1 tsp cumin jeera 1/­­2 tsp mustard seeds rai 1/­­8 tsp asafetida hing 1/­­2 tsp turmeric haldi 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder 1 tsp salt 1 1/­­2 tsp mango powder aam choor 2 Tbsp cilantro finely chopped, hara dhania 4 cup water For Garnishing2 Tbsp ghee clarified butter, this is optional 1/­­4 tap red chili powder InstructionsIn a bowl add the 1-1/­­2 cups of water slowly to besan to make a smooth batter (batter should be consistency of pancake batter or dosa batter). Open the heat on medium high, oil should be moderately hot, when you add the cumin seeds to oil seeds should crack right of way. Add cumin seeds, mustard seeds, asafetida, turmeric, and chili powder to oil, stir and turn off the heat. Add the besan batter and open the heat to medium heat. Keep whipping the batter and batter will start thickening. Add salt and keep adding the water slowly and keep mixing about 2-1/­­2 cups of water. After Pithla comes to boil besan will start splattering. Reduce the heat to low, cover the pan and let it simmer for about 5 to 8 minutes. Pithla will become thick, add chopped cilantro and mango powder mix and let it cook for 2 more minutes. Pithla should be quite thick in consistency thats why sometimes I will call Pithla Besa ki Sabji. Pithla is served hot before serving, traditionally Pithla is served garnished with hot ghee (clarified butter). And sprinkle of red chili powder. If you are vegan skip ghee, clarified butter. NotesServing suggestions: Serve Pithla with Rice, Roti, Kurkuri Bhindi. The post Pithla (Besan Curry) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins

January 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

Top 20 Plant-Based ProteinsWill I get enough protein? is one of the most common questions asked by people looking to add more plant-based foods to their diet. The short (and long) answer is -- YES. Check out our Plant Protein Power Kit for downloadable social media graphics, plant-protein GIFs and printable posters. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the recommended dietary allowance for individual daily protein intake is 0.8 grams per of protein per every 2 pounds of body weight. Although this is an approximate calculation -- other factors such as age, sex, body type, and lifestyle must be considered for a precise nutrient recommendation -- it provides a reliable benchmark to measure your daily protein requirements.  This amounts to around 56 grams of protein per day for the average sedentary man and 46 grams per day for the average sedentary woman. So, how do you reach that daily number eating only plant-based foods? Easy, check out our guide below and discover which seeds, nuts, legumes, vegetables, and plant-based products pack the biggest protein punch. Still have questions? Learn more about plant-based protein from the nutritional experts at Johns Hopkins University. Broccoli One of the most popular vegetables is also one of the most protein dense, with one cup of cooked broccoli containing 6 grams of protein. Roast it, sauté it, or steam it for a quick and nutritious side dish. Chia Seeds Small but mighty, 1 ounce of chia seeds packs nearly 5 grams protein. Drop a spoonful into a smoothie or combine with a liquid like juice or nut milk to make a fun-textured chia pudding. Chickpeas Cooked chickpeas are the main ingredient in hummus and boast nearly 15 grams of protein per cup. And remember, when using canned chickpeas, save the liquid -- also known as aquafaba -- for a terrific, plant-based egg white replacement. Edamame Popular in Japan and other areas of East Asia, edamame is as close you can get to a perfect food: One cup of cooked edamame contains 8 grams of fiber, 17 grams of protein, and is only 189 calories. Farro One of the lesser known ancient grains, farro needs to be on your radar. A quarter cup of uncooked farro contains 6 grams of protein. Its toothsome texture adds a pleasant chew to grain bowls and salads. Frozen Veggie Burgers There are tons of different types of pre-made frozen veggie burgers varying in ingredients, texture, and flavorful, and although their nutritional profiles differ, you can generally expect between 10 - 15 grams of protein per patty. Try a range of brands and see which one(s) fit your palate. Hemp Seed Heralded as a superfood, hemp seeds have a subtle, nutty flavor similar to pine nuts. In baking, hemp seeds can be used as a nut replacement, but it can also be added to smoothies, with 2 tablespoons containing over 6 grams of protein. Jackfruit Jackfruit is often marketed as a plant-based alternative to pulled pork, with a meaty, stringy texture fit for faux barbecue platters and sandwiches. Jackfruit is rarely sold whole, but there are a handful of brands selling products made with jackfruit in the refrigerated section of supermarkets. Jack fruit is not the most protein-dense item on this list, but it still contains 3 grams per cup. Kidney Beans These hefty beans are dense, nourishing, and nutrient-packed. One cup of cooked kidney beans contains roughly 13 grams of protein (as well as 13 grams of fiber). Lentils With tons of fiber and almost no saturated fat, look to use lentils as the foundation of multiple meals throughout the week. A cup of cooked lentils contains 18 grams of protein and more than half your recommended daily value of fiber. Mung Beans Mainly cultivated in East and Southeast Asia, the mung bean is often used as the foundation of stews, vegetable patties, or dal. One cup of cooked mung beans contains 14 grams of protein. Note: mung beans are easier to find dry rather than cooked and canned. Nut Butters Although not all nut butters are considered equal when it comes to protein content (or flavor), they generally contain around 4 grams of protein per tablespoon. Oatmeal A cup of cooked oatmeal contains 6 grams of protein; pair it with a scoop of peanut butter and a sprinkling of hemp or chia seeds for a protein-packed breakfast. Plant-Based Meat Thanks to plant-based meat, sources of vegan protein are all the rage. A typical plant-based burger patty contains 20 grams of protein. Many quick-service restaurant chains now offer versions of their classic menu items featuring some variety of plant-based meat. Quinoa The trendiest of grains (well, its technically a seed), quinoa is a splendid source of protein that can serve as the foundation of any meatless meal. A cup of cooked quinoa boasts around 8 grams of protein. Seitan The original plant-based meat replacement, seitan -- which is made from wheat gluten -- is packed with protein and can be quite tasty when properly prepared. A 3-ounce serving of seitan includes between 15 - 20 grams of protein, a number that is comparable to most animal proteins. Soy Milk The market for non-dairy nut milks has exploded in recent years, but soy milk remains the most nutritious option. One cup of soy milk has 8 grams of protein, which makes it a nice base for smoothies and shakes. Sprouted Bread Sprouted bread is a certain category of bread made from grains that have been allowed to germinate (aka sprout) before being milled into flour. Ezekiel Bread -- a common brand of sprouted bread -- contains 4 grams of protein and only 80 calories per slice. Sunflower Seeds Who wouldve thought that the innocent little sunflower seed could pack such a protein punch? A half-cup of sunflower seeds has 15 grams of proteins. Bring some in a little baggy and keep with you for a quick and nutritious snack. Tofu There are imitators and then there are originators. Tofu -- made from soy beans -- is sold in a variety of textures and forms, but no matter the type, youre guaranteed to get a solid dose of plant-based protein, with a half-cup offering around 10 grams. Our recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu (the most popular recipe on our website) will make you a lifelong tofu loyalist.   Below, weve curated a sample a menu to demonstrate how easy it is to hit your daily protein target eating only plant-based foods. Breakfast: Overnight Pumpkin Pie Oats (17 grams of protein) Lunch: Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast (13 grams of protein) Dinner: Veggie Meatballs (27 grams of protein) No time to cook? No problem. Meatless Monday On-the-Go is easier than ever. Creating a plant-based Meatless Monday masterpiece? Let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff

January 18 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff I really love January. To me, this month has a bright and sparkling clean feel to it. And even though the start of a new year is purely symbolic, it can be such great time to set some concrete intentions and start making lasting changes or small steps in a new direction. This year, much like the past few years, I’m inspired to simplify, minimize, and really think about the things that I bring into my life, and my impact as a consumer. In the past few years, we’ve tackled food waste and figured out a way to compost food scraps that’s sustainable for us. We’ve also done away with a lot of store-bought household products like paper towels and most single-purpose cleaning products, but there is still a lot of work to do in that area. Of course I find that cooking at home is always a top priority when it comes to simplifying in a sane way. Being prepared, having tried and true recipes and techniques under my sleeve, and having some trusted meal components stocked in the fridge or pantry always leads to less stress, less waste, and more enjoyment throughout the week. This Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff doesn’t have any particular ties to these January musings, beside the fact that it’s a cozy, wintery recipe that I’ll gladly plan to cook on any given week this winter. It’s a nostalgic flavor for us, since our family in Russia cooked it quite a bit, but we think that this plant-based version is even better than the original :) Below I’m sharing some of my plans, projects I’d like to tackle, and resources that I’ve found to be super inspiring when it comes to simplifying, minimizing my impact and beyond. Would love to hear yours! Goals: projects I’d like to tackle and a few (small but impactful) new habits I’d like to form this year – Stop buying single-purpose household cleaning products and make my own, super simple ones (key words: super simple). I already do this by making a 1 part vinegar, 1 part water all-purpose cleaner that I use on pretty much all surfaces. I sometimes infuse the vinegar with citrus peels for a week or add a few drops of essential oils for a more refreshing scent. That cleaner works really well for most things. But I’d like to make a few more site-specific mixes as well, since I sometimes panic and end up buying some shower cleaner I don’t actually need. Simply Living Well is an amazing resource for easy, home-care recipes. I’m going to make this shower spray, this floor cleaner, and this glass/­­window cleaner. All those recipes have really basic, interchangeable ingredients, which keeps them from being overwhelming. Please let me know if you have a favorite homemade laundry detergent recipe – still trying to figure that one out. – Repair things I have before buying new. I’ve always liked doing stuff with my hands, so for me this is an inherently relaxing activity that I’d like to make more time for. Right now, our linen duvet cover has decided to rip in many places at once, and instead of buying a new one, the plan is to mend it properly with tonal patches, which can look really cool. Julie O’Rourke has a super comprehensive darning and mending tutorial here in her IG stories (just flip through the doll-making part). Her whole account is super dreamy as well. – Make a pot of beans every single week. I’ve noticed that every time I make a big batch of beans, I end up thanking myself over and over again for all the easy meals I’ve made possible with that one step. I like to cook the beans with aromatics so that I also end up with a delicious broth that I can either eat with the beans or use later for soups, etc. Different kinds of beans yield such different flavor/­­cooking potential, so it’s easy to switch them up every week without getting bored. For example, I cook chickpeas with aromatics, then have them for dinner in their broth with greens and maybe other veggies wilted in. I freeze some of the broth to use later as veggie stock. I then eat the chickpeas as is in veggie bowls/­­salads, make hummus with them, marinate them, make crispy chickpeas, or make falafel/­­veggie burgers. You can of course do all of this with canned beans, but home-cooked ones are much tastier, more cost effective, less wasteful if you buy them in bulk, and the broth that you get from cooking them is super valuable! If I find that I can’t use up all of the beans, I just freeze them in their broth and again set my future self up for success. We have a lot of meal plans centered around whole pots of beans here. Inspiring Resources: – 75 Ways to Create a Low-Waste Home from Simply Living Well and Zero Waste, Plastic Free Alternatives Master List from Paris to Go are chock-full of ideas to slowly chip away at. – Jessie’s Produce Prep Ebook is such a wonderful guide to reducing food waste and enjoying the abundance of the plant food world. – Mama Eats Plants is the queen of low-waste living, vegan cooking, and a generally mindful lifestyle. – Live Planted is a great, short-format podcast about a practical approach to a low-waste lifestyle and much more. – This One Part Podcast interview with Kathryn Kellogg of Going Zero Waste is so full of positivity and details some actionable steps most of us can implement to decrease waste. Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 8 oz package tempeh - crumbled 2 teaspoons tamari 1 teaspoon maple syrup ½ cup cashews - soaked to soften if no high-speed blender 1 tablespoon white or chickpea miso 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 cup purified water sea salt black pepper avocado oil or other cooking oil of choice 1 yellow onion - diced 4 garlic cloves - minced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary 1 tablespoon tomato paste pinch of red pepper flakes (optional) 6 oz portobello mushroom caps (about 3 medium) - sliced into long strips ½ cup red wine 10-12 oz any pasta of choice fresh parsley - for serving (optional) Instructions Put the crumbled tempeh in a bowl. Pour the tamari and maple syrup over it, mix and let sit while making the cashew sauce. In an upright blender, combine the cashews, miso, mustard, apple cider vinegar, water, and salt and pepper to taste. Blend until very smooth. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Set aside. Heat some oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the tempeh and stir once to coat with the oil, then let sit uninterrupted for 2-3 minutes, until the undersides are browned. Mix and let sit again for another 3-5 minutes, until browned. Push the tempeh to one side of the pan, if your pan is large enough, or transfer back to a bowl and set aside until later. Add more oil to the pan. Add the onions and a pinch of salt, and sauté for 7-8 minutes, until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic, rosemary, tomato paste, and red pepper flakes, if using. Stir until the garlic is fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the mushrooms, along with another pinch of salt. Sauté until the mushrooms are browned and all the liquid that they release has evaporated, about 8-10 min. Mix the tempeh back in. Add the wine, bring it up to a simmer, and let reduce for about 3 minutes. Add the cashew sauce, stirring it and letting it warm through for a few minutes. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Meanwhile, cook the pasta al dente in well-salted water, according to the directions on the package. Reserve about 1 cup of starchy pasta water for thinning out the sauce. Drain the cooked pasta and add it to the pan with the stroganoff. Start mixing the pasta with the sauce, adding splashes of the starchy pasta water to thin out the sauce and to get it to stick to the pasta, as needed. Enjoy right away, garnished with parsley, if using. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Top Tips To Get You Through Veganuary 2020

January 8 2020 Happy Cow veggie blog 

If you’re new to veganism - or have always been curious, but never made the jump – the international campaign known as Veganuary may be the perfect transition period to attempt it. According to their blog, Veganuary set out to create a movement that would appeal to non-vegans throughout the world. With more people starting the new year with new trends, new objectives, and newfound motivation, you surely won’t be alone diving into a plant-based prerogative. With so many questions surrounding newly-vegan navigation, we’d like to share with you some tips and resources for how you can best prepare for the month (or year) ahead of you. Register on Veganuary.com By doing so, you can take advantage of the free resources provided to help you understand how to tackle this process from the get-go. Don’t be scared of the kitchen There are plenty of resources on the web to get you comfortable whipping up easy meals for you and your family. Try typing in “Vegan Recipes” in Google or in YouTube, or hashtagging it on Instagram. A great website to start with? The feedfeed vegan. Look around your city for participating local restaurants A handful of U.S. Cities are focused […] The post Top Tips To Get You Through Veganuary 2020 appeared first on HappyCow.


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